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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 01 JUNE 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01snqrp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01snxs9)
Paul Morley - The North (and Almost Everything in It)

Episode 5

Paul Morley grew up in Reddish, less than five miles from Manchester and even closer to Stockport. Ever since the age of seven, old enough to form an identity but too young to be aware that 'southern' was a category, Morley has always thought of himself as a northerner. What that meant, he wasn't entirely sure. It was for him, as it is for millions of others in England, an absolute, indisputable truth.
Forty years after walking down grey pavements on his way to school, Morley explores what it means to be northern.

In today's episode it's 1976, and the Sex Pistols play Manchester's Free Hall. Morley was there.

Paul Morley is an acclaimed music journalist, writer, presenter and music producer. He made his name writing for the NME between 1977 and 1983, and has gone on to publish several books about music.
Reader: Paul Morley, with additional readings from Paul Hilton
Abridger: Viv Beeby
Producer: Justine Willett.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01snqrr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01snqrt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01snqrw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01snqry)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01snz0t)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01snz0w)
She was sexually abused by her father, forgave him, he moved back into the family home but police "over-zealousness" broke the family up. One iPM listener tells Eddie Mair her story. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01snqs0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01snqs2)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b02147m6)
Series 24

In Search of Love

Clare Balding meets those who have found love and companionship through walking when she joins a group to walk a section of the Greensand Way in Surrey.

She speaks to Liz and James who explain how walking side-by-side took the awkwardness out of their first meeting. Liz said she knew James liked her when he started flirting like a teenager over lunch, even though she was wearing her Mum's over-sized waterproof at the time.

Margaret explains how walking transformed her retirement and led to a wider range of social activities. She adds, "London can be very lonely when you live on your own".

Clare hears how walk-leader Roger met his wife Sue thirty years ago on a walk, and that this history can provide a map of a relationship both literally and metaphorically. Although they walk at a different pace, Sue's keen to point out that Roger never forgets she's on the walk.

Producer: Toby Field.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0210pl2)
Farming Today This Week

Agricultural shows attract 6 million visitors every year, but what is their true purpose in the 21st century? Caz Graham visits the Royal Bath and West Show on its 150th anniversary. She asks the show's chief executive about the event's audience, and learns that sales at trade stands alone are estimated at £10 million pounds. Caz meets the farmers who hope to prove their animals' worth in competition. As well as sampling farmhouse ice cream from a new business, she meets the owner of a country outfitters which has been trading at shows for five generations, and finds out about the exacting world of competitive horse-shoeing.

Presenter: Caz Graham.
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01snqs4)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0210pl4)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, including:

0750
"I have to see people whom I have known for years cross the road to avoid me because they do not know what to say to me." That is what April Jones' mother, Coral, said as part of her witness impact statement. Why do we struggle to know what to say to grieving people, and are the British particularly bad at it? Dr Katie Koehler, assistant director of bereavement services at Child Bereavement UK and a clinical psychologist, and Rose Dixon who lost her daughter, discuss.

0810
Nick Clegg has insisted that he remains committed to a statutory register of lobbyists to help clean up politics. The policy is in the coalition agreement signed by Mr Clegg and David Cameron, but has not yet made it into the government's legislative programme. Francis Ingham, director general of the Public Relations Consultants Association, and Fabian Hamilton, a Labour MP, consider the government's position on the matter.

0818
British Airways' procedures have been under the spotlight after an accident report revealed that doors on both engines of the BA plane in last week's Heathrow emergency landing drama had been left unlatched during maintenance. Graham Braithwaite, the head of the Department of Air Transport at Cranfield University, considers the impact of the findings.

0823
A new anti-tobacco law comes into force in Russia today - a country which has one of the highest rates of smoking in the world. Forty per cent of Russians regularly light up. The law will restrict smoking in public places, prohibit tobacco advertising and, eventually, make all cafes and restaurants smoke free. But will it encourage Russians to kick the habit? BBC correspondent Steve Rosenberg has been finding out.

0830
Rebel reinforcements are reported to have arrived in the Syrian city of Qusair, where conditions after almost two weeks of fighting are thought to be very challenging. Dr Kasem Al Zein, a doctor in Qusair, and Ruth Sherlock, a correspondent for the Telegraph, consider who has the upper hand in the fighting at Qusair.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0210pl6)
Travel writer Paul Theroux

Sian Williams and Richard Coles with traveller Paul Theroux, Lucinda Lambton at Heathrow, John McCarthy in Painswick and Jamie Cullum's Inheritance Tracks. There are stories from a mother whose husband is serving life for killing their children, the 105 year old author as well as the glory that is Coronation Chicken and your Thank Yous

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 Nightingales of India (b0210pl8)
This is the remarkable story of two iconic sisters revered by Bollywood fans the world over. Lata Mangeshkar and Asha Bhosle are two of the finest and most prolific female vocalists in the business. They are playback singers extraordinaire - providing the singing voices of generations of film actresses.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown tells the story of the sisters from a humble background parallels the story of Bollywood and of India itself.

Known as the 'nightingales of India', they have forged careers spanning more than six decades. One or the other of them is rarely out of the record books as the most recorded artist in the world.

The sisters were born into a theatrical family. Lata, the older of the two, who is interviewed in the programme was left, at the age of thirteen, to support the whole family. After much hardship she got her big break and, just as the Hindi film industry was taking off at the end of the thirties, a star was born. Now in her 80s, despite her fame and fortune, she leads a quiet, simple life and remains unmarried. Her younger sister Asha, now in her eighties too, was far from shy and retiring. Teenage elopement, affairs and divorce make her the dangerous half of the duo. She too made it to the top.

Everyone who is anyone in Bollywood has worked with or is familiar with the sisters' work. And the programme includes a rare interview with Lata Mangeshkar herself.

Please note: at one point, the presenter refers to Lata and Asha's audience as being in "south east asia". This should be an audience in "south asia".

Producer: Mohini Patel

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2013.


SAT 11:00 Front Row (b0214dly)
Cultural Exchange

Mark Lawson presents highlights from the Cultural Exchange project so far, in which leading creative minds select a favourite cultural work.

The choices, which include books, music and art, have at times had life-changing consequences: Tamara Rojo, Terence Stamp and Bernardo Bertolucci explain how childhood experiences shaped their future careers.

Will Self and Mohsin Hamid share unexpected influences - The Man Who Was Thursday by G.K. Chesterton and the sci-fi novel Star Maker by Olaf Stapledon.

Choosing outside their field, writers Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and A.S. Byatt are inspired by art. A reproduction of Tutu by Ben Enwonwu means home for Adichie, and A.S. Byatt explains why she always takes a pilgrimage to see The Red Studio, by artist Henri Matisse, when she is in New York.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0210sp5)
The World's Troubles - Put on Hold!!

A world that's not just full of doom and gloom: Anna Borzello on the remarkable changes that have happened in northern Uganda since the area was abandoned by the brutal rebels of the Lords Resistance Army; Richard Porter tells us how the cruelties of Saddam Hussein have become a distant memory in the marshlands of southern Iraq -- people have returned to their homes, the wildlife is back too; BBC foreign correspondent James Reynolds talks of the phone call to London which might have cost him his job; Elisabeth Kendall explains how tribesmen of eastern Yemen are finally getting a say in their own future and Hugh Schofield, a British dad in Paris, sees his daughter transformed by philosophy lessons.
From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b0210sp7)
Mortgage refusal mix-up, fake financial advisors, discount vouchers

Meet Ms K Richardson, Ms K Richardson, and Ms K Richardson. As triplets they share the same date of birth, the same name, and, until recently, they all shared the same address. Kelly, the youngest by a few minutes, saved up carefully with her fiancé to buy a home. With few debts and all payments up to date she expected to get a mortgage easily. But when she sent for her credit record, she got a shock. Found out what happened next on the programme and hear advice about managing your credit file from Neil Munroe of the credit rating agency Equifax.

Crooks trying to sell people shares are now cloning the identity of registered financial advisers to give themselves respectability. One top adviser tells us he had to spend thousands of pounds changing his firm's name and website after it was copied flawlessly by crooks who even answered the phone in his name! And a victim of the scam tells us how he was reeled in with small investments. Every check he made seemed to show the advisor was legitimate. But it was a clone and eventually took £120,000 off him. We hear how investors can protect themselves from the fake financial advisors.

Legitimate websites of major and well-known online retailers are being used to lure people into joining a discount club which can cost them hundreds of pounds. It is all entirely above board but some customers say they are not aware they are being signed up.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b01snyk9)
Series 40

Episode 3

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Jon Holmes, Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Mitch Benn and Susan Calman to present a topical selection of stand-up, sketches and song. Produced by Colin Anderson.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01snqs6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01snqs8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01snykh)
Theresa Villiers, Sunder Katwala, Lord Adonis, Julie White

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Slough in Berkshire. The panel includes the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Theresa Villiers MP, the director of the think-tank British Future Sunder Katwala, Business woman Julie White and Labour peer Lord Adonis.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0210sp9)
A chance for Radio 4 listeners to have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions. Today, in the wake of the April Jones verdict, should internet providers do more to curb pornography? On the day that far right groups take to the streets of Britain, how is multiculturalism faring? Does the term itself divide us? And what's your reaction to the European commission's legal challenge to Britain's welfare policy on EU migrants. Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet using #bbcaq.

The producer is Katy Takatsuki.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b0210spc)
The Letter of Last Resort

The Letter of Last Resort is a hand-written letter from the Prime Minister to the commanding officer of each of Trident's submarines. It contains instruction on what action the commanding officer of the submarine should take in the event that Britain is obliterated by nuclear attack and all those in authority deceased. The letter can only say one of two things: retaliate, or, don't retaliate. Each new British prime minister must write the letter upon taking office.

Set in the near future, David Greig's brilliant play is a conversation between the new prime minister (in this case a woman) and the Head of Arrangements, John, at the end of her first day. It unpacks the arguments around nuclear deterrents - and the surreal position a new prime minster must find themself in.

Are you saying that in the end it all rests on what I write on this piece paper now -

Yes, Madam.

To write 'retaliate' is monstrous and irrational. To write 'don't retaliate' renders the whole nuclear project valueless.

Yes, Madam.

'The Letter of Last Resort, should be compulsory viewing for all our legislators' - Michael Billington, The Guardian.

'amusing, moving and thought-provoking, brilliantly encapsulating the paradoxes and terror of mutually assured destruction' - Charles Spencer, The Telegraph.

The Letter of Last Resort was
written by David Greig
directed by Nicolas Kent
and produced by Lu Kemp

The Letter of Last Resort was originally commissioned and produced by the Tricycle Theatre as part of a cycle of plays 'The Bomb - A Partial History'.


SAT 15:08 Letter of Last Resort: The Discussion (b0210spf)
What would you tell the commander of the Trident submarine at sea to do if the UK was destroyed, and its leadership killed, by a surprise nuclear strike?

To retaliate? Or not?

That is the question for Paddy O'Connell's guests.

Dr David Rodin, Commodore Tim Hare and Dr Caroline Lucas MP debate what orders they would give in a "Letter of Last Resort".

The letters contain orders from beyond the grave. They are written out by every new Prime Minister, within days of entering office, four times - one for each of Britain's four Trident submarines.

When a PM leaves office his or her orders are removed from the submarines, destroyed unread and replaced by the orders of their successor.

You can only give one order in the Letter of Last Resort. What should it be?

Producer: Arlene Gregorius
Editor: Richard Knight.


SAT 15:30 The Science of Music (b01sm6s2)
Episode 3

Professor Robert Winston looks at music with a scientist's eye in a series which seeks to fully understand our relationship with the power of sound.

In this programme, Robert Winston explores music and the mind. What's happening in our heads when we listen to music?


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0210sph)
Jessica Hynes; Ute Lemper; Women in The Apprentice

Jessica Hynes on her new suffragette comedy Up The Women. Facebook agree to tackle gender based hate speech - Laura Bates from Everyday Sexism tells us about her campaign. World Champion Paraclimber, Fran Brown. Outspoken women on The Apprentice - are they behaving badly or is it in the casting and edit? Ex-Apprentice runner-up Saira Khan, TV Executive Lorraine Heggessey and Professor Sharon Mavin discuss.
Rita Hayworth: arts critic David Benedict and Dr Helen Hanson talk about the screen siren's enduring allure.
Barking Blondes Jo Wood and Anna Webb on the importance of their dogs in forming friendships and testing relationships. Ute Lemper on the love poems of Pablo Neruda.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0210spk)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01snmp2)
The App Industry

Evan Davis meets "appreneurs" trying to make money in a marketplace where traditional business rules do not apply. Becoming an appreneur is easy. All you need is a computer and a couple of hundred pounds. And an idea of course. No surprise perhaps that thousands of new apps are created every week to serve the ever growing smart phone and tablet computer market. But what happens next? How do you make a living if your product is free? And if you sell your app, how high can you go when buyers expect a lot for very little? And how do you market to customers without knowing who they are?

Guests :
Barry Meade, co-founder Fireproof Studios
Professor Anthony Steed, co-founder Chirp
Max Whitby, co-founder & CEO Touch Press

Producer : Rosamund Jones.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01snqsb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01snqsd)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01snqsg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0210t8h)
Irvine Welsh, Clarke Peters, Richard Olivier, Simon Hopkinson, Jo Bunting, Yasmine Hamdan, Ruth Moody

Clive's Trainspotting with novelist Irvine Welsh, whose new book 'Skagboys' is the prequel to the 20th century cult classic charting the lives of Renton, Sick Boy, Spud and Tommy, addicted to the heroin flooding their disintegrating community. Clive talks about his journey from Leith to Hollywood and why he's gone back to the novel.

There's Much Ado About Nothing with Laurence Olivier's son, Richard Olivier. Clive asks Richard what it was like growing up with an iconic actor as a father and talks to him about new book 'Inspirational Leadership', which looks to the leadership lessons found in Shakespeare's plays, not least Henry V.

Jo Bunting's fine dining with food writer, cook and critic Simon Hopkinson, who reveals the sumptuous secrets that go into making the world's most delicious restaurant dishes and shows how it's possible to achieve those professional results at home. 'Simon Hopkinson Cooks' is on Monday June 3rd at 21.00 on More4.

Clive's back in the courtroom with actor Clarke Peters. Well known for his role as Detective Lester Freaman in The Wire, Clarke's now starring in 'Race,' a play set in a hotel room with a man accused of rape. 'Race' is at Hampstead Theatre, London until Saturday 29th June.

With music from Wailin' Jenny, Ruth Moody, who performs 'Trouble and Woe' from her album 'These Wilder Things'.

And from Lebanese songstress Yasmine Hamdan, who performs 'Deny' from her album 'Ya Nass'.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b0210t8k)
Series 14

The Woman and the Warrior

Playwright and novelist Chris Dolan creates an imaginative response to a story from this week's news as the award-winning series returns.

To complement Radio 4's News and Current Affairs output, our weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. The form and content is entirely led by the news topic.

From Fact to Fiction presents writers with the creative opportunity to work in a bold and instinctive way as they respond to events in the news, beginning on a Monday when an idea is selected through to Friday when the programme is recorded and edited.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0210v88)
The Mary Rose Museum; David Mamet's Race; more vampires in Byzantium

Tom Sutcliffe and guests, Ellah Allfrey, Misha Glenny and Kevin Jackson, discuss the cultural highlights of the week including the £27m Mary Rose Museum opening in Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard and David Mamet's Race

In the UK premiere of David Mamet's play, "Race," starring Jasper Britton and Clarke Peters - known to television audiences from "The Wire" - Mamet sets out to write a play which explores racial tension. Mamet himself says, "Race, like sex, is a subject on which it is near impossible to tell the truth." A playwright who likes to shock, most famous for his Pullitzer Prize winning play Glengarry Glen Ross, how close does he get to providing a truthful analysis in this play which explores one of contemporary society's most controversial themes, both in the UK and in the US.

The new £27 million Mary Rose Museum opens in Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard, showcasing the Tudor ship in a unique hot box. The Mary Rose is the only sixteenth century warship on display anywhere in the world, and the museum displays 19, 000 Tudor artefacts found on board King Henry VIII's favourite warship as well as bringing to life those who worked on board. Described by David Starkey as the "British Pompeii," the exhibition also documents the amazing story of the Mary Rose's 1982 rescue from the sea bed.

"Money, The Unauthorised Biography" by Felix Martin sets out to answer the question: "What is Money and how does it work?" Martin argues that the conventional answer - that people once used sugar in the West Indies, tobacco in Virginia and dried cod in Newfoundland, and that today's financial universe evolved from barter - is not just wrong, but dangerous. So what is the true nature of money, and how crucial is our understanding of it to our economic recovery?

And ITV's answer to Channel 4's "Homelands" is "The Americans" - set in 1980s America, when the Cold War is in full swing, it follows the lives of Soviet agents posing as an all-American family. It's written by Joseph Weisberg, who himself worked for CIA in the 90s, and is inspired by a real life incident in 2010 when the FBI discovered 10 undercover agents who had been living nationwide for over a decade.

Producer: Hilary Dunn.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0210v8b)
The Longest Suicide Note in History

Denys Blakeway tells the story of Labour's botched campaign in the 1983 general election with the help of the vivid archive from the time and interviews with participants from all sides.

In 1983, the Labour Party - in the midst of a bitter battle for the soul of the party and led by the unlikely figure of Michael Foot - produced a manifesto that was regarded as so extreme that it was dubbed by a leading party member as 'the longest suicide note in history'.

In this Archive on 4, Denys Blakeway looks at the genesis of this document which called for nuclear disarmament, withdrawal from Europe and a return to nationalisation- and which, it is alleged, only narrowly avoided a clause on the need to ban puppy farms.

