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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 NOVEMBER 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01nxzb7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01nxzcb)
Patrick Leigh Fermor: An Adventure

Episode 5

Artemis Cooper's biography charts for the first time the extraordinary life story of the celebrated travel writer and war hero who was as renowned for his feats of derring-do as for his sumptuous prose.

The construction of Paddy's "power-house for prose" in Greece and a fascinating insight into the remarkable creative journey which culminated in the award-wining, A Time of Gifts.

Read by Samuel West
Abridged by Miranda Davies
Produced by Gemma Jenkins.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01nxzb9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01nxzbc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01nxzbf)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01nxzbh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ny0gg)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with Church of Scotland Elder, Alison Twaddle.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01ny0gj)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01nxzbk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01nxzbm)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01nxwn4)
Snowdonia

Helen Mark discovers the myths and legends of the landscape of Snowdonia. A recent million pound appeal by the National Trust successfully enabled the Trust to buy one of Wales' most iconic farms, Llyndy Isaf, and the land around it on the shores of Llyn Dinas. As well as being important environmentally, legend states that the area is the setting for the mythical battle between the red and white dragon, the red dragon being the victor and claiming the honour of becoming the country's national symbol.
Helen also visits Ty Hyll, the Ugly House, a cottage saved from dereliction in the 1980s by the Snowdonia Society. The true origins of the house remain shrouded in mystery, although legend tells of it being built by two outlaw brothers as a 'Ty Un Nos', a house built overnight between sunset and sunrise with walls, roof and a smoking chimney. Under ancient law anyone succeeding in doing this could claim the freehold.
What other mysteries surround this stunning landscape?

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01p027n)
Farming Today This Week

The European budget talks have collapsed, leaving a question mark over funding for European agriculture.

Farming Today visits Strasbourg and asks decision makers if the CAP has a future, and if so, what shape will it come in.

Farming Today this Week was presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01nxzbp)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01p027q)
Morning news and current affairs, with James Naughtie and Evan Davis, including:

0810
As heavy rain is forecast for many parts of the country this weekend, flood risk manager Peter Fox from the environment agency has the latest.

0813
Over the last four years an estimated 10,000 mainly Eritrean refugees have been kidnapped by people traffickers, largely based in Egypt's Sinai region. Most disappear on the way to seek a better life in Israel. The BBC's Mike Thomson reports, and Tulberg University's Mirjam van Reisen speaks from the Netherlands.

0831
Rotherham social services are being accused by a couple of removing three foster children from their care because the council disapproved of their membership of UKIP. The strategic director of children and young people's services at Rotherham Council, Joyce Thacker, comments.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01p027s)
Writer and comic Emma Kennedy, John McCarthy in Maastricht and Sir John Major's Inheritance Tracks

Sian Williams and Richard Coles talk to comic, writer, children's author, winner of celebrity masterchef and fan of noir Danish cop show 'The Killing', Emma Kennedy, hear about former investment banker and farmer Jan McCourt's 'love letter' to the NHS after he narrowly escaped death under the wheels of his own tractor, remember the first ordination of women in the Church of England with the Revered Jane Hayward, squeal as JP Devlin recreates James Bond's wet shave with a cut throat razor, enjoy the metronomic pleasure of a listener's clock built by their father, travel to Maastricht with John McCarthy and listen to Sir John Major's Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 Eddie Goes Country (b01p2w7d)
PM presenter Eddie Mair has harboured a secret. But no more - it's a lifelong love of Country music. He wants to know why these three chord melodramas call him and many of his fellow Celts.

While, to the casual listener, Country is often regarded as a twang of twee tunes and lachrymose lyrics for the permanently melancholic, Eddie suggests that it is actually a 'complex state of mind'. He considers the accessible merits of the music and discovers the roots of Country.

Returning to Scotland, Eddie attends the Celtic Connections Music Festival in Glasgow. Here he compares notes, likes and dislikes with fellow broadcaster and Country aficionado Ricky Ross, along with singers Eleanor McEvoy and Dick Gaughan.

On hand to explain the 18th century Scots/Irish exodus to America and Canada is emigration historian Professor James Hunter. And providing a master class on the Celtic musical lineage detected in contemporary Country Music is musicologist Dr. Katherine Campbell from Edinburgh University.

And for the first time, Eddie will reveal where his musical devotion took root. It began on the Sabbath in a yellow Triumph PI. That almost sounds like the beginning of a Country song...

Producers: Jo Coombs and Stewart Henderson
A Loftus Audio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01p02n7)
Fraser Nelson of The Spectator finds out what's been happening in Westminster this week
Parliamentarians are squaring up for Lord Justice Leveson's report on his inquiry into press standards. A group of Conservative MPs is calling for some sort of statutory regulation to prevent abuses suffered by people such as the McCanns, Chris Jefferies, and Millie Dowler's family.
Former Home Secretary David Blunkett thinks it is imperative to preserve press freedom, while Nadhim Zahawi Conservative feels there is a case for statutory underpinning to some form of regulatory practice.
While the European summit ended with no agreement on the budget, and no requirement for the Prime Minister to use his veto, the Justice Secretary Chris Grayling laid down his own challenge to the European Court of Human Rights announcing announcing legislative proposals onprisoners right to vote. Dominic Raab Conservative and Barry Gardiner Labour discuss.
And Nadine Dorries MP on her future as she prepares to return home from her excursion in the jungle.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01p02n9)
The Worst Possible News

Despatches from reporters across the globe.

Jon Donnison was in Gaza as the city came under Israeli attack and a BBC staffman took a distressing phone call.

Gabriel Gatehouse was in Goma as rebels took the town in eastern Congo with UN peacekeepers standing by, unable to intervene.

Petroc Trelawny was in a part of France which is taking a special interest in the vote in Catalonia which many feel could be a step along the road to Catalonian independence,

Owen Bennett Jones has been talking to a famer in New York state who feels consultancy might be a better earner than growing onions.

And cup cakes? Salsa classes? Nightclubs? Mary Harper's been seeing signs of Africa both old and new in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.

Producer: Tony Grant.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01p02nc)
Fuel poverty, Choosing your PIN number, The Great Pension Debate and How to change a Bin Laden

We investigate why a listener on a cheaper social fuel tariff has been hit by an 18% price rise while his neighbour on a regular duel fuel tariff has had an 8% increase. Social tariffs were introduced to help people who live in fuel poverty - spending more than 10% of their income on fuel - which includes the elderly and people on benefits. But changes to the way that this group of people are assisted is changing and Money Box has learnt that some may now be worse off than before. We speak to Greg Barker, Junior Minister for Energy and a fuel poverty expert.

To what extent should a bank be able to dictate what pin you use to keep your card transactions secure? From January 1st, Santander will require customers to have a separate pin for its cards. Is this going to help cut down on fraud or is having too many pins a security risk in itself? Bob Howard investigates.

What would encourage you to save for your retirement? Would you be more willing to pay into a workplace pension if your boss gave some guarantee about the size of your pension pot and the rough size of your retirement package? That's what could happen with a new type of pension scheme being considered by the Pensions Minister, Steve Webb. He talks to Paul Lewis about his plans.

