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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 29 JUNE 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b02ypklq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b02ymgwl)
David Mitchell - The Reason I Jump

Episode 5

By Naoki Higashida
Translated by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida, and introduced by David Mitchell
Read by Kasper Hilton-Hille

Thirteen year old Naoki Higashida invites us into his world, an intimate astonishing insight into the perceptions and feelings of a child with autism. He explains his simple delight in spinning objects, and his own pleasure in movement, which is deeply calming for him and stems from a feeling that in stillness his very soul might detach itself from his body.

Naoki's autism is so severe that he finds it difficult to hold a conversation, and he wrote the book painstakingly, using an 'Alphabet Grid', Japanese character by character. His writing reveals a young teenager sensitive to the feelings and perceptions of others but often isolated from those he loves.

When the author David Mitchell, whose own son has autism, discovered this extraordinary book, he felt that for the first time his own son was talking to him about what was going on inside his head, through the words of the young author.

Abridged and Produced by Allegra McIlroy.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02ypklx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02ypkm1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02ypkm6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b02ypkmb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02yr1h9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Roger Hutchings.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b02yr1hd)
"Dogs enjoy making decisions" - Jennifer Tracey speaks to the guide dog trainer who changed one listener's life. And we discuss the "legal clout of English Heritage". Presented by Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b02ypkmg)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b02ypkmm)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b02yl46r)
Series 24

Tara Bariana recalls his long walk home to India

Clare Balding walks on Cannock Chase with Tara Bariana who recalls his extraordinary walk home to India.

Tara Bariana was born in Punjab, and at the age of 13 came to the UK with his mother. His father and older brother had arrived four years earlier, in 1958.

In 1995 Tara decided he needed an adventure and made the decision to walk from the Midlands - where he'd grown up, married and settled - back to his home village in India.

He walked to Southampton where he caught the ferry to Cherbourg. There he realised he didn't speak any French, he couldn't even say 'bonjour'... but, despite being hit by the reality of what he'd decided to do, he couldn't turn back.

Nineteen months later, of almost non-stop walking, he arrived in his home village but instead of returning home, remembers thinking 'is that it?', and stayed in India for a further 18 months.

On this walk, around Cannock Chase in Staffordshire, Tara is accompanied by his son, Clive, Clive's wife, Jodie, and their two children.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0366wml)
Farming Today This Week

A third of people living in rural areas face poverty, despite the fact that most of them are in work.
And that's not all that's worrying. People in their thirties are moving out of the countryside as house prices nearly double and wages are not keeping pace rising 17 percent slower in rural areas than in urban areas. That's according to the National Housing Federation. On Farming Today This Week, Charlotte Smith visits Exmoor to explore this issue further. This programme investigates the impact of a lack of affordable housing, the funding system for smaller schools and the importance of transport services in rural areas. Presented by Charlotte Smith and Produced by Anna Varle.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b02ypkmw)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0366wmn)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb including:

0810
This week, energy regulator Ofgem said the danger of UK power shortages by 2015 has risen. The National Grid is looking at ways it can help to relieve pressure on energy. BBC Reporter Tom Bateman reports on the situation and Lord Oxburgh, former chairman of Shell, explains his views on the issue.

0815
John Humphrys reports from Glastonbury Festival about what brings so many to the festival each year that it is staged.

0831
As the Rolling Stones prepare to headline this year's Glastonbury Festival, the group's lead singer Mick Jagger reflects on the band's history and considers the festival ahead.

0845
Edward Snowden, the Prism whistleblower, is currently thought to be in the transit area of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport with no travel documents, and possibly no country to immediately fly to. It appears Snowden may be waiting to travel for some time. The writer Will Self and sociologist Sasika Sassen consider life in limbo.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0366wmq)
Barb Jungr, John McCarthy, Otis Williams' Inheritance Tracks

Sian Williams and Richard Coles with singer Barb Jungr, the Inheritance Tracks of Otis Williams the co-founder of Motown wonders the Temptations, a crowdscape from Rochdale, non-operatic sounds from Glyndebourne, a story of survival on a sinking cruise ship, and sussex bats with bat conservationist Jenny Clark. Also, John McCarthy meets a mountain rescue team in the Lake District

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 Zeitgeisters (b0366wms)
Series 1

YouTube

As part of Radio 4's Year of Culture initiative, the BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz meets the cultural entrepreneurs who are shaping our lives and defining the very spirit of our age.

These are not Turner Prize winners or the recipients of grants from the Arts Council or the Lottery Fund. These are the people behind the scenes, pulling the strings and plotting a path of consumer-driven success. They are the designers of the latest 'must have' piece of technology or clothing, the brains behind an artist's development, and the tastemakers that know what will work at the box office and what will sell on the high street. Their impact goes beyond mere commerce, it shapes contemporary culture. They are the Zeitgeisters and it's about time we met them.

Programme 3. YouTube - For a platform that was launched in 2005 as a means of sharing personal videos on the internet (the very first YouTube video was called 'Me At The Zoo' and was uploaded by co-founder Jawed Karim), it has become a major player in how we consume video content and increasingly in how we make it. Today 100 hours of video are uploaded onto YouTube every minute... six billion hours of video are watched every month. And by the time you finish reading this description, those figures may already be out of date.

The BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz, in searching for the next generation of cultural Zeitgeisters, meets the people who are moving YouTube up to the next level: 'YouTubers' like Benjamin Cook, who posts regular episodes of 'Becoming YouTube' on his channel Nine Brass Monkeys; Andy Taylor, who's 'Little Dot Studios' aims to bridge the gap between television and YouTube; and Ben McOwen Wilson who is Director of Content Partnerships for YouTube in Europe.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0366wmv)
Steve Richards looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
As George Osborne and Ed Balls battle it out over spending cuts, former Conservative chancellor Lord Lamont and the Observer's economic correspondent William Keegan look at the way their reputations are shifting as they try to win hearts and minds. David Cowling head of BBC Political Research and Joe Twyman of the polling agency YouGov discuss public attitudes to austerity.
Plus 2 Lib Dem activists with their assessment of the business secretary Vince Cable, and the ever increasing empowerment of the humble backbench MP.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0366wmx)
A Thousand Horses Come to Town

A thousand horses. Three thousand sheep. And people, thousands of them too, clustered like locusts around the Old Port in Marseille. What on earth were they all doing there? Anna Magnusson has been finding out. European leaders have announced they'll try to tackle unemployment; Emma Jane Kirby's in southern Spain where the under-25s are finding it hardest to get jobs. Qatar has a new ruler, or emir; Frank Gardner's just back from this ultra-rich Gulf state wondering: is this the world's most ironic country? Rupert Wingfield Hayes has been to the Indonesian island of Sumatra to look into South East Asia's worst smog crisis in years. And among the correspondents in Senegal, reporting on the excitement, the rumours and the disruption which accompany a visiting American president, was Caspar Leighton.
From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b0366wmz)
Mobile insurance rip-off; Care home top-up fees; Flood insurance; Credit card rewards

The mobile phone insurance industry was rapped over the knuckles this week for giving some customers a poor deal. We hear from Money Box listeners about their experiences and the Financial Conduct Authority about its concerns and what action it wants insurers to take.

Some care homes are telling elderly residents whose bills are paid by the council that they must now pay more on top. That means a relative or friend has to chip in as the law forbids the resident from doing so. What happens if you refuse? Can the home make good on threats to evict the person or put them in a shared room? We speak to Simon Bottery from Independent Age.

We examine the last minute flood insurance deal that has been struck between the government and the insurance industry with Mary Dhonau from the campaign and support group 'Know Your Flood Risk'. From 2015 the cost of flood insurance for 500,000 at-risk homes will vary by council tax band but there will be exceptions including homes in the highest council tax band H, those built in 2009 or later, and those that are uninsurable.

If you are one of the 4.6 million Lloyds bank customers who will be hived off to TSB this summer what are your rights to stay with Lloyds if you want to? And is the bank making those rights - and the problems you may face - clear? The bank's Retail Banking Director answers listeners' complaints.

A new version of a Capital One credit card gives better benefits. But existing customers won't get it unless they re-apply. Claire Francis from Money Saving Supermarket takes a look at the best credit card deals on the market.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b02yqh7y)
Series 81

Episode 1

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Andrew Maxwell, Miles Jupp and Katy Brand.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b02ypkn8)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b02ypknj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b02yqh8g)
John Denham, Bernard Jenkin, Maura McGowan, Lord McNally

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Titchfield in Hampshire with John Denham MP, Chair of the Public Administration Select Committee Bernard Jenkin MP, Chair of the Bar Council Maura McGowan QC and Minister of State for Justice Lord McNally.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0366wn1)
A chance for Radio 4 listeners to have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions. Today, should there be a public inquiry into the police, following allegations of a smear campaign and bugging of Stephen Lawrence's family? Do you support the proposal of league tables for surgeons? Capital spending now - or in 2015? Will reforms to legal aid damage our justice system? And does the Queen deserve a pay rise? Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet using #bbcaq.
The producer is Katy Takatsuki.


SAT 14:30 The Stuarts (b0366wn3)
It Came In with a Lass

By Mike Walker

Queen Mary arrives in Scotland enshrouded in mist and must quickly distinguish her friends from her enemies, as they strive to understand and control her.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole & Sasha Yevtushenko
Sound design by Colin Guthrie

Production co-ordinator: Phil Hawkins
Studio managers: Martha Littlehailes, Anne Bunting, Alison Craig

Notes
Queen Mary
From her earliest years Mary was at the centre of a power struggle: as a child queen, with contending regents; then on her own behalf, balancing powerful men - the King of France, Darnley and Bothwell - against each other and using her own considerable powers to ensure her survival; then against her own countrymen, determined to bring her down and finally, with her cousin Elizabeth of England, this last a desperate and doomed fight for life itself and the survival of her line. There is not a single British monarch whose life was so dramatic, bringing together dynastic struggles, love and murder, the shadowy world of the spy and the lethal jealousy of cousins.

The Stuarts
Shakespeare and Marlow were born three years before James VI of Scotland and I of England. Three years before Queen Anne died, Thomas Newcomen created a piston driven steam engine.

The age of the Stuarts is the age in which Britain entered the modern world. Within the brief historical span of its 111 years, the nation experienced virtually all the excitements and alarms we recognise in our own times, from financial meltdown to foreign wars; from the growth of parliamentary democracy to uprisings of the popular will; from the splendours of Catholic ritual to the rigours of religious fundamentalism; from a strict patriarchal society to the first, faint beginnings of female emancipation; from the domination of the stage to the birth of the novel and from a renaissance way of thought to the creation of scientific method and the first stirrings of psychology.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0366wn5)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Billie Jean King; Modern Feminism; Cost of Childcare

Billie Jean King on her fight for equality in tennis and her Battle of the Sexes. The young women passionate about modern feminism. Ed Miliband on why he wants to ensure another woman is put on a banknote. The most important person in British publishing, and Woman's Hour powerlister, Gail Rebuck. The economics of childcare - why is it so expensive, and how to get by when you can't afford to pay for it. Poet Fleur Adcock on her latest collection, Glass Wings.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0366wn7)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b02yl4wn)
Start-ups

Entrepreneurs discuss how much money you need to start a business - and where to get it from - with Evan Davis.

Why do some start-ups require millions and others just a few hundred pounds? And what are the benefits and pitfalls of finding investors on the web? It's called crowd-funding and many consider it to be the next big thing in venture capital.

Guests:
Mark Popkiewicz, founder, MirriAd
Julie Deane, founder, The Cambridge Satchel Company
Jonathan Medved, venture capitalist and founder, Our Crowd
Producer : Rosamund Jones.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b02ypkp2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b02ypkp5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02ypkp9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0366wn9)
Alexei Sayle, Reece Shearsmith, Mike Gayle, Bridget Christie, Emma Freud, Denai Moore, Cymbals

Clive Anderson talks to star and co-creator of television's The League of Gentlemen and Psychoville, Reece Shearsmith, about his role in Ben Wheatley's latest film, A Field in England, released in cinemas on July 5th

Writer and onetime agony aunt for teen magazine Just Seventeen, Mike Gayle tells Clive about his latest novel Turning Forty, which follows hot on the heels of his bestselling Turning Thirty.

Comedian Bridget Christie talks to Emma Freud about her new show A Bic for Her and why she wants to replace the costumes and props of previous shows with some simple frustration and shouting. A Bic for Her previews in London and the South East in July, then at The Stand, Edinburgh Fringe Festival, from 3 August

Alexei Sayle sheds light on his return to the comedy circuit after 16 years. Following his hit come-back performances at Soho Theatre, he takes his infamous and irreverent blend of political vitriol to London's Southbank Centre Queen Elizabeth Hall on Thursday 4th & Friday 5th July Southbank Centre and then from 13 - 25th August 2013 at The Stand, Edinburgh Fringe.

And there's live music in the Loose Ends studio from Cymbals who perform Window Edge, and from singer Denai Moore with Gone from her 'Saudade' EP, which is available now. Cymbals new single 'The End' is released on 22nd July.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b0366wnc)
Series 14

The Cleansing

The Cleansing
by Martin Jameson

With recent allegations of institutional corruption and cover-ups, Martin Jameson creates a parallel world set in the near future, in which disgraced managers and executives face their retribution in a reality tv show. Tonight, however, Paul has escaped and is hiding in Kylie's house.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0366wnf)
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, LS Lowry

Sam Mendes' production of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has been years in the making and had to be juggled with his Skyfall directing duties. Now at last the musical has arrived at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane with Douglas Hodge taking the role of Willy Wonka.

Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life at Tate Britain is something of a response to critics in recent years who have suggested that the gallery should show more of the Lowrys it owns. He's a painter who divides art lovers: some say he's an underrated genius who's dismissed because he depicts the Northern working classes; others that his paintings lack depth. What kind of case does this exhibition make for him?

Stories We Tell is a film made by the Canadian actress and director Sarah Polley about her mother Diane. Talking to different members of her family she uncovers an extraordinary story about her own birth. Using fake Super 8 footage as well as real, the film includes reconstructions of the past as well as interview in the present.

Another documentary, The Act of Killing, made by Joshua Oppenheimer, tells the chilling story of the killings that went on in Indonesia in 1965 in an anti-Communist purge. Oppenheimer allows the killers to make their own movies about what they did - what do the results tell us about the power and possibilities of film?

And A Thousand Pardons is the latest novel from Pulitzer Prize shortlisted author Jonathan Dee. It's an American story about saying sorry in a difficult world.

Joining Tom are the musician and presenter Cerys Matthews, writer Aminatta Forna and critic David Benedict.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0366wnh)
Dial-a-Poem

Brian Patten, one of the original Liverpool poets, explores how radical, subversive and occasionally risqué poetry - rooted in the counter-culture of the late 1960s - became available to a mass audience at the end of a phone line for the first time.

Dial-a-Poem changed the public face of poetry for generations.

Producer: Llinos Jones
A Terrier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Dangerous Visions (b02y0wpp)
JG Ballard - Concrete Island

By J.G. Ballard
Adapted by Graham White

Driving home one Friday rush hour, a cocky young architect crashes down a motorway embankment. At first he seems bound to be rescued, but as he fails to make the passing commuters notice him, he finds himself trapped on a strange, neglected island between the highways. Can this modern day Crusoe survive in a strange new world?