Denys explores how Labour's election campaign disintegrated under the leadership of Michael Foot, a firebrand leftist orator and romantic intellectual, who rejected polling and sound-bites as no more than the slick ephemera of marketing men. Foot used all his oratory to persuade a sceptical public to embrace his vision, and led the party to a crashing defeat.

But it was not only his leadership and a radical manifesto put off the electorate. Labour's bitter civil war caused the party to split and resulted in the formation of the Social Democratic Party. Although many are critical of Michael Foot, he staved off melt-down. The Labour Party survived - just - to fight another day and, ironically enough, some of the manifesto policies regarded as so extreme in 1983 have now been adopted by the mainstream.

With Neil Kinnock, Roy Hattersley, Denis Healey, Shirley Williams, Cecil Parkinson, Tony Benn and John Sergeant.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01slrj9)
Eric Ambler - The Mask of Dimitrios

The House of the Eight Angels

Episode 2 (of 2): The House of Eight Angels

English crime writer, Charles Latimer's growing obsession with the career of infamous master criminal, Dimitrios Makropoulos, takes him to Geneva where he learns of Dimitrios' exploits as a spy, and on to Paris where, in the company of the eccentric Mr Peters, he finds his own life under very real threat.

The Mask of Dimitrios was written in 1939 by Eric Ambler, a key figure in the evolution of the crime thriller who brought realism and political awareness to the genre and influenced writers such as Graham Greene and John le Carré.

By using the criminal career of Dimitrios as a lens, it enables us to see the dark heart of Europe, a continent riven by violence and corruption. Its demonstration that the pursuit of money is the well-spring from which all other evils flow is as pertinent as ever - and its cast of drug dealers, shady businessmen and displaced refugees makes it seem astonishingly modern.

Dramatised by Stephen Sheridan
Original music by Neil Brand

Director: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01snqsj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b01sn9cf)
How Free Is Our Speech?

Are laws designed to protect individuals and minority groups from offence and harassment, inhibiting free speech?

Clive Anderson and his guests discuss whether cases such as the conviction of a woman for telling David Cameron he had "blood on his hands" and the arrest of a man for calling a police horse "gay" are bringing the law into disrepute.

Barristers Ivan Hare and Neil Addison call for the repeal of some public order laws and for reform of law relating to the incitement of hatred on the grounds or race, religion or sexual orientation.

But Chief Constable Andrew Trotter argues that such laws are essential tools in the police armoury for maintaining public order. He says minority groups and individuals deserve protection from abusive language.

Legal academic Gavin Phillipson suggests that hate speech laws should be restricted to preventing language which fundamentally questions other people's right to exist or that attempts to relegate them to lower class citizens.

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b01sm2f5)
Series 27

Episode 4

(4/13)

Paul Gambaccini welcomes four more musically-minded contestants to the wide-ranging quiz on all aspects and genres of music.

In heat four of the 2013 competition, the contestants are from London, Bury St Edmunds and Berkhamstead. They'll have to demonstrate a wide knowledge of music in all its variety, as well as specialising in a musical topic of which they've had no prior warning. Will they prefer questions on Verdi, or on Paul Weller?

The winner will take a place in the semi-finals in July.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01slrjf)
A Bouquet of Flowers

Roger McGough celebrates the centenary of the Chelsea Flower Show with a bouquet of poems about flowers.

Daisies from Emily Dickinson and Jon Silkin, roses by Blake and Burns and the wonderfully moving account of his son's birth 'The Almond Tree' by Jon Stallworthy.

With readers Juliet Aubrey, Mark Meadows and Harry Livingstone.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.



SUNDAY 02 JUNE 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b020tp0t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Mick Jackson - Junior Science (b01756jf)
The Answering Machine

To coincide with the broadcast of 'Junior Science', Mick Jackson is taking up a year-long post as writer-in residence at The Science Museum in London.

In these three specially-commissioned stories, children become involved in science with strange and unsettling results.

In 'The Answering Machine', the narrator remembers his father buying an early version of an answering machine. The machine changes the lives of his family in a chilling and unexpected way.

Mick Jackson is a Booker-nominated author and screenwriter. His first novel, The Underground Man, was shortlisted for The Booker Prize, The Whitbread First Novel Award and won The Royal Society of Authors' First Novel Award. He has published three novels and two illustrated collections of stories including Spirit Bears, Circus Bears and Sewer Bears which were produced by Sweet Talk for BBC Radio 4.

Mick also writes screenplays and has directed documentaries. One of his short stories,The Pearce Sisters, was adapted by Aardman Animation and won more than twenty prizes at international film festivals, including a BAFTA for Best Short Animation.

Mick lives in Brighton with his family.

Written by Mick Jackson
Read by David Holt

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b020tp0w)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b020tp0y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b020tp10)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b020tp12)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b02116ys)
The bells of Westminster Abbey.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b01snbm0)
Series 4

Anna Woodhouse: Windows to the Soul

Anna Woodhouse explores what looking through glass and glasses means for us.

When she was a call centre worker Anna could see the towers of Leeds University through the window of her high rise block on a Leeds council estate. For her, this symbolised both possibility and disconnection from the object of her desire. When she eventually left the estate, she completed a study on the place of glass in our culture.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine new ideas and personal stories. Speakers explain their latest thinking on the trends and ideas in culture and society in front of a live audience at Somerset House.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b020tp14)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b02116yv)
Walking a Mile in Another Man's Shoes

As the old saying has it, "Before you judge a man, you must walk a mile in his shoes".

At a time when some claim divisions in society to be widening, Mark Tully examines the place of empathy in politics, religion, medicine, popular culture and the arts. He tries to establish the difference between empathy, pity and compassion and consults the works of thinkers and writers - ranging from Jain Mystic Shrimad Rajchandra to T.S. Eliot and comic poet Shel Silverstein.

Mark also talks to veteran politician Tony Benn about the importance of developing empathy in political life and plays music by Mozart, Mark Campbell and the Bhutanese monk, Lama Gyurme.

The readers are Harriet Walter and Tim Pigott-Smith.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b02116yx)
British Brie - Anna Hill visits a young dairy farmer in Suffolk who is trying to make a living by creating something unique. Jonny Crickmore has just started producing a brie made from his unpasteurised milk. Anna visits him on Day 2 of the operation just as he is cutting the curd.

Jonny Crickmore's father is a dairy farmer at Fen Farm near Bungay in Suffolk. Jonny and his wife Dulcie decided that they want to diversify the business into making cheese. They think there is a gap in the market for a raw milk brie style cheese made in Suffolk. And they've enlisted the help of a French cheesemaker to teach them the tricks of the trade.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b020tp16)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b020tp18)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b02116yz)
Melvyn Bragg; Coronation; Synagogue Saviours

Following two days of protests in Turkey the BBC's James Reynolds talks to Edward Stourton about the underlying issues driving the unrest, including fears about the secular state's 'Islamic drift'.

A joint report by Church Action on Poverty and Oxfam is calling for urgent action to tackle UK food poverty. We hear from one woman about what it's like to live in food poverty and Niall Cooper from CAP explains the findings of the report.

As the Queen marks the 60th Anniversary of her Coronation, Charles Carroll takes a look behind the pomp and pageantry at the religious significance of this event.

'How will we ever get over it?' This was the question asked by the family of April Jones following the conviction of Mark Bridger this week. The Bishop of Bangor, Andrew John, talks to Edward Stourton about the difficult road ahead for the family and the village of Machynlleth.

Fiyaz Mughal, director of Faith Matters and Tell Mamma, discusses Islamophobia and social media post-Woolwich.

The tiny Jewish community of Bradford have for many years been in despair about their finances - until the local Muslim community stepped in to help. Kevin Bocquet reports.

Melvyn Bragg talks to Edward about William Tyndale and his mission to translate the Bible into English ahead of BBC Two's retelling of his story in 'The Most Dangerous Man in Tudor England'.

And ahead of the Lords debate on the Government's same sex marriage legislation, Edward is joined by the Bishop of Chester, Peter Forster, and Lord Richard Harries who will be taking part in the debate.

Producers: Catherine Earlam, Zaffar Iqbal
Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b02116z1)
SignHealth

Liz Wyatt, whose son is deaf, presents the Radio 4 Appeal for SignHealth
Reg Charity:1011056
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope SignHealth.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b020tp1b)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b020tp1d)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b02116z3)
Marking the 60th Anniversary of Her Majesty The Queen's Coronation.
From Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh, the Parish Church for the Palace of Holyroodhouse.
Leader: Katie Munnik; Preacher: The Revd Neil Gardner.
With the Choir of Fettes College, Edinburgh, directed by David Goodenough.
Organist: Donald Hunt.

Hymns: O praise ye the Lord! (Laudate Dominum)
O thou who camest from above (Hereford)
Lord of Life we come to you (Eriskay Love Lilt)
Lord for the years (Lord of the years)

Anthems: Most glorious Lord of life (William Harris)
O clap your hands (Ralph Vaughan Williams)

Producer: Mo McCullough.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b01snykk)
Gatsby: The Perfect Fake

John Gray finds new resonance for our own age in the story of "the Great Gatsby". "Just as in the Roaring Twenties, we've lived through a boom that was mostly based on make-believe - easy money, inflated assets and financial skulduggery." "We want nothing more than to revive the fake prosperity that preceded the crash. Just like Gatsby, we want to return to a world that was conjured into being from dreams."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b01slvgp)
Spotted Crake

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Spotted Crake. If it weren't for its whiplash song, the spotted crake could win a prize as our least visible bird. Unlike its showy relatives the coot and the moorhen, this polka-dotted skulker is notoriously hard to find and only rarely betrays itself by singing.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b02116z5)
Sunday morning magazine programme.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b02116z7)
Matt's pulling the strings, and Tom comes to the rescue.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b02116z9)
Sir Mervyn King

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the out-going Governor of the Bank of England, Sir Mervyn King.

He has been in charge during a period of unprecedented global financial turmoil yet under his leadership the Bank of England has emerged as one of the world's most powerful central banks. He may have grown used to the pink tails coats and top hats of his attendants in Threadneedle Street but his background was far from privileged. His father worked on the railways and then became a teacher; his mother was a housewife and sang in the church choir. Their son studied hard and gained a top first at Cambridge before going on to teach at MIT and the London School of Economics.

Throughout his demanding public life he has been sustained by his twin passions for cricket and Aston Villa football club. His other great love appears to have been an intriguingly slow burn: he first met Barbara, the woman who would become his wife, in 1970 - they married in 2007.

He says, "Being the Governor of the Bank of England is actually the easiest job I've ever done; you're in charge & you've got tremendous support."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01sm2fc)
Series 66

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons is in Derry, Londonderry for this edition of the linguistically challenging Just A Minute. The panellists are; Gyles Brandreth, Tony Hawks, Fred MacAulay and Roy Walker.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b02116zc)
Michael Pollan: Why Cooking Matters

Sheila Dillon speaks to the writer Michael Pollan on the craft, science and pleasures of cooking.

In his new book, Cooked, "a love letter to cooking", Pollan who is one of the world's most popular thinkers on food reflects on the value of being a cook and preparing our own food.

From understanding the physics and culture of the barbecue to the art of fermentation, Pollan has spent the last two years researching cooking techniques around the world to help explain how transforming food has influenced our evolution and development over millions of years.

Cooking, says Pollan, is "baked into our DNA", we are "the cooking animal". For that reason he examines what we've lost as rates of domestic cooking have declined since the 1960's and what it will take for more of us to make a meaningful return to the kitchen.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b020tp1g)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b02116zf)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The New North (b02116zh)
Episode 2

Professor Martin Goodman explores the new, iconic cultural buildings that have emerged in the North of England over the last decade and asks if they represent a 'New North'.

In the second part of his journey, he visits the Hepworth Gallery in Wakefield and talks to its architect, Sir David Chipperfield about the design. In Manchester he gets a panoramic view of the city from the 47th floor penthouse of the architect Ian Simpson, who designed the tower.

He talks to Maria Balshaw, the director of the Manchester Art Gallery to find out about the historic relevance of that gallery today, and meets the director of a new cultural building, where work has just begun.

Martin also hears from Professor Peter Barrett about the regeneration of Salford Quays, home of the Imperial War Museum and the recently opened MediacityUK. Professor Barrett has studied the economics of Lottery funded arts and cultural buildings.

In Cheshire, at the Jodrell Bank telescope, Martin explores a longer-term view of the North's history with the writer Alan Garner.

In Liverpool, he visits the new Museum of Liverpool on the banks for the Mersey, meeting its director Janet Dugdale to find out about its perspective on Liverpool's history, and also talks about that city's culture and place in the world with the writer Phil Redmond. Finally Martin hears from Liverpool's Mayor about the challenges of economic austerity and public funding for the arts, and his hopes of attracting investment from China into a huge redevelopment of the city's derelict Docks.

Producer: Philip Reevell
A City Broadcasting production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01snyjz)
Cornwall

Eric Robson hosts this edition of GQT with local gardeners in Cornwall. Anne Swithinbank, Bunny Guinness and local special guest Toby Buckland feature on the panel.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions:

Q. How should I fertilise my Asparagus bed?

A. Seaweed can be used, put directly onto the crowns. If the seaweed is gathered straight after a storm, it isn't too salty and won't cause a problem. If you don't have a ready supply of seaweed, mushroom compost, horse manure, cow manure and sheep manure are all suggested. For large crowns, plant the asparagus about 90cm centres. In addition, keep the bed well weeded.

Q. We burn a lot of old timber, how can I best use the ash in the garden?

A. Wood ash is quite high in potash, so can be good for fruiting plants, or plants such as Clematis (especially in quite acid soil). Use it on the garden now rather than when it's very wet weather as the nutrients will leach away very quickly in the rain. It should be applied quite thickly and raked into the soil to prevent it from blowing away.

Q. I need to replace my polytunnel cover. A plastic cover would provide protection from wind and vermin (slugs and snails), but the crops need irrigation. A netting cover would offer similar advantages, but with natural watering, but would significantly effect light. Which would the panel recommend?

A. Shade tunnels are very good for raising shrubs and herbaceous plants in a stress-free environment. For vegetables and flavour in fruits such as tomatoes, lots of light is needed and so a plastic covering is better. Shop around for 'non-drip', 100% transparent plastics. Also recommended are tunnels with a polythene top and netted sides to prevent overheating. However, by using a seep hose throughout the tunnel and capillary matting, watering should not necessarily be a problem.

Q. I have very vigorous brambles growing through an Escallonia hedge. What is the best way to remove them?

A. Cut the tops off the brambles first, then lever the bottom out with a short spade, with a pointed blade and a T-shaped handle. Alternatively, Glyphosate can be applied using a mister bottle.

Q. I recently bought a young Rowan tree, which a friend told me has protective powers against evil spirits. Do the panellists know of any other trees with similarly powerful properties?

A. Yew trees were traditionally planted in cemeteries to capture the souls of the dead. Willow was considered by the druids to be a tree of magic and willow wands are where the concept of magician's wands comes from. Hawthorn is thought to have magical properties and is known as the fairy thorn in Ireland.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b02117wy)
Sunday Edition

Fi Glover introduces conversations about the miners' strike and the Suffolk flood of 1953, about how mums are never satisfied, and about the impact a teacher can have on a student, in the Sunday Edition of Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b02117x0)
The Radetzky March

Episode 1

The end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire as seen through the lives of three generations of the Trotta family.

Joseph Roth's most celebrated novel dramatised in two-parts by Gregory Evans.

This is the story of the Trottas, a family of Slovenian peasants ennobled when Lieutenant Joseph Trotta saves Emperor Franz Joseph's life at the Battle of Solferino in 1859. Most of the action, however, is set in the early years of the twentieth century and concerns the next two generations of Trottas, a bureaucrat and a soldier: the Baron - stiff, guarded, but secretly loving - and his son, the feckless, disaster-prone Carl Joseph.

The Radetzky March is a novel about the ending of things: love affairs, friendships, individual lives, dynasties, an empire, a world.

Literary critic Harold Blom described Joseph Roth's The Radetzky March as "One of the most readable, poignant and superb novels in twentieth century German".

Joseph Roth ...... Henry Goodman
Carl Joseph ...... Paul Ready
Franz Von Trotta ...... Sam Dale
Demant ...... Scott Handy
Barenstein ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Moser ...... Chris Pavlo
Eva ...... Joannah Tincey
Jacques ...... John Rowe
Josef Von Trotta ...... Paul Stonehouse
Onufrij ...... Ben Crowe
Kovacs ...... Robert Blythe
Kindermann ...... Matthew Watson
Sternberg ...... David Seddon
Frau Slama ...... Hannah Wood
Aunt Resi ...... Joanna Brookes

Piano and Trumpet played by Peter Ringrose

Director: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2013.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b02118cw)
Jim Crace - Quarantine

Jim Crace talks about his novel Quarantine. The novel is a re-working of the biblical account of Jesus' forty days spent in the wilderness; and, he says, has its roots in a 'Care in the Community' hostel in Moseley, Birmingham.

First published in 1997, it was shortlisted for that year's Booker Prize for Fiction.

James Naughtie presents and a group of readers ask the questions. Recorded at the Stratford-Upon-Avon Literature Festival.

July's Bookclub choice : The Time Traveller's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b02118cy)
Poets reading other poets

Roger McGough presents a selection of poetry requests. This week; poets reading other poets' work, including Maya Angelou reading Shakespeare and Alice Oswald reading Milton. Also featuring Christopher Logue's rendition of Neruda's work with jazz accompaniment, and translations of Rilke and Machado by Don Paterson.

Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01sm74t)
Iran's Nuclear Standoff

There's mounting concern over the Iranian nuclear programme. Is Tehran is simply playing cat and mouse with the international community and buying time until it is ready to develop a nuclear weapon? Evidence is emerging that Iran is co-operating with North Korea, a country which has already developed its own weapon.

The latest report from the UN's international watchdog, the IAEA, is due out next month - but has the IAEA been strong enough in its dealings with Tehran and Pyongyang?

Reporter Rob Broomby charts the history of concealment of Iran's nuclear activities and its refusal to abandon the most controversial parts of its programme, despite numerous UN Security Council resolutions and a raft of sanctions. In a detailed interview with File on 4, Iran's ambassador dealing with nuclear matters, Ali Ashgar Soltanieh, denies his country is a "serial offender". But can protestations of innocence be taken seriously when Iran still refuses inspectors access to key sites and documents?

The programme also examines the role of the IAEA in dealing with Iran and hears from former nuclear inspectors, ex-Whitehouse officials, diplomats and experts. Is the Agency up to the job of preventing states from acquiring the bomb?
Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b0210t8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b020tp1j)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b020tp1l)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b020tp1n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b02118d0)
Simon Parkes makes his selection of the best of this week's BBC Radio programmes.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b02118d2)
Jennifer still thinks Tony should have had the courtesy to say they were selling their herd. Brian is more philosophic and thinks they should get a good price. She is relieved that Brian and the Borchester Land dairy can't be blamed for the sale. They both go to check on the recently-arrived fruit pickers.

Whilst Brian is mending a caravan door, Jennifer takes a call about the next book club meeting. Jennifer is adamant she won't go, as Jim Lloyd is hosting. Brian appreciates her loyalty but thinks they shouldn't bear a grudge about Jim's article.

Before taking Peggy to church, Lilian leaves a message for Paul. She can't make Monday morning but will see him at the flat tomorrow afternoon as previously arranged. Peggy notices that Lilian seems a little down. Lilian brushes it off. Work has been very busy. Peggy thinks the forthcoming holiday in Turkey will do Lilian good.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b02119cq)
Series 16

Dorothy Parker

Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton, with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests Sue Limb and Mark Watson.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SUN 19:45 The Time Being (b02119cs)
Series 6

The Dog Track

The latest season of The Time Being brings another showcase for new voices, none of whom have been previously broadcast. Previous series have brought new talent to a wider audience and provided a stepping stone for writers who have since gone on to enjoy further success both on radio and in print, such as Tania Hershman, Heidi Amsinck, Sally Hinchcliffe and Joe Dunthorne.

The Dog Track by Rebecca F. John

A young woman visits the dog track for the first time, and weighs up a matter of life and death.

Rebecca F. John was born in 1986 and grew up in Pwll, a small village on the Welsh coast. She has previously worked as a ski instructor and in the financial sector, and holds an MA in Creative Writing from Swansea University.

Reader: Rakie Ayola
Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b01snyk3)
The maths of spies and terrorists

MI5 has been criticised in the media after it emerged that both suspects in the Woolwich attack case had been known to them for a decade. But how feasible is it for the security services to follow all the people on their watch list? Tim Harford crunches the numbers, with the help of former head of MI5, Dame Stella Rimington; Howard Wainer, distinguished research scientist at the National Board of Medical Examiners in the US; and Professor Louise Amore, a security data analytics expert from Durham University.

Kidney donations: a cost-benefit analysis
A More or Less listener is donating his kidney to a stranger. Jason contacted the programme to ask how much his donation will save the NHS. Tim Harford compares the cost of the operation with dialysis, and considers the cost-benefit analysis to the donor and recipient. And he looks at whether the UK's system for allocating kidneys could be improved.
Tim speaks to Keith Rigg, consultant transplant surgeon at Nottingham University Hospitals Trust; and Lisa Burnapp, Lead Nurse for Living Donation at NHS Blood and Transplant.

Waste paper?
The Chancellor George Osborne says the Crown Prosecution Service generates a million print-outs per day, and that it's an example of the kind of "waste" in central spending that he wants to clamp down on. But, in this context, is one million a big number?

The Apprentices do the Math
Over the centuries many top mathematicians have tried and failed to solve some of the great numerical challenges. It took 100 years to prove the Poincare Conjecture, but that was very quick when compared to the 358 years it took to solve Fermat's Last Theorem. However last week on BBC One's The Apprentice programme, a new maths conundrum for the 21st Century was discovered: what is 17 divided by 2? There's only one man who can - maybe - help solve the puzzle: TV's Johnny Ball.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01snyk1)
An actor, a child behavioural researcher, a French singer-songwriter, a chemist, a lighthouse keeper and a bass player

Matthew Bannister on:

The actor Bill Pertwee, best known as the pugnacious air raid warden in Dad's Army.

Joyce Robertson, whose research into young children who were separated from their parents transformed public policy

Georges Moustaki, the Egyptian born French singer songwriter who had an affair with Edith Piaf

Professor George Gray, the world's leading authority on the properties of liquid crystals. His work lies behind the screens that now dominate our daily lives.

Angus Hutchison, Scotland's last principal light house keeper.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0210sp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b02116z1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01sm2g0)
Labour's New New Jerusalem

The words of William Blake's Jerusalem were invoked by Labour Prime Minister Clement Attlee when he launched his party's proudest achievement: the creation of a welfare state.

"I will not cease from mental fight, Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand, Till we have built Jerusalem, In England's green and pleasant land."

But some leading Labour Party figures no longer believe in the top down model that was meant to make real that vision of a "new Jerusalem". Mukul Devichand hears from leading Labour Party figures who want a radical new welfare settlement, saying the state itself is to blame for society's ills as much as the market.

This new cadre of Labour thinkers is known as "Blue Labour". Two years ago we made a programme about them. Then they were worried about the impact of immigration on blue collar communities.

Now they are part of Labour's inner circle: academic Maurice Glasman has been elevated to the House of Lords; Jon Cruddas MP is in charge of writing the party's manifesto; and Ed Miliband's widely applauded "One Nation" conference speech last year was written by "Blue Labour" godfather Marc Stears.

The post war welfare settlement, according to Lord Glasman, represented the triumph of those who believed that government could solve social problems. That victory, says Glasman, came at a price: "A labour movement that was active and alive in the lives of people became exclusively concerned with what the state was going to do."

The alternative, according to Blue Labour thinkers, is welfare delivered at local level rather than by a centralised state; and a benefits system that prioritises those who contribute over those who do not. "The key concept we use is incentive to virtue," Lord Glasman tells Mukul Devichand, "so we have to be judgemental."

Producer: Fiona Leach

Interviewees include:

Maurice Glasman
Labour Peer

Sir Robin Wales
Labour Mayor of Newham

Jeremy Cliffe
Britain Politics Correspondent, The Economist

Polly Toynbee
Guardian Columnist

Andrew Harrop
General Secretary, The Fabian Society.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b02119kd)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b02119kg)
Sue Cameron of The Telegraph analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01snlst)
Neil Jordan on Byzantium; Dr Who 50 years on; Trailers or spoilers?

Matthew Sweet talks to the director Neil Jordan about his new vampire film, Byzantium starring Gemma Arterton and Saoirse Ronan. He describes how he relished the chance to meddle with vampire stereotypes and rituals. And 50 years after Dr Who appeared on TV, we look at the Dr Who films that took to the big screen in Technicolor. We hear from its stars Bernard Cribbins and Roberta Tovey and from Dr Who writer and comedian Mark Gatiss. Plus trailers - too much information? Tasters or spoilers? We trawl through some of the worst offenders with critic Andrew Pulver and The Creative Partnership trailer-maker Dave Coultas. And as the Japanese director Hirokazu Koreeda wins the Jury Prize at Cannes Film Festival with Like Father, Like Son, Peter Bradshaw looks at his last film, I Wish, a tale of two young brothers separated by family breakdown who pin their hopes on the magic of high speed trains.
Producer: Elaine Lester.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b02116yv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 03 JUNE 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0211bxk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01smpw6)
Multicultural Prison; Jellied Eels

The multicultural prison - a unique analysis of the daily lives and interactions of both white and ethnic minority inmates in the closed world of the modern, male prison. Diverse British nationals, foreign. and migrant populations, have been brought into close proximity within prison walls. How do they negotiate their tensions and differences? The criminologist, Coretta Phillips, talks to Laurie Taylor about her empirical research in Rochester Young Offenders' Institution and Maidstone Prison.

Also, reactions to jellied eels. Drawing on a series of ethnographic encounters collected while hanging around at a seafood stand in east London, Alex Rhys Taylor explores the relationship between individual expressions of distaste and the production of class, ethnic and generational forms of distinction.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b02116ys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0211bxm)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0211bxq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0211bxv)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0211bxz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b021zfqy)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0211hmz)
Bringing back the bumblebees - Caz Graham hears how the short-haired bumblebee, a species extinct from the UK, is being reintroduced into a reserve in Kent. She talks to Dr Nikki Gammans, leader of the project, about why the bee disappeared from Britain in the first place and how they're pinning their hopes on a collection of queen bees from Sweden.

The weather is finally warming up and with it we head into sheep shearing season. Kicking off Farming Today's 'Wool Week', Caz chats to Stephen Spencer from the British Wool Marketing Board about the current state of the UK trade.

And if you've ever come across a giant vegetable that looks a "like a leek gone wrong", chances are it was elephant garlic. The UK market is growing but, as our reporter Anna Varle discovers, the rest of Europe isn't so keen. She talks to Colin Boswell on his Isle of Wight farm, where he grows the most elephant garlic in Europe.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Anna Jones.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0211by3)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tnrx)
Nightjar

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Nightjar. Take a walk on a heath on a warm summer evening and you may hear the strange churring sound of the nightjar.


MON 06:00 Today (b0211hn1)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0211hn3)
Fairy Tale Physics?

On Start the Week Allan Little grapples with super-symmetric particles, superstrings and multiverses with the help of Jon Butterworth. But the writer Jim Baggott dismisses many of the ideas of modern theoretical physics as mere fairy tales and fantasy. The sociologist Hilary Rose bemoans the commercialisation of biological sciences and warns against believing the hype. But the world-renowned stem cell scientist Stephen Minger believes recent developments show great promise for the treatments of many life-threatening diseases.
Producer: Natalia Fernandez.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01s7yvn)
Damian Barr - Maggie and Me

Episode 1

Damian Barr reads his touching and entertaining memoir of growing up in a small Scottish steelworks town in the 80s.

On 12th October 1984 young Damian's world explodes. He watches in panic as his mum rips off her wedding ring and packs their bags. Later that night he is glued to the news as Margaret Thatcher miraculously survives the IRA bomb that has blown apart the Grand Hotel in Brighton. As his own life descends into chaos, he knows that he too must survive.

In the shadow of the Falklands war, milk snatching, and the strikes that are spreading across Britain, tensions flare up in the heart of his own community. As the local Ravenscraig steelworks and his dad's job come under threat, Damian holds onto Maggie's advice to work hard and escape.

Written and read by Damian Barr.
Abridged by Sian Preece

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0211hn5)
Women in Syria; Impact of Pornography; Playground Bullying

What impact the Syrian conflict is having on women's lives, the anti-bullying campaign aimed at autistic children that reduced bullying for all pupils, pornography and its effect on families, tribute concert for American mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, the work of a doctor who carries out terminations explored in fiction.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01pz9xx)
Kidnap

Abduction

by Richard Monks.

Director ..... Sally Avens

Richard Monks serial looks at the kidnapping of an aid worker from five different viewpoints; the hostage, one of her captors, the hostage negotiator, a soldier on a rescue mission and her daughter. As the story unfolds we discover that all the characters are trapped by events in their own lives.
The cast includes: Barbara Flynn, Hamza Jeetooa, Neil Dudgeon, James McArdle and Morven Christie.

Richard Monks is a Sony Award winning writer; his plays include - Hearing Sense, The Donor Trail, Lying Undiscovered and Shattered.


MON 11:00 Recycled Radio (b0211hn7)
Series 1

Power

What connects Adolf Hitler, John Humphrys, John Prescott, Jenni Murray and Genghis Khan? You are about to find out.

Welcome to the chopped up, looped up, sped up world of Recycled Radio - a kind of archive hour on speed.

Gerald Scarfe introduces this episode on the issue of POWER, a subject close to his heart. Expect to hear Tony Blair talking with the devil Mephistopheles about the Faustian pact; Sue Perkins on Just a Minute's Machiavellian chairman Nicholas Parsons; and Eddy Grundy from the Archers stumbling into a sliced and diced version of Animal Farm. All animals are equal, wrote George Orwell, but some are more equal than others. This programme is asking you why.

Structured around Bertrand Russell's 1948 Reith lecture on Authority and the Individual, this is a crazed reworking of his exploration of power, where it comes from, and why it works.

Producer: Miles Warde

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


MON 11:30 Bleak Expectations (b01nxt2d)
Series 5

A Pleasant Yet Dull Life Re-Evilled

Pip Bin is beginning to miss the conflict with his absent evil nemesis Mr Gently Benevolent when he receives an intriguing invitation to a house party with Britain's poshest man, the Baron-Viscount-Marqu-earl-et the Lord-Dukey Clampvulture of Too-Many Titles.

But one of the other guests may not be all he seems....

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ...... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ...... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ...... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ...... James Bachman
Clampvulture ...... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ...... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ...... Susy Kane
General Kartoffel-Kopf ...... Mark Evans

Producer: Gareth Edwards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b0211hn9)
Doctors prescribing books, stolen phones, sun creams

Doctors in England will soon be prescribing a range of specially selected books to people with mental health problems. It follows a scheme developed in Wales and widely regarded as a success. But can books be an effective treatment, and how do patients feel about reading as therapy?
Sun creams make a variety of claims as to the protection they provide, but what do they really do for our skin? How much should we use, and what is the difference between using a factor 5, 10 or 50?
Some smart-phones come with attractive warranties, but it's emerged that thieves are exploiting these to increase the profits they make on a stolen phone.
Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0211by7)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0211hnc)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Disability: A New History (b0211jrg)
Doing and Being

Work and disability has always been an awkward fit.

Peter White says, 'When as a teenager I said I wanted to be a broadcaster, there was a sharp intake of breath. Shouldn't I be considering becoming a piano tuner, or a physiotherapist? That's what blind people did. I wanted to know what it was like in the past, when people had to work - or starve.'

What he discovers is surprising - disabled people were everywhere in the 19th century work-force. In some parts of the country, more than 60% of nurses had a disability. For other disabled men and women, earning a living meant creating a particular niche for themselves. Peter uncovers the career of the blind poet Priscilla Pointon, who made a living writing poetry about her life - signing up hundreds of people on a subscription list to become a wealthy woman. She was just one in a long tradition of blind poets.

Peter also discovers a treasure trove of letters from disabled people seeking work in the Victorian period, which have been collected by Professor Stephen King of Leicester University. They describe the indignity of being assessed by the authorities of the day, and their anger at being accused of faking disability. There are some striking parallels with today, when the debate about work and disability is in full swing.

With historians Steven King, Chris Mounsey and Julie Anderson, and readings by Gerard McDermott and Emily Bevan.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Academic adviser: David Turner of Swansea University
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b02118d2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b01s8qxp)
William Trevor - The Hill Bachelors

Paulie has returned home for the funeral of his father. A man he barely knew. The remote farm is on a boreen, high up in the hills, a place he hasn't been back to in many years. As his brothers and sisters arrive home for the funeral, the question on everyone's mind is - 'What will happen to Ma?' She cannot manage by herself and Paulie knows what they are inadvertently saying - he is the only one who is unmarried, doesn't have children - it is up to him to move back and help his mother.

Caught between desire and circumstance, Paulie, must choose between marrying his long-time love, Patsy Finnucane, or caring for his widowed mother and resigning himself to the isolated life of a hill bachelor.

'There is no better short story writer in the English-speaking world' The Wall Street Journal

William Trevor has long been hailed as the master in short story telling. He has published nearly 40 novels, short story collections, plays, and collections of non-fiction. He has won three Whitbread Awards, a PEN/Macmillan Silver Pen Award, and been nominated five times for the Booker Prize, most recently for his novel Love and Summer (2009). In 1977 Trevor was awarded an honorary CBE (Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) for his services to literature.

Written by William Trevor

Directed by Gemma McMullan.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b0211jrj)
Series 27

Episode 5

(5/13)

The latest heat of the wide-ranging music quiz comes from the Radio Theatre in London, with Paul Gambaccini asking the questions.

The contestants will have to display their knowledge of music in all its variety, from Puccini and Wagner to Elvis Costello and the music of the Bond films. There are plenty of musical extracts to identify, both familiar and surprising. The winner will take a place in the Counterpoint 2013 semi-finals later in the summer.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b02116zc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Rock 'n' Roll in Four Movements (b01m182x)
When Rock 'n' Roll began, it was music of rebellion, fighting against the strait-laced world of classical music. The two worlds seemed far apart until the late Jon Lord wrote his Concerto for Rock Group and Orchestra which combined the forces of his heavy rock group Deep Purple with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The work was premiered in the Royal Albert Hall in London under the baton of Malcolm Arnold in 1969. From then until the arrival of Punk in the late seventies rockers like the Nice, Emerson Lake and Palmer and Rick Wakeman embraced this hybrid genre with great energy and enthusiasm. Rick Wakeman in particular became known for stage shows which matched the ambition of his music.

Stuart Maconie talks to Rick Wakeman and Keith Emerson about the genre's excesses. We hear from Roy Wood about the early days of the Electric Light Orchestra. And the late Jon Lord, in his last ever recorded interview, talks about his passion for writing classical music, inspired by his early experiment with his Concerto.