How do you change a Bin Laden? That's the question a listener posed to the Money Box team this week. John from East Sussex has two 500 Euro notes which he is having huge problems changing into sterling. The note is infamous for being the note of choice for organised crime which is why it was withdrawn from sales in the UK two years ago. We set Simon Calder, the Independent's Travel Editor the challenge of trying to change a Bin Laden.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b01ny0fh)
Series 38

Episode 3

Budgets, Bishops, and Bullying. This was the week that David Cameron threatened to use his veto at the EU, the Church of England voted against female bishops, and the BBC appointed a new DG. Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week in stand-up and sketches, and Mitch Benn bashes the bishops. With Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, and Sarah Kendall. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01nxzbr)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01nxzbt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01ny0fp)
Samuel Ward Academy, Haverhill, Suffolk

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Samuel Ward Academy in Haverhill, Suffolk. Guests include the Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change Caroline Flint MP, Revd Canon Rosie Harper Chaplain to the Bishop of Buckingham and member of General Synod, Pensions Minister Steve Webb MP and Conservative MP Mark Reckless who led the recent Tory rebellion on the Euro budget.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson

There are a limited amount of audience tickets left for this broadcast from the Samuel Ward Academy in Haverhill. To reserve them please email any.questions@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01p02nf)
Listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01mnxxd)
The Martin Beck Killings

The Fire Engine That Disappeared

The Fire Engine That Disappeared
by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö
Translated by Joan Tate
Dramatised by Katie Hims

The apartment of a suspect being staked out by Gunvald Larsson explodes, killing three people. Arson and murder isn't at first suspected - much to Larsson's fury - but when it becomes clear that the fire was started on purpose, the case hinges on the needle-in-a-haystack chance of finding a man who fits an impossibly vague description who was somewhere in the area around the time of the fire.

Original Music composed by Elizabeth Purnell

Directed by Mary Peate.


SAT 15:30 Blues Run the Game (b01nxh4s)
Laura Barton reveals a lost gem of British folk music and tells the poignant story of its creator, Jackson C Frank.

With insurance money from a childhood accident Jackson C Frank migrated from New York to London in the mid-'60s, where his first album was produced by another ascendant young songwriter called Paul Simon. It was warmly received and Frank is spoken of as an influence on a generation of British folk performers.

And then, it seems, he disappeared from view. Little was heard from Jackson C Frank for decades.

Laura Barton speaks to some of those who knew him to find out about the lost years and the tragedy of the life of Jackson C Frank.

Featuring Jackson C Frank's friends Al Stewart, John Renbourn, Jim Abbott and John Kay.

Producer: Martin Williams.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01p02nh)
Susan Boyle; Grace Coddington; Maria Miller MP

Susan Boyle talks about her rapid rise to fame and the changes it's made to her life. Grace Coddington, creative director of US Vogue on her early modelling career and working relationship with Anna Wintour. Antonio Carluccio Cooks the Perfect...arancini, delicious rice balls. Women's Minister, Maria Miller MP on equality, page three and her views on abortion. Movember woman...Siobhan Fletcher tells us why she's joined the men and not shaving her facial hair this month. Kate Rusby sings Mockingbird. As a new law comes into force criminalising stalking, Alison Hewitt talks about the impact being stalked had on her and her family.
Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Laura Northedge.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01p02nk)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b01ny0gj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01nxzbw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01nxzby)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nxzc0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01p02sc)
Bobby Womack, Sir David Frost, Mark Steel, Angela Hartnett, Danny Wallace, Willy Mason

Clive looks Through The Keyhole to nosey at the remarkable broadcasting career of Sir David Frost. Among the world figures he has interviewed are six British Prime Ministers, seven US Presidents, from Tony Blair to Richard Nixon and many outside the political world. Sir David is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the pioneering satirical programme 'That Was The Week That Was' with a dedicated evening at London's BFI Southbank on Tuesday 27th November.

Clive's burning up in Hell's Kitchen with chef Angela Hartnett, who cooks up a storm in her Michelin-starred restaurant, Murano. Angela's chair of the judges on this year's BBC Food and Farming Awards, searching for the most delicious and innovative food in Britain today. The winners will be announced at the BBC Good Food Show, NEC, Birmingham on Wednesday 28th November. Yes chef!

Danny Wallace starts a Revolution with author and comedian Mark Steel, who's made a virtue of the touring comedian's life. Mark returns to Radio 4 to scrutinise some of the UK's more distinctive towns and sheds some light on the people, history and eccentricities that makes them unique. 'Mark Steel's in Town' is on Wednesday 28th November at 18.30.

Clive crosses 110th Street to hang loose with legendary soul singer Bobby Womack whose career began as lead singer in 'The Valentinos' and as Sam Cooke's backing guitarist. Since then, Bobby's been in The Safety Zone, gone Back To His Roots and Saved The Children.... to name just a few of his 27 albums. Bobby reveals why he's now 'The Bravest Man in the Universe' and performs 'Deep River' from his Q award-winning Album of the Year.

With more music from low-fi, alt-folkie golden boy Willy Mason who performs 'I Got Gold' from his album 'Carry On'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01p03b4)
Lynton Crosby

Mary Ann Sieghart profiles the Australian political strategist Lynton Crosby.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01p03b6)
Tom Sutcliffe and guests Lionel Shriver, Alex Preston and Jim White discuss the week's cultural highlights including Pinero's farce The Magistrate. This production marks the first time that American actor John Lithgow has appeared at the National Theatre - he is best known to English audiences for his role in the US sitcom Third Rock From The Sun.

David Ayer's cop flick "End of Watch" is a fast-paced action thriller, starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Pena with the aim of presenting Los Angeles Police Department as it "really is".

In Michael Kimball's novel "Big Ray" a middle aged man comes to terms with his father's death. Told in five hundred brief entries, it's written in the form of a memoir, detailing the narrator's abuse at the hands of a father who was defined by his obesity and his violence.

"Gaiety is the Most Outstanding Feature of the Soviet Union" is the title of one of two exhibitions opening at the Saatchi Gallery in London. It takes its name from a quote by Joseph Stalin and highlights work by an exciting group of 20 artists who have recently emerged in Russia. The second exhibition "Breaking The Ice: Moscow Art, 1960s-80s" features leading underground artists who lived and worked in Moscow during a period described as a "golden renaissance" in Russian art.

The Fear is a new mini-series on Channel 4, starring Peter Mullan as Brighton crime boss turned entrepreneur and Anastasia Hille as his wife. Pursuing his dream of rebuilding Brighton's derelict West Pier, Richie Beckett's hard-earned respectability is threatened by two new enemies: an invading Albanian mafia and an aggressive form of early onset dementia. It's written by Richard Cottan (Wallander, Hancock & Joan) and also stars Richard E Grant.

Producer: Hilary Dunn.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01p2wd0)
From Easy to Cryptic - 100 Years of the Crossword

Famous for her own love of word play, Lynne Truss decodes a bountiful archive of clues, answers, interviews and puzzles to celebrate the centenary of this resilient mind teaser. The first crossword appeared in the New York Times in 1913, devised by a Liverpudlian called Arthur Wynne. He was the first of many setters whose cryptic clues and clever answers encapsulate the cultural and social agenda of their age. MI5 interrogated the Telegraph's first setter in 1944 when his crossword solutions suggested he knew too much about military operations. Lynne learns that code breakers selection for Bletchley Park was based on their prowess for cracking crosswords.

In an internet age of gaming and quick access to information, Lynne Truss learns why scientists argue that the hardy crossword keeps the mind agile and listens to the sounds of the setter and crossword solver at work, pondering the trickiest clue.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01nx3pm)
Rebus: The Black Book

Episode 2

2/2. As Rebus investigates an unsolved murder someone kidnaps and suspends his brother over the Forth Bridge. Ian Rankin's novel is dramatised by Chris Dolan.

When DS Brian Holmes is left in a coma after being severely beaten, Rebus discovers his colleague's black notebook contains coded clues on a case involving arson and murder. Five years before, a mysterious fire burned down Edinburgh's seedy Central Hotel. All the staff and customers were accounted for but an unidentified body was found in the rubble. The post mortem revealed the victim had died from a bullet through the heart before the fire broke out.

The attack on his brother can only mean that Rebus is close to deciphering the secrets of the black book - but can he track down those responsible for the Central Hotel murder before they decide that it will take more than a warning to stop his investigation?