Directed by Mary Peate

Radio 4's Dangerous Visions Season:

The adjective Ballardian refers to the writer 'JG Ballard's fearful imaginings of what the near future might be like. Even though the master creator of dystopian futures died four years ago, his vision of what our future might become feels as relevant, satirical and as scary as ever. Radio 4's Dangerous Visions is a season of dramas that explore contemporary takes on future dystopias. Dramatisations of Ballard's seminal works, Drowned World and Concrete Island, straddle the season, and we have asked five leading radio writers - Nick Perry, Ed Harris, Michael Symmonds Roberts, Michael Butt and Philip Palmer - to imagine what life might be like in the near future if everything goes wrong - and their Dangerous Visions form the bedrock of the series: clever, imaginative and disturbing takes on just what might happen. What happens if sleep is outlawed? If cloning becomes a matter of course, and your loved ones are capable of being cloned? If North London declares UDI on South London, which has become a wasteland? If human sacrifice becomes a part of society? We are also running a 5 part dramatisation of Jane Roger's award winning terrifying novel The Testament of Jessie Lamb, dramatised by the author

Dangerous Visions - you will be disturbed as you see the present reflected in the glass
of an uneasy future.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b02ypkpn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b02ykygq)
They've been called the Dick Turpin generation - but time could be up for the Baby Boomers this week as the Chancellor announces spending cuts of £11.5 billion in the Spending Review. With budgets so tight previously sacrosanct universal benefits, like free bus passes and winter fuel payments for rich pensioners start to look tempting targets. But for some this is more than just an argument about balancing the books - it's about inter-generational equity. Instead of being custodians of future generations the Baby Boomers are accused of busily raiding their kids' piggy-banks - saddling them with a vast and increasing national debt to fund for their own generous pensions and welfare payouts. That, combined with universal free healthcare, free education to degree level and steadily rising house values have made the post-war generation healthier and wealthier than any before. And now they're accused of pulling up the ladder behind them. Following generations if they want to go to university will leave with a massive debt hanging over them, 1 in 5 16 to 24 year olds are unemployed, housing is now so expensive the average first time buyer is 35 years old, they'll have to work longer before they get a pension and when they do it will be pitifully small compared to the those of their parents. Is this just a sad fact of the recession or is a greater moral crime being committed here - "generational theft"? Can you really blame the post-war generation for the luck of having lived through a period of unprecedented peace and prosperity and then claiming what is their right and what they've already paid for through their taxes? And the silver pound adds billions to the economy through spending, property and savings. Or have the baby boomers become uniquely blind to their own selfishness while they steal the future from underneath the noses of their own children? Or do the young only have themselves to blame because they don't vote and the older generation does? The morality of inter-generational equity.
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Anne McElvoy, Giles Fraser, Matthew Taylor and Melanie Phillips. Witnesses: Ros Altmann - Former Director-General of Saga, Angus Hanton - co-founder of the Intergenerational Foundation, Ed Howker - co-author of "Jilted Generation: how Britain has bankrupted its youth", Stuart Prebble - producer of 'Grumpy Old Men' TV series and books.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b02yk9fg)
Series 27

Episode 8

(8/13)

Do you know which novelty dance became popular after Charles Lindberg's crossing of the Atlantic in 1927? Or which singer made the most successful recording of the soul standard 'The Shoop Shoop Song'?

If so, you may be able to match the contestants in today's quiz. Paul Gambaccini asks these and many other questions in the wide-ranging music quiz, this week featuring contestants from Brighton, Bristol and Cheltenham. The one who can demonstrate the broadest general musical knowledge will win through to the 2013 semi-finals, which start in a fortnight's time.

There are extracts to suit all tastes, and plenty of musical trivia and anecdotes.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b02yjbww)
Words for weddings and other celebrations

Roger McGough finds words for weddings and other celebrations in poems requested by listeners. With readers Juliet Aubrey, Mark Meadows and Harry Livingstone.

Carol Ann Duffy says that 'Britain has many countries and one of them is poetry." Today's programme is all about where we go when we want words to mark a celebration and take us somewhere memorable and extraordinary, with an emphasis on weddings.
Roger includes two 'wedding' sonnets by Shakespeare, 116 and 8; 'Sunrise' by Mary Oliver; 'Poem for a North London Wedding' by Tobias Hill and Christopher Marlowe's beautiful pastoral poem: 'The Passionate Shepherd to His Love'.
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.



SUNDAY 30 JUNE 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0366klf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b010mrz7)
Malachi Whitaker - The Crystal Fountain

Home to Waggonhouses

Martin Jarvis directs Rosalind Ayres in Malachi Whitaker's moving story, written in the 1930s. Sarah has been cycling for two hours. Where's she going? And why? She's determined to see the husband who deserted her. She has heard he is lying ill at Ebesham.

Three years ago he had come into some money and it had turned his head. Then the farm seemed too small for him. He went to look at bigger farms miles away. On one of his journeys he met an attractive widow. One day they left quietly together, and later Sarah heard that they had set up house at Ebesham. And now Sarah is riding there, where David is lying ill. But she arrives to find an unexpected situation. What she does next could probably only have come from Malachi Whitaker compassionate pen.

Malachi Whitaker was prolific in the 1920s and '30s, writing with great perception and care about ordinary folk, invariably setting the stories in her native Yorkshire. She became known as 'the Chekhov of the north' because of her sympathetic observation of the minutiae of human beings and their (often comic) behaviour.

Producer/Director: Martin Jarvis
A Jarvis & Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0366klh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0366klk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0366klp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0366klr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0366xrt)
The bells of St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury, Shropshire.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b02ykygs)
Series 4

Jamie Tehrani

Social anthropologist Jamie Tehrani sees our obsession with celebrity culture as a result of our maladapted brains.
Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks which combine personal stories with ideas of contemporary relevance. Speakers air their thinking in front of a live audience, hosted by David Baddiel.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0366klt)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0366xrw)
Holy Verses

In a programme about the role of poetry in worship, Mark Tully examines the work of the poets John Donne, Kathleen Raine and W.H. Auden, amongst others.

In conversation with the poet Michael Symmons Roberts, he discusses the concept of 'religious poetry' asks whether the term, as TS Eliot claimed, suggests that it's 'like a variety of minor poetry'. He asks what poetry has to offer religion and what it means to poets with faith.

The programme includes music by Stravinsky, John Coltrane and Simon and Garfunkel.

The readers are Toby Jones, Frances Cadder and Harriet Walter.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0366xry)
Whelks may not be top of the shopping list in Scotland, but they are in great demand in Korea. Caz Graham spends a day with Jay Mackay, who fishes out of Inverness, watching him haul his whelk pots from the inshore waters of the Moray Firth. The whelk isn't the most glamorous of shellfish.It looks like a large barnacle-encrusted snail, lured in to the pot by the scent of rotting crab, but the market for whelks is proving more reliable this year than for other, better-known crustaceans. Recession in Spain and France, the long-established markets for Scottish lobster, means that demand there has waned, and it's the Far East with its love of whelks which is providing a consistent market for Jay and his fellow fishermen.

Presented by Caz Graham. Produced by Moira Hickey.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0366klw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0366kly)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0366xs0)
Archbishop Vincent Nichols; Hospital Chaplains; Lindisfarne Gospels

The Church of England is supporting a bid for hundreds of branches being offloaded by the Royal Bank of Scotland, raising the prospect of a new, ethical bank on the high street. William is joined by Stefan Stern from the Cass Business School.

In a landmark ruling earlier this week the US Supreme Court struck down a law that defines marriage as between a man and a woman only. The court's 5-4 vote said the Defence of Marriage Act, known as Doma, denied equal protection to same-sex couples. The court also declined to rule on a California ban on same-sex marriage known as Proposition 8. Matt Wells reports from New York.

The All Party Parliamentary Group on International Religious Freedom released its first report this week. One of its recommendations to the Government is the appointment of an ambassadorial figure in the Foreign Office to spearhead UK efforts on religious freedom. William speaks to Baroness Berridge who is chair of the group.

New research conducted by the BBC shows that acute hospital trusts in England have significantly reduced their number of chaplains in the last five years. Kevin Bocquet reports on the reasons behind the cuts and why many still believe chaplains play a significant role in the recovery process.

On Friday an estimated two hundred mosques across Britain delivered a sermon organised by the campaign group Together Against Grooming. This comes in response to string of cases including those in Rochdale, Derby and Oxford, but is this the right course of action? We hear from Ansar Ali, spokesperson for Together Against Grooming and Monowar Hussein, Imam at Eton College, who believes the sermon is a publicity stunt.

In response to this this week's Spending Review the Catholic church has raised concerns about the lack of support in place for struggling families. The Most Reverend Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster joins William to discuss his concerns.

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox
Producer: Annabel Deas
Producer: Dawn Bryan

Interviewees;
Archbishop Vincent Nichols
Stefan Stern
Baroness Berridge
Ansar Ali
Monowar Hussein.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b0366xs2)
Acid Survivors Trust International

Samira Ahmed presents the Radio 4 Appeal for Acid Survivors Trust International
Reg Charity:1079290
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope A S T I.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0366km0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0366km2)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0366xs4)
A service from St. Arvan's Parish Church, Chepstow, exploring the theme of "Faith and Transformation" based on the lives of Peter and Paul.
Readings: 2 Timothy 4: 6-8; 17-18. Matthew 16: 13-19.
Preacher: Fr. Michael Gollop. Cantemus Chamber Choir, Wales. Musical Director: Huw Williams. Organist: Peter King. Cello: Kathryn Price.
Producer: Karen Walker.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b02yqh8l)
Anyone for Art?

Isn't it time to democratize art? Shouldn't we, the public, be allowed to borrow works of art from our national collections? That way we could have an affair with art, rather than a one-night stand. Tom Shakespeare presents the last of his four essays.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b020vp4h)
Little Egret

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Little Egret. The colonisation of the UK by these small brilliant-white herons with black bills and yellow feet, has astonished ornithologists because of its speed.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0366xs6)
News, discussion and a few gags. Each week BH picks apart the key themes in the news in fresh and surprising ways. There's a review of the Sunday newspapers and a sound quiz with a special prize. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0366xs8)
Clarrie's a woman on a mission, and Jazzer's trying to keep a low profile.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0366xsb)
Steven Pinker

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker.

An author and Harvard professor he's been named by Time Magazine as one of the world's 100 most influential scientists and thinkers.

The psychology of violence and where language comes from are just two of his specialist subjects. Bill Gates is officially a fan, the man who sends him hate mail related to his work on irregular verbs is not. It would seem that whenever he publishes yet another best-selling book controversy is never far behind - his recent contention that we live in an "unusually peaceful time" drew opprobrium from many quarters.

Born and brought up in Montreal his parents encouraged vigorous debate around the dinner table - indeed it was his mother's interest in the psychology of language and linguistics that sparked his own.

He says "I appreciate what my parents did for me beyond words. Not in making me what I am, but in my view of what's important in life, what I think about and cherish."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b02ykcwr)
Series 66

Episode 6

Nicholas Parsons puts Gyles Brandreth, Russell Kane, Richard Herring and Paul Merton through their linguistic paces.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0366xsd)
Butter, a delicious story of decline and revival

Sheila Dillon meets a new generation of producers making butter special again.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0366km4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0366xsg)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Tales from the Stave (b02ykrd3)
Series 9

Porgy and Bess

In the last of the current series of Tales from the Stave Frances Fyfield returns to the Library of Congress in Washington to see one of their most treasured possessions. George Gershwin's Opera Porgy and Bess still provokes debate today from those uneasy at the work of three white men, George, his brother Ira and the lyricist Dubose Heyward, in depicting the world of what amounts to a black Ghetto in early 20th century South Carolina. However, the brilliance of the music, and the complexity and craft of Gershwin's score is beyond dispute.

Frances is joined by the conductor and writer Nigel Simeone, the library's expert Raymond White and most important of all by Solomon Howard of the Washington National Opera. Solomon, who's sung the role of Porgy and has himself experienced life at the bottom end of American society, is given the chance to perform from Gershwin's original manuscript. In doing so he finds small but vital changes from the texts he's used to, as well as evidence of the detailed but vital changes George Gershwin made to the lyrics delivered to him by Heyward - lyrics including famous hits like 'Summertime'.

As well as a full orchestral score there are also the fragments and sketches Gershwin made while living in Carolina where he sought inspiration for this, his most ambitious work.

Producer: Tom Alban.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b02yqh70)
Glenarm Castle

Chaired by Eric Robson, the GQT team is in Northern Ireland, visiting Glenarm Castle, for this week's episode of Gardeners' Question Time. Taking the audience's questions are Pippa Greenwood, Bob Flowerdew and special guest panellist Reg Maxwell.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. How should I treat a Lemon tree that is plagued with scale insect - avoiding pyrethrum?
A. Try dabbing on a mentholated spirit to erode the waxy coating of the scale, which, after repeating, kills the insect. After, wrap the compost and shower the tree, ideally with tepid water, to wash off the scales. Another method is to take a stiff paintbrush and vigorously brush off the insects, this will need to be repeated every couple of weeks. Also, try to ensure ants are not on the plant, as ants will reintroduce the species even after you have cleaned it.

Q. Can Tulips be grown in pots all year round?
A. This is not recommended due to the small soil volume and root growth in pots meaning the bulbs may degenerate. It is best to feed the Tulip in the ground in the growing season and when the foliage dies down lift them. However, the best way to grow them in pots if necessary would be to treat them as you would in the ground, feeding during the growing season and lifting when the foliage dies down, take the bulbs out, dry them and store until late November, then re-plant into pots again. Additionally, bone meal is recommended to help Tulip growth.

Q. How do I clear a garden completely full of overgrown weeds including Dandelions and Switchgrass?
A. Avoid rotavating, as this can spread and increase the number of plants. Skim off the top couple of inches of the weeds, stack the off-cuts and cover with a plastic sheet. In approximately 12 months spread this back on the garden. Then dig the land over; a good method is called "bastard trenching" or "double digging".

Q. My blackcurrant and gooseberry bushes in my garden grow vigorously but with very little fruit, why is this?
A. Blackcurrants fruit on the wood that grew a year previously. Therefore hard pruning means you may be at risk of removing the fruiting wood. For blackcurrants it is recommended to remove a third of the bush to the ground every year, always removing the oldest third. Gooseberry bushes are a little more difficult as they grow on spurs, so avoid cutting everything back and focus on removing whole branches. Additionally try to cut down on feeding the bushes, slowing growth and therefore minimising the necessity to prune.

Q. Many evergreen hedges seem to have struggled to survive in the recent cold winters, what other plants could you suggest to replace these so they would cope with the cold conditions?
A. If you want to replace with alternative Evergreens then Yew would be recommended, it can be grown into a hedge and can be trained into many shapes and sizes, other suggestions include Privet, Holly and Laurel. A more unusual choice would be Berberis Darwinii, which has small orange flowers in spring or Sarcococca, which is slow growing but can be used as a hedge. Alternatives to evergreens are Capensis or Beech, as they still have leaves in the winter.

Q. My 20-year-old Portuguese Laurel is threatening to push over a 6ft fence. Can I restrict its exuberance by cutting the offending branches?
A. You can prune Laurels quite severely. It is best to do so in autumn, making sure wounds are clean and the cut is clean to the stem. Avoid having stumps because they will die back. Pippa Greenwood would suggest not painting wounds, allowing them to heal on their own. However Bob Flowerdew recommends sealing the surface of the dead wood in the middle of the wound, whilst avoiding the bark. Alternatively Reg Maxwell would opt to sealing the cambium layer, which is immediately under the bark.

Q. What would be good to plant following early potatoes and peas to keep my plot productive over the winter?
A. Many saladings, including loose-leaf lettuces, small beet, onions and garlic could all be planted in autumn. Leaks can be planted in July and in August Japanese onions would be recommended. Also Rocket, Mizuna, Pak Choi and Mooli are great alternatives.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0366xsj)
Sunday Edition - Coming to the End

Fi Glover with conversations from around the UK dealing with death and remembrance, including the notion of soul midwives to ease the final journey, and the record we leave behind, in the Sunday Edition of Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Stuarts (b0367c3b)
To Make the Plough Go before the Horse

by Mike Walker. James I & VI. Charting the life and reign of the loneliest boy in the world, through his relationships, with his one love, Esme, his bullying tutor, Buchanan, his charming Queen, Anne, to his favourite, George Villiers.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole & Sasha Yevtushenko
Sound design by Colin Guthrie

Production co-ordinator: Phil Hawkins
Studio managers: Martha Littlehailes, Anne Bunting, Alison Craig

Notes

Becoming King of England does not free James from the prison of his past or his nature; on the other hand it does allow him a vastly broader canvas on which both his virtues and his faults show clearly. He seeks to vindicate his mother's memory and attacks those who attacked her; he encourages learning and discourages foreign adventures, he supports brilliant men and women but, when convenient, or when bullied, allows them to be destroyed. At his death, will he leave as difficult an inheritance to his son as his mother did to him?


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0367c3d)
Evie Wyld on her latest novel All the Birds, Singing

Evie Wyld, just named on the 2013 Granta list of the best of young British novelists, discusses her latest novel All the Birds, Singing with Mariella Frostrup. Set between Australia and an isolated British sheep farm, where a menacing killer is working its way through her flock, the story of its female protagonist Jake slowly unfurls.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F Kennedy in Dallas, Texas. Writer and broadcaster Michael Carlson, himself a young boy living in the States during these events, explores how this defining event of the 20th Century has continued to capture the imagination of writers down the decades.

