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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 APRIL 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01s0s4c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01s687m)
Letters from Italy

Annalisa Piras

5 leading Italians deliver letters about Italy today, the dangers and the possibilities.

The last of five Letters from Italy at a time of huge upheaval in that country. The week ends with the thoughts of Annalisa Piras, the London based journalist and author of the recent TV documentary 'Girlfriend in a Coma'.

Annalisa's letter was written while on a recent holiday in her native country and so comes with the distant observation of one who spends time watching developments from a distance. She understands the British view of Italy and is concerned and puzzled that a political system that she used to understand seems to have become even more confusing and unfathomable.

Her letter takes her from the Tuscan countryside to Rome, to the coast and then, for her concluding thoughts back to London where she reflects on what is happening and what might happen as Italy continues to teeter on the edge of economic crisis.

At a time when Italy's political and economic fragility is in the spotlight, 5 leading Italian figures deliver a letter about Italy today, the dangers and the future possibilities.

Five letters from leading Italians from the fields of politics, economics, television, art and journalism.
At a time when Italy is in the spotlight, both for the changing of the Pope but more especially for the recent election results and the economic fragility that has brought austerity and anger, each of the letter writer talks about their sense of Italy today, it's challenges, the dangers it faces and the possibilities for the future.

This week's contributors will be:

Prof Gustavo Piga is an economist at Rome University.

Lucia Annunziata is editor of the Huffington Post, Italy but spent many years in Italian television including a period as head of RIA, the Italian equivalent of the BBC.

Carlo Sibilia is a member of the new Five Stars Movement lead by Beppe Grillo, the new and surprising force in Italian politics.

Dacia Maraini is a novelist and playwright and an established figure in the Italian literary landscape.

Annalisa Piras is an Italian Journalist based in London.

Producer: Tom Alban.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01s0s4f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01s0s4h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01s0s4k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01s0s4m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01s0ttm)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with the Rev'd Peter Baker.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01s0ttp)
A journalist tells us how she covertly entered North Korea, but decided not to report. And Jennifer Tracey goes shopping with a woman who survives on a £20 per week food budget. Presented by Jennifer Tracey and Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01s0s4p)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01s0s4r)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01s0qn3)
Fens of Cambridgeshire

What is phenology? Felicity Evans visits Fenland Cambridgeshire to learn about an influential but largely unacknowledged Victorian vicar - the Reverend Leonard Jenyns - who made a lasting contribution to science.

Jenyns is certainly not as well known as Charles Darwin, even though he passed up the chance of sailing on HMS Beagle as the ship's naturalist. In fact, Jenyns never set foot outside the UK, yet his contribution to science was enormous. Felicity hears how phenology has become a key aspect of observing climate change, noting the first and last days of the seasons.

She finds out how much Fenland Cambridgeshire has been dried out since Jenyns' day, and the ways in which this rural vicar bore witness to the habitat destruction and species extinction in his own parish in the mid-Victorian period.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01s3706)
Farming Today This Week

Charlotte Smith searches for farming land workers as the rules for migrant labour change.
It's estimated that farming will need another 60,000 workers in the next ten years at a time when skilled labour shortages may worsen. Can British farmers rely on Bulgarians and Romanians to do the work young British nationals won't?
She meets a dairy milker from the Philippines and hears from fruit pickers from Bulgaria. Will a British scheme to encourage more local people to learn farming skills ? And what difference could the abolition of the Agricultural Wages Board make ?

Presented by Charlotte Smith, Produced by Emma Weatherill.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01s0s4t)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01s378x)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and John Humphrys, including:

0810
12 days on from the Boston bomb, US police have announced that surviving suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been transferred from hospital to prison. This week, it emerged that the brothers had planned to detonate the rest of their explosives in Times Square. Ben Wright, our Washington correspondent, and Commissioner Edward Davis, Boston police commissioner, reflect on recent events.

0817
Britain's cuckoo population has seriously declined in recent decades and the British Trust for Ornithology is tracking a number of the birds to try to find out why. Dr Phil Atkinson, head of international research at the organisation, explains more about the process.

0820
The BBC's reporter Tom Esslemont explains that, every year, hundreds of children across the UK abuse their parents - sometimes tormenting them physically.

0830
The police watchdog is investigating whether a Taser electric stun gun ignited a flammable liquid which caused a man to be fatally burned. Carl Eve, a crime reporter at the Plymouth Herald who has been covering the case, and Simon Chesterman, of the Association of Chief Police Officers, reflect on the case and consider police use of Tasers.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01s378z)
Howard Goodall, John McCarthy, Mary Berry

Sian Williams and Richard Coles with broadcaster and composer Howard Goodall, the Inheritance Tracks of cookery writer Mary Berry, a visit to Kosovo with John McCarthy, a trip around Sussex admiring stiles in the company of the Monday Group who build and maintain them, a chat with opera singer Nicky Spence who turned down a million pound contract, local newspaperman and lifelong Newcastle United fan John Gibson talking about his life and work, and a jolly singalong in a public house.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 Building Bridges - The Art of the Middle 8 (b01s3791)
Midge Ure explores the art and the craft of the bridge, or middle 8, in popular song.

Think of A Day In The Life, Good Vibrations, We Can Work It Out, I'm Not In Love and Born To Run. Each of them features a clever middle section which builds musical tension.

It's not always in the middle and it's not always 8 bars in length, but its job is always to introduce a new element into the song, a new chord sequence or melody, a change in the arrangement or an instrumental solo.

Jazz pianist Neil Cowley traces its origins back to Mozart, musicologist Helen Caddick and journalist David Hepworth discuss the drama a good bridge can create, and songwriters Justin Currie and Boo Hewerdine demonstrate some of the most memorable examples and how they were composed.

Boo even composes a new middle 8 for a famous Bee Gees song which doesn't have one.

Produced by Trevor Dann
A TDC production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01s3793)
George Parker of the Financial Times presents this look behind the scenes at Westminster.
In a rare interview Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, discusses the morality and culture of banking and talks about how being head of the Church of England relates to his work on the all-party parliamentary banking commission.
SNP MP Stewart Hosie and Liberal Democrat MP Sir Malcolm Bruce discuss how truly independent Scotland could be if it retained sterling as its currency.
And parliamentary 'ping pong', as a last minute deal is struck over the chancellor's big idea to exchange shares for rights, to help small businesses - former Conservative employment minister Lord Forsyth debates with Conservative MP Nick De Bois.
Plus Justine Thornton, wife of Labour leader Ed Miliband embarks on the campaign trail with her husband - Helen Lewis of the The Statesman assesses the modern role of the political spouse.

The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01s3795)
Nigeria's Lady Gaga

Reporters from around the world tell their stories.
Steve Rosenberg visits Dagestan on the trail of the alleged Boston bombers, and finds that violence is part of everyday life there. Nick Thorpe watches an attempt to educate Hungarian police cadets away from prejudice against the Roma minority. It's a tough sell. The military's continuing grip on Egyptian society is explained by Shaimaa Khalil, who hails from an army family herself. In the Sioux country of South Dakota, Matt Wells investigates the contested legacy of the site of the battle of Wounded Knee. And Will Ross in Nigeria's Bayelsa State sees the glamorous movie stars at an endless awards ceremony, and also the militants getting rich off illicit oil money.
Producer: Lucy Ash.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01s3797)
Overseas resort schemes; chargeback complications

Thousands of investors fear for their cash in an overseas resort scheme after the main UK sales agent, Harlequin Group, filed for administration earlier this week. Investors diverted their pension savings into the scheme through self-invested personal pensions, or SIPPS. Harlequin says it is seeking external finance to speed up building construction in its resorts.

An estimated 14,000 customers are still waiting to see if they'll get their money back following the collapse earlier this month of a firm offering flights in hot air balloons. It's been revealed at a creditors meeting this week that Go Ballooning has few assets to repay the estimated £2million it owes. And Money Box has discovered those who paid on a debit card may have problems getting refunds from their bank because of a little known time limit.

The guaranteed income for life you can buy with the money you have saved up in your pension pot is getting smaller. The normal route to buy an annuity is to go to a specialist independent financial adviser. But major firms like financial management company Hargreaves Lansdowne and Tesco financial services are actively promoting another route - going online and using their computer search engine to find the best deal by yourself without any advice at all. Hargreaves Lansdowne has now introduced a special site for people with illnesses or habits such as smoking who get a bigger pension because, on average, they will claim it for a shorter time. But is do-it-yourself annuity purchase a good idea?


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b01s0ss6)
Series 80

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Miles Jupp and Samira Ahmed.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01s0s4w)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01s0s4y)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01s0ssg)
Caroline Flint, Caroline Lucas, Michael Fallon, Sir Menzies Campbell

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Harrow in Middlesex with Green MP Caroline Lucas MP Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change Caroline Flint MP, and former leader of the Liberal Democrats Sir Ming Campbell.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01s3799)
A chance for Radio 4 listeners to have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions. Today, we ask how Britain should respond to the situation in Syria, in light of reports that chemical weapons have been used. Following the deaths of more than 200 workers at a textile factory in Bangladesh, do consumers have a responsibility to stop buying cheap clothes? And should the government opt out of the Human Rights Act in order to deport the radical cleric Abu Qatada? Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet using #bbcaq.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b011ttfk)
The Browning Version

Written by Terence Rattigan. A starry celebration of Terence Rattigan's centenary. Michael York, Joanne Whalley, Ioan Gruffudd and Ian Ogilvy star in Terence Rattigan's 1948 masterpiece. Set in an English public school on the last day of the summer term, buried emotions re-surface when unpopular classics master Andrew Crocker Harris is given a present on his final day.

A once-brilliant classicist, now known by boys and staff alike as 'The Crock', he is retiring due to ill health. When a pupil, Taplow, presents him with an unexpected gift (a copy of Browning's translation of the Agamemnon) The Crock, also known as the Himmler of the Lower Fifth, is overwhelmed. His dammed-up misery, disappointment and humiliation are released and the way is paved for a series of surprising revelations and decisions.

A brand-new production directed by Martin Jarvis with an outstanding cast. Acknowledged as Rattigan's enduring masterpiece, 'The Browning Version' shows the writer's unrivalled ability to characterise repressed emotion, and provides a devastating portrait of a dead marriage. One of the finest, most moving and beautifully crafted plays of the 20th century.

In the second part of the programme Martin Jarvis, director of 'The Browning Version', reveals some of the play's background and describes Rattigan's hopes, fears and ambitions for its ongoing success. The reading - adapted from 'Terence Rattigan - a Biography' written by Geoffrey Wansell, describes some of the author's 'behind the scenes' difficulties - and includes a number of surprising and very funny anecdotes concerning the play's first production in 1948.

Director: Martin Jarvis

Produced by Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis & Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01s379c)
Weekend Woman's Hour. Older Women's Style; Margaret Hodge MP; Ana Moura

Older women dressing with style and aplomb: journalist Katherine Whitehorn, theatre critic Blanche Marvin and Amber Jane Butchart from the London College of Fashion discuss. Margaret Hodge MP, chair of the Public Accounts Committee on her place in the Woman's Hour Power List. Hadley Freeman talks about feminism and her new book Be Awesome: Modern Life for Modern Ladies. The York schoolgirls and their campaign to get the city's shops to feature adverts using ordinary customers, rather than airbrushed models. Yvonne Roberts and Sue Atkins discuss parenting teens in your 50s and 60s. Women and snoring. Jody Williams on her campaign to end landmines. And Ana Moura sings fado from her latest album Desfado.

Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Rebecca Wood.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01s379f)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b01s0ttp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01s0s52)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01s0s54)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01s0s56)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01s37bg)
Marc Almond, Tanya Franks, Robin Ince, Lalla Ward, Ian Pattison, Matthew E White, Brasstronaut

Clive talks illness and death with pop star Marc Almond. Having shot to fame in the eighties as one half of New Wave duo Soft Cell, Marc has also enjoyed a diverse career as a solo artist and has sold over thirty million records worldwide.

He's currently performing 'Ten Plagues'; an hour long song cycle, libretto by Mark Ravenhill, which tells the story of the 1665 London Plague through the eyes of a survivor. It's at Wilton's Music Hall, London until 18th May.

Clive's time travelling with Doctor Who actress Lalla Ward. Accompanying the Fourth Doctor as Time Lady Romana from the planet Gallifrey, Lalla travelled through space and time in the iconic Tardis. Doctor Who is fifty years old this year and 'Destiny of the Doctor' is a celebratory series on AudioGO, featuring a story for each of the 11 doctors. Lalla performs 'Babblesphere', which is available now.

Robin Ince is on the pull with actress Tanya Franks, who played promiscuous primary school teacher Karen in the comedy series 'Pulling' and Lucy Stevens in 'Broadchurch'. Tanya's now starring as the alluring Irene Adler in 'Sherlock Holmes - The Best Kept Secret'. It's at West Yorkshire Playhouse from 18th May to 8th June and then touring.

Clive's feeling lucky with Glaswegian writer Ian Pattison, whose TV credits include Scottish sitcoms 'Rab C. Nesbitt' and 'Atletico Patrick'. Ian's new book 'Unhappy-Go-lucky' is the tale of Ivan Moss, who sets aside his heartless streak and weakness for Merlot to give time to his ailing mother and her final hospital appointments.

With music from Vancouver sextet Brasstronaut, who perform 'Bounce' from their album 'Mean Sun'.

And from Virginia singer-songwriter Matthew E. White, who performs 'One of These Days' from his album 'Big Inner'.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01s37bj)
Alisher Usmanov

Alisher Usmanov has just been named the richest man in Britain. Born in Uzbekistan, Usmanov made his fortune in the collapsing Soviet Union. His empire has stretched from plastic bags to minerals, telecoms, Facebook and Arsenal Football Club. But, as Mark Coles reports, Usmanov's rise has not been straightforward, nor free of controversy.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01s37f1)
Adrian Lester as Othello, and The Look of Love with Steve Coogan

Adrian Lester and Rory Kinnear star in the long-awaited production of Othello at the National Theatre, directed by Nicholas Hytner. Do the talent and charisma of its leads and a striking setting in a modern-day military conflict add up to the great theatrical event the audience is hoping for?

Paul Raymond was a strip club and soft porn tycoon who became the richest man in Britain but he couldn't save his daughter Debbie from a drug-fuelled lifestyle and early death. Steve Coogan plays Raymond in Michael Winterbottom's new film The Look of Love and Imogen Poots plays his daughter, with support from Anna Friel and Tamsin Egerton. How illuminating is this biopic about his life and times?

Vicious is a new sitcom on ITV starring two Sirs: Derek Jacobi and Ian McKellen. Frances de la Tour features too in the show which is written by Gary Janetti, who's written for Will & Grace and Family Guy, and is co-created by Mark Ravenhill.

New Order: British Art Today at the Saatchi Gallery showcases 17 artists who might come to form a new Sensation generation. Are there stars in the making?

And a first novel from Sam Byers, Idiopathy, proclaims on its cover that it is a novel of love, narcissism and ailing cattle... and depicts a couple broken up by relentless arguing who have to meet again when a friend from their past re-appears.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Dreda Say Mitchell, Cahal Dallat and David Benedict.

Producer: Sarah Johnson.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01s37f3)
Collar the Lot

Actor Tom Conti explores the story of Italian internment in Britain during the Second World War.

On June 10th 1940, Mussolini declared war on Britain and France. Overnight, as a result, the thousands of Italians living in Britain were declared enemies, considered a potential threat. Winston Churchill ordered the authorities to 'collar the lot' of so-called 'enemy aliens' and over four thousand Italians were rounded up and imprisoned.

Most were shopkeepers, hairdressers, ice cream sellers and respectable citizens at the heart of their communities. Many had been in Britain all their lives.

We hear from some of the very few still alive, who were taken from families, jobs and homes to makeshift camps across the UK.

Tom Conti's own father was an Italian who had made a life in Scotland. He was married to a Scottish woman and ran a successful business in ladies' hairdressing. The day after Italy declared war he was taken from his home, and interned on the Isle of Man. Tom visits the island to discover which camp his father was kept in, and what conditions were like for the many thousands of men who were kept behind barbed wire during the war.

Alfonso Conti narrowly avoided being put on board the cruise liner the Arandora Star, which had been requisitioned for war duties and was bound for Newfoundland carrying internees. It was hit by a torpedo just off the Irish coast and sank within twenty minutes.

With archive interviews and testimony from the last Italian survivor, Tom will tell the story of the ship's tragic sinking, in which nearly 500 Italian civilians lost their lives, and lift the lid on this overlooked episode in British history.

Produced by Jo Wheeler
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01s0329)
The Great Scott

Rob Roy

Rob Roy by Walter Scott
Adapted by Robin Brooks

Our Rob Roy has dispensed with the Jacobite setting and updates the story to the 20th century. It is 1924 and 20-year-old Frank falls foul of his father. He has spent a year in Paris, supposedly learning the business, but actually hanging out with Imagist poets. When he refuses to join the business his father sends him north to stay with his Uncle - a radical and mixed up in the cause of Irish Nationalism.

Scott's book doesn't really depend on the historical trappings on which the author's reputation now rests. A son being banished by his father because he wants to be a long-haired poet is a perennial situation, as is the love-triangle between Frank, Die Vernon and her wicked cousin Rashleigh. With this production the listener is asked to regard Scott as a novelist like any other, concerned with the workings of the human heart and how they play out in a society more like ours.

With David Tennant as Walter Scott
All other parts were played by members of the cast
The music was composed and performed by Ross Hughes and Esben Tjalve

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01s0s58)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Four Thought (b01pp89r)
Series 3

Anwar Akhtar: The Meaning of Pakistan

Anwar Akhtar, Director of The Samosa, argues that Pakistan should think of itself as an Asian nation, not as an Arab one. And after years of working between Britain and Pakistan, he says British Pakistanis are uniquely placed to help Pakistan embrace its multicultural history - and to create a prosperous and peaceful future with India.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling. Recorded live in front of an audience, speakers air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SAT 22:30 In Search of the British Dream (b01q8lhy)
Episode 1

Foreigners are settling in the UK in record numbers. Lost in the immigration debate are the surprising stories of the migrants themselves and what they say about how Britain works.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b01s09kc)
Series 3

Bath Spa University

A lively and funny quiz show, hosted by Steve Punt, where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from Bath Spa University, the specialist subjects are Creative Music Technology, Creative Writing and Physical and Environmental Geography, with questions ranging from VAT rates and model railways all the way to Meet The Kardashians and the Ku Klux Klan - via Mo Farah and Dame Nellie Melba.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds, and the 'Highbrow and Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction.

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list.