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/director: Bruce Young.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01nxzc2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b01nxw2g)
Morality and Ethics in the Gaza Conflict

Both sides in the current conflict in Gaza have been claiming the moral high ground. To the Israelis it's an issue of self-defence and they're trying to avoid casualties. To Hamas it's about responding to the oppression and aggression of a much more powerful neighbour. The world looks on, counting the bodies and is almost inevitably drawn to the graphic simplicities of competing victimhood. The Palestinians win that hands down, but, terrible though it is, there's more to morality than suffering. What if, as the Israeli writer Amos Oz says, they're both right? Should we substitute pragmatism for morality? Stop trying to weigh up competing moral claims in the interests of some sort of solution. Or is giving up the idea of right and wrong, relativism of the worst kind, that could lead to a different kind of moral tragedy? Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Anne McElvoy, Matthew Taylor and Claire Fox. Witnesses: Professor Daniel Statman - Department of Philosophy, University of Haifa; one of the authors of the IDF Code of Conduct, Dr David Rodin - Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict, University of Oxford, Dr Philip Cunliffe - Lecturer in International Conflict, University of Kent.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b01nxh1t)
(12/12)

What's the aesthetic connection between Sewell's horse, Perrault's princess, the object of Spacey's affection, and a South London insect?

Tom Sutcliffe invites the regular teams from Scotland and the North of England to tackle this and other cryptic puzzles, in the last clash of the current series. By tradition, the questions in this final programme have all been suggested by Round Britain Quiz listeners, and the teams will need to be on their mettle to deal with the listeners' ingenuity.

Michael Alexander and Alan Taylor play for Scotland, and Adele Geras and Jim Coulson represent the North of England. Both teams will be making a last-ditch effort to increase their standing in the RBQ league table for 2012. The questions, as always, are available to read on the Round Britain Quiz pages of the BBC Radio 4 website.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Workshop (b01nx3rp)
Series 2

Episode 3

Ruth Padel works with a group of poets who meet at Stalybridge Station buffet bar in Manchester. Testing their poems as they go, in a spirit of supportive criticism; tough love for poems.
Poetry Workshops are gathering all over the country. In the back rooms of pubs like this one, and in libraries and in front rooms, poets meet to sharpen their verse.
Ruth and the group work on three very different poems on the theme of 'journeys' - both symbolic and actual. One poem takes us to Zante via Watford Gap, one considers perspective and scale from on high, whilst another has a much darker tone. The group will pay particular attention this week to metaphor.
The group consider the use of metaphor in their poems that are touching, funny and perceptive. Ruthless support is applied as they chuck out each other's words and test and prune as they go.
They discuss the techniques, inspiration, wordplay and imagination that make poetry so enjoyable and rewarding. As well as working on their own poems, they also consider a poem by Carol Ann Duffy called Close.
Producer: Sarah Langan.



SUNDAY 25 NOVEMBER 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01p01c4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Vasily Grossman from the Frontline (b014m1pz)
The Stalingrad Army

Elliot Levey reads the second of Vasily Grossman's front line despatches from the battle of Stalingrad. The Stalingrad Army. Red Star -January 13th 1943. Translated by Jim Riordan.

'How can I convey my feelings at this moment in the dark basement which hadn't surrendered the factory to the enemy?'

As the 'special correspondent' for Red Star newspaper Vasily Grossman conveyed the 'ruthless truth of war' from the first disastrous weeks of the Nazi invasion in 1941 to victory in the ruins of Berlin. His intimate portraits of baby faced snipers, taciturn machine gunners and enthusiastic 'tankists' brought home the struggle to both the Soviet people and a wider world. Never more so than during the terrible battle for Stalingrad between July 1942 to February 1943.

The whole world was transfixed by a struggle that might determine the course of the war as Hitler's Sixth Army found the early success of late summer turning into disastrous defeat in the icy winter amidst the rubble. Throughout these months of terrible battle Grossman endured countless dangers to cross the river Volga and enter the ruined city. There he would listen & gather material for his detailed portraits for Red Star, stories from those who would most likely die in this pitiless 'war of the rats'. A war in which every cellar and every building became a front line. By January 1943 the desperate defence of the city had shifted as the surviving soldiers of the Red Army sensed a priceless victory. 2: The Stalingrad Army.

Reader: Elliot Levey
Translator: Jim Riordan
Producer: Mark Burman.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01p01c6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01p01c8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01p01cb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01p01cd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01p03qw)
The bells of Howden Minster, East Yorkshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01p03b4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01p01cg)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01p03qy)
Inside a Tree

Mark Tully asks why trees are so important to us.

Why is it that, from childhood onwards, we feel the urge to climb inside their hollow trunks or up into their branches? How does the world seem different from inside a tree?

From Herman Hesse to Seamus Heaney, writers, poets and composers have been inspired by the power and grandeur of trees. The Hindu sacred text, the Bhagavata Purana, celebrates the shade cast by trees and the many uses of their bark, wood, leaves and sap. Their age and majesty inspires respect and, as the Dalai Lama said, "trees echo the Buddha's words expressing his fundamental teaching of impermanence".

With professional tree climber James Aldred, Mark visits the ancient yew tree which stands in the corner of St George's Churchyard in Crowhurst, Surrey. Together they climb inside its hollow trunk to contemplate the protective, comforting presence of a living organism which has stood in one place for four thousand years.

James has climbed hundreds of trees all over the world, even slept inside them. He describes the connection he makes with them and the way each tree he meets seems to have a distinct personality. Being inside a tree is the closest he comes to prayer.

Producer: Jo Coombs
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 Living World (b01p03r0)
Brambles

Brambles are amazing plants, once introduced into New Zealand they began to spread at a rate of 30 feet each year to colonise vast stretches of the country and must come a close second to oaks for their importance. It not only provides the most accessible 'food for free' for us, it must rank as one of the most important plants in Britain for wildlife, providing nesting sites for at least 26 species of bird and around 100 insect species that depend upon brambles, and are a major component in a good habitat mosaic, which is often the best invertebrate habitat and is relatively resistant to rabbits which make it good in creating shelter.

For this Living World, James Brickell travel to mid Wales to join botanist Ray Woods on a personal exploration of the humble blackberry bush in an attempt to learn more about the importance of brambles in supporting a myriad of nature. With over 300 species of bramble in the British Isles, some inhabiting small areas and highly adapted to soil type or aspect such as the sub-erecta group living at over 1000 feet above sea level. Ray explains the role of the blackberry in the wider landscape and how its complex ecology is a boon to the wildlife that inhabits, utilises and finds shelter from its structure.

Brambles are a very good nectar source, food plant mainly for many species; the fruits are a wonderful reservoir for raspberry beetles and feed wasps in late autumn! Humans have been eating blackberry fruits, known as drupes, for millennia and historically man may be one of the main vectors of spreading the seeds across the British Isles. Recent research though has uncovered a possible link to bramble growth and Climate Change, which once again illustrates the complexity surrounding brambles.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01p01cj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01p01cl)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01p03r4)
On the programme this week.

It's been a momentous week for the Church of England after their synod voted to reject women bishops.Trevor Barnes reports from Synod on reaction to the vote and we also have a report from two parishes.. a liberal and a conservative .. gauging reaction from the pews..

The Archbishop of Canterbury himself has said that the Church has "lost a measure of credibility" over this issue..many politicians are now calling for a change in the law to allow women bishops and there are more voices calling for the church's disestablishment. What now for the Church? Dr Philip Giddings, Chair of the House of Laity discusses with Rosemary Lain- Priestly, Dean of Women's Ministry in Central London and
the Bishop of Willesden, Pete Broadbent.

As the ceasefire begins between Israel and the Hamas movement in Gaza, we hear from both side of the conflict on what life has been like on the ground.. and what their hopes are for the future.

Westminster Abbey plan to honour CS Lewis with a memorial at Poets Corner.Professor Alister McGrath talks to us about its significance.