Stuart Maconie casts a fairly benevolent eye on the genre - in his view some of it was actually very good. But classical music critic Ivan Hewett is pleased that the genre was largely killed off by punk - although in his view there are more modern examples where classical and pop sensibilities are successfully combined, by the likes of Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead and Damon Albarn.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b0211jrn)
Livingstone's Legacy

Beyond Belief debates the place of religion and faith in today's complex world. Ernie Rea is joined by a panel to discuss how religious beliefs and traditions affect our values and perspectives.
It's 200 years since the birth of the Scottish missionary, David Livingstone. His legacy was to shape missionary work in Africa and elsewhere, right through to the present day. His supporters point to the medical and educational advances Christian missions have brought whilst his detractors talk about the oppression of colonialism. Today African missionaries are being sent to the UK.
Joining Ernie Rea to discuss Livingstone's legacy are Paul Lloyd, Senior Pastor of the Victory Outreach Church; Cyprian Yobera, an Anglican Minister in Salford and Dr Jack Thompson, Honorary Fellow at the School of Divinity, the University of Edinburgh.


MON 17:00 PM (b0211jrq)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0211by9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b0211jrs)
Series 66

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons hosts the verbally challenging panel game with panellists; Paul Merton, Richard Herring, Gyles Brandreth and Russell Kane.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0211jrv)
Freddie is happy he no longer needs extra tuition but disappointed this means less time with Ifty.

Rob returns from Germany having found some good heifers. Brian explains their recruitment challenge. There have been no suitable applicants to their ad for two assistant herd managers. Rob agrees reluctantly. He is pleased to escape the third degree from Jennifer when she starts asking about his wife Jess.

Elizabeth shows Matt and Lilian a plot of land for sale. Edgy Lilian is worried about getting involved in another big project. Matt confesses he's been thinking the same. Matt suggests lunch but she claims she has an appointment with Rick the designer.

Later Matt calls Rick to speak to Lilian. Rick is surprised, as his meeting with Lilian is not until Thursday.

Lilian goes to the flat to meet Paul as arranged but he's not there. When her phone rings, it is Jennifer asking if she had any joy convincing Peggy to have a home help from an agency. With Lilian having no success, Jennifer concedes she will have to cancel the agency.

Lilian leaves an angry phone message for Paul. Enough is enough. She's sick of being treated like this and asks him to call.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0211jrx)
Philip Glass; Michael Douglas plays Liberace; P D James on Philip Larkin

With Mark Lawson

Comedian Julian Clary reviews Steven Soderbergh's film Behind the Candelabra, starring Michael Douglas as Liberace, with Matt Damon as his lover Scott Thorson.

American composer Philip Glass discusses his latest opera, The Perfect American, which imagines the last few months of Walt Disney's life. It's based on the novel by Peter Stephan Jungk and directed by Phelim McDermott, and is Philip Glass's 24th opera.

Novelist P D James reveals her choice for the Cultural Exchange, in which leading creative minds share their passion for a favourite work. She nominates a poem by Philip Larkin.

Channel 4's first subtitled drama for two decades, French zombie drama The Returned, is reviewed by novelist Denise Mina.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01pz9xx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Looking for Luddites (b01rqnvx)
In 1813, 17 Luddites were hanged in York for machine-breaking and/or murder.

Ask people on the street if they're Luddites and the odds are they'll refer to whether or not they hate the intrusion of new technology into their lives. Which does a disservice to the original Luddite textile workers. These machine-breakers didn't hate new technology per se - rather, the way it was being used by factory owners to drive down wages, create unemployment and create an inferior product. They saw governments side with employers by doing away with guaranteed wages and union rights.

In Looking for Luddites, technology writer Bill Thompson assesses how far this authentic representation of the Luddite mindset can apply to a 21st century environment in which technology is ever more intrusive.

Has the introduction of new technology created modern-day factory environments which are as de-humanising in their own way as those of the early 19th centuries? What are the appropriate models for the introduction of new technology in terms of industrial relations? Has capitalism's insatiable need to lower costs, combined with consumer demand for competitive prices, meant that we ignore the fact that workers in the developing world have conditions imposed on them which Luddites would have baulked at?

Bill Thompson pursues the Luddite trail to the prison and execution sites in York and to the Huddersfield area, where some of the worst machine-breaking took place. He hears from RMT General Secretary Bob Crow, Minister of State for Universities and Science, David Willetts, extreme anti-technology campaigner John Zerzan, and Luddite descendant Alan Brooke.

Producer: Andrew Green
An Andrew Green production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0211jzs)
Is Regional Policy a Waste of Time?

The gap between English north and south is growing. But does government have the answer? In the north-east of England, Alison Wolf discovers why 'regional policy' may be a waste of time. Does better infrastructure or state support for 'key' industries make a real difference? But there's a twist. Instead of everyone heading from north to south, there may just be a move back in the other direction. She discovers that individuals chasing quality of life, not government pushing its policies, will be what really decides the regions' future.

Presenter: Professor Alison Wolf
Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Richard Vadon.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01snlsw)
Multiverses; Culture-driven Evolution; Lee Smolin on Time

Laura Mersini-Houghton is appearing at this weekend's How The Light Gets In festival of philosophy and music in Hay-on-Wye.Born in Albania, she is a cosmologist at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill whose theory of the origin of the visible universe has attracted a lot of attention for its strong observational predictions.
As she and Marcus Chown explain to Quentin Cooper, the recently released data from the Planck telescope lend particular support.

Could the big blue blotch on the Cosmic Microwave Background be a kind of shadow cast just after the big bang by a neighbouring universe beyond our own?

"Are evolutionary changes in our genome a cause or a consequence of cultural innovation?"

In last week's journal Science, a piece by Simon Fisher and Matt Ridley suggested that contrary to much received wisdom, we must consider whether sometimes in the evolution of the human genome, it is cultural changes which have led to genetic ones.
According to Ridley, mistaking cause for effect is common in the science, and this realisation could have profound consequencies for our understanding of who - and why - we are.

Is time real after all?

Many physicists and thinkers over the last century or so have treated our experience of the passage of time as an illusional human adaptation, and is actually unreal.
Some powerful physics relies on time being reversible, and a lot of particle physics works equally well backwards as forwards.
But in Lee Smolin's new book, Time Reborn, he outlines his conclusions from 20 years thinking, that time is real after all.
As he explains to Quentin, more importantly for him this implies the laws of physics are not constant, but have likely changed over the course of the history of the universe.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0211hn3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b0211byc)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0211jzv)
Latest from Turkey protests;

Is Labour ditching universal welfare?

Youth unemployment in Greece.

With Carolyn Quinn.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0211jzx)
Sarah Dunant - Blood and Beauty

Episode 6

Acclaimed novelist of the Italian Renaissance, Sarah Dunant, takes on the era's most infamous family - the Borgias.

The story of the Borgia Pope is not long - Roderigo Borgia, Alexander VI, was the Head of the Church for barely a decade - but an enormous amount of activity, social, political and sexual, was crammed into that period.

Our abridgement began last week in August 1492 when Roderigo Borgia won his campaign to become Pope. This week, we move on to the next four years of his reign. The problems seeded in the first year are blossoming into crises at every turn, as Italy explodes into war against the invading French. Rising above this challenge through a series of canny political manoeuvres, Alexander proves less able in his ability to control his children.

Read by Robert Glenister
Written by Sarah Dunant
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b0211jzz)
Series 2

Mike Scott and Steve Wickham of the Waterboys (the A-Side)

John Wilson continues with the series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 2, A-side. "Fisherman's Blues" - Twenty five years after it was first released, Mike Scott and Steve Wickham return to the album that marked a distinct change in the sound of their group The Waterboys. Featuring the ominous 'We Will Not Be Lovers', the otherworldly 'When Ye Go Away' and the much covered title track (including Hip Hop, torch song and Japanese punk versions), "Fisherman's Blues" only came about when Scots-born Mike went to stay with fiddler Steve Wickham in Dublin for a week in 1986 and ended up living in Ireland. Two years and well over 100 songs later, the album marks the band's musical journey from rock to roots, with electric guitar and sax being replaced by mandolin and fiddle. An album that mixes rock and roll with Celtic folk, a love of literature with spirituality and the British poetic tradition with punk's DIY ethic. The programme also features live performances of music from the album.

The B-side of the programme, where it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions, can be heard tomorrow at 3.30pm

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0211k01)
Sean Curran covers a busy day at Westminster, as David Cameron promises to launch a task force to tackle radicalisation in the UK following the fatal stabbing of Drummer Lee Rigby in Woolwich. The Prime Minister set out his plans to "learn the lessons" from the horrific killing.
On Syria, David Cameron has told MPs no decision has yet been taken on whether the UK will send arms to opposition forces in the war-torn country.
Also on the programme:
* Kristiina Cooper covers the first day of debate in the Lords on the controversial Bill that brings in same-sex marriage ceremonies.
* Simon Jones reports on MPs claims about a lack of affordable housing across Britain.
* Peter Mulligan covers peers exchanges on changes to legal aid.



TUESDAY 04 JUNE 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0211bzf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01s7yvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0211bzh)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0211bzk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0211bzm)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0211bzp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b021zdg6)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0213yff)
Farmers count the cost of severe flooding in the Czech Republic, Germany, and Austria. The European farmers union organisation COPA-COGECA says that damage already runs into hundreds of millions of euros, with the true extent of the devastation not yet known.

MPs are asking the Government to set compulsory national targets for food suppliers and retailers to cut waste. The International Development Select Committee's latest report says cutting food waste will play a key role in feeding a growing world population.

Scientists in Scotland are looking at ways of stimulating plants to use their own natural defences against infections and pests. They believe 'defence elicitor' compounds could cut the use of pesticides.

Presented by Anna Hill, and produced by Sarah Swadling.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp2b)
Kittiwake

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Kittiwake. In June you can find kittiwakes breeding on sea-cliffs around the coast. You may well hear them before you see them, shouting their name from vertiginous cliffs.


TUE 06:00 Today (b0213yfh)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and John Humphrys, including:

0752
The NHS in England missed its A&E waiting time target in the first three months of the year, researchers at the King's Fund say. The conservative MP Chris Skidmore, and the chair of the Royal College of GPs, Clare Gerada, discuss what needs to be done to address the issue.

0810
The government's consultation on proposed changes to the legal aid system ends today. Conservative MP Bob Neill outlines the changes and Sir Anthony Hooper, a former appeal court judge, explains his concerns.

0822
A hundred years ago today the suffragette Emily Davison jumped in front of the King horse at the Derby. Derby Lucinda Hawksley explains that she has published a collection of documents and anecdotes to commemorate the anniversary, and Helen Pankhurst, the granddaughter of Sylvia and great-granddaughter of Emmeline, discusses the significance of the protest.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b0213yfk)
Athene Donald

When she started her career, physicist Dame Athene Donald took a decision that shocked her colleagues. She wanted to apply the strict rules of physics to the messy, complicated world of biology.

Since then, she has taken the field of biological physics out of an unfashionable rut in the 1980s, and helped to turn into one of the most exciting and promising areas in science today.

As Professor of Experimental Physics at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge University, she studies the microscopic structure of everyday stuff, from plants to plastics.

Jim Al-Khalili talks to Athene about her life and her passionate campaign to get more women working in science.

Producer: Michelle Martin


TUE 09:30 One to One (b0213yfm)
Clive Myrie talks to Sylvia Emenike

BBC News presenter, Clive Myrie, presents the second of his three interviews on immigration as seen from an immigrant's point of view.

As the son of Jamaican immigrants who came to the UK in the 1960s, Clive has a personal interest in this topic. Clive lived abroad as a foreign correspondent for almost 15 years, returning once or twice a year to see his family. After 2004 he noticed how much the UK was changing: the EU had expanded, Polish people were settling here in large numbers and the transformation came as a shock.

In the first programme he spoke to Alp Mehmet, Vice-Chair of Migration Watch. This week he meets Sylvia Emenike. Sylvia came to the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s.

Clive will explore with Sylvia what her experience has been of living in the UK, but also of the changes she has seen since she moved here and her feelings about the waves of immigration that she's seen from other parts of the world.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b0213yfp)
Damian Barr - Maggie and Me

Episode 2

Damian Barr reads his extraordinary memoir of growing up in small-town Scotland in the 1980s.

The threat of closure comes to Ravenscraig, the nearby steelworks where Damian's dad works, and tensions build locally. But as the community mounts a campaign to 'Save the Craig' and the chaos of his homelife escalates, ten year old Damian finds escape in his books and his new best friend Mark - everybody at school loves Mark, but he's joined at the hip to Damian.

Written and read by Damian Barr.
Abridged by Sian Preece

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0213yfr)
Raha Moharrak; Bullying in the Playground

Raha Moharrak on being the first Saudi woman to climb Everest. Does parenting style have any impact on whether a child is likely to be bullied at school? We hear from Professor Dieter Wolke about his new study of bullying. There are currently 2.4 million women in the UK who do not work but want to and a new report highlights their untapped potential and calls for more women to set up new businesses. Maria Miller is Minister for Women and Equalities and a Woman's Hour Power Lister and she joins Jane to discuss the role women play in economic growth. And Mary Jane Baxter will be making her own hat live in the studio. Jane Garvey presents the programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:40 15 Minute Drama (b01pzs6p)
Kidnap

Captivity

by Richard Monks

Director ..... Sally Avens

A young boy, Samir, is left to guard the hostage Elizabeth and a bond forms between them when she hears Samir's story.

Richard Monks' drama looks at the kidnapping of an aid worker from five different viewpoints; the hostage, one of her guards, the hostage negotiator, a soldier on a rescue mission and her daughter.
The cast includes: Barbara Flynn, Hamza Jeetooa, Neil Dudgeon, James McArdle and Morven Christie.

Richard Monks is a Sony Award winning writer: his plays for radio include Hearing Sense, The Donor Trail, Shattered, Lying Undiscovered and Mole.


TUE 10:55 Coronation 60th Anniversary Service (b0213yfv)
Commentator Nicholas Witchell describes the scene in Westminster Abbey as Her Majesty The Queen, His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh and members of the Royal Family attend a service to mark the 60th anniversary of the Coronation of HM Queen Elizabeth II.

Preacher: The Archbishop of Canterbury
The Choir of Westminster Abbey
The Choir of Her Majesty's Chapel Royal
Conductor: James O'Donnell, Organist and Master of the Choristers, Westminster Abbey
Organist: Martin Ford, Assistant Organist, Westminster Abbey
Producer: Simon Vivian

Following HM The Queen's Accession to the throne in 1952, her Coronation took place, after months of planning, on Tuesday 2nd June 1953. Despite the wet weather, the route of the Golden State Coach carrying The Sovereign from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey was lined by packed crowds.

Pageantry and celebration gave way to a solemn ceremony conducted by Dr Geoffrey Fisher, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Westminster Abbey, which had been specially adapted for the service with galleries and staging to accommodate as many people as possible - a congregation, royal and political, representing the Nation, the Commonwealth, and many foreign states.

It was also the day when television came of age, as hundreds of thousands from the Commonwealth gathered around brand new television sets to share in the splendour and significance of the Coronation in a way never before possible.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b0213yfz)
Call You and Yours: The future of our high streets

It's predicted that one in five shops could disappear from our high streets in the next five years and research commissioned by You and Yours shows that attempts to stop the decline are having mixed results.

What more should be done to secure the future of our high streets? Julian Worricker puts your views to a panel of experts at the Corn Exchange in Bedford.

What would tempt you to use your local shops more often?
If you run a high-street business what would make life easier for you?
Or, is time to simply give up on some of our high streets?

On the panel:
High street veteran Bill Grimsey who has worked as a senior manager for the likes of Tesco, Iceland and Focus DIY.
Helen Dickinson chair of the British Retail Consortium, whose members account for eighty percent of all retail spending in the UK,
Mark Prisk MP, the Minister responsible for our town centres and high streets.

Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Joe Kent.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0211bzr)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b0213yzp)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Disability: A New History (b0213yg1)
Wooden Legs and Wheelchairs

Peter White has a close encounter with a huge wooden leg, and asks who got access to new technology in the 19th century.

Strangely, wooden legs were thought to be sexy in the 19th century. During the 22 years of war with France, tens of thousands of British soldiers and sailors gave their lives for their country. Surviving, with a missing limb, became tangible proof of valour - and virility.

However, the reality of life with a wooden leg was anything but romantic. Peter White discovers an extraordinary account written by a 19th century soldier, Thomas Jackson, who lost his leg in battle:

"Military surgeons are not very nice about hurting one. What with the tearing off of the bandages, and the opening of the wound afresh, and the tying of the ligaments of the arteries, I fear in my feeble strength I must have sunk under the excruciating pain. When fitted on, my wooden leg was strapped by the knee. I looked down with the same kind of satisfaction which a dog does when he gets a tin kettle tied to his tail."

But William Jackson was one of the lucky ones. As a military man, he had access to the latest technology. Disabled women were not so lucky - and could be confined to the house, unable to leave their bedroom. Two case studies - one soldier, one genteel woman in Bath - reveal how expectations of mobility were limited by gender. And how crucial it was to have individual ambition.

With historians Julie Anderson, Caroline Nielsen, and Amanda Vickery.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Academic adviser: David Turner of Swansea University
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0211jrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b018grvp)
Charles Dickens - A Tale of Two Cities

The Grindstone

Episode 4/5 - The Grindstone

Much against the wishes of his new wife, Charles Darnay is determined to travel to Paris to go to the aid of a family retainer who has been imprisoned by the revolutionary committee.

