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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 JUNE 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b02qsb6f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b02x5qpx)
Charles Timoney - An Englishman Aboard

Episode 5

Charles Timoney is an English writer, with a French wife, living in France.

After showing a group of friends the rowing boat he has spent the last six months building, Charles - possibly unwisely - accepts a challenge to travel the entire length of the River Seine from source to the sea, using the boat where he can, to discover the true France.

But it proves rather more difficult than he imagined. Not all of the Seine is navigable by rowing boat, so he sets sail into an unvarnished France on a variety of craft, hitching lifts in everything from a converted Parisian tourist boat to a sailing boat with no mast. He even tries out an amphibious vehicle.

Along the way he encounters Stèphane (a carp fisherman with a very strange habit), grapples with rapids and stubborn cattle, rescues a couple when their sailing dinghy capsizes, and discovers that rowing in the dark is more frightening than he first thought.

Written by Charles Timoney
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Reader: Mark Heap
Producer: Joanna Green

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02qsb6h)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02qsb6k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02qsb6n)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b02qsb6s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02qt7y4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b02qt7y6)
"Since my wife's death I still want a sex life" - iPM hears from an elderly listener who was faithful for 40 years, struggled with his wife's death, but now often pays for sex. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b02qsb71)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b02qsb75)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b02qnk88)
Series 24

In Search of the Old Ways

Clare Balding walks with the celebrated author and academic, Robert Macfarlane who takes her from his home in Cambridge out onto the Icknield Way. For a man known to love mountains, Robert explains how he's slowly come to love the tame lowlands of Cambridgeshire and how he now relies on climbing trees to give him height and views. While Clare is not tempted to join him at the top of an accommodating beech tree, she's happy to admire the graffiti left on the bark.
Walking out in the summer sunshine Robert shares his fascination for the ancient tracks, drove-roads and sea paths that criss-cross the British Countryside.
Producer Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b02x58c2)
Farming Today This Week

We have had the wettest autumn since records began and the coldest spring in 50 years. Now the UK is importing wheat for the first time in 11 years. This follows research from the National Farmers' Union which reveals nearly a third less wheat is being grown in Britain this year. So for Farming Today This Week, Charlotte Smith is at a mixed farm in North Cadbury, Somerset, to investigate the current state of cereal production in the UK and to find out what innovative measures farmers are using to maintain their harvest.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anna Varle.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b02qsb7k)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b02x58c4)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Evan Davis, including:

0750 The Iranian/American journalist Azadeh Moaveni talks about the impending results of the Iranian presidential election.

0810 Richard Murphy, director of Tax Research UK, a campaigner for tax reform and Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander analyse the government's plan for more disclosure on the tax payments of companies and wealthy individuals.

0824 Amongst those being awarded in The Queen's Birthday Honours is bereavement counsellor Sally Derry, she tells us about her experience volunteering for the Solihull Bereavement Counselling Service.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b02x58c6)
Festival director James Runcie and George Benson's Inheritance Tracks

Sian Williams and Richard Coles with festival director and writer James Runcie, a visit to the Birmingham Model Engineering Society, the secret life of Yvette Fielding, The Inheritance Tracks of George Benson, Adrian Laing on growing up with a famous father, psychiatrist R.D. Laing, the award winning wildlife cameraman and photographer Doug Allan on the pleasures of adventure travel and diving with his son Liam and 16 year old scientist Jack Andraka, who's invented a landmark new test for pancreatic cancer.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 Zeitgeisters (b02x58c8)
Series 1

Episode 1

As part of Radio 4's Year of Culture initiative, the BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz meets the cultural entrepreneurs who are shaping our lives and defining the very spirit of our age.

These are not Turner Prize winners or the recipients of grants from the Arts Council or the Lottery Fund. These are the people behind the scenes, pulling the strings and plotting a path of consumer-driven success. They are the designers of the latest 'must have' piece of technology or clothing, the brains behind an artist's development, and the tastemakers that know what will work at the box office and what will sell on the high street. Their impact goes beyond mere commerce, it shapes contemporary culture. They are the Zietgeisters and it's about time we met them.

Over the next four weeks he'll be talking with the visionary masterminds plotting a future for education, music and television. But the first Zeitgeister is the founding editor of Vogue China, Angelica Cheung... the woman who not only wants to change the meaning of Made in China, but also change China itself. She's been called the most powerful woman in fashion today and the gate-keeper of the growth hotspot of the world - the market where consumer demand is unlimited.

For Angelica Cheung, fashion is not frippery. It's important - as a global business worth billions, and as a platform for freedom of expression. It allows individuals to be individual - it's political.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b02x58cd)
Tom Newton Dunn of The Sun hears a former spymaster call for more powers of surveillance for the secret services. A Labour MP says her phone has been tapped. And why the MP who knows President Assad wants to arm the Syrian rebels.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b02x58cg)
A Demo a Day

A passion for protest. Street demonstrations, rarely permitted in the days of President Mubarak, have become common in Cairo and Egypt's other cities; Aleem Maqbool sets out to see if he can find a demo a day. Phil Goodwin on how war has changed Syria from a hospitable, friendly place into one that's brutal, paranoid and vicious. A meeting critical to the future of Detroit - Jonny Dymond on a great American city poised on the edge of bankruptcy. Peter Meanwell meets cross-dressing musicians in Equatorial Guinea and tucks into crocodile in chocolate sauce. And a snake guarding a pot of gold? Jane Dyson says it's one of the less alarming ghosts many believe reside in the forests of the Himalayas.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b02x58cj)
PROMISES, PROMISES
P & O is accused of failing to keep a 'price promise' made to encourage customers to book in advance. Buy now and if the price comes down we'll refund the difference, it says. So why did two Money Box listeners find themselves in cabins next to other passengers who had paid half the price but still could not get a refund? Paul talks to Simon Calder, Travel Editor of the Independent

PENSIONS BILL
Women who are a year or so too old to get the new single-tier state pension that is due to begin in April 2016 say they are being discriminated against because men of the same age will get it. We'll hear from one of those affected, Cathe Rikby, with her solution to the problem. We'll find out why another group - married women, widows and divorcées - will get less from the flat-rate pension. And why half a million pensioners who live abroad want MPs to reject Clause 20 of the Pensions Bill when it comes before Parliament on Monday. Paul talks to John Markham and Sally West from Age UK

COMPARISON WEBSITES
Are comparison websites now fixing prices rather than just reporting them? Insurance sites in particular like to guarantee the best prices. But many of them do not cover the whole market. And they impose conditions on the insurers they allow onto their sites which can lead to a lack of competition rather than more of it. That's the accusation. Oh, and did you know that many comparison websites are owned by one of the insurance firms whose products they list? Money Box hears from Kevin Paterson, Managing Director of Source Insurance, Chris Walters, OFT's Chief Economist and Sarah Pennells, Founder and Editor of savvywoman.co.uk

RATES CUT
National Savings & Investments is cutting the rates on three of its most popular savings products after discovering, to its horror, that they are at the top of best buy tables or close to it. Retail Director John Prout explains why he doesn't want to be top of the table as his cash ISA falls down below the top 20. And we find out just where the best rates on savings can be found with Damien Fahy, Editor of moneytothemasses.com.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b02qt7wd)
Series 40

Episode 5

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Jon Holmes, Marcus Brigstocke, Mitch Benn and Pippa Evans for a comic romp through the week's news. Producer: Colin Anderson.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b02qsb7z)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b02qsb84)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b02qt7wl)
Don Foster, Mary Creagh, Daniel Hannan, Mehdi Hasan

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Great Yarmouth Racecourse in Norfolk with Daniel Hannan MEP, commentator Mehdi Hasan, Communities and Local Government Minister Don Foster MP and Shadow Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Mary Creagh MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b02x58cl)
A chance for Radio 4 listeners to have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions. Today, should the UK become more involved in the Syrian crisis? Is your local authority facing financial collapse due to government spending cuts? Will changes to GCSEs help raise standards or damage learning? And will Prince Charles' meadow policy be enough to reverse a decline in wildlife? Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet using #bbcaq.
The producer is Katy Takatsuki.


SAT 14:30 Dangerous Visions (b02v25nw)
Michael Symmons Roberts - The Sleeper

A fable for our times. A future British society as it is today - except human beings have gradually lost the gift of sleep.

Michael Symmons Roberts' verse drama with music composed by Stephen Deazley adapted to create a soundtrack mixing speech, poetry and chorus.

Society is strained to breaking point by 24-hour wakefulness. The government has cracked down on subversive images of sleep. People work around the clock. Hotels are for private meetings and illicit sex. Shops never close.

Into this paranoid world, a teenage girl emerges, a girl who can sleep. Protected by her friends, she goes on the run from the authorities who are keen to control and study her gift. The group ends up living in a city centre squat, surviving as a group by shoplifting and begging.

The group grows increasingly anxious and fractious, with Ellah (the sleeper)'s boyfriend Jamie lapsing into cultish beliefs in the 'old gods', in which lullabies are chanted as prayers, worshipping sleep. Some of the other group members join in these rituals. Keller, the level-headed natural leader of the group, is struggling to keep the peace.

Hungry, scared and sick of being pursued, the group receives an offer of help from a wealthy man - known by the nickname Hypnos - who says he will protect them. But what does he want in return?

Stars Matthew Beard as Keller, Sarah Churm as Ella, Henry Devas as Jamie, Rachel Austin as Sara, Jason Done as Davis, Maxine Peake as Harper, Danielle Henry as Somnus and Kevin Doyle as Hypnos.

With music created from the original WNO Youth commission by the composer Stephen Deazley, and performed by members of the Welsh National Opera Orchestra and Youth Opera

Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


SAT 15:30 Tales from the Stave (b02mxyy1)
Series 9

Appalachian Spring

Frances Fyfield is back with a new series of Tales from the Stave which begins in the Library of Congress in Washington DC. The manuscript being examined is Aaron Copland's "Appalachian Spring" - written for the Martha Graham Dance company during the Second World War. The Ballet was first performed in the Library itself, and joining Frances is the current Martha Graham Company director of music Aaron Sherber, the former dancer and now Director of the Martha Graham center of Contemporary Dance Janet Eilber and the Library of Congress librarian Loras Schissel.
As well as Copland's beautifully presented pencil-written sketches and score, including the famous shaker tune 'A gift to be simple' there are also the letters written to Copland by Martha Graham in which she outlined her initial ideas about a ballet that has become an American classic. And while charting a close partnership between choreographer and composer, the score also reveals performance secrets such as the changes made to incorporate the desires of a guest performer - Rudolf Nureyev.

Producer: Tom Alban.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b02x5b4f)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Debbie Harry; Censoring the internet; Kanya King

Debbie Harry on Blondie, style and still touring 30 years on. Sonali Deraniyagala on the 2004 tsunami that killed her children, husband and parents. Women, sex and infidelity in Shakespeare's Othello. Stress at work and breast cancer - does evidence of a reported link stack up? Regulating harmful content on the internet - how far should we censor what's available? Index on Censorship has reservations. Health minister Anna Soubry on her comments about part-time GPs. Power Lister Kanya King on creating the MOBOs and becoming a single mum at 16.

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Shoku Amirani.
Editor: Anne Peacock.


SAT 17:00 PM (b02x5b4h)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b02qr6wl)
Travel

Travel companies have recently had to weather the storms of recession for their customers and major upheaval at popular holiday destinations around the world.

Evan Davis finds out how airlines and tour companies plan for their seasonal business in light of economic crisis in Greece and political unrest in Egypt and North Africa - getting it wrong could lead to financial disaster. And guests will discuss the future for Greece, where tourism is seen as the biggest hope for reviving the economy.

Guests:
Peter Long, CEO TUI Travel
Carolyn McCall, CEO Easyjet
Andreas Andreadis, CEO SANI Resort

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b02qsb8v)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b02qsb91)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02qsb99)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b02x5b6s)
Julie Felix, Ben Fogle, Hari Dhillon, Ned Boulting, Robin Ince, Sarah Gillespie

Heaven is Here, in the form of 'Britain's First Lady of Folk', singer- songwriter and peace protester Julie Felix, who was resident singer on 'The Frost Report', hosted her own show 'Once More With Felix' and has toured worldwide for over fifty years. Julie talks to Clive about her 75th birthday. 'Life is the Song' is at Leicester Square Theatre, London on Saturday 15th June. Julie also performs 'Tiger Eyes'.

Clive drops the anchor with intrepid adventurer and original 'Castaway' Ben Fogle, whose new ITV series focuses on Dorset. Home to one of Britain's most dramatic coastlines with its craggy cliffs and miles of stunning sandy beaches, Ben explores the millionaires' playground of Sandbanks and the trawlers in the harbour, to find out what makes it unique. The second episode of 'Harbour Lives' is on Friday 21st June at 20.00.

Robin Ince saddles up with sports journalist and cycling nut Ned Boulting, whose new book 'On the Road Bike: The Search For a Nation's Cycling Soul' asks how Britain became so obsessed with cycling. His search puts him in contact with some of the wonderful and wonderfully idiosyncratic people who have contributed to this nation's two-wheeled history.

Clive talks to actor Hari Dhillon. Well known for playing Michael Spence in Holby City, Hari's currently starring as corporate lawyer Amir Kapoor, who is happy, in love and about to land a promotion.. Amir and his wife host a dinner party and what starts out as a friendly conversation soon escalates into something far more damaging. 'Disgraced' is at London's Bush Theatre until Saturday 22nd June.

And a second serving of folk from the glorious Sarah Gillespie, who performs 'Signal Failure' from her album 'Glory Days'.

Producer: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b02x5c9v)
Series 14

Nothing to Fear

Is there a spy in your laptop? Edson Burton's thriller explores how national security agencies and terrorists might exploit an information system like Prism.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b02x5c9x)
The Amen Corner and The White Queen

The Amen Corner starring Marianne Jean-Baptiste has been lifting the roof off the National Theatre according to early audiences, thanks partly to the participation of the London Community Gospel Choir. An early James Baldwin play, Rufus Norris' production looks at the lives of men and women trapped in poverty and lack of opportunity, and extracts powerful drama from it.

Joss Whedon had a week off at the end of shooting The Avengers - rather than have a break, he made another film with a group of friends. The result is Much Ado About Nothing - does its sparky charm capture the flavour of classic romantic comedies, as the director hopes?

Neil Gaiman has a huge international following and is well known to the Radio 4 audience thanks to the recent dramatisation of Neverwhere. Now he has a new adult novel out, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which he says is a story of childhood, memory, magic and the power of stories.

The Hayward Gallery in London is offering an Alternative Guide to the Universe - an art exhibition featuring work envisaging other worlds and extraordinary takes on this one - much of it created by untrained artists.

And the colourful history of the Plantagenets comes to television as Philippa Gregory's The White Queen begins on BBC1. Starring Rebecca Ferguson and Max Irons, will the screen version capture the drama of the real life events?

The writers Gillian Slovo, Dreda Say Mitchell and Kamila Shamsie join Tom Sutcliffe.

Producer Sarah Johnson.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b02x5c9z)
Very British Dystopias

Beneath the calm surface of British politics, lurking in the imaginations of some of our leading writers, terrible things have happened. Professor Steven Fielding examines these dystopian visions which have gripped creative and public imaginations in novels and dramas since the end of the second world war.

British democracy has come under threat time and again in fictions from 1984 to V for Vendetta, by way of Dr Who, The Prisoner, A Very British Coup, Edge of Darkness and others.

Britons have been oppressed by authoritarian governments, suffered alien subjugation, been threatened by extremist nationalists in Scotland, endured American-backed coups and faced Soviet attempts to install a Marxist-Leninist Prime Minister. The intelligence services have gone from hero to zero and back again, while more recently elected politicians themselves have threatened democracy.

Some of these stories have left a lasting legacy on our politics: references to 1984 have become part of our culture, and the iconic Guy Fawkes mask from the film V for Vendetta is worn as a symbol of resistance by protestors around the world. But why? And wherein lies the appeal of these visions of politics gone bad? Steven Fielding asks what the authors intended, and whether these visions make a useful contribution to the political process.

He shows how these imagined futures were rooted in the real concerns of times in which they were imagined. And at a time when the politics of Westminster is seen as increasingly irrelevant by many people, he asks what can dystopian visions achieve now?

Interviewees include authors Douglas Hurd, Chris Mullin, Frederick Forsyth and David Hare.

Steven Fielding is Professor of Political History at the University of Nottingham.

The producer is Jane Ashley.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b02lwc5t)
The Radetzky March

Episode 2

Carl Joseph has been posted to a remote outpost of the Austro-Hungarian near the Russian border where his life, and the life of the Empire, is about to take a turn for the worse.

Conclusion of Joseph Roth's most celebrated novel about the ending of things: love affairs, friendships, individual lives, dynasties, an empire, a world.

Joseph Roth ...... Henry Goodman
Carl Joseph ...... Paul Ready
Franz Von Trotta ...... Sam Dale
Chojnicki ...... David Schofield
Zoglauer ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Emperor Franz ...... JosephJohn Rowe
Valli ...... Joannah Tincey
Onufrij ...... Ben Crowe
Brodnitzer ...... Chris Pavlo
Wagner ...... David Seddon
Hirschwitz ...... Philippa Stanton
Skowronneck ...... Robert Blythe
Sgt Slama ...... Paul Stonehouse

Dramatised by Gregory Evans.

Piano and Trumpet played by Peter Ringrose

Director: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2013.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b02qsb9l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b02qm2s1)
Spying and Surveillance

Clive Anderson and guests explore the extent to which the law protects our right to privacy in the face of increasing use of covert surveillance by MI5, police, local authorities and other public bodies and commercial organisations.

Clive's guests, all with wide knowledge of the world of spying and surveillance, warn that the threat to our privacy comes not just from Big Brother, but also from Little Brother and Big Brother PLC. And they argue that the law controlling surveillance is largely inadequate and widely misinterpreted.

Barrister Eric Metcalfe says a very wide range of bodies have the power to spy on us - from intercepting telephone calls, emails or letters, to carrying out covert surveillance in private premises and public places or accessing electronic data and private passwords. Some of these powers are utilised by local authorities to combat such crimes as allowing pets to foul footpaths, fly-tipping and breaches of the smoking ban.