Thousands of people have attended rallies in the Republic of Ireland in memory of Savita Halappanavar, calling for changes to Irish abortion law. She died in hospital after her family claimed she was repeatedly refused a termination. Mary Harte reports from Dublin.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01p03r6)
One to One Children's Fund

Sue MacGregor presents the Radio 4 Appeal for One to One Children's Fund
Reg Charity:1086159
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope One to One Children's Fund.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01p01cn)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01p01cq)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01p067h)
For the Feast of Christ the King, and looking forward to St Andrew's Day.
From St Salvator's Chapel in the University of St Andrews.
Leader: University Chaplain, The Revd Donald MacEwan
Preacher: The Revd Johnston McKay
St Salvator's Chapel Choir directed by Thomas Wilkinson
Readings: John 16: 28-33
John 6: 1-15
Music:
Rejoice in God's saints (Tune: Laudate Dominum)
Kyrie from St Anne Mass (James MacMillan)
Courage, Brother, Do not stumble
'Doctor Bonus' (Victoria)
Jesus calls us! (Tune: St Andrew)
'O Radiant Dawn' (MacMillan)
Son of God, eternal Saviour (Blaenwern)
Producer: Mo McCullough.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01ny0fr)
On Pompeii

"Last weekend I spent a couple of hours with the remains of one of the human victims of the eruption of Vesuvius" writes Mary Beard, as she wanders through the rooms of a new exhibition about Pompeii, the "City of the Dead".

The display at the J Paul Getty museum in Malibu is one of several Pompeii exhibitions running in different museums around the world - and very similar to one coming to the British Museum in the spring.

As she makes her way through the bodies - or "anti-bodies" as she refers to them - she ponders questions of privacy, archaeology and restoration.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01p067k)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01p067m)
See daily episodes for synopsis

Writer ..... Keri Davies
Director ..... Julie Beckett
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

Kenton Archer..... Richard Attlee
David Archer..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer..... Felicity Finch
Josh Archer..... Cian Cheesbrough
Elizabeth Pargetter..... Alison Dowling
Matt Crawford..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy..... Sunny Ormonde
Fallon Rogers..... Joanna Van Kampen
Emma Grundy..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy..... Barry Farrimond
Susan Carter..... Charlotte Martin
Mike Tucker..... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker..... Rachel Atkins
Roy Tucker..... Ian Pepperell
Hayley Tucker..... Lorraine Coady
Brenda Tucker..... Amy Shindler
Oliver Sterling..... Michael Cochrane
Caroline Sterling..... Sara Coward
Lynda Snell..... Carole Boyd
Lewis Carmichael..... Robert Lister
Jim Lloyd..... John Rowe
Paul Morgan..... Michael Fenton Stevens
James Bellamy..... Roger May
Darrell Makepeace..... Dan Hagley
Rhys Williams..... Scott Arthur
Corey..... Adam Nagaitis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01p067p)
Edmund de Waal

Kirsty Young's castaway is the artist and author, Edmund de Waal. His ceramics are on display in many of the world's major museums. They're delicate pots in shades of white and cream, informed he says by a great deal of thinking about literature.

His written work has also won him several awards; his book "The Hare With Amber Eyes" traces the rich and dramatic story of his family's Russian Jewish heritage and the diaspora in Odessa, Paris, Vienna, and Tokyo.

He says, "I make pots and I write. I'm not one of those people who by mistake became a potter or by mistake is a writer - they are both completely entwined."

Producer: Isabel Sargent.


SUN 12:00 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b01nxh2s)
Series 58

Episode 2

The 58th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the Grove Theatre in Dunstable. Regulars Graeme Garden, Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel by Tony Hawks with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano - Colin Sell. Producer - Jon Naismith.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01p067r)
2012's Best "Big Food Ideas"

Sheila Dillon meets finalists in the BBC Food & Farming Awards offering ideas for our food future, from making more local food available online to redistributing spare food.

Joining Sheila to explore these ideas are Kath Dalmeny, research director of Sustain, and Christine Tacon, former CEO of the Coop's farms.

Under discussion are Growing Communities in East London, Riverford Organics in Devon, Cornish Food Market, The Real Bread Campaign, and Fareshare.

Producer: Toby Field.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01p01cs)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01p067t)
The latest national and international news presented by Shaun Ley, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Hardeep's Sunday Lunch (b01nx3ph)
Series 1

Episode 1

Hardeep Singh Kohli travels around the country cooking Sunday lunch with families and communities, introducing some of his favourite recipes, learning about their food and hearing some amazing stories. In the first programme in this 6 part series Hardeep meets Avril and Ron Head. Over the last 30 years they have dedicated much of their lives to caring for children and in particular those with special medical needs. As well as having 3 children of their own they have adopted two children and fostered 138. At a time when foster carers are increasingly in short supply for the growing number of children who need care, Avril and Ron talk about how the values and beliefs that underpin their approach to fostering. As Hardeep cooks them Sunday lunch he hears the story of how they became foster carers and the highs and lows they have experienced over the years.

Producer: Amanda Hancox
Dawn Bryan.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01nxzcx)
Balsall, West Midlands

Peter Gibbs is in the chair as Gardeners' Question Time heads to Balsall, West Midlands - with horticultural experts Christine Walkden, Chris Beardshaw and Bob Flowerdew fielding queries from the local gardening audience.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b01p067y)
Sunday Edition

Fi Glover hears what Dorothy Sheridan of the Mass Observation Archive thinks of the value of The Listening Project to oral historians of all types in the Sunday edition of Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Alexandre Dumas - The Count of Monte Cristo (b01p0680)
Episode 1

At the age of 19, seaman Edmond Dantès has a charmed life - about to be promoted to Captain, and engaged to the beautiful Mercédès.

But Marseilles in 1815 is a dangerous place, and three of Dantes' acquaintances set in train a chain of events that will lead Edmond to 14 years of solitary confinement in the notorious Chateau D'If.

Adventure novel by Alexandre Dumas first published in 1844.

Dramatised in four parts by Sebastian Baczkiewicz.

Edmond Dantes ...... Iain Glen
Haydee ...... Jane Lapotaire
Abbe Faria ...... Richard Johnson
Monsieur Morrell ...... Robert Blythe
Danglars ...... Toby Jones
Fernand ...... Zubin Varla
Caderousse ...... Ben Crowe
Jacopo ...... Joe Sims
Captain Patin ...... Patrick Brennan
Albert de Morcerf ...... Will Howard
Antoine ...... Will Howard
Claude ...... Paul Stonehouse
Max Morrell ...... Adam Nagaitis
Mathilde ...... Liza Sadovy
Julie Morrell ...... Eleanor Crooks

Directors: Jeremy Mortimer / Sasha Yevtushenko

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01p0682)
Children's Book Special

Open Book is devoted to the joys of children's literature

Four Weddings and a Funeral screenwriter Richard Curtis explains why he has written his first children's book The Empty Stocking, and Jeff Kinney explains the key to the success of runaway bestseller Diary of a Wimpy Kid; a book he originally thought he had written for adults.