With Adam Billington, Rikki Lawton, Christopher Webster
Music by Lennert Busch
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole and Jeremy Mortimer.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b0213yg5)
Series 3

Taking Flight

Josie Long presents a selection of short documentaries in which people hurl themselves into the air with the hope of taking flight.

We glide through the air, fall into the sea and explore grand leaps of the imagination, which cross the border between dreaming and reality.

From comedian Holly Walsh's tale of hurtling off the edge of a pier in a handmade helicopter, through to the story of a trapeze artist balancing on the edge of falling as he casts himself upwards.

The items featured in the programme are:

The Fall
Featuring Charlie Morley

Sky Boy
Produced by Hana Walker-Brown

Falling for Rambo
Featuring Holly Walsh
Produced by Benjamin Partridge

The Dreamers
Featuring Charlie Morley

Looking Up
Originally broadcast in 'Space' from Radiolab
http://www.radiolab.org

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b0213yg7)
Series 2

Mike Scott & Steve Wickham of the Waterboys (the B-Side)

John Wilson continues with his new series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 2, the B-side. Having discussed the making of "Fisherman's Blues", the career changing forth album from The Waterboys (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 3rd June and available online), Mike Scott & Steve Wickham respond to questions from the audience and performs acoustic live versions of some to the tracks from the album which was released twenty five years ago.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b0213yg9)
Interview with the President of the European Court of Human Rights

Joshua Rozenberg returns for another series of Law in Action. This week, Joshua asks the president of the European Court of Human Rights, Dean Spielmann, what he makes of the fierce criticism levelled at his court by some in Britain. The short answer: not much. Also in the programme: what are we really agreeing to when we accept internet companies' terms of service? And are pornography laws in England and Wales working?


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b0213ygc)
Terry Deary & Shappi Khorsandi

In the first of a new series, Terry Deary, author of Horrible Histories, and Iranian-born British comedian Shappi Khorsandi talk to Harriett Gilbert about their favourite books.

Terry chooses a little-known but fascinating 1904 novel by G.K. Chesterton: The Napoleon of Notting Hill. It's set in an imaginary future London in 1984, and it's said to have inspired George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. For Terry, it's the book that made him become a writer.

Shappi's favourite is Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction, by Sue Townsend, in which Adrian hits middle age.

And presenter Harriett Gilbert talks about John McGahern's masterpiece, Amongst Women, which stirs up strong feelings about family in both her and her guests.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b0213ygf)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0211bzw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Castle (b01jjtn3)
Series 4

Boogie Knights

Hie ye to The Castle, a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley"), Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley"), Martha Howe-Douglas ("Horrible Histories") & Ingrid Oliver ("Watson & Oliver")

The wedding of the decade is almost ruined by 200 tents and an over-excited woodpecker. Plus Henry, Duncan and De Warenne gatecrash a rather special Hen Night

Written by Kim Fuller & Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson
Produced and directed by David Tyler.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b0213ygk)
Ruth and David are almost as nervous as Pip as they wait for her assignment results. They needn't have been so anxious as it's good news. Pip passed both retakes and her work was of such high standard she received a phone call of congratulations from her tutor. Pip has further promising news. She thinks Spencer has found her a second hand car that's in good condition.
David and Ruth discuss their delight that all their children are so full of enthusiasm at the moment, and both boys are in full preparation mode for Open Farm Sunday. Ruth remarks how strange it will feel once the cows are dried off and the milking stops for a while. She's ready to explain to the crowds on Sunday why they have decided to change to block calving. She is glad they are not in Pat and Tony's position, having to say goodbye to the herd for good.
Rob picks Adam's brain about hiring staff. He offloads his issues onto Adam, who is only too happy to provide some tips about handling Brian. The pair are getting on well and Rob has an idea about Open Farm Sunday at Brookfield.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0213yzr)
Museum of the Year 2013

John Wilson has news of the winner of the £100 000 Art Fund Prize for Museum of the Year, as he presents the programme live from the ceremony at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

The 10 contenders are:

BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead

Beaney House of Art and Knowledge, Canterbury

Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

The Hepworth Wakefield, Wakefield

Horniman Museum & Gardens, London

Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery, Glasgow

Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, Cambridge

Narberth Museum, Pembrokeshire

Preston Park Museum, Stockton-on-Tees

William Morris Gallery, London

John hears from each of the museums in the running, as well as speaking to the judges of the Prize, including Stephen Deuchar of the Art Fund, Bettany Hughes, Sarah Crompton and artist Bob and Roberta Smith.

Maria Miller, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, discusses the current role of museums, and Ian Hislop will announce the winning museum live on the programme.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01pzs6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:40 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b0213yzt)
Elderly Care: Neglected Questions

Operation Jasmine was the UK's biggest ever care home abuse investigation.

But in January this year proceedings against two key figures in the case collapsed, leaving dozens of families asking if they will ever get justice.

While relatives demand a public inquiry into what happened in the six Welsh care homes at the centre of the case, 12.5 metric tonnes of unpublished evidence lie in a Pontypool warehouse.

Experts say prosecutors too often face insurmountable difficulties in bringing people accused of neglecting the vulnerable to justice. Several high-profile figures are now calling for a change in the law: one barrister and academic tells File on 4 current legislation gives greater protection against cruelty to animals than against people.

With other major scandals such as those at Winterbourne View and Mid-Staffordshire still fresh in the public mind, Fran Abrams asks if the justice system is fit for purpose when it comes to dealing with abuse and neglect.
Producer: Nicola Dowling.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0213yzw)
The Royal College of Ophthalmologists has published guidance that gives non-medical healthcare professionals the go ahead to treat patients with macular disease, under supervision and with the appropriate training. We hear from Sobha Sivaprasad of the RCO, about why it's taken this decision. Cathy Yelf from the Macular Society gives their reaction.

We also speak to Mike Starling from National Public Radio in the US, who has headed up a project for providing captioning for radio output. This means that DeafBlind people could access radio output that is delivered to an electronic braille display. We explore the idea and ask whether it has a future here in the UK, with the BBC's technical controller for radio.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b0213yzy)
Memory and depression; Global mental health; Compassion training

An ancient memory training technique is being used to help people with depression. When someone is depressed they can find it hard to remember happier times. Dr Tim Dalgleish's study used the method of loci, associating familiar places with positive memories.

What is the best way to treat mental health problems around the world?
Vikram Patel, a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellow with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Sangath Centre in Goa in India, and Professor Pat Bracken, Psychiatrist and Clinical Director of the Mental Health Service in West Cork in Ireland, debate the extent to which a western psychiatric model can be used in low and middle income countries.

New research by Helen Weng from the University of Wisconcin Madison has shown that a short course in meditation can increase altruism.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b0213yfk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b0211bzy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0213z00)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0213z02)
Sarah Dunant - Blood and Beauty

Episode 7

Acclaimed novelist of the Italian Renaissance, Sarah Dunant, takes on the era's most infamous family - the Borgias.

The story of the Borgia Pope is not long - Roderigo Borgia, Alexander VI, was the Head of the Church for barely a decade - but an enormous amount of activity, social, political and sexual, was crammed into that period.

Our abridgement began last week in August 1492 when Roderigo Borgia won his campaign to become Pope. This week, we move on to the next four years of his reign. The problems seeded in the first year are blossoming into crises at every turn, as Italy explodes into war against the invading French. Rising above this challenge through a series of canny political manoeuvres, Alexander proves less able in his ability to control his children.

Read by Robert Glenister
Written by Sarah Dunant
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The Toll (b02140k8)
The Toll is a warm-hearted and uncynical sitcom following the lives of the people who work on a toll bridge in Wales, written by Benjamin Partridge. It centres around the character of Neville, who is the general manager of the bridge, a man struggling always to do the right thing.

In this episode, Neville (Played by Gavin and Stacy's Steffan Rhodri) finds a pair of rare birds nesting on the bridge and disrupts traffic flow to protect them, enraging motorists and his boss Felicity. Meanwhile, Paul has bought a new coat having discovered the local charity shop.

Benjamin Partridge has written for The News Quiz, The Now Show, Dilemma, The Headset Set and Listen Against. He devised the Radio 4 panel show It's Your Round. Partridge has also co-presented shows on BBC Radio Wales with Chris Corcoran or Gareth Gwynn, and is a regular panellist on the BBC Radio Wales panel show What's The Story?

Written by ..... Benjamin Partridge

Producer ..... Tilusha Ghelani.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0213z04)
The Government survives a cross-party attack on its energy policy but with its majority slashed.
The House of Lords rejects an attempt to block proposals to allow same-sex marriage.
A top Metropolitan police officer faces questions about the killing of soldier Lee Rigby in Woolwich.
A leading GP calls on ministers to work with family doctors to ease the pressure on hospitals.
And peers mark the death of the suffragette, Emily Davison, who jumped in front of the King's horse during the Derby.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 05 JUNE 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0211c0s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b0213yfp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0211c0v)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0211c0x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0211c0z)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0211c11)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b021zdp3)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0214310)
The initial findings of a review into how the Food Standards Agency handled the horsemeat scandal have been announced. Anna Hill talks to Professor Pat Troop, who carried out the review, and asks whether the FSA went wrong and what can be improved - from better early warning systems to more clarity on leadership.

Talk politics at any livestock market or agricultural event and you'll no doubt hear people say the government doesn't understand farming. A rather unexpected voice joins that chorus - none other than the former farming minister Sir Jim Paice. The MP for South East Cambridgeshire talks to Anna about a government ethos which he claims lets down farmers.

And increasing numbers of British sheep shearers are heading down under to work in New Zealand for part of the year. Not only that, changes in sheep farming here in the UK mean there's greater demand for contract shearers. Reporter Sarah Swadling meets the clippers on a sheep shearing course in Devon.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Anna Jones.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp38)
Puffin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Puffin. Far better-known for its comical looks than its calls, the puffin is a bird that that is recognised by many and has earned the nickname "sea-parrot" or "clown of the sea".


WED 06:00 Today (b0214312)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b0214314)
Cerys Matthews, Eve Branson, Margaret and Barry Mizen, Emma Decent

Libby Purves meets musician and broadcaster Cerys Matthews; Eve Branson, mother of Sir Richard; Margaret and Barry Mizen and actor and writer Emma Decent.

Cerys Matthews is a musician, broadcaster and author. Her book, Hook, Line and Singer, is a compilation of family songs with their history and tips on how they should be sung. Hook, Line and Singer is published by Particular Books. She is also appearing at the MBNA Chester Music Festival and is taking part in the 6 Music Prom at the Royal Albert Hall.

Eve Branson, Sir Richard's mum, trained as a ballet dancer before enlisting in the Women's Royal Navy Service as a signaller. After the war she became a 'Star Girl' air hostess on British South American Airways. She writes of this adventurous life in her memoir, Mum's The Word - The High Flying Adventures of Eve Branson, published by Author House.

Margaret and Barry Mizen are the parents of 16-year-old Jimmy Mizen who was killed during an attack in a bakery five years ago. Since his death Margaret and Barry have dedicated their lives to helping young people play a positive role in their community through The Jimmy Mizen Foundation. The book, Jimmy - A Legacy of Peace, written by Margaret with Justin Butcher, is published by Lion Hudson.

Emma Decent is a writer and actor. Her play, Beyond Dreams of Aberystwyth, tells the story of her father's secret past. After his death in 2009 Emma discovered she had a half-sister she knew nothing about. She wrote the play to discover why her father made the decision to abandon his daughter. Beyond Dreams of Aberystwyth is on at Hebden Bridge Little Theatre and the Greenbelt Festival, Cheltenham.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0214316)
Damian Barr - Maggie and Me

Episode 3

Powerful 1980s memoir written and read by Damian Barr.

It's 1987 and Damian Barr is eleven years old. He's terrified of the AIDS epidemic, and he's sure it's coming to get him. Secondary school is a harsh place for a young gay boy on free school dinners. As his chaotic home life escalates he attempts to hide from his sexuality, and turns to the escape offered by his friend Heather's calm home.

Written and read by Damian Barr.
Abridged by Sian Preece

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0214318)
Radical feminism; Children and bereavement

Radical Feminism - do we need it? Children and bereavement. What the latest research into Tamoxifen means for women in remission from breast cancer. Mentoring to inspire girls at primary school to aspire to go to university. Mary Lily Walker, pioneer for women's rights in Scotland. With Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01pztjk)
Kidnap

Negotiation

by Richard Monks

Director ..... Sally Avens

A hostage negotiator finds his personal life harder to confront than a kidnapping thousands of miles from home.

Richard Monks' drama looks at the kidnapping of an aid worker from five different viewpoints; the hostage, one of her guards, the hostage negotiator, a soldier on a rescue mission and her daughter.
The cast includes: Barbara Flynn, Hamza Jeetooa, Neil Dudgeon, James McArdle and Morven Christie.

Richard Monks is a Sony Award winning writer: his plays for radio include Hearing Sense, The Donor Trail, Shattered, Lying Undiscovered and Mole.


WED 11:00 Trade-Plating Round Britain (b021406q)
In the latest of his quirky and revealing assignments for Radio 4, Steve Carver works for a week as a Trade Plate driver.

'Trade-Platers' are self-employed (mostly) men who deliver vehicles up and down the country for car dealerships, rental companies, the Motability scheme, corporate clients... anyone who needs a car, or van, or lorry shifted, for whatever reason.

The 'trade-plates' themselves are the red-and-white licence plates issued to the drivers so they are legally able to drive any vehicle without being specifically registered and taxed for it.

It's a tough life. Drivers must turn up for work at around 4.30 every morning; they have no idea where they might be sent, what they'll be driving, or how they'll get home. A typical day might involve driving from Essex to Coventry, crossing Coventry by bus (or fold-up bicycle, or on foot) picking up another vehicle and delivering it to Birmingham. There you'll fetch yet another vehicle and - if you're lucky - bring it back down to Essex.

Or you might hop in a mini-bus and be delivered to Glasgow, where you'll pick up a car and drive it down to Leeds, where you'll pick up a car and drive it to Worcester, where you'll pick up a car and - perhaps - drive it back to your base.

The logistics are extraordinary, and in smaller companies with fewer vehicles on the move, drivers have no choice but to hitch between jobs. However we sent Steve to work for one of the biggest firms, based in Essex, who have 160 drivers and enough clients to ensure that hitching isn't necessary - there's always another vehicle to move. And in an extraordinary jigsaw puzzle - coordinated from the office - the deliveries are linked up, and the drivers eventually return home.

Join Steve behind the wheel as he spends the week Trade Plating Round Britain.


WED 11:30 House on Fire (b021431b)
Series 3

Crime

A new series with Matt and Vicky, the two flatmates who love to hate to love each other - with the usual mixture of somewhat hapless situations brought about by their inability to live in the real world, or indeed with each other.

They are aided and abused as ever by their less than loving parents, who can always be relied upon to wash their hands of any responsibility.

After looking at the latest crime statistics, Vicky decides to learn self-defence. But she doesn't expect to see Matt's mother at the same class.

Written by Dan Hine and Chris Sussman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b021431d)
Insulation collapse, call centre voice recognition technology

The number of homes being insulated has fallen dramatically this year perhaps local authorities could do more to promote the government's Green Deal scheme which offers it for no cash up front?

The modest insurance premium that can save you a heap of cash if you prang your hire car on holiday.

What makes a good 'call centre? More responsibility and fewer calls for handlers and says one of Britain's biggest users of the telephone contact lines.

We have heard all about the Portas towns but what about our regional shopping centres? Has anything they have tried to shore up their shopping districts worked? We visit Chester.

Smokers who want to cut down will now be able to access nicotine replacements -like patches and gum- without committing to give up entirely.

Barclays Bank says its come up with the ultimate in bank security - voice recognition, which its trialling for its wealthiest clients.

The discount supermarket which swept the board for taste at a prestigious national awards ceremony.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0211c13)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b02143ym)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Disability: A New History (b02143yp)
Sex and Marriage

Peter White explores sex and marriage between disabled people and reveals the shameful history of eugenics in Britain.

The programme begins with a document from Buckingham Palace - an order for some glamorous undergarments for a Royal Trousseau. They were sewn by the women of the Girls' Friendly Society, a group of disabled seamstresses who made a living by sewing sexy underwear. But they themselves had no expectation of marriage, or a sex life. In fact, if they were discovered not to be a virgin they were expelled from the group.

For disabled women - or men - the idea of sex or marriage was taboo. The programme traces the fear of 'bad blood' - the early and shameful history of the eugenics movement in Britain. It was a potent mixture of bad science and fear, and it ran right through society. The birth control pioneer Marie Stopes, for instance, became hysterical at the prospect of her son marrying a girl who had bad eyesight and refused to attend the wedding.

But despite such fears, there were of course romantic relationships between disabled people - not surprising, when so many of young people were living together in residential institutions in the 19th century. New research from a Swansea institution for the deaf reveals that the official rules about sex, and the reality of what happened, were very different.

With historians Professor Joanna Bourke, Mike Mantin and Vivienne Richmond. Documents are brought vividly to life by actors Euan Bailey, Gerard McDermott and Madeleine Brolly.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Academic adviser: David Turner of Swansea University
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b0213ygk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b02143yr)
Julian Simpson - Kokomo

A thriller by Julian Simpson.

A single act of cyber-terrorism. A computer virus - incredibly advanced and coded in a language no one understands - is released onto the internet, encrypting every piece of information held on every system.

All information is being held hostage.

Alice Price is sent in to negotiate the safe return of the information before the world descends into chaos. But who are the terrorists and why have they asked for Price?

Director: Julian Simpson
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b02143yt)
Payday loans

Worried about a Payday loan or thinking about taking one out? Call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk.

If money is tight and you're struggling to make it last until the next pay slip arrives, you may be tempted by adverts offering short-term or 'Payday loans'.