The period in life between adolescence and full adulthood can be a very difficult time - when many are studying for important exams, leaving home for the first time, having that first job, and all the while those disruptive hormones are coursing through their bodies. It's no surprise therefore that a new genre of books has sprung up called New Adult. But who is actually reading these books - are they a bridge between Young and Adult fiction or actually erotica more suited for an older readership? Mariella discusses the issue with Emily Thomas who's a publisher with Hot Key Press, Caroline Sanderson, a contributor to Books for Keeps, the Children's online magazine, and also Chair of the London Book Fair seminar "New Adults, Steamies, Crossed Genres - Reinventing Teen Fiction," and New Adult writer Liz Bankes, whose novel Irresistible came out in April.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0367c3g)
Homer Made Anew

Roger McGough introduces poems after Homer by Alice Oswald and Michael Longley. Poems from the beginnings of Western literature made new. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b02yks7x)
Petrol Prices

The way in which oil is traded on commodities markets is coming under close scrutiny. Last month, officers of the European Commission raided the London offices of BP and Shell along with Norway's Statoil company and the leading price reporting agency Platts. They said they were investigating claims of collusion to manipulate the prices of oil and biofuels on the international markets.

A leading city insider tells File On 4 that the price-reporting mechanism for oil is 'wide open to abuse'

So are petrol prices being kept artificially high by hidden forces beyond the normal workings of supply and demand ?

Gerry Northam investigates and asks whether British regulators are proving slow to recognise the potential problem.

Producer: David Lewis.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b0366wnc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0366km8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0366kmb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0366kmd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0367c3j)
Join Peter Curran as he brings together the ancient Yew tree and the Mini Skirt. Robert Peston and Mr Punch, Benjamin Britten and Porgy and Bess, Pornography and Poetry It could only be Pick Of the Week, this Sunday evening at 6.15 on Radio 4.

Programmes chosen this week:

Lowry Revisited - Radio 4
The Infinite Monkey Cage - Radio 4
Heart and Soul - In God's Waiting Room - World Service
Short Cuts - Radio 4
New American Shorts - Thief - Radio 4
Analysis - Pornography - Radio 4
Tales from the Stave - Porgy and Bess - Radio 4
Live in Concert - Britten's War Requiem - Radio 3
One to One - Radio 4
Michael Chandler - Mid Morning Show Fri 28 June - BBC Radio Gloucester
Dial-a-Poem - Radio 4
PM (Tuesday 25 June) - Radio 4
The People's Songs ep 26 - Radio 2

Producer: Louise Clarke

If there's something you'd like to suggest for next week's programme, please e-mail potw@bbc.co.uk.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0367c3l)
Peggy and Jennifer discuss the Flower Festival. Things went well yesterday. There was a steady stream of people and everyone seemed pleased. Another good day today should make a real impression on the fundraising effort.

Jennifer is keen to promote the 'Swishing' event that she is organising with Sabrina. She explains to Peggy that it is a clothes exchange, or swap shop, and certainly not a jumble sale. With a £10 entry fee for everyone taking part, Jennifer is confident that it will raise a good amount for the organ fund.

Neil has good news. The Felpersham Church Conservation Trust has donated £1200 for the organ fund. There's still a long way to go but it's a promising start.

Tom was up early working in the polytunnels. It is going to take some time for his body clock to adjust to not being a dairy farmer.

Jago arrives at Bridge Farm to collect the heifers he bought at the herd sale last week. He has a new tenancy in Cornwall and is setting up his own dairy farm. Although Tony is sad to see the last of the herd go, he is really pleased that they are going as foundation stock for a young couple just starting out. He feels he is passing the baton to the next generation.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b015p86q)
Cheltenham Literature Festival Special

James Walton presents a special edition of the programme recorded at 2011's Cheltenham Literature Festival. With guests Rachel Johnson and Sue Limb.


SUN 19:45 Chris Paling - Words and Music (b0367c3n)
The Piano Player Does Not Do Requests

A series of stories by novelist Chris Paling, in which the music plays as important a role as the words.

Episode 1: The Piano Player Does Not Do Requests.
Snow falls on the village pub. A stranger walks in and orders a whisky. Slowly, hesitantly, he tells his strange story to the landlord - a tale of a fortune being made and the woman he made it for.

Occasionally he breaks off to listen to the piano being played in the room next door. But will he ever know how important the music is to the story of his life?

Read by Philip Jackson
Music composed and performed by Cormac Dorrian
Director: Celia de Wolff

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b02yqh7f)
Is any discussion too adult for Radio 4? When the Moral Maze took on the subject of internet pornography, Feedback listeners were diametrically opposed on whether the discussion went too far. Roger Bolton talks to Moral Maze producer Phil Pegum about how and why he chose to tackle the subject, live on air, and when he has to intervene to rein in contributors.

Plus, Jazzer from The Archers and acting Archers editor Julie Beckett discuss the controversial outburst that has been the most talked about Radio 4 event this week.

Also this week: Radio 4's Recycled Radio has proved to be divisive - a type of Marmite radio - loved by many on Twitter but generally loathed by Feedback listeners. Roger puts your feedback to its producer Miles Warde and invites Radio 4 commissioning editor Mohit Bakaya and Wireless Nights producer Laurence Grissell to discuss experimental radio on Radio 4.

Last week the Editor of the BBC Radio Science Unit, Deborah Cohen, gave the reasons for the removal of Material World and its long-serving presenter Quentin Cooper. Many of you thought the reasons were less than satisfactory. We hear from those lamenting the departure of Material World and those who welcome the change.

And, a celebration of the bonkers in this week's Tweet of the Week. Every week we ask our Twitter followers on @BBCR4Feedback to tweet us their reviews of BBC Radio programmes that have caught their ear this week. If you hear something you loved or loathed tweet us your very best poetry and prose reviews and you could win: our gratitude; admiration; and the coveted title of 'Tweet of the Week' during next week's Feedback.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b02yqh78)
An archaeologist, a psychoanalyst, a former Lord Advocate, a writer and an aboriginal singer

Professor Mick Aston, the archaeologist best known for his work on the TV programme Time Team. His colleagues Sir Tony Robinson and Phil Harding pay tribute.

Betty Joseph, the psychoanalyst who analysed the process of psychoanalysis.

Lord Fraser of Carmyllie, the Scottish Conservative politician, who as Lord Advocate presided over the investigation of the Lockerbie bombings.

Michael Baigent, the co-writer of a book called Holy Blood Holy Grail which suggested that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene and had a child by her.

And the aboriginal singer Mr Yunupingu who brought indigenous music to a world wide audience.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0366wmz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0366xs2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b02ykg3m)
Pornography: What Do We Know?

What do we really know about the effects of pornography?

Public debate has become increasingly dominated by an emotive, polarised argument between those who say it is harmful and those who say it can be liberating. Jo Fidgen puts the moral positions to one side and investigates what the evidence tells us. She explores the limitations of the research that's been carried out and asks whether we need to update our understanding of pornography. She hears from users of pornography about how and why they use it and researchers reveal what they have learnt about our private pornographic habits.

With pornography becoming increasingly easy to access online, and as policy-makers, parents and teachers discuss how to deal with this, it's a debate that will have far-reaching implications on education and how we use the internet.

Producer: Helena Merriman

Interviewees:

Professor Neil Malamuth - University of California
Dr Miranda Horvath - Middlesex University
Dr Ogi Ogas - Author of A Billion Wicked Thoughts
Professor Roger Scruton - Conservative philosopher and Author of Sexual Desire: A Philosophical Investigation
Professor Gail Dines - Wheelock College, Boston.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0367c3s)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b0367c3v)
Mary Riddell of the Daily Telegraph analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b02yl46t)
This Is the End; The Act of Killing; Stories We Tell; The Brood

Director Evan Goldberg talks to Francine Stock about This Is The End, an apocalypse comedy with a diverse range of celebrities playing versions of themselves including James Franco, Rihanna and Jonah Hill as well as co director Seth Rogen.
Filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer explains how he came to make The Act of Killing, a documentary in which Indonesian gangsters re-enact the massacres of the 1960s. He follows their progress as they make movies about their crimes, heavily influenced by Hollywood films, even musicals.
Plus further discussion of the ethics of documentary making with Sarah Polley who describes turning the camera on her family secrets. Her film follows her search for her biological father.
And as David Cronenberg's 1979 classic The Brood is released on Blu Ray and DVD, critic Kim Newman and biologist Adam Rutherford explore how the contemporary scientific advances informed this psychotherapy horror film.
Producer: Elaine Lester.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0366xrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 01 JULY 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0366knh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b02ykygb)
Welfare reform; Crime in the Armed Forces

Crime in the Armed Forces - Laurie Taylor talks to Emeritus Professor of History, Clive Emsley, about his pioneering, historical study into criminal offending by members of British armed forces both during and immediately after the two world wars of the 20th century, and concluding in the present day.

For a quarter of the 20th century, the UK had large conscripted armed forces and it is these services, and in particular the Army, that are the principal focus of this study. Emsley argues that the forces "reflect the society from which they come, both the good and the bad", pointing out that it's predominantly made up of younger men, the social group that commits the most crime. He also examines two popular assumptions about crime and war; namely, that crime decreases when wars begin as young men - those likeliest to commit crimes - are swept up into the forces; and that crime goes up at the end of war as men brutalised by combat returned to the civilian world but, unable to cope with 'peacetime', engage in crime and violence. Dr Deirdre MacManus, from King's College, joins the discussion, having recently completed a study into the relationship between combat experience and violent crime amongst British soldiers returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Also, Ruth Patrick's research into the lived experiences of welfare reform. She's interviewed a range of out of work benefits claimants between 2011 and 2013. Talking to single parents being moved from Income Support onto Jobseeker's Allowance, disabled people waiting to be migrated off Incapacity Benefit and onto Employment and Support Allowance, and young jobseekers experiencing the new Jobcentre/Work Programme and sanctions regime, her study gives a unique insight into the impact of a revolution in 'welfare' provision on 'real' people.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0366xrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0366knk)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0366knm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0366knp)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0366knr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0367dzl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Roger Hutchings.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0367dzn)
Farming is one of the UK's most dangerous jobs. At the start of Farm Safety Awareness week, Sybil Ruscoe hears from one woman who knows more than most about the importance of safety in agriculture.

And ever thought seaweed was just something that washed up on the beach? In the North West of Scotland, scientists are trying to grow underwater mats of seaweed to use as a biofuel crop.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe. Produced by Datshiane Navanayagam.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0366knt)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvggm)
Corn Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall begins May with the corn bunting. Corn buntings may be plain-looking birds which sing their scratchy songs from cornfields, but their private lives are a colourful affair and a single male bird may have up to 18 partners.


MON 06:00 Today (b0367dzq)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0367dzs)
Population: Ten Billion

On Start the Week Sue MacGregor asks what happens when the world's population reaches ten billion. The computer scientist, Stephen Emmott argues that time is running out for humanity unless we radically change our behaviour, but the geographer Danny Dorling believes that we should be preparing for the inevitable population decline. Jill Rutter explores the impact of differing scientific advice on politics, and the complexity of evidence-based policy. And with India's population set to exceed that of China, the Nobel prize-winning economist Amartya Sen lambasts political inaction in raising standards for the poorest in society.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b0367dzv)
The Cooked Seed

Episode 1

At seventeen, Anchee Min was spotted by one of Madame Mao's talent scouts and taken to the Shanghai Film Studio as the embodiment of a proletarian heroine.

But when Madame Mao was denounced, Min was guilty by association and labelled 'a cooked seed' - one who has no chance to sprout.

With no future in her homeland, she dares to dream of living in America. But first she has to work out how to get out of China.

Read by Chipo Chung

Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0367dzx)
Domestic violence; attitudes to single parents; taking your friend on holiday

What statistics can tell us about domestic violence, and how likely men are to experience a trauma more often faced by women and girls. Author David Mitchell on his translation of the Japanese memoir 'The Reason I Jump', and how it helped him make sense of his son's autism. We also talk to the mother of a profoundly autistic teenager and hear her reaction to the book. With a quarter of UK families headed by single parents, why do negative attitudes persist? Journalist Katie Roiphe is joined by Sally Whittle who discusses her experience of being a single-mother. As the summer holidays approach, we discuss whether it's better to travel with a partner or a friend.


MON 10:45 The Cazalets (b0367dzz)
Casting Off

Episode 1

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
dramatised by Lin Coghlan

The war has ended and Rupert finally returns home but he finds much has changed for the Cazalet family.

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.

This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.

With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...

When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


MON 11:00 Tanning Tales (b0367j1l)
Kit Hesketh Harvey explores the meteoric rise of the spray tan. From Katie Price to Kate Middleton, no well dressed woman, or man, would now be seen without one. While social position used to be judged on accent and clothing, it now comes down to skin tone; with burnt umber tones being more prevalent in the north and subtle olive tones more common in the south. But, as one tanning expert bluntly explains to Kit, there's one thing we can all agree on: brown fat looks better than white.

As one who modelled himself on Adam Ant and the New Romantics of the 80s, Kit is not unfamiliar with the muddy, fake-tan look that could be achieved thirty years ago with a bottle of sticky brown liquid. However, he remains a spray tan virgin. In the hands of celebrity tanner James Read, aka The Tantalist, will Kit agree to don a paper thong and discover what all the fuss is about?

Seemingly recession proof and, most importantly, the safest way to achieve the sun kissed look, fake tan has become the fastest growing sector of the cosmetics industry with a retail value of over 100 million pounds in the UK alone.

Kit talks to those who have shaped the industry to discover if this is a trend that's here to stay and why we all now wish to be beyond the pale. And he visits Liverpool, the fake tan capital of Britain, where over half the population are sneering at the vagaries of the weather and are tanned all year round.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


MON 11:30 Bleak Expectations (b01p9l4v)
Series 5

A Terrifying Life Made Even Scarier a Bit Some More

A new and terrible danger threatens Victorian Britain as Harry Biscuit becomes possessed by the evil Pen of Penrith, which turns his heart to inky black.

Pip and Gently Benevolent join forces to take on this new, cruel and cake-obsessed nemesis and his army of robot swans. They also turn out to share a love of antiquing in the Cotswolds.

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ..... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ..... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ..... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ..... James Bachman
Servewell ...... James Bachman
Clampvulture ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ..... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ..... Susy Kane
Lily ...... Sarah Hadland
Hector the Holy Horse ...... Mark Evans

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b0367j1n)
Mobile phone hackers, fear of flying, seaweed as fuel

Security experts are warning that smartphones are being targeted by criminals who hack into phones used in public places. It's claimed that emails and other personal information can be accessed. In some cases software is placed on phones to stop them working or make charges against the owner's mobile phone account.
Powering your car with seaweed sounds a fanciful idea, but scientists are farming crops at sea, to generate new kinds of biofuel.
Is it possible to cure a fear of flying? We hear from the people who are desperate to fly abroad, but can't bear to step on board a plane.
A good looking woman, the colour red and a handsome horse. What are the ingredients of a top-selling painting?
In an era of tablets, mobile phones and connectivity, what is the future for traditional tourist guidebooks?
Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0366knw)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0367j1q)
National and international news with Carolyn Quinn. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Food for Thought (b0367sl8)
Series 3

Terence Stamp

Actor Terence Stamp shares the joys of raw fruit and vegetables and the delight of the alphonso mango with Nina Myskow.

Raised in Plaistow, East London, one of five children to a tugboat-owner father, when he took himself off to drama school the joke was he would do anything for a bowl of soup. Catapulted to 60s icon status and finally able to afford rich food, Terence describes the effect steak and kidney pudding had on his health.

Attuned to the creative possibilities of brown rice, Terence discusses life as a food intolerant, from designing his own dinners, to how he stays healthy. Plus how he shocked Brigitte Bardot, the roast potatoes his mother used to make and how he loves to indulge his passion for an alphonso mango.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0367c3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00vcqld)
Andrea Earl - The Climb

The Climb by Andrea Earl
A feel good drama about three men who venture on a climb of their lives.