In the studio Mariella is joined by two giants of the children's literary scene, Lauren Child and Charlie Higson, who between them have brought us Ruby Redfort, the young James Bond, Charlie and Lola and zombies, and by the esteemed children's book critic Amanda Craig. They'll be discussing how literature remains vivid in this new digital world, the difficulties of buying books for different age groups, how The Hobbit, seventy five this year, remains a favourite for all the family and why children loved to be scared by literature.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Workshop (b01p0684)
Series 2

Episode 4

The Shalom House Poets meet regularly in Belfast Central Library to dole out tough love on each other's poems. Ruth Padel joins them as they workshop their poems in a spirit of supportive criticism, going behind the scenes of a poem to find out which techniques work and which don't.
Ruth and the group work on three very different poems on the theme of 'windows'. One of them is an intricate observation of a sculpture in Salzburg, another is an enigmatic reflection on shadows, and there's a nostalgic and powerful recollection of a living room in Belfast.
The technical focus this week will be on inspiration and description .The group discuss the techniques, inspiration, wordplay and imagination that make poetry so enjoyable and rewarding. As well as working on their own poems, they also consider a very well know one by Louis MacNeice; 'Snow'.
Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01nxt2p)
Highways Agency

Fed up with road works? Stuck in a queue of traffic? The Government is promising big improvements for drivers who use motorways and major roads. It's looking for ways to increase private sector involvement and to boost investment. So what future for the body that currently manages the network in England? With the CBI calling for it to be scrapped, and with criticism from local authorities and motoring organisations, Allan Urry road asks whether it's the end of the road for the Highways Agency?
Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01p03b4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01p01cv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01p01cx)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01p01cz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01p0686)
This week, Pick of the Week hears the chilling tale of Lancashire's Pendle Witch Trials, and about a modern exorcist in Leicester. There's mockery with monocles from those caddish toffs the Western brothers, who were nevertheless "frightfully BBC", and news of an African campaign to send radiator-aid to Norway.

Eddie Mair goes country, Peter White goes back to school and a soprano packs up her souvenirs: that's all in Pick of the Week, presented by Catherine Bott.

I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue - Radio 4
Mockery With Monocles :The Western Brothers Revealed- Radio 4
Between The Ears: Belongings - Radio3
Book of the Week: Patrick Leigh Fermor - An Adventure -Radio 4
Sunday Feature : Way Off the Beaten Track- Radio 3
Blaggers Guide To Bond - Radio 2
Eddie Goes Country- Radio 4
From Worcester with Love- Radio 4
The Curse of Pendle- Radio 4
Asian Network Reports Special 'Possession, Jinn and Britain's Back Street Exorcists'- Asian Network
The Essay: TV Dinners to Roadside Diners ( Episode 5)- Radio 3
The Strand (20/11/12) - World Service
The Infinite Monkey Cage-Radio 4
Music in the Air - Radio 2

If there's something you'd like to suggest for next week's programme, please e-mail potw@bbc.co.uk.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01p0688)
Jolene's surprised about Fallon and 'dark horse' Rhys, and Fallon looks forward to plenty of rehearsal of their newly added final kiss in the Christmas show. Neil gives an update on the Tree Dressing Day, and reports that Fallon was spotted leaving Rhys's earlier. Fallon feels she might as well put her diary on the Ambridge website.
Susan suggests that Emma and Ed move into Ambridge View. Emma's keen, but she's not sure Ed will go for it. It would be like admitting he couldn't cope. Susan suggests Emma and Ed talk it through, reminding Emma it's not charity but support in a crisis.
Susan invites Emma to join her next week for Christmas shopping, as the lights are being turned on. Emma worries how she'll afford anything for the kids, though.
Ed's against the move, as he wants his family together in their own home. Neil offers to speak to Ed, but Susan thinks they should leave it with Ed and Emma. Susan's moved when George admits to wishing Emma and Ed could win the lottery.
Emma later tells Ed that George asked to spend Christmas Eve at Will and Nic's. With some persuasion from Emma, Ed finally agrees to think about the move.


SUN 19:15 The Golden Age (b01p068b)
Minority Appeal

Mabel suggests making some programmes for "minorities"; a suggestion which takes Lord Reith by surprise.

Meanwhile, Tharb does his best to cheer up BBC Radio's most depressed newsreader, Roger Eves.

Set in the BBC's Broadcasting House in London during the 1930s, this series follows head of programmes, John Tharb and his assistant, Mabel Hopcraft as they struggle to deal with the foibles and fragile egos of radio's biggest stars.

Robert Bathurst stars in the last episode of the radio sitcom written by Arthur Mathews.

Robert Bathurst.....John Tharb
Vicky McClure.....Mabel Hopcraft
Ford Kiernan.....Lord Reith
Peter Egan.....Doctor Ganley
Malcolm Tierney.....Sergeant Major
Kevin Bishop.....Ordinary Cockney Father / Perfumed Pete
Pippa Evans.....Ordinary Cockney Mother
Ewan Bailey.....Roger Eves / Fancy Dan
Moisty.....Arthur Mathews

Producer: Simon Mayhew-Archer.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


SUN 19:45 Astray (b01p07lf)
The Widow's Cruse

Four short stories from Emma Donoghue's new collection Astray. These fact-inspired fictions, about travels to, in and from North America, focus on emigrants, runaways or drifters all gone astray for love or money, under duress or incognito. Emma's compassionate imagination crosses borders of race, law, sex, and sanity bringing the reader through a scattered scrap-book of history.

The Widow's Cruse, read by John Schwab, follows a bachelor attorney in 1735 New York. The lawyer idealises his childless, wifeless existence until a recently widowed Mrs Gomez appears at his office door.

Dublin born Emma Donoghue is an emigrant twice over; she spent eight years in Cambridge doing a PHD before moving to southwest Ontario where she now lives. Emma is probably best known for her international bestseller Room, winner of the Roger's Writers' Trust Fiction prize and the Hughes & Hughes Irish novel of the year and a finalist for the Man Booker. Emma has also written The Sealed Letter, Landing, Life Mask alongside many short story collections, most recently Three and a Half Deaths. Emma has also written drama for radio, theatre and screen.

The Widow's Cruse was abridged by Doreen Estall and produced by Laura Conway.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b01ny0fc)
Ash Dieback and Fergie-Time

Ash Dieback. Did the disease really kill 90 percent of ash trees in Denmark? Is this really a good comparator for the UK and have 100,000 trees really been 'felled' in the UK?

Fiscal Multipliers. The International Monetary Fund has admitted that it got its fiscal multipliers wrong when forecasting growth. This could have huge consequences in assessing whether or not austerity at a time of deep recession is the right way forward. But what does this mean for the Treasurer of Trumpton Tim Harford after he sacked Dibble the fireman last year as part of his cutbacks.

Cod - we show how wrong the headline 'There are only 100 cod left in the North Sea' actually is.

Fergie-time. Does Fergie-time exist? Do Manchester United get more injury time than other top teams when they're drawing or behind?


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01nxzd1)
William Turnbull, Albano Harguindeguy, Martin Fay, Kenneth Cragg, Sir Philip Ledger

Matthew Bannister on:

The sculptor and painter William Turnbull. He was friends with Giacometti, Paolozzi and Rothko but always went his own way.

The Argentine General Albano Harguindeguy. As Interior Minister in the country's military regime, he was known as the brains behind the government's "dirty war".

Martin Fay, who was the original fiddle player with the Irish traditional band the Chieftains,

Bishop Kenneth Cragg, who devoted his life to the study of relations between Islam and Christianity

And Derek Hutchinson - the first and only man to kayak across the North Sea.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01p02nc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01p03r6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b01nxxzl)
The New Normal

Peter Day travels to the Midlands to find out how beleaguered manufacturers are coping with the most difficult economy in decades. The region used to be the metal bashing heartland of the country but now manufacturers, service providers and entrepreneurs starting their own companies are all struggling to find a way to keep profitable in an era of low growth. What lessons have been learned over the past five years and how can the past help plan the way forward for the future?

Contributors to this programme:

Stuart Fell
Chairman, Metal Assemblies Ltd

Mark Smith,
Regional Chairman, Price Waterhouse Coopers Birmingham

Ricardo Morcilo
Owner, Chase Park Café

Linda Arrowsmith
Chase Park Café

Mike Molesworth
Managing Director, Dennis Eagle

James Martin
Partner, Moore Stephens, Birmingham and Midlands Regional Representative for R3 Insolvency trade body

Sally Hares
Director, Hare's Moor Diy Curry

Paul Kalinauckas
Chief Executive, Black Country Reinvestment Society

Claire Dowdall and Chris Pritchard
Jelly Attendees

Dr Mark Swift
Head of SME Programmes at Warwick Manufacturing Group

Jim Griffin
Managing Director, Automotive Insulations.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01p089g)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01p08bh)
Tom Newton Dunn of The Sun analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01nxwn6)
Colin Firth on his new film Gambit, and why he never expected to play posh people.