Who are these loans suitable for?

What should happen before you sign up?

How much will you repay and who can help if you can no longer afford it?

What are you rights and where can you complain if things go wrong?

To answer your questions, Paul Lewis will be joined by:

David Cresswell, Financial Ombudsman Service

Russell Hamblin-Boone, The Consumer Finance Association (short-term lending trade association)

Dennis Hussey, National Debtline adviser

Whatever your question, call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Phone lines are open between 1pm and 3.30pm. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b0213yzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b02143yw)
'Long Hours' work culture; Empty labour

Empty labour - international statistics suggest that the average time an employee spends engaged in private activities is 1 and a half to 2 hours a day. Laurie Taylor talks to Roland Paulsen, a Swedish sociologist, who interviewed 43 workers who spent around half their working hours on 'empty labour'. Are such employees merely 'slacking' or are such little' subversions' acts of resistance to the way work appropriates so much of our time? They're joined by the writer, Michael Bywater. By contrast, Jane Sturges, discusses her research into professionals caught up, both reluctantly as well as willingly, in a 'long hours' work culture.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b02143yy)
Leader debates?

UKIP leader Nigel Farage says he expects to be included in leader debates at the 2015 general election and may go to court if needed. Behind the scenes, broadcasters are exploring ways of staging debates both in 2015 and potentially next year before the Euro elections. So what might happen? Do all the leaders want to take part? Who has a veto? Isabel Oakeshott, political editor of the Sunday Times and Stewart Purvis, former ITN editor in chief and OFCOM partner, discuss.

Netflix has attracted publicity with its strategy of commissioning new programmes and releasing them all at once, like an online boxed set. Last week, it was the US sitcom Arrested Development and before that a remake of House of Cards. Is the new programme strategy paying off? Joris Evers, from Netflix, joins Steve from California while, in the studio, Paul Lee looks at the bigger picture for on demand services and rivalry with TV and DVDs. Paul is director of TMT research at Deloitte (tech, media and telecoms).

And why regeneration in Dr Who is such effective marketing - that's with Lorraine Heggessey who, as controller of BBC1, brought the programme back with Russell T Davies after its long break.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett

Producer: Simon Tillotson

Editor: Andy Smith.


WED 17:00 PM (b02143z0)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0211c15)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Sketchorama (b01s8q18)
Series 2

Episode 2

Thom Tuck presents the pick of the new sketch groups currently performing live on the UK comedy circuit - with character, improv, broken and musical sketch comedy.

This is the second series, and in the second episode:

SO ON AND SO FORTH
Posh sketch boys Nick Gadd, John Sherman and Martin Allanson have been performing together since 2010. In that time they have chalked up an acclaimed Edinburgh Fringe debut and picked up a Cofilmic Comedy Film Award for best sketch in 2011.

THAT PAIR
That Pair are Kathryn Bond and Lorna Shaw, who met at Bretton Hall where they discovered their mutual love of being from Essex. After graduating with one degree each in Theatre Acting, they have worked as professional actresses ever since. They came out of the comedy closet in 2010 as a female musical comedy duo. Influenced by fellow Bretton Haller's and comedy legends The League of Gentlemen and their Nans and Grandads, they perform sketches and songs with bags of silliness.

SHEEPS
Sheeps are Daran Johnson, Alastair Roberts and Liam Williams - three erudite young chaps doing sketches, and then doing themselves reflecting on their own sketches. Sheeps are graduates of that most venerable of comedy finishing schools, Cambridge Footlights. Liam Williams was runner-up in the 2010 standup contest So You Think You're Funny?, while Daran Johnson is already a prizewinning playwright.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b02144zs)
Lynda is not happy with Jazzer's ideas for the Highland Games. But Jim thinks she will be pleasantly surprised, as Jazzer has been putting his heart and soul into his research.

Lynda attempts to discuss Jennifer with Jim, but he avoids the matter, steering all conversation in another direction. But he can only avoid the issue for so long. When Jennifer visibly avoids the shop, he can't resist a snide remark. Lynda doesn't think much of Jim's behaviour and challenges him about relishing Jennifer's discomfiture. Jim admits defeat and suggests he may have gone too far.

Brian doesn't think Rob has made much progress regarding the hiring of staff. But he is pleased that Rob has found a vet practice. Even though the company doesn't meet his initial specification of a large animal practice, Rob has negotiated terms. Brian knows one of the vets, Ken Drewitt.

David and Josh discuss Josh's marketing ploys. Neil is bringing over a small ark of chickens and eggs so that Josh can display them on Sunday. It seems Rob has had a similar idea as he approaches David about displaying some information about the Borchester Land's mega-dairy. David politely declines, but Josh is offended at Rob's cheek.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b02144zv)
Anne-Marie Duff, Women's Prize for Fiction, RA Summer Exhibition, Sarah Hall

With Mark Lawson

As actress Anne-Marie Duff (The Virgin Queen, Shameless) takes to the stage as Nina in Eugene O'Neill's 1923 play Strange Interlude, she talks to Mark about the soliloquy technique, madness, shyness, and Doctor Who.

Formerly known as the Orange Prize, this year's Women's Prize for Fiction will be awarded this evening. The shortlist includes Hilary Mantel, Barbara Kingsolver, Zadie Smith, A.M. Homes, Kate Atkinson and Maria Semple. Mark speaks to the winner live from the ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall.

Now in its 245th year, the Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy in London is about to open. It is the world's largest open-submission exhibition, displaying more than 1,000 works in all styles and media, including painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, architectural models and film. Curators Eva Jiricna and Norman Ackroyd discuss the range of works chosen by the Academicians.

And for this evening's Cultural Exchange, novelist and poet Sarah Hall chooses the 1992 Director's Cut of Blade Runner - Ridley Scott's dystopian science fiction film.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01pztjk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b02144zx)
Secret Courts

Leading human rights barrister Dinah Rose challenges cabinet minister Ken Clarke over the Government's extension of the use of secret courts.

Dinah Rose is fundamentally opposed to the new law which allows so-called closed material proceedings to be used in civil courts where the Government is defending itself against such things as claims for compensation by alleged victims of torture. She says the move is unfair and unnecessary and undermines the principle of open justice. She was among a number of high profile figures who recently resigned from the Lib Dems over the issue.

But Ken Clarke, who pushed new legislation through parliament, says the alternative would be to allow Al-Qaeda to learn all of Britain's security secrets.

Their lively exchange comes in an edition of Unreliable Evidence asking if the fundamental tenet of our legal system - that justice should be seen to be done - is coming increasingly under threat.
Clive Anderson and his guests discuss the arguments for and against conducting proceedings behind closed doors in the Court of Protection, the family courts and in the criminal courts as well as issues relating to anonymity of defendants, victims and witnesses.

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b02144zz)
Series 4

Steven Poole: Think for Yourself

Steven Poole argues that we should resist the modern message, from pop science and brain scans, that humans are irrational creatures, driven by instant judgement and primordial urges.

Instead, he says we should stand up together and say we can think, and that's what makes us human.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine new ideas and personal stories. Speakers explain their latest thinking on the trends and ideas in culture and society in front of a live audience. It is recorded in front of a live audience at Somerset House in London.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Malcolm Sayer - Aerodynamic Wizard (b021463z)
Jonathan Glancey tells the story of one of the most talented but little known British designers, Malcolm Sayer.

Sayer was responsible for the classic Jaguar cars, the C- and D-Types, that won Le Mans five times throughout the 1950s. He went on to create that 1960s icon, the E Type, and the XJS.

During WWII he worked for the Bristol Aeroplane Company and, following the war, he went to Iraq in 1948 to work at Baghdad University. This only existed on paper, so he worked instead on the maintenance of a fleet of government vehicles. While overseas, he met a mysterious character who taught him some arcane and advanced mathematics.

Returning to the UK in 1950, he joined Jaguar the following year and began to use the maths he had learnt to create some extraordinary designs. He used the slide rule and log tables to work out formulae for drawing curves - work which is now undertaken by complex Computer Aided Design software.

But in many ways, Sayer was years ahead of his time. Neville Swales, who is building a replica of the one-off XJ13, has used Sayer's calculations and married them with up-to-date technology - he found that they matched almost exactly.

The programme includes interviews with Neville Swales; Sayer's test driver, Norman Dewis; Sir Stirling Moss; one of Sayer's daughters, Kate; his grandson, Sam; fellow workers at Jaguar, Peter Wilson and Mike Kimberley; writer, Philip Porter; Goodwood owner, Lord March; motoring journalist, Mick Walsh; sports car enthusiast, Jools Holland; and current Jaguar designer Ian Callum.

Jonathan Glancey also takes the new F-Type for a spin to see whether Sayer's legacy is being upheld.

Produced by Neil Rosser
A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b0214314)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b0211c17)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b021469f)
Assad forces regain town of Qusair in major blow to Syrian rebels. Clegg blocks govt plans to allow more children to be looked after by single carer. New Pakistani PM calls for end to US drone strikes. Presented by David Eades.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b02147zx)
Sarah Dunant - Blood and Beauty

Episode 8

Acclaimed novelist of the Italian Renaissance, Sarah Dunant, takes on the era's most infamous family - the Borgias.

The story of the Borgia Pope is not long - Roderigo Borgia, Alexander VI, was the Head of the Church for barely a decade - but an enormous amount of activity, social, political and sexual, was crammed into that period.

Our abridgement began last week in August 1492 when Roderigo Borgia won his campaign to become Pope. This week, we move on to the next four years of his reign. The problems seeded in the first year are blossoming into crises at every turn, as Italy explodes into war against the invading French. Rising above this challenge through a series of canny political manoeuvres, Alexander proves less able in his ability to control his children.

Read by Robert Glenister
Written by Sarah Dunant
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing (b02147zz)
Series 2

About Difficult Dads

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing: 6. About Difficult Dads

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing - tells the story of young, up-and-coming comedian Nathan Caton, who after becoming the first in his family to graduate from University, opted not to use his architecture degree but instead to try his hand at being a full-time stand-up comedian, much to his family's annoyance who desperately want him to get a 'proper job.'

The series is a mix of Nathan's stand-up intercut with scenes from his family life.

Janet a.k.a. Mum - loves Nathan, but she aint looking embarrassed for nobody!

Martin a.k.a. Dad - turning 50 and doesn't want to.

Shirley a.k.a. Grandma - can't believe she left the paradise in the West Indies and came to the freezing United Kingdom for a better life so that years later her grandson could 'tell jokes!' How can her grandson go on stage and use foul language and filthy material... it's not the good Christian way!

Each episode illustrates the criticism, interference and rollercoaster ride that Nathan endures from his disapproving family as he tries to pursue his chosen career.

About Difficult Dads

Nathan's Dad celebrates his 50th birthday but resents being made to feel middle-aged by his son. So, he challenges him to see who is The Man of the House.

Written by Nathan Caton and James Kettle
Additional Material by Ola and Maff Brown
Producer: Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


WED 23:15 Dreaming the City (b02224wv)
Ashes

Four journeys into the dark, recurring dreams of the city. In each episode, leading writers collaborate with documentary-makers Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta to uncover the unsaid obsessions of city life.

Episode 1: Ashes by Craig Taylor.

When an urban explorer suffers a fatal accident, two friends are charged with the task of scattering his ashes. They travel to London and revisit the derelict buildings, river barges and train sidings he used to explore, to find the most appropriate location for his final resting place.

These experimental radio features blend archive, fiction and documentary footage. What's real and what's fiction becomes unclear, just like in the city.

A city isn't just a location on the map, it's a place we imagine, dream about, invent. A place to love, to endure or to resent. A place where you can find anything - but it always has a price.

You don't need to live in a city - it's part of the universal imagination. But the way we think of it has common dark undertones, recurring dreams that come round again and again. These late night woozy dreamscapes uncover those unsaid obsessions, each taking a different theme, and question why these ideas seem to keep coming back in the way we imagine urban living.

Featuring the voice of Joseph Kloska.

Producers: Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0214803)
Sean Curran reports on a row over the NHS; Labour is accused of U-turns; and there's high anxiety about the badger cull.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



THURSDAY 06 JUNE 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0211c4s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0214316)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0211c4v)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0211c4x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0211c4z)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0211c51)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b02144gd)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b02144gg)
Who should maintain our rivers and streams? Defra wants everyone from farmers to wildlife groups to work together. Charlotte Smith asks whether differing priorities will create tensions between flood-hit farmers and conservation groups.

And ever thought wool was just for jumpers and scarfs? Farming Today hears about the benefits it can also have in the bedroom.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Datshiane Navanayagam.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp50)
Razorbill

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Razorbill. Smart as a dinner-jacketed waiter and with a deep blunt patterned bill, the razorbill is a striking bird - though its looks could be compensation for its voice.


THU 06:00 Today (b02144gj)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Webb and Evan Davis, including:

0751
Residents who live near wind farms could see significant reductions in their electricity bills under plans being announced today by the Government. Robert Keeler, member of North Kincardine Community Council, and Anne Hopkins, from Delabole, in Cornwall which is the site of UK's first wind farm, discuss the effect of the turbines in their area.

0810
The Labour Leader Ed Miliband is making a speech today on Labour's welfare policy, ahead of the Comprehensive Spending review. Nick Robinson, the BBC's political editor provides analysis and Liam Byrne, Shadow Work and Pensions Secretary explains that the speech will be on welfare, spending, cuts and strategy for the Labour party post- election.

0820
There are 103 detainees on hunger strike, 35 being tube fed and six hospitalised. Some 166 detainees still remain in Guantanamo Bay with 86 cleared for release. The prison costs $1m per detained to operate each year. There is one British resident left at Guantanamo Bay, Shaker Aamer who has been cleared for release. The BBC's Jonathan Beale reports.

0832
Are the protests in Turkey in recent days a sign that the country has to choose a path? That choice of course would have huge implications for both the Middle East and the European Union. The BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen from reports Istanbul.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b02144gl)
Relativity

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Einstein's theories of relativity. Between 1905 and 1917 Albert Einstein formulated a theoretical framework which transformed our understanding of the Universe. The twin theories of Special and General Relativity offered insights into the nature of space, time and gravitation which changed the face of modern science. Relativity resolved apparent contradictions in physics and also predicted several new phenomena, including black holes. It's regarded today as one of the greatest intellectual achievements of the twentieth century, and had an impact far beyond the world of science.

With:

Ruth Gregory
Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Durham University

Martin Rees
Astronomer Royal and Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge

Roger Penrose
Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford.

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b0213zsb)
Damian Barr - Maggie and Me

Episode 4

Though Damian is caught up in the anti-capitalist enthusiasm of one of his teachers who smuggles key anti Poll Tax Protesters into school to inspire the children, he still has a secret desire to impress his unlikely heroine Margaret Thatcher.

He's been hiding his sexuality for years, but he finally discovers some freedom in dancing to Madonna in Glasgow's only gay club.

Written and read by Damian Barr.
Abridged by Sian Preece

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b02144gn)
Ann Widdecombe; Curtis Sittenfeld

Ann Widdecombe on her life and new autobiography, Strictly Ann. Fines for unmarried mothers in China. Curtis Sittenfeld: the author of American Wife talks about her latest novel Sisterland. Proposed changes to Anti-Social Behaviour Orders - will they make life safer for those affected? Ruth Corney on swimming in the Lady's Pond at Hampstead Heath.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01q030j)
Kidnap

Rescue

by Richard Monks

Paul ..... James McArdle
News Reporter ..... Ben Crowe

As a rescue attempt is made to save the hostage one of the soldiers mind is distracted by events back home.

Richard Monks' drama looks at the kidnapping of an aid worker from five different viewpoints; the hostage, one of her guards, the hostage negotiator, a soldier on a rescue mission and her daughter.
The cast includes: Barbara Flynn, Hamza Jeetooa, Neil Dudgeon, James McArdle and Morven Christie.

Richard Monks is a Sony Award winning writer: his plays for radio include Hearing Sense, The Donor Trail, Shattered, Lying Undiscovered and Mole.

Producer Sally Avens.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b02144pw)
Is Mr Erdogan Listening?

Is the Turkish prime minister Mr Erdogan listening to the demonstrators? James Reynolds has been following the protests in Istanbul and other cities. Chris Morris is in historic Mostar learning how difficult it is for Bosnians to forget about the past. People in the Golan Heights have been telling Wyre Davies they are concerned the fighting over the border in Syria is about to spill over into their territory. Lucy Ash has been to Yaroslavl in Russia to examine whether the first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, really was the proletarian heroine she's made out to be.
From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.


THU 11:30 The Science of Music (b02144py)
Episode 4

Professor Robert Winston looks at music with a scientist's eye in a series which seeks to fully understand our relationship with the power of sound.

In this programme, Robert Winston explores the science of music performance. What's happening when we perform music? And does it change our brains?


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b02146xf)
Thames Water prices, university graduation costs

Unexpected bills of hundreds of pounds, poor customer service and handsets that keep breaking. We're looking at the most common mobile phone complaints and getting advice on the best way to solve them. The UK's biggest water company, Thames Water, on why it's going to ask the Government for permission to increase its prices. Plus, we'll be looking at the cost of university graduations and looking for tips on how you can save money.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0211c5s)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b02147h5)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Disability: A New History (b02147h7)
Brave Poor Things

Disabled children are everywhere in popular fiction - Tiny Tim, What Katy Did, The Secret Garden. But what about the real children of the 19th century? What were their lives like, and where can we hear their voices?

In this 9th programme in the series, Peter White searches for documents which reveal the reality of children's lives.