Ropes, crampons, grappling irons at the ready; D-day has arrived. Frankie, John and Bud are ready, well as ready as they'll ever be. But this is not a mountain, nor a great hill they are preparing to climb tonight - it's Blackpool Tower. Furthermore, Frankie has Down's syndrome, John is blind and Bud is only 3'6". It was Frankie's idea as he wants to follow in the footsteps of his hero Sherpa Tenzing. The men are forced to pull together as a team in a race against time in an attempt to reach the top as the police try to intercept their highly dangerous (and highly illegal!) deed.

Producer/Director - Pauline Harris.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b0367mxg)
Series 27

Episode 9

(9/13)

Paul Gambaccini welcomes three more music enthusiasts to the last of the heats in the current Counterpoint series. Taking part, at the BBC Philharmonic's studio at MediaCity in Salford, are contestants from Liverpool, Newcastle and Wombourne in Staffordshire.

Which other female recording artist apart from Adele has won six Grammy awards in a single ceremony? And which controversial classical pianist was the subject of a TV drama featuring Victoria Wood, shown last year?

These and many other questions will be testing the mettle of today's contestants - and they'll also have to pick a specialist musical topic to answer individual questions on, with no advance warning of what the choice of topics will be.

As always, Paul will be providing musical extracts and anecdotes to entertain whatever your taste.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0366xsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Shot in Belfast (b0367mxj)
The history of Northern Ireland on film is rich and varied. Carol Reed's 'Odd Man Out', starring James Mason, was acclaimed upon its release in 1947 as 'the best film of all time', and is still regarded as one of the finest of the post-war era.

But for years, Northern Irish cinema goers often had to endure clichéd representations of the 'Troubles' as captured by Hollywood.

Now though Northern Ireland is ready to tell its own story. An indigenous film industry is taking shape and in this programme Peter Curran returns home to Belfast to explore the city's burgeoning movie business.

At the centre of things is a giant former 'paint hall' in the heart of the old Harland and Wolff shipyard, where cruise liners once received their finishing touches before setting sail. The old building has become Titanic Studios, a hub for film and television production, including the HBO fantasy series Game of Thrones.

Northern Ireland provides attractive locations and financial incentives for film makers. So who's benefitting?

Here Peter Curran meets the main players, eavesdrops on current productions and considers how Northern Ireland is now starring in its very own movie.

Producer: Owen McFadden.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b0367mxl)
Series 8

Glastonbury

Brian Cox and Robin Ince transport their cage of infinite proportions to the Glastonbury Festival as they take to the stage with their special brand of science and comedy. They are joined by singer KT Tunstall and physicists Fay Dowker and Jeff Forshaw to discuss all things Quantum, in the most unlikely of places!


MON 17:00 PM (b0367mxn)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0366kny)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b0367mxq)
Series 59

Episode 1

The fifty-ninth series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the City Hall in Salisbury, where regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Tony Hawks, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0367nrp)
Brenda calls Lilian with good news. She has shown some promising tenants around 3, The Green. They are keen to move in as soon as possible and would like to decorate it themselves for a small rent reduction. But Lilian won't budge on the rent.

Tony and Pat are discussing how to invest the money from the sale of the Bridge Farm herd. They are going to meet with a financial advisor. Tom is keen for some of it to be spent on equipment for the farm. He has his eye on a new tractor.

Oliver and Tony go out for a spot of rough shooting. Oliver is still feeling disappointed about missing out on a special anniversary dinner with Caroline. She is always so busy with work that they can't even plan a holiday. Tony is struggling to adjust to the idea of no longer being a dairy farmer. He feels like he's not a farmer at all any more but wants to be strong for Pat.

Tom is feeling optimistic about the launch at Bellingham's, and wonders whether this will be the moment that the business goes 'big time'.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0367nrr)
Now You See Me; Henning Mankell; African art at Tate Modern

With Mark Lawson.

Mark Ruffalo, Morgan Freeman and Jesse Eisenberg star in a new film Now You See Me, in which four illusionists pull off bank heists during their elaborate shows and reward the audiences with the money. But the FBI and Interpol are on their case. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews.

The Swedish writer Henning Mankell is best known for his series of novels featuring Inspector Kurt Wallander, but this accounts for only a fraction of his work, which includes books for children, plays, and novels set in Africa, where he spends half his time. Henning Mankell discusses his latest novel, A Treacherous Paradise, set in Mozambique, and how his Wallander series has tended to overshadow his other output.

For the first time in its history, Tate Modern is focussing on the rarely told story of African and Arabic modernism. Sudanese painter Ibrahim El-Salahi gets his first major exhibition in the UK, with a retrospective that spans five decades and over one hundred paintings. Meanwhile Benin-born artist Meschac Gaba has created a temporary museum of contemporary African art inside the gallery, complete with its own shop.

In Cultural Exchange, Julia Donaldson, the former Children's Laureate, talks about the stories by American writer Arnold Lobel. Best known for his series Frog and Toad which are for young children beginning to read, Julia chooses and reads from Grasshopper on the Road.


MON 19:45 The Cazalets (b0367dzz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace (b0367nrt)
Espionage

The first of three programmes about the virtual world where they steal, spy and wage war. The British government recently declared that one of the greatest threats to national security emanates from cyberspace. Hostile nation states are conducting a war over the internet, while Western companies face the wholesale plundering of their economic life-blood. There is increasing tension as China and the United States square up to each other, while North Korea and Iran are both thought to have launched attacks.

BBC Security Correspondent Gordon Corera reports from London, Washington and Beijing. He talks to those who are holding the line, including top intelligence officials, political leaders and the heads of some of the world's largest companies which stand to lose millions from the theft of their intellectual property. "Britain is under attack," says Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague. "Most countries are under attack and certainly many industries and businesses are under attack." Who is responsible and where will it end?

Producer: Mark Savage.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0367nrw)
Syria and the New Lines in the Sand

Where the Arab Spring overthrew dictators, is the Middle East now dismantling the very 'lines in the sand' imposed by Britain and France a century ago? Edward Stourton investigates.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b02ykrd1)
Global Collapse

Monty Don presents Shared Planet, the series explores the crunch point between human population and the natural world. In this weeks programme we have a report from Northern Kenya about the Grevy's Zebra, the worlds most stripy Zebra and a species in decline for many different reasons, all of which appear to be attributed with human activity. Monty Don examines the wider issues of species abundance and people and interviews one of the authors of a recent paper " Can a Collapse of Civilisation be Avoided" published by The Proceedings of The Royal Society with one of its authors Professor Paul Ehrlich from Stanford University. Also in the programme Dr Joe Smith from The Open University, an expert in environment and the media, exploring how the media should keep up with such apocalyptic headlines.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0367dzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b0366kp0)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0367ns0)
Egyptian protests: will President Morsi resign?

Europe reacts to US spying allegations.
Misrata - the struggle to rebuild the city.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0367ns3)
The Professor of Truth

Episode 6

Peter Firth reads from James Robertson's powerful new novel which is inspired by some of the aspects and events surrounding the Lockerbie bombing.

Alan Tealing has spent two decades conducting his own investigation into the bombing of an airplane in which his wife and daughter were killed. After receiving new information about the case from a former secret service agent, Tealing has flown from the UK to Australia in the hope of confronting the investigation's key witness face-to-face.

Read by Peter Firth.

Written and abridged by James Robertson.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 23:00 Arthur Smith's Balham Bash (b0101g5j)
Series 3

Episode 1

Arthur Smith presents music and comedy from his home in Balham, South London.

There's music in the kitchen, comedy in the front room and poetry on the landing.

Finding a decent sized performance space amongst the accumulated debris that is Arthur's life are Katie Melua, Roisin Conaty, Alun Cochrane and Nick Helm

Producer; Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2011.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0367p3r)
Labour attacks the Work and Pensions Secretary over changes to the welfare system.
Iain Duncan Smith faces accusations of a "stately home lifestyle". But he says Labour "crashed" the economy forcing thousands into poverty.
Transport chiefs defend the cost of a high-speed rail scheme as MPs say it was a "project plucked out of the air".
Peers give a warning to ministers not to arm the Syrian opposition.
And there are calls for action to improve road safety for cyclists after figures reveal a rise in deaths.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 02 JULY 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0366kpv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b0367dzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0366kpx)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0366kpz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0366kq1)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0366kq3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0367p8p)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Roger Hutchings.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0367p8r)
Farmers say they have warned of the fire risk posed by Chinese lanterns for years. Does the blaze at a recycling plant in the West Midlands, believed to have been started by a lantern, now prove them right? Anna Hill hears from the Women's Farming Union about their campaign to get the lanterns banned.

Could over-zealous strimming of roadside verges be putting our wildflowers at risk of extinction? A leading plant charity wants local councils and the Highways Agency to hold back.

And game, set and match to British strawberries! We're set for a bumper crop this year, because of the cold spring and recent sunshine.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Weatherill.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tt1kv)
Yellowhammer

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the yellowhammer. The yellowhammer is a member of the bunting family and its name comes from "ammer" the German for bunting. It's one of the few British birds to have its song transcribed into words and seems to be saying ..a little bit of bread and no cheese".


TUE 06:00 Today (b0367p8t)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b0367p8w)
Nika Riots

Jonathan Freeland takes the long view of riots in Turkey: as Prime Minister Erdogan confronts his critics in Taksim Square, Jonathan and his guests consider Emperor Justinian's response to the Nika Riots of AD532 in Constantinople as the citizens rose up and demanded change at the heart of the Byzantine Empire. Historian Bettany Hughes guides us through the events and brutal response of Justinian and his Empress Theodora - whilst the modern story is reflected by guests from both sides of the political divide.

Producer: Mohini Patel.


TUE 09:30 Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities (b01kblcn)
Series 1

Episode 4

In the fourth in the series, Roger Law has arrived in Zhengzhou on his journey through China to see some of the many museums of the country. In this city, a major railway junction, he is amazed to discover a 'Chinese Louvre', a pyramid-shaped building housing some of the finest treasures of the country. He travels on to the Longman Grottos, where he is amazed to find more than 30,000 Buddha statues and 100,000 Buddha images in a series of caves hollowed out of the rock. He also finds himself alongside almost the same number of Chinese tourists jostling to see a part of their history.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b0368gpx)
The Cooked Seed

Episode 2

Having secured a place to study art at an American college, Anchee Min lands in the States.

She marvels at the luxury of her first American airport but, having lied about her ability to speak English, she is terrified that immigration will turn her back before she can begin her new life.

Read by Chipo Chung
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0367rwl)
How to Be a Powerful Woman

How to be a Powerful Woman - a series of Woman's Hour Power List films are launched in this live programme, presented by Jane Garvey, from the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House.

Artist Tracey Emin, paralympian and Life Peer Tanni Grey Thompson, Liberty Director Shami Chakrabarti and MOBO's Kanya King are some of the powerlisters featured in the films. They share their experiences, advice and philosophy for a successful working life.

In the programme we'll take a look at some of the barriers women still face in the workplace. We'll examine how to raise girls' aspirations so they choose the careers they really want - not just jobs that will fit in with family responsibilities. We'll also look at the changes needed to enable more women to reach senior positions. And we'll discuss how women can keep their careers buoyant and fulfilling as they juggle work and home life.


TUE 10:45 The Cazalets (b0367rwn)
Casting Off

Episode 2

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
dramatised by Lin Coghlan

Edward is surprised when Louise agrees to meet his long-standing lover, Diana. But he can't quite bring himself to tell his wife, Villy.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.
This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.
With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b0367rwq)
Valuing Nature

How much is a honey bee worth? Can you put a price tag on a mountain? Monty Don explores the value of nature. Some believe the only way to preserve nature is to show that it can pay its way in a world driven by money, others disagree saying nature is too precious to be left to the whim of markets. Monty Don discusses if we should put a price tag on nature and if so how do we value it? This week there is a report from St. Andrews in North East Scotland where Trai Anfield explores the value of the Eden Estuary to both nature conversation and human activity. Estuaries and mud flats protect our coastlines and filter water entering the sea, as well as provide food for many birds - but here and all over the world coastlines are under threat from development. Jonathan Aylen from the Manchester Business School thinks valuing eco-system services is a good idea in theory but very hard to put into practice. Environmentalist Tony Juniper and Dr Bill Adams from the Department of Geography at University of Cambridge also join Monty in the studio to discuss the pros and cons of valuing nature.


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b0367sl2)
Series 16

Lili Marlene

A new series of SOUL MUSIC begins with stories of love, loss and friendship through the WWII favourite Lili Marlene, made famous by Marlene Dietrich and sung by soldiers on both sides.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b0367sl4)
Call You and Yours: Will the future be Local Council PLC?

As the Local Government Association launches a ten point plan to 'rewire' public services, Julian Worricker asks how local authorities and communities are coping in the face of spending cuts.

Last week councils were told to expect further cuts in the money they receive from central government, and a continued freeze in council tax. But already the cuts are beginning to hurt. Some councils are trying new and creative ways to make money; such as surcharges on your stay at hotels or buying up Premier League training grounds and leasing them back to the clubs.

What has been the impact of spending cuts in the area where you live? Should councils behave more like businesses? Is there a role for charities and community groups, to step-in and provide services that councils can no longer afford?

We want to hear your experiences and your views. 03700 100 400 is the phone number, e-mail youandyours@bbc.co.uk, text to 84844.

Presenter Julian Worricker
Producer Stephanie Power.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0366kq5)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b0367sl6)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Food for Thought (b0367j1s)
Series 3

Angela Georghiu

Over Afternoon Tea, world-renowned Romanian soprano Angela Gheorghiu tells Nina Myskow about scarcity and abundance, being spoon-fed by her mother, feasting on cakes and how to sweeten cabbage.

Growing up under the Ceausescu communist regime in Romania, the opera singer remembers standing in endless lines for rations and what you could get on the black market. Despite the hardships she describes the Romanian knack for feeding and generous hospitality.

Accompanied by a glass of champagne, Angela delights in homemade Romanian cozonac cake, a sweet fruit and nut-filled bread, eaten as a celebration cake especially around religious festivals. Feted for her prodigious musical talent at an early age, she studied at the Academy of Music in Bucharest, where she sometimes struggled to indulge her sweet tooth. Leaving Romania for the first time in her mid-20s, she describes her wonder at the shops full of food and produce.

Plus Angela remembers meeting her ex-husband-to-be, the tenor Roberto Alagna and reveals if, during her rare moments at home, she is now eating alone.

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
A Wise Buddah Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0367nrp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b0367slb)
Sleeping Dogs

Sleeping Dogs
By Steven Camden

Jason is an English teacher, he's financially stable but in essence treading water, living in a one bedroom flat at the top of a tower block with his wife Jess and their five-year-old daughter Evie. Then his life is derailed by the arrival of Riley - Jason's best mate from school, who's been missing for six years. As Riley stirs up the past, Jason wonders whether some things are best left forgotten.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b0367sld)
Series 3

Escape

Josie Long presents a showcase for delightful and adventurous short documentaries and makes her escape as we hear stories of running away, flight and car chases.

From breaking away to disappearing into escapism - we hear the tale of a narrow escape as three young Australian men desperately try to manoeuvre themselves out of trouble, alongside the story of a 93 year old wing walker getting lost in the clouds.

The items featured in the programme are:

Swimming in Snafu
Produced by Meagan Perry

River Guard
Feat. Laura Barton

Drive for Portugal
Produced by Leo Hornak

Head in the Clouds
Produced by Sara Parker

Road Warriors
Produced by Bob Carlson
Originally featured in Unfictional
http://www.kcrw.com/etc/programs/uf/uf111202the_road_warriors

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4

Rpt

Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b0367slg)
Series 2

Episode 1

The Human Zoo is a place to learn about the one subject that never fails to fascinate - ourselves. Are people led by the head or by the heart? How rational are we? How do we perceive the world and what lies behind the quirks of human behaviour?

Michael Blastland presents a curious blend of intriguing experiments, with Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick University, on hand as guide and experimenter in chief.

Our thoughts, John Milton said, are a kingdom of infinite space and they might take us anywhere -whether our subject is writ large, like the behaviours of public figures or the contradictions of politics, or located in the minutiae of everyday life. We can show how what happens on the big stage is our own behaviour writ large - like the old Linda Smith joke about the Iraq-war coalition's failure to find chemical weapons: "I'm the same with the scissors".