Eric Metcalfe says only a tiny percentage of the millions of applications made for surveillance warrants in the past ten years have been subject to any kind of judicial oversight.

The programme also considers the possible revival of Government's proposals for what has been condemned as a "snoopers' charter" - legislation which would make it possible to track everyone's email, internet and mobile text use.

Produced by Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b02m7g03)
Series 27

Episode 6

(6/13)

Do you know which hit comedy film of the 1980s featured the theme tune 'Axel F'? And in Berlioz's opera based on Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, which two characters are named in the title?

Paul Gambaccini is in the chair for the latest heat of the music quiz Counterpoint, this week coming from Media City in Salford and featuring competitors from Glasgow, Chester and Malvern in Worcestershire.

One of them will win a place in the semi-finals later in the summer, and may be in with a real chance of becoming the 27th Counterpoint champion.

There's music to suit all tastes, and plenty of surprising facts and anecdotes.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b02lyb06)
Roger McGough encounters a mango for the first time, meets the Queen of Sheba and hears how spoken word artist Steven Duncan is inspired by his grandma's wise words.

Listeners have requested a poem from his play 'The Mother' that got Bertolt Brecht into hot water with the House Committee on Un-American Activities, and another by the champion of Jamaican patois, Louise Bennett-Coverley 'Colonization in Reverse'.

With readers Alex Lanipekun, Hannah Wood and Nadia Williams.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.



SUNDAY 16 JUNE 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b02x52fn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b010mv4r)
Malachi Whitaker - The Crystal Fountain

Landlord of the Crystal Fountain

Martin Jarvis directs Imelda Staunton in Malachi Whitaker's moving story, written in the 1930s. Attractive red-headed teacher, Brenda Millgate, meets five jolly men on a train from King's Cross going north. What happens to her on the journey is a life-changing experience. They're very friendly and helpful. All northerners. Where have they been? Who are they? Eventually it's revealed that they're all landlords.

Brenda, unhappy in London away from her northern roots, is beguiled by their talk, their humour and their courtesy. Then one of them says something which changes her whole life.

Malachi Whitaker was a prolific writer in the 1920s and '30s, writing with great perception and care about ordinary folk, invariably setting the stories in her native Yorkshire. She became known as 'the Chekhov of the north' because of her sympathetic observation of the minutiae of human beings and their (often comic and surprising) behaviour.

Imelda Staunton biography: Oscar nominated and Bafta award-winning for her title role performance in 'Vera Drake'. She has had a long and distinguished career in the theatre, RNT and West End, performing A Man for all Seasons, Mack & Mabel, Side by Side, and Elektra. Also BBC TV Series: Cranford.

Producer/Director: Martin Jarvis
A Jarvis & Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02x52fq)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02x52fs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02x52fv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b02x52fx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b02x5g0y)
The bells of St. Eadburgha's Church, Ebrington, Gloucestershire.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b02qm2s7)
Series 4

Dick Moore

Dick Moore calls for urgent action to tackle the problems of adolescent mental health. Driven by personal experience, he sees a growing need for society to provide young people with more emotional support.
Four Thought is a series of talks which combine new ideas and personal stories. Speakers explain their latest thinking on the trends and ideas in culture and society in front of a live audience.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b02x52fz)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b02x5g10)
Holding Hands

John McCarthy reflects on the significance of holding hands as an act of trust, commitment, unity and love between fellow human beings.

John interviews retired academic physician Professor Tony Pinching who had major involvement with HIV/AIDS and CFS/ME patients. Tony talks about the significance of the first handshake when a doctor meets a patient for the first time, and also about the special place holding hands can have at the end of a patient's life.

Ambassador Mart Tarmak describes the peaceful protest of 1989, which became known as the Baltic Way, when around two million people joined hands to form a human chain spanning 600 kilometres across the Baltic States of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. As the people held hands, they sang. These countries were granted their independence from the Soviet Union shortly afterwards.

The programme includes readings of poetry by Sarah Kay and Adrian Mitchell, and Sharon Olds' poem True Love. There's music from Stream of Sound, Ray Charles and Nina Simone, and John Martyn sings May you Never.

Readers: Rachel Atkins and George Irving

Produced by Rosie Boulton
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b02x5g12)
The Blant family have lived and breathed pig farming for 43 years, but after making a loss of £55,000 last year they have decided to leave the industry. Charlotte Smith meets them as the last pigs leave and silence descends over their Nottinghamshire farm. Their decision reflects the continuing contraction in UK pig farming, over the last 15 years the UK breeding herd has halved. Richard and Julia Blant share how pig farming has shaped their lives, and their son Simon tells Charlotte about his future business plans.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Sarah Swadling.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b02x52g1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b02x52g3)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b02x5g14)
G8 summit; Bishops on museum cuts; Huddleston show

On the programme this weekend

As the Archbishop of York John Sentamu attacks the proposed closure of one of three museums in the north of England, we examine whether our cultural institutions should be protected on moral, as well as economic and political grounds. Kevin Boquet reports from Bradford, the home of the national Media museum which is one of the three under threat.

A group of Muslims say they want to open up mosques to everyone regardless of their gender or sexual orientation. The Inclusive Mosque Initiative (IMI) says it would allow men and women to pray side-by-side and openly welcome the gay community. We examine the theological arguments with Tamsila Tauqir of the Inclusive Mosque Initiative and Khola Hassan, Islamic Law Consultant and member of the Islamic Sharia Council.

Kati Whitaker previews a photographic exhibition opening this weekend to mark the centenary of the late Father Trevor Huddleston, an Anglican bishop famous for his anti apartheid activism.

As the G8 summit opens in Enniskillen this weekend we examine what can realistically be done to alleviate poverty with Oliver Morrissey, Professor of Development Economics and Sudarshan Sathianathan from the aid agency Tearfund.

Mourners who scatter the ashes of loved ones are being asked to be more considerate in the Lake District after complaints about urns , boxes and ashes littering the landscape. What's the attraction of scattering ashes and do we think its disrespectful? Professor Douglas Davies discusses with Edward.

And we find out about the women at Jerusalem's wailing wall who have won their battle to pray there on equal terms as men.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b02x5g16)
The Prison Phoenix Trust

Erwin James, a former prisoner, presents the Radio 4 Appeal for The Prison Phoenix Trust
Reg Charity:327907
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope The Prison Phoenix Trust.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b02x52g5)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b02x52g7)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b02x5g18)
On the eve of the G8 Summit in County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland, Sunday Worship comes from St Macartin's Cathedral, Enniskillen. Led by the Very Rev Kenneth Hall, Dean of Clogher. Preacher: The Right Rev John McDowell, Bishop of Clogher.

1 Kings 21:1-10, 15-21; Luke 7:36-8.3

Organist: Glenn Moore
Conductor: Jayne Haslett.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b02qt7wq)
Fly, Fish, Mouse and Worm

"When I was a child, one of my favourite books was Bear, Mouse and Water Beetle," says Tom Shakespeare. "Today, I want to tell you a contemporary story, which you could call Fly, Fish, Mouse and Worm."

These 'model animals' help scientists to understand the basic processes common to all living creatures. But while model animals epitomize the success of the scientific strategy of reductionism, they may also illustrate the downside.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp7c)
Barn Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Barn Owl. Barn owls are mainly nocturnal hunters. They are ghostly creatures, with rounded wings and a large head which acts as a reflector funnelling the slightest sound from their prey towards their large ear openings.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b02x5gky)
Sunday morning magazine programme.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b02x5gl0)
For detailed synopses, please see daily episodes

Writer ..... Nawal Gadalla
Director ..... Vanessa Whitburn & Dawn Coulson
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn
Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Josh Archer ..... Cian Cheesbrough
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Christine Barford ..... Lesley Saweard
Jolene Perks ..... Buffy Davis
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Nic Grundy ..... Becky Wright
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Phoebe Aldridge ..... Lucy Morris
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Darrell Makepeace ..... Dan Hagley
Elona Makepeace ..... Eri Shuka
Rob Titchener ..... Timothy Watson
Grace Morgan ..... Jenny Johns.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b02x5j67)
Alexandra Shulman

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the editor of British Vogue, Alexandra Shulman.

In spite of being in charge of one of our leading 'style bibles' for more than 20 years, her reputation is that of someone rather down to earth. She thinks designers cut clothes too small, refuses to let superstars have photo and copy approval and when she was first appointed editor, she'd never even been on a fashion shoot. During her tenure Vogue's circulation has increased.

Her first job as editor was with the men's magazine GQ and she's had spells at Tatler, the Sunday Telegraph and writing a weekly column for the Daily Mail.

She says, "Vogue is not my personal taste, really. I think of it more as a kind of newspaper, reporting on what's out there."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b02mfzq3)
Series 66

Episode 4

Nicholas Parsons hosts the vocabularious panel show from the BBC Radio Theatre with panellists; Graham Norton, Kevin Eldon, Pam Ayres and Paul Merton.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b02x5j69)
The chocolate world of Mott Green

The story of Mott Green, cocoa farmer and chocolate maker, who was changing the industry one bar at a time.

Born in New York, this gifted engineer and mathematician left Manhattan in his twenties to explore the Caribbean. He ended up in Grenada, fell in love with cocoa and with a local drink, "cocoa tea".

Despite this chocolate tradition and Grenada having some of the finest cocoa trees in the world, farmers were leaving the land and abandoning their crop because of low prices. Mott Green took it upon himself to change that.

By using hand built machines and creating a co-operative, Mott managed to build a chocolate factory in a tropical climate, the first time this had been done. Sales of his quality bars grew and cocoa farming on the island once again became profitable.

His success was documented in a film, Nothing Like Chocolate, and he was celebrated in Grenada as someone who had not only made a big impact on the island's economy but also changed thinking about chocolate around the world.

Tragically, shortly after the Food Programme recorded with Mott Green he was killed in an accident as he was repairing some equipment. The programme follows him through the chocolate making process and as he embarked on a three month voyage transporting his bars across the Atlantic using only wind and solar power.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b02x52g9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b02x5j6f)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Foot Notes (b01rgm9s)
Writer, journalist and passionate shoe collector Rowan Pelling takes us on a journey through her personal shoe collection to tell us the extraordinary story that lies behind footwear.

She discovers that, far from being simple functional objects that we put on our feet, shoes can communicate our sexual desire, aesthetic sense, social status and personality. They not only reflect social history and changing fashions, but are also a personal record of our lives - a touchstone that evokes a time, a place and an emotion.

In language and throughout literature, they can be magical as in The Red Shoes, transform lives as in Cinderella, and used as punishment in the Twelve Dancing Princesses.

Shoes have been made from jewels, can cost thousands and are often bought in the wrong size - just because we love them.

Fancy shoes, comfy shoes, old shoes, new shoes - they can change an attitude and define a generation and mean something different to us all.

Presenter: Rowan Pelling
Producer: Angela Hind

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b02qt7w0)
Penicuik

Chaired by Eric Robson, the GQT team is in Penicuik for this week's episode of Gardeners' Question Time. Taking the audience's questions are panelists Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank, along with guest panelist Carole Baxter.

Produced by Victoria Shepherd
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

For more information on The Lost Garden of Penicuik visit: www.lostgarden.co.uk

Q. What is the best way to store seed and how long should you keep bags of compost?
A. When storing seeds they need to be kept away from air, damp, heat and frost so it is best to use a sealed container for example a jam jar or a paper envelope and store in a shaded, frost free location. Fresh compost is usually best. If you keep compost for a long time changing weather conditions can affect the fertility however you can still find uses for it, such as topping up containers and beds towards the end of the year.

Q. What can I do to help celery grow in a cold and wet climate?
A. Celery is usually planted at the beginning of the year under cover. It needs to be sheltered from the wind, have continual moisture and very rich conditions and it must be protected from frost. A good idea is to put a box around it and fill it with sharp sand or leaf mould, which should keep it protected from frost. Another method would be to create a raised hot bed. Dig but some of the soil and put some well rotted horse manure in the bed followed by the soil on top, then plant the celery and place a fleece on top, this will induce some heat and keep some moisture off, helping the celery grow.

Q. How would you deal with impacted clay soil, whilst avoiding too much physical labour?
A. Clay is very rich and has a lot of nutrition but it is very hard to work with. One method of planting would be to put a layer of mulch on top and then plant through the mulch and let the roots break through the clay. The plants can then also use the nutrition of the clay. Also you could use some woven ground cover (geotextile), covering the area, after a year remove the cover and the ground should be suitable for planting.

Q. What do you think of the concept of perennial vegetables and would you be able to recommend any?
A. Asparagus, Sea Kale, a cross between cabbage and asparagus, and "Good King Henry" are all great and delicious options and all grow year after year with very little work needed. Asparagus can only be harvested for about eight weeks, let the rest of the spears grow and they can then go back into the ground to build up for the following year's crop. Kale is a hardy, flavoursome plant and should ideally be sown in spring, planted out in June and ready for cropping in the winter. Finally, Chinese artichoke has a lovely flavour; usually cropped in October it can be planted in the ground but is best undercover.

Q. My Prunus Aviums are showing signs of stress with poor growth and little to no flowering. My garden is at 800ft (240m) and exposed could this problem be due to climatic influences?
A. A possible diagnosis is a fungal disease called Blossom End Wilt. If this were the case the answer would be to cut out the diseased and damaged parts. A lack of magnesium in the soil could cause nutrient deficiency and therefore feeding them with a well-balanced feed or perhaps a seaweed spray with a lot of trace elements in them could help. Additionally, the stone fruit family do need a higher level of lime in the soil to grow so adding lime to the soil may help.

Q. What is the best way to grow and harvest an Angelica plant?
A. Avoid disturbing the soil around it and let some seed fall to the ground because it is very good at seeding itself if left undisturbed. Also collect some seed and sow it into a pan and leave it in the Greenhouse. For cooking, collect the stems before they flower, peel and boil in sugar syrup, let them sit in the syrup and then drain, for a great flavour repeat the boiling process over several days.

Q. My husband urinates in our garden; as a result the grass grows very healthily while the weeds seem to die. What elements in urine could cause this?
A. The grass family are all very responsive to nitrogen and are all able to cope with higher levels of nitrogen than most other plants, therefore it is likely the weeds do not like the heavy levels of nitrogen. Growth hormones such as indoleacetic acid and other auxins are in urine so it does have an effect on plants.


SUN 14:45 Dangerous Visionaries (b02xgngc)
As Radio 4 begins its new season of Dystopic Dramas, Dangerous Visions, the playwright and poet Michael Symmons Roberts wonders how close the gap between imagining and living in dystopia actually is.

Producer: Mark Burman.


SUN 15:00 Dangerous Visions (b02x5j6k)
The Drowned World

As part of Radio 4's Dangerous Visions season, Graham White's adaptation shows a future in which the earth's atmosphere is destroyed. As a scientific mission surveys England's drowned capitals before their final abandonment, two lovers find themselves reverting to a primitive state of consciousness.

In a future in which solar flares have wreaked havoc with the earth's atmosphere, Dr Robert Kerans is part of a scientific mission to survey the drowned cities of what was once the temperate zone before they are abandoned for good.

The de-evolution that the ecological crisis has provoked seems to have affected the expedition's crew. Kerans, alongside his enigmatic lover Beatrice, whom he is trying to persuade to leave, attempts to make sense of the disappearance of a crew member who has succumbed to the lure of the emerging new water world.

Kerans and Beatrice also start to embrace the breakdown they see around them, until an encounter with the maverick scavenger Strangman and his piratical crew forces them to face what de-evolution may really mean, as he drains the drowned city in search of the powers of civilization it may once have held. Ballard's vivid futurescape imagines the surreal results of Darwin's theories going into reverse.

Dangerous Visions - you will be disturbed as you see the present reflected in the glass
of an uneasy future.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b02x5l4g)
Louise Doughty on Apple Tree Yard; a new pan-African prize for novelists

Louise Doughty talks to Mariella Frostrup about her psychological thriller Apple Tree Yard. When a successful fifty-two year old scientist has her first and only affair, she discovers the consequences of the decisions we make.

A geographical melting pot of nations, the Balkans have a long and turbulent history; the area was a flash pot for rising nationalism at the beginning of the 20th century, the location for the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand that triggered the First World War and in the 1990's the former Yugoslavia was the setting for one of the bloodiest civil wars in European history. Fiona Sampson and Vesna Goldsworthy discuss how such a complicated past has informed the literature of the present and how writers from the region have continued to respond to challenging and changing times.

Ellah Allfrey discusses the launch of The Etisalat prize for literature. Open to debut novelists who hold an African passport, it has been set up to recognise writers and the publishing industry across the African Continent.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b02x5l4j)
Roger McGough presents poems to make you glad to be awake, alive and not in prison.

Listeners requests include the moving and uplifting poem 'Things I didn't know i Loved' by Nazim Hikmet; 'The Land of Mists' by the South Korean poet Kim Kwang-kyu; and an extraordinary poem contemplating the kind of miracle Polish poet Piotr Kniecicki would wish for if he could: 'Not Quite Convinced.'

There are also two poems by A E Housman and Slam Poetry champion Hollie McNish performs 'British National Breakfast'.

Roger is joined by readers Alex Lanipekun and Mark Meadows.
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b02q78p4)
Grooming: A Life Sentence?

In the latest high profile grooming trial, 7 men from Oxford will be sentenced later this month for sexually exploiting and raping 6 schoolgirls. Police said the girls - some as young as 12 - were 'abused to the point of torture' for years. One girl was injected with heroin. Another was forced to have a backstreet abortion.

The police praised the young women for finding the strength to give evidence against the gang and protect other girls.

But, after the legal process ends, what support is there for victims?

After a string of such abuse cases around the country, Jane Deith finds there are many young women who say they've been let down by the authorities and are struggling, alone, with mental health problems and difficulties with education and housing.

More victims of grooming are being rescued. But does being sexually exploited as a child mean a life sentence?

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Sally Chesworth.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b02x5c9v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b02xgs36)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b02x52gf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02x52gh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b02x5l4l)
Pick of the week crosses continents to hear about potting sheds, prisons, and two prostitutes in Amsterdam who recently retired in their seventies. We also join a ceilidh on the ferry to the island of Yell in the Shetlands and play you another tune which you'll have trouble getting out of your head... presented by Martin Wainwright.