He discovers new research into the history of the Brave Poor Things, a charity which set out to 'save' disabled children across the country through organised games, outings, and a Guild song:

'A trouble's a ton, A trouble's an ounce
A trouble is what you make it.
And it isn't the fact that you're hurt that counts
But only how did you take it.'

The literature of the Brave Poor Things includes quotes from children - like this girl:

'O! I am so glad to be a cripple!' said a happy-faced girl one day when away in the country. 'Glad?' questioned someone. What DO you mean? And she answered, 'I can't help being glad. It is so beautiful to belong to the Guild, and I couldn't unless I had lost my leg.'

That's from fund-raising propaganda - but it's not a real girl's voice. Using images of pathetic children to raise money for charity has had a powerful legacy.

Just occasionally, there is a real child's voice. Peter discovers a letter from a little girl in a Swansea Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, and it is almost unbearably moving:

'I do feel homesick. When are you coming to see me? Do you know how long I have to stop here? The children are all dumb here, I am the only girl that can speak.'

With historians Julie Anderson, Joanna Bourke and Mike Mantin.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Academic adviser: David Turner of Swansea University
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b02144zs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00p93sy)
The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency

Tea Time for the Traditionally Built

Written and dramatised by Alexander McCall Smith, from his hugely popular series of books set in Botswana.

Precious Ramotswe, owner of The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, is about to get in over her head. She's got an important new client from the incomprehensible world of football, but she's on her own as her loyal assistant Mma Makutsi is distracted by the return of a troublesome figure from her past.

Directed by Eilidh McCreadie.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b01snjq6)
Series 24

George Monbiot in search of the wild

Clare Balding goes rambling, near Machynlleth, with the writer and environmentalist, George Monbiot. The theme of this series of Ramblings is 'In Search Of.' and, together, George and Clare are walking in search of wildness.

George's new book, 'Feral', is partly a personal story about his attempt to stave off the monochrome nature of modern-day life: "I could not continue just sitting and writing, looking after my daughter and my house, running merely to stay fit, watching the seasons cycling past without ever quite belonging to them. I was, I believed, ecologically bored".

In this walk, George explains how he has attempted to 'rewild' his own life and describes what he believes needs to be done in order to reintroduce true wildness to our countryside through the large-scale restoration of ecosystems. He says "researching it felt like stepping through the back of the wardrobe".

Using OS Explorer OL23 - Cadair Idris and Llyn Tegid - George takes Clare to his favourite place in mid-Wales, a rare stand of ancient native woodland, which stirs him to his very soul.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b02116z1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b02118cw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b02147x0)
Michael Douglas on Liberace, Audrey Tautou on Therese Desqueyroux

Francine Stock talks to Michael Douglas about his role as Liberace in Steven Soderbergh's bio-pic Behind the Candelabra, chronicling the flamboyant entertainer's 5 year relationship with Scott Thorson. The film features a starry cast, including Matt Damon as Scott Thorson and Rob Lowe as the infamous plastic surgeon Dr Startz.

Audrey Tautou talks about her eponymous role in François Mauriac's legendary 1927 novel of French provincial life, Therese Desqueyroux, in French film director Claude Miller's final film.
But how does a writer face the challenge of adapting a much loved novel for the screen? Byzantium screen writer Moira Buffini, who adapted Jane Eyre for the cinema in 2011, and Deborah Moggach, who adapted Pride and Prejudice in 2005, discuss whether the resulting film reveals much more about current society's values than the age in which the work was originally written.

Shane Meadow's new documentary "Stone Roses: Made Of Stone" is about the iconic Manchester band of the late 80's and 90's. Meadows had unprecedented access to the band for a year after their reunion in October 2011. Film critic Dave Calhoun discusses Made of Stone's contribution to the way in which British films have explored particularly British music.

Producer: Hilary Dunn


THU 16:30 Material World (b02147xp)
Professor Elspeth Garman commemorates a century since the publication of an idea that made discovering protein structures possible: The Bragg Equation. She takes us from the Braggs' father-and-son discovery of x-ray crystallography and publication of the structure of table salt in 1913, to the cutting-edge work happening in her lab at Oxford University. Her team's past projects have included determining the structure of the N9 part of influenza viruses, which was used to develop antiviral drugs. She explains how this work and cryogenically cooling proteins to preserve them inside the Diamond Light Source synchrotron are where crystallography is heading.

How can we better understand and perhaps control the spread of drug-resistant HIV? Dr Katrina Lythgoe, an evolutionary epidemiologist from Imperial College London and L'Oreal-UNESCO For Women In Science fellow, recently published work in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Academy B that suggests HIV may evolve more slowly in a population of humans that it does in an individual person.

FameLab, started in the UK in 2005, and is now a world-leading science communication competition. To-date, more than 5000 young scientists and engineers from over 20 countries have participated so far. Lyubov Kostova, Public Communications Manager at the British Council in Bulgaria and Timandra Harkness - writer, performer and FameLab stalwart - discuss why the model is so successful.

Author Ann Cleeves's crime novel Shetland features a surprising character from real life: Dr James Grieve, a senior forensic pathologist at the University of Aberdeen. Ann and James discuss whether media portrayals of crime reflect the real-life people and real-life science involved.

The producers were Jen Whyntie and Ania Lichtarowicz.


THU 17:00 PM (b02147xr)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0211c6f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Heresy (b021480y)
Series 9

Episode 4

Victoria Coren Mitchell presents another edition of the show which dares to commit heresy.

Her guests this week are newspaper columnist Julia Hartley-Brewer, the Rev. Richard Coles and food critic, television presenter and novelist Giles Coren.

Producers: Victoria Coren Mitchell and Daisy Knight
An Avalon Television production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b02142rt)
Lilian still hasn't heard from Paul and is becoming concerned.

Emma approaches Peggy about replacing Elona. Peggy seems impressed by Emma's experience, but isn't too happy with her childcare arrangements, or lack of them.

Jazzer and Kenton are pleased with their plans for the Highland Games, though they haven't quite gained Lilian's seal of approval. Lilian joins them at The Bull. She is having a quiet chat with Jolene over a G&T when Darrell arrives with some bad news. He has just discovered that his ex-boss was found dead the other day, a nice bloke called Paul Morgan. Lilian is clearly devastated and Jolene quickly takes her upstairs to console her. Jolene is perplexed by the extent of Lilian's grief until she reveals her secret affair.

Matt has also heard the news. He is concerned that his intimidation attempt might have had something to do with Paul's heart attack. Mikey assures him that Paul was fine when he left.

When Lilian arrives home, Matt sees she has been crying and realises she must know about Paul. He hopes Lilian will tell him the truth, but she makes her excuses, suggesting she is simply upset about her mother.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b021484g)
Miranda Hart, Martin Amis, Kwame Kwei-Armah's Cultural Exchange

With Mark Lawson.

Writer and comedy performer Miranda Hart reflects on her career so far, as her book Is It Just Me? appears in paperback.

Martin Amis discusses his 13th novel Lionel Asbo: State of England, a black comedy about a very violent and not very successful criminal and his nephew Desmond Pepperdine.

Playwright and actor Kwame Kwei-Armah, currently Artistic Director of Center Stage in Baltimore, Maryland, selects his Cultural Exchange: Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August Wilson

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01q030j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b0213yg9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b02148kx)
Recruitment

Recruitment companies discuss the marks left by recession on their businesses and the employment market.

Companies in the eye of the storm when the economy first collapsed have had to adapt to stay in business. Evan Davis finds out the survival strategies of three recruiters in very different markets - from board level headhunting to finding seasonal temps and mid-level professionals.

Guests :
Virginia Bottomley, Odgers Berndtson
Matthew Sanders, CEO de Poel
Ian Temple, chair Hydrogen Group

Producer : Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 In Search of Originality (b01fd4v4)
Is it still possible to do anything truly original? And why should we care if it isn't? Ian Peacock finds out, with a challenge to come up with just one original thought of his own: a new sound to end a radio programme.

'Creation is the art of concealing your sources' is a mantra attributed to any number of great thinkers, Einstein among them. And if we are not convinced that Einstein was original, who is?

In his trademark quirky but thoughtful style, Ian Peacock sets off on a Kafkaesque quest for true originality. But his infectious optimism quickly begins to crack. Doubts set in during a trip to the UK Patent Office, surely a bastion of unalloyed originality. Patents it seems are rarely built on blinding flashes of inspiration, more on incremental development. And Ian's own inventions (a hamster wheel for cats and bleeping contact lenses amongst them) find surprisingly little enthusiasm.

For help he turns to Kane Kramer, self-proclaimed inventor of the digital audio player, who also runs a side-line helping people nurture their own creativity. Is there originality lurking within us all, or is this a gift you have to be born with? According to writer Winifred Gallagher, invention is an instinct lurking within all of us, if only you can work out how to harness it.

As Ian's increasingly philosophical journey evolves, ever more curious sounds emerge from a quartet of specially-engaged minds, holed up in a darkened anechoic chamber and challenged by Ian to devise the most original sound ever for the programme's finale. At times it sounds more like a children's party than a route to blinding new truths as this menagerie of professors and artists clank together random objects. The result, when at last it appears, turns out to be, well, interesting. Have these great brains achieved the ultimate alchemist's dream? Or are we doomed, in the era of the mash-up never to achieve originality again? And would that even matter?


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b02144gl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b0211c6h)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b021499p)
In-depth reporting and analysis with Philippa Thomas.

Tonight - Austrian troops leave the UN force in the Golan Heights - we'll assess the impact on the wider Syria conflict

and we'll hear from the Tory MPs who want a full parliamentary debate and vote before Britain decides to send arms to the Syrian rebels

We'll get the latest from our royal correspondent on Prince Phillip being back in hospital

Paul Moss is on the trail of the Bilderberg Group - the annual gathering of elite business and political leaders - this year meeting in...Watford

We look ahead to the meeting of President Obama and Xi Jinping in California tomorrow

and Michael Dobbs reflects on the life and works of his fellow satirist, Tom Sharpe.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b021499r)
Sarah Dunant - Blood and Beauty

Episode 9

Acclaimed novelist of the Italian Renaissance, Sarah Dunant, takes on the era's most infamous family - the Borgias.

The story of the Borgia Pope is not long - Roderigo Borgia, Alexander VI, was the Head of the Church for barely a decade - but an enormous amount of activity, social, political and sexual, was crammed into that period.

Our abridgement began last week in August 1492 when Roderigo Borgia won his campaign to become Pope. This week, we move on to the next four years of his reign. The problems seeded in the first year are blossoming into crises at every turn, as Italy explodes into war against the invading French. Rising above this challenge through a series of canny political manoeuvres, Alexander proves less able in his ability to control his children.

Read by Robert Glenister
Written by Sarah Dunant
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Listen Against (b00tmt97)
Series 3

Episode 1

A week of radio and TV that never happened in the show that works its way through it all, like a critical tapeworm going through a giant media dog.

* Jeremy Paxman finally breaks and goes rogue,

* Today gets remade as a US sitcom,

* Listeners thoughts on the Food Programme giving recipes for cooking a Flump and spit roasting a Clanger.

With special guests Jenni Murray, Richard Bacon and John Humphrys.

Presented by Alice Arnold and Jon Holmes.

Featuring: James Bachman, Stephen Critchlow, Sarah Hadland and David Schnieder.

Producer: Sam Bryant

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b021499t)
Rachel Byrne hears the government express regret for colonial torture. There are new rules on windfarms; and why space is tight in the House of Lords.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



FRIDAY 07 JUNE 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0211c8l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b0213zsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0211c8n)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0211c8q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0211c8s)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0211c8v)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0213yrq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0213yrs)
Charlotte Smith hears threats of an impending crisis in the character of our countryside. A coalition of 18 conservation charities is writing to the government to ask for more subsidies for farms in high wildlife areas to preserve the landscape.

And preparations are under way for this weekend's Open Farm Sunday.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp6d)
Goldfinch

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Goldfinch. With its bright yellow wing-flashes and face painted black, white and red, the goldfinch is one of our most colourful birds.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0213z3k)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b02116z9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b0213yrn)
Damian Barr - Maggie and Me

Episode 5

Still at school, Damian makes a brave decision to come out as gay, but discovers first-hand the impact of Clause 28 when his normally supportive teachers are unable to discuss his sexuality openly with him.

He heads to university and leaves Scotland for good with the help of a bursary from a mystery benefactor, and finally makes it to a new life as a journalist living in Brighton with his partner. His last visit to Scotland reminds him of the ghosts of his past that still echo in his life, the Ravenscraig steelworks that were the heart of the community and have now disappeared from the landscape, and his complicated relationship with Margaret Thatcher, his unlikely heroine.

Written and read by Damian Barr.
Abridged by Sian Preece

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0213zsd)
Women and birdwatching; Why are Turkish women demonstrating?

The women who started the RSPB. Older women returning to work. Turkish women are protesting to retain their rights. Should young children be taught to manage money? Presented by Jenni Murray.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01q0335)
Kidnap

Resolution

by Richard Monks

Director ..... Sally Avens

Lucy waits for her mother's release from captivity with ambiguous feelings about her return.

Richard Monks' drama looks at the kidnapping of an aid worker from five different viewpoints; the hostage, one of her guards, the hostage negotiator, a soldier on a rescue mission and her daughter.
The cast includes: Barbara Flynn, Hamza Jeetooa, Neil Dudgeon, James McArdle and Morven Christie.

Richard Monks is a Sony Award winning writer: his plays for radio include Hearing Sense, The Donor Trail, Shattered, Lying Undiscovered and Mole.


FRI 11:00 New Broadcasting House (b02w0kvr)
On the day The Queen opens the BBC's new headquarters Sian Williams and Jim Naughtie are joined by Professor of Media History Jean Seaton, Head of BBC History Robert Seatter, and The Daily Mail's royal correspondent Robert Hardman to consider the cultural identity of a London landmark.

Producers: Peter Hanington and Dixi Stewart.


FRI 11:45 Four Thought (b01snbm0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 on Sunday]


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b021406s)
Disabled sport, infested houses, soap star diets

Young people with disabilities say they are struggling to get involved in sport because gyms, leisure centres and sports clubs do not have the facilities they need. It's less than a year since London hosted the Paralympic Games, under the motto "inspire a generation" - so why are some people facing such barriers to participating in sport?

What happens if you move into a new house, only to find it crawling with rats or other pests? Sellers have no legal obligation to declare infestations, which often leaves buyers having to pick up the bill to fix the problem. What can you do to protect yourself?

And does it matter if characters in our favourite soaps lead healthy lives? A university study of scenes from television soaps found plenty of references to alcohol and unhealthy food, but precious little talk of exercise or healthy eating. Does that reinforce bad habits, or are writers just reflecting the lives of ordinary people?

Producer: Andrew Silke
Presenter: Peter White.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b02140bm)
Linda and Ruona - Circumcision

Fi Glover presents a conversation between Nigerian women married to white men here, about their families' reactions and how they manage to continue their traditions in this country, in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0211c8x)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b02140nw)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Disability: A New History (b02140ny)
A Disabled Identity

In the final part of his series, Peter White reveals the birth of a modern disabled identity in the 19th century - through the lives of some extraordinary independent blind women.

Peter says, 'I'm used to people describing me as disabled. Fair enough, I can't see. But I do wonder sometimes whether putting me into a disabled category really makes much sense. Some of my best friends use wheelchairs, but the truth is our needs could hardly be more different. I fall over them, they run over me! But over the last 40 years, disabled people have needed a collective identity to make change possible, to break down discrimination in jobs, transport, in people's attitudes generally.

People have tended to think that this sense of collective identity in Britain began after the First World War, when so many men returned with very visible injuries. But the evidence I've uncovered making this series reveals it to have begun much earlier.

This evidence comes from new research into the lives of blind women in the 19th century. We hear the stories of two extraordinary women who fought the conventions of their time, Adele Husson and Hippolyte van Lendegem. Independent, critical, angry - their voices are very modern, and research into their lives challenges accepted wisdom about the history of the disability movement.

With historians Selina Mills, David Turner and Julie Anderson, and readings by Emily Bevan and Madeleine Brolly.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Academic adviser: David Turner of Swansea University
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b02142rt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00p94r2)
The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency

The Seller of Beds

Written and dramatised by Alexander McCall Smith, from his hugely popular series of books set in Botswana.

The detectives are embroiled in the murky world of the football cheat as they investigate the recent bad form of the Kalahari Swoopers. But Mma Ramotswe's problems don't end there - she must confront an issue which has been avoided for too long. Could it be the end of the road for the tiny white van?

Mma Ramotswe ...... Claire Benedict
Mma Makutsi ...... Nadine Marshall
Mr JLB Matekoni ...... Ben Onwukwe
Mr Molofololo ...... Mo Sesay
Mma Tafa ...... Gbemisola Ikumelo
Fanwell ...... Beru Tessema
Grandmother ...... Albie Parsons
Puso Boy ...... Kedar Williams-Stirling
Oteng Boleleng ...... Emmanuel Ighodaro
Charlie ...... Tyrone Lewis
Violet Sepotho ...... Anna Bengo
Phuti Raduphuti ...... Nyasha Hatendi

Directed by Eilidh McCreadie.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b02142z1)
Stoke-on-Trent

Eric Robson chairs the horticultural panel programme in Stoke on Trent. Taking questions from a local gardening audience this week are Matt Biggs, Christine Walkden and Chris Beardshaw.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions:

Q. Is it too late to plant potatoes?

A. Potatoes can be planted throughout the year, but to extend cropping plant in large containers or compost bags and keep in an area where they can be kept frost-free at the latter end of the season. Plant a succession of early potatoes through the spring, have a break at 'Blight time' and then begin again in mid-August.