Producer: Toby Murcott
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 It's My Story (b0367slj)
Living in the Memory Room

Kim Normanton presents a personal programme about memory and dementia, inspired by her mother's illness. She explores a new approach to treatment: recreating the past. As her mother's memory of recent events was destroyed, Kim discovered that she could only reach her by entering the past. She began sharing memories of her mother's childhood with theatrical props: "She can't reach where I'm living anymore, so it's up to me to go back to happier days in the past and reach her."

This approach to dementia is tried on a much larger scale in Hogewey Dementia Village in Holland. The village recreates the surroundings of the residents' youth, with old-fashioned furnishings, even a supermarket selling old-fashioned sweets. Kim talks to the director about ethical issues: is it right to deceive people with this 'Truman-Show' theatrical illusion?

In Britain she finds care homes increasingly using 'reminiscence objects' to stimulate dementia sufferers to share memories. Kim visits a Cornwall home where Janet Brown, known locally as 'the Memory Lady', organizes group memory sessions using old toys and kitchen utensils plucked from a memory box. "It's a horrible disease and there's no cure, but there are moments which we can make more pleasurable for those living with it, and their carers."

Kim explores the latest memory science with Dr Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster: "The biggest problem with dementia is a lack of narrative: being suspended in space without the context of memories to support you. But I've seen people with dementia who are very happy - when you're reminiscing, you really are in that world and enjoying that moment."

There are 800,000 dementia sufferers in the UK.

Producers: Kim Normanton and Elizabeth Burke.
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b0367smf)
Sarah Hall and Owen Jones

Journalist and writer Owen Jones and novelist Sarah Hall discuss their favourite books with Harriett Gilbert.

Owen Jones picks the book which gave him nightmares in his teenage years: Brother in the Land, by Robert Swindells, a post-apocalyptic novel set in the North of England.

The thrill of flying, grief and the consolations of fiction are rendered in beautiful style in Sarah Hall's choice: American writer James Salter's memoir Burning the Days.

And Owen and Sarah are transported across Europe into the dark heart of the English countryside in Harriett Gilbert's pick - the page-turning Rogue Male, by Geoffrey Household, a prototype for Bond, Bourne, and many others.


TUE 17:00 PM (b0367smh)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0366kq7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Castle (b01jyq99)
Series 4

A Term for the Worse

Hie ye to The Castle, a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley"), Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley"), Martha Howe-Douglas ("Horrible Histories") & Ingrid Oliver

Anne's off to Cambridge but Charlotte doesn't know the meaning of the word "thick". Literally. Is this the end of a beautiful friendship? And what will Sir Warenne do?

Written by Kim Fuller & Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson
Produced and directed by David Tyler.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b0367smk)
Brian's got work on his mind, and Brenda's lost direction.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0367snn)
Emma Watson in The Bling Ring, Anna Chancellor, Clarke Peters' Cultural Exchange

With John Wilson.

Emma Watson stars in The Bling Ring, Sofia Coppola's film about a teenage gang who raid the Hollywood homes of young celebrities. Jason Solomons reviews.

Actress Anna Chancellor discusses her role as Amanda in Noel Coward's Private Lives on stage. Anna won acclaim for roles on TV in Spooks and Pramface and was nominated for a BAFTA for BBC One's The Hour - and is still remembered as Hugh Grant's jilted fiancée Duckface in Four Weddings and a Funeral.

For Cultural Exchange, actor and musician Clarke Peters selects an anthropological book: They Came Before Columbus, by Dr Ivan Van Sertima. Dr Van Sertima argued that the Indians whom Columbus encountered had already met Africans, long before Columbus had got there. This would mean that Africans had first arrived in the Americas not as slaves, but far earlier - as explorers and traders.

A new apocalyptic comedy This is the End features James Franco, Seth Rogen and Emily Watson playing James Franco, Seth Rogen and Emily Watson. And this week Status Quo make their movie debut in action-comedy caper Bula Quo!, playing none other than Status Quo. Critic Adam Smith looks into this cinematic habit of actors playing alternative versions of themselves in films.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 The Cazalets (b0367rwn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b0367snq)
NHS: Pricing Patients

NHS hospitals in England are back in the spotlight with a crisis in A&E and a growing number of cancelled operations. But does the real problem lie in the way the Government is currently funding them?
The Department of Health uses a system called Payment by Results to try to ensure better patient care is delivered more efficiently. However Allan Urry hears from hospitals which say they're being treated unfairly and losing millions because of perverse tariffs which short-change them. Critics say the payments system is no longer fit for purpose.
So how deep is the financial crisis facing our hospitals? Could budget cuts and the rising costs of admissions push some of them over the edge?

PRODUCER: EMMA FORDE
EDITOR: DAVID ROSS.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0367sns)
At a diplomatic conference in Marrakesh last week, 52 countries adopted a treaty to share books for the blind across international borders. Until now, each country has had to negotiate commercial rights to provide each publication in an accessible format. As a consequence the process has been slow and expensive and only 7 per cent of all books are available in an accessible form. If the treaty is ratified by each of the 52 nations, an organisation which obtained the rights to a popular novel would have the right to distribute it in other participating nations.

Many view this as a significant step in the quest for every book to be made accessible to all blind and visually impaired people. Peter White finds out what the treaty could mean for visually impaired readers, what stumbling blocks still remain and whether access to every book is a realistic expectation.

Producer:Lee Kumutat
Editor:Andrew Smith.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b0367snv)
Hayfever management; Generic drugs; Diclofenac; Breastfeeding and cheese molars; Pacemakers; Antibiotics and MS

Should private clinics be offering out dated injections for hay fever? Cheese Molars - why do up to 1 in 7 British children have soft yellow teeth? And generics versus branded medicines - why pay more for the same thing?


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b0367p8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b0366kq9)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0367snx)
Egypt: in the midst of a military coup?
European outrage at US spy programme.
Is Channel 4 right to broadcast the Muslim call to prayer.
Re-visiting the cradle of the Libyan revolution, Benghazi.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0367snz)
The Professor of Truth

Episode 7

Peter Firth reads the powerful new novel by award-winning author James Robertson.

Alan Tealing, an academic based in Scotland, has spent two decades conducting his own investigation into the bombing of an airplane in which his wife and daughter were murdered. Acting on information he's received from a former secret service agent, he's travelled to Australia to confront the trial's key witness: Martin Parroulet. He's proving elusive, however, so Tealing has located Parroulet's wife and engineered a meeting with her instead.

Read by Peter Firth.

Written and abridged by James Robertson.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b0367mxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0367sp1)
Susan Hulme hears the Prime Minister talk tough on Europe. There are plans to scale back 'stop and search'. And how a chief constable lost her job.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 03 JULY 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0366kr6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b0368gpx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0366kr9)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0366krd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0366krg)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0366krj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0367spc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Roger Hutchings.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0368knr)
Today sees the start of Livestock 2013 at the NEC in Birmingham. It's hailed as one of the largest events in the farming calendar. And it also sees the launch of the National Farmers Union's new strategy for the british dairy industry. At the moment imports of dairy products are worth 1.5 billion pounds more than the dairy goods the UK produces at home. The NFU wants farmers to get enough money for their milk so they can invest in their businesses and increase production, to narrow that trade gap. Also on today's programme, DEFRA Secretary Owen Paterson has just returned from a UK trade delegation in New York where he's been trying to drum up more export trade to the US. The UK already exports £1.8 billion worth of food and drink to America, making it the third largest export destination after Ireland and France. And Anna Hill explores why the UK is just one of three countries in the world which exports significant amounts of beans to North Africa. Presented by Anna Hill, Produced by Anna Varle.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ttqwv)
Turtle Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the turtle dove. The soft purring song of the turtle Doves are mentioned in the Song of Solomon in the Bible: " The voice of the turtle is heard in our land". They are migrants from sub-Saharan Africa and are now a treat to see here in the UK where they breed in farmland and scrub where they can find weed seeds for their growing young.


WED 06:00 Today (b0367sph)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Justin Webb, including:

0750
Ofgem is calling on energy suppliers to clamp down on electricity theft, with up to 25,000 cases of electricity theft each year, costing consumers at least £200m. Ian Marlee, a senior partner at Ofgem, Angela Knight, chief executive of energy UK, and Tony Thornton, chairman of United Kingdom Revenue Protection Association, explain why the theft must be dealt with.

0810
The Egyptian military is reported to have drawn up a plan to suspend the Islamist-backed constitution, dissolve the Islamist-dominated legislature and set up an interim administration headed by the country's chief justice if President Mohammed Morsi fails to reach a solution with his opponents by the end of a Wednesday deadline. BBC Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen explains the significance of the military's actions.

0818
The government is setting out a proposal aimed at ensuring migrants make a fair contribution for use of the NHS. The proposals include a new levy for non-emergency healthcare of at least £200 a year, in addition to the visa charge for anyone coming to the UK for more than six months. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt explains the new proposals.

0824
A Chinese court has ordered a woman to visit her mother once every two months and provide her with financial help in the first case since a new law on parental visits came into effect on Monday. Writers Katherine Whitehorn and Hardeep Singh Kohi consider whether a similar approach would be welcome here in the UK.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b0367sq6)
James Bowen, Mary Sheepshanks, Gino Strada, Ty Jeffries

Libby Purves meets James Bowen who befriended Bob the cat; author Mary Sheepshanks; surgeon Dr Gino Strada and Ty Jeffries, also known as cabaret star Miss Hope Springs.

James Bowen is a street musician and former heroin addict who found Bob the cat in 2007. Bob was badly injured and James nursed him back to health. The pair have been inseparable ever since and Bob helped James recover from drug addiction. The World According to Bob is published by Hodder & Stoughton.

Mary Sheepshanks is a poet and author who published her first novel when she was in her sixties. She was brought up at Eton College where her father was a housemaster. At 21 she married the head of a prep school, becoming responsible for the welfare of the staff and 80 boys. Her book, Wild Writing Granny, is published by Stone Trough Books.

Dr Gino Strada is an Italian surgeon who co-founded Emergency, an NGO which provides free medical and surgical treatment to victims of war and poverty. The charity operates in a range of war-torn countries including Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan, Sierra Leone and Cambodia. Dr Strada is in London to speak at Bloomsbury Central Baptist Church.

Ex-Las Vegas showgirl, pianist and nightclub singer Miss Hope Springs is the creation of composer and lyricist Ty Jeffries. Ty is the son of the late actor and director Lionel Jeffries. He spent his formative years in Hollywood where his father had moved to work on the film Camelot. Family friend Fred Astaire taught Ty to tap dance down Sunset Boulevard. Miss Hope Springs performs every Sunday at The Crazy Coqs Cabaret room, Brasserie Zedel, in London's Piccadilly.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0368h35)
The Cooked Seed

Episode 3

Anchee Min begins to learn about student culture American style - dancing to Michael Jackson, 'hanging out' at the dorm and trying to learn English by watching Sesame Street.

But the luxury of her new surroundings worries her as she struggles to pay her debt to her Aunt.

Read by Chipo Chung
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0367sq8)
Sigrid Rausing, Brene Brown

Publisher and philanthropist Sigrid Rausing. Brene Brown on why we all need to be more vulnerable. The challenges facing intersex people. Why are women in the UK less informed about politics than men? With Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 The Cazalets (b0367sqb)
Casting Off

Episode 3

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
Dramatised by Lin Coghlan

Sid's relationship with Thelma reaches breaking point, whilst Christopher declares his feelings for Polly.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.
This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.
With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


WED 11:00 Mabey in the Wild (b0367sqd)
Series 2

Elm, Beech And Holly

Richard Mabey is that rare species - a gifted writer who can talk about the natural world in a way that interweaves botany, personal insights, intellectual history, art, memoir, poetry and an account of man's relationship with Nature.

Here he turns his attention to three favourite trees in the British landscape - the much-battered Elm, the festive Holly and his own 'personal' tree, the Beech.

Recorded on location in the New Forest his guests include the naturalist Clive Chatters and founder of Common Ground, Susan Clifford.

Producer: Susan Marling

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2013.


WED 11:30 Paul Temple (b0368fwf)
Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair

With the Compliments of Mr Gregory

Part 1 of a new production of a vintage serial from 1946.

From 1938 to 1968, Francis Durbridge's incomparably suave amateur detective Paul Temple and his glamorous wife Steve solved case after baffling case in one of BBC radio's most popular series. Sadly, only half of Temple's adventures survive in the archives.

In 2006 BBC Radio 4 brought one of the lost serials back to life with Crawford Logan and Gerda Stevenson as Paul and Steve. Using the original scripts and incidental music, and recorded using vintage microphones and sound effects, the production of Paul Temple and the Sullivan Mystery aimed to sound as much as possible like the 1947 original might have done if its recording had survived. The serial proved so popular that it was soon followed by three more revivals, Paul Temple and the Madison Mystery, Paul Temple and Steve, and A Case for Paul Temple.

Now it's the turn of Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair from 1946, in which Paul and Steve come to the aid of a baffled Scotland Yard in pursuit of a deadly and mysterious criminal mastermind. Not only has the recording disappeared but also the scripts of Episodes 1, 2 and 6. This new production is made possible by the recent discovery by a colleague in Norwegian radio of a complete set of scripts in an old store cupboard in Oslo.

Episode 1: With the Compliments of Mr Gregory

The daughter of an eminent physician disappears after a night out at the Alpine Club.

Producer Patrick Rayner.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b0368fwh)
Selling customer data, vitamins, holidays without a guidebook

A shortage of surveyors is creating long waiting times for prospective housebuyers and sellers after a recent surge in the housing market. Spanish shops start a sale on July 1st as they attempt to increase people's spending. But have shoppers got the money or confidence to spend?

How widespread is data selling and data sharing by companies? Taking vitamin supplements is highest in the over 65 age group, but can they cause complications?

A new technology entrepreneur is connecting dog owners across the country with a new pet lending service. Alternatives to the guide book: "Pay-what-you-want" tours are becoming increasingly common in European cities.
Presenter: Aasmah Mir
Producer: Simon Browning.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0366krl)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b0368fwk)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Food for Thought (b0368fwm)
Series 3

Mary Portas

At breakfast at her favourite local cafe, retail guru Mary Portas remembers fighting for scraps as the fourth child in a large Irish family in the 1970s.

As the Government's 'Queen of Shops', she tells Nina Myskow how her passion for the local High Street came from losing her mother at the age of 16, and needing to provide for herself and her younger brother.

Over porridge and a flat white, Mary contemplates the emotion and experiences behind her love of good food and a full fridge. With another young mouth to feed, who does the cooking now in her household?

And she talks about the relationship between food and sex, and admits to a love of fine wine and cheap chocolate.

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
A Wise Buddah production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b0367smk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0368fwp)
Iain Finlay MacLeod - Cherry Blossom Whisky Company

By Iain Finlay MacLeod

How do you begin again when everything you've spent your life working for has been destroyed?

Broken-hearted and rootless after losing her whisky company in the 2011 tsunami, a Japanese businesswoman arrives on the Scottish island of Islay in search of the perfect dram of whisky. Following in the footsteps of her great-grandfather (who had visited the island in 1910 to learn the secrets of whisky distilling and returned to Japan with a Scottish wife) she hopes to find solace by returning to her Scottish roots.

Iain Finlay MacLeod is a Scottish playwright who has written for theatre, radio and television. He is a native Gaelic speaker from the Outer Hebrides and is fascinated by questions of home and exile, language and identity.

"Sakura's Tune" is composed by Angus Lyon and the accordionist is Colin Train.

Written by Iain Finlay MacLeod

Produced and directed by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b0368fwr)
Saving and Investing

Where's the best place to keep your cash, a reliable savings account, a cash ISA or could riskier stock markets be for you? To ask our investment panel for their view call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk

What are tracker and exchange traded funds?

Should you consider a managed fund?

Perhaps you want to pick, buy and sell your own shares.

How much will you pay in fees and charges?

What's the outlook for the bond market and do stock markets have further to fall?

After all that, if you decide to keep your money safely in the bank, where will you get the highest interest rate?

To answer your questions, presenter Vincent Duggleby will be joined by:

Anna Bowes, Director at SavingsChampion
Brian Dennehy, IFA and Director at Research and Dealing Hub, FundExpert.co.uk,
Nick McGregor, Investment Manager at Redmayne Bentley

E-mail questions to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now or call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday. Calls cost the same as 01 and 02 numbers, calls from mobiles may be higher.