Programmes chosen this week:

The Archers - Monday 10 June - at 2 pm - Radio 4
Today - Michael Buchanan feature - Monday 10 June - Radio 4
Start the Week - Radio 4
Today - Max Hastings interview - Monday 10 June - Radio 4
1913 - The Year Before - Radio 4
Book At Bedtime - A Commonplace Killing - Radio 4
London's Oldest Prison - Radio 4
The Truth About Mental Health - Solitary - World Service
The Potting Shed - Dartmoor Diary - Radio Devon
Oblique Strategies - Radio 4
Zeitgeisters - Radio 4
Saturday Drama - The Sleeper - Radio 4
Outlook - Fokken sisters interview - World Service
World Routes - Shetland Folk Festival - Radio 3

Producer: Louise Clarke.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b02x5l4n)
It's Ruth's birthday and Father's Day so Pip is cooking lunch as a treat. Josh is busy selling eggs at the Farmers' Market but phones home. He wants to check they both got his gifts.

David and Pip view a car for her that ticks all the boxes. If they can knock the dealer down a bit it could be a goer. Ruth is pleased to hear they have found a car, providing all the checks come back ok.

Josh returns home triumphantly having sold all the eggs. He and Phoebe plan to meet on Thursday to discuss further business plans.

Jazzer wangles himself an invitation to lunch with the Grundys, explaining he has more intelligence on Christine's flower design. He improvises a lurid design for Christine's arrangement including sparkly material, ribbons and flashing lights for a halo. Clarrie thinks Christine is losing her touch.

Clarrie has been researching St Brigid. Her display will include the power to multiply milk, and a lamp for learning and wisdom.

Jazzer has been saving the best till last. Christine is adding a water feature! Eddie is amused by Clarrie's competitiveness. She is convinced that anything Christine can do she can do just as well if not better.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b02x5l4q)
Series 16

Ian Fleming

James Walton’s literary quiz with Sebastian Faulks, John Walsh, Nigel Williams and Harry Ritchie. From April 2002.

Author of the week: Ian Fleming.

Reader: Beth Chalmers.

Producer: Dawn Ellis.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2002.


SUN 19:45 American Shorts (b02x5l4s)
First Sale

A series examining everyday life across the water.

Jessica Francis Kane's story is next in the series and a yard sale becomes fraught with unspoken tensions for a young boy as he wonders where his father is.

Read by Kelly Burke
Abridged and produced by Gemma Jenkins

First Sale is taken from Jessica Francis Kane's short story collection, This Close, longlisted for the 2013 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b02qt7w6)
It's a year since the BBC introduced an improved complaints procedure. And the BBC Trust, which exists to protect the licence fee payers' interests, has just reported back on the new system. Their public consultation shows that most people now think the system is working well. But some Feedback listeners still think there's room for improvement. Roger Bolton speaks to BBC Trustee Richard Ayre, who is in charge of reviewing the complaints procedure.

And Richard Ayre gives the BBC Trust's view on the BBC's failed Digital Media Initiative (DMI). While we were off-air, the BBC announced that it was scrapping DMI after spending £98 million pounds on the five-year digital archiving project, a sum amounting to almost 700,000 licence fees.

Plus, which programme is sending feline Feedback listeners into a frenzy? Roger speaks to renowned wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson about this pressing issue.

And could you be our Tweet of the Week? We know you're the best radio reviewers around so we'd like you to tweet us on @bbcr4feedback with your most poetic, heartfelt, heated, and inventive reviews of BBC Radio, programmes and policies in 140 characters. If yours is selected as a Tweet of the Week you will win.absolutely nothing, except the undoubted admiration of other listeners, and our undying gratitude of course.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b02qt7w4)
A novelist, a racehorse trainer, a swimmer and film star, a key figure in the Warsaw Pact and 'the fastest granny on water'

Matthew Bannister on

The Scottish novelist Iain Banks - author of The Wasp Factory and The Crow Road - who also wrote science fiction

Sir Henry Cecil - one of the most successful flat racing trainers of recent times. Willie Carson pays tribute.

Hollywood's swimming superstar Esther Williams,

Marshall Viktor Kulikov - one of the last of the Soviet military commanders. He played a key role in the crisis that led to martial law being imposed in Poland.

And the Countess of Arran - a powerboat racer known as the fastest woman on water. She reached 103 miles per hour in a rocket-like boat on Lake Windermere in 1980.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b02x58cj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b02x5g16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b02mfzrw)
The Quantified Self: Can Life Be Measured?

Self knowledge through numbers is the motto of the "quantified self" movement. Calories consumed, energy expended, work done, places visited or how you feel. By recording the data of your daily life online, the life-loggers claim, you get to know who you really are.

So far this type of self-tracking is the obsession of a geeky minority. But through our smartphones and social networking sites more and more of us being drawn into this world by stealth. Frances Stonor Saunders asks what it means for our ideas about privacy and sense of self.

Producer: Fiona Leach.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b02x5l4v)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b02x5l4x)
Miranda Green of The Day analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b02qp1s2)
Zack Snyder on Man of Steel; Neil Brand on superhero soundtracks; Ulrich Seidl's Paradise trilogy

Francine Stock talks to Zack Snyder, director of the latest Superman film, Man of Steel, starring Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Russell Crowe and Kevin Costner. A young boy learns that he has extraordinary powers and is not of this Earth. As a young man, he journeys to discover where he came from and what he was sent here to do. But the hero in him must emerge if he is to save the world from annihilation and become the symbol of hope for all mankind.

Hans Zimmer - whose credits include the Batman trilogy - provides Man of Steel's musical score, but how has superhero music evolved over the decades? Film composer Neil Brand tracks the evolution of the superhero soundtrack from the 'positive' Superman of John Williams, to the 'dark' Man of Steel of Hans Zimmer, by way of Poledorous's Robocop and Kamen's X-Men.

Moo Man is a low budget British documentary following a year in the life of maverick dairy farmer Steve Hook - and the first British film to be kickstarter funded. If they reach their target, film making duo Andy Heathcote and Heike Bachelier will be able to secure Moo Man the marketing budget it needs to reach a wider audience.

Austrian film director Ulrich Seidl's films appeal to a particular kind of indie, European art cinema fan base. Critics Sandra Hebron and Ryan Gilbey discuss his latest offering, the Paradise trilogy, about three women in one family who take three very different vacations; from searching for love, and more, on a Kenyan beach, to working as a Catholic missionary to going on a diet camp for teenagers.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b02x5g10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 17 JUNE 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b02x52hf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b02qd1vy)
Scottish nationalism and identity; Austerity

Does Austerity Kill? Laurie Taylor talks to political economist, David Stuckler, about the human costs of the financial crisis as documented in his book 'The Body Economic' (co-authored with Sanju Basu) -the culmination of ten years research. They're joined by David Smith, Economics Editor of the Sunday Times.

We're well aware of the extreme costs of banking crisis in terms of the wealth of nations, but much less idea of how they affect one of the most central issues of all: our physical and mental health. Why has health in Iceland actually got better whilst it's deteriorated in Greece? From the Great Depression of the 1930s to post communist Russia and the US foreclosure scandal; Dr Stuckler study examines the surprising, seemingly contradictory nature of economic disasters' role in public health. They are joined by David Smith Economic Editor of the Sunday Times.

Also, Nasar Meer discusses his study into ethnic minority Scots' relationship to Scottish Nationalism and identity

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b02x5g0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02x52hh)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02x52hk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02x52hm)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b02x52hp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02ynj41)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b02x62sm)
Charlotte Smith hears the realities of rising rural crime and its effect on communities.A report from Cornwall shows how farmers can fight back to deter criminals.
.

A field trial into GM wheat at Rothamsted Research is to be extended into the autumn. And Charlotte hears about the abolition of "Grandfather Rights" on pesticide spraying. Are some operators too nervous to take a test?

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


MON 05:56 Weather (b02x52hr)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tq6h)
Great Skua

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Great Skua. Great skuas are often known as bonxies - their local name in Shetland where most of the UK's population breeds. Almost two thirds of the world's great skuas nest here or on Orkney.


MON 06:00 Today (b02x62sp)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b02x62sr)
Hari Kunzru and Dystopia

On Start the Week Jonathan Freedland talks to Hari Kunzru about his dystopian vision, where books and the act of remembering have been banned. Jane Rogers explains how her apocalyptic tale may be set in the future but points to today's abuse of scientific knowledge and the heroism of youth. Past real events are at the heart of James Robertson's latest novel which explores grief, justice and the truth. And the photographer Adam Broomberg asks how far images of war capture the truth.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b02x62st)
Peter Stothard - Alexandria: The Last Nights of Cleopatra

Episode 1

When Peter Stothard, former editor of The Times and now editor of the Times Literary Supplement, finds himself in Alexandria in the winter of 2010 after his flight to South Africa has been cancelled, he sets out to explore a nation on the brink of revolution.

Accompanied by two native Egyptians, Mohammed and Socratis, whose eagerness to spend time with him is never really explained, Stothard traces his lifelong interest in the history of Cleopatra, and his repeated failure to write the book about her that he has started so many times.

Melancholy and sometimes humorous, Alexandria filters the life of a classics scholar turned journalist through the prism of Cleopatra's turbulent history - while all around the author, the cracks begin to appear in Hosni Mubarak's own empire.

Episode 1 (of 5):
Pieces of paper, sketches and maps on a hotel room bed and the remarkable story behind the only fragment of parchment to bear Cleopatra's signature - a political gesture sanctioning a tax break.

Read by Kenneth Cranham
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b02x62sw)
Cameron's cabinet; Kids online; Kishwar Desai; Feminist fiction

With a government reshuffle expected, will David Cameron choose to promote more women to his Cabinet? Isabel Hardman from The Spectator assesses which women might be in the frame. Claire Perry MP joins Jenni as the Culture Secretary meets the big internet companies to discuss how to prevent easy access to extreme and illegal material on line. Laura Higgins from the UK Safer Internet Centre gives advice on how to help children to avoid certain websites. Kishwar Desai talks about her new novel, The Sea of Innocence which addresses the topic of violence against women in India. And Amanda Craig asks whether the feminist fire has gone out when it comes to fiction. Presented by Jenni Murray.


MON 10:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x62sy)
Episode 1

With the death toll from Maternal Death Syndrome rising daily and the world on the brink of disaster, teenager Jessie Lamb becomes convinced she must take action.

Her act of heroism could save the human race, but will those closest to her offer their support?

Jane Rogers dramatises her award-winning novel in five parts.

Stars Holliday Grainger as Jessie, Mark Jordon as Joe, Joanne Mitchell as Cath, Kate Coogan as Mandy, Oliver Lee as Baz and Nisa Cole as Lisa.

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013


MON 11:00 Recycled Radio (b02x62t0)
Series 1

Blood

At the end of May 2013, Gerald Scarfe's weekly illustration in the Sunday Times was a meat cleaver wedged into a pool of blood. Underneath he'd scrawled 'Political Debate'.

Recycled Radio has taken this as the inspiration for a programme about blood - from Enoch Powell's Rivers of Blood in 1968 to the horrific scenes in Woolwich in 2013.

Slicing, dicing and splicing words from Tony Blair, Margaret Thatcher and Enoch Powell, the programme offers its own typically unpredictable response to this emotive word. Blood descends into a world of violence and hate. Red blood, blue blood, mixed blood, bad blood.

Also featuring the voices of Harry Allen, Louis Farrakhan, Melvyn Bragg and Pauline Black.

With music from Willie King and the Liberators.

Producer: Miles Warde

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


MON 11:30 Bleak Expectations (b01p41hd)
Series 5

An Alrightish Life Savagely Frozen to Bits

Pip races to Antarctica to thwart another fiendish plot by his evil ex-guardian, Mr Gently Benevolent.

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ..... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ..... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ..... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ..... James Bachman
Clampvulture ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ..... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ..... Susy Kane
Explorer ..... Mark Evans

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b02x64yz)
Celebrity wine, group-buying of insurance, live events at the cinema

Buying gas and electricity as a group has led to reduced bills for some people, but could the same approach work when buying insurance? A company which brings together people to buy their cover collectively claims to have secured real savings for its customers. How successful is it compared with a conventional price-comparison website? High protein drinks have long been popular with body builders, but now they are being marketed to everyone. So what is the appeal? The famous names who promote wines. Would a celebrity endorsement encourage you to choose a particular bottle? Jellyfish numbers are increasing in the Mediterranean, should we think twice before wading into the water?
Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


MON 12:57 Weather (b02x52hy)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b02x64z1)
Syria is set to dominate the G8 summit, the former head of the FSA says there are 'still dangers in the banking system', and Peter Grimes rings out over the waves in Aldeburgh.


MON 13:45 1913: The Year Before (b02x64z3)
Labour Relations & the Triple Alliance

The one hundredth anniversary of the start of the First World war looms on the horizon. 1914 is a date forged into the British consciousness, just as it's carved into monuments the length and breadth of the UK and many places beyond. With that awareness comes an understanding that it was the war to end all wars, shocking the culture, politics, and societies of Europe, but particularly Britain, out of their comfortable progress and reshaping everything.
But in this series Michael Portillo challenges that notion. Looking at a series of themes, the suffrage movement, the Irish question, the decline of the liberal party and the arts, he argues that to a large extent Britain was already in a state of flux by 1913 and many of the developments we think of as emanating from or being catalysed by the war, were actually in full flow.

Michael starts today's programme at the Railway station in Llanelli, scene of a riot in 1911. It was provoked by industrial unrest on the railways and resulted in the shooting of two men by the armed forces. The familiar high-water mark of Industrial unrest in Britain is usually understood to be the General Strike of 1926. In fact the ten year period leading up to the First World War saw a wave of industrial strife with thousands of days labour lost and a growing feeling, on the part of the workers, that their voice could and would be heard. Ships were built, railways run and the Empire supplied, but not by a quiescent work force.

Producer: Tom Alban.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b02x5l4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b02x66zn)
Ed Harris - Billions

by Ed Harris

One of three plays nominated as Best Single Drama at the BBC Audio Drama Awards 2014.

Mark's wife Donna has an accident and ends up in a life-threatening coma. But when he comes home from hospital, Donna is in the kitchen. Not Donna, in fact, but a near-perfect replica provided by her insurance company.

Award-winning writer Ed Harris tells a wickedly twisted tale of love - and adjustments.

Producer/Director ... Jonquil Panting.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b02x66zq)
Series 27

Episode 7

(7/13)

Paul Gambaccini is in the chair for the seventh heat in the 2013 series of Counterpoint, this week coming from the BBC's studios at Maida Vale.

The questions and musical extracts cover territory as diverse as Wagner, Lionel Bart, Handel and Culture Club. As ever, the contestant who can demonstrate the widest range of musical knowledge stands to win a place in the semi-finals, which begin in a few weeks' time.

This week's competitors are from London, Woodstock in Oxfordshire and Romsey in Hampshire. A full list of the music played will be posted on the Counterpoint website after the broadcast.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b02x5j69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Derek Tangye - The Cornish Gardener (b02x66zs)
John McCarthy explores the fascinating life of British author Derek Tangye and reveals a remarkable and enigmatic portrait of this influential writer.

Popular writer Derek Tangye who lived in the West Country for almost fifty years penned a score of books collectively known as 'The Minack Chronicles'. The stories illustrate the anomalous lives Derek and his wife Jeannie led when, in the 1950's, they abandoned their sophisticated metropolitan lifestyle to live in isolation working a cliff top daffodil farm with their beloved animals in the farthest reaches of Cornwall.

As McCarthy travels to the area surrounding Minack, the main inspiration for Tangye' work, he explores the world of a writer whose literary triumphs mask a mysterious and complex life. His descriptions in the books of the 'glorious anthem' of a cat's purr and the 'sweet moment when a long-awaited harvest awakes' provide an atmospheric backdrop to the captivating discoveries and secrets of his life.

Derek Tangye was educated at Harrow and subsequently worked as a journalist. During and after the war he was a member of MI5 and throughout his days at Minack was a neighbour of novelist John Le Carre. A few years after Derek Tangye's death in 1996 a national newspaper ran allegations that he was a Russian spy. The sensational headlines were quickly dismissed by those who knew him but last year during a Tangye centenary event an audio project also revealed a life a lot bleaker than the books portrayed, uncovering the author's intense jealousy and the extent to which the couple managed to avoid the Second World War.

Speaking with the Tangye's inner circle, followers and experts in spy history, McCarthy attempts to uncover some of the mysteries and unanswered questions surrounding the author whilst evoking the struggles and triumphs he encountered making a living from the land. He'll examine the Tangye's marriage, the motivation behind the couple's decision to discard glamour to live in a neglected cottage, and why after Derek Tangye's death his inspirational books fell so quickly out of print.

In recent times there has been renewed interest in Tangye's books with publishers set to re-launch his canon of work using 21st century technology. McCarthy will discover the impact and merits of the anthologies past and present and consider whether Tangye's chronicles should receive greater recognition for their contribution towards literature.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b02x66zv)
Religion and Mrs Thatcher's Politics

Margaret Thatcher's funeral in St Paul's Cathedral was attended by thousands of world leaders and watched by millions more around the world. In death, as in life, Margaret Thatcher shaped the occasion: she dictated the order of service and chose the hymns and readings. She was probably the most overtly Christian Prime Minister of the twentieth century up to the time of her leaving office. So where did those Christian influences come from? How did her religious conviction shape her politics? And what is her legacy in terms of the relationship between religion and politics in a multi cultural Britain?

Joining Ernie Rea are Dr Eliza Filby, Lecturer in Modern British History at King's College London, whose book, "God and Mrs Thatcher: The Battle for Britain's Soul", is published later this year; Edwina Currie, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Health under Margaret Thatcher and MP for South Derbyshire between 1983 and 1997 and Canon Dr Alan Billings, Deputy Leader of Sheffield City Council under David Blunkett when Margaret Thatcher came to power, and former Director of the Centre for Ethics and Religion at Lancaster University.