Q. I have three young apple trees. The Jonagold and Cox's Orange Pippin are fine, but the James Grieve is always covered in greenfly at this time of year. Why might this be?

A. If the tree is sickly, the chances are it will be a struggle, especially when competing with two other healthy trees. It might be worth checking the roots for any signs of what might be causing the trouble, such as compacted soil or standing water. In order to tackle the greenfly, place a nesting box nearby, as natural predators such as Blue Tits might be encouraged to feed on the aphids. If all else fails, the tree may need to be removed altogether.

Q. Do tomato plants grow well and fruit hanging upside down? What would be the best variety for this?

A. A hanging basket variety such as Tumbler would be best.

Q. Which vegetables could be planted in a north-facing plot in partial shade?

A. Anything rapid growing such as the salad vegetables - lettuce, chard and spinach - are recommended. If kept wet, Wasabi is one of the few plants that will grow well in those conditions. Herbs such as Sweet Cicely are also suggested.

Q. Is it too late to hard prune a Choisya bush that was badly damaged by frost in the spring. Will it still make new growth from the base?

A. With evergreens such as Choisyas, it is best to prune when they are in their first growth. Any time before midsummer's day will be OK in a slow season such as this one. As a precaution, the shrub can be cut back in stages, reducing the total canopy by a third in size or removing a third of the stems each year. On a damaged bush such as this, keep pruning to a minimum - removing only parts which are damaged, dead, diseased or dying. Feed with general fertiliser and water well during the warm summer season.

Q. How can a wild flowering lawn be established on an existing area of grass which is in part shade and currently full of moss?

A. Take off the mowings and reduce the fertility of the soil significantly. Don't worry about the moss unless it is really rampageous, in which case introducing plugs may be easier than seeding down. Species such as Celandine and Ajuga will do well in shady, damp areas. Oxeye Daisies and Buttercups will spread over time from the existing grass if managed well. Sorrel and Violets could also be grown.

Q. Do Wisteria take time to get established, or is there something wrong if the plant has not flowered for three years?

A. A grafted Wisteria plant will grow quite quickly, but ones raised from seed can take from five to 10 years to start flowering. If the plant is growing well, prune it in July, taking the side shoots back to two buds' length. Try to prune in such a way to encourage one or two of the stems up. Turning the stems horizontally will change the hormone levels in the plant and may encourage it to flower. Wisteria are best when grown against a south-facing wall.

Q. Does the panel have any advice for growing Morning Glory (Ipomoea 'Heavenly Blue')? The seeds germinate well and grow strongly until being hardened off and put outside. Would it be better to grow them indoors?

A. Morning Glory likes to have its head in the sun and free-draining soils. The past few seasons have not been the right weather - warmth, particularly longevity of warmth, is the key for growing these plants. A cool glass house or a conservatory would be a good environment for this. However, if they become too warm indoors, they can be subject to attack from red spider mite.

Q. What can be planted in the gaps left by tropical plants killed off by the last three years' worth of bad weather?

A. Rhododendron 'Polar Bear' and 'Arctic Freeze' lettuce are suggested! Native plants throughout the garden will be much better suited to cope with the poor weather conditions.
Eric Robson chairs the horticultural panel programme in Stoke on Trent. Matt Biggs, Christine Walkden and Chris Beardshaw take questions from the local gardening audience.


FRI 15:45 Four Bare Legs in a Bed (b0222fgn)
An Interesting Condition

The second of three stories from Helen Simpson's collection, Four Bare Legs in a Bed, read by Rosie Cavaliero.
2/3 An Interesting Condition. Fear and loathing in an antenatal class.
Producer: Sarah Langan.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b02142z3)
A novelist, a botanist, a TV writer, a missionary and a composer

Mark Coles on:

The writer Tom Sharpe, best known for his comic novels like Wilt and Porterhouse Blue.

The Kew Gardens botanist Nigel Hepper who foresaw the effects of global warming decades before anyone else.

Anne Valery, the co-writer of the hugely successful BBC World War 2 drama, Tenko.

The leading French classical composer, Henri Dutillieux. A man who believed in the magic of music.

And Molly Clutton-Brock, a British missionary who set up ground-breaking clinics to help disadvantaged children in former Rhodesia.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b02142z5)
A&E, and the chances of having twins

The news has been awash with headlines about the crisis in A&E departments. More people are using emergency care services and more people are waiting to be treated. We take a look behind the headlines.

Hunting for official statistics
MPs have criticised the way official statistics are published. They say it is hard for both experts and members of the public to make the most of all the statistical information supplied by the Office for National Statistics- the producers of the nation's economic and population data. Tim Harford sits down with Evan Davies to explore the their website. We hear their frustrations and examine how the numbers are used. Not only is it hard to find data, but Chris Giles from the Financial Times explains the problems with reporting data without sufficient context and explanation, leading to poor reporting in the press. We hear from Laura Dewis from the ONS.

Twins
What are the chances of a woman having three sets of non-identical twins? It has been reported that it is 1 in 500,000 chance. But is that true? We work out the probability.

Naked Statistics
Tim Harford interviews the author of the new book Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread From the Data. Charles Wheelan, a former Economist correspondent and professor at Dartmouth College in the US, has created an accessible primer for number-crunching: stripping away the complexity and making statistics comprehensible. He gives Tim some statistical tips for parenting.

Men think about sex every seven seconds
This urban myth has been repeated time and again in songs, articles and advertising. But where did it come from? And could it possibly be true? Not to mention- how do men compare to women? More or Less charts the use of the saying, and tests its veracity.
We speak to Professor Terri Fisher, professor of psychology, The Ohio State University at Mansfield in the US.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b021430b)
Helen and Tom - Now You're Home

Fi Glover presents a conversation between a mother and son about his recent disappearance in Thailand and how it affected their relationship, in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b021430d)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news. Including Weather at 5.57pm.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0211c91)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b0214336)
Series 40

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Holly Walsh, John Finnemore, Laura Shavin and Mitch Benn for a comic run through the week's news. Producer: Colin Anderson.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b021433b)
Jennifer arrives at her mother's with the present she has bought on Peggy's behalf for Elona. Mother and daughter chat about the recruitment of Elona's replacement. Jennifer is not pleased that the second candidate is Tracy Horrobin. Jennifer advises Peggy to choose Emma, but Peggy is still concerned with the idea of Keira accompanying her mother while she works.

When Elona arrives for her last shift, she is concerned about leaving everything in order for Peggy. But Peggy just wants to have a nice chat. While Elona makes the tea, Peggy calls Jennifer to discuss her decision. She has hired Emma, as Tracy will look after Keira while Emma is at work. Elona is touched when Peggy presents her with a necklace and the pair reminisce about their time together.

Matt informs Lilian of Paul's death to gauge her reaction. They go for a walk and discuss things further. Lilian attempts to contain her grief and be supportive now that Matt's only link to his birth mother is his sister in Dubai. Later, she seeks out Jolene to discuss how she is really feeling. How she can live with keeping her affair a secret from Matt.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b021438t)
Marc Chagall, Laura Marling, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Colm Tóibín

With John Wilson.

Marc Chagall's paintings filled with colour, floating figures and Jewish motifs are among the most distinctive in art. A new exhibition at Tate Liverpool traces the creation of Chagall's style by following his early years as an artist in Paris and his native Russia. Jackie Wullschlager, author of the biography Chagall: Love and Exile, reviews.

St Colmcille, the patron saint of Derry/Londonderry, returns for a public pageant on a city-wide scale, starting this evening. Frank Cottrell Boyce, the writer behind the London 2012 Opening Ceremony, discusses how he created the story for this weekend's events in the UK's City of Culture. Many aspects of the city's history are celebrated, culminating in a showdown on the river front between St. Colmcille and his monstrous nemesis.

Singer-songwriter Laura Marling reflects on her new album Once I was an Eagle, and explains why she has chosen to base herself in Los Angeles. She also brings her guitar to the Front Row studio, to perform.

And the Irish writer Colm Tóibín makes his selection for the Cultural Exchange: Poem by Elizabeth Bishop, a reflection on a small painting of a scene in rural Nova Scotia, where the poet spent time as a child.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01q0335)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b021438w)
Owen Paterson, Peter Hain, Leanne Wood, James Delingpole

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Centre for Alternative Technology in Machynlleth, Wales with Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Owen Paterson MP, Labour's Peter Hain MP, Leader of Plaid Cymru Leanne Woods, and commentator James Delingpole.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b021439g)
Can Compassion Be Taught?

Tom Shakespeare presents the first of his four essays. There have been several recent scandals in the health service, with appalling cases of abuse and neglect coming to light. Not surprisingly, this has led to calls for people in the medical profession to be taught compassion. But Tom is sceptical. This week he asks whether compassion can and should be taught.


FRI 21:00 Disability: A New History (b02143kr)
Omnibus Edition - 2/2

Across the country, historians are discovering the voices of disabled people from the past. In this two week series, Peter White draws on the latest research to reveal first-hand accounts of what it was like to live with physical disability in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The result is moving, revealing, and sometimes very funny:
"Sirs, I am a dwarf. I have lost my job at the circus and what is a dwarf to do in such a situation? In this Godforsaken place the snow comes so deep that a self-respecting dwarf can't even walk along the street without drowning!"

This document is from a huge archive of letters from disabled people in the 19th century, applying to the local authorities for money. Sources like this are only now being discovered and interpreted by historians across the country - it amounts to a new historical movement.

For Peter, as a blind man, the series is revelatory. He says, "I'm used to people describing me as "disabled". Fair enough, I can't see. But I do wonder sometimes whether putting me into a disabled category really makes much sense. Some of my best friends use wheelchairs, but the truth is our needs could hardly be more different. I fall over them, they run over me! But over the last 40 years, disabled people have needed a collective identity to make change possible, to break down discrimination in jobs, transport, in people's attitudes generally.

People have tended to think that this sense of collective identity in Britain began after the First World War, when so many men returned with very visible injuries. But the evidence I've uncovered making this series reveals it to have begun much earlier."

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Academic adviser: David Turner, Swansea University
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b0211c94)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b02143qp)
GCHQ accused of secretly gathering information from covert US operation. Chinese President Xi to begin summit with Obama in California. Institute for Fiscal Studies warns of two more austerity general elections. Presented by Philippa Thomas.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b02143qr)
Sarah Dunant - Blood and Beauty

Episode 10

Acclaimed novelist of the Italian Renaissance, Sarah Dunant, takes on the era's most infamous family - the Borgias.

The story of the Borgia Pope is not long - Roderigo Borgia, Alexander VI, was the Head of the Church for barely a decade - but an enormous amount of activity, social, political and sexual, was crammed into that period.

Our abridgement began last week in August 1492 when Roderigo Borgia won his campaign to become Pope. This week, we move on to the next four years of his reign. The problems seeded in the first year are blossoming into crises at every turn, as Italy explodes into war against the invading French. Rising above this challenge through a series of canny political manoeuvres, Alexander proves less able in his ability to control his children.

Read by Robert Glenister
Written by Sarah Dunant
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b0213ygc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b02143t9)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b02143tc)
Craig and Luke - No Laughing Matter

Fi Glover Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a veteran stand-up and a newcomer in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. What they have in common is the fear of failure and the excitement that comes from living on the edge.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01pz9xx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01pz9xx)

15 Minute Drama 10:40 TUE (b01pzs6p)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01pzs6p)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01pztjk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01pztjk)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01q030j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01q030j)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01q0335)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01q0335)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b0213ygc)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b0213ygc)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b01snykk)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b021439g)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b0213yzy)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b0213yzy)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01sm2g0)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0211jzs)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0210sp9)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01snykh)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b021438w)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0210v8b)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b02116ys)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b02116ys)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b0211jrn)

Bleak Expectations 11:30 MON (b01nxt2d)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0211jzx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b0213z02)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b02147zx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b021499r)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b02143qr)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01snxs9)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01s7yvn)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01s7yvn)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b0213yfp)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b0213yfp)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0214316)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0214316)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b0213zsb)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b0213zsb)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b0213yrn)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b02118cw)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b02118cw)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b02116z5)

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing 23:00 WED (b02147zz)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01slrj9)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b02117x0)

Coronation 60th Anniversary Service 10:55 TUE (b0213yfv)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b01sm2f5)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b0211jrj)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b02116z9)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b02116z9)

Disability: A New History 13:45 MON (b0211jrg)

Disability: A New History 13:45 TUE (b0213yg1)

Disability: A New History 13:45 WED (b02143yp)

Disability: A New History 13:45 THU (b02147h7)

Disability: A New History 13:45 FRI (b02140ny)

Disability: A New History 21:00 FRI (b02143kr)

Drama 14:15 MON (b01s8qxp)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b018grvp)

Drama 14:15 WED (b02143yr)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00p93sy)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00p94r2)

Dreaming the City 23:15 WED (b02224wv)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0210pl2)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0211hmz)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0213yff)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0214310)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b02144gg)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0213yrs)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01sm74t)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b0213yzt)

Four Bare Legs in a Bed 15:45 FRI (b0222fgn)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b01snbm0)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b02144zz)

Four Thought 11:45 FRI (b01snbm0)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b0210t8k)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b0210t8k)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0210sp5)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b02144pw)

Front Row 11:00 SAT (b0214dly)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0211jrx)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0213yzr)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b02144zv)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b021484g)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b021438t)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01snyjz)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b02142z1)

Heresy 18:30 THU (b021480y)

House on Fire 11:30 WED (b021431b)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b02144gl)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b02144gl)

In Search of Originality 21:00 THU (b01fd4v4)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0213yzw)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01sm2fc)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b0211jrs)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01snyk1)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b02142z3)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b0213yg9)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b0213yg9)

Letter of Last Resort: The Discussion 15:08 SAT (b0210spf)

Listen Against 23:00 THU (b00tmt97)

Looking for Luddites 20:00 MON (b01rqnvx)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0210t8h)

Malcolm Sayer - Aerodynamic Wizard 21:00 WED (b021463z)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b0211jzz)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b0213yg7)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01snlsw)

Material World 16:30 THU (b02147xp)

Mick Jackson - Junior Science 00:30 SUN (b01756jf)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01snqrp)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b020tp0t)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0211bxk)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0211bzf)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0211c0s)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0211c4s)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0211c8l)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b0214314)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b0214314)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b02143yt)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b0210sp7)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0210sp7)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b01snyk3)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b02142z5)

New Broadcasting House 11:00 FRI (b02w0kvr)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01snqry)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b020tp12)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0211bxz)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0211bzp)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0211c11)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0211c51)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0211c8v)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b020tp14)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01snqs0)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b020tp18)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b020tp1d)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01snqsj)

News 13:00 SAT (b01snqs8)

Nightingales of India 10:30 SAT (b0210pl8)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b02116yx)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b0213yfm)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0210spk)

PM 17:00 MON (b0211jrq)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0213ygf)

PM 17:00 WED (b02143z0)

PM 17:00 THU (b02147xr)

PM 17:00 FRI (b021430d)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b02118d0)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01slrjf)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b02118cy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01snz0t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b021zfqy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b021zdg6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b021zdp3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b02144gd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b0213yrq)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b02116z1)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b02116z1)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b02116z1)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b02147m6)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b01snjq6)

Recycled Radio 11:00 MON (b0211hn7)

Rock 'n' Roll in Four Movements 16:00 MON (b01m182x)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b0210spc)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0210pl6)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0210v88)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01snqrt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b020tp0y)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0211bxq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0211bzk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0211c0x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0211c4x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0211c8q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01snqrr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01snqrw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01snqsb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b020tp0w)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b020tp10)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b020tp1j)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0211bxm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0211bxv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0211bzh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0211bzm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0211c0v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0211c0z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0211c4v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0211c4z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0211c8n)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0211c8s)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b0213yg5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01snqsg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b020tp1n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0211by9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0211bzw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0211c15)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0211c6f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0211c91)

Sketchorama 18:30 WED (b01s8q18)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b02116yv)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b02116yv)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0211hn3)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0211hn3)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b02116z3)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b02116yz)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b02116z7)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b02118d2)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b02118d2)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0211jrv)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0211jrv)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b0213ygk)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b0213ygk)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b02144zs)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b02144zs)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b02142rt)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b02142rt)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b021433b)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01snmp2)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b02148kx)

The Castle 18:30 TUE (b01jjtn3)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01snlst)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b02147x0)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b02116zc)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b02116zc)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b0213yfk)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b0213yfk)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b02117wy)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b02140bm)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b021430b)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b02143tc)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b02143yy)

The New North 13:30 SUN (b02116zh)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b01snyk9)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b0214336)

The Science of Music 15:30 SAT (b01sm6s2)

The Science of Music 11:30 THU (b02144py)

The Time Being 19:45 SUN (b02119cs)

The Toll 23:00 TUE (b02140k8)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b02116zf)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0211jzv)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0213z00)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b021469f)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b021499p)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b02143qp)

The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b02119cq)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01smpw6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b02143yw)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0211k01)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b0213z04)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b0214803)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b021499t)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b02143t9)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0210pl4)

Today 06:00 MON (b0211hn1)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0213yfh)

Today 06:00 WED (b0214312)

Today 06:00 THU (b02144gj)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0213z3k)

Trade-Plating Round Britain 11:00 WED (b021406q)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b01slvgp)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b020tnrx)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b020tp2b)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b020tp38)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b020tp50)

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Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b01sn9cf)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b02119kd)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b02119kg)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0210sph)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0211hn5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0213yfr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0214318)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b02144gn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0213zsd)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0211hnc)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b0213yzp)

World at One 13:00 WED (b02143ym)

World at One 13:00 THU (b02147h5)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b02140nw)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b0211hn9)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b0213yfz)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b021431d)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b02146xf)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b021406s)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01snz0w)