Presenter: Vincent Duggleby
Producer: Diane Richardson.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b0367snv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0368fwt)
Northern Ireland Sectarianism and Civility; The Global Pigeon

The Global Pigeon - our complex and contradictory relationship with the quintessential city bird.
Laurie Taylor talks to Colin Jerolmack, an American sociologist, who spent over 3 years studying pigeon/human interaction across 3 continents. Pigeons were domesticated thousands of years ago as messengers, as well as a source of food. These days they're either treated as a nuisance or scarcely noticed on our city streets and roofs. This new study uncovers the many and versatile lives of these anonymous looking birds; the ways in which people have kept them for sport, for pleasure and profit: From the 'pigeon wars' waged by breeding enthusiasts in the skies over Brooklyn to the Million Dollar Pigeon Race held every year in South Africa. The author argues that our interactions with pigeons offer surprising insights into city life, community, culture, and politics.

Also, sectarianism and civility in Northern Ireland - Dr Lisa Smyth explores how mothers from different religious communities 'get along' in the shared spaces of inner city Belfast.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b0368fww)
David Liddiment on BBC severance pay

The BBC Trust came in for strong criticism this week in a National Audit Office report on severance payments for senior BBC managers. Following this, Public Accounts Committee chairman Margaret Hodge MP said "There are real issues for the Trust - what are they there for but to protect licence-fee payers interests?" She added the Digital Media Initiative project, recently shut down at a cost of £100m, as another case where the governance structure appeared not to be working properly. Steve puts the case for reform to BBC Trustee David Liddiment.

Channel 4 is to broadcast a film of a murder trial next week, the first UK case to be shown in almost 20 years. It comes as the government confirms that Appeal Court hearings may be televised from October, subject to restrictions. The director of C4's "The Murder Trial", Nick Holt, discusses the programme and the issues with Simon Bucks, associate editor, Sky News and Frances Gibb, legal correspondent of The Times. The programme will be shown on C4 on 9th July at 9pm.

And Nick Robinson, BBC political editor, updates Steve on developments in the press regulation process. This follows confirmation that the industry's alternative Royal Charter will be considered next week by the Privy Council, some three months before the possible date for considering the charter approved by Parliament.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett
Producer: Simon Tillotson
Editor: Andy Smith.


WED 17:00 PM (b0368fwy)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0366krn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Brig Society (b0368fx0)
Series 1

Hospital

Uh-oh - Marcus Brigstocke has been put in charge of a thing! Each week, Marcus finds he's volunteered to be in charge of a big old thing - a hospital, the railways, British fashion, a prison. And each week he starts out by thinking "Well, it can't be that difficult, surely?" and ends up with "Oh - turns out it's utterly difficult and complicated. Who knew...?"

This week, he's been given his very own hospital, complete with doctors, nurses and pyjama smokers outside so you know it's a proper one. Do we have too many bureaucrats? Is privatization of health care a good or a bad thing? And are alternative medicine and homeopathy utter rubbish or merely complete drivel? Marcus gives you the results - albeit two weeks later and mixed up with those of another programme!

Assisting him with the procedures are Rufus Jones (Hunderby, Holy Flying Circus), William Andrews (Sorry I've Got No Head) and Margaret Cabourn-Smith (Miranda).

The show is produced by Marcus's long-standing accomplice, David Tyler, who also produces Marcus appearances as the inimitable as Giles Wemmbley Hogg.

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Steve Punt and Tom Neenan.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0368fx2)
Pip is pleased that the agency Rob suggested has found her a summer milking job. As it is near Churcham and as she will be staying there while she's working, Pip decides that David and Ruth should let her look after the farm and take a well-earned break before she goes. Ruth isn't sure at first, but after looking into some holidays in the Champagne area of France, she starts to come round . Now they just need to persuade David.

David takes Josh to Lower Loxley to give Freddie some coaching in halter training in preparation for the Borsetshire Show. The lesson isn't the only thing on Josh's mind. He is keen to take the opportunity to speak to Hayley and apologise for booking the extra farmers' markets without checking with her, and being irritable when she had to cancel them. Hayley is impressed with his mature attitude.

David fills Ruth and Pip in on how proud he is of Josh for helping Freddie and apologising to Hayley. Ruth and Pip spring the news of the holiday on David. He is surprised but comes round to the idea. David asks what he did to deserve such a brilliant family.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b0368fx4)
Elton John in conversation

With John Wilson.

Elton John reflects on his return to musical basics on his forthcoming album The Diving Board, to be released later this year. He also considers the impact of early fame on young performers, the continuing influence of soul and classical music on his own songs and the effect of his two young sons on his performing career.

Producer John Goudie.


WED 19:45 The Cazalets (b0367sqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b0368fx6)
Transparency and Secrets

The 16th century philosopher Francis Bacon is widely credited with coining the phrase "knowledge is power". If he was alive today he would surely have appreciated the irony of the government this week launching its consultation on transparency and open data while the news is full of stories about spying and under cover surveillance. The goal of "transparency" has become something of mantra across a wide section of our society. It is held up as a moral virtue; an unambiguously Good Thing that should be pursued at all costs. Vascular surgeons are the latest to have the "spotlight" of transparency shone upon them. The NHS is publishing league tables of their results and doctors who refuse to co-operate will be named and shamed. Transparency has become not just a descriptive term, but an ideology - something that should be actively strived for and is a fundamental human right that underpins democracy. But by investing so much moral capital in transparency have we done the opposite of what those who champion it wanted? Instead of a more trusting society, do we now automatically assume that what goes on behind closed doors is not to be trusted and always capable of being corrupted? Is the CIA whistleblower Edward Snowden a hero who's exposed the scale of state surveillance on its citizens, or a traitor who has undermined our capacity to fight terrorism? In an age when digital data about every aspect of our life is so easy to generate, how much of a right do "they" have to know about us and how much of a right do we have to know about "them?" Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Anne McElvoy and Kenan Malik. Witnesses: David Leigh - The Guardian's investigations editor until 2013, and professor of journalism at City University, London UK, Dame Pauline Neville-Jones - Former Chairman of the Joint Intelligence Committee, Professor Gwythian Prins - Visiting professor of War Studies Buckingham University and member of the Chief of the Defence Staff's Strategic Advisory Panel, Shami Chakrabarti - Director of Liberty.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b0368fx8)
Series 4

Kevin Allen

Advertising guru Kevin Allen tells a tale of missing cutlery on passenger jets to show where business leaders go wrong. Success, he says, belongs to the "buoyant" leader, riding high on the esteem of the workforce, rather than ruling by fear.

Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks combining personal stories with ideas of contemporary relevance. Speakers air their thinking in front of a live audience, hosted by David Baddiel.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b0368fxd)
Plate Tectonics and Life

Earthquakes are feared for their destructive, deadly force. But they are part of a geological process, plate tectonics, that some scientists say is vital for existence of life itself. Without the ever-changing land surfaces that plate tectonics produces , or the high continental masses raised above sea level by earthquake activity, planet Earth would atrophy into a lifeless mass like our neighbour Mars. But why is Earth the only planet with plate tectonics? And when did they start. The clues are so faint, the traces so ephemeral, that researchers are only now beginning to find tentative answers. And extraordinarily, some say that life itself has changed the forces in plate tectonics, and helped to shape the world.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b0367sq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b0366krq)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0368fxg)
Egypt's army forces elected president Morsi from power. Jubilation in Tahrir Square, but Morsi condemns it as military coup. Home Secretary banning herbal stimulant, khat, despite expert advice it's generally safe to use. Presented by Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0368fxj)
The Professor of Truth

Episode 8

Peter Firth reads the new novel by award-winning author James Robertson.

Alan Tealing has travelled to Australia to confront Martin Parroulet - the key witness in the trial of the man convicted of bombing the airplane in which Tealing's family were killed. But Parroulet is proving elusive. Instead, Tealing has tracked down his wife, Kim, who reveals that she also bears the burden of a tragic loss.

Read by Peter Firth.

Written and abridged by James Robertson.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 23:00 News Quiz USA (b0368fxl)
The News Quiz gets a US makeover with an all-American panel.

Just in time for Independence Day, with Obama deep in to his final term, turmoil in the Middle East, financial insecurity all around - not to mention Kim Kardashian's due date growing perilously close - a team of US comedians dissect the headlines as the News Quiz format crosses the Atlantic.

Hosted by Andy Borowitz - New York Times columnist, brain behind the Borowitz Report, Time magazine's top Twitterer, and the creator of the Fresh Prince of Bel Air!

Producer: Sam Bryant.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0368fxn)
Sean Curran and team report from Westminster on the top news from the Commons and the Lords, including: a fiery session of Prime Minister's Question Time, tough questioning of CQC bosses, the Speaker rebuking the Defence Secretary for the "total mishandling" of his Army reservist announcement, and the potential impact of HS2 on ancient woodlands. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



THURSDAY 04 JULY 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0366ksm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0368h35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0366ksp)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0366ksr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0366kst)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0366ksw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0368knp)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Roger Hutchings.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b036dms2)
Charlotte Smith gets to grips with the NFU's new dairy strategy at the Livestock Event 2013 in Birmingham. She talks to the chairman of the union's dairy board Mansel Raymond, who believes UK
dairy farmers have the potential to produce an additional four billion litres of milk - if they can get more for their milk now. But what do farmers and processors think of such ambitious plans for the industry?
And continuing our farm safety theme, Charlotte meets farmer's wife Rebecca Godwin who's helping to launch of National Farm Safety Awareness Week. Rebecca is no stranger to accidents on the farmyard and uses her own experiences to spread the safety message.
Presented by Charlotte Smith, Produced by Anna Jones.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvnnw)
Sandwich Tern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the sandwich tern. Sandwich terns are the UK's largest breeding terns and have shaggy black crests and a black bill with a yellow tip. They live in colonies on shingle or sandy beaches and were first described from birds seen in Sandwich in the 1780s by William Boys, a Kentish surgeon.


THU 06:00 Today (b0368knt)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b0368knw)
The Invention of Radio

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the invention of radio. In the early 1860s the Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell derived four equations which together describe the behaviour of electricity and magnetism. They predicted the existence of a previously unknown phenomenon: electromagnetic waves. These waves were first observed in the early 1880s, and over the next two decades a succession of scientists and engineers built increasingly elaborate devices to produce and detect them. Eventually this gave birth to a new technology: radio. The Italian Guglielmo Marconi is commonly described as the father of radio - but many other figures were involved in its development, and it was not him but a Canadian, Reginald Fessenden, who first succeeded in transmitting speech over the airwaves.

With:

Simon Schaffer
Professor of the History of Science at the University of Cambridge

Elizabeth Bruton
Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Leeds

John Liffen
Curator of Communications at the Science Museum, London

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b0368kny)
The Cooked Seed

Episode 4

Anchee Min juggles several jobs along with her university course, in order not to slip further into debt.

Increasingly isolated and homesick, she longs to see her family. But when she finally goes home for a visit, after three years away, she begins to realise how much she has changed.

Read by Chipo Chung
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0368kp0)
Old-Fashioned Baby Names

Mabel's back in fashion after 'retro' name revival. A poll by parenting site Netmums.com has found that 40% of couples now opt for old-fashioned baby names. Baroness Hayter questions why there are no women on the Public Health England Advisory Board. How the Breast Radiation Injury Rehabilitation Service hopes to help women who had radio therapy for breast cancer BEFORE 1990 - and may have suffered injuries as a result of their treatment - improve their lives.
Suzette Jordan - an Indian rape survivor - has become one of the first women in the country to go public about her experience. She tell Jenni Murray why she decided to come forward. And Florence Knight chef at a Venetian Restaurant in London prepares a perfect recipe for the summer: a Warm Salad of Chargrilled Courgette, Pecorino and Honey.


THU 10:45 The Cazalets (b0368kp2)
Casting Off

Episode 4

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
dramatised by Lin Coghlan

As bad news arrives for the Cazalet family, Archie finds himself the unexpected confidant for what seems like the whole family.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.
This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.
With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b0368kp4)
A House in Damascus

What's happened to her house in the Old City in Damascus? Diana Darke hears how it's fared during the ongoing conflict in Syria. David Shukman is in Prescott, Arizona, a community devastated after 19 firefighters lost their lives battling a forest fire. Kinshasa in DR Congo is Africa's fastest-growing city - Jonny Hogg's been finding out how law and order's fast collapsing there too. Natasha Breed, who lives in Kenya and regularly films lions there, is shocked at the conditions a lion's forced to endure at a circus in France. And, on a lighter note, Rajan Datar, high in the Caucasus mountains of Georgia, is invited to try his hand, or rather his larynx, at the ancient art of polyphonic singing.


THU 11:30 Arthur in the Underworld (b0368kp6)
Arthur Machen's stories of the supernatural twitched the veil between our own world and an underworld populated by gods, demons and malevolent 'little people'. His themes were visions, dreams and madness and his novel The Hill of Dreams was described on publication as "the most decadent book in the English language". Machen was also responsible for one of the great myths of the First World War - the story of the 'Angels of Mons'- and he has inspired generations of horror writers and film-makers, from Stephen King to Guillermo del Toro.

Machen spent a solitary childhood roaming the hills and woodlands of his native Monmouthshire. He became fascinated by the history and folklore of the border landscapes and the idea that this was a 'thin place' which touched supernatural borders too. As a writer he returned to this area again and again in stories which revealed abduction, possession and routes into dark underworlds. By contrast, his other favourite place was London and he was probably the first horror writer to set terrifying events in everyday, suburban settings.

Writer Horatio Clare grew up in the same Welsh landscapes which so haunted and inspired Machen. On the 150th anniversary of his literary predecessor's birth, Horatio Clare hunts for Machen and his supernatural familiars in a North London necropolis, a fairy-haunted wood and a nightjar-haunted hill. And he meets an artist whose work was already full of malevolent Machen-esque faeries long before she discovered that Arthur Machen was actually her great-grandfather.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b0368kp8)
A better mobile phone contract, and a celebration of the telegram

How you can save money on your mobile phone contract just by negotiating with your provider. Why, after two years, product placement on TV in the UK still hasn't taken off. Plus, as one of the last public telegram services prepares to close in India, we'll be looking at how telegrams changed the world and hearing some of the most remarkable ever sent.

Presenter Peter White
Producer John Neal.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0366ksy)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b0368kpb)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Food for Thought (b0368rdg)
Series 3

James Cracknell

4/5 James Cracknell

Rower, adventurer and endurance athlete James Cracknell shares his secrets for fuelling a body capable of winning two Olympic Gold medals. He describes nutrient-dense carbs and how he has had to balance his calorie intake with the energy he burns in extreme conditions, from the Sahara to the South Pole.

James discusses how his food habits have changed since losing his sense of taste and smell following brain damage sustained in a serious bike accident. Does a restaurant supper still hold any attraction for him or is he focused on the nutritional value of food now more than ever?

He describes his increased sensitivity to texture and introduces Nina to the hot sauces that he uses to stimulate his taste buds. Over carrots in chilli sauce Nina offers James some sweet treats, as James describes the impact losing his sense of taste has had on his life.

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
A Wise Buddah production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0368fx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00y2vgk)
A Nursery Tale

by Kate Clanchy

Xhensila has lost a child. Leona has lost a child. The two women are very similar. They could not be more different. As Kate Clanchy's nailbiting and bitterly funny play uncovers the where, the how and the why of their missing children, we discover exactly why parenthood is not a fairytale.

Producer/Director: Jonquil Panting

The music accompanying the programme is sung by Sister Mildred Barker, from the collection 'Early Shaker Spirituals', published by Rounder Records.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b0368kpj)
A Tale of Three Piers

Helen Mark takes a day at the seaside to visit the romance of piers. They have been hailed as great examples of Victorian architecture but the cost of maintenance and repair from weather damage or fire can run into millions. She visits Weston-super-Mare in Somerset where the now hi-tech restored Grand Pier overlooks the damaged remains of Birnbeck. Actors Timothy West and Prunella Scales join her in Clevedon to visit the 'pier of the year' which was once only a vote away from demolition. It was described by Sir John Betjeman as 'delicate as a Japanese print in the mist' but it may have a fragile future. They welcome the paddle steamer Waverley as it docks - revisiting memories of Timothy's childhood holidays.

Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0366xs2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b0367c3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b0368kpl)
Ben Wheatley on A Field in England; Mark Gatiss on TV classics on the big screen

Sightseers director Ben Wheatley talks to Matthew Sweet about his new civil war film, A Field in England which is the first UK film to be available in the cinema, on DVD and Blu Ray, on television and download simultaneously. He describes his fascination with periods of revolution and the European sense of history.
Sofia Coppola explores celebrity emulation that leads to house-breaking in her film The Bling Ring and explains why the designer gear these teenagers steal holds no attraction for her.
Almost 40 years after the release of Werner Herzog's The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, it's back, showing at the British Film Institute and selected cinemas nationwide. It's based on the story of a youth found in 1828 in a German town, barely able to speak or walk having been kept in a cellar since birth. Critics Mike Catto and Leslie Felperin, whose son has autism, look at how this film plays now and assess the figure of the idiot savant and other outsiders in modern cinema.
And the writer and comedian Mark Gatiss discusses the big screen films spawned by classic TV shows from the 1960s and 70s. He begins with Steptoe and Son and its dark, bleak, movie incarnation. Next week, he tackles Are You Being Served?

Producer: Elaine Lester.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b036cx22)
Bovine TB; Coral sunscreen; Space junk

Today the government announced a plan to rid England of bovine TB within 25 years. Adam Rutherford looks back at how this issue has evolved and the extent to which scientific evidence has informed the eradication strategies, from culling badgers to vaccination programs.

Pharmacognosy is the study of medicines found in nature. Reporter Gaia Vince travels to the seaside to find out how corals could save us from sunburn in summers to come.

There are an estimated 23,000 pieces of space junk around the size of a tennis ball floating above us.
But there are millions of smaller bits of flotsam and jetsam, from the exploded rocket debris to fleck of paints. Even a 1cm bit of space debris could deliver the same energy as a car impacting on a concrete wall at 30 miles per hour.


THU 17:00 PM (b0368kpq)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0366kt0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My First Planet (b01g62ph)
Series 1

Hairdresser from Space

Day 7 on the colony, and Mason stirs up an ethical nightmare involving a clone, a murder and some dreadlocks. Meanwhile, Archer the handyman attempts some repairs on his own head.

A sitcom set on a shiny new planet where we ask the question - if humankind were to colonize space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Welcome to the colony. We're aware that having been in deep cryosleep for 73 years, you may be in need of some supplementary information.

Unfortunately, Burrows the leader of the colony has died on the voyage, so his Number 2, Brian (Nicholas Lyndhurst) is now in charge. He's a nice enough chap, but no alpha male, and his desire to sort things out with a nice friendly meeting infuriates the colony's Chief Physician Lillian (Vicki Pepperdine - "Getting On"), who'd really rather everyone was walking round in tight colour-coded tunics and saluting each other. She's also in charge of Project Adam, the plan to conceive and give birth to the first colony-born baby. Unfortunately, the two people hand-picked for this purpose - Carol and Richard - were rather fibbing about being a couple, just to get on the trip.

Add in an entirely unscrupulous Chief Scientist, Mason and also Archer, an idiot maintenance man who believes he's an "empath" rather than a plumber, and you're all set to answer the question - if humankind were to colonize space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Written by Phil Whelans
Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0368kps)
The flower festival raised just over £1500, bringing the total to £4500. That's good but it's still a long way short of the required £30K.

Lynda is delayed so Jill, Kenton and Jazzer discuss the Highland Games. A few teams are planning to enter the tug of war. Jazzer's doing the sheaf toss, and has entered unknowing Ed. The ceilidh is booked for the Friday before. Jill reluctantly breaks the news that absent Lynda has approached a local performance poet, Logan McGregor. Jazzer desperately claims that he's already lined up a clan chief: Dougie.

Despite Kenton's doubts, Jazzer insists that not only does Dougie exist, but he is in fact a drinking buddy. And Jazzer needed to work fast to prevent the fete being spoiled by some latter-day William McGonagal.

Rob reluctantly accepts Brian's decision to let SPJ Personnel find the remaining dairy staff. Brian says it's Rob's job to mould them together as a team.

Emma and Neil proudly show George his own patch of garden. They buy seeds and plant them, and Neil brings one of Eddie's model pigs to decorate it. But Emma's hopes that it will divert George from his devotions founder. George gives thanks to God for the pig and then inveigles Emma into attending church as well!


THU 19:15 Front Row (b0368nzd)
Michael Simkins on acting, A Field in England, Brian Sewell's Cultural Exchange

With Mark Lawson.

A Field In England is the first British film to be simultaneously released in cinemas, on DVD, video on demand and terrestrial television. Directed by Ben Wheatley and starring Reece Shearsmith from The League Of Gentlemen, it's a Civil War drama about a group of soldiers who ingest some magic mushrooms and encounter a mysterious figure who may, or may not, be the devil. Professor Roger Luckhurst decides whether it's a trip worth taking.

With a CV that includes EastEnders, The Iron Lady and West End productions of Mamma Mia! and Yes, Prime Minister, Michael Simkins has a wide range of acting experience. He talks to Mark about his book which offers a practical guide to aspiring actors, including tips on what to do on stage if someone misses their cue and why you should always read the whole script.

Eagle-eyed viewers of the new film Chasing Mavericks might notice that the new surf drama is credited to two directors, because Michael Apted completed the last few weeks of photography when the original director, Curtis Hanson, had to drop out for health reasons. But it isn't the first movie to have two or more directors in the credits, as critic Catherine Bray explains.

Tonight's Cultural Exchange is by the outspoken art critic and historian Brian Sewell - who has chosen a painting by the Spanish artist Diego Velazquez (1599 - 1660) depicting Christ after the Flagellation. Called Christ Contemplated by the Christian Soul, the work is on display at the National Gallery in London.

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


THU 19:45 The Cazalets (b0368kp2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b0368nzg)
Tension in Woolwich

Off-duty soldier Lee Rigby was killed in broad daylight in Woolwich, south-east London, in May. Fears were voiced at the time that the town - which was the scene of riots in the summer of 2011 - could become the site of further violence. Simon Cox goes to Woolwich to find out how its many communities are coping with the tension.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b0368nzj)
Managing in a Crisis

What do you do when it all goes wrong? How to manage corporations in times of crisis is the subject under discussion by Evan Davis and his guests.

Business leaders should expect the ride sometimes to be bumpy - but what is it reasonable to expect? And what is the best way to proceed when the truly unexpected happens?

Guests
Michael Woodford, former chief executive & president, Olympus Corporation
Ann Cairns, President International Markets, Mastercard
Eddie Bensilum, Director, Regester Larkin

Producer : Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b036cx22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b0368knw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b0366kt2)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0368nzl)
With David Eades

24 hours after a military ousted President Morsi of Egypt, we hear from our reporters in Cairo and Alexandria, and examine the future for political Islam.

Tom Watson resigns as Labour's campaign manager, amid recriminations about the selection of a candidate for Falkirk

The biggest animal extermination programme ever mounted

And the latest in Andrew Hoskens' series of reports from Libya.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0368nzn)
The Professor of Truth

Episode 9

Peter Firth reads the powerful new novel by award-winning author James Robertson.

For twenty-one years, Alan Tealing has been a vocal critic of the investigation into the bombing of an airplane in which his wife and daughter were murdered: he believes the wrong man was convicted of the atrocity.

Acting on information he's received from a retired secret service agent, Tealing has travelled to Australia to meet the trial's key witness, Martin Parroulet. Instead of the expected confrontation, however, the men have been caught up in a saving themselves from a huge bush fire that is fast approaching the house.

Read by Peter Firth.

Written and abridged by James Robertson.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 23:00 The Show What You Wrote (b0368nzq)
Series 1

Crime and Thriller

The Show What You Wrote is a brand new sketch show, which is made up entirely from sketches sent in by the public. Recorded in Manchester in front of a live audience, and starring John Thomson, Helen Moon, Fiona Clarke and Gavin Webster.

We've picked the best sketches from thousands of submissions to make each show, and every week we'll be covering a different theme, from sci fi and fantasy, to kitchen sink drama. This week's episode is Crime and Thriller.

Script editor ...... Jon Hunter
Producers ..... Carl Cooper and Alexandra Smith
Written by ..... Jack Bernhardt, James Boughen. Peter Brush, Dominic Burgess, John Dennett, Richard Felber, Andy Fell, Robert Frimston & Edward Rowett, Stephen Holford, Caspian James, Nathan King, Nick Hall, Matt Oakley, John-Luke Roberts, Eddie Robson, Ash Williamson.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0368nzs)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 05 JULY 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0366ktz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b0368kny)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0366kv3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0366kv5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0366kv7)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0366kv9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0368pkw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Roger Hutchings.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0368pky)
TB should be eradicated from England in the next 25 years.That's the aim of DEFRA's new TB Strategy. Scotland has been officially TB free since 2009 and different strategies are being employed in both Wales and Northern Ireland, but ministers are confident that by using a variety of measures in a co-ordinated way they can control the disease in England. TB has spread across cattle herds in the South West and west of the country. The Government says it will continue to spread and could cost taxpayers a billion pounds over the next decade if no action is taken.
The draft strategy which which now goes out to consultation suggests using culling and vaccinating badgers, alongside stricter rules on cattle testing and movement. It plans splitting England into three different TB disease zones and suggests a new partnership, with farmers taking on more of the costs of controlling the disease. Also on Farming Today the government programme to make superfast broadband available to 90 per cent of premises in rural areas of the UK looks likely to be delivered nearly two years later than planned. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Varle.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvryl)
Common Buzzard

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the common buzzard. Common buzzards are stocky birds of prey which often soar on upturned wings. In Scotland they're sometimes called the tourists' eagle because of many golden eagles claimed by hopeful visitors. Common buzzards are increasing their range and numbers and range in the UK and their soaring flight over their territories is now a regular sight nearly everywhere.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0368pl0)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0366xsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b0368pl2)
The Cooked Seed

Episode 5

Still battling to gain the elusive green card, Anchee Min has nevertheless saved enough money to get on the property ladder.

She begins to live the American dream the hard way and, while labouring to keep up with the mortgage payments, she finally finds her voice.

Read by Chipo Chung
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0368pl4)
Royal dresses; Dying your hair; Mindful eating; Older motherhood

A new exhibition of Royal dresses at Kensington Palace. Older motherhood: Is having children in your 40s irresponsible? More of us are dying our hair than ever before: What are the current hair dying trends and how much damage can hair dyes cause? Lucy Cavendish talks about how mindful eating. Presented by Jenni Murray.


FRI 10:45 The Cazalets (b0368pl6)
Casting Off

Episode 5

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
Dramatised by Lin Coghlan

Polly finds an admirer in a new client whilst Clary's relationship with her boss reaches a difficult conclusion.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.
This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.
With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b0368rd8)
Series 13

It's a Bargain

We're all at it - from the very wealthiest amongst us to the very poorest: buying and selling on eBay. And no one knows better than Dave and Gary what's involved in shifting the items traded up and down the country.

The idea was simple: the depression in the building trade left Gary casting round for an alternative occupation. He's quite entrepreneurial and when someone suggested buying a van and cashing in on the eBay boom he decided to do just that, roping his uncle Dave in on what is now a family business.

They operate from a garage on a council estate in Cottingley, on the outskirts of Bradford, but for most of the week they're on the road - picking up and dropping everything from household goods to wool and even ornamental fountains! Their job takes them up and down the country and in just one journey they pick up a bed from the Speaker's wife, Sally Bercow - who has sold it on eBay to someone in the North - and drop off a rusting metal bench from Salford to a new owner in the South who hopes it will net him many thousands of pounds.

This might not be the future they once envisaged: Dave spent thirty years as a metal worker but when he topped 26 stones in weight his knees gave in and he lost his job. He has had gastric surgery and lost a third of his body weight but is sticking with the van driving for the time being. His nephew, Gary, needs him: he has a baby on the way and thinks he's identified an opportunity to make money from our national obsession with bargain hunting.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.


FRI 11:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Open Letters (b00yrfwh)
Series 1

Estate Agents

Through the medium of four open letters, the comedian Tom Wrigglesworth investigates the myriad examples of corporate lunacy and maddening jobsworths in modern Britain.

In this series his subjects range from traffic wardens to estate agents, with Tom recalling his own funny and ridiculous experiences as well as recounting the absurd encounters of others.

Tom asks why we still bother with estate agents.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b0368rdb)
'Step-free' stations, Euro power bills and food bank appeal

Campaigners for accessible transport say Crossrail should push to make its entire service step free; currently five of the 37 stations will not have lifts from street to platform.

We investigate claims that a holiday company promising a boot camp fitness regime in the sun didn't deliver on promises.

The theatre company, preparing to take the stage in Manchester, that has invited audiences to its rehearsals.

As the telegram turns into history we hear about some memorable ones received or sent by our listeners.

How to ensure that your online photos, music and documents stay safe, now and forever.

The travel guide book has been through many changes but how much longer will it be around now that we have apps?

A giant newspaper group is criticised for centralising all its local newspaper photo archives from district and regional offices to a national collection in Watford.

Tesco will be asking its customers to donate food to feed the hungry this weekend but we are not talking developing countries - it'll go to families in the UK.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0366kvc)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b0368rdd)
The row between Ed Miliband and Unite worsens, and the latest from Cairo where supporters of the ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi gather for Friday prayers.


FRI 13:45 Food for Thought (b0368kpd)
Series 3

Helene Darroze

Top chef Helene Darroze tells Nina Myskow about the moment she realized she wanted to devote her life to cooking and food.

Born in the South of France, her family boasted four generations of cooks down her father's side. Taught to cook pastries from the age of 5, Helene looked outside of the family business for her goals and ambitions when she was growing up. Over home-cooked pasta in her small London kitchen, she remembers the epiphany moment that changed the course of her life.

Describing her emotional and instinctive approach to cooking, she explains why some of her signature dishes have a Vietnamese flavour. With restaurants across Europe how does she juggle her demanding schedule with bringing up two adopted daughters as a single Mum? And how did she feel when her rural family restaurant closed for business?

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
A Wise Buddah production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0368kps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01ckpjh)
Rumpole and the Man of God

By John Mortimer
Adapted by Richard Stoneman

The text for this episode of Rumpole is 'we shouldn't drop bombs of information which might cause ruin and havoc.'

It's 1959, and Rumpole is faced with defending a clergyman accused of shoplifting who although he clearly did not commit the crime, is curiously reluctant to be cross examined under oath, where he would have to tell the truth, but save himself from being defrocked.

Meanwhile Rumpole's fellow barrister and friend Frobisher, a confirmed bachelor, announces his engagement to a very merry widow, whom Rumpole seems to remember he has met somewhere before...

And finally, Hilda, she who must be obeyed, drops a bomb of information which will have a profound effect on their marriage.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0368rdj)
Gressenhall, Norfolk

Peter Gibbs chairs BBC Radio 4's horticultural panel programme from Gressenhall in Norfolk, where he is joined by gardening experts Chris Beardshaw, Matthew Wilson and James Wong who field the questions from gardening enthusiasts.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions:
Q. Why is my rhubarb so spindly?!

A. Rhubarb thrives in quite moisture-retentive soil rich in organic matter, often in semi-shade - clay is the ideal soil-type.

Q. Have the panel ever used historic garden archives for their own needs?

A. What is fascinating about past-practices in gardening is how much it has changed over the years. There are methods from the past that make good sense practically as they were developed before the science and technology of gardening was developed.

Q. Is interest in 'grow your own' fading as a result of this year's bad weather? What crops would the panel suggest to spark continued interest?

A. Sow edibles such as Pak Choi, Chrysanthemum Coronarium, Borage and Wasabi - these will fare better in cool conditions than in full sun. Choose your plants and environments carefully in order to build confidence.

Q. Could the panel suggest hardy plants to give a tropical or exotic feel to my garden?

A. Persicaria Polymorpha is recommended, mixed in with Macleaya Cordata. The combination will offer plenty of growth, exuberance and lavish foliage. One of the compact hardy palms, Chamaerops Humilis, could also be added. Also suggested are Thalictrum 'Black Stockings' and Actaea 'Black Negligee'!

Q. A thirty-fifth wedding anniversary is represented by coral and jade. Which plants on this theme would the panel recommend as an anniversary gift for my wife?

A. Clivia, Clianthus and Kolkwitzia Amabilis 'Pink Cloud' are recommended for their coral-coloured flowers. Tiarella 'Coral', Macleaya Cordata 'Coral Plume', Hemerocallis 'Jade Flutters' and the Jade plant (also known as the 'lucky plant' or 'money plant') are suggested. Finally, the Pink Oyster Mushroom looks just like table coral and can be grown easily.