The man behind Festen, Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, discusses his timely drama The Hunt, about a nursery teacher accused of wrongdoing.

Cinema owner Kevin Markwick tracks the origins of advertising on the big screen, unearthing ads from as far back as the 1890s.

And critic Peter Bradshaw on the power of The Passion of Joan of Arc, Carl Theodor Dreyer's classic from 1928.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01p03qy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01p01dz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01nxw23)
Archaeology of homelessness; residential care revisited

Residential care revisited - Laurie Taylor considers Peter Townsend's landmark research, 'The Last Refuge', fifty years after its publication. Retracing Townsend's footsteps, a hundred, older volunteer researchers sought to find out what had happened to the 173 care homes in his classic study. Julia Johnson, one of the authors of the new study, charts the changes and continuities in care for older people in England and Wales. She's joined by Robin Darton, an expert in social care, Also, the archaeologist Rachael Kiddey, examines artefacts from two homelessness sites in Bristol and York. What can these items, as well as oral histories collected from the homeless, tell us about what it means to have no shelter in the 21st century?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01p03qw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01p01f1)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01p01f3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01p01f5)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01p01f7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01p09nt)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with Church of Scotland Elder, Alison Twaddle.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01p09nw)
New government proposals to relax testing for BSE in cattle are welcomed by vets and the meat industry, who say that it will reduce the regulatory and economic burden at a time when mad cow disease no longer poses a threat.

Meanwhile Russia has lifted its import ban on British meat which was imposed 12 years ago in the wake of the BSE crisis. Eblex - the body that represents the UK meat industry - says it will be a great opportunity for producers in this UK.

Juniper was one of the first plants to colonise the British Isles but has been devastated over the last 50 years by overgrazing and disease. Caz Graham visits the Cumbrian uplands where a replanting project is taking place.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Polly Procter.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01p01f9)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01p09ny)
Morning news and current affairs, with James Naughtie and Sarah Montague, including:

0810
Three hundred flood warnings are in place across the country this morning after the latest torrential downpours. BBC Somerset presenter Ben McGrail reports from Norton Fitzwarren near Taunton, and visits a flooded pub, flooded homes and a holiday park that was evacuated.

0820
The Rolling Stones celebrated 50 years on the road at the O2 arena in London last night. We speak to Neil McCormick of the Daily Telegraph, who was at the concert, and Radio 1 DJ Annie Nightingale, who remembers being thrown out of one of their gigs in 1964.

0833
Within a few days, the new Governor of the Bank of England will be appointed from a shortlist of five candidates. The Today programme's Evan Davis asks what qualities the bank needs from a new governor.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01p09p0)
Germany and the EU

On Start the Week Andrew Marr looks at Germany's role in Europe. Katinka Barysch argues that despite the crisis, support for EU integration still dominates, and that unlike Britain, the ability to compromise is seen as a skill, not a weakness. Two British MPs, from left and right, Gisela Stuart and Douglas Carswell, remain sceptical about the EU, but German-born Stuart understands her birth country's emotional connection to it. Carswell argues that the digital revolution calls for smaller, not larger governments, and Karen Leeder believes that despite Germany's belief in the European project it still has not laid to rest the ghosts of unification.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01p09p2)
The Black Count

Episode 1

In his new biography Tom Reiss reveals that Alexandre Dumas' father led a life of derring-do that is captured in his son's novels, The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers. Born to a French nobleman, and a black slave in the colonies, the writer's father went on to rise rapidly through the ranks to become a general in the French army. General Alex Dumas' acts of heroism were met with great acclaim, but events conspired against him leading to an irrevocable reversal of fortune.

Read by Hugh Quarshie who appears regularly in BBC One's Holby City.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01p09p4)
Tanni Grey-Thompson; Stooshe; Women in Farming

Tanni Grey-Thompson on sport and the Power List, why more women are taking up farming, Stooshe perform live in the studio, how adult children react to a parent's new romance later in life, what was the impact of the creation of the welfare state on women's lives?
Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Lucinda Montefiore.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p09p6)
Baby Powder and Perfume

The Punter

By Janice Okoh. Everything is about sex. Except sex. Sex is about power. Or perhaps the lack of it. When a lap dancer fears she's being stalked by a regular punter and the local 'gentleman's' club faces closure, a small community is forced to confront its feelings on the sex industry.

Part 1. The Punter

Mike and Rani's cosy night in is disrupted by some startling accusations.

Director ..... Helen Perry

Janice Okoh is an award winning playwright and one of the UK's most promising writing talents .
Her play 'The Real House' (Three Birds) won the prestigious Bruntwood Prize in 2011 and was short-listed for the Verity Bargate Award and the Alfred Fagon Award. She is one of just eight writers selected for the BBC Writers Academy. Her previous works include 'Egusi Soup', which premiered at the 2009 Hotbed Festival, an adaptation of Malorie Blackman's novel 'Noughts and Crosses' for the Saturday Drama and 'SE8', a Radio 4 Afternoon Drama.

Baby Powder and Perfume is set against the backdrop of new licensing laws imposed under the Policing and Crime Act 2009 which allow local communities to challenge the number of lap dancing clubs operating in their neighbourhoods. This law came into force in 2010. It is not a black and white area as Councils are adopting the measures to varying degrees. There is also debate over whether the laws are far reaching enough in the protection of lap dancers.


MON 11:00 Walking on Planet C (b01p09p8)
Even a cursory look at the writing credits for many of the world's greatest pop hits would reveal the name Nile Rodgers. As well as penning many memorable hit songs with his own band Chic, Rodgers spent the 1970s and 1980s writing and producing acclaimed records for Madonna, David Bowie, Diana Ross, Sister Sledge and Duran Duran. In 2010, Rodgers was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer that very nearly claimed his life.

As part of his recovery regime, Nile began to take a daily walk and many times these walks would produce vivid memories that were blogged online later that evening. 'Walking on Planet C' was the name Nile gave to his collection of thoughts and reminiscences and in this programme he recreates some of these well-trodden paths with microphone in hand.

As we're guided throughout his native New York, we visit the site of the infamous Studio 54 discotheque, the Apollo Theatre in Harlem, plus the sometimes rough and ready streets of Manhattan where Rodgers was raised. With 'Walking on Planet C', Nile recounts the story of his life, a story entwined with the social history of the city itself.

Producer: Paul McClean.


MON 11:30 55 and Over (b01p09pb)
Episode 3

With new partners on the scene the possibility of progeny suddenly seems more likely. But not everyone is so keen on later-in-life breeding.

Juliet Stevenson and Philip Jackson star in Peter Souter's comedy about love, sex and other foolhardy mistakes made by the modern 50pluser.

Jane ..... Juliet Stevenson
Ray ..... Philip Jackson
Tony ..... Patrick Brennan
Heather ..... Liza Sadovy
Honey ..... Stephanie Racine
Sam ..... Adam Nagaitis
Dr Miller ..... Robert Blythe
Portia ..... Sarah Thom

Director: Helen Perry.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01p09pd)
How to turn your old clothes into cash - whether they're high end or bargain basement.

Inexperienced young drivers are involved in a disproportionately high number of road accidents causing death or serious injury. They learn about external hazards for the driving test - but what about behaviour inside the car? A teenager who passes the test in ideal conditions during the day, could be out driving that evening with a car-full of loud, lairy and most importantly, distracting mates. We hear about new technology that could help put a wise driving head on young shoulders and reduce the death toll amongst teenage motorists.