The host Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show, is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. He has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, on subjects as varied as "The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen" and "Getting The Gongs" (an investigation into awards ceremonies), as well as a comedy for Radio 4's Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called "The Genuine Particle".

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 What I Read to the Dead: Wladislaw Szlengel (b01s032f)
Writer Eva Hoffman explores the extraordinary verse and little known life of Wladislaw Szlengel, poet of the Warsaw Ghetto. Before the war and the Nazi invasion of Poland, he had written poetry in his native tongue and witty lyrics for popular tunes sung in the nightclubs of Warsaw. But confinement in the Warsaw Ghetto and its increasingly tragic circumstances changed Szlengel's work into urgent bulletins for both fellow Jews, trapped inside the walls of their prison city, and his former Polish neighbours.

Szlengel wrote until his last days which came with the discovery of their hiding place in April 1943. Poems like The Little Station of Treblinka, What I Read to the Dead and Counterattack captured with ruthless immediacy the confused, terrifying, days and nights of Ghetto life until the beginnings of the doomed uprising in 1943 that finally brought total destruction.

The station is tiny,
Three firs grow in a line,
This is Treblinka station,
Says the ordinary sign.

There's not even a cashier's window,
A porter's room? Do not seek it.
For a million you won't get
A simple return ticket.

People read aloud Szlengel's verses in their hiding places. In them they recognized not just their plight but their own humanity as family and friends continued to be deported. His poetry survived in versions committed to memory by a handful of survivors, in a small cache of poems kept safe and buried in a unique, secret archive and, decades later, in the form of a sheaf of pages found hidden inside a table marked for firewood.

'I am looking through and sorting the poems that were written to those who are no more. Read it. This is our history.
This is what I read to the dead.

Reader Elliot Levey

Producer Mark Burman.



SUNDAY 28 APRIL 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01s37k2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Human Cradle (b01by9lj)
Government by Magic Spell

In 'Government by Magic Spell' by Somali writer Saida Hagi-Dirie Herzi, a young woman is possessed by a jinni, but this soon leads her to a uniquely powerful position in state government. A satirical parable of power and corruption.
The third in our series of contemporary stories from the Horn of Africa - Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia.
Read by Yusra Wasrama
Produced by Emma Harding
About the author: Saida Hagi-Dirie Herzi is a Somali feminist writer.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01s37k4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01s37k6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01s37k8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01s37kb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01s38rw)
The bells of St.Mary the Virgin, Chislet, Kent.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01s37bj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01s37kd)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01s38ry)
Escapism

The art historian James Fox considers the idea of escapism, asking if there is a human need to escape and, if so, what it might be that we need to escape from.

From the idea of heaven to the draw of nostalgia, and from the reaction against the horrors of the First World War to the appeal of popular entertainment, the human imagination is celebrated and explored.

James Fox traces a path through readings from, amongst others, W.B. Yeats, David Foster Wallace and Marcel Proust, with music from Gabriel Fauré, Vaughan Williams and The Wizard of Oz.

The readers are Mark Quartley, Monica Dolan and Frank Stirling.

Producer: Philippa Geering
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b01s38s0)
Golden Pheasant

One of Britain's scarcest birds is also one of its most beautiful. The flame-coloured golden pheasant is a riot of red, orange and bronze and is native to Chinese forests. The birds are popular around the world as ornamental species and over the years have been introduced on country estates. In a few places they have thrived and a few populations have now established themselves in the wild and are classed as British birds.

For Living World, Brett Westwood joins Paul Stancliffe of the British Trust for Ornithology in search of wild golden pheasants in the conifer woods of Norfolk. Here, in spite of their bright colours, they are very elusive and behave much as they do in their native China, skulking in dense undergrowth and glimpsed only as they dash across rides. The population here raises questions as a new atlas of British bird distribution is about to appear later this year. How viable is the population of "goldies" in the UK? As a non-native species should we consider them at all? As numbers in China are in decline, do our UK pheasants have an international importance? They're also inspirational birds which have adapted to our dense forests and are breath-taking to see in the wild. They appear on china, in art, and even in the stained glass window of a nearby church. They prefer to run rather than fly and call loudly at dusk in spring, so this visit is the best chance that Paul and Brett have to see one - a bird that's one of the toughest challenges that the countryside can offer.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01s37kg)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01s37kj)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01s38s2)
Our Presenter Samira Ahmed talks to Father Nadim Nassar, the Director of The Awareness Foundation, an ecumenical and international charity working to build peace through education, about his concerns for the Syrian Church leaders kidnapped earlier this week.
The land around Wounded Knee in South Dakota was the scene of a massacre of the Lakota tribe in 1890 and occupies a unique place in Native American history. But as Matt Wells reports plans to sell off the Reservation have rekindled old tensions.
A revealing insight into the personal life of Charles Wesley, a founding father of Methodism has been unearthed in a series of his own letters. Many were written in a complex shorthand. Samira speaks to Dr Gareth Lloyd of the University of Manchester who had the task of deciphering them.
A Buddhist Monk who refers to himself as the 'Burmese Bin Laden' is stoking his own brand of religious hatred across Burma. Martin Palmer, Secretary General of the Alliance of Religions and Conservation talks to Samira about this strand of Buddhism.
Our reporter Kevin Bocquet takes a look at the recommendations from a new report into Northern Ireland's Education system. Whilst it proposes greater co-operation between individual schools, it falls short of suggesting full religious integration.
Samira talks to Jan Graffius, Curator at Stonyhurst College about the Vatican's decision to unblock the beatification process for El Salvador's assassinated prelate, Archbishop Oscar Romero.
And as the Ministry of Defence confirms armed Drone Aircraft are now operating from RAF Waddington in Lincolnshire, Chris Cole, Director of Drone Wars UK and Colonel Richard Kemp, Former Commander of British Forces in Afghanistan discuss whether their use is an immoral form of warfare.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01s3939)
3H Fund

Peter Sissons presents the Radio 4 Appeal for 3H Fund (Helping Hands for Holidays)
Reg Charity:286306
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 3H Fund.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01s37kl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01s37kn)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01s393c)
Commemorating David Livingstone in the 200th anniversary year of his birth. From Cramond Kirk, Edinburgh with the Revd Russell Barr.

Readings: Acts 11: 1-10
John 13: 31-35
Introit: Lord, Give me Faith (Robson)
Hymns: God whose almighty word (Moscow)
I to the hills will lift mine eyes (French (Dundee)
For everyone born a place at the table
Ye servants of God (Laudate Dominum)
Anthem: There's a wideness in God's mercy (Corvedale): Maurice Bevan.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01s0ssj)
John Gray: Bitcoin's Cyber Freedom

John Gray wonders what the rise of the cyber currency Bitcoin tells us about our human need for freedom and protection, "The dream of finding some kind of talisman, a benevolent tyrant or a magical new technology, that can shelter us from power and crime and protect us from each other." Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01s393f)
Sunday morning magazine programme.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01s7wm2)
For detailed synopses, see daily episodes

Writer ..... Simon Frith
Director ..... Rosemary Watts
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Nic Grundy ..... Becky Wright
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Jazzer McCrearie ..... Ryan Kelly
Alan Franks ..... John Telfer
Paul Morgan ..... Michael Fenton Stephens
Elona Makepeace ..... Eri Shuka
Alec Murray ..... Rick Warden
Darrell Makepeace ..... Dan Hagley
Andrew Eagleton ..... John Flitcroft.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b01s393k)
The Centre for Alternative Technology

Sue MacGregor reunites the pioneers behind The Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), the radical community that launched the Green Movement in Britain from a disused slate quarry in Machynlleth, Wales.

Led by an entrepreneurial aristocrat turned environmentalist, a group of self-declared 'Crazy Idealists' arrived at 'The Quarry' in 1973 with an urgent mission. The limits to growth and resources had been forecast, the nuclear threat was real, and fundamentally new ways of living had to be found that were more self-sufficient, locally-focused, and alternative to the assumptions of modern industrial society.

From humble beginnings as a tiny commune sidelined by the scientific establishment, CAT went on to build some of Britain's first ever electricity generating windmills and the largest solar roof in Europe. They attracted the patronage of the royal family, the suspicions and support of their local Welsh neighbours, and the interest of tens of thousands of visitors. Forty years on, the alternatives that CAT pioneered are becoming mainstream, and the Centre's work is more relevant than ever.

Joining Sue MacGregor are: Mark Matthews, the Centre's first director; architect Roderick James, who designed the first complex of buildings; Bob Todd, the Centre's pioneering technical expert; Liz Todd, Bob's wife and an early volunteer, who raised her young family on the site; and Des Rees, the Welsh builder who unexpectedly found himself immersed in The Quarry's unique way of life.

Producer: Patrick Sykes
Series Producer: David Prest
The Reunion is a Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b01s09km)
Series 11

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Ed Byrne, Mark Watson, Tony Hawks and Lucy Porter are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as the horn, windows, monkeys and grass.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01s395f)
Black Pudding v Boudin Noir

Charles Campion reports from Normandy in France as he helps judge the world black pudding championships, which features entries from Japanese, Austrian and Irish butchers.

Each year the "knights of the black pudding", a long established organisation of food lovers, hold the annual Foire au Boudin. Nearly six hundred butchers from around the world enter the competition to help celebrate the ancient dish.

As Charles discovers most of the world's great food cultures have some form of blood sausage and they vary in size, shape, texture and flavour.

Although we've been making this dish since the arrival of the Romans, many parts of Britain have fallen out of love with the black pudding. The simple recipe of blood, barley, fat, onions and spices is affordable, delicious and a complete meal, and there are signs of a chef led revival.

The competition, and the work on display of some extremely creative butchers provides many delicious reasons why this humble food really is worthy of a revival. Young chef and rising star James Winter based in Gloucestshire, also provides some tips on how to cook black pudding.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01s37kq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01s39z4)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Living with Lady T (b01s8pm4)
Charles Moore shares insights gleaned while working on the first volume of Margaret Thatcher's authorised biography. Recorded partly by Charles Moore himself over an extended period, the programme contains some surprising stories about his subject from high-profile and less well-known figures in her life as well as reflections on the biographical process.

Producer: Helen Grady.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01s0slz)
St Keverne

This week Radio 4's horticultural panel show is in St Keverne, Cornwall, with Eric Robson in the chair and Anne Swithinbank, Toby Buckland and Bunny Guinness on the panel.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

Q: Can you recommend a foolproof method of growing Lily of the Valley and keeping them from year to year?
A: Lily of the Valley can be a difficult plant to establish. They can be best in a border with some competition. A North-facing slope that is well composted should work well, but you should try it in many different positions if you want success.

Q: We've had an East wind off the beach for at least the last 4 weeks and a lot of plants have been scorched badly, will they recover? Can the panel advise remedial treatments?
A: It depends what the plants are (they are bamboos in this case) but they will probably self-rectify, as they will still have a good root base. The worst problem is with evergreen shrubs when they become disfigured and you can either leave it to grow and hope it repairs, or prune hard to encourage re-growth. The key thing is to grow your plants a little harder if they've been stripped, so no high-nitrogen feeds but just good garden compost so that when they come back next year they are tougher. If you thin out the clumps of bamboo it should help reduce scorching and the plant often looks nicer.

Q: We have a tiered North-facing bank next to our conservatory, can you suggest low-growing plants for summer colour? It has Hellebores and Daffodils in the Spring.
A: If you have quite small steps you shouldn't worry about it being North-facing because you haven't got a big shadow covering it and you've got long days, so you could use your colour from anything really. Pelargoniums would do well in a slightly shading place. You could plant ground-cover roses and peg them to the bank. Argyranthemums would do well. You could use shade-tolerant perennials like Phlomis russeliana, which is a ground-cover evergreen plant with yellow spikes in the summer.

Q: I've got an Aeonium Schwarzkopf which is currently flowering for the first time in the greenhouse. What should I do with it when the flowers finish?
A: They produce yellow flowers. When it's finished you should cut the whole top off the plant. It will then respond with side rosettes, taking on a more tree-like shape. You can then take cuttings for more plants or pot it on to become an even bigger specimen.

Q: For the last year I have been trying to grow Celeriac in different parts of the garden. The top growth looks good but they only produce thin routes and no bulbs. The soil is clay but I add lots of compost and horse muck. Why is this?
A: Celeriac, like celery, likes a lot of moisture. If you're on dry soil you can plant it in raised beds, lined with black polythene, with holes in the bottom. This will impede the drainage. If you add too much nitrogen this will make the tops grow, but the bottoms need more phosphates. If you start them off in trays you can plant out when the conditions are right. Low light levels also can encourage too much top growth and not enough bottom. The other issue is that they need spacing of about 30cms in all directions for the roots to spread.

Q: Why do the potatoes I buy from the supermarket for eating, that I keep in the cupboard, send out loads of shoots, while seed potatoes from the garden centre that I keep in the shed don't?
A: It's the warmth of your kitchen that encourages the potatoes to sprout more quickly.

Q: I have two ponds fed by a small river. Is there anyway of eradicating reedmace (Typhaceae) other than getting a digger to uproot it?
A: The un-organic way would be to use Glyphosate that is cleared for use in water. There is only one Glyphosate that is cleared for this use so you must be careful to get the right one and use it with caution. If you want to be organic you can buy a fabric that lies on the bottom of the pond and acts like a mulch to stop weeds growing.

Q: I like to use water from water butts to water greenhouse plants. However, my compost does become covered by a green film and cucumber plants become diseased. Can the team suggest a way of safely purifying the rainwater?
A: Make sure that the water is washing through the rain-butt. A lot of composts are prone to getting the green film on top due to their contents and this is not due to the water used. It is very good to use the water for established plants, but always take water from the tap for seedlings and young plants, because the rain-butt water may be diseased. You can keep goldfish in your waterbutt, or use Potassium permanganate if you don't want to be organic.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b01s39z6)
Sunday Edition

Conversations about the perils facing fishermen, the legacy of a Catholic upbringing, ensuring disabled children are cared for after you've gone, and planning your future are all introduced by Fi Glover in the Sunday Edition of Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01s39z8)
The Great Scott

Waverley

Waverley by Walter Scott
Adapted by Mike Harris

A gripping tale of love, war and divided loyalties with Scotland in open rebellion against the Union with England.

It's 1745 and 21year old Edward Waverley, a newly commissioned red-coat officer, is posted to Scotland on the eve of Bonnie Prince Charlie's violent bid for power. His father is a rising minister in the ruling Hanoverian state, but the beloved Uncle who brought him up is an old Jacobite, loyal to the exiled Stewart dynasty.

Waverley falls in love with two very different Scottish girls - the cautious, loyalist, lowlander Rose Bradwardine, and the fiery highland rebel Flora. He goes AWOL for Flora just as her brother Fergus is rallying their clan to fight for Charlie.

When Waverley is accused by his Commanding Officer of a treasonable flirtation with the enemy, he joins the uprising in a fit of pique and helps defeat an English army at the battle of Prestonpans.

When he finds out that he has caused the arrest of Uncle, he returns to London to try to clear his name.

With David Tennant as Walter Scott.

All other parts are played by members of the cast.

The music is composed and performed by Ross Hughes and Esben Tjalve.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01s39zb)
Sir Walter Scott Special from the Royal Opera House

Mariella Frostrup presents a special programme from The Royal Opera House on the prolific and influential Scottish novelist Sir Walter Scott.

Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771, and followed in his father's footsteps as a lawyer before embarking on a writing career which made him the most important and significant writer of his day.
Despite being credited with creating the historic novel, for his innovative characters and his inspiring portrayals of both Scottish and English life and myths, as well as influencing writers from Dickens to Dumas, his expansive romanticised stories eventually fell out of favour in the 20th century and his literary works were neglected.

Bringing his novels and literary legacy to life are biographer Stuart Kelly, authors Denise Mina and Allan Massie and actor Emun Elliott.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01s39zd)
Roger McGough presents the first in a new series of poems requested by listeners, with an edition that dares to walk on the wilder side, focusing on feelings other than those that relate to love. If the emotions felt in a single day were mapped across a life, what would be encountered? We hear poems that touch upon darker feelings, such as hatred, shame and remembrance.

Joined by the actors Patrick Romer, Kate Littlewood and Alun Raglan, Roger introduces poems by the likes of the footloose Verlaine, some sharply observed gems by Emily Dickinson, a dark poem about shame by the American poet Richard Wilbur, and a lament that conjures up powerful suburban frustrations, written by the Bristol-based poet and novelist, Helen Dunmore.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SUN 17:00 Tax Avoidance: The Hidden Cost (b01s0df4)
The revelation of how little tax Google, Starbucks and Amazon have been paying on their global operations has triggered political indignation around the world and thrown fresh light on the aggressive techniques multi-national companies can use to slash their tax bills.

More than lost tax is at stake.

In this programme, Michael Robinson reports on the additional advantages aggressive tax avoidance can provide to multinationals.

With sophisticated systems, shifting their profits to low-tax countries, these multinationals have a competitive edge over nationally-based companies whose tax bills are usually far harder to avoid.

The result: more profit for the multinational and squeezed margins for the national competitor.

And there's more. With an effective tax-avoiding infrastructure in place, aggressive multinationals are better placed to compete for new markets or to buy up competitors in higher-tax countries - further extending their global reach.

For governments around the world, many already facing slowdown and recession, such tax-avoidance powered competition is a disturbing danger. Because as a tax-avoiding company extends its operations, so a country's revenues from corporate tax come under threat.

While politicians around the world look for ways to cut back corporate tax avoidance, and with Prime Minister David Cameron promising the issue will be on the agenda when the G8 group of world leaders meet in Northern Ireland in June, this programme assesses their chances of reversing this global trend.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01s37bj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01s37ks)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01s37kv)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01s37kx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01s39zg)
In Pick Of The Week, we join a production of Shakespeare's Henry V featuring a cast of former soldiers who identify strongly with the characters they play. What's more they find that drama is therapy for their post-traumatic stress.

Principal ballerina Tamara Rojo (Roko) introduces the music which calms her down; Hugh Bonneville finds himself transported to a parallel universe; Tom Conti recalls his father, an Italian hairdresser in Paisley; and we discover the origins of Muzak.

Join Gerry Northam for his highlights of the week's listening.

Ella in Berlin - Radio 4
Noise: A Human History Ep 28 - Radio 4
The Essay: Unknown Cities, Kunming - Radio 3
The Reunion: The Centre for Alternative Technology - Radio 4
The Big Ditch Ep 1 - Radio 4
Private Passions with Tamara Rojo - Radio 3
And Calm Of Mind - Radio 4
Archive on Four: Collar The Lot - Radio 4
What I Read To The Dead - Radio 4
Cultural Exchange on Front Row, Adrian Lester - Radio 4
The Unbelievable Truth - Radio 4
Married - 4 Extra.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01s39zj)
Pip tells her parents she's going to stay with a university friend for the night because without a car it's the only way she'll get to uni on time. Unhappy David thinks Pip's playing games to get her own way over the car, but Ruth says to be patient. Pip will see sense in the end.