Q. Should I be concerned about the state of my red and white currant leaves, which look blistered?

A. The sample provided looks like it is infected with blister aphid. However, this is a cosmetic problem and will not affect the health of the plant. If the plant is fruiting well, it is not worth treating.

Q. What is the best soil mix to use for growing a Zantedeschia 'Crowborough' in a terracotta pot?

A. Plenty of moisture and nutrition is needed to grow these plants, and in this country, in a pot, this plant would do best in a frost-free glass house. After New Year's Day (or thereabouts), stand the container in a saucer of water, which will encourage the plant into growth. Once the frosts are over, the pot can be placed outside - in dappled shade ideally. Keep it well fed, with a liquid feed or standard hanging basket compost.

Q. Can the panel tell me why it has taken over 50 years for me to become obsessed with gardening?!

A. It gets to all of us eventually - congratulations on resisting for so long!


FRI 15:45 Home Sweet Home (b0368rdl)
The Homes of Others

3/3. Home Sweet Home - The Homes of Others.

What's home to you or I?

Writer and stand-up AL Kennedy asks why she spends so much time away from her own hearth and home, when so much of her life is spent on the road.

It took a year for her to make the recent move from Glasgow to London. This only brought home the recognition of how important it is to have a room of one's own - especially a bathroom of her own.

But when staying with others, and in particular, relying on the generosity of friends, there's the challenge of observing the peculiar bathroom etiquette of others, while being polite to one's hosts. And when she's house-sitting, and those generous friends are away on holiday, there's the issue of lying awake at night in their habitual, well-used beds, everything in their home covered with the patina of their lives, an intrusion too far.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b0368rds)
A computer pioneer, a Hungarian politician, a choral director, an animator and a Native American tribal executive

Douglas Engelbart, pioneer of the Internet and inventor of the computer mouse.

John D Wilson, the animator behind the title sequence of the film 'Grease', whose other credits include The Lady and the Tramp.

The man credited with helping bring down the Iron Curtain, Hungarian politician Gyula Horn. He was the country's last Communist Foreign Minister.

Marjorie Anderson, American Chippewa tribal executive, and the first woman to lead the Mille Lacs tribal band in Minnesota. She was in charge when the band successfully sued to retain hunting and fishing rights that were promised in 19th century treaties.

Richard Marlow, Director of Music at Trinity College, Cambridge, for 40 years. He was a pioneer in bringing women's voices to the fore in cloistered choirs.

Bernie Nolan, lead singer with the Nolans, who went on to act in Brookside and found a new audience in the talent show 'Popstar to Operastar'.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b0368rf0)
Is the BBC impartial? What does impartiality really mean? Questions posed in the latest review by the BBC Trust. The Breadth of Opinion report is part of the Trust's rolling programme of impartiality reviews and looks at how the BBC covers immigration, Europe, and religion - three areas listeners regularly write to Feedback about. We speak to the review's author, Stuart Prebble, to find out whether the BBC is living up to its impartial reputation.

Also, the acting editor of The Archers, Julie Beckett, is back in the Feedback hotseat. Roger Bolton asks her why a major Archers plot revelation was only heard in the new series of Ambridge Extra, which began this week on the digital station Radio 4 Extra. Some Archers devotees are not happy.

Radio comedy is something that regularly leaves audiences unamused. Perhaps that's why Radio 4 commissioned you, the listener, to pen its latest comedy offering The Show What You Wrote on Thursday nights. Roger speaks to two fledgling comedy writers about what it takes to get the nation laughing.

And it's not only comedy that's divisive. Last week, Recycled Radio producer Miles Warde fought off strong listener criticism about his series, which takes well-known voices from the archive, chops them up, and creates something new. But after that edition of Feedback aired, admirers of the series immediately came to its defence.

One Feedback listener - part-time songwriter Dave Summers - liked Recycled Radio so much that he's dedicated one of his songs to everyone who didn't get it. You can hear 'I Heard it on Radio 4' in this week's Feedback and in full below.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b0368rf2)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0366kvf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b0368rf4)
Series 81

Episode 2

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Jason Cook and Hugo Rifkind.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0368rf6)
Elizabeth and David take the Gloucester heifer, Sorrel, to the Borsetshire showground ready for Freddie to show on Sunday. Elizabeth insists on giving her a brush and a spruce up - she needs to look her best.

Josh is nervous as he really wants Freddie to do well. Ruth and David are impressed with how seriously he's taken it. Freddie is feeling confident and can't wait for it to be Sunday. Elizabeth is pleased that Freddie is showing an interest in rare breeds as well as his horses. He takes after Nigel.

After a nervous wait, Pat and Tony are relieved when the TB test on 'Lonely Cow' comes back negative. Tony can now take her to market next week, and there really will be no more cows at Bridge Farm.

Later they reflect on their meeting with the financial advisor. Pat is keen on investing some of the money from the herd sale in a green energy fund but Tony is feeling cautious. Helen wants to invite Rob round for dinner. Pat acquiesces, although she isn't particularly enthusiastic about the idea.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b0368rf8)
Manchester International Festival

With Mark Lawson at the Manchester International Festival.

Film-maker Adam Curtis and the band Massive Attack are the co-creators of the event that launched this year's Manchester International Festival. Adam Curtis discusses his approach to directing a film which works with the live music, to create an experience that he and the band hope will redefine the idea of the gig.

During the 1980s and 1990s, Garry Kasparov dominated the world of chess. His much-publicised match against the IBM computer, Deep Blue, is the inspiration for a new play by Matt Charman, called The Machine. Matt and the play's director Josie Rourke discuss dramatizing a game of chess with only one human player.

At 4am this morning Mark arrived at the Whitworth Gallery for the start of a show which will last about 65 hours. In the Gallery, the performance artist Nikhil Chopra aims to connect his native India with Manchester through a variety of personal and political explorations. Just before sunrise, he reflected on becoming a live artwork, and Mark also returned to the Gallery during the afternoon to find out how the show is progressing.

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


FRI 19:45 The Cazalets (b0368pl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b0368rfb)
Graham Brady, Tim Farron, Emma Reynolds, Paul Nuttall

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Keswick in the Lake District with Liberal Democrat President Tim Farron, Shadow Europe Minister Emma Reynolds MP, Deputy leader of UKIP Paul Nuttall and Leader of the 1922 Committee Graham Brady MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0368rfd)
Gender Matters

At a party to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the feminist press Virago last week, writes Sarah Dunant, the current head of the company told the story of how one night she asked one of Virago's founders why she had started the company. "To change the world of course" was the reply.

Forty years on, Sarah, a Virago author herself, wonders just how much Virago has changed the world.

She talks about how, a few weeks ago, as she waited for an hour in the studio of the Today Programme to be interviewed for a piece about female characters in fiction, she didn't hear a single women's voice.

She tells how last month, the Australian writer and academic, Kathryn Heyman, got into a very public spat with The London Review of Books because of a dearth of women writers in its pages.

And the ousting of Julia Gillard as Australia's Prime Minister last week is the most striking example that Virago's mission is not yet complete.

But Sarah takes some comfort from the fact that Kevin Rudd, the new PM, has an unprecedented six new women in his cabinet.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b01k9lcd)
Menna Gallie - Strike for a Kingdom

By Menna Gallie
Dramatised by Diana Griffiths

It's 1926 and in the small Welsh valleys village of Cilhendre, the miners are on strike. When the local mine's manager is found dead, the murder investigation begins to expose the tensions and secrets of this close knit community.

Paul Rhys stars in a new adaptation of Menna Gallie's classic novel. First published in 1959, Strike for a Kingdom was Menna Gallie's first book. Menna grew up in a small village in the Swansea valley which serves as a template for the fictional Cilhendre. She was six at the time of the miner's strike, though deeply affected by its impact on her community.

Strike for a Kingdom is two things: It's a darkly engrossing murder mystery that keeps you guessing until the end. But it's also a beautifully poetic evocation of a close knit community struggling to survive in a world of extreme poverty.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales production.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b0366kvh)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0368rjb)
Egyptian troops have opened fire on supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi marching in Cairo, Labour will refer Falkirk selection row to police, Spanish corruption and Pope John Paul II is to become a saint, with Roger Hearing.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0368rjd)
The Professor of Truth

Episode 10

Peter Firth reads the conclusion of James Robertson's powerful new novel, inspired by aspects and events surrounding the Lockerbie bombing.

In the quiet aftermath of the bush fire, Alan Tealing finally comprehends the deep truth that lies at the heart of the investigation into the bombing in which his wife and daughter were killed twenty-one years ago.

Read by Peter Firth.

Written and abridged by James Robertson.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b0367smf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0368rjg)
MPs finally get their chance to debate the merits of a referendum on Britain staying in or getting out of the European Union. Mark D'Arcy has the best of a lively and often passionate five-hour debate in the Commons. Also on the programme :
* Keith Macdougall reports on anger in the Lords that peers are not allowed to vote in General Elections.
* Bethany Bell has the latest news on events at the European Parliament in Strasbourg.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b0367smf)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b0367smf)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b02yqh8l)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0368rfd)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b010mrz7)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b02ykg3m)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0367nrw)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0366wn1)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b02yqh8g)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b0368rfb)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0366wnh)

Arthur Smith's Balham Bash 23:00 MON (b0101g5j)

Arthur in the Underworld 11:30 THU (b0368kp6)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b036cx22)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b036cx22)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0366xrt)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0366xrt)

Bleak Expectations 11:30 MON (b01p9l4v)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0367ns3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b0367snz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b0368fxj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b0368nzn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0368rjd)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b02ymgwl)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b0367dzv)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b0367dzv)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b0368gpx)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b0368gpx)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0368h35)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0368h35)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b0368kny)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b0368kny)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b0368pl2)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0366xs6)

Chris Paling - Words and Music 19:45 SUN (b0367c3n)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b02yk9fg)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b0367mxg)

Dangerous Visions 21:00 SAT (b02y0wpp)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0366xsb)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0366xsb)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00vcqld)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b0367slb)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0368fwp)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00y2vgk)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01ckpjh)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0366wml)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0367dzn)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0367p8r)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0368knr)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b036dms2)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0368pky)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b02yqh7f)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b0368rf0)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b02yks7x)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b0367snq)

Food for Thought 13:45 MON (b0367sl8)

Food for Thought 13:45 TUE (b0367j1s)

Food for Thought 13:45 WED (b0368fwm)

Food for Thought 13:45 THU (b0368rdg)

Food for Thought 13:45 FRI (b0368kpd)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b02ykygs)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b0368fx8)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b0366wnc)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b0366wnc)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0366wmx)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b0368kp4)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0367nrr)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0367snn)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0368fx4)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0368nzd)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b0368rf8)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b0368fxd)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b02yqh70)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0368rdj)

Home Sweet Home 15:45 FRI (b0368rdl)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b0367mxq)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b0368knw)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b0368knw)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0367sns)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b0367snv)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b0367snv)

It's My Story 16:00 TUE (b0367slj)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b02ykcwr)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b02yqh78)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b0368rds)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b0368rd8)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0366wn9)

Mabey in the Wild 11:00 WED (b0367sqd)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b02ypklq)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0366klf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0366knh)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0366kpv)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0366kr6)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0366ksm)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0366ktz)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b0367sq6)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b0367sq6)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b0368fwr)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b0366wmz)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0366wmz)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b02ykygq)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b0368fx6)

My First Planet 18:30 THU (b01g62ph)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b02ypkmb)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0366klr)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0366knr)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0366kq3)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0366krj)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0366ksw)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0366kv9)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0366klt)

News Quiz USA 23:00 WED (b0368fxl)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b02ypkmg)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0366kly)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0366km2)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b02ypkpn)

News 13:00 SAT (b02ypknj)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0366xry)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0367c3d)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b0367c3d)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b0368kpj)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0366wn7)

PM 17:00 MON (b0367mxn)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0367smh)

PM 17:00 WED (b0368fwy)

PM 17:00 THU (b0368kpq)

PM 17:00 FRI (b0368rf2)

Paul Temple 11:30 WED (b0368fwf)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0367c3j)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b02yjbww)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0367c3g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b02yr1h9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b0367dzl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0367p8p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b0367spc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0368knp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b0368pkw)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b0366xs2)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0366xs2)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0366xs2)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b02yl46r)

Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities 09:30 TUE (b01kblcn)

Saturday Drama 21:00 FRI (b01k9lcd)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0366wmq)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0366wnf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b02ypkm1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0366klk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0366knm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0366kpz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0366krd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0366ksr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0366kv5)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b02ykrd1)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b0367rwq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b02ypklx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b02ypkm6)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b02ypkp2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0366klh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0366klp)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0366km8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0366knk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0366knp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0366kpx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0366kq1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0366kr9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0366krg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0366ksp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0366kst)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0366kv3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0366kv7)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b0367sld)

Shot in Belfast 16:00 MON (b0367mxj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b02ypkp9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0366kmd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0366kny)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0366kq7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0366krn)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0366kt0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0366kvf)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0366xrw)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0366xrw)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b0367sl2)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0367dzs)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0367dzs)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0366xs4)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0366xs0)

Tales from the Stave 13:30 SUN (b02ykrd3)

Tanning Tales 11:00 MON (b0367j1l)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0366xs8)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0367c3l)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0367c3l)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0367nrp)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0367nrp)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b0367smk)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b0367smk)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0368fx2)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0368fx2)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0368kps)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0368kps)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0368rf6)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b02yl4wn)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b0368nzj)

The Brig Society 18:30 WED (b0368fx0)

The Castle 18:30 TUE (b01jyq99)

The Cazalets 10:45 MON (b0367dzz)

The Cazalets 19:45 MON (b0367dzz)

The Cazalets 10:45 TUE (b0367rwn)

The Cazalets 19:45 TUE (b0367rwn)

The Cazalets 10:45 WED (b0367sqb)

The Cazalets 19:45 WED (b0367sqb)

The Cazalets 10:45 THU (b0368kp2)

The Cazalets 19:45 THU (b0368kp2)

The Cazalets 10:45 FRI (b0368pl6)

The Cazalets 19:45 FRI (b0368pl6)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b02yl46t)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b0368kpl)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0366xsd)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0366xsd)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b0367slg)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b0367mxl)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b0367mxl)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0366xsj)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b0367p8w)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b0367p8w)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b0368fww)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b02yqh7y)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b0368rf4)

The Report 20:00 THU (b0368nzg)

The Show What You Wrote 23:00 THU (b0368nzq)

The Stuarts 14:30 SAT (b0366wn3)

The Stuarts 15:00 SUN (b0367c3b)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0366wmv)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0366xsg)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0367ns0)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0367snx)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0368fxg)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0368nzl)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b0368rjb)

The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b015p86q)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b02ykygb)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0368fwt)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0367p3r)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b0367sp1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b0368fxn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b0368nzs)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b0368rjg)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0366wmn)

Today 06:00 MON (b0367dzq)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0367p8t)

Today 06:00 WED (b0367sph)

Today 06:00 THU (b0368knt)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0368pl0)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Open Letters 11:30 FRI (b00yrfwh)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b020vp4h)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b02tvggm)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b02tt1kv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b02ttqwv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b02tvnnw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b02tvryl)

Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace 20:00 MON (b0367nrt)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b02ypkmm)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b02ypkmw)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b02ypkn8)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b02ypkp5)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0366klw)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0366km0)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0366km4)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0366kmb)

Weather 05:56 MON (b0366knt)

Weather 12:57 MON (b0366knw)

Weather 21:58 MON (b0366kp0)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b0366kq5)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b0366kq9)

Weather 12:57 WED (b0366krl)

Weather 21:58 WED (b0366krq)

Weather 12:57 THU (b0366ksy)

Weather 21:58 THU (b0366kt2)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b0366kvc)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b0366kvh)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0367c3s)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b0367c3v)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0366wn5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0367dzx)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0367rwl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0367sq8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b0368kp0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0368pl4)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0367j1q)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b0367sl6)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0368fwk)

World at One 13:00 THU (b0368kpb)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b0368rdd)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b0367j1n)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b0367sl4)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b0368fwh)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b0368kp8)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b0368rdb)

Zeitgeisters 10:30 SAT (b0366wms)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b02yr1hd)