And - if you live outside the big cities where bands usually stage concerts, there's a new way to attract them to play where you live - even if it's off the usual tour circuit. Find out how you could choose who plays and where they put on the show.

Presenter: Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01p01fc)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01p09pg)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Letters from Germany (b01p09pj)
Matthias Politycki

Leading German novelist, poet and satirist Matthias Politycki, writes the first in a series of letters exploring the shifting and often darkening image of his native country as the European economic crisis deepens.

The European Economic crisis has been broadly portrayed as a tale of north versus south with the north, and particularly Germany, portrayed as either the frugal, hardworking nation forced to prop up its profligate southern neighbours, or as the heavy-handed bully forcing those same neighbours into yet more penury. With each developing twist, starting first in Greece and then Spain, Portugal and Italy, Germany has been the 'other' side. Pressure has built and attitudes have become stark and, much to the horror of many in Germany, old and ugly stereotypes have been unleashed. It reached something of a watershed during Chancellor Angela Merkel's recent visit to Athens with Nazi flags there to greet her.

In this series Radio Four invites a range of leading German figures, a writer a politician, a churchwoman, a historian and an economist, to write a letter putting forward their notion of national identity and the version of Germany they believe should inform the views of their British and broader European partners.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01p0688)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 McLevy (b01p0bms)
Series 9

A Dangerous Remedy

New series of Victorian detective dramas, starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode one: A Dangerous Remedy.

McLevy investigates a series of street attacks on clients of the Just Land - while Mulholland's Aunt Katie turns up unexpectedly from Ireland pursued by an angry neighbour.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b01p0bmv)
(1/17)
The most venerable radio general knowledge quiz of them all returns for the 2012-13 season, with Russell Davies welcoming 48 competitors from all over the UK hoping to be named the 60th Brain of Britain.

In the first programme the contestants are from the Isle of Wight, Cornwall, South Wales and Aberdeen.

History, music, science, geography, literature, mythology, popular culture, and all points in between, lurk in Russell's pack of questions. This is the quiz where you can't save yourself with clever tactics, hedging your bets, making your opponents go first, or voting them off! The winner will be the contestant who knows the most correct answers - who will go through to a place in the series semi-finals in the new year.

As always, the programme includes the 'Beat the Brains' feature, in which the competitors tackle a pair of questions suggested by a listener trying to outwit them.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01p067r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 When Harry Potter Met Frodo: The Strange World of Fan Fiction (b01p0bmx)
Novelist Naomi Alderman investigates the extraordinary sub-culture of internet fan fiction and asks how it is influencing the future of popular culture.

The age of the internet has seen an explosion in the writing and reading of fan fiction. Fans of books, movies, TV shows are writing their own stories about their favourite fictional characters and worlds.

Some sample stories: What happens if Hamlet was a woman? What would happen if the Pirates of the Caribbean raided the Titanic? How does Mulder from the X Files deal with growing a pair of wings?

Many of the stories are on explicit sexual themes. The recent, hugely successful series Fifty Shades Of Grey by EL James has its roots in the fan fiction scene and has sparked interest in the genre from commercial publishers. The homoerotic sub-genre known as Slash fiction also has a huge following among heterosexual women as readers and writers.

Naomi talks to 'fanfic' writers and professional authors about this unprecedented flowering of creative writing. She finds out how it is giving a voice to female fans and pioneering new forms of creativity outside the commercial arena.

With author China Mieville, Francesca Coppa, Henry Jenkins and Ika Willis

Produced by Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b01p0bmz)
Series 7

Improbable Science

Brian Cox and Robin Ince discuss some of the more unlikely and odd avenues of research travelled down in the name of science. For example, the British physicist who calculated the optimal way to dunk a biscuit into a cup of tea without it disintegrating too quickly. Or the brain researchers who demonstrated that they could detect meaningful brain activity... in a dead salmon. All these academics share something in common, not just a slightly quirky application of the scientific method. They have also been a recipient of the now infamous Ig Nobel prizes, awarded each year as a parody of the Nobel Prize, to research that seems at first glance, entirely improbable, and possibly pointless. Robin and Brian are joined on stage by the organiser of the Ig Nobels, Marc Abrahams, comedian Katy Brand and biologist Professor Matthew Cobb, from the University of Manchester, to ask whether all scientific exploration is valid, no matter how ridiculous it may seem at first glance, or whether there is genuinely something to be learned from observations that to many, may seem pointless.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem
Presenters: Robin Ince and Brian Cox.


MON 17:00 PM (b01p0bn1)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01p01ff)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b01p0bn3)
Series 58

Episode 3

The nation's favourite wireless entertainment pays a visit to the Symphony Hall in Birmingham. Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Jeremy Hardy, with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell provides piano accompaniment. Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01p0bn5)
Roy's delighted to tell Elizabeth they have a potential sponsor - Shires Brewery. Roy's meeting their contact on Wednesday, with Elizabeth joining. They also discuss Ifty. Elizabeth's pleased with his maths tutoring for Freddie. Over coffee, Elizabeth and Roy discuss the impending visit of Lewis's recommended architect regarding the dairy conversion.
Ed and Emma break the news to David that they're moving out. David tries to suggest alternatives, but Ed can't see anything else working. Reluctantly David accepts the news, saying he'll miss them as neighbours. Ed stresses to Emma that the move is just a stepping stone along the way. They'll move the business on and get their own place again, for sure.
Lilian apologises to Joyce for not being at Arthur's funeral. Joyce understands, aware of James's accident. Keen that Joyce should eat, Lilian offers to cook a lunch. Joyce has been lonely at the house since Arthur died, and is glad to be going. She knows Matt will want to do up the house and she's sure she'll get used to the new flat in time. Lilian tells Joyce to promise that she'll let them know if she needs anything.
On her way home, heavy-hearted Lilian leaves a message for Paul. She really wants a chat.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01p0bn7)
Trouble With the Curve; Sports Book of the Year; theatre awards

With Mark Lawson.

Dame Judi Dench, Danny Boyle and Simon Russell Beale were just some of the winners at last night's Evening Standard Theatre Awards. Despite the glamour of the ceremony, the mood was reflective, with speeches addressing proposed funding cuts to arts organisations. The night's winners reflect on the past year on stage.

Clint Eastwood returns to the big screen in baseball drama Trouble With The Curve. He plays a veteran scout on a last trip before retirement. Joining him on the journey is his daughter (Amy Adams) and the pair bond as they share the crucial talent spotting decisions that her father's entire career will be judged by. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh gives her verdict.

The winner of the William Hill Sports Book of the Year is announced today, from a varied shortlist which features cycling, the Isle of Man TT races, squash, Ironman, running, cricket and football. Each of the shortlisted authors discuss their subjects and the chair of the judges, John Inverdale, assesses the current state of sports writing in this country.

Producer Ellie Bury.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p09p6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Open Sesame: Science in the Desert (b01p0bn9)
SESAME will be the first big scientific laboratory in the Middle East. It's a synchrotron radiation source, which produces light at different wavelengths that is used by all kinds of scientists to understand the structure of everything from materials to viruses.

It is being built in Jordan and will bring together scientists from an extraordinary range of countries in the region, including Turkey, Iran, several Arab countries, and Israel. Apart from encouraging co-operation between hostile neighbours it also aims to stop the brain drain to Europe and the US.

BBC Science Editor David Shukman travels to the desert kingdom of Jordan to look at the construction of this multi-million pound instrument and asks whether this will help rekindle the region's Golden Age of science. And he asks if it will achieve its grand aim - to encourage cooperation between hostile neighbours and open a new path to peace.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b01nxwmt)
El Salvador's Gang Truce

In one of the most violent countries on earth, peace has broken out. In March, a truce was brokered between El Salvador's two most violent street gangs; they agreed to stop killing each other.