MON 17:00 PM (b02x66zx)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02x52j0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b02x66zz)
Series 66

Episode 5

Nicholas Parsons hosts without hesitation, repetition or deviation with panellists; Tony Hawks, Roy Walker, Fred MacAulay and Gyles Brandreth. This edition comes from the City of Culture Derry, Londonderry.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b02x6701)
Clarrie's ideas for her flower display are keeping her awake at night. She wants to meet Nic and Eddie in the Bull later.

Nic announces she has decided to help out at junior church and has spoken to the organiser Erica already. Clarrie asks Nic if she can help her run the tea bar at Pat and Tony's sale next week.

Eddie and Nic are shell-shocked when Clarrie reveals her plan for a water feature. When Clarrie dashes off to source flowers, Nic explains she's feeling eased out. She wonders if she should try to get Clarrie to tone the idea down.

Lilian is anxious when she and Matt arrive for Paul's funeral. Lilian thinks she shouldn't go in after all but Matt insists.

After the service, Paul's daughter Grace invites them back for the buffet. After letting Lilian squirm for a moment, Matt declines. Lilian is surprised that Paul's ex wasn't there. Matt apologises. He claims he thought he'd mentioned that Grace had said Celia wouldn't be attending.

When Lilian and Matt arrive home Clarrie calls round, asking if she could have some roses for her display. Lilian agrees. As Clarrie leaves Lilian breaks down. Sobbing in Matt's arms she is sorry, it's just... the day.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b02x6703)
Daniel Radcliffe; World War Z; Neil Gaiman's Cultural Exchange

With Mark Lawson.

Daniel Radcliffe discusses playing the title role of Billy in the darkly comic stage play The Cripple of Inishmaan by Martin McDonagh (writer and director of In Bruges). Radcliffe describes the challenges of taking on a distinct west coast Irish accent and portraying someone with severe disabilities, who wants to leave his remote island home when a Hollywood film crew comes to town. The actor also talks about his career choices post-Harry Potter and a potential return to his famous role, why he expects people to dislike him, and whether he would want to take the lead in Doctor Who.

Adapted from Max Brooks' novel with the same name, World War Z is the latest zombie apocalypse film. It stars Brad Pitt as Gerry Lane, a United Nations investigator who travels the world to try work out a cure for the zombie pandemic. Jenny McCartney gives her verdict.

Neil Gaiman, whose books include Stardust and Coraline, chooses a work by the Victorian artist Richard Dadd - The Fairy Feller's Master-Stroke - painted whilst Dadd was incarcerated at Bedlam hospital.

Produced by Kate Bullivant.


MON 19:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x62sy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Parkinson's Law Revisited (b02x6705)
Does work expand to fill the time available for its completion? Do bureaucracies bloat of their own accord? These are some of the insights offered by Cyril Northcote Parkinson whose essay "Parkinson's Law" made him a famous commentator on organisational structures in the 1950s. But Parkinson's Law might have more to offer us in a world where bureaucracies are being slimmed down, as Matthew Sweet discovers.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b02x6707)
Predistribution

Predistribution is Labour's new policy buzzword, used by leader Ed Miliband in a keynote speech. The US thinker who coined the phrase tells Edward Stourton what it means.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b02mqmqc)
The Problem of Population

Monty Don presents Shared Planet, the series that looks at the crunch point between human population and the natural world. In this programme Howard Stableford reports from Connecticut on the complex decline of the once very ubiquitous Chimney Swift, a story Monty Don believes is the paradigm for the series. The wider issues of human population and nature are explored in the studio with Lord May, past president of The Royal Society and from Vienna, Professor Wolfgang Lutz, a specialist in human population dynamics.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b02x62sr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b02x52j2)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b02x6709)
G8 meets amid division over Syria.

How moderate will Iran's new President be?

Czech scandal engulfs Government.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b02x7r7s)
A Commonplace Killing

Episode 6

Harriet Walter reads Episode Six of a dark and mysterious thriller by Sian Busby.

The discovery of an ID card leads DDI Cooper to Walter Frobisher, who is clearly hiding something.
Cooper takes an instant dislike to Frobisher and he allows Inspector Lucas ask the questions to start so that he can stand back and observe. He notices that this ostensibly pathetic looking man is seething with rage, and a lie is revealed.

A Commonplace Killing by Sian Busby is abridged by Lauris Morgan Griffiths and produced by Sarah Langan.


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b02x7r7v)
Series 2

Eliza and Martin Carthy (A-Side)

John Wilson continues with the second series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 1, A-side. "Anglicana" with Eliza Carthy and her father Martin Carthy.

Together Eliza Carthy and her parents Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson have consistently breathed new life and vitality into English folk music. Martin Carthy MBE has influenced the likes of Bob Dylan and Paul Simon with his interpretations of the traditional music of these shores. His guitar playing continues to inspire artists in all genres and he continues to tour and record on his own, and when working with wife Norma Waterson and daughter Eliza Carthy as Waterson:Carthy.

Eliza Carthy has continued to expand the legacy of her parents work, reinterpreting and reinvigorating English folk in her own unique style. Her fiddle playing is in a class of its own and throughout her career she has experimented with unusual musical collaborations, including the hugely successful Imagined Village project. "Anglicana" was released in 2002 and gained Eliza her second Mercury nomination. It features both Martin Carthy and her mother Norma Waterson and was hailed as a new definition of what it means to be English in the 21st Century.

Eliza and Martin Carthy, came to the BBC Maida Vale studios to discuss the making of "Anglicana", their constantly evolving interpretations of traditional folk songs and their work together with Norma Waterson as Waterson:Carthy.
.

The B-side of the programme, where it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions, can be heard tomorrow at 3.30pm

Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b02x7r7x)
The Foreign Secretary tells MPs that the election of Iran's president Hassan Rouhani should be an opportunity for the country to start a new relationship with the West.
Fresh divisions emerge in the House of Lords over plans to legalise same-sex marriage.
Ministers announce that discards - the throwing back of dead edible fish into the sea - will be banned under a new European fisheries policy.
And MPs debate the Government's plans to introduce a new single-tier pension system and bring forward an increase in the state pension age to 67.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 18 JUNE 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b02x52k1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b02x62st)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02x52k3)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02x52k5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02x52k7)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b02x52k9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02ynl0z)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b02x7h0v)
Illegal sports like badger baiting and hare coursing affect both animals and people living in the countryside. Can police successfully tackle it? Farming Today travels to Lincolnshire to hear the results of one police operation in the area.

The unusual recent weather patterns have had an effect on barn owl populations, but one project in Somerset is seeing farmers and conservationists work hand in hand to help them. Meanwhile, meteorologists are gathering for their own meeting at the Met Office today, to try and get to the bottom of our recent bad weather.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Datshiane Navanayagam.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tqcb)
Golden Oriole

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Golden Oriole. Golden orioles look as exotic as they sound. The male is bright yellow with black wings and a reddish bill. The female is more greenish, but both are very hard to see among the fluttering leaves.


TUE 06:00 Today (b02x7h0x)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Webb and John Humphrys, including:

0750
Climate scientists and meteorologists are meeting today to debate the causes of UK's bad weather in recent years. The BBC's John Kay reports from Somerset, and Professor Sir Brian Hoskins, director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change at Imperial College, London, examines whether the UK has lost the warm temperate predictability.

0810
Tax, trade and transparency are expected to dominate discussions on the second day of a summit of the G8 group of leading industrialised nations. The Chancellor George Osborne speaks to the Today programme's John Humphrys.

0822
A former submarine commander and local war memorial historian have uncovered the lost names of 25 men in three Oxfordshire villages who served their country from the Boer War onwards. The Today programme's Nicola Stanbridge reports.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b02x7h0z)
David Spiegelhalter

Is it more reckless to eat a bacon sandwich everyday or to go skydiving? What's the chance that all children in the same family have exactly the same birthday? Jim Al-Khalili talks to Professor David Spiegelhalter about risk, uncertainty and the real odds behind everyday life.

As one of the world's leading statisticians, he is regularly called upon to help answer questions in high profile inquiries - like the one into the Harold Shipman murders, infant heart surgery at Bristol Royal Infirmary and the PiP breast implant scandal.

Jim finds out more about the Life Scientific of the man who despite winning many awards and his research papers being some of the most cited in his field David Spiegelhalter says he isn't really that good at maths.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b02x7h11)
Owen Bennett Jones talks to Mick Flynn

Owen Bennett-Jones has spent most of his BBC career reporting on armed conflict around the world. On March 2003 he was in Kuwait as the US forces began their invasion of Iraq. While talking to the American writer PJ O'Rourke, Owen said how frightened the soldiers heading into Iraq must be, but O'Rourke replied: "Well, they are off to do the most exciting thing ever known to man: going to war".

It was a striking remark. Was he glorifying war? Or just telling a truth? Since humans first started to communicate, they have been telling - and listening to - war stories. And, alongside the empathy and fellow feeling for victims, the accounts of bravery, suffering and cheating death are compelling and perhaps vicariously thrilling.

Mick Flynn has many war stories. He is the most decorated serving soldier in the British army. He has served in Northern Ireland, the Falklands, Iraq and Bosnia and has had three tours of Afghanistan. In the first of a two part series of 'One to One', Owen hears from Mick about one particular day of fighting in Iraq.

Presenter: Owen Bennett-Jones.
Producer : Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b02xcz3c)
Peter Stothard - Alexandria: The Last Nights of Cleopatra

Episode 2

When Peter Stothard, former editor of The Times and now editor of the Times Literary Supplement, finds himself in Alexandria in the winter of 2010 after his flight to South Africa has been cancelled, he sets out to explore a nation on the brink of revolution.

Accompanied by two native Egyptians, Mohammed and Socratis, whose eagerness to spend time with him is never really explained, Stothard traces his lifelong interest in the history of Cleopatra, and his repeated failure to write the book about her that he has started so many times.

Melancholy and sometimes humorous, Alexandria filters the life of a classics scholar turned journalist through the prism of Cleopatra's turbulent history - while all around the author, the cracks begin to appear in Hosni Mubarak's own empire.

Episode 2 (of 5):
Peter Stothard was a bookish child who began his only work of fiction, featuring Cleopatra, aged 9. The new library in Alexandria is the obvious place to visit, and his own name the obvious one to look up in its vast catalogues of published work.

Read by Kenneth Cranham
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b02x7h13)
Beatrice Mtetwa; the politics of female friendships

Beatrice Mtetwa, human rights' lawyer working in Zimbabwe. Kinship Care: why carers who take on full time responsibility for relatives' children miss out on financial support. The politics of female friendships - do the cliques of the playground continue into adulthood? The women enthusiasts for the traditional Irish pursuit of loy digging. With Jenni Murray.


TUE 10:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x7h15)
Episode 2

As society splinters, panic and fear reign. As her own world falls apart, Jessie realises she must act.

Jane Rogers dramatises her award winning novel set in a future where an act of biological terrorism has spread a deadly virus across the world.

Stars Holliday Grainger as Jessie, Mark Jordon as Joe, Joanne Mitchell as Cath, Kate Coogan as Mandy, Rebecca Ryan as Sal, Oliver Lee as Baz, Nisa Cole as Lisa and Will Finlason as Iain.

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b02x7h17)
Can We Save It All?

A giant hamster in Alsace provides Monty with a puzzling dilemma, how do we decide what to conserve? With so many pressures on so many creatures and habitats how to decide where to put our energy and money is difficult. Monty Don explores the issues, do we save the creatures that appeal to us or those that are most useful? Is a beetle better to save than a hamster? Shared Planet explores the crunch point where the natural world and human population meet. Monty Don presents the series and invites a field report each week from around the world where people and wildlife are negotiating the same space: different stories, different outcomes, and different issues. How is the Giant Hamster negotiating it's bit of the planet in the Alsace region with land owners who need its home for crops. Should we try to save everything?


TUE 11:30 Tales from the Stave (b02x7j74)
Series 9

A Shropshire Lad

Frances Fyfield visits two locations in today's Tales from the Stave as she continues her forensic musical enquiries in search of the life and work of George Butterworth. She begins at Eton College where Butterworth was a pupil. He donated the manuscript of his song settings of A 'Shropshire Lad' to the library and Michael Meredith shows Frances and baritone Roderick Williams the manuscript and some rather special editions of A.E. Houseman's poems. They are joined by the conductor, Adrian Davis and handwriting expert, Ruth Rostron.

They continue the Butterworth trail to Oxford where Butterworth was a student. Bodleian librarian Martin Holmes and Peter Ward Jones then show Frances, Adrian, Roderick and Ruth the orchestral manuscript of Butterworth's Orchestral Rhapsody, A Shropshire Lad. Alongside the manuscript there is also a chance to look at the scrapbook which Butterworth's father compiled after his son's untimely death, serving as a soldier in World War 1.

Butterworth was at the forefront of folk music collecting and was admired by those around him. Contained in the scrapbook are letters from Ralph Vaughan Williams, written from his posting in France 1916, to Butterworth senior, expressing his sadness upon hearing the news of his son's death. George Butterworth was only 31 years old when he was killed by a sniper's bullet. Who knows what else he may have gone on to compose.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b02x7mx2)
Call You and Yours: Quality of Care

Today we're talking about the quality of care provided for people at home and in care homes. Poor quality care is constantly in the news - there was Panorama last night where there was secret filming of inadequate treatment of a woman in a care homes. Just a few days ago there were distressing images of an old lady at home alone waiting for carers who were late.

Everyone agrees that it's not good enough - all the promises of change are for the future. So is there a lost generation of older people for whom any changes will come too late. People we're failing to care for right now?

We'd like to know what you think. We want to hear from professional carers, your positive and negative stories, what it's like when you leave hospital and need continuing care, and how we can improve things now and in the future.

Please call us now on 03700 100 444 - a call will cost you the same as dialling an 01 or an 02 number. E-mail youandyours@bbc.co.uk or you can text to 84844..if you do that you'll be charged your standard operator message rate and we may call you back on that number. Or you can tweet @BBCRadio 4 using the hashtag #youandyours.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b02x52kc)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b02x7mx4)
Nato hands over responsibility for security to Afghan forces. Culture secretary Maria Miller meets internet companies. We speak to woman who spent 11 years with an abusive partner.


TUE 13:45 1913: The Year Before (b02x7mx6)
Poverty

The one hundredth anniversary of the start of the First World war looms on the horizon. 1914 is a date forged into the British consciousness, just as it's carved into monuments the length and breadth of the UK and many places beyond. With that awareness comes an understanding that it was the war to end all wars, shocking the culture, politics, and societies of Europe, but particularly Britain, out of their comfortable progress and reshaping everything.
But in this series Michael Portillo challenges that notion. Looking at a series of themes, the suffrage movement, the Irish question, the decline of the liberal party and the arts, he argues that to a large extent Britain was already in a state of flux by 1913 and many of the developments we think of as emanating from or being catalysed by the war, were actually in full flow.

In the seventh programme in the series Michael explores the pre-war attitudes to poverty, both in town and country. On the strength of forensic reporting by the likes of Seebohm Rowntree in York senior figures in the Liberal party were seeking to do something about wage rates, living standards and the damaging gap between rich and poor. Their reforming zeal lead to a series of compromises, not least over Irish Home Rule, but rather than an era content with its Edwardian lot, this was one of the most politically dynamic governments of the century. Michael argues that the passing of a National Insurance Act, which came into effect in January 1913, does not deserve to be lost in the memory of the War that followed.

Producer: Tom Alban.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b02x6701)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b02x7mx8)
Invasion

30 years from now, Astronaut Kadian Giametti becomes the first human to walk on Mars. But on his return to Earth he wakes up in a quarantine cell from which he's not allowed to leave. Slowly Kadian learns the truth about what's happened on Earth while he's been away, and what he's brought back with him.

A claustrophobic two-hander from science fiction writer Philip Palmer. Part of the Dangerous Visions season.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b02x7njf)
Series 3

Lines of Communication

Josie Long presents a selection of short documentaries about communication - messages that could break your heart, rescue you from a fight or save you from a long stay in jail.

The writer Glenn Patterson explains why sometimes we should ignore the writing on the wall, and musician Tom Robinson describes the unlikely message he sent at a time when he was in a lot of trouble.

Stories of last words, lost love and lights being knocked out.

The items featured in the programme are:

Guess Who
Found sound from the collection of Mark Vernon
http://www.meagreresource.com/

L'Esprit De L'Escalier
Produced by Hana Walker-Brown

Yanto
Featuring Glenn Patterson
Produced by Rachel Hooper

Message from Above
Featuring Tom Robinson
Produced by Alan Hall

Dear Sophie
Produced by Sara Parker

Conversations with Nic
Featuring Esther Baker

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b02x7t3t)
Series 2

Eliza and Martin Carthy (B-Side)

John Wilson continues with the second series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 4 (the B-side). Having discussed the making of Eliza's award winning 2004 album, "Anglicana" (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 17th June and available online), Eliza Carthy and her father Martin Carthy respond to questions from the audience and perform live versions of some of the songs from the album, as well as discussing their work together with Norma Waterson as Waterson:Carthy.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b02x7t3w)
The Neuberger Experiment

There are 12 judges in the Supreme Court and only one, Lady Hale, is a woman. Last March on Law in Action, Lord Neuberger - the president of the court - told us it was unfair that there are so few women in the senior judiciary. But, he wondered, do women judge differently from men?

Lord Neuberger wasn't sure - and he set us a little challenge, one we have called the 'Neuberger Experiment'. With the help of law students at Durham University, we attempt to discover whether male and female judges really do judge differently. Then we put our findings to Lady Hale.

Also in the programme: the curious case of the gruesome New Zealand murder appeal being heard in London. And what have been the practical consequences of last April's changes to civil legal aid?


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b02x7t3y)
Antonia Quirke & Kerry Shale

Film critic Antonia Quirke and actor Kerry Shale talk to Harriett Gilbert about their favourite books, which are wildly varied: a graphic novel, a travel book and a collection of short poems.

Kerry Shale talks about Blankets, a poignant memoir drawn and written by Craig Thompson.

Antonia's choice is a less well-known book by the author of Ring of Bright Water. It's A Reed Shaken by the Wind: Travels among the Marsh Arabs of Iraq by Gavin Maxwell.