Tom's awkward when Pip asks if there are any more milking shifts going. He tells her he'll think about it.

When Pat says that an on-farm herd sale will be really difficult for her, Tony tells her not to hurry into a decision. Helen takes Pat for a walk with Henry, where Pat worries about Tom's split with Brenda. Helen reckons he'll get through it by focussing on work. She suggests that if Pat can't bear to be around for the herd sale they could go somewhere nice for the day.

Later Pat agrees to the on-farm sale - she and Helen have plans if it gets too much. They agree to tell Pip about it as it affects her job, but to keep it to herself for now. Pat needs more time before it goes public. Pat will also tell Clarrie and Susan but she needs to pick the right moment.


SUN 19:15 Believe It! (b01j5nw6)
Series 1

Power

Celebrity autobiographies are everywhere. Richard Wilson has always said he'd never write one.
Based on glimmers of truth, BELIEVE IT is the hilarious, bizarre, revealing (and, most importantly, untrue) celebrity radiography of Richard Wilson.

He narrates the series, weaving in and out of dramatised scenes from his fictional life-story. He plays a heavily exaggerated version of himself: a Scots actor and national treasure, unmarried, private, passionate about politics, theatre and Manchester United (all true), who's a confidant of the powerful and has survived childhood poverty, a drunken father, years of fruitless grind, too much success, monstrosity, addiction, charity work, secret work for governments and fierce rivalry with Sean Connery (not true). All the melodramatic staples of celebrity-autobiography are wonderfully undercut by Richard's deadpan delivery.
(The title - in case you hadn't spotted - is an unashamed reference to his famous catchphrase.)
Richard is supported by a small core cast viz:
David Tennant
John Sessions
Lewis Macleod
Arabella Weir
And Jane Slavin
Who play anyone and everyone!

Ghost written by Jon Canter
Produced by: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 George Mackay Brown Stories (b01s39zl)
The Wireless Set

The first in a series of three short stories by one of Orkney's finest writers, George Mackay Brown. An internationally renowned poet and Booker-nominated novelist, Mackay Brown's work was infused by the islands history and culture; his friend Seamus Heaney said of him: "He transforms everything by passing it through the eye of the needle of Orkney."

In today's story, set in 1939, a couple are bemused by their son's gift of a wireless set, but when he leaves the small island community for service in the Navy, they and their neighbours keep a close ear upon the news it brings of the war's progress.

George Mackay Brown (1921 - 1996) was a prolific short story writer. "The Wireless Set" can be found in the collection "A Time to Keep", which is republished this month by Birlinn.

Read by Claire Knight.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.

The opening music is "Shapinsay Polka" by Jennifer and Hazel Wrigley, taken from their album Mither O' The Sea.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01s0sm5)
In the last of the current series of Feedback, Roger Bolton is joined by Gwyneth Williams, the Controller of Radio 4. She responds to listener questions on topics ranging from the coverage of Baroness Thatcher's funeral to Paul and Lillian's love affair in The Archers.

Earlier this week the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, was interviewed by John Humphrys about UK borrowing figures - but the interview took a personal turn at the end when Mr Osborne was quizzed on his tears during Margaret Thatcher's funeral. We hear the views of listeners who were unimpressed by the line of questioning.

Also, are standards of grammar and pronunciation slipping at Radio 4? Many think so. But what will the Controller make of the comments?

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01s0sm3)
An interior designer, a theatre director, a cricketer, a prima ballerina and a musician

Matthew Bannister on

The designer Jocasta Innes who wrote "The Pauper's Cookbook" and "Paint Magic", introducing a generation to stippling and rag rolling. Her daughter Daisy Goodwin shares her memories.

The theatre director and poet Patrick Garland: his friend Alan Bennett pays tribute.

The cricketer Mike Denness, an elegant batsman who captained Kent and England and started an international row as a match referee.

Maria Tallchief - the native American ballet dancer who was a muse to her husband George Ballanchine.

And the singer and songwriter Richie Havens who opened the Woodstock festival when other acts were stuck in traffic. Tom Findlay of Groove Armada recalls working with him recently.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01s3797)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01s3939)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b01s0qnm)
Potash of Gold

Nearly one mile underground beneath the North Sea are vast supplies of potash and polyhalite waiting to be dug up and turned into valuable fertiliser. There's just one snag: the planned new mine would be in the North York Moors National Park, where such developments are normally prohibited. Locals are taking sides for and against, as Peter Day reports.
Producer: Mike Wendling.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01s39zn)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01s39zq)
Zoe Williams of The Guardian analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01s0qn5)
Steve Coogan as Paul Raymond; Jack Black in new movie Bernie; Terence Stamp on his best films

Steve Coogan's discusses his latest role as the Soho entrepreneur, Paul Raymond, in The Look of Love, directed by Michael Winterbottom. He tells Francine Stock why he's attracted to characters who prove initially hard to like.
Bernie, directed by Richard Linklater, is also based on a real person and tells the story of a Texan man accused of murdering an elderly woman. Using documentary-style interviews within the feature film, it's a sympathetic portrayal by Jack Black. He explains why he was attracted to the role and his nervousness about the reaction of the real Bernie, currently serving his sentence in prison.
So how can biopics be both honest and innovative about their subjects? Film critic Hannah McGill discusses those that work and those that fail to engage.
And the actor Terence Stamp looks back at this career from Billy Budd to The Collector, Theorem and The Limey as the British Film Institute opens a retrospective on his work next week.
Producer: Elaine Lester.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01s38ry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 29 APRIL 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01s37mc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01s0dkm)
The Power of Oil

The Power of oil - Laurie Taylor explores the role of oil in shaping our society, economy and environment. He talks to James Marriott of Platform, co-author with Mika Minio-Paluello of 'The Oil Road'. Their research took them from the oil fields of the Caspian Sea to the refineries and financial centres of Northern Europe. Timothy Mitchell, Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Colombia University, joins the discussion, considering the relationship between democracy and oil. John Urry (1946-2016) also took part in the programme. He was Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Lancaster University and author of a book which pioneered a sociology of energy, analysing our carbon addiction in the light of ever dwindling resources and asking if an oil free society was possible or desirable. Sadly, John died several years after the programme was first transmitted. He had done more than most British sociologists to characterise the complexities of global society. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01s38rw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01s37mf)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01s37mh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01s37mm)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01s37mp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01s43pv)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with the Rev'd Peter Baker.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01s46g1)
A vote in Europe today could take the EU a step closer to banning some pesticides, in order to protect bees. Wildlife campaigners want three neonicotinoids banned for use on crops which are attractive to bees, but manufacturers claim that would cost UK agriculture 630 million pounds in lower yields.

Blossom has been very late on the trees this year, but this could just be a return to how things used to be thirty years ago. A plum grower in Norfolk compares her father's weather notes from the 1970s and 1980s with this year's situation in her orchards.

And what do you get if you set the Archers in Afghanistan? Charlotte Smith's been finding out.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01s37mr)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01s46g3)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01s46g5)
Gavin Turk on the Value of Art

On Start the Week Lisa Jardine talks to the artist Gavin Turk about the construction of artistic myth and the question of authorship and authenticity. The rare book dealer Rick Gekoski searches for lost treasures amid tales of theft, forgery and destruction, while the curator Paul Roberts reveals the life and culture preserved in the volcanic devastation of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The everyday object - a table - is at the centre of Tanya Ronder's new play of belonging, identity and inheritance.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01s8tb5)
Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography

Episode 1

In 1997 Margaret Thatcher invited Charles Moore to write her biography on the understanding that it would not be published until after her death. This is the first volume of his meticulously researched portrait of the former Prime Minster. The reader is Nicholas Farrell.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01s46g7)
Women in TV comedy; XX Factor; Dawn O'Porter

Why are there so few female comedians on our screens? Katherine Ryan and Jo Bunting on why, and whether it matters to audiences. Alison Wolf talks about women with what she's calling the XX factor and what impact its having on society. Dawn O'Porter on her first novel and the appeal of young adult fiction. Coronary heart disease and why it's the single biggest killer of women in the UK.
Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Louise Corley.


MON 10:45 The Cazalets (b01s46g9)
Confusion

Episode 6

by Elizabeth Jane Howard, dramatised by Sarah Daniels

A suggestion of Rachel's finds Sid basking in some unexpected attention - whilst Louise has to rebuff the advances of mother-in-law Zee's over-eager friends.

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Confusion' is the third of four compelling Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and August 2013.
You can catch up with series two, The Cazalets: Marking Time, on iplayer.

The third series is set between 1942 and 1945: For the Cazalet family the war has brought tragedy;
Rupert has been missing since Dunkirk and only his daughter Clary refuses to believe he is dead, whilst her step-mother Zoe has buried her hope and devotes her energy to bringing up their daughter, Juliet. At home, Sybil has lost her battle with cancer leaving Polly bereft and trying to comfort her father, Hugh. Even Edward seems wracked with doubt over whether he should give up his mistress, Diana, who is carrying his child and try and make a go of things with Villy once again. The younger generation seems as confused as their parents: Louise makes a hasty marriage to society painter Michael Hadleigh, giving up her dreams of being an actress, whilst Polly and Clary finally convince the family they can move to London, but the girls are soon to discover that independence and adulthood brings heartbreak of its own.
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 - have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Dominic Mafham, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
'Casting Off' follows in July.


MON 11:00 Jemima Khan and the Part-Time Wife (b01s46rr)
Jemima Khan investigates the practice of polygamy in the UK's Muslim community.

For divorced Muslim women, finding a new spouse isn't always easy. But would being a part-time wife be the solution?

Khan attends a Muslim matchmaking event to talk to divorced and widowed women about whether they would contemplate becoming a co-wife. She finds a number of women who are actively considering it.

Polygamy in the UK is mostly practiced by Muslims, though not exclusively. Although only one marriage can be officially registered under British law, the Quran permits men to take four wives. But some Muslims believe that this permission needs to be interpreted in the context of 21st century Britain, where women enjoy equality with men and should not be subject to religious laws which seem to contradict their rights.

In this programme, Jemima Khan speaks to women who have chosen to become second wives as well as women who have had polygamy imposed upon them without their consent or, sometimes, even their knowledge.

We hear from a family barrister and a representative of the Sharia Council. Baroness Caroline Cox explains why she believes that practices such as polygamy bring suffering to women and must be prevented from happening; but Islamic law consultant, Khola Hasan, wants the English legal system to recognise the existence of polygamy (though she does not wish the law to be changed to accommodate the practice.)

Producer: Isabel Sutton
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Kerry's List (b01s46vd)
Series 1

Episode 1

The first in a four-part sketch show co-written by and starring comedian and actress Kerry Godliman.

Kerry is a married mother of two, a stand up comedian and has two children. Her life can only properly function with her daily list - if she didn't compile this vital list, her life would simply fall apart.

Each week, this series looks at a different list and delves into Kerry's madcap world by looking at various elements of that week's list in sketches, narrative and stand up.

In this first episode, Kerry's List includes avoiding eBay, de-scaling the kettle, looking good and being romantic for Valentine's Day, buying jeans, retrieving an asthma pump from the Hoover, toning her upper arms and reviewing the plumber!

Joining Kerry is her husband Ben (played by her real husband Ben Abell) and her five year old daughter Elsie (played by Melissa Bury) together with a range of bizarre characters - including an enthusiastic council environment worker, some disgruntled satsumas, a bored therapist, a Fairy Jeanmother and a very keen gym instructor.

Any busy parent who's ever compiled a list of their own will relate to Kerry Godliman's incident filled world.

The cast includes David Pusey (who co-wrote the series), Bridget Christie, Lucy Briers, Rosie Cavaliero and Nicholas Le Prevost.

Kerry Godliman is fast establishing herself as a highly skilful stand up comic and actress, from her recent appearances on Live at The Apollo (BBC 1), Derek (C4) and Our Girl (BBC 1).

Producer: Paul Russell
An Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01s46vg)
Fixed energy contracts, cut-price funerals, and iTunes is 10

Thousands of households face a big rise in energy bills because their fixed term agreement is coming to an end but in some cases they may fall; have those customers been paying too much?

A quarter of local authorities are still to appoint a director of public health a month after the function transferred out of the NHS into local government.

A charity collection agency admits that only a quarter of the cash they raise finds its ways into its clients coffers.

I-Tunes, the world's largest digital music store is ten years old.

As the average cost of a funeral rises towards £3,500; can you cut corners without skimping on dignity.

The Pembrokeshire coastal walk is rated second best in the world- what makes it so special and which walk is number one?

More Creative Writing Courses are being offered to budding authors every year and at a pretty price too but are they worth the money?


MON 12:57 Weather (b01s37mt)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01s46vj)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Thames Crossings (b01s4740)
Beginnings

Episode 1 (of 5): Beginnings

The River Thames has run softly through Piers Plowright's largely unplanned life. In this five-part series, he visits different points along its course where his life has crossed the great river.

In this first programme he seeks out the river's source in a dry field in Gloucestershire and finds his way, meanderingly, to Lechlade, where he spent family holidays as a child. Along the route, he meets people who spend their lives by the river - and takes the occasional dip.

Produced by Alan Hall.
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01s39zj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 The Interrogation (b01s4742)
Series 2

Marc

by Roy Williams

1/3 The Story of Marc. DS Max Mathews returns from bereavement leave to rejoin DC Sean Armitage doing what they do best. An ex-colleague, Marc, is suspected of domestic violence, but while Sean is maybe too close to the case, Max has an uncanny insight into the crime.

Music by David Pickvance
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

This is another chance to hear the second series of Roy Williams' hard hitting dramas of modern crime. Critical acclaim for the first series included this, in the Spectator...

He writes about the stuff you'd rather not know, prefer not to think about, pretend to ignore. But it lives on with you in the mind. It won't let you go. By his words, the sharp, brittle, spot-on dialogue, he forces you to recognise the limitations of your experience, your understanding. It's not the story outline that matters, but the characterisation, the way the people speak, the language they use. Each of the characters is so clearly differentiated you know exactly what they look like without a detail being given to us. Through the conversation, the interaction, we gather in the back story, we get the gist. There are no easy answers. It's life, messy life, the life we'd rather not think about as we listen to the radio, doing the ironing, making marmalade, cocooned mostly from the nasty, brutish world dealt with by others on our behalf.

Kate Chisholm.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b01s4744)
Series 3

University of Leeds

A lively and funny quiz show, hosted by Steve Punt, where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from the University of Leeds, the specialist subjects are Civil Engineering, Popular Music Studies and Psychology, with questions ranging from dada and Dylan, to concrete and cogwheels - via penguins and postage stamps.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds, and the 'Highbrow and Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction.

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list.

The host Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show, is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. He has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, on subjects as varied as "The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen" and "Getting The Gongs" (an investigation into awards ceremonies), as well as a comedy for Radio 4's Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called "The Genuine Particle".

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01s395f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Sid James: Not Just a Dirty Laugh (b01s4762)
Marking the centenary of Sid James, comedian Lee Mack examines recently discovered archives and rare recordings offering a unique insight into the actors lesser known work on radio, stage and screen.

Actors Bernard Cribbins, Lance Percival and Liz Fraser reveal their own experiences of working with Sid and we hear from his daughter, the author, Reina James who provides the programme with previously unheard material from the family archives of her father's years in South Africa.

Throughout the programme Christopher Fairbank provides the voice of Sid for sketches found in the BBC's written archives and quotes excerpts from interviews given during his extraordinary life.

Born in Johannesburg in May 1913, Sid James arrived in Britain in 1946 and came to prominence as sidekick to ground breaking comedy actor Tony Hancock. He later became a household name as the star of the Carry On series of films

As Lee Mack discovers there's more skill to Sid James' performances than is often evident. He'd already made numerous screen appearances before Hancock and the Carry Ons with straight roles and comic support in films by Powell and Pressburger and Ealing Comedies. His early radio work includes parts alongside Peter Sellers and Dennis Price, on stage he performed in Guys and Dolls and starred in Citizen James his own television situation comedy scripted for him by Galton and Simpson.

Presenting a fascinating collection of extracts never before broadcast on radio this documentary puts the emphasis on the unfamiliar with interviewees adding another dimension to Sid's story by revealing his early career and assessing his copious talents.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b01s4764)
Series 3

Isolation

Aleks Krotoski explores our lives in the digital world. This week she asks, are our connected modern lives making us lonelier than ever?


MON 17:00 PM (b01s4766)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01s37mw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b01s4768)
Series 11

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Katherine Ryan, Graeme Garden and Lloyd Langford are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as geese, horses, advertising and Madonna.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01s47bl)
Eddie thinks it's odd that Lynda still has a strip fenced off where the llamas can't go. When he asks Clarrie what she wants for her birthday, she says she'd love to go to the coast.

Susan's excited about going to supper at Home Farm on Thursday to thank Neil for his actions over the dog-fighting, but Neil's not so impressed. Susan's a bit put out when she hears Elona and Darrell have also been invited, but rallies when she realises they've not been there before. She can make them feel at home.

Pat tells Clarrie and Susan about deciding to sell the herd. It won't impact on their jobs as they'll be buying in milk. Afterwards, Clarrie tells Pat she knows it wasn't an easy decision for her. Later Susan and Clarrie speculate on the reasons for the sale.

Neil and Christine discuss the church organ before Wednesday's PCC meeting, admitting it raises difficult moral issues over the cost of its repair.

Neil gets a call from police liaison. They have arrested the man who shot Neil. Relieved Susan hugs Neil, saying he must tell Darrell who'll be pleased about it. Yes, says Neil, he dares say Darrell will.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01s483g)
Lucy Moore on Nijinsky, Bernardo Bertolucci's Cultural Exchange, Dead Man Down

With John Wilson,

Nijinsky is known as one of the greatest dancers and most experimental choreographers of the 20th century, but his career was curtailed by mental illness. Lucy Moore has written the first English language biography of Nijinsky for more than 30 years, and she discusses the myths which surround him, his complex relationship with the impresario Diaghilev, and the possible reasons for his breakdown and inability to work again.

More from the Cultural Exchange project, in which 75 leading creative minds share their passion for a book, film, poem, piece of music or other work of art: tonight Oscar-winning director Bernardo Bertolucci nominates Federico Fellini's film La Dolce Vita.