The Mara Salvatrucha and Barrio 18 are criminal outfits that trace their origins to Los Angeles. In the 1990s, older members were deported from the US and forged local 'branches' on the streets of El Salvador. Since the truce - brokered in prisons with the gangs' leaders - the murder rate of this small Central American nation (with the highest homicide rate in the world after Honduras) has been cut by more than half.

In Crossing Continents, Linda Pressly visits the imprisoned leaders of both gangs to find out how the deal was done. And she finds many Salvadorans are relieved. Now they can go out at night, and their children can play again on the streets. But the truce has not been without its critics. Should the state sponsor a non-aggression treaty between criminal organisations? And is there more to the agreement than Salvadorans are being told?

Many are asking if this is a sustainable peace. Some question whether the murder rate is really falling, alleging that actually the gangs are continuing to kill and hiding the corpses. Claudia thinks this is what happened to her son - a teenager associated with the Barrio 18 who disappeared last month after a local shooting. She says she knows he's dead. All she wants is the return of his body.

But for all the uncertainty, the gains are dramatic. Not only has the murder rate plummeted, but the number of public hospital emergency admissions in San Salvador for people injured by guns or knives has fallen by nearly two-thirds. Can the truce last? El Salvador is holding its breath.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01nxwn8)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. He talks to the scientists who are publishing their research in peer reviewed journals, and he discusses how that research is scrutinised and used by the scientific community, the media and the public. The programme also reflects how science affects our daily lives; from predicting natural disasters to the latest advances in cutting edge science like nanotechnology and stem cell research.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01p09p0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01p01fh)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01p0bnc)
The new Governor of the Bank of England will be Mark Carney - a surprise choice?

Egypt's constitutional crisis - will President Morsi relinquish any of his powers?

Investing in Burma - we have a special report.

With Philippa Thomas.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01p0bnf)
The Mighty Walzer

Episode 1

From the beginning Oliver Walzer is a natural - at ping-pong. Even with his improvised bat (the Collins Classic edition of 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde') he can chop, flick, half-volley like a champion.

At sex he is not so natural, being shy and frightened of women. But with tuition from Sheeny Waxman, fellow member of the Akiva Social Club Table Tennis team, his game improves. And while the Akiva boys teach him everything he needs to know about ping-pong, his father Joel Walzer teaches him everything there is to know about 'swag'.

Unabashedly autobiographical, this is a hilarious and heartbreaking story of one man's coming of age in 1950's Manchester.

Howard Jacobson won the Mann Booker in 2010 for "The Finkler Question", but this is his masterpiece.

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b01p0bnh)
Series 1

Brinsley Forde (the B-Side)

John Wilson continues the series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios, each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Having discussed the making of New Chapter, the third album from the UK reggae group, Aswad, Brinsley Forde responds to questions from the audience and performs live versions of some to the tracks from the album which was released more than three decades ago.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4, where a new series of Mastertapes began on 11th November.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01p0bnk)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster.



TUESDAY 27 NOVEMBER 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01p01gb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01p09p2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01p01gd)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01p01gg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01p01gj)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01p01gl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01p0fp4)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with Church of Scotland Elder, Alison Twaddle.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01p0fp6)
As floods hit Britain after heavy rain, one scientist says British agriculture will have to rethink how it farms in response to climate change

A Lincolnshire sugar beet farmer tells Farming Today this is the worst year he can remember for flooding. Meanwhile in Somerset, the weather has even been too wet for the water loving willow.

There are 23 000 women farmers in the UK as opposed to virtually none a decade ago. Female farmer Sarah Petit says its because brawn has been replaced by brains for business.

Farming Today was presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01p0fp8)
Morning news and current affairs, with James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:

0750
Eurozone finance ministers and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have reached a deal on an urgently needed bailout for debt-laden Greece. Gerard Lyons, chief economist of Standard Chartered, and Constantine Michalos, president of the Athens Chamber of Commerce and Industry and president of the Union of Greek Business, outline what to expect from the agreement.

0810
For the first time there will be an Ofsted league table of schooling standards in Local Authorities and they also announce the creation of eight new regional directors to inspect and monitor progress at a local level. Sir Michael Wilshaw, who is presenting his first annual report and previously head teacher at the Mossborn Academy in London, explains what the reports hope to achieve.

0820
Why do many British acts sing in an American accent? Matilda Egere Cooper, music journalist, and Scottish musician Pat Kane analyse the apparent trend.

0833
The African Union will consider the deployment of an international force in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo after regional leaders met at the weekend to urge M23 rebels to end their military offensive and withdraw from Goma, an official said on Monday. Lord Malloch-Brown, former foreign and Commonwealth office minister, explains the UK's stance in the situation.

0842
Flooding is causing terrible problems in parts of the UK. The BBC's Hywel Griffiths reports from St Asaph in north Wales.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b01p0fpb)
Dutch Elm Disease and Ash Dieback

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme which looks at the past behind the present. This week he takes the Long View of tree disease in Britain by charting Dutch Elm Disease from its arrival in the 1920s until the 1970s. As Ash Dieback takes root in the countryside and is treated as a national emergency, Jonathan asks what lessons can be learned from the phenomenon and ensuing crisis of Dutch Elm Disease in the 20th century when 28 million trees were lost.

Produced by Neil McCarthy.


TUE 09:30 In Alistair Cooke's Footsteps (b01p0fpd)
Washington DC to New York

Alvin Hall concludes his trip through the USA revisiting Alistair Cooke's Letter from America. This week he travels to Washington DC to reflect on a letter about the war in Vietnam.

Letter from America was Alistair Cooke's weekly radio broadcast that ran continuously for 58 years on the BBC, from 1946 to 2004. The BBC will be making available the entire archive - over 900 programmes - on the Radio 4 website, from November 1st. Cooke had set himself a challenge that seemed deceptively simple: to explain the United States to Britain and the world. His Letters achieved that and more. He was an acute observer, a marvellous story teller, a man who loved America but saw it in intensely clear terms - a country that was both great and sometimes terribly flawed in its greatness.

All the major issues, all the significant stories were grist for his writer's mill. The Korean War and the Cold War, desegregation, the assassinations of the Kennedys and Martin Luther King, the fall of Nixon, the rise of Reaganomics, immigration, September 11 and the George W Bush presidency.

But eight years after his death are the Letters still relevant? For Alvin Hall, the answer is emphatically yes. Crisscrossing America he tests the insights and observations of Cooke on subjects as diverse as desegregation and jazz, the American Dream and immigration. And Hall discovers that Alistair Cooke remains as fresh and insightful as he ever was when he wrote and spoke over all those years about an America he loved and understood so well. Alvin Hall is an internationally renowned financial educator, television and radio broadcaster, bestselling author, and regular contributor to magazines, newspapers, and websites. He is an unabashed admirer of Alistair Cooke and Letter from America.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01p4ns5)
The Black Count

Episode 2

Tom Reiss's new biography about the novelist Alexandre Dumas' father reveals that he led a life of derring-do that is captured in his son's novels, The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers. Today, an opulent lifestyle is surrendered when the young gallant enlists in the French Army.

Read by Hugh Quarshie.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 The State of Welfare (b01p0fpg)
Seventy years ago William Beveridge wrote a report that was to lay the foundations for the welfare state. He identified the Five Giants that society needed to slay: Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness. Using archive from the time, Jane Garvey and Julian Worricker take us back to that extraordinary moment in wartime Britain that has proved so pivotal to the shape of the welfare state today. They discuss how well the system serves those who rely it on it now - and those who pay for it. Changing attitudes to those on benefits are reflected in a new BBC-commissioned poll and and we hear three radical visions for how welfare should be provided in the future. There'll be tough debate on fairness, entitlement, rights and compassion with Frank Field, Labour MP, the philosopher Roger Scruton and social commentator Polly