Harriett Gilbert's recommendation is Short and Sweet: 101 Very Short Poems, edited by Simon Armitage.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b02x7t40)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02x52kf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Castle (b01j8gyl)
Series 4

Highlights and Twilights

Hie ye to The Castle, a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley"), Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley"), Martha Howe-Douglas ("Horrible Histories") & Ingrid Oliver ("Watson & Oliver")

The village of Woodstock receives two mysterious visitors - one deathly pale and one deathly orange. Meanwhile, Lady Anne meets the love that dare not speak its name and Sir John meets the love that can speak its name but can't pronounce it properly

Sir John Woodstock James Fleet
Sir William De Warenne Neil Dudgeon
Lady Anne Woodstock Martha Howe-Douglas
Cardinal Duncan Jonathan Kydd
Lady Charlotte Ingrid Oliver
Master Henry Woodstock Steven Kynman
Bates Lewis Macleod

with special guest
Amy De Childs Jess Robinson

Written by Kim Fuller & Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson
Produced and directed by David Tyler.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b02x8znh)
Tom arrives on Estate land to meet Brian but he's not there. Rob gives Tom a tour of the site, during which apologetic Brian arrives. Tom fills Brian in on his positive meeting with Bellingham's about the ready meals trial. Brian and Rob are impressed with Tom's business sense.
Brian and Rob get down to business. Rob has found a prospect for one of the assistant herd manager posts. She's an expert in genetics, so she'd be great to manage their fertility programme. The second possible candidate is Filipino, which will make recruiting him more complicated.
Brenda is showering at Vicky's, as the morning rush is too much at Willow Farm. Vicky invites Brenda for a quick lunch, when they discuss last minute arrangements for Bethany's christening.
Back at the office, Frustrated Brenda tries to pin Lilian down as to what her workload will be while Lilian and Matt are away on holiday. The tension mounts. Lilian thinks Brenda should get on with her job, suggesting that she go away and leave her in peace.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b02x8znk)
Before Midnight, Conor McPherson, The Duckworth Lewis Method, Rachel Whiteread

With Mark Lawson

Before Midnight is the last instalment in the acclaimed film trilogy that began with Before Sunset and continued with Before Sunrise. Jesse and Celine, who enjoyed brief encounters in Vienna and Paris, are now married with children, but as their summer holiday in Greece comes to an end, the light seems to be going out of their relationship. Antonia Quirke delivers her verdict on one of modern cinema's most famous and enduring couples, played by Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke.

Neil Hannon (frontman and founder of The Divine Comedy) and musician Thomas Walsh discuss their second cricket-inspired album Sticky Wickets, and the formation of their band The Duckworth Lewis Method. They also reveal how they arranged special guests including Daniel Radcliffe, Stephen Fry and Henry Blofeld.

The Weir, a series of ghost stories told in an Irish pub, was a huge hit for playwright Conor McPherson over a decade ago. His latest play The Night Alive returns to the theme of how the past can haunt the present in unexpected ways. Conor McPherson talks to Mark about the experiences that have informed his writing.

Artist Rachel Whiteread makes her selection for the Cultural Exchange - a painting by Bridget Riley, which she kept as a postcard.


TUE 19:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x7h15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b02x8znm)
Council Asset Sales

Local authorities across the UK are facing tough decisions as they try to balance their books in the face of unprecedented funding cuts - with many opting to sell land and buildings to reduce spending and bring in much needed capital.

But, one person's white elephant is another's much loved local facility, so the choice of what goes on the market often causes great public resentment.

Jenny Chryss visits four local authorities where announcements about asset sales have caused serious questions to be asked. She finds allegations of decisions taken behind closed doors, sums that don't stack up and property that could end up being mothballed for years to come.

So are councils getting value for money for their tax payers? Or are they out of their depth when they negotiate with the private sector, especially in one of the harshest property markets for years?

And with a major shift in the way councils are audited, is there a danger that mistakes could go unnoticed and unchallenged?

Producer: Rob Cave.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b02x8znp)
We talk to a couple of listeners, about their individual experiences of the legal system. One whose was positive, and another who struggled to get access to information.

We also speak to barrister Catherine Casserley, about what rights and responsibilities different arms of the legal system have when it comes to providing accessible information.

And finally, a blind barrister tells us about what it's like working in an environment where quick and complete access to information is key.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b02x8znr)
Ageless Psychiatry; From DNA to the Brain; Recipe of Life

The introduction of the equality act has focussed attention on mental health services for older people. Sixty five used to be the cut off point for adult services, after which people were referred to old age psychiatry departments. Now though there is a trend towards ageless psychiatry and a one size fits all service. As the Baby Boomers hit sixty five is this a welcome move or will it lead to a loss of expertise and worsening services?

Understanding the structure of DNA has revolutionised how neuroscientists understand the brain, and a new exhibition "photo-51 From DNA to the Brain" at the Kings Cultural Institute celebrates the impact of DNA on neuroscience. The work will feature three artists: photographers Christine Donnier Vallentin and Marcus Lyon and glass sculptor Shelley James.

Recipes for Life is a project where Vietnamese people with mental health problems meet once a week to cook together and they have developed a recipe to protect themselves from homesickness.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b02x7h0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b02x52kh)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b02x8znt)
Talking to the Taliban: US and Afghan governments announce start of direct negotiations.

G8 leaders announce deal on tax avoidance.

Brazil protests continue.

Can science help to bake the perfect cake?

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b02x8znw)
A Commonplace Killing

Episode 7

DDI Cooper's suspicions about Walter Frobisher increase as he pays him an unexpected visit.
Frobisher has admitted that he rowed with Lillian before she left - she had even thrown her wedding ring at him in anger, and he tells Cooper that he thought she would have gone off to visit her sister in Jaywick. A conversation with their son Douglas brings some clarity, and Evelyn, under pressure reveals some interesting information that opens up a new line of enquiry.
A Commonplace Killing by Sian Busby is abridged by Lauris Morgan Griffiths and produced by Sarah Langan.


TUE 23:00 Lucy Beaumont: To Hull and Back (b02x8zny)
BBC New Comedy Award 2012 winner Lucy Beaumont returns to her home town of Hull for a very special performance... in a working men's club. Hosted by Johnny Vegas, with music from tribute band 'The Kings of Lyon', Lucy Beaumont: to Hull and Back displays the razor sharp wit and superb comic timing that has the stand-up poised for future success.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b02x8zp0)
Susan Hulme hears MPs press for a binding vote on Syria. There's a row over a tax on transactions in the City. And why youngsters shouldn't work for free.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 19 JUNE 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b02x52lb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b02xcz3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02x52ld)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02x52lg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02x52lj)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b02x52ll)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02ynln0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b02x93cp)
There are fears that a new food labelling system will stop us buying dairy products. The government today introduces traffic light labels, which will be used by all major retailers. But the dairy industry is concerned that an amber label on milk and red labels on some cheeses will stop people buying them. Should dairy products really be labelled as more unhealthy than diet fizzy drinks?

And a Shropshire beekeeper is forced to spend £10,000 buying bees from abroad because he has lost two thirds of his hives in the past 18 months.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tqln)
Lesser Whitethroat

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Kresovnikoff presents the Lesser Whitethroat. A loud rattling song from a roadside hedge announces that Lesser whitethroats are back from their African winter homes.


WED 06:00 Today (b02x93cr)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb, including:

0749
The banking commission report published today suggests a new criminal offence of reckless misconduct in managing a bank - punishable with a prison term. Andrew Tyrie, the man who chaired the commission, and Lord Myners, the former Labour city minister, discuss whether the problem can be avoided in the future.

0810
Health bosses in charge of Morecambe Bay NHS Trust, where babies died through neglect, have been accused of a cover-up of their failures after a Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspection gave the all-clear in 2010. James Titcombe, whose son Joshua died at Furness General Hospital in Morecambe Bay, and David Prior, chair of the CQC, discuss where the failures occurred and the action that needs to be taken.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b02x93ct)
Claire Belhassine, Paul Conroy, Douglas Villiers, Errollyn Wallen

Libby Purves meets film-maker Claire Belhassine, photojournalist Paul Conroy, entrepreneur Douglas Villiers and composer Errollyn Wallen.

Claire Belhassine is a British/Tunisian filmmaker whose documentary film, Papa Hedi tells the story of her grandfather Hedi Jouini, whom she discovered was the Frank Sinatra of the Arab world. When he died in 1990 he was considered to be one of the significant Arabic composers of the 20th century. Papa Hedi is being shown as part of the 2013 London Shubbak Festival.

Paul Conroy is a former soldier turned photojournalist who was with war correspondent Marie Colvin when she was killed in Syria in 2012. He survived five terrifying days with serious wounds sustained during the shelling, and his eventual escape was via a tunnel under the city. His book Under the Wire - Marie Colvin's Final Assignment is published by Quercus.

Douglas Villiers is an entrepreneur, property developer, artist, adventurer and film producer. One of his first ventures was to open the first disco in London back in 1959 - La Discotheque - and one of the first legal casinos. His book, It's Only Rock 'n' Roll - My Unconventional Life is published by Book Guild Publishing.

Errollyn Wallen MBE is a composer and musician who recently won the Ivor Novello Award for Classical Music. She has written eleven operas including The Silent Twins about the love-hate relationship of black twin girls and last year composed two pieces for the Paralympic opening ceremony. She is performing at the Wapping Hydraulic Power Station and her work is also currently featured in an installation there entitled Memory, Reflection and the Passing of Time.

Producer: Annette Wells.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b02xczk7)
Peter Stothard - Alexandria: The Last Nights of Cleopatra

Episode 3

When Peter Stothard, former editor of The Times and now editor of the Times Literary Supplement, finds himself in Alexandria in the winter of 2010 after his flight to South Africa has been cancelled, he sets out to explore a nation on the brink of revolution.

Accompanied by two native Egyptians, Mohammed and Socratis, whose eagerness to spend time with him is never really explained, Stothard traces his lifelong interest in the history of Cleopatra, and his repeated failure to write the book about her that he has started so many times.

Melancholy and sometimes humorous, Alexandria filters the life of a classics scholar turned journalist through the prism of Cleopatra's turbulent history - while all around the author, the cracks begin to appear in Hosni Mubarak's own empire.

Episode 3 (of 5):
A meal with the author's two newly acquired friends, Mahmoud and Socratis, takes a bizarre conversational turn.

Read by Kenneth Cranham
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b02x93cw)
Women and Alternative Sentencing

A special programme examining alternatives to prison for low-risk female offenders.
The numbers of women sent to prison has increased significantly over the past ten years, despite numerous studies showing that community solutions which address the causes of women's offending are more effective than custodial sentences. Are community solutions the way forward or a soft option?
Jane Garvey talks to staff and clients at the Anawim Women's Centre in Birmingham. Helen Grant MP, Justice Minister explains the government's new strategy for women offenders. Jane is joined in the studio by Alan Beith MP, Chair of the Justice Select Committee, which is about to publish a report on Women Offenders; Joy Doal, Anawim's Project Manager; and Jenny Earle, director of the Prison Reform Trust's programme to reduce women's imprisonment.


WED 10:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x93cy)
Episode 3

Maternal Death Syndrome is spreading rapidly and Jessie's world is still in crisis. Her aunt Mandy is desperately ill, boyfriend Baz is planning drastic action and her father is adamant that Jessie should not volunteer to be a Sleeping Beauty. Can Jessie be swayed from her path?

Jane Rogers dramatises her dystopian novel: winner of the Arthur C Clarke Award 2012.

Stars Holliday Grainger as Jessie, Mark Jordon as Joe, Oliver Lee as Baz, Nisa Cole as Lisa and Will Finlason as Iain.

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013


WED 11:00 London's Oldest Prison: A History of Criminal Justice (b02x93d0)
The Experiment

Through the prism of HMP Brixton, BBC Radio 4 traces changing attitudes to crime and punishment during 19th century industrialisation, urbanisation, and national debate about how prisons should be run, who should run them and whether they exist to punish, deter or reform.

In 1852, overcrowded and with a reputation for brutality, Brixton was closed as a local prison for the south of London. Its notorious treadwheels were dismantled and the land and buildings sold at auction. But, at the eleventh hour, it was saved.

The end of transportation to Australia in the 1850s meant Britain suddenly had to find prison accommodation for thousands of serious offenders. The government made a compulsory purchase of Brixton and converted it into a prison solely for female convicts - the first of its kind in the country.

In the second programme of this series, award-winning historian Jerry White investigates how both prisoners and staff dealt with this new regime.

Long-term imprisonment on a large scale was an unknown quantity. We hear the reaction of current prisoners - as the current chaplain reads out the first sermon ever delivered in the chapel. And we discover a remarkable connection between the woman put in charge of Brixton in the 1850s and a member of staff of today.

Jerry also examines cases of so-called 'breakings out' - where women would tear up their bedding, strip naked and smash windows in apparent outbursts of frenzy. And how public concerns about the mollycoddling of prisoners eventually led to Brixton's closure for a second time.

Producer: Chris Impey
A PRA production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 House on Fire (b02x93d2)
Series 3

Baby

A new series with Matt and Vicky, the two flatmates who love to hate to love each other - with the usual mixture of somewhat hapless situations brought about by their inability to live in the real world, or indeed with each other.

They are aided and abused as ever by their less than loving parents, who can always be relied upon to wash their hands of any responsibility.

After Matt agrees to look after his mate's baby, Vicky decides to borrow it to become a "single mother". She's certain it will help with her up-coming pay review.

Written by Dan Hine and Chris Sussman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b02x93d4)
Computers for £24, supermarket fashions, Picasso pottery

Computers are on sale for £24 to get people on benefits and school children online. But how accessible are they? The the woman who lost everything investing in property abroad and the court that's ruled she can have all her money back.

Profits at Sainsbury's and ASDA are up, Tesco and Morrisons are down. Are our habits or our supermarkets changing? And is your trolley filled with t-shirts and socks as well as yogurts? We sent Caryn Franklin to test the fashions at 3 supermarkets.

How's this for a clever new way of helping people, when times are tough? A restaurant near Barcelona where you can work to cover the cost of your meal. Work by Picasso goes to auction for a fraction of the normal price.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Simon Browning.


WED 12:57 Weather (b02x52ln)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b02x93d6)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 1913: The Year Before (b02x93d8)
Politics and the Tory Gamble

The one hundredth anniversary of the start of the First World war looms on the horizon. 1914 is a date forged into the British consciousness, just as it's carved into monuments the length and breadth of the UK and many places beyond. With that awareness comes an understanding that it was the war to end all wars, shocking the culture, politics, and societies of Europe, but particularly Britain, out of their comfortable progress and reshaping everything.
But in this series Michael Portillo challenges that notion. Looking at a series of themes, the suffrage movement, the Irish question, the decline of the liberal party and the arts, he argues that to a large extent Britain was already in a state of flux by 1913 and many of the developments we think of as emanating from or being catalysed by the war, were actually in full flow.

If pre-war politics is remembered for anything it's the dying days of the Liberal party as a dominant force in British politics. But Michael turns his attention to the Tories of the day, the party that appeared to be dicing with political death as tensions over Home Rule in Ireland turned from potential to reality. The ambitions and manoeuvring of their leader Andrew Bonar Law make sobering reading for a former Tory politician.

Producer: Tom Alban.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b02x8znh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b02x93db)
London Bridge

By Nick Perry

In the future, London is divided in two. North of the river is a virtual police state and the South is a lawless no-go area ruled by criminal gangs. When the body of young boy washes up on the banks of the Thames, a police detective crosses the dangerous divide in the search for his killers.

Director: Sasha Yevtushenko

Production Co-ordinators: Jessica Brown, Selina Ream
Editor: Colin Guthrie
Studio Managers: Cal Knightley, Keith Graham

The adjective Ballardian refers to the writer JG Ballard's fearful imaginings of what the near future might be like. Even though the master creator of dystopian futures died four years ago, his vision of what our future might become feels as relevant, satirical and as scary as ever. Radio 4's Dangerous Visions is a season of dramas that explore contemporary takes on future dystopias. Dramatisations of Ballard's seminal works, Drowned World and Concrete Island, straddle the season, and we have asked five leading radio writers - Nick Perry, Ed Harris, Michael Symmonds Roberts, Michael Butt and Philip Palmer - to imagine what life might be like in the near future if everything goes wrong - and their Dangerous Visions form the bedrock of the series: clever, imaginative and disturbing takes on just what might happen. What happens if sleep is outlawed? If cloning becomes a matter of course, and your loved ones are capable of being cloned? If North London declares UDI on South London, which has become a wasteland? If human sacrifice becomes a part of society? We are also running a 5-part dramatisation of Jane Roger's award winning terrifying novel The Testament of Jessie Lamb, dramatised by the author. Dangerous Visions - you will be disturbed as you see the present reflected in the glass of an uneasy future.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b02x93dd)
Disability and Carers' Benefits

Disability and Carers' benefits are changing. Are you affected? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

If you, your child or somebody you care for has a disability, you may be claiming benefits which are being phased out.

Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is being replaced by a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and six others including Income-based Jobseeker's Allowance, Income-related Employment and Support Allowance, Income Support, Housing Benefit and Working and Child Tax Credit will merge into a monthly payment called Universal Credit.

Charities are concerned that around 600,000 fewer disabled people will receive support by the time DLA reforms are complete and that 10,000 fewer carers will receive Carer's Allowance because the person they care for will not have entitlement to support under the new system.

If you want to know if you'll be affected call Paul Lewis on Wednesday. To answer your questions, presenter Paul Lewis will be joined by:

Jean French, Head of Advice and Information. Carers UK
Derek Sinclair, Welfare Rights Advisor, Contact a Family
Robbie Spence, Advisor, Disability Rights UK

Call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday. Calls cost the same as 01 and 02 numbers, calls from mobiles may be higher. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Diane Richardson.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b02x8znr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b02x93dg)
Remembering Diana; Ethnography Award

Remembering Diana - did Princess Diana's death lead to a major shift in British culture? Professor of Sociology, Vic Seidler, talks to Laurie Taylor about his new book which analyses the repercussions of Diana, Princess of Wales', death in 1997. He argues that the public outpourings of grief and displays of emotion prompted new kinds of identification and belonging in which communities came together regardless of race, class, gender and sexuality and helped to make visible changes in what might be called 'New' or 'post-traditional' Britain. Did her unexpected death see a challenge to 'stiff upper lip' reserve and to the typical split made in modernity between reason and emotion?
The writer, Bea Campbell, who has also written about the Diana 'phenomenon', joins the discussion. Also, the anthropologist, Henrietta Moore discusses the history and significance of Ethnographic research.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b02x93dj)
Jon Snow on reporting from Iran

C4's Jon Snow was one of the few foreign reporters in Tehran for the recent election and the only UK broadcaster. What conditions was he working under, how did he handle the Iranian authorities and what keeps drawing him back to the country?