Dead Man Down is the first Hollywood film from Niels Arden Oplev, the Danish director of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. This dark thriller stars Colin Farrell as a hit man working for a New York crime boss and Noomi Rapace, who Arden Oplev worked with on The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, as a damaged woman seeking his help in her own revenge plot. Mark Eccleston discusses the film and considers the choices European directors have made when making their Hollywood debut.

With less than a year to go until the first exhibition opens in the British Museum's new Exhibitions Gallery, John gets a behind-the-scenes glimpse of how the £135 million project is progressing. British Museum director Neil MacGregor explains how the new part of the building will aid conservators and museum scientists in their work, provide a new display areas - and not add a single penny to the museum's current heating or lighting bills.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


MON 19:45 The Cazalets (b01s46g9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 How to Run Europe (b01s483j)
Napoleon's Way

In the last of three programmes, Anne McElvoy explores the challenges of governing the peoples of Europe across three of the continent's great empires ...and the parallels today. To conclude the series, Anne is in Brussels and Paris to explore the empire of Napoleon Bonaparte.

The Arc de Triomphe, symbol of Napoleon's power and victorious military exploits, stands proudly at the heart of Paris, the centre of the Corsican-born French Emperor's vast territory. At its peak, France's First Empire comprised 130 departements, from the Bouches de l'Elbe near Hamburg to the Bouches de l'Ebre in northern Spain and Rome in the south-east. Joining Anne at the Arc de Triomphe is Professor Michael Broers of Oxford University and together, at the Fondation Napoleon and at the Conseil d'Etat, still France's focus of executive legal power, they unpick the complexities of governing a huge and disparate empire.

Famed for his administrative and legal reforms, the Code Napoleon, the French emperor has bequeathed a legacy of standardisation that remains today the model not only in France but - in different guises - across the continent he once bestrode. But how did he achieve it, and were the challenges he faced in bringing 'harmonisation' to Europe in any way analogous to the frustrations of 'straight bananas' and the like that annoy so many today?

Producers Simon Elmes & Georgia Catt.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b01s0qmq)
Belarus's university in exile

Belarus has been described as the last dictatorship in Europe. Few dare speak out against President Alexander Lukashenko and his ruling elite. But the opposition has found a way of making its voice heard through an academic community which has taken refuge abroad.

Lucy Ash visits the European Humanities University which teaches Belarusian students on its campus in neighbouring Lithuania. She talks to teachers and students, many of whom commute back and forth across the border. Is the EHU devoted to intellectual freedom and training future leaders of Belarus or is it a "trampoline for emigration" to the west?

Producer: Tim Mansel.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01s0qn7)
Bovine TB; Big Cat; Shark teeth

DEFRA's Chief Scientific Advisor meets with scientists at the Royal Society to discuss future strategies in controlling bovine TB. Ian Boyd has called together sixty leading experts in bovine TB with the aim of developing new strategies in controlling the disease. He speaks to Quentin Cooper from the meeting. Also on the programme Christl Donnelly, Professor of Statistical Epidemiology at Imperial College London, and James Wood Alborada Professor of Equine and Farm Animal Science at Cambridge, both of whom were at the meeting.

The rediscovery of a mystery animal in the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery's underground storeroom proves that a non-native 'big cat' prowled the British countryside at the turn of the last century. When the skeleton of the animal was compared to the mounted skin, researchers realised that the description in the records was wrong and that it was in fact a Canadian lynx. The researchers studied the teeth of the lynx and looked at strontium isotopes in the bones to find out where it lived. Dr Ross Barnett, from the University of Durham and the Natural History Museum of Denmark at the University of Copenhagen, tells us more.

Shark teeth found at the bottom of aquariums are being used by scientists at Birmingham University to find out about biological diversity in ancient seas. Ultimately the work could help predict what will happen to life in the currently warming seas. Sharks lose teeth regularly and researchers think that clues to marine biological diversity over millions of years may be locked up in sharks' teeth. Studying oxygen isotopes, which are incorporated into sharks' teeth as they develop, can reveal the temperature of the seawater the shark lived in at the time. Dr. Ivan Sansom, a Palaeobiologist, is leading the project.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01s46g5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01s37my)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01s483n)
Is Iraq returning to civil war?

Human rights in Dubai after 3 Britons sentenced;

Fisticuffs on Everest;

New research claims that austerity kills.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01s483q)
This Is Where I Am

Episode 6

Abdi and Debs have had their first awkward disagreement when he asks for her help to educate his silent daughter and she panics about the extent to which this little family are becoming dependent on her.

But when Abdi returns to his flat to face a crisis, she is the first person he turns to and she responds immediately.

Read by Maureen Beattie and Jude Akuwidike.

Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b01s0b02)
Instructions Instructions

Michael Rosen opens some flat-pack furniture to discover why instruction manuals are so hard to follow. Are they simply badly written or do they reveal something fundamental about how words capture movement. Beset by orphaned bolts and extraneous screws Michael plums for the latter and invites guests in to help explain the conundrum. He tracks down the company that has written the instructions to his bedside cabinet ;delving into their world he gets an insight to these experts who make a living from developing the 'perfect' instructions for us .But are words alone simply not suffice - are words and the language sometimes a problem if trying do make complex things ? Would we better off without words and have image alone - does that work ? And what about those who suffer from dyslexia how do they cope ? Whether you follow every word or simply loathe and chuck them away, instructions and manuals are a powerful influence on our lives and something most companies and organisations are starting to realise they need to get right .

Presenter : Michael Rosen
Producer : Perminder Khatkar.


MON 23:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b01m4c77)
Margaret Maughan

When Margaret Maughan won Britain's first-ever gold medal in the Paralympics, there was no crowd, no podium, and almost no Margaret! They had to drag her off the coach going back to the rudimentary Olympic village. As no one was keeping the score in the archery competition, she had no idea she'd won, let alone the fact that there was a ceremony.

The incident was typical of the first Paralympics which took place in Rome in nineteen sixty. Paralympic villages these days are fully wheelchair accessible, each athlete has an assistant to help with any special needs, and athletes can get advice about anything from diet to the very latest equipment. In Margaret's first games the accommodation was on stilts, and they had to be carried in and out by soldiers. Undignified it might have been, but Margaret didn't seem to mind! It was typical of the times, and in No Triumph, No Tragedy, Margaret, now eighty-five, tells her story with the laconic acceptance of her generation.

It had been typical of her treatment since a road accident in Malawi only a year earlier left her paralysed and in a wheelchair. After being flown home, she was taken to Stoke Mandeville Hospital, then more or less just a row of huts, though offering what was at the time the most sophisticated treatment around for those with spinal injuries. It was run by Ludwig Guttmann, who Margaret clearly greatly admired, even though he ran the place a bit like an army camp. Discipline was tough; trips to the local pub which got out of hand were greeted with a firm dressing-down, and threats that you might have to leave.

He would put up with no feeling sorry for yourself, and it was Guttman who decreed that sport was therapy, and turned what began as sports days into the start of an international phenomenon--the Paralympics. A few hundred competitors went to the first games: now it's around four thousand. Then, hardly anyone noticed them go; now, there are hour upon hour of television coverage. Then, they begged time off work, if they were lucky enough to have a job; now people like Oscar Pistorius and our own Tanni Gray Thompson are household names.

But Margaret's story shows how these rudimentary games were symptomatic of attitudes back in the fifties and sixties. She might have got a gold medal in Rome, but when they put her on the train back to her home town in Preston, she and her wheelchair had to travel in the guard's van. Although she was a qualified teacher, it was assumed that no way could she control a class: she was offered a job stamping cards; there were no benefits, and no anti-discrimination legislation; but Margaret Maughan wonders on the programme whether present generations had the same get up and go as she and her friends. She's delighted that the Paralympics is now a major international festival, but she speculates whether some of the camaraderie has been lost along the way.



TUESDAY 30 APRIL 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01s37nv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01s8tb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01s37nx)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01s37nz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01s37p1)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01s37p3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01s4g6r)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with the Rev'd Peter Baker.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01s4g6t)
In an act of determination by the European Commission, a ban on the use of neonicotinoid pesticides will come into force across Europe at the end of this year. After the latest vote failed to produce the necessary majority either way, the final decision lies with the Commission, which has been proposing a suspension of the use of three neonicotinoids, following advice from its food safety authority. A two-year ban will start in December. No member state can opt out. Anna Hill gauges reaction from all sides of the debate - disappointment from the NFU, relief from Friends of the Earth and an insistence from Defra's farming minister David Heath that the UK has not been overruled and will continue to research the causes of the decline in bees.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01s4g6w)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather, Yesterday in Parliament and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Syria: Can Aid Meet the Challenge? (b01s4vvd)
Edward Stourton reports from Jordan on the international aid response to the Syrian refugee crisis and how far politics is compromising humanitarian action.

The number of Syrian refugees in Jordan is expected to triple from a little under 400,000 to 1.2 million by the end of this year. Of these, it is projected that 400,000 will be living in camps and the other two thirds in host communities.

The Syrian emergency poses a profound challenge to aid agencies operating in the region, and humanitarian principles such as transparency, impartiality and accountability are being put to the test. Fundraising is also difficult and agencies on the ground in Lebanon and Jordan talk of the situation reaching a tipping point, as already thin resources are being stretched to breaking point by the refugee influx, exacerbating existing tensions.

Edward Stourton follows Islamic Relief, Oxfam, Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF) and the United Nations Refugee Council as they respond to the crisis for an insider's view of their debates and decisions.

The programme begins at an Islamic Relief food distribution point at the Prince Hassan football stadium in Irbid, where Edward meets some of the refugee families who have come seeking help.

In Zataari camp near the Syrian border, he talks to residents of the camp about their experiences. In Zataari, now home to more than 100,000 Syrian refugees, tensions are rising over the lack of aid and inhumane living conditions. In Amman, Edward asks Andrew Harper, the UN's head of its Syria response, whether this is a reflection of the UN's failure to adequately deal with a refugee crisis of this scale.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01sbgbx)
Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography

Episode 2

In 1997 Margaret Thatcher invited Charles Moore to write her biography on the understanding that it would not be published until after her death. This is the first volume of his meticulously researched portrait of the former Prime Minster. The reader is Nicholas Farrell.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01s4g70)
Dr Hawa Abdi; Fat shaming and body confidence

Fat shaming and body confidence with bloggers Karina Marshall and Bethany Rutter aka feministcupcakes and myarchedeyebrow. Dr Hawa Abdi on running the refugee camp which grew up around her family home in Somalia. Pink Martini play live in studio. South African author Lauren Beukes on her genre bending new book, The Shining Girls. Women in golf - should The Open be played at a men only club. With Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 The Cazalets (b01s4g72)
Confusion

Episode 7

by Elizabeth Jane Howard, dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Zoe and Jack's time together is running out, but for Louise things are about to change in an unexpectedly happy way.

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Confusion' is the third of four compelling Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and August 2013.
You can catch up with series two, The Cazalets: Marking Time, on iplayer.

The third series is set between 1942 and 1945: For the Cazalet family the war has brought tragedy;
Rupert has been missing since Dunkirk and only his daughter Clary refuses to believe he is dead, whilst her step-mother Zoe has buried her hope and devotes her energy to bringing up their daugher, Juliet. At home, Sybil has lost her battle with cancer leaving Polly bereft and trying to comfort her father, Hugh. Even Edward seems wracked with doubt over whether he should give up his mistress, Diana, who is carrying his child and try and make a go of things with Villy once again. The younger generation seems as confused as their parents: Louise makes a hasty marriage to society painter Michael Hadleigh, giving up her dreams of being an actress, whilst Polly and Clary finally convince the family they can move to London, but the girls are soon to discover that independence and adulthood brings heartbreak of its own.
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Dominic Mafham, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
'Casting Off' follows in July.


TUE 11:00 Return to Japan (b01s4vdt)
The BBC Philharmonic was in Japan when the earthquake hit in 2011, and they were forced to abandon the country. Now they are returning for an emotional tour of the cities they should have visited.

In 2011, as one member of the orchestra put it, "We were having a very successful tour and then it shook'.

The musicians were on the top of a suspension bridge when the earthquake happened, and felt lucky to escape with their lives. When the seriousness of the situation at the Fukushima nuclear plant was made public, the decision was taken to leave the country as quickly as possible. Many of the musicians felt that they were abandoning the Japanese, and were reluctant to go. Now they have a chance to return to Japan with the same repertoire as the original tour.

How will the musicians react to going back to a country where many of them had been deeply upset by the experiences of 2011? And does their music help a nation still coming to terms with the traumatic events of 2011?

We join the BBC Philharmonic in Tokyo as they prepare to play the music of both sadness and survival throughout the concert halls of Japan.

Producer Mark Rickards.


TUE 11:30 Richard Wagner - Power, Sex and Revolution (b01s4g74)
Episode 1

Mention his name and images flicker of dwarves, flying maidens, magic swords and bronze breast-plates, all of it served in vast portions to test stamina of audience and singers alike. But what's really going on in Wagner?

200 years after the composer's birth, Paul Mason takes a fresh look at the man whose music has gripped him for as long as he can remember. The megalithic 15 hours of The Ring cycle dominate our view of Wagner, but behind it lies a man whose complex personality leaves us still struggling to understand him. He was a revolutionary, not just in music but also in politics, even finding himself a wanted man in exile. He was determined to transform drama into something which would be a powerful force in society, and a man driven by ambition to revitalise a Germany which he saw as critically unwell. And there were the darker instincts, not least an attitude to racial purity which leaves deep questions about his validity as an artist.

In the first of two programmes, Mason peers into the murky depths of a tale of desire and obsession. 'Tristan and Isolde' takes us deep into the mind of its composer, a man with powerful sexual urges of his own, and whose approach to life was totally reshaped by his discovery of one of the greatest philosophers of his age.

We hear from those who have sung and studied the work, and also a man so captivated by the power of opera, and Wagner in particular, that he built his own opera house in which to stage these giant and ever-challenging works.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01s4g76)
Call You and Yours: Should the police focus more on preventing crime?

On Call You &Yours tomorrow - prevention is better than cure says the new chief inspector of constabulary for England and Wales. Tom Winsor has called for more focus on preventing crime.

As police forces face budget cuts and are being asked to do more with less, he says "If we can prevent offences taking place, we prevent there being any victims, which is absolutely critical, and also we save all of those costs."

And in a new report published today, the think-tank Policy Exchange recommends the introduction of modern versions of police boxes, where people could "report crime, provide witness statements, discuss concerns and access information".

The report also says that, faced with budget cuts, police chiefs must avoid putting "buildings before bobbies" and should replace local police stations with "cops in shops".

It's six months since the first Police Commissioners were appointed. Who are they, and what have they been doing? Are they value for money?

We want to hear from you....

Will the cuts to police budgets lead to a rise in crime? Would you like a cop-shop on your High Street? And would you ever think of going into it to try to prevent a crime? What's it like in your area? Has the bobby on the beat disappeared?

03700 100 400 is the number or you can e-mail via the Radio 4 website or text us on 84844.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Maire Devine.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01s37p5)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01s4g78)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Thames Crossings (b01s5d47)
Learning

Episode 2 (of 5): Learning

The River Thames has run softly through Piers Plowright's largely unplanned life. In this five-part series, he visits different points along its course where his life has crossed the great river.

In today's programme he returns to Oxford where, fifty years ago, he studied history. He swims in his favourite spot at Port Meadow, meets a retired boat builder and talks to Sarah, the lock-keeper at Godstow.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01s47bl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00x923h)
Believe Me

Believe Me by Stephanie Dale

When art teacher Rachel bumps into chef Tyrone on his first day in London it is the start of a sunny, passionate love affair, an affair that will take them into much darker places.

Director: David Hunter

When art teacher Rachel, walking home festooned with end-of-term gifts from her pupils, bumps into Tyrone on his first day in London it is the beginning of a passionate love affair. Soon it makes sense for Tyrone, now working as a chef in a local up-market cafe, to move into Rachel's flat. But it's not long before there are tiny bits of grit starting to despoil the love oyster. As things get more serious issues of control, jealousy, trust and violence rise to the surface in this thriller exploring a lesser-known side of domestic abuse.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b01s4g7b)
Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Alison Carrol, Lecturer in European History at Brunel University, and the author of "Berlin at War" Roger Moorhouse.

Professor Matthew Cobb joins the discussion to talk about whether or not the Liberation of Paris in 1944 has become forgotten - or at least misunderstood.

Helen Castor meets up with Dr Jonathan Conlin from the University of Southampton, who has written a new Tale of Two Cities - one which highlights the many shared histories of London and Paris.

Finally the author of "Fire and Steam", railway writer Christian Wolmar, heads for Balcombe in Sussex where the great grandfather of Making History listener John Ireland worked on the London to Brighton Railway shortly after its opening in 1841. He finds out that the HS2 of its day was fought over by local landowners who saw the benefits and not the environmental damage of the railway.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b01s4g7d)
Amphibian Extinction

Frogs, toads and newts are becoming a less frequent sight in our ponds and gardens. Globally 40% of amphibians - almost 2000 species - are threatened with extinction according to the IUCN red list. Some scientists even say we're on the verge of the 6th mass extinction. Yet with things at such an alarming state Tom Heap asks what's being done to save these creatures and if it's too little too late?

Amphibians are a key part of the food chain but not only do they control less favoured bugs, they have also been described as 'hopping pharmacies' carrying important chemical compounds on their skin which have been used for medicines. If they disappear so does that link.

Tom hears about the different factors which are impacting on numbers - including habitat loss, climate change and diseases such as chytrid fungus and ranavirus. Andrew Blaustein at the University of Oregon is currently doing research to find out why some species are more vulnerable to chytrid than others but has also found parasites causing mutations in frogs nearby - including some with up to 15 limbs.

Meanwhile, of the UK's seven native amphibian species, one- the pool frog - has already died out. Tom travels to the secret location where they've been reintroduced from Sweden to find out how well they're doing and what can be learnt from this near-miss. Tom also gets his hands dirty on toad patrol, helping them cross busy roads as they come out of hibernation and return to their ponds for breeding. As he asks motorists to apply their brakes he also asks just how much this will do to halt their decline.

Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b01s4g7g)
Accents Will Happen

New research at the University of Liverpool is tracking for the first time in the United Kingdom how and what words babies and toddlers are picking up or understand. According to Professor Caroline Rowland and her colleague Anna Christopher what is emerging is the need to take into account the different dialects spoken. But what's in an accent or dialect ? Should we be correcting children's accent and grammar so that they are not disadvantaged later in life and how and what influences they way we speak; for dialectologist Dr Andrew Hamer we are all products of our history. In this edition of 'Word of Mouth' Michael Rosen talks to those who love or loathe their accent; those who have managed to retain their accent and those who have changed the way they speak concluding with voice and dialect coach Charmian Hoare who works with actors and Vicky Carpenter who trains- well anyone and claims she can make you 'accent-less' but is there such a thing ? surely we all have an accent ?

Presenter: Michael Rosan
Producer :Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b01s4g7j)
Series 30

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Broadcaster Gyles Brandreth nominates Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as his "Great Life". Matthew Parris chairs, assisted by biographer Andrew Lycett.

Conan Doyle is best known as the creator of Sherlock Holmes. This always irritated him, and he tried to kill off the great detective, only to bring him back by popular demand. But there was more to Conan Doyle than Holmes. A footballer, cricketer, skier,, a campaigner against the Belgian atrocities in the Congo, and most startlingly, a convinced spiritualist who believed in fairies.

The paradox of Conan Doyle's life was that, having invented the most rational, cerebral fictional character of all time, he himself embraced superstition and behaved in ways that caused even his allies to despair of his credulity.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01s4g7l)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01s37p9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Isy Suttie's Love Letters (b01rlngr)
Series 1

Peter and Anne

Isy Suttie (Dobby from Channel 4's Peep Show and double British Comedy Award nominee) returns to BBC Radio 4 with these unique tales, recounting a series of love stories affecting people she's known throughout her life, told partly through song.

Sometimes Isy has merely observed other people's love lives; quite often she's intervened, changing the action dramatically - for better or worse. Intertwined within these stories are related real life anecdotes from Isy's own, often disastrous, love life.

In this first episode, Isy and her first ever boyfriend, Darren Jones, conspire to write love notes that bring two shy bell-ringers together, Peter and Anne.

With her multi-character and vocal skills, plus her guitar, Isy creates a hilarious and deeply moving world, sharing with us her lessons in life and love.

"A voice you want to swim in" The Independent


Produced by Lianne Coop.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01s4g7q)
Lilian's caught off guard when Matt says he's having the afternoon off to play golf with Andrew Eagleton. During their match, Andrew mentions he saw Lilian with a builder contact at Felpersham Races the other day. Matt's surprised but hides it, although his golf suffers.

When Tom tells Pip about selling the Bridge Farm herd, Pip's upset she'll lose her work there. Tom offers her other work on the burger van in the summer, but Pip's unenthusiastic about the wages. Tom says she can take it or leave it.

Things are awkward when Tom bumps into Brenda. She tells him she needs to collect the rest of her things and they agree on tomorrow morning.

Pip and Lilian chat at the Bull. Pip puts up a poster touting for relief milking work, but manages not to let slip about Bridge Farm. When Spencer rings Pip whilst she's there, Pip tells him all about it.

Matt meets Lilian for dinner at The Bull and mentions her day at the races. Lilian apologises for not telling him. She went with a beautician friend who had a last minute spare ticket. Matt appears understanding and tells her not to worry about it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01s4g7s)
I'm So Excited; Tony Garnett

With Mark Lawson

Pedro Almodovar's film I'm So Excited features Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz, and returns to the comedic style of his early works such as Women On The Verge Of A Nervous Breakdown. When technical problems develop on board a plane, the pilots and flight attendants strive to keep morale high. Adam Mars-Jones reviews.

Film and TV producer Tony Garnett's work includes Kes, Cathy Come Home and This Life, and the British Film Institute is marking his 50 year career with a retrospective season. In a rare interview, he discusses how personal tragedies affected his work, the battles that went into making films tackling controversial issues - including back-street abortions - and why he wouldn't work in television now.

More from the Cultural Exchange project, in which 75 leading creative minds share their passion for a book, film, poem, piece of music or other work of art: tonight writer and performer Meera Syal selects To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee.

Amanda Knox's autobiography, Waiting To Be Heard, is being published in America today, but its UK release has been indefinitely postponed, on account of the British legal system. This is not the first time that a book has been unavailable in the UK but available in other countries. Professor of English Literature John Sutherland and lawyer Susan Aslan consider the issues this raises.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


TUE 19:45 The Cazalets (b01s4g72)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Constant Cravings: Does Food Addiction Exist? (b01s4g7v)
Could obesity, in some cases, result from an addiction, and if so, do we need to change the way we treat it?

When we think about addiction, drugs, alcohol or gambling come to mind. Though hardly uncommon, many people will go their whole lives without ever even dabbling in them. But could the everyday act of eating also be addictive? In excess, drugs, alcohol and gambling can cause massive physical and psychological harm, cutting across class, sex and age. But so can excessive eating. And if we're to believe alarming predictions about rising obesity levels, then perhaps we need to consider looking at overeating from a different angle.

Researchers around the world are asking the same question: is overeating a compulsive behaviour that exploits the same biological mechanisms we see in people addicted to drugs or alcohol? Is there such a thing as food addiction and how addictive are certain foods? In, Constant Cravings: Does Food Addiction Exist, Sally Marlow, a researcher in alcohol addiction at London's Institute of Psychiatry, explores the latest evidence underpinning the scientific basis for overeating, and asks just how radical should the solutions be?

In 2012, NeuroFAST, an EU research project began co-ordinating data on the relationship between overeating and addiction. Its mission is to achieve consensus on how overeating should be classified clinically, which might then lead to major shifts in treatment, public policy and attitudes to obesity.

Few of us, if we're honest, would consider obesity as little more than self-inflicted. And it's how many of us used to think about other addictions. Yet now we know that an individual's choices are influenced by a host of biological and environmental mechanisms: genes, brain chemistry and family history. Might overeating share these mechanisms?


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01s4g7x)
Disability rights barrister Catherine Casserley talks to Mani Djazmi about what visually impaired people's rights are when they are booking holidays, at home and abroad. She also tells us about travel insurance: Firstly, taking out travel insurance, how much do we have to disclose; and should we automatically expect to be charged more? And when making a claim: how much does visual impairment affect the outcome?

Listener John Gardner from Blackpool tells us his good news: he has had his Employment Support Allowance reinstated and has some advice for other claimants who feel they have not had a fair decision.

And we hear from world-renowned sitarist Baluji Shrivastav on his involvement in the multi-national Inner-vision orchestra which is made up of musicians who are all visually impaired.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b01s4g7z)
Doomsday prophets; News consumption and wellbeing; Christian Jarrett

Doomsday Prophets and the Nature of Belief

How do you cope with believing you are very right, but finding out you that were very wrong ? Neuroscientist Dr Kris de Meyer from King's College, London, spent six weeks interviewing followers of evangelical Christian broadcaster, Harold Camping, as they waited for May 21st, 2011, the date the earth was supposed to end. The resulting film explores the psychology of belief and tracks the mental gymnastics that individuals resort to when their fundamental beliefs are so publicly shattered.

News Consumption and Mental Wellbeing

Is bad news bad for your mental health ? Rolf Dobelli, author of The Art of Thinking, believes so, and he's given up on the habit. Rolf and Dr Pam Ramsden, from the University of Bolton, discuss with Claudia Hammond what we know about news consumption and mental wellbeing.

Psychology Research With Dr Christian Jarrett

Why women give better speeches if there's a picture of Hilary Clinton, or even Angela Merkel, behind them. Dr Christian Jarrett, Editor of the British Psychological Society's Research Digest, reviews the latest intriguing and important studies from psychology and neuroscience, including evidence that fighters should resist the urge to smile in their pre-match press conferences...apparently those who grin, do not win !

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Fiona Hill.


TUE 21:30 Syria: Can Aid Meet the Challenge? (b01s4vvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01s37pc)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01s4g81)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01s4g83)
This Is Where I Am

Episode 7

Abdi has some good news so he takes Debs to a traditional Glasgow pub to celebrate. But his encounter with the Scottish police has prompted more memories of his time at the Kenyan refugee camp at Dadaab.

Read by Maureen Beattie and Jude Akuwidike.

Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Absolutely Delish (b01s4gfq)
Home Alone

By Rose Heiney.

Daisy Haggard stars as a hostess desperate to throw the most sophisticated New Year's Eve dinner party ever. If she can get this right then perhaps the rest of her new year will be equally successful. But despite her meticulous planning, things go a bit pear-shaped. And pears aren't even on the menu.

Lucy ... Daisy Haggard
Man ... Ben Crowe
Beth ... Phillipa Stanton
Jessica ... Hannah Wood
Estate Agent ... Michael Shelford
Mum ... Joanna Brookes
Marcus ... Will Howard

Director ... Helen Perry

Actress Daisy Haggard is best known for her comedy roles in TV series 'Psychoville,' and 'Episodes'.

Rose Heiney won the 4Talent Award for Best New Comedy Writer in 2008 and was a Broadcast Hotshot in 2009. She writes for Channel 4's Fresh Meat and her first novel, The Days of Judy B, was nominated for The Times/South Bank Show Breakthrough Award and is currently being adapted by Rose for TV.


TUE 23:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b01m9n33)
Mark Goffeney

When, aged eight, Mark Goffeney strolled into a guitar shop to enrol for lessons, the owner thought he was being kidded. Mark had no arms, the result of an unexplained birth defect. He didn't even have prosthetic limbs, because he had found they were more trouble than they were worth. It's a measure of Mark's persuasiveness, even then, that the shop proprietor took him on as a pupil. He taught him to tune and play the guitar with his feet, laying it in front of him on the floor. He's been a highly respected rock musician for more than twenty years, running his own bands, and touring the world.

This was only the start of Mark's career of choices which apparently would make life as difficult for him as possible. In No Triumph, No Tragedy, he talks with humour, warmth, and practical common sense, about the philosophy that there's usually a solution, if you think hard enough about it. Only Mark, for instance, could choose tiling roofs as an early occupation. When asked how he got the tiles up there, he seemed faintly surprised. It involved, logically enough, getting down on the ground, manoeuvring them with his feet into a container that had a strap or a rope, and then a lot of wriggling till he got it on his back. Simple enough!

He used similar techniques bringing up his three children. He'd always done his share, but when the marriage broke up, amicably but irrevocably, his former wife asked him if he would take custody of the children while she put herself through college! They preferred to live with him, she said. He did it without a second thought, devising ways of lifting, carrying and feeding them. The only problem, he says, was fighting off the older women who wanted to rescue them from his tender mercies. His life as a touring musician was a bigger handicap to childcare than his so-called "handicap". "It's hard to check kids are doing their homework in the wings, when you're onstage doing a gig," he explained.

Recently, Mark has become something of an online sensation, with his act receiving hundreds of thousands of "hits" on YouTube. Is there a danger that people are more concerned with how he plays than what he plays? He says he doesn't care, as long as they end up hearing the music. He drives, as he does most things, with his feet. It works fine, but it's also led to the biggest scare of his life. Late one night he was stopped by a cop. He then heard the dreaded words: "put your hands out of the window; then get out of the car". He tried explaining that he had no hands. The cop said he'd shoot him if he didn't put his hands out of the window. It was only the word "disabled", which Mark doesn't use very often, which finally persuaded the officer to check. "So how was I supposed to know," he said grumpily. Listening to Mark Goffeney on No Triumph, No Tragedy should avoid such mistakes in the future.



WEDNESDAY 01 MAY 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01s37q8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01sbgbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01s37qb)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01s37qd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01s37qg)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01s37qj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01s4q5b)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with the Rev'd Peter Baker.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01s4q5d)
Anna Hill hears warnings that EU proposals to make seed registration compulsory could lead to the loss of old and rare crop varieties, and stop people sharing seeds. The European Commission argues that updating the legislation will protect buyers and that there will be a 'light touch' when dealing with heritage varieties.

The genetic diversity of our livestock is also under the spotlight, after a Government report finds that 75% of native breeds are under threat.

Anna visits an oil seed rape grower pondering how to protect future crops from aphids, following the European ban on neonicotinoids in order to protect bees.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Sarah Swadling.


WED 06:00 Today (b01s4q5g)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Webb and Sarah Montague, including:

0815
The NHS is one of the few government departments whose budget is ringfenced - that is, immune from the budget cuts that ministers are expected to make in order to bring government spending under control. John Appleby, chief economist at the King's Fund, and Lord Warner, former Health Minister, discuss whether ringfencing is desirable for the NHS.

0822
The Epiacum Roman Fort in the North Pennines, one of the best preserved Roman Forts in the former Empire, contains many roman artefacts that are not allowed to show up with a metal detector. However moles have been digging up all manner of stuff and a team has been sifting through it. Elaine Edgar, who with her husband owns the farm on which the fort lies, and Paul Frodsham, archaeologist with the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, describe the discoveries.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01s4q5j)
Brian Cox, Jason Lewis, Adela Jusic, June Tabor

Libby Purves meets actor Brian Cox; adventurer Jason Lewis; artist Adela Jusic and singer June Tabor.

Actor Brian Cox has performed in the West End, on Broadway, at the National Theatre and the Royal Court. He is currently playing Jack in Conor McPherson's The Weir at the Donmar Warehouse. Brian joined Dundee Rep as a young man and since then has carved out a successful theatre and Hollywood career - his films include Manhunter, The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Supremacy and Coriolanus. The Weir is at the Donmar Warehouse.

Jason Lewis is an adventurer who became the first person to circumnavigate the earth using human power. His journey took over 13 years, starting in 1994 and finishing in 2007. Using only the power of his body he travelled 46,505 miles across five continents, two oceans and one sea. His book, The Expedition - Dark Waters, is the first in a trilogy about his experiences and is published by Billy Fish Books.

Adela Jusic is a Bosnian artist whose work is part of Conflicted Memory, a show featuring eight female artists who have experienced life in conflict zones. Born in Sarajevo, Adela's work is inspired by her father who was a sniper in the Bosnian army and was himself killed by a sniper's bullet. Conflicted Memory is at the Alan Cristea Gallery in London.

June Tabor is widely recognised as one of Britain's leading folk singers. Her style straddles folk and jazz and she often sings unaccompanied. At last year's Radio 2 Folk Awards she won Singer of the Year and, with the Oysterband, she also picked up best group and best album. Her latest band and album - both called Quercus - feature Iain Bellamy on saxophone and Huw Warren on piano. Quercus is released on ECM records and the band are performing at the Salisbury Festival.

Producer: Paula Mcginley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01sbgfp)
Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography

Episode 3

In 1997 Margaret Thatcher invited Charles Moore to write her biography on the understanding that it would not be published until after her death. This is the first volume of his meticulously researched portrait of the former Prime Minster. The reader is Nicholas Farrell.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01s4q6f)
Women on Bank Notes; Adoption; Young Feminists

Saudi Arabia's first government backed advert to tackle domestic abuse is launched. It uses an image of a women with a bruised eye visible behind the slits in her veil, with the slogan 'Some things can't be covered'. The campaign to reverse the Bank of England's decision to replace Elizabeth Fry with Winston Churchill on English £5 notes. Edward Timpson, the Minister for Children & Families, on the government's plans to speed up the adoption process. Who are the young feminists today? Jenni talks to two active teenage bloggers, 15 year Lili and 16 year old Cat about why feminism matters to them. And we explore the pleasures and pains of a really good sulk.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Shoku Amirani.


WED 10:45 The Cazalets (b01s4qb2)
Confusion

Episode 8

by Elizabeth Jane Howard, dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Polly plucks up the courage to tell Archie she loves him, whilst Hugo convinces Louise they must do the same with Michael. None can foresee what will result.

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Confusion' is the third of four compelling Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and August 2013.
You can catch up with series two, The Cazalets: Marking Time, on iplayer.

The third series is set between 1942 and 1945: For the Cazalet family the war has brought tragedy;
Rupert has been missing since Dunkirk and only his daughter Clary refuses to believe he is dead, whilst her step-mother Zoe has buried her hope and devotes her energy to bringing up their daughter, Juliet. At home, Sybil has lost her battle with cancer leaving Polly bereft and trying to comfort her father, Hugh. Even Edward seems wracked with doubt over whether he should give up his mistress, Diana, who is carrying his child and try and make a go of things with Villy once again. The younger generation seems as confused as their parents: Louise makes a hasty marriage to society painter Michael Hadleigh, giving up her dreams of being an actress, whilst Polly and Clary finally convince the family they can move to London, but the girls are soon to discover that independence and adulthood brings heartbreak of its own.
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Dominic Mafham, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
'Casting Off' follows in July.


WED 11:00 The Big Ditch - How the Panama Canal Changed the World (b01s0dk1)
Episode 2

Jonny Dymond concludes his passage from the Pacific to Atlantic side of the Panama Canal, exploring the global impact of the so-called Big Ditch. A century after it was constructed, Dymond explores the present and future of the isthmus nation of Panama and the trade route of which it is the custodian.

How has Panama fared since full control of running the canal was bestowed on it? Dymond broaches the tricky relationship between the United States and Panama over the Canal Zone. More widely, was America's relinquishing the canal part of a wider trend that has seen US influence in Latin America decline? At the same time, Dymond discovers growing China's interests in the region - Chinese-backed plans for a new canal in Nicaragua.

Has the US taken its eye off the Americas, distracted by other concerns? This Big Ditch marked the beginning of the American century - do the signs on the isthmus suggest that the superpower that was made here is on a gradual retreat?

Producer: Dom Byrne

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in May 2013.


WED 11:30 Wordaholics (b01s6c9z)
Series 2

Episode 4

Gyles Brandreth chairs the word-obsessed comedy panel show.

Katy Brand and Alex Horne compete with Richard Herring and Natalie Haynes for wordy supremacy.

Richard Herring decides to reclaim the word 'middle class' and tries to decipher the 16th century phrase 'a mare's nest'. Team-mate Natalie Haynes tries to get rid of the word 'decimate' and despite being a vegetarian works out what the very meaty cookery term 'barding' means.

Alex Horne comes up with the correct definition for the Victorian phrase 'a scraping castle' and asks to take the word 'a' out of the dictionary. Meanwhile, Katy Brand takes a guess at what the unit of measurement 'the Warhol' is and reveals that her favourite word is 'plop'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2013.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01s4qqg)
Gardening with arthritis; advertising in schools; be careful who you date in Iceland

Celebrity gardener Chris Beardshaw talks about the special arthritis garden he has designed for the Chelsea Flower Show and about living with the condition himself since he was a teenager.

And should advertising be allowed in secondary schools? What if it's for a good cause- like getting girls into sport or healthy eating? Or should schools always be advert-free?

And help is at hand for love-struck Icelanders worried about accidentally dating a close relative.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01s37ql)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01s4qqj)
In the last of our Party leader interviews ahead of the local elections, we hear from David Cameron of the Conservatives.
Lord Ashdown gives his reaction to the deaths of three British servicemen in Afghanistan.
We hear of the increasing use of zero hours contracts to employ workers flexibly.
And should South Africa receive aid from the UK? We have a debate.
Presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 Thames Crossings (b01s5f3m)
Pilgrimage

Episode 3 (of 5): Pilgrimage

The River Thames has run softly through Piers Plowright's largely unplanned life. In this five-part series, he visits different points along its course where his life has crossed the great river.

In this programme, Piers visits Ewelme, a small village in the scoop of the Chiltern Hills where his sister is buried across the way from Jerome K Jerome.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01s4g7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01s4qqn)
Love, War and Trains

Love, War and Trains by Ian McMillan
John is a sailor in the Royal Navy and Olive is in the WAAFs based in Wigan. He's Scots, she's a Yorkshire lass and they're in love. John has a 48 hour pass to get married in Scotland - but he's travelling from Plymouth and she can't get leave. So she goes AWOL. This is the heart warming story of how poet Ian McMillan's parents' got married during World War 2. A poignant and funny verse drama.

Director/Producer Gary Brown

John is played by Billy Boyd - Pippin in 'Lord of the Rings'.

Ian McMillan: "This is the story of my mum and dad's wedding in October 1943 in Peebles in the Scottish Borders. They wrote to each other for a few years, met a couple of times and then got married on a forty-eight hour pass.
My dad's ship docked at Plymouth and he got the train to Peebles; my mother had applied for leave but they wouldn't give her any so she went AWOL, over the fence and away to the nearest station. They arrived in Peebles, got married, had one night together in the Tontine Hotel and then my dad went back to his ship and my mother went back to base and got arrested and spent two weeks in the glasshouse. Arrested for love! Fantastic!".


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01s4qqq)
Do you need advice about student finance? Call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk

Whether you're hoping to begin or continue with a higher education course in the autumn you need to apply now if you want your money at the start of term.

The NUS estimate that average expenditure for a full-time student in England is around £22,189 for each academic year, so getting your finances sorted out in advance is a must.

Tuition fees will vary depending on your choice of course and university but they can be up to £9,000 per year and you will also have to meet accommodation costs and living expenses.

For advice about entitlement to loans, grants and bursaries which could help, why not call or e-mail our student advice team.

Or perhaps you have a question about the interest rate which will be charged on loans and how and when you will have to repay them.

Presenter Paul Lewis will put your questions to:

Phil Davis, Chairperson of National Association of Student Money Advisers
David Malcolm, Head of Social Policy, National Union of Students
Miriam Craven, Head of Customer Engagement, Student Awards Agency for Scotland

Whatever your student finance question, call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Phone lines are open between 1pm and 3.30pm. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b01s4g7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01s4qqs)
British class survey; Tribute to Geoff Pearson

Laurie Taylor discusses the 'Great British Class Survey', a unique piece of research conducted by BBC Lab UK and academics from six different universities. The researchers devised a new way of measuring class, which doesn't define it by occupation but by the different kinds of economic, cultural and social resources or 'capitals' that people possess. But how have other academics with an interest in class reacted to this research? Mike Savage, one of the survey researchers and Professor in Sociology at the University of Essex, debates the merits of this new approach to class stratification with Colin Mills, lecturer in Sociology at Nuffield College, Oxford and Beverly Skeggs, Professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths College, London.

Also, Dick Hobbs, Professor of Sociology at the University of Essex, offers a tribute to the eminent criminologist, Geoff Pearson who died recently.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01s4qqv)
Steve Hewlett discusses the rival Royal Charters with acting Times editor John Witherow and Christopher Jefferies, wrongly named by some in the press following Jo Yeates' murder. Is this really a time for further consultation and negotiation?

Charlotte Raven tells Steve more about her plans to bring back Spare Rib, the feminist magazine, 20 years after it closed.

And, as more media Twitter accounts are temporarily taken over by the Syrian Electronic Army, is this becoming as much of a problem for the social media company as it is for the people being hacked? Rupert Goodwins, former editor of technology news website ZDNet, looks at the issues.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett
Producer: Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01s4qqx)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01s37qq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Down the Line (b01s4qqz)
Series 5

Food and Music

The ground-breaking Radio 4 phone-in show, hosted by the legendary Gary Bellamy and brought to you by the creators of The Fast Show.

Starring Rhys Thomas, with Amelia Bullmore, Simon Day, Felix Dexter, Charlie Higson, Lucy Montgomery, Adil Ray, Robert Popper and Paul Whitehouse.

Produced by Charlie Higson and Paul Whitehouse
A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01s4qr1)
Collecting the last of her things from 1, The Green, Brenda is surprised that Tom's there. He'd forgotten Pip was milking this morning. Hurrying off, she wishes Tom luck for his meeting with the supermarket buyer.

Kirsty sympathises with Tom about the break-up. She is encouraging when Tom's unenthusiastic about his meeting, even though he's been asked back for a tasting along with other similar products. She wishes him luck.

Matt asks Brenda how Lilian's been recently. Brenda admits she's been a bit touchy, especially when Brenda picked up Lilian's ringing phone. Matt appears to be concerned that Lilian is overworked. They need to look after her.

In a call to Paul, anxious Lilian admits lying to Matt about why she was at the races. They need to be more careful. The call is interrupted by Charlie arriving at Paul's house. When Charlie angrily says that he and Grace are sick of their Dad's behaviour, Paul says he just wants them to stay away from their Mum's wedding. If they don't, they won't get a share of his business. But Charlie doesn't want Paul's money and storms off.

Paul leaves Lilian a terse message telling her to meet up at the flat next Thursday. No excuses this time.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01s4qr3)
Geoffrey Rush; artist Ellen Gallagher; Cultural Exchange - Melvyn Bragg

With Mark Lawson.

Oscar-winning actor Geoffrey Rush stars alongside Charlotte Rampling and Judy Davis in The Eye of the Storm, a film based on Patrick White's novel about sharp family tensions, as a middle-aged brother and sister return to the home of their dying mother. Geoffrey Rush talks about his career on stage and in films such as Shine, Pirates of the Caribbean and The King's Speech.

In the latest edition of the Cultural Exchange project, in which 75 leading creative minds share their passion for a book, film, poem, piece of music or other work of art, Melvyn Bragg shares his long-standing love of a Rembrandt self-portrait from 1658.

The artist Ellen Gallagher discusses her new exhibition, AxME, which opens this week at the Tate Modern. Gallagher's work includes painting, collage and film installations, and she often uses newspaper cuttings and advertisements from vintage magazines to explore race and identity. She discusses how she moved from being an aspiring writer to working as an artist via jobs as a baker and a carpenter, and the challenges of creating work using plasticine.

In 1963 John Profumo, the then war minister, resigned over his affair with Christine Keeler. The scandal damaged the government and led to the suicide of Stephen Ward - the man who'd introduced Keeler to Profumo. Whilst preparing a display to mark the 50th anniversary of the Profumo Affair, the National Portrait Gallery made an incredible discovery: on the reverse of Stephen Ward's pastel drawing of Christine there's a similar drawing of an unknown young woman. Richard Davenport-Hines, author of a book about the scandal, talks to Mark about the enduring appeal of the Profumo affair, and speculates on the identity of the woman.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


WED 19:45 The Cazalets (b01s4qb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Leader Conference (b01s4qr5)
Series 3

Episode 2

Andrew Rawnsley presents a live, studio-based debate taking the form of newspaper leader conferences. He was joined by Raphael Behr of the New Statesman; Mary Ann Sieghart formerly of the Independent; Sarah Sands of the London Evening Standard; Kamal Ahmed of the Sunday Telegraph; and Peter Montellier of the Newcastle Journal.

They drew up leaders on: the government's decision to end direct aid to South Africa; how to provide better sex education to school children; and why tedious university lecturers are a good thing.

Aiding South Africa
We consider that the diplomatic handling of the British government's decision to end direct aid to South Africa left much to be desired. It prompted understandable anger and resentment there. This is a country which has in recent months shown by its intervention in African hotspots its importance in promoting stability across the continent and protecting the vulnerable. These objectives are in Britain's interests too.

Although countries like South Africa have grown fast, the benefits of their greater wealth are unevenly distributed. Poverty there has a very long tail. Britain, having strong historic links to South Africa and still aspiring to a world leadership role in promoting democracy and human rights, needs to stay engaged with Pretoria, especially if it has doubts about the openness of South Africa's government and the probity of some of its officials.

We note the argument that the UK is, despite present economic conditions, still a relatively wealthy country and should, at a low annual cost to the British taxpayer, hold out the hand of fiscal friendship to the African continent's largest economy and democracy. Nevertheless, we think there may be better ways of helping South Africa.

We prefer business investment to direct government support. We also advocate freeing up trade to give consumers lower prices and South African businesses the chance to invest and create jobs. These would offer mutual benefits of lasting value.

Better Sex Education
Ofsted's finding that the quality of sex education in about a third of English secondary schools is not of a sufficiently high standard is disquieting and requires action.

We do not minimise the demands placed upon teachers - and parents - in a much more sexualised culture. Advertising can contain explicit imagery and young children are able to access hard core material online. But a panic about the alleged moral degeneracy of the internet would divert attention from areas where the improvement of sex education needs to be focused.

Accordingly, we propose a four-point plan of reform. First, some teaching focuses too narrowly on the biological dimensions of sex education to the neglect of relationships. Understanding the dangers of sexually-transmitted diseases is important. But mutual respect in relationships also needs to be emphasised. This is valuable in itself. It would also help, however, counteract the objectification of women which defines both pornography and its subtler manifestations in youth culture.

Second, teaching should promote confidence among school children in dealing with sexual matters. This is not to override parental preferences or concerns in this area. These should be taken account of sensitively, especially those which have an ethnic, religious or ethical component. But pupils' confidence will be best fostered by teaching that is well-informed emotionally and factually.

Third, teaching children how best safely to maintain their identities on social media is critical and can be buttressed through the technology component of the national curriculum. Finally, we believe these objectives will be best achieved by separate teaching of boys and girls.

Redeeming Dr Bohring
Jimmy Wales's obituary of the boring university lecturer, thanks to the alleged excitement of acquiring knowledge online through such portals as his own Wikipedia, is in our view premature and unwelcome.

Yes, students pay considerable sums for their courses. But enduring tweedy, dandruff-afflicted dons interminably reciting recondite knowledge in stuffy lecture theatres has been a valuable rite of passage for generations of undergraduates.

Many have learned that the acquisition of knowledge is not always simple and easy. But we also suspect innumerable eureka moments have occurred while harmless Dr Bohrings monotonously delivered their quotidian insights into metaphysics, quantum mechanics or the Laffer curve. And knowing which lectures can be skipped altogether was itself an indispensable education. It freed up time for by far the most useful hours of our student years. So "citation needed", as Mr Wales would say, for dispensing with droning dons.

Producer Simon Coates.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01s4qr7)
Series 4

Daniela Papi: The Problem with Volunteering

Daniela Papi explores the dark side of volunteering overseas, and asks how local people and wealthy 'voluntourists' alike can ensure a positive experience.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine new ideas and personal stories. Speakers explain their latest thinking on the trends and ideas in culture and society in front of a live audience at Somerset House.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01s4g7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01s4q5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01s37qs)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01s4qr9)
UAE president at Downing Street: balance between human rights and trade? After Bangladesh factory collapse, could country's access to EU markets be reconsidered? Slovenia's economic crisis new problem for Eurozone. And the strange non-death of the book. Presented by David Eades.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01s4qrc)
This Is Where I Am

Episode 8

Debs and Abdi have been happily painting his new flat with Rebecca and things are looking positive for the newly settled family. But then Abdi's first day at work sparks off a devastating flashback to his last day in Dadaab.

Read by Maureen Beattie and Jude Akuwidike.

Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing (b01s4r79)
Series 2

About Upset Mums

EPISODE ONE: ABOUT UPSET MUMS

In a mix of stand-up and re-enacted family life - Nathan Caton illustrates what can happen when you don't listen to your Mum.

NATHAN ..... NATHAN CATON
MUM ..... ADJOA ANDOH
DAD ..... CURTIS WALKER
GRANDMA ..... MONA HAMMOND
REVEREND WILLIAMS ..... DON GILÉT

Written by Nathan Caton and James Kettle
Additional Material by Maff Brown and Ola
Producer: Katie Tyrrell

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing - tells the story of young, up-and-coming comedian Nathan Caton, who after becoming the first in his family to graduate from University, opted not to use his architecture degree but instead to try his hand at being a full-time stand-up comedian, much to his family's annoyance who desperately want him to get a 'proper job.'

Each episode illustrates the criticism, interference and rollercoaster ride that Nathan endures from his disapproving family as he tries to pursue his chosen career in comedy.

Janet a.k.a. Mum is probably the kindest and most lenient of the disappointed family members. At the end of the day she just wants the best for her son. However, she'd also love to brag and show her son off to her friends, but with Nathan only telling jokes for a living it's kind of hard to do. She loves Nathan, but she aint looking embarrassed for nobody!

Martin a.k.a. Dad works in the construction industry and was looking forward to his son getting a degree so the two of them could work together in the same field. But now Nathan has blown that dream out of the window. Martin is clumsy and hard-headed and leaves running the house to his wife (she wouldn't allow it to be any other way).

Shirley a.k.a. Grandma cannot believe Nathan turned down architecture for comedy. She can't believe she left the paradise in the West Indies and came to the freezing United Kingdom for a better life so that years later her grandson could 'tell jokes!' How can her grandson go on stage and use foul language and filthy material... it's not the good Christian way!

So with all this going on in the household what will Nathan do? Will he be able to persist and follow his dreams? Or will he give in to his family's interference?

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


WED 23:15 One (b008z74g)
Series 2

Episode 1

David Quantick's critically acclaimed sketch show where no sketch features more than one voice.

Featuring the vocal talents of Graeme Garden, Dan Maier, Lizzie Roper, Deborah Norton, Andrew Crawford, Katie Maskell, Johnny Daukes and Dan Antopolski.

Producer: Julian Mayers
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b01mhtcy)
Genevieve Barr

Peter White talks to Genevieve Barr about the impact deafness has on her acting career.

Genevieve Barr is a deaf actress who recently took the lead in the BBC drama, The Silence. She played Amelia, a deaf girl who preferred the silence to hearing with a cochlear implant. Genevieve tells Peter that her own experience differs from that of her character Amelia, as she didn't learn to sign and was taught to speak by her mother. Genevieve has also not had a cochlear implant. She explained that she had to learn how to use sign language to perform the role and was also asked to remove her hearing aids by the director, so that Amelia could have her hair tied back and the implant could be visibly inserted and removed from her ear.

Genevieve said that this experience meant that she was then subjected to hearing the silence enjoyed by her character and that this experience helped her play the part better.

Producer: Cheryl Gabriel.



THURSDAY 02 MAY 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01s37rm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01sbgfp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01s37rp)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01s37rr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01s37rt)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01s37rw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01s4rhs)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with the Rev'd Peter Baker.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01s4rhv)
The High Court is this week being asked to make a judgement on the question of who owns the fish in our seas. The Government wants to re-allocate unused quotas worth more than £1m from big firms to small-scale fishermen. But the UK Association of Fish Producer Organisations claims the Government is wrong to do it without its consent - and it's taking Defra to court to challenge the decision.

Also on Farming Today, supermarkets are piloting a new way of proving where foods come from, to prevent a repeat of the horsemeat scandal. The process analyses the carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur to identify the country of origin, and it can be used on everything from fruit to meat.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anna Varle.


THU 06:00 Today (b01s4rhx)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01s4rhz)
Gnosticism

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Gnosticism, a sect associated with early Christianity. The Gnostics divided the universe into two domains: the visible world and the spiritual one. They believed that a special sort of knowledge, or gnosis, would enable them to escape the evils of the physical world and allow them access to the higher spiritual realm. The Gnostics were regarded as heretics by many of the Church Fathers, but their influence was important in defining the course of early Christianity. A major archaeological discovery in Egypt in the 1940s, when a large cache of Gnostic texts were found buried in an earthenware jar, enabled scholars to learn considerably more about their beliefs.

With:

Martin Palmer
Director of the International Consultancy on Religion, Education, and Culture

Caroline Humfress
Reader in History at Birkbeck College, University of London

Alastair Logan
Honorary University Fellow of the Department of Theology and Religion at the University of Exeter

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01sbgl4)
Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography

Episode 4

In 1997 Margaret Thatcher invited Charles Moore to write her biography on the understanding that it would not be published until after her death. This is the first volume of his meticulously researched portrait of the former Prime Minster. The reader is Nicholas Farrell.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01s4rj1)
Sarah Dunant; Katelyn Campbell; PHSE education; living with a sulker

Sarah Dunant depicts the Borgias in her new novel Blood and Beauty. Dr Pam Spurr gives advice on dealing with sulking. Katelyn Campbell has taken a stance against the sex education in her American school and in the UK we hear the response of the PHSE Association to a report from Ofsted. And spending your teenage years in care - Lisa Cherry and Pav discuss the way their experiences have shaped them.


THU 10:45 The Cazalets (b01s4rj3)
Confusion

Episode 9

by Elizabeth Jane Howard

Dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Zoe is astonished to find Jack waiting for her at Home Place, whilst Louise discovers more about herself and the terrible secret Michael has been hiding from her.

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Confusion' is the third of four compelling Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and August 2013.
You can catch up with series two, The Cazalets: Marking Time, on iplayer.

The third series is set between 1942 and 1945: For the Cazalet family the war has brought tragedy;
Rupert has been missing since Dunkirk and only his daughter Clary refuses to believe he is dead, whilst her step-mother Zoe has buried her hope and devotes her energy to bringing up their daughter, Juliet. At home, Sybil has lost her battle with cancer leaving Polly bereft and trying to comfort her father, Hugh. Even Edward seems wracked with doubt over whether he should give up his mistress, Diana, who is carrying his child and try and make a go of things with Villy once again. The younger generation seems as confused as their parents: Louise makes a hasty marriage to society painter Michael Hadleigh, giving up her dreams of being an actress, whilst Polly and Clary finally convince the family they can move to London, but the girls are soon to discover that independence and adulthood brings heartbreak of its own.
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Dominic Mafham, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
'Casting Off' follows in July.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01s4rj5)
Hazaras, Hatred and Pakistan

Mobeen Azhar travels to the Pakistani city of Quetta to investigate how it has become the scene of violent and indiscriminate attacks by Sunni militants against the local ethnic Hazara community. It's a city which has become effectively a no-go area for foreign journalists due to the persistent and intensifying violence. Mobeen tells the story of a single day in January of this year when over 100 people lost their lives in twin bombings in Quetta. Claiming responsibility was the Sunni militant group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. Mobeen retraces the story of the bombings, and examines the growing security concerns in a district dominated by the Shia Hazara community.

He speaks to Fayyaz Mohammed, a candidate in the forthcoming elections who has links to Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, and talks with Paul Bhatti, who until recently was the Pakistani Minister of National Harmony. Bhatti blames the government's inability to enforce "effective policy" on Pakistan's long history of military dictatorship. Azhar meets blast survivors and the families of victims, and finds out how the security situation is causing many young Hazaras to leave Quetta to seek a better life elsewhere - despite the dangers of putting their lives in the hands of people smugglers.

Producer: Julie Ball.


THU 11:30 Bernard Who? (b01s4rj7)
Episode 2

This year, the actor Bernard Cribbins celebrates his 85th birthday and more than 70 years in showbusiness. In this revealing two-part series he talks to his friend and producer Martin Jenkins about his extraordinary career, and a cast of friends share their memories of working with Bernard, including David Tennant, Barbara Windsor, Barry Cryer and the late Richard Briers.
He's been directed by Hitchcock, starred alongside a galaxy of screen legends including Peter Sellers and Kenneth Williams, is good mates with David Tennant, and has performed with Barbara Windsor wearing nothing but a bikini.

In this second programme, the legendary Beatles producer George Martin recalls working with Bernard on the 1962 chart-toppers Right Said Fred and Hole in the Ground. Bernard reveals the secret to his storytelling magic on Jackanory, which captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation of children - including David Tennant. We hear how Bernard found the voices for Uncle Bulgaria and Tomsk in The Wombles and Jenny Agutter, his co-star in The Railway Children, discloses what she believes to be the secret of Bernard's eternal youth.

David Tennant and the writer Russell T Davis give their insights on working with Bernard on Dr Who, and the joy of reminding the viewing public what an exceptional actor he is. "He can break your heart with a single line," says Russell T Davis.

This is Bernard's own intimate retrospective of his career, told in conversation with his friend for more than 50 years, the acclaimed radio drama producer Martin Jenkins.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01s4rv2)
Kate Silverton explores how IVF became big business

We explore a tradition that began in cafes in Naples and has now spread through Europe and the US. Why 'suspended coffees' are forcing major brands to change their policies. Kate Silverton explores the business of IVF and reflects on her own experiences. We hear from one of the thousands of people currently facing redundancy and get some expert advice. Plus, Matthew Parris on why he decided to invest in gold and silver and won't be changing now.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01s37ry)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01s4rv4)
Veteran broadcaster Stuart Hall admits indecently assaulting girls; Sexual harassment and bullying at the BBC; Fresh sectarian violence in Burma; Will Gompertz meets JJ Abrams.


THU 13:45 Thames Crossings (b01s5g50)
Words and Flesh

Episode 4 (of 5): Words and Flesh

The River Thames has run softly through Piers Plowright's largely unplanned life. In this five-part series, he visits different points along its course where his life has crossed the great river.

Piers' journey brings him to Cookham and Maidenhead, where he views the river through the work of his favourite artist, the painter Stanley Spencer, and explores the town's racy reputation: 'Are you married or are you from Maidenhead?'

Producer by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01s4qr1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01s4sz2)
The Colour of Milk

The Colour of Milk adapted from her novel by Nell Leyshon.

It's 1830. Mary is fifteen. She lives a quiet life on a farm with her mother and father. She's never spent a night away from her home, until the local vicar asks for help with his sick wife. Sexual desires have brutal consequences .

Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01s4sz4)
Highland Ponies

The image of a keeper leading a pony off a heather-clad hill, a deer carcass slung across its back, may sound like something from a Landseer painting, but in 21st century Scotland, Highland ponies - or garrons - are still a valued part of the deer stalking business.

Helen Mark visits the Reay Forest estate in Sutherland to find out what ponies can offer which even the toughest off-road vehicle cannot. Garrons were a fixture of most estates until the 1970s, when in many places they were deemed to be part of the past. Some estates, though, kept garrons for use in the most inaccessible corners of their land, and they are now being adopted for the first time by some estates which have come to see the value of these hardy creatures. Helen hears how the garron is part of the Highland landscape not just for sentimental reasons, creating continuity with the past, but for sound economic and practical purposes too.

Produced by Moira Hickey.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01s3939)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01s39zb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01s4sz6)
Pedro Almodovar on I'm So Excited; Tom Courtenay on Billy Liar; Riz Ahmed's big break

The Spanish director Pedro Almodovar talks to Francine Stock about his raunchy new comedy I'm So Excited in which a plane with a technical fault circles the skies, hoping to find an airport to land in. According to Almodovar, it's a metaphor for the political and financial difficulties facing Spain.
Adam Leon explains why he wanted to show the grittier, real New York in his new feature Gimme The Loot about young graffiti artists. And how he deals with questions over how a white director can make a convincing film about a predominantly black scene.
The actor Tom Courtenay, seen most recently in Quartet, looks back at Billy Liar, 50 years on. Directed by John Schlesinger, and co-starring Julie Christie, the film portrays Billy, a dreamer working in an undertakers and planning escape.
And with The Reluctant Fundamentalist due for release next week, the young British actor Riz Ahmed tells the story of his big break and how he was discovered by the director Michael Winterbottom.
Producer: Elaine Lester.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01s4sz8)
Bees and pesticides; Heart gene therapy; Petal shapes

EU states have voted in favour of a proposal to restrict the use of certain pesticides that have been linked to causing serious harm in bees. Neonicotinoid chemicals in pesticides are sprayed onto seeds and spread throughout the plant as it grows. There has been a lot of concern about this systematic approach, with some scientists arguing that it is comparable to using antibiotics prophylactically. Professor Dave Goulson from the University of Sussex and Dr. Lynn Dicks from the University of Cambridge discuss the scientific evidence currently available on these pesticides as well as the limited data available on the state of pollinating insects.

Patients in the UK have begun being enrolled into trials to see if an engineered virus can be used to heal their damaged and struggling hearts. The trial will use a virus to introduce genetic material into heart muscle to reverse the organ's decline. Researchers found that levels of the protein SERCA2a were lower in heart-failure patients. So they devised a genetically modified virus, with the instructions for producing more of the protein that can infect the heart. The virus will be released into the damaged heart muscle of patients involved in two separate trials testing both the safety and effectiveness of this potential treatment. Dr Alexander Lyon, a cardiologist at one of the hospitals involved, the Royal Brompton in London, and also a Senior Lecturer in Cardiology at Imperial College London is in the studio.

Why are petals all sorts of different shapes? New research shows that petals get their shape from a hidden molecular map within their buds that tells them how to grow. Dr Susana Sauret-Gueto from the John Innes plant science Centre in Norwich explains more about her research.


THU 17:00 PM (b01s4szb)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01s37s0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Mark Thomas: The Manifesto (b01s4szd)
Series 5

Manchester

Comedian-activist Mark Thomas takes his People's Manifesto to Manchester.

With policies on low-cost housing, happier train carriages and novel road safety techniques.

Producer: Colin Anderson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01s4szg)
Jumpy Darrell's convinced Des will grass on him. But Neil says that if so it would surely have happened by now.

Neil's surprised by Josh's proposition that he buy a share in the hen business. Josh says he's researched it They could exploit the niche market for free-range eggs and push up the profit margins. Josh could help with the marketing side and maybe eventually buy Neil out.

Wondering if Josh's parents know about this, Neil chats to David. David's impressed, later telling Josh he's proud of him.

Elona and Darrell discuss their upcoming supper at Home Farm. Elona's angry with Darrell at having to continue the pretence over the dog fight. Darrell says he'll make up an excuse and go on his own. But Elona says that would be another lie. Won't he ever learn?

At the meal, Jennifer praises Darrell for his decorating work and thanks Elona for all she's done for Peggy and Jack. When talk turns to Darrell's derring-do with the dog fight, Jennifer tells him he shouldn't be so modest but be proud of what he's done. She proposes a toast.

On their way home Elona tells Darrell she can't take any more. She wants a divorce.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01s4szj)
Zoe Wanamaker; Cultural Exchange - Suggs; Arne Dahl

With Mark Lawson.

Zoe Wanamaker, familiar to TV and cinema audiences from her roles in My Family, Poirot and the Harry Potter films, returns to the stage in a new production of Passion Play by Peter Nichols - a drama about marriage and temptation. She reflects on her approach to theatre, and remembers her father Sam, founder of Shakespeare's Globe theatre.

Swedish novelist and critic Jan Arnald uses the pen-name Arne Dahl when writing crime-fiction. His novels about Paul Hjelm and his colleagues in the Intercrime Group, an elite team of Swedish detectives, were adapted for Swedish TV, and are currently being broadcast on BBC Four. The books themselves are now being published in English. He discusses the advantages of having a team of detectives, rather than an individual, and about the reaction in Sweden to the British passion for Scandi Noir fiction.

In the latest edition of the Cultural Exchange project, in which 75 leading creative minds share their passion for a book, film, poem, piece of music or other work of art, Suggs from Madness nominates the poem On a Portrait of a Deaf Man by John Betjeman.

It's 50 years since The Beatles first topped the UK singles chart with From Me to You, which was a hit in May 1963. But what else was in the Top 40 back then? David Hepworth considers whether this was a turning-point in pop history, and identifies some other classics in that week's chart.

Producer Olivia Skinner.


THU 19:45 The Cazalets (b01s4rj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01s4szl)
MMR and the Legacy of the Link With Autism

Melanie Abbott looks at the measles outbreak in South Wales. She looks at how the legacy of Andrew Wakefield's 1998 paper still lives on because of a perception that autism is rife amongst some immigrant groups. She talks to Somalis in Minnesota and finds that a lack of answers and high rates of autism in their families has affected MMR uptake and how this message is being heard back here in the UK.


THU 20:30 In Business (b01s4szn)
Job Search

Millions of young people want to work but do not know where to find it.
A clutch of them tell their stories to Peter Day, and a panel of experts
weighs in with advice and guidance.


THU 21:00 Return to Japan (b01s4vdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01s4rhz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01s37s2)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01s4szq)
Force-feeding at Guantanamo Bay.

ECB cuts interest rates - too little too late?

Can brain cooling help treating strokes?

Womens Institute's pirate faux pas?

With Ritula Shah.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01s4szs)
This Is Where I Am

Episode 9

Four year-old Rebecca has been staying with Debs while Abdi recovers in hospital from the dramatic trauma of his flashback. But finally it's time for the little girl to go and visit her beloved father.

Read by Maureen Beattie and Jude Akuwidike.

Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Jon Ronson On (b01s4szv)
Series 7

Pride

Writer and documentary maker Jon Ronson with more fascinating stories shedding light on the human condition.

If you discovered that Hitler was a fugitive on the run, you might call the police. But what if, when he met you, he exclaimed how much he loved your work. Graham Linehan opens the programme with this conundrum, which tells you nothing about Nazi escapees, and everything about what too much pride in your work can do to your morals.

Having a surfeit of pride wraps its tendrils around us, it can affect whole lives - as was the case with Anna, who always held her much loved grandparents up as role models for a long happy marriage. That was until her grandfather died and they discovered a box of cassettes in his office, revealing a secret so shocking it changed Anna's entire understanding of her family.

Luke Wright is a performance poet who once fell foul of his pride when he tried to impress a band he greatly admired. He planned to seduce them with his wit so that they'd want to be his friend. Things began to go awry but pride, that most domineering of masters, forced Luke to struggle on. The gap between his imagined evening and the one that was actually happening widened to epic proportions.

There's a lesson in there somewhere - one that comedian Helen Keen learnt the hard way. A good degree from Cambridge University meant she felt she was sure to walk into a successful career. When she found herself doing filing in a dead end engineering firm in London, she took matters into her own hands and tried to become a spy. MI5 must have collectively raised an eyebrow as she set about trying to convince them of her credentials by weaving together some far-fetched untruths.

Producer: Lucy Greenwell
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b01mnqmn)
Chen Guangcheng

Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng blazed across the global news headlines earlier this year when he escaped from custody in China and sought refuge in the American Embassy - but Peter White has known Chen for about ten years and interviewed him several times. In this special edition of the programme, Peter draws on those recordings - and records a new interview - with Guangcheng to explore his childhood, his lack of formal education and his attitude to disability.

Chen talks about his interest in law and his growing political awareness, which resulted in him taking on cases for blind and disabled people who were being forced to pay taxes, despite laws exempting them. These actions brought him to the attention of the Chinese authorities and he soon became a thorn in their side. He was imprisoned for over four years and then placed under house arrest, during which time he and his wife were beaten by local officials.

Chen eventually escaped and was finally allowed to fly to America to study law in New York, which is where Peter went to talk to him for this programme.

Prod: Cheryl Gabriel.



FRIDAY 03 MAY 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01s37sx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01sbgl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01s37sz)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01s37t1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01s37t3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01s37t5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01s4vdh)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with the Rev'd Peter Baker.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01s4vdk)
As the export of live sheep resumes from Dover so do the protests demanding it ends. Charlotte Smith explores the controversy with the RSPCA and the NFU. And the Scottish Government is giving farmers hit by last month's show £6 million. But what difference is all this cash making? Charlotte speaks to two farmers on both sides of the Scottish border.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01s4vdm)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather, Yesterday in Parliament and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b01s393k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01sbgr3)
Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography

Episode 5

In 1997 Margaret Thatcher invited Charles Moore to write her biography on the understanding that it would not be published until after her death. This is the first volume of his meticulously researched portrait of the former Prime Minster. The reader is Nicholas Farrell.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01s4vdp)
The Staves; Alison Curtis; Women in science fiction

Folk rock sisters The Staves sing live in studio. What's happened to the tough women in science fiction? Alison Curtis - Britain's first female boxing coach. Presented by Jenni Murray.


FRI 10:45 The Cazalets (b01s4vdr)
Confusion

Episode 10

by Elizabeth Jane Howard. Archie has something to tell Zoe which will break her heart - but neither of them knows who is returning to surprise them. The joys and sorrows of war have never seemed more acute than now. Dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Confusion' is the third of four compelling Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and August 2013.
You can catch up with series two, The Cazalets: Marking Time, on iplayer.

The third series is set between 1942 and 1945: For the Cazalet family the war has brought tragedy;
Rupert has been missing since Dunkirk and only his daughter Clary refuses to believe he is dead, whilst her step-mother Zoe has buried her hope and devotes her energy to bringing up their daugher, Juliet. At home, Sybil has lost her battle with cancer leaving Polly bereft and trying to comfort her father, Hugh. Even Edward seems wracked with doubt over whether he should give up his mistress, Diana, who is carrying his child and try and make a go of things with Villy once again. The younger generation seems as confused as their parents: Louise makes a hasty marriage to society painter Michael Hadleigh, giving up her dreams of being an actress, whilst Polly and Clary finally convince the family they can move to London, but the girls are soon to discover that independence and adulthood brings heartbreak of its own.
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Dominic Mafham, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
'Casting Off' follows in July.


FRI 11:00 Swimming through Chocolate (b01s4qqb)
For 30 years, Gladys Jones and Sir Adrian Cadbury worked at the same factory in Bourneville in Birmingham, but never met. They now come together to reflect on their lives then and now, and the love of chocolate and sport that unites them.

Gladys joined Cadbury in 1936 at the age of 14. She was grateful to have a job that would provide her with security, further education and a chance to indulge in her great passion: swimming. Having previously only ever swum in the local canal, the new opportunity to use the factory's 'Girls Baths' on a daily basis led her to a new career in the sport's section at the plant as a swimming teacher and life saver.

Sir Adrian had a different trajectory: after Cambridge, the army and rowing in the Helsinki Olympics, he joined the family firm in 1952 rising to become Chairman of the company.

We join them both as they travel from their homes to the Bourneville club to meet and compare their memories of the place, the people and a working life long gone.

Producer: Lucy Lunt

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


FRI 11:30 Party (b01mqq72)
Series 3

The Curry

Return of the satirical comedy about a group of young idealists trying to make waves with their new political party.

The group reconvene after their Summer break and the ambition steps up a gear.

Written by Tom Basden.

Simon .... Tom Basden
Duncan .... Tim Key
Jared .... Jonny Sweet
Mel .... Anna Crilly
Phoebe .... Katy Wix

Producer .... Julia McKenzie.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01s4vdw)
Five-a-day, Goat Meat, Clever Headlines and School Dinners

The drink that promises children their '5-a-day' but said to deliver not a single one.

How the meat industry is saving thousands of new-born goats from an early death.

And clever headlines catch the eye but how much is a good one worth?

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Jon Douglas.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b01s4vdy)
Gail and Natalie - Healing Old Wounds

Fi Glover with a conversation between sisters about how one of them turned to self-harm as the result of being bullied, proving once again that it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01s37t7)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01s4vf0)
We analyse the latest local election results as they're declared.

A defeated Conservative councillor from Lincolnshire tells us the results show that David Cameron should break up the coalition government and call a general election.

Conservative Cabinet Minister Michael Gove says any challenge to David Cameron's leadership of the party would be "bonkeroony".

Plus reaction from UKIP, Labour and the Liberal Democrats.


FRI 13:45 Thames Crossings (b01s5gjv)
The Boat Is Waiting

Episode 5 (of 5): The Boat is Waiting

The River Thames has run softly through Piers Plowright's largely unplanned life. In this five-part series, he visits different points along its course where his life has crossed the great river.

Piers' pilgrimage along the river reaches its conclusion in south-west London, where the Thames becomes tidal and where he lived with his young family. He visits Eel Pie Island and meets Walter De La Mare's grandson.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01s4szg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01s4vf2)
Michael Stewart - Dead Man's Suit

Dead Man's Suit
A strange loner buys a suit in a charity shop and it changes his life. He secures a powerful new job and women notice him for the first time. Does the suit possess some sort of supernatural power? Or is it something more sinister? A black comedy by Michael Stewart.

Director/ Producer Gary Brown

Michael Stewart is a former winner of the Alfred Bradley Bursary Award for writers new to radio; this is his third Afternoon Drama. His novel 'King Crow' was published in 2011 to great critical acclaim.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01s4vf4)
East Malling

This week the team visits the East Malling Research Centre in Kent, with Eric Robson in the chair. Matthew Wilson, Bob Flowerdew and Christine Walkden are on the panel taking local gardeners' questions.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. I have a north-facing border, approx. 1.5m x 10m in size and with alkaline soil. What floriferous shrubs or perennials would the panel recommend for maximum interest?

A. Herbaceous plants may be better in the long run, as they will maintain their smaller size. Delphiniums, Lupins, Phlox and Peonies are recommended, as are dwarf shrubs such as Sorbuses (e.g. Sorbus fruticosa), Virburnums (e.g. Viburnum opulus 'Compactum', the compact Guelder rose), Spireas, Cornuses and Kerria japonica. Woodland plants such as Hellebores or Pulmonarias (e.g. 'Mawson's Blue') would do well in the north-facing conditions.

Q. I would like to move and divide a Peony but have been told it is not a good idea. Can I do this and, if so, when?

A. Now! If the buds are up and you can see a nose, water well the night before and then lift as much of the root ball as possible. Slice this, and let the cut surface dry before replanting. Treat it like any other herbaceous perennial, much as you would with Hostas at this time of the year.

Q. What can I do to slow the growth of the Dawn Redwood at the bottom of my garden?

A. No-one likes to fell a tree, but it may have to go. Check that it does not have a Tree Preservation Order placed on it.

Q. What novelty fruit would the panel like to see developed?

A. A reasonably hardy Fuchsia with a juicy, sweet berry developed for the crop - Fuchsia California Dreamers produce large, sweet berries. A square banana with a tough skin, that wouldn't get damaged in your rucksack. A fig crossed with a melon (a felon), a fig crossed with a mango (a fandango) or a fig crossed with a melon, a strawberry, a grape, a raspberry, a kiwifruit and a pomegranate - a fruit salad.

Q. There is an Osmanthus 'Gulftide' shrub near our house. Almost every leaf on the bush is being eaten, though there is no sign of anything on the bush. Could the panel advise as to what is doing the damage?

A. The damage shown on the leaves of this plant is typical of the adult vine weevil, which takes semicircular bites from around the edge of the leaf. It is unusual for vine weevil to target a plant with such a thick, leathery leaf. There are nematodes available for tackling vine weevil, but you would need to wait for soil and air temperature to warm up a little.

Q. I have a Prunus x subhirtella 'Autumnalis' which is grafted onto a rootstock. The rootstock throws up suckers up to 30ft away from the tree. What is the best way to deal with the suckers?

A. There are two options. Firstly, regular cutting would stop you noticing them. Alternatively, go to where they are, find the root and remove the shoot - be careful not to leave any of the shoot remaining, as any remaining shoot will return. At 30ft from the tree it would be safe to cut the root.

Q. I have a small pond, approx. 70cm x 60cm, which has two shelves for shallow water plants. What plants - preferably those which are good for wildlife - would the panel recommend?

A. Blackcurrants are bog plants and will grow (though stay small) with their roots entirely submerged in 6in to a foot of water, providing a ladder for dragonfly larvae to climb out of the water. The dwarf Nymphaeas would grow well, as would the dwarf form of Pontederia cordata or various other dwarf aquatic plants. Caltha palustris (marsh marigold) is early flowering and as such a good source of pollen and nectar, and Butomus umbellatus (flowering rush) would also be good for wildlife.

Q. What plant would the panel like on their grave and why?

A. Something sweet-smelling such as Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata'. Soldanella hungarica, which is delicate but tenacious. Kelp - for a sea burial!


FRI 15:45 Afternoon Reading (b00tq11c)
Agatha Christie's The Mysterious Mr Quin

The Sign in the Sky

Following the success of the first series of The Mysterious Mr Quin, Martin Jarvis reads three more stories about Agatha Christie's personal favourite character.

Mr Quin assists his friend Mr Satterthwaite to investigate mysteries. But one mystery remains - who is Mr Harley Quin himself?

Mr Satterthwaite, and Mr Quin discuss the outcome of a trial. Martin Wylde has been found guilty of the murder of Vivian Barnaby. Satterthwaite knew the victim and her husband Sir George, and thinks Wylde is an unlikely murderer but the evidence seems convincing.

Younger than her husband, Vivian formed a relationship with Wylde, but he became anxious to end the liaison to pursue a romance with a local girl, Sylvia Dale.

At trial, Wylde admitted that, in answer to her letter, he had gone to the Hall for a final meeting. He then went home, accidentally leaving his shotgun behind. The household staff heard a shot and found Vivian dead in the music room. All the evidence was highly dependent on the time-lines of everyone's story.

Quin encourages Satterthwaite to visit the only member of the household who was present on the day of the murder but had not given evidence, a housekeeper who had taken up a lucrative job in Canada. She has one piece of new information. Just before she heard the shot she saw the smoke from the local train which seemed to be forming the shape of a giant hand in the sky. She felt that - given it was also Friday the 13th - it was 'a sign'.

With the help of Mr Quin will Satterthwaite be able find the murderer and save a possibly innocent man?

Producer: Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis & Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01s4vf6)
A country singer, a Labour Party General Secretary, a film star, a cellist and a co-housing campaigner

Matthew Bannister on

The country singer George Jones whose turbulent life of divorce and drunkenness matched the subject matter of many of his songs. Hank Wangford pays tribute.

Jim Mortimer who was General Secretary of the Labour Party during the troubled 1980s and the first chair of the conciliation service ACAS during the industrial strife of the 70s.

Deanna Durbin, the film star known as "America's perfect daughter" who retired from the public eye when she grew out of the role.

Sarah Berger who was a leading campaigner for the British co-housing movement.

And the Hungarian cellist Janos Starker - Steven Isserlis shares his memories.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b01s4vf8)
Austerity, Thatcher, Mozart and dead birds

Austerity: a spreadsheet error?

Tim Harford tells the story of the student who uncovered a mistake in a famous economic paper that has been used to make the case for austerity cuts. In 2010, two Harvard economists published an academic study, which showed that when government debt rises above 90% of annual economic output, growth falls significantly. As politicians tried to find answers to the global economic crisis, "Growth in a Time of Debt" by Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff was cited by some of the key figures making the case for tough debt-cutting measures in the US and Europe. But, in the course of a class project, student Thomas Herndon and his professors say they have found problems with the Reinhart-Rogoff findings. What does this mean for austerity economics?

Interviewees: Thomas Herndon, University of Massachusetts student; Professor Michael Ash, University of Massachusetts; Professor Daniel Hamermesh, Royal Holloway, University of London; Megan McArdle, special correspondent for Newsweek and The Daily Beast.

Margaret Thatcher in Numbers:

Baroness Thatcher was Britain's first female prime minister and one of the most influential political figures of the 20th Century. She was a pioneer of free market economics, helping to spread the ideas around the world. But the Iron lady was a divisive figure with passionate supporters and critics. Both hold to strong beliefs about what she did. But what does the data tell us about the many claims made about Mrs Thatcher?

With special thanks for the journalism of Michael Blastland and Andrew Dilnot.

Interviewees: Professor Andrew Oswald, Warwick University; Professor Alissa Goodman, Institute of Education; Professor Nick Crafts, Warwick University.

A mathematical reading of the Magic Flute:

Hear Professor Marcus du Sautoy's mathematical reading of the Magic Flute, presented at London's Royal Opera House. Mozart's final opera, The Magic Flute, premiered just 10 weeks before the composer's death and was the biggest popular hit of his life. With its panto-style storyline and catchy tunes, it's said to be one of the most accessible operas for the uninitiated. But there's an awful lot going on beneath the jokes and the musical notes.

Birds + Windows =?

"In America each day, more than 2 million birds die crashing into window panes." A fact from a recent episode of BBC Radio 4's The Unbelievable Truth. But More or Less refused to believe - and started investigating.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b01s4vfb)
Ian and Chad - The Crying Game

Fi Glover with another conversation in the Radio 4 series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. This one's about whether men feel it's ok to let the tears fall.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01s4vfd)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01s37t9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b01s4vfg)
Series 80

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Katy Brand, Fred Macaulay and Humphrey Ker.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01s5j4y)
Lynda's edgy when Eddie mentions the pasture that's been fenced off. He says it's a waste because the llamas could graze there. She's even more anxious when Alistair arrives with Wolfgang's post-mortem results. But there's huge relief when the results show there was no bovine TB.

Clarrie's glad that the PCC are going to raise money to repair the church organ and that Ed and Jazzer have completed their shearing course ready to start work. When Eddie suggests staying with Rosie in Great Yarmouth for her birthday, Clarrie says she can't take time off with the way things are at Bridge Farm.

Later when Eddie asks Nic for birthday ideas, she says she's come up with a plan.

Tom's new ready meals packaging arrives but Pat finds it odd not seeing 'organic' printed on it. Pat's concerned when Clarrie mentions that Lynda's heard a rumour that they're selling Bridge Farm and retiring. She rings Lynda, who apologises. She heard from Robert, who heard from Bert, who got it from The Bull. Lynda's relieved to hear there's no truth in the rumour. She'll put everyone straight.

Alistair tests the Bridge Farm herd for TB, but they'll need to wait until Monday to see if there are any reactors - so fingers crossed until then.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01s4vfn)
Agnetha Fältskog; Hannibal reviewed; Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

With John Wilson.

Agnetha Fältskog talks about her years with Abba, the painful break-up from her marriage to Björn,
her solo career and her new album - the first of original material for 25 years - which is called simply A.

Hannibal Lecter, the psychiatrist and cannibalistic killer created by Thomas Harris, is about to reappear - this time in a TV series starring Mads Mikkelsen, set before Red Dragon and The Silence Of The Lambs. Hannibal is employed by the FBI to help an unusually gifted criminal profiler, Will Graham, who's haunted by his ability to see into the minds of serial killers. Crime writer Mark Billingham reviews.

In the latest episode of Cultural Exchange, in which creative minds select a favourite art-work, writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie nominates Tutu, a painting by Igbo Nigerian painter and sculptor Ben Enwonwu.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


FRI 19:45 The Cazalets (b01s4vdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01s4vfq)
Yvette Cooper, Lord Oakeshott, Steve Crowther, Chris Grayling

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, London, with Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper MP, Liberal Democrat Peer Lord Oakeshott, Justice Secretary Chris Grayling MP and Steve Crowther the Executive Chairman of UKIP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01s4vfs)
The Limits of Materialism

John Gray draws on a story by Walter de la Mare to argue that the prevailing creed of scientific materialism is a "simple minded philosophy", preferring de la Mare's unsettling portrayal of everyday existence as insubstantial and unknowable. "Even if there are such things as laws of nature, there's no reason to think they must be accessible to the human mind."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b01jppvt)
Talking It Over

By Julian Barnes
Dramatised by Julia Stoneham

Stuart and Oliver have been friends since school but are rather different.
Oliver is charismatic and has this way of talking. Stuart is shy and
no good at saying what he means. But then Stuart meets Gillian and things
begin to change ...

Directed by Tracey Neale

Julian Barnes' sequel 'Love, etc' is the Saturday Drama tomorrow afternoon at 2.30 pm.

Award winning writer Julian Barnes has written many novels which have been translated into more than thirty languages. 'Talking It Over' won the Prix Femina Award. 'The Sense of An Ending' was winner of the 2011 Man Booker Prize. His latest book, recently published, is 'Levels of Life', a semi-biographical book about his wife Pat Kavanagh's death.

Julia Stoneham has written many radio plays. Her radio series about the Land Army Girls - 'The Cinderella Service' has been published as a trilogy of novels and she is at present working on another novel. Julia has also dramatised the sequel 'Love, etc' which is the Saturday Drama tomorrow afternoon at 2.30 pm.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01s37tc)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01s4vfv)
Complete local election results, Gunmen have shot dead the prosecutor investigating the murder of Pakistan's ex-leader Benazir Bhutto, and this weekend the leaders of World Jewry will gather in the Hungarian capital Budapest, with Ritula Shah.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01s4vfx)
This Is Where I Am

Episode 10

Debs has been overburdened by her grief at losing her husband. Now Abdi shows her how to let it go. And, in return, Debs makes a startling discovery about his family's last day in Dadaab.

Read by Maureen Beattie and Jude Akuwidike.

Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b01s4g7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 With Great Pleasure (b01l7qk9)
June Tabor

Eminent folk singer (and former librarian) June Tabor movingly explores the links between literature and song, presenting extracts from her favourite books and poems to an audience at Bristol's Arnolfini. The readers are Alun Raglan and Noni Lewis.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b01s4vfz)
Kim and Ann - Always There for Me

Fi Glover with a conversation between lifelong friends about how they supported each other through the tragic loss that tested their relationship, in the Radio 4 series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01s0ssj)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01s4vfs)

Absolutely Delish 23:00 TUE (b01s4gfq)

Afternoon Reading 15:45 FRI (b00tq11c)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b01s4g7z)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b01s4g7z)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01s3799)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01s0ssg)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01s4vfq)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01s37f3)

Believe It! 19:15 SUN (b01j5nw6)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01s38rw)

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Bernard Who? 11:30 THU (b01s4rj7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01s483q)

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Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01sbgr3)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01s393f)

Building Bridges - The Art of the Middle 8 10:30 SAT (b01s3791)

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing 23:00 WED (b01s4r79)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01s0329)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01s39z8)

Constant Cravings: Does Food Addiction Exist? 20:00 TUE (b01s4g7v)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b01s4g7d)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01s4g7d)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b01s0qmq)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b01s4rj5)

Down the Line 18:30 WED (b01s4qqz)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00x923h)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01s4qqn)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01s4sz2)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01s4vf2)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01s3706)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01s46g1)

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Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01s0sm5)

Four Thought 22:15 SAT (b01pp89r)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01s4qr7)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01s3795)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01s483g)

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Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01s0slz)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01s4vf4)

George Mackay Brown Stories 19:45 SUN (b01s39zl)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b01s4g7j)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b01s4g7j)

How to Run Europe 20:00 MON (b01s483j)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b01s0qnm)

In Business 20:30 THU (b01s4szn)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01s4rhz)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01s4rhz)

In Search of the British Dream 22:30 SAT (b01q8lhy)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01s4g7x)

Isy Suttie's Love Letters 18:30 TUE (b01rlngr)

Jemima Khan and the Part-Time Wife 11:00 MON (b01s46rr)

Jon Ronson On 23:00 THU (b01s4szv)

Kerry's List 11:30 MON (b01s46vd)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01s0sm3)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01s4vf6)

Leader Conference 20:00 WED (b01s4qr5)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b01s38s0)

Living with Lady T 13:30 SUN (b01s8pm4)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01s37bg)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b01s4g7b)

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto 18:30 THU (b01s4szd)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01s0qn7)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01s4sz8)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01s0s4c)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01s37k2)

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Midweek 09:00 WED (b01s4q5j)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01s4q5j)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01s4qqq)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01s3797)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01s3797)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b01s4vf8)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01s0s4m)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01s37kb)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01s37mp)

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News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01s37kd)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01s0s4p)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01s37kj)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01s37kn)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01s0s58)

News 13:00 SAT (b01s0s4y)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 23:30 MON (b01m4c77)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 23:30 TUE (b01m9n33)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 23:30 WED (b01mhtcy)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 23:30 THU (b01mnqmn)

One 23:15 WED (b008z74g)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01s39zb)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01s39zb)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01s0qn3)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01s4sz4)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01s379f)

PM 17:00 MON (b01s4766)

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PM 17:00 FRI (b01s4vfd)

Party 11:30 FRI (b01mqq72)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01s39zg)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b01s39zd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01s0ttm)

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Profile 19:00 SAT (b01s37bj)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01s37bj)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01s37bj)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01s3939)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01s3939)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01s3939)

Return to Japan 11:00 TUE (b01s4vdt)

Return to Japan 21:00 THU (b01s4vdt)

Richard Wagner - Power, Sex and Revolution 11:30 TUE (b01s4g74)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b011ttfk)

Saturday Drama 21:00 FRI (b01jppvt)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01s378z)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01s37f1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01s0s4h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01s37k6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01s37mh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01s37nz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01s37qd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01s37rr)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01s0s4f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01s0s4k)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01s0s52)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01s37k4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01s37k8)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01s37ks)

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Sid James: Not Just a Dirty Laugh 16:00 MON (b01s4762)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01s0s56)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01s37kx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01s37mw)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01s37s0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01s37t9)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01s38ry)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01s38ry)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01s46g5)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01s46g5)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01s393c)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01s38s2)

Swimming through Chocolate 11:00 FRI (b01s4qqb)

Syria: Can Aid Meet the Challenge? 09:00 TUE (b01s4vvd)

Syria: Can Aid Meet the Challenge? 21:30 TUE (b01s4vvd)

Tax Avoidance: The Hidden Cost 17:00 SUN (b01s0df4)

Thames Crossings 13:45 MON (b01s4740)

Thames Crossings 13:45 TUE (b01s5d47)

Thames Crossings 13:45 WED (b01s5f3m)

Thames Crossings 13:45 THU (b01s5g50)

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The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b01s09kc)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b01s4744)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01s7wm2)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01s39zj)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01s39zj)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01s47bl)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01s47bl)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01s4g7q)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01s4g7q)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01s4qr1)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (b01s4szg)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01s4szg)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01s5j4y)

The Big Ditch - How the Panama Canal Changed the World 11:00 WED (b01s0dk1)

The Cazalets 10:45 MON (b01s46g9)

The Cazalets 19:45 MON (b01s46g9)

The Cazalets 10:45 TUE (b01s4g72)

The Cazalets 19:45 TUE (b01s4g72)

The Cazalets 10:45 WED (b01s4qb2)

The Cazalets 19:45 WED (b01s4qb2)

The Cazalets 10:45 THU (b01s4rj3)

The Cazalets 19:45 THU (b01s4rj3)

The Cazalets 10:45 FRI (b01s4vdr)

The Cazalets 19:45 FRI (b01s4vdr)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b01s4764)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01s0qn5)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01s4sz6)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01s395f)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01s395f)

The Human Cradle 00:30 SUN (b01by9lj)

The Interrogation 14:15 MON (b01s4742)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b01s39z6)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b01s4vdy)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b01s4vfb)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b01s4vfz)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01s4qqv)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b01s0ss6)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b01s4vfg)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01s4szl)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b01s393k)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b01s393k)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b01s09km)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b01s4768)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01s3793)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01s39z4)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01s483n)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01s4g81)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01s4qr9)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01s4szq)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01s4vfv)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01s0dkm)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01s4qqs)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01s378x)

Today 06:00 MON (b01s46g3)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01s39zn)

What I Read to the Dead: Wladislaw Szlengel 23:30 SAT (b01s032f)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01s39zq)

With Great Pleasure 23:27 FRI (b01l7qk9)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01s379c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01s46g7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01s4g70)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01s4q6f)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b01s0b02)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b01s4g7g)

Wordaholics 11:30 WED (b01s6c9z)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01s46vj)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01s46vg)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b01s0ttp)

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