The Guardian's PRISM story has given it a boost in the USA, which reportedly already provides a third of the traffic to its website. Has this increased the viability of its free digital news strategy? Prof Emily Bell of Columbia University is the former director of digital at the Guardian and now on the Scott Trust board and she joins Steve from New York while, in London, Douglas McCabe of Enders Analysis gives his opinion. Also, as NewsCorp splits into 21st Century Fox and a smaller NewsCorp, what is the future of Rupert Murdoch's printed newspapers in the UK?

And how does the BBC respond to claims that the TV licence fee is anachronistic and increasingly avoided by people only watching catch up? Do the figures back that up and how would enforcement work if more people claim they don't need a licence yet watch online or on mobiles? Steve puts this to John Tate, the BBC's director of policy and strategy.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett
Producer: Simon Tillotson
Editor: Andy Smith.


WED 17:00 PM (b02x93dl)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02x52lq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Sketchorama (b01sjj11)
Series 2

Episode 4

Thom Tuck presents the pick of the new sketch groups currently performing live on the UK comedy circuit - with character, improv, broken and musical sketch comedy.

This final episode of the second series is in Glasgow and also features a special one-off reunion performance from classic sketch group Absolutely.

The sketch groups featured in episode four of Sketchorama are:

ENDEMIC
Endemic came together in 2009 as a loose collective of performers who just wanted to make new, funny stuff. This diverse bunch of experienced comedians, musicians, writers, actors and film-makers have since produced a variety of comedic offerings - music videos, online sketches and live shows, including a run at the Edinburgh Fringe festival. Their fan-base is growing, and now includes some of their own friends and family.

ABSOLUTELY
Members of the cast of Channel 4's hugely popular sketch show Absolutely reunited for a special, one-off radio appearance as part of this second series of Sketchorama. Pete Baikie, Morwenna Banks, Moray Hunter, Gordon Kennedy and John Sparkes recorded the show at The Oran Mor in Glasgow and performed new and classic material from some of the show's favourite characters - including Calum Gilhooley, Denzil and Gwynedd, The Little Girl and the Stoneybridge Town Council.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b02x93dn)
After a busy day shearing, Ed and Jazzer tease Jamie over his first experience as their catcher. Isn't he exhausted...? Finally Ed concedes that Jamie's done a good job. Jazzer's thinking of applying for a milking job at the new dairy. He thinks he's got 'transferable skills'. They all laugh and drink a toast to successful shearing. And when Jazzer falls asleep first, the other two are even more amused.

Jolene quizzes Matt gently about Paul's funeral. Evasive Matt makes his excuses and escapes to talk to Rob. Lilian calls Jolene, and has a moment of horror as she realises she's left perfume in the apartment she shared with Paul. Panicking, she wants to retrieve it. Jolene offers to go with her.

The two of them look round the flat. As she sees things that remind her of the affair, it's all too much for Lilian and she breaks down. Matt rings and she has to make a colossal effort to cover. As concerned Jolene offers comfort, Lilian confesses she doesn't think she can go on holiday with Matt. It wouldn't seem right. Jolene does her best to point out the positives. She urges Lilian not to throw it all away now.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b02x93dq)
Lenny Henry, Joan Bakewell, Foghorn Requiem and the Kate Greenaway prize winner

With John Wilson.

Lenny Henry returns to the stage after a succesful run playing Othello. He now stars in the Pulitzer prize-winning play Fences by American playwright August Wilson. Lenny Henry discusses the importance of the play and the challenge of memorising his lines in a role where he's rarely off the stage.

The winner of the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal for children's book illustration is announced today. Previous winners include Raymond Briggs, Shirley Hughes, Lauren Child and Quentin Blake. John talks to this year's winner.

The foghorn is a disappearing sound from the British coastline - increasingly made redundant by the advances of GPS technology. Now an ambitious project is using GPS technology in the service of a Foghorn Requiem. Composed by Orlando Gough, the requiem features three brass bands, a flotilla of vessels positioned offshore, and the Souter Lighthouse Foghorn itself. Composer Orlando Gough and artist Lise Autogena discuss a one-off musical performance that aims to fuse the sounds from land and sea.

In tonight's Cultural Exchange, Joan Bakewell discusses her choice - Luchino Visconti's sumptuous 1963 film adaptation of di Lampedusa's novel The Leopard.


WED 19:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x93cy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b02x93dv)
Pornography and the Internet

The statistics on internet porn are eye-popping enough - it's claimed that 36% of internet content is pornography, with one in four queries to search engines being porn-related the online porn industry makes more than $3,000 a second. But if that isn't enough to convince you that pornography has long since abandoned the seedy confines of the top shelves and colonised mainstream media, then perhaps the fact that porn is to get an academic journal devoted to the study of the genre might. Concerns about the volume, nature and easy availability of porn have been growing for some time, but the recent trials of Stuart Hazell, convicted for killing 12-year-old Tia Sharp, and Mark Bridger for killing five year old April Jones have brought the issue in to sharp focus. Both men were found to have violent pornography on their computers and one of them was watching it just hours before he carried out the murder. This week the Culture Secretary Maria Millar and charities held a summit meeting with internet service providers demanding that they do something to reduce access to obscene images, especially by children. The "ban porn/don't ban porn" argument has raged, perhaps ever since the Lady Chatterley trail. Of course there are the issues of freedom of speech and censorship, but has technology changed so rapidly in recent years that the moral framework of the debate needs to be changed? Do we have the moral language to balance the right of consenting adults to watch other consenting adults having sex against the fact that such hardcore porn is so easily available and consumed, especially by adolescent boys? Is it the job of the state to police what goes online, or should parents be taking more care what their children are doing online? Is the normalisation of porn culture subtly damaging us all by commodifying and brutalising relationships - reducing them to animalistic couplings? Or is that being hopelessly romantic? Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Giles Fraser. Witnesses: Jerry Barnett - Former Chairman of the Adult Industry Trade Association, Reg Bailey, Chief Executive of Mothers' Union, Myles Jackman - Solicitor. Sexual freedom and obscenity specialist, Eleanor Mills - Sunday Times campaigning reporter.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b02x93dx)
Series 4

Judith Shapiro

Economist Judith Shapiro argues that the next steps towards equality for women will be far harder than those which went before.

Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks which combine personal stories with ideas of contemporary relevance. Speakers air their thinking in front of a live audience, hosted by David Baddiel.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b02x93f1)
England's chief medical officer recently warned that within twenty years, the spread of antibiotic resistance may have returned us to an almost 19th century state of medicine. Infections following routine operations will be untreatable and fatal because so many common bacteria will have acquired immunity to all the available antibiotic drugs.

The vast majority of the antibiotics we rely upon today were developed between the 1940s and 1970s. There has been no new class of antibiotic for 25 years.

A radically different approach to dealing with bacteria would be stop them from communicating and coordinating their attacks, rather than trying to kill them. The bugs would be rendered harmless and much less likely to develop drug resistance.

This is the hope of researchers who are working on an aspect of bacterial life known as Quorum Sensing.
Bacteria may just be single-celled organisms but microbiologists now realise they have a kind of social life. They need to cooperate and coordinate their attacks on the bodies they infect.

Many kinds of bacteria only become dangerous to us when they sense that their numbers are high enough. Only when they 'know' that there are enough of them to overwhelm human defences, do they release their toxins and cause illness and death.

They monitor the number of their fellow bugs by sensing the concentration of a message molecule which they all manufacture and secrete into the environment. It's a rudimentary form of communication which many bacteria use to synchronise their activities.

In Frontiers, Geoff Watts talks to scientist and doctors who are exploring this phenomenon in disease-causing bacteria, and trying to devise ways of interfering with the microbial communications. One line of thinking is the development of drugs which stop the microbes from either 'talking' or 'hearing' the chemical messages.

Another more radical idea is to treat infected patients with doses of the kind of bacteria causing the illness - except that the 'medicinal' bugs would be ones that would subvert the communication system and bring the infection to an end. At least, that is the theory.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b02x93ct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b02x52ls)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b02x93f3)
Osborne announces Lloyds Bank to return to private sector, RBS to wait. Deadly Islamist attack on main UN compound in Somali capital, Mogadishu. Brazil's two largest cities reverse increases in transport fares after days of protests. Presented by Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b02x93f5)
A Commonplace Killing

Episode 8

Harriet Walter reads Episode Eight of a dark and mysterious thriller by Sian Busby. The investigation follows a new twist.

The sham of The Frobishers' marriage is now out in the open. The couple had been trying to make a go of things since Walter came back from the war 'for the sake of their son', but Walter has admitted that he knew that his wife had affairs, and finally Lillian had become aware of Walter's deceit too. Evelyn's revelation that Lillian had met a spiv called Dennis in a café has sent the enquiry off in a new direction and Cooper is now armed with an artists' impression of him. Bright eyed Policewoman Tring has made some interesting discoveries and reveals, to Cooper's devastation, that she wants to join CID.

A Commonplace Killing by Sian Busby is abridged by Lauris Morgan Griffiths and produced by Sarah Langan.


WED 23:00 Living with Mother (b01nq4j3)
Series 2

Told You I Was Ill

Lisa is a hypochondriac and worries about everything. She can't accept the fact that her son has grown up and isn't a baby anymore.

Luke wants to leave home and move in with his girlfriend but he dare not break the news to his Mum. He hasn't actually told her that he's been going out with someone for the past year. The girlfriend gives Luke an ultimatum and he eventually plucks up the courage to tell his mother about her and that she is coming over for tea. Lisa seems OK with it all - but we soon discover that she has a plan.

Writing about the first series of Living with Mother, Radio Times described it as "Alexander Kirk's astutely-observed comedy series...underpinning each of these tales is a bittersweet poignancy, a moment when the easy laughs are replaced with a lip-trembling insight into the vulnerability, lack of self-confidence and interdependency".

Cast:
Luke ..... Daniel Mays
Lisa ..... Linda Robson

Written by: Alexander Kirk

Producer: Anna Madley
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Dreaming the City (b02x93ry)
Raising the Bones

Four journeys into the dark, recurring dreams of the city. In each episode, leading writers collaborate with documentary-makers Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta to uncover the unsaid obsessions of city life.

Episode 3: Raising the Bones by Naomi Alderman

A heart-broken girl returns to the Roman ruins of Silchester, where she once spent the perfect day with a lost love. But on her return, she discovers it has been transformed into a bustling city - the city that could have been but never was.

These experimental radio features blend archive, fiction and documentary footage. What's real and what's fiction becomes unclear, just like in the city.

A city isn't just a location on the map, it's a place we imagine, dream about, invent. A place to love, to endure or to resent. A place where you can find anything - but it always has a price.

You don't need to live in a city - it's part of the universal imagination. But the way we think of it has common dark undertones, recurring dreams that come round again and again. These late night woozy dreamscapes uncover those unsaid obsessions, each taking a different theme, and question why these ideas seem to keep coming back in the way we imagine urban living.

With thanks to English Heritage.

Producers: Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b02x93s0)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster, where there's an apology from the Health Secretary over accusations of a cover-up by England's health watchdog. Also in the programme: Prime Minister's Question Time, and David Cameron's report on the G8 Summit. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



THURSDAY 20 JUNE 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b02x52mp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b02xczk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02x52mr)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02x52mt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02x52mw)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b02x52my)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02ynmsm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b02x97k2)
Feeding catering waste to pigs has been banned, ever since the foot and mouth outbreak of 2001 was traced back to pigswill which hadn't been boiled properly and contained illegally imported contaminated meat. But campaigners argue it's time to re-think the rules, to avoid wasting valuable food resources. The "Feeding the Five Thousand" campaign is now testing the idea on eight pigs at Stepney City Farm in London. Charlotte Smith has been to meet them.

And specialist new intelligence units are being used to track the tractor rustlers who are stealing hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of equipment from farms. Police and insurers are joining forces to help fund the fight against farm theft.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tr6m)
Cormorant

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Cormorant. Although cormorants are common on rocky and estuarine shores, increasingly they are breeding inland in tree colonies - where branches whitened by their droppings are a giveaway in summer.


THU 06:00 Today (b02x97k4)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Justin Webb, including:

0750
Children who live in the country or in coastal towns in England do less well at school than those who live in the big cities, Ofsted's chief inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw has said. Professor Chris Husbands, director of the Institute of Education at the University of London, and Dr Mary Bousted, general secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, discuss why rural areas and coastal areas are doing so poorly.

0810
The government has a duty to explain the benefits of genetically modified crops to the British people, Environment Secretary Owen Paterson is to say in a speech today. The BBC's science editor David Shukman reports and Owen Patterson, the Environment Secretary, outlines what he will announce.

0819
Authors who write for teenagers should include realistic sex scenes so that young people don't learn everything they know from online pornography, the new children's laureate Malorie Blackman has argued in an article in the Telegraph. The author Philip Pullman gives his view.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b02x97k6)
The Physiocrats

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Physiocrats, an important group of economic thinkers in eighteenth-century France. The Physiocrats believed that the land was the ultimate source of all wealth, and crucially that markets should not be constrained by governments. Their ideas were important not just to economists but to the course of politics in France. Later they influenced the work of Adam Smith, who called Physiocracy "perhaps the nearest approximation to the truth that has yet been published upon the subject of political economy."

With:

Richard Whatmore
Professor of Intellectual History & the History of Political Thought at the University of Sussex

Joel Felix
Professor of History at the University of Reading

Helen Paul
Lecturer in Economics and Economic History at the University of Southampton.

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b02xf60h)
Peter Stothard - Alexandria: The Last Nights of Cleopatra

Episode 4

When Peter Stothard, former editor of The Times and now editor of the Times Literary Supplement, finds himself in Alexandria in the winter of 2010 after his flight to South Africa has been cancelled, he sets out to explore a nation on the brink of revolution.

Accompanied by two native Egyptians, Mohammed and Socratis, whose eagerness to spend time with him is never really explained, Stothard traces his lifelong interest in the history of Cleopatra, and his repeated failure to write the book about her that he has started so many times.

Melancholy and sometimes humorous, Alexandria filters the life of a classics scholar turned journalist through the prism of Cleopatra's turbulent history - while all around the author, the cracks begin to appear in Hosni Mubarak's own empire.

Episode 4 (of 5):
A visit to a carpet shop and a history lesson: ancient and modern.

Read by Kenneth Cranham
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b02x97k8)
Lauren Weisberger. The Devil Returns

Author Lauren Weisberger on her new book Revenge Wears Prada: The Devil Returns. What's life like for Andrea, Miranda's former personal assistant, ten years after leaving Runway. Is she still having nightmares about her former boss? Adrian Bailey MP, chair of the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee reveal the findings of the "Women in the Workplace" Report. We celebrate the launch of the biggest archive collection of British folk music with live music from folk musicans Nancy Kerr and Fay Hield. Plus how realistic are the ideas explored in this week's 15 minute drama? the ethics and politics of reproduction.


THU 10:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x97kb)
Episode 4

Jessie becomes increasingly certain that sacrificing her own life for a healthy baby is the most important thing she can do. But her plan to become a Sleeping Beauty hits an obstacle.

Jane Rogers dramatises her dystopian novel: winner of the Arthur C Clarke Award 2012.

Stars Holliday Grainger as Jessie, Mark Jordon as Joe, Joanne Mitchell as Cath and Rebecca Ryan as Cath.

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b02x97kd)
Discontent on the Nile

'Everything is worse after the revolution' - tourism workers along the River Nile in Egypt tell Matthew Teller about the turmoil in their industry. Tessa Dunlop returns to Romania to see if the lot of orphans there has improved in the last twenty years. How some refugees from the fighting in Syria are finding a warm welcome in Hezbollah communities in northern Lebanon - Sakhr Al-Makhadhi explains. Alastair Leithead meets the Yurock tribe in northern California -- an ancient people in modern America. And why Andy Martin found the huge police presence at the G8 gathering of world leaders in Ireland distinctly disarming.
The programme is produced by Tony Grant.


THU 11:30 Shakespeare and Company (b02x97kg)
Stuart Maconie travels to the Shakespeare and Company bookshop in a bid to understand how a winding, twisting, bohemian bookstore in Paris has become a draw for generations of writers.

Since its beginnings in 1919, Shakespeare and Company has played host to an extraordinary range of authors. James Joyce and the Lost Generation of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein communed, borrowed books and exchanged ideas in the original shop founded by Sylvia Beach.

A bookshop dedicated to empowering writers, it was Sylvia Beach who first published James Joyce's Ulysses. George Whitman took up this mantle in 1951 and attracted the writers of the Beat Generation including Allen Ginsberg, William S Burroughs, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Anais Nin, and Henry Miller. In a rare interview, Beat poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti speaks to Stuart Maconie about his relationship with George Whitman.

It was not just these famous authors who worked, slept, ate and loved in this "socialist utopia masquerading as a bookstore". Stuart Maconie meets with Sylvia Whitman, daughter of the former owner, to discover the lives of the 30,000 aspiring writers called Tumbleweeds who have found shelter among the books.

Professor Andrew Hussey OBE discusses the bookshop's contemporary cultural contribution. In a literary landscape dominated by digital downloads, Stuart Maconie investigates if this labyrinth of bookish treasures can remain culturally relevant or if it has become a museum to its past.

The programme also includes contemporary authors such as former Children's Laureate Michael Morpurgo, poet Kate Tempest, author Sarah Hall and musician Olivia Chaney.

Producers: John Leonard and Ruth Fitzsimons
A Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b02x97kj)
Charges for paper billing, and new options for first-time house buyers

The companies making you pay just to receive a paper bill. We assess the success of the Government's 'Help to Buy' scheme so far and speak to first-time buyers who have had to rely on the bank of mum and dad instead. Why Stephen King will only publish his latest book in hard copies. Plus, the people paying their mortgage for the whole year by spending a couple of months in a tent.


THU 12:57 Weather (b02x52n0)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b02x97kl)
The Government says it expects the Care Quality Commission to name the senior managers alleged to have decided not to publish a damning internal report. We'll be examining the issues.

The EU's Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid tells us how arming Syria's opposition groups could make the country's situation worse.

Why you may have to ration your double gin and tonic for just a single this summer.

And as President Obama confuses the Chancellor of the Exchequer with a rhythm and blues singer, we imagine what would happen if Jeffrey Osborne were to meet George.


THU 13:45 1913: The Year Before (b02x97kn)
The Empire

The one hundredth anniversary of the start of the First World war looms on the horizon. 1914 is a date forged into the British consciousness, just as it's carved into monuments the length and breadth of the UK and many places beyond. With that awareness comes an understanding that it was the war to end all wars, shocking the culture, politics, and societies of Europe, but particularly Britain, out of their comfortable progress and reshaping everything.
But in this series Michael Portillo challenges that notion. Looking at a series of themes, the suffrage movement, the Irish question, the decline of the liberal party and the arts, he argues that to a large extent Britain was already in a state of flux by 1913 and many of the developments we think of as emanating from or being catalysed by the war, were actually in full flow.

In today's programme Michael turns his attention to The Empire. There's now a vivid understanding of the price in war dead, paid by India, Canada, Australia and South Africa amongst others. It clearly put a huge strain on relations with the mother country. But as Michael discovers, the tensions were already well matured by 1913, in spite of the flag waving of Empire Day and the spectacular celebrations of the Delhi Durbar in 1911.

Producer: Tom Alban.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b02x93dn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b02x98fc)
Death Duty

By Michael Butt

In a desperate bid for water, a city-state plagued by drought has instituted a system of so-called Gifts, a weekly lottery that leads to the sacrifice of its young men. But the Gifts aren't working, and when the man in charge of the system sees his son's number called up, his faith is sorely tested.

Producer, Sasha Yevtushenko.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b02x98ff)
Series 24

West Highland Way from Balmaha

Clare Balding walks a section of the West Highland Way, north from Balmaha, with twin sisters Pauline Walker and Fiona Rennie.

Pauline and Fiona are both 'ultra runners' and they haven't, before, walked the West Highland Way. However they have run the entire route, non-stop, several times. It's one of their favourite challenges on the ultra-runner calendar; running through the night, dealing with hallucinations, and pushing themselves to the limit is all part of the experience.

Clare hears about their adventures, their close and supportive relationship, and Fiona's recent battle with mouth cancer as they slow to an unfamiliar pace to enjoy the beautiful scenery north of Balmaha.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b02x5g16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b02x5l4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b02x98fh)
Before Midnight; World War Z; Like Someone in Love; The Sea

Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy and the director Richard Linklater reunite after almost a decade for Before Midnight, the third part of the Jessie and Celine story. In Before Sunrise, they meet on a train and spend all night together exploring Vienna. In Before Sunset, they meet again in Paris and wonder if they can re kindle their initial spark. Before Midnight explores their relationship as they hit their 40s. They talk to Francine Stock about their extraordinary collaboration.
As Brad Pitt's troubled project World War Z finally hits the big screen, the film critic Nigel Floyd assesses whether it can escape its torturous genesis to make a decent zombie-style film about a world-wide epidemic. Or has Pitt's production company over-reached itself?
Renowned Iranian film maker Abbas Kiarostami is back with another 'international' film, set this time in Japan. Like Someone in Love explores the life of a young university student who goes on paid dates while fending off a jealous fiance. Fari Bradley discusses its take on sex and morality.
And director Stephen Brown on how he persuaded the writer John Banville to give him the rights of the Booker Prize winning book The Sea.


THU 16:30 Material World (b02x98fk)
MRC; Snails; Applause

The advent of the randomised clinical trial (RCT) helped transform clinical decision making from subjective anecdotal pronouncements to evidence-based choices. To mark the 100th anniversary of the UK's Medical Research Council, Quentin Cooper is joined by Dr Catherine Elliott and Professor Andrew Nunn, both from the MRC, to reflect on the first such trial, and its subsequent ramifications, pioneered by the MRC's Sir Austin Bradford Hill for the treatment of TB.

The ecology of Ireland is subtly different to Britain's. It's long been known that certain species of animal and plant - such as the strawberry tree - exist in Ireland and the Mediterranean, but are not found in Britain. Now, geneticists at the University of Nottingham have confirmed a unique and close relationship between the snails of Ireland and those of a small region in the Pyrenees. As Dr. Angus Davison suggests, it raises the possibility that these snails were brought directly to Ireland by a single voyager, perhaps in the bilges of a trading boat, some 8000 years ago by-passing the British mainland.

When the curtain falls, what determines the length of the rapturous ovation? Is it really all to do with the quality of the show? Or could it be down to other, unrelated factors? Latest research suggests that the quality of his performance will have less impact than social pressure. Behavioural researcher Dr Richard Mann, from Uppsala University explains why and also what the wider implications of his studies of applause might mean.

The producer is Ania Lichtarowicz.


THU 17:00 PM (b02x98fm)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02x52n2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Heresy (b02x98fp)
Series 9

Episode 6

Victoria Coren Mitchell presents another edition of the show which dares to commit heresy.

Her guests this week are comedians Katy Brand and David Baddiel and television presenter Richard Osman.

Producers: Victoria Coren Mitchell and Daisy Knight
An Avalon Television production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b02x98fr)
Tony's perturbed to hear that Tom's been keeping Brian in the loop regarding the ready meals. He's hurt, and lets Tom know as much. Later Tony confides in Helen. What happens at Bridge Farm is none of Brian's business; he doesn't want Brian poking his nose in. Helen reminds him Tom doesn't have to take Brian's advice. But Tony thinks Tom's too impressed with Brian's business nous not to. Helen promises she'll do her best to make sure Tom appreciates what they all stand for. Tony insists he wouldn't put anything past Brian.

Rob helps Helen fly Henry's kite. Grateful and somewhat enchanted, Helen invites Rob to a food festival the following day.

Pip's touting for milking work, and Rob gives her the number of the agency he uses.
She shows Tony her new car, and he's impressed. Pip remarks cheerfully that now all she needs to do is find the cash to run it.

Desperate Lilian still hasn't packed for the holiday. Matt coaxes her, like a child, to get her things together. As he begins to lose patience, heavy-hearted Lilian finally gets in the car and they set off.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b02x98ft)
David Edgar, Errol Flynn, Airport Live, Glenn Patterson

With Mark Lawson

The business side of aviation and the logistics of the industry are the focus of a series of TV documentaries this week. The bosses of easyJet and Ryanair reveal their business models tonight in Flights and Fights: Inside the Low-Cost Airlines, and Airport Live concludes with its final report from Heathrow. Henry Sutton, whose novels include Flying, reviews both.

Northern Irish novelist Glenn Patterson selects his Cultural Exchange, the 1942 film Yankee Doodle Dandy starring James Cagney, about the life of the renowned musical composer, playwright, actor, dancer and singer George M. Cohan.

Tomorrow the Royal & Derngate theatre in Northampton will open an art house cinema named after Hollywood screen icon Errol Flynn. Flynn, who was born in Australia, became famous in the 1930s for playing swashbuckler roles in films including The Adventures of Robin Hood, Captain Blood and The Sea Hawk. But the actor spent his early acting career with the Northampton Repertory Company. Mark visits the Errol Flynn Filmhouse to talk to Royal & Derngate Chief Executive Martin Sutherland and Errol Flynn biographer Gerry Connelly to find out more about the actor's connection to the town.

David Edgar's new play If Only imagines what will happen to the coalition in 2014. He tells Mark what will happen to his play if life mirrors art.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


THU 19:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x97kb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b02x7t3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b02x98fw)
Food

The food industry is increasingly in the spotlight as consumers and government worry about obesity, sustainability and safety.

Evan Davis finds out from three very different food companies about how their supply chains work and how much oversight any company leader can have. Guests discuss how to create an efficient and cost effective system that delivers on quality and safety. Do consumers elsewhere in Europe and the world demand the same level of locally-sourced credentials as the British now do and are these ideals worthwhile?

Guests:
Alastair Storey, CEO, WSH
Perween Warsi, CEO, S&A Foods
Gavin Darby, CEO, Premier Foods

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


THU 21:00 Material World (b02x98fk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b02x97k6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b02x52n4)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b02x9985)
With Carolyn Quinn

The CQC names those allegedly involved in covering up a critical report into an NHS hospital. We will discuss our trust in public institutions.

Demonstrations continue across Brazil, the BBC's reporter in Rio de Janiero with the latest news from there.

Nick Bryant reports from an Australian 'holding centre' for refugees.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b02x9987)
A Commonplace Killing

Episode 9

Harriet Walter reads Episode Nine of a dark and mysterious thriller by Sian Busby. DDI Cooper wants to find the spiv called Dennis.

Cooper is distracted temporarily from the case by a raid on a packaging factory. One of the apprehended villains though happens to be in possession of something that he hopes may lead him to the spiv that Evelyn said Lillian went off with. So next on his list of people to talk to is a barber called Manny Cohen, who it's said can fence anything from a cigarette to an elephant.

Meanwhile, Dennis has had one of his dreams again - the one that always ended with him flying through the air with the feeling that the bit that of his brain that had been blasted out of him in the war, was gone forever.

A Commonplace Killing by Sian Busby is abridged by Lauris Morgan Griffiths and produced by Sarah Langan.


THU 23:00 Listen Against (b00txhld)
Series 3

Episode 4

A disaster on the island from Desert Island Discs, and BBC presenters go commercial.

Alice Arnold and Jon Holmes look back at a week's worth of radio and TV that never happened.

Produced by Sam Bryant and Jon Holmes.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b02x9cmj)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster, as the Health Secretary updates MPs on a possible cover-up by England's healthcare regulator. Also in the programme: Prime Minister's Question Time, David Cameron's report on the G8 Summit, and the legacy of the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. Editor:Rachel Byrne.



FRIDAY 21 JUNE 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b02x52p7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b02xf60h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b02x52p9)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b02x52pc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b02x52pf)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b02x52ph)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02ynpsv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b02x9f4g)
Caz Graham visits the Royal Highland show in Edinburgh, where Scotland's politicians are trying to win the rural vote in the debate on independence. Caz speaks to Lib Dem MEP George Lyon, as he launches the Rural Better Together 'No' Campaign. She also hears from Scotland's Farming Minister, the SNP's Richard Lochhead, on his campaign for a 'Yes' vote. Also, how Scotlands food and drink industry is set to hit 12 billion pounds a year, and Caz samples some tasty Scottish produce and meets plenty of farmers too.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020trjh)
Wryneck

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Wryneck. These strange birds - with feathers intricately barred and blotched in browns, blacks, fawns and creams - are so-called because of their habit of writhing their heads round at seemingly impossible angles.


FRI 06:00 Today (b02x9f4j)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:

0751
Teacher Jeremy Forrest has been found guilty of abducting a schoolgirl. Melanie Gill, a psychologist, and Alice Robinson, an assistant head teacher and former president of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, discuss how schools, parents and the police should deal with this kind of abusive relationship.

0810
The Care Quality Commission has been revealed to have covered up its own failures in monitoring the bad performance of a Cumbria hospital. The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, answers questions on what needs to be done.

0820
The juniper, the source of gin, is under threat from a fungus, according to scientists. Dr Deborah Long, from Plantlife Scotland who is carrying out research on the disease, explains whether it can it be saved.

0823
There used to be more than a hundred foghorns stationed around the British Isles but now there are fewer than 30. The BBC's arts correspondent Rebecca Jones reports that a special requiem has been written which will be performed by ships at sea, three brass bands on the shore and the Souter Lighthouse foghorn near South Shields tomorrow afternoon to mark the demise of the foghorn.

0838
Mortality rates among people with diabetes are falling dramatically. Dr Lorraine Lipscombe, who conducted the research in the UK and Canada, to explains what was found and Dr Gerry Rayman, a consultant physician at Ipswich hospital and advises Diabetes UK, discuss the findings.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b02x5j67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b02xf6ps)
Peter Stothard - Alexandria: The Last Nights of Cleopatra

Episode 5

When Peter Stothard, former editor of The Times and now editor of the Times Literary Supplement, finds himself in Alexandria in the winter of 2010 after his flight to South Africa has been cancelled, he sets out to explore a nation on the brink of revolution.

Accompanied by two native Egyptians, Mohammed and Socratis, whose eagerness to spend time with him is never really explained, Stothard traces his lifelong interest in the history of Cleopatra, and his repeated failure to write the book about her that he has started so many times.

Melancholy and sometimes humorous, Alexandria filters the life of a classics scholar turned journalist through the prism of Cleopatra's turbulent history - while all around the author, the cracks begin to appear in Hosni Mubarak's own empire.

Episode 5 (of 5):
The author recalls seeing Elizabeth Taylor in the 1963 film Cleopatra. In the meantime the Arab Spring begins.

Read by Kenneth Cranham
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b02x9f4l)
Woman's Hour Special with the BBC Philharmonic

Live from MediaCityUK in Salford, Jenni Murray is joined by the BBC Philharmonic and conductor Jessica Cottis for a celebration of women and music. Featured composers include Elena Kats-Chernin, Anna Meredith and Alice Mary Smith. Jenni will also be having a go at conducting the orchestra in a performance of Bizet's Les Toreadors. Guests: Linda Merrick, The principal of the Royal Northern College, and Ian Graham-Jones who has written the biography of Alice Mary Smith. Guest Leader: Lesley Hatfield [Leader of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales]. Conductor: Jessica Cottis.


FRI 10:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x9f4n)
Episode 5

Society is splintering, apocalyptic sects with fundamentalist, ecological or anti-scientific beliefs are springing up. Panic, chaos and fear reign.

When Jessie's own world begins to fall apart and her best friend Sal experiences a shocking act of violence, Jessie realises it is time to take action.

The conclusion of Jane Rogers dramatisation of her award-winning novel.

Stars Holliday Grainger as Jessie, Mark Jordon as Joe, Joanne Mitchell as Cath, Rebecca Ryan as Sal, Oliver Lee as Baz and Nisa Cole as Lisa.

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b02x9f4q)
Series 13

New School: Under Construction

To kick off the new series of Lives in a Landscape, Alan Dein presents a two part special following a year in the life of a new primary school just outside Peterborough - from initial construction to the end of the third term.

For headteacher Jackie Ashley, the opening of St Michael's Church School will be the culmination of her life in teaching and probably her last role before retirement. She's keen to see the school grow to its full capacity of 210 pupils under her leadership.

But as building work continues, there are concerns it may not open its doors on time and Jackie only has five children confirmed to start in September.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


FRI 11:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Open Letters (b00y92mb)
Series 1

Utilities Companies

Through the medium of four open letters, the comedian Tom Wrigglesworth investigates the myriad examples of corporate lunacy and maddening jobsworths in modern Britain.

In this series his subjects range from traffic wardens to estate agents, with Tom recalling his own funny and ridiculous experiences as well as recounting the absurd encounters of others.

Tom finds himself bemused by the peculiar practices of utilities companies.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b02x9f4s)
Energy bills, art works, the high street

There are plans to simplify the way we pay for our gas and electricity. Will they help us to make more informed choices when we chose which energy company we chose to go with?
For two weeks in August, Britain looks set to become one huge art gallery with giant posters of artworks being displayed on billboards nationwide. And from tomorrow you can start voting for the ones to go on show.
And the battle to save the high street. One veteran retailer announces his own alternative review and the Women's Institute give details of their campaign.

Presented by Peter White
Produced by Bernadette McConnell.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b02x9f4v)
Michelle and Georgy - Penguins and Vulcans

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between best friends who have approached motherhood in very different ways, in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b02x52pk)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b02x9f4x)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 1913: The Year Before (b02x9f4z)
The Great Change

The one hundredth anniversary of the start of the First World war looms on the horizon. 1914 is a date forged into the British consciousness, just as it's carved into monuments the length and breadth of the UK and many places beyond. With that awareness comes an understanding that it was the war to end all wars, shocking the culture, politics, and societies of Europe, but particularly Britain, out of their comfortable progress and reshaping everything.
But in this series Michael Portillo challenges that notion. Looking at a series of themes, the suffrage movement, the Irish question, the decline of the liberal party and the arts, he argues that to a large extent Britain was already in a state of flux by 1913 and many of the developments we think of as emanating from or being catalysed by the war, were actually in full flow.

In the final programme Michael talks to a number of Historians about the turmoil of the pre-war years, why they've been painted as innocent and untroubled and what it was that created the tensions running in almost every walk of British life.

Producer: Tom Alban.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b02x98fr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b02x9f51)
Mind Hackers

A new drama by Lou Stein inspired by the phone hacking scandal.

Jessica Brown-Findlay (Lady Sybil in Downton Abbey) stars as ambitious media lawyer Hayley Schaffer. When she begins to suspect that a daily newspaper is illegally obtaining information about one of her clients, she pushes the boundaries of legality to defend her client and advance her career. She locks horns with her former lover and mentor, newspaper lawyer Paul Madsen (played by Anthony Head), in an effort to uncover the truth behind the scandal. But Paul has reasons of his own to encourage her to ditch her evidence.

The office of Rex Kingsley, the publicity agent whom Hayley represents (played by actor/comedian Owen Brenman) is the circus-like backdrop to the psychological battle which ensues between Hayley and Paul. He is the wizard behind the gamesmanship of lawyers, newspaper hacks, and celebrity clients.

Olivier-Award winning actress Marcia Warren also stars as Hayley's wily and dry-humoured grandmother.

Written and Directed by Lou Stein

Producer: Lucinda Mason Brown
Sound Editor: David Chilton
A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b02x9f53)
Post Bag Edition

This week the team visits Matt Biggs' garden to tackle listeners' questions as Eric Robson hosts a postbag edition of Gardeners' Question Time. Eric and Matt are joined by Pippa Greenwood and Bunny Guinness.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. I have a small yard and would like to grow tall plants to screen the windows. The yard is north-west facing, shady and very windy, and plants would need to be in large pots. I currently have a Salix Caprea willow, but it has not done well this year.

A. Black bamboo is recommended, or Hawthorne for a more 'native' feel. Hollies would work but are difficult to establish. House plants such as Dracaenas, Begonias or chili plants could be used to create a foliage curtain behind the window on the inside of the house.

Q. My 20m square lawn is repeatedly infested by moss. Is there an alternate ground cover I can plant instead of the traditional grass, ideally not too costly or time-consuming.

A. Pallets of low-growing flowering plants could be used, established using a combination of seed and plugs, that would require mowing about six times per year. Epimediums, Tiarella or Lamiums could be used if the current lawn is in a shady spot.

Q. We are trying to create a bog garden in a shady area, but have limey soil that does not agree with plants such as Candelabra Primulas, Himalayan Poppies etc. Could the panel suggest plants for the boggy area that will tolerate the lime?

A. Think about adding sulphur chips to reduce the pH, and the Primulas and Poppies should be fine. Marsh Marigolds would also do well.

Q. My soil is dry and sandy so when I grow potatoes I don't heap up the soil around them because I am worried the soil would dry out even faster and that rainwater would run off the plants. What would the panel advise?

A. If the soil is free draining, heaping up with organic matter may help to conserve the moisture. A huge amount of watering will also be needed to get good growth. Earthing up also helps to protect against frost etc.

Q. I have a bare area under a well-established Cherry tree, the area corresponding to that of the canopy. Would you plant in that area to keep year-round interest, or keep it free from plants and weeds?

A. Try a succession of bulbs early in the year. Erythroniums, Crocuses, Daffodils and Narcissus, Camassias, Tulips, Saxotile, Geraniums (specifically Geranium Phaeum 'Samobor') and Cyclamen hederifolium are all recommended. The bulbs will come out in the most part before the Cherry comes into leaf.

Q. I planted a rhubarb plant at the end of last summer and managed to get two crops from it. This year it seems to have flowered. What should I do with it?

A. Flowering is often a sign of stress or distress - in this case harvesting before the plant is established. Take the flower stem out and keep the plant well watered and manured, and don't pull any more sticks from it until it is well established. Rhubarb flowers are very beautiful - Rheum Ribes, the Syrian rhubarb, is a wild species grown just for its flowers.

Q. I have a very shady garden and wanted to grow a Clematis which would enjoy the shady location. Two years ago I bought a Clematis called 'Guernsey Cream' which claimed to do well in shade. For two springs the plant flowered well. However, this year's flowers have been small and green. Why is this?

A. There is an infection that Clematis gets, caused by a microplasma, which causes the plant's petals to turn green. This tends to remain, so it may be best to begin again with a new plant. When growing Clematis in shady spots, opt for varieties with paler flowers (such as 'Nelly Moser') as they keep their colour for longer.

Q. I have nine old Hawthorne trees around the boundary of my garden. They look like they may have once been a hedge, but that left uncut have become trees. If I were to cut down the trees to around 6ft, would they grow and bush out again and how long would this take?

A. Planting a secondary hedge below them would probably work better - plants such as Rosa Arvensis or Rosa Canina, Gelder Rose, native Dogwoods, Field Maples and Euonymus are recommended.

Q. There is a Rowan tree growing in a Scots Pine near my house. Can the panel shed any light on what the Rowan is doing growing so high up in a Pine?

A. The Rowan berry would probably have been deposited in the Pine by a bird, and rot or general debris up the pine will have allowed the roots to take hold. Water from the atmosphere will have helped the Rowan to survive.


FRI 15:45 Home Sweet Home (b02x9f55)
A Room of One's Own

1/3. A Room of One's Own.

Writer and standup AL Kennedy has upped sticks and left Glasgow for London, but English conveyancing law and her solicitor's concern about sewage pipes leaves her bewildered and confused.

She misses her old, familiar writing room back home, and criss-crosses the capital looking for a new place to call her own. Meanwhile, her favourite black writing chair beckons - but it's boxed up in a storage warehouse somewhere near Heathrow. It's a writer's life...

Producer: Mark Smalley.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b02x9f57)
An actor, a youth worker, a ballet dancer, a poet and a local radio presenter

Matthew Bannister on

The American actor James Gandolfini - best known for playing the mafia boss Tony Soprano.

The youth worker Elizabeth Braund who transformed the lives of thousands of inner city children by inviting them to her working Dartmoor farm.

The former principal dancer at the Royal Ballet David Wall - Deborah Bull pays tribute.

The poet Oliver Bernard, last survivor of the Bohemian days of Soho.

And Mark Turnbull - the blind presenter on BBC Tees, loved by his listeners but not always by his local managers, he became the President of the National Union of Journalists.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b02x9f59)
This week Quentin Cooper presented his last edition of Radio 4's long-running science programme Material World. The Editor of BBC Radio Science, Deborah Cohen tells Roger why it was time for a change.

In the wake of our interview with BBC Trustee Richard Ayre about the BBC's loss of £98.2 million, we air your views on the decision to bring in outside investigators at further cost.

There was another story about BBC finances this week. But you might not have heard it. Listeners were surprised that the BBC did not report on revelations that it paid out £28 million of licence-fee payer money in payoffs over the last eight years.

Plus, OFCOM comes down on the side of listeners who complained about the use of a derogatory and discriminatory word during a Today programme interview.

Our reporter Karen Pirie mingles with the crowds at the Royal Cornwall Show to hear how BBC Cornwall interacts with its listeners.

Let sleeping dogs lie -the strange effect that Feedback has on listeners of particularly sensitive hearing.

And the moment you've all been waiting for...the announcement of our Tweet of the Week. We've been asking our loyal twitter followers on @BBCR4Feedback to tweet us their reviews of BBC Radio programmes that have caught their ear this week. If you hear something you loved or loathed tweet us your very best poetry and prose reviews and you could win: our gratitude; admiration; and the coveted title of 'Tweet of the Week' during next week's Feedback.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b02x9f5c)
Barbara and June - The Lifeboat Ladies

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about how wives and mothers cope when the lifeboat and menfolk are at sea, in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b02x9f5f)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news. Including Weather at 5.57pm.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b02x52pm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b02x9f5h)
Series 40

Episode 6

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, Marcus Brigstocke and Pippa Evans for a comic scramble through the week's news. Producer: Colin Anderson.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b02x9f5k)
Darrell pops to see Clarrie. He's moving out of 3, The Green today but would be grateful if they could let him know of any work going.

At the food festival, Helen has spotted a cooking demonstration she'd really like to watch but thinks it is a no because of Henry. Well-prepared Rob offers to entertain him. When Helen catches up with them afterwards Rob has done a great job of tiring Henry out.

On her way home, Helen bumps into Jill and Clarrie at the shop and shares her thoughts on Rob. Helen was surprised at how nice he was. Not a hard-nosed business type like Brian.

Vicky asks Jill if she'd like a sneak-peek at Bethany's christening gown. Jill points out that it looks too small now. Vicky panics and arranges for Mike to take her to Underwoods to try and get a bigger size.

On their way, they spot Darrell hitching and pick him up. A grateful Darrell explains he'll be staying with a mate in Borchester until he gets himself sorted.

Mike spots an ideal outfit in Underwoods and Vicky is thrilled. She thinks it is perfect for when they show Bethany off to the world.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b02x9f5m)
Giorgio Moroder, site-specific art, Tim Firth, Cultural Exchange

With John Wilson.

Disco legend, music producer and Oscar-winner Giorgio Moroder is the man behind hits from Donna Summer, The Three Degrees and Sparks. In a rare interview, Moroder reflects on his humble beginnings, his rise to fame and his recent comeback with Daft Punk.

As Roger Hiorns' blue crystal sculpture Seizure is moved from a derelict council flat in south London to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, artist Richard Wilson and critic Rachel Campbell-Johnston consider the importance of site-specific art and what happens when an installation is transferred to an environment other than its original location.

Tim Firth, writer of the stage version of Calendar Girls - one of the most successful plays in recent British theatre - has turned his hand to a musical. The result is This Is My Family, which explores family life from the perspective of a 13 year old girl, and opens this week in Sheffield. Tim Firth and Daniel Evans, artistic director of Sheffield Theatres, discuss the project.

For Cultural Exchange, Francine Stock chooses The Apple, a film made by Iranian director Samira Makhmalbaf in 1998, when she was only 18 years old.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb (b02x9f4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b02x9f5p)
Alistair Burt, Oona King, Bronwen Maddox, Joan Smith

Jonathan Dimbleby presents live political debate and discussion from Purley in Croydon.

The panel are Labour peer Baroness Oona King; editor of Prospect magazine Bronwen Maddox, Foreign and Commonwealth minister Alistair Burt and the novelist, journalist and human rights activist Joan Smith.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b02x9f5t)
A Midsummer Daydream

In Britain many of our holidays and festivals are rather dull - bank holidays for example. Tom Shakespeare, presenting the third of his four essays, says that when he looks at other cultures he feels a strong sense of festival envy. He wants Britain to have better festivals. To start with, shouldn't we celebrate Midsummer?


FRI 21:00 1913: The Year Before (b02x9f5w)
1913: The Year Before - Omnibus

Omnibus Week Two

The one hundredth anniversary of the start of the First World war looms on the horizon. 1914 is a date forged into the British consciousness, just as it's carved into monuments the length and breadth of the UK and many places beyond. With that awareness comes an understanding that it was the war to end all wars, shocking the culture, politics, and societies of Europe, but particularly Britain, out of their comfortable progress and reshaping everything.
But in this series Michael Portillo challenges that notion. Looking at a series of themes, the suffrage movement, the Irish question, the decline of the liberal party and the arts, he argues that to a large extent Britain was already in a state of flux by 1913 and many of the developments we think of as emanating from or being catalysed by the war, were actually in full flow.

Michael starts today's programme at the Railway station in Llanelli, scene of a riot in 1911. It was provoked by industrial unrest on the railways and resulted in the shooting of two men by the armed forces. The familiar high-water mark of Industrial unrest in Britain is usually understood to be the General Strike of 1926. In fact the ten year period leading up to the First World War saw a wave of industrial strife with thousands of days labour lost and a growing feeling, on the part of the workers, that their voice could and would be heard. Ships were built, railways run and the Empire supplied, but not by a quiescent work force.

Producer: Tom Alban.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b02x52pp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b02x9f5y)
Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has held an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss the country's most widespread unrest in two decades, what does the future hold for the Care Quality Commission, Paul Moss is in the Black Sea port of Trabazon in the far North East of Turkey to hear reaction to recent protests and a pair of Siberian tiger cubs have been born at a zoo in Norfolk with Carolyn Quinn.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b02x9f60)
A Commonplace Killing

Episode 10

Lillian was sick and tired of her life. The drudgery, the scrimping, and Walter's pathetic ways. She longed for some sophistication; for nice dresses, and for cocktails at Quaglino's. She had been looking for an excuse for whatever it was she felt she might just do, and discovering her husband's deceit with Evelyn was just the thing.
Dennis has woken from another one of his episodes, but this time something was different. Since the crack on the head he'd had whilst in action, he always suffered blanks when he had drunk too much, and he had definitely been drinking gin with Nesta in The Feathers. As the memories come back to him in fractured pieces, he realises that Nesta has made away with all of his money. His plea for help leads DDI Cooper to the devastating and heart rending conclusion of the case.

A Commonplace Killing by Sian Busby is abridged by Lauris Morgan Griffiths.
Produced by Sarah Langan.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b02x7t3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b02x9f62)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b02x9fmj)
Les and Dave - Milkmen With Bottle

Fi Glover presents a philosophical conversation between two former milkmen, contrasting the early mornings of the milk round with the retirement that followed, proving it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

1913: The Year Before 13:45 MON (b02x64z3)

1913: The Year Before 13:45 TUE (b02x7mx6)

1913: The Year Before 13:45 WED (b02x93d8)

1913: The Year Before 13:45 THU (b02x97kn)

1913: The Year Before 13:45 FRI (b02x9f4z)

1913: The Year Before 21:00 FRI (b02x9f5w)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b02x7t3y)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b02x7t3y)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b02qt7wq)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b02x9f5t)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b010mv4r)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b02x8znr)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b02x8znr)

American Shorts 19:45 SUN (b02x5l4s)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b02mfzrw)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b02x6707)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b02x58cl)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b02qt7wl)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b02x9f5p)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b02x5c9z)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b02x5g0y)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b02x5g0y)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b02x66zv)

Bleak Expectations 11:30 MON (b01p41hd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b02x7r7s)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b02x8znw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b02x93f5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b02x9987)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b02x9f60)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b02x5qpx)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b02x62st)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b02x62st)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b02xcz3c)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b02xcz3c)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b02xczk7)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b02xczk7)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b02xf60h)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b02xf60h)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b02xf6ps)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b02x5gky)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b02lwc5t)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b02m7g03)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b02x66zq)

Dangerous Visionaries 14:45 SUN (b02xgngc)

Dangerous Visions 14:30 SAT (b02v25nw)

Dangerous Visions 15:00 SUN (b02x5j6k)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 MON (b02x66zn)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 TUE (b02x7mx8)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 WED (b02x93db)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 THU (b02x98fc)

Derek Tangye - The Cornish Gardener 16:00 MON (b02x66zs)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b02x5j67)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b02x5j67)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b02x9f51)

Dreaming the City 23:15 WED (b02x93ry)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b02x58c2)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b02x62sm)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b02x7h0v)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b02x93cp)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b02x97k2)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b02x9f4g)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b02qt7w6)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b02x9f59)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b02q78p4)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b02x8znm)

Foot Notes 13:30 SUN (b01rgm9s)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b02qm2s7)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b02x93dx)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b02x5c9v)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b02x5c9v)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b02x58cg)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b02x97kd)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b02x6703)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b02x8znk)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b02x93dq)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b02x98ft)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b02x9f5m)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b02x93f1)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b02qt7w0)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b02x9f53)

Heresy 18:30 THU (b02x98fp)

Home Sweet Home 15:45 FRI (b02x9f55)

House on Fire 11:30 WED (b02x93d2)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b02x97k6)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b02x97k6)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b02x8znp)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 10:45 MON (b02x62sy)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 19:45 MON (b02x62sy)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 10:45 TUE (b02x7h15)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 19:45 TUE (b02x7h15)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 10:45 WED (b02x93cy)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 19:45 WED (b02x93cy)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 10:45 THU (b02x97kb)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 19:45 THU (b02x97kb)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 10:45 FRI (b02x9f4n)

Jane Rogers - The Testament of Jessie Lamb 19:45 FRI (b02x9f4n)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b02mfzq3)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b02x66zz)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b02qt7w4)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b02x9f57)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b02x7t3w)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b02x7t3w)

Listen Against 23:00 THU (b00txhld)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b02x9f4q)

Living with Mother 23:00 WED (b01nq4j3)

London's Oldest Prison: A History of Criminal Justice 11:00 WED (b02x93d0)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b02x5b6s)

Lucy Beaumont: To Hull and Back 23:00 TUE (b02x8zny)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b02x7r7v)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b02x7t3t)

Material World 16:30 THU (b02x98fk)

Material World 21:00 THU (b02x98fk)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b02qsb6f)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b02x52fn)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b02x52hf)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b02x52k1)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b02x52lb)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b02x52mp)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b02x52p7)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b02x93ct)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b02x93ct)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b02x93dd)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b02x58cj)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b02x58cj)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b02x93dv)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b02qsb6s)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b02x52fx)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b02x52hp)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b02x52k9)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b02x52ll)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b02x52my)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b02x52ph)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b02x52fz)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b02qsb71)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b02x52g3)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b02x52g7)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b02qsb9l)

News 13:00 SAT (b02qsb84)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b02x5g12)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b02x7h11)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b02x5l4g)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b02x5l4g)

PM 17:00 SAT (b02x5b4h)

PM 17:00 MON (b02x66zx)

PM 17:00 TUE (b02x7t40)

PM 17:00 WED (b02x93dl)

PM 17:00 THU (b02x98fm)

PM 17:00 FRI (b02x9f5f)

Parkinson's Law Revisited 20:00 MON (b02x6705)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b02x5l4l)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b02lyb06)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b02x5l4j)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b02qt7y4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b02ynj41)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b02ynl0z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b02ynln0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b02ynmsm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b02ynpsv)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b02x5g16)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b02x5g16)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b02x5g16)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b02qnk88)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b02x98ff)

Recycled Radio 11:00 MON (b02x62t0)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b02x58c6)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b02x5c9x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b02qsb6k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b02x52fs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b02x52hk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b02x52k5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b02x52lg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b02x52mt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b02x52pc)

Shakespeare and Company 11:30 THU (b02x97kg)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b02mqmqc)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b02x7h17)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b02qsb6h)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b02qsb6n)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b02qsb8v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b02x52fq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b02x52fv)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b02xgs36)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b02x52hh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b02x52hm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b02x52k3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b02x52k7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b02x52ld)

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Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b02x7njf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b02qsb99)

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Sketchorama 18:30 WED (b01sjj11)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b02x5g10)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b02x5g10)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b02x62sr)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b02x62sr)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b02x5g18)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b02x5g14)

Tales from the Stave 15:30 SAT (b02mxyy1)

Tales from the Stave 11:30 TUE (b02x7j74)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b02x5gl0)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b02x5l4n)

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The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b02qr6wl)

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The Castle 18:30 TUE (b01j8gyl)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b02qp1s2)

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The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b02x5j69)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b02x5j69)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b02x7h0z)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b02x7h0z)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b02x9f4v)

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The Media Show 16:30 WED (b02x93dj)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b02qt7wd)

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The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b02x58cd)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b02x5j6f)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b02x6709)

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The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b02x5l4q)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b02qd1vy)

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Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b02x7r7x)

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Tom Wrigglesworth's Open Letters 11:30 FRI (b00y92mb)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b02x5l4v)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b02x5l4x)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b02x5b4f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b02x62sw)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b02x64z1)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b02x64yz)

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Zeitgeisters 10:30 SAT (b02x58c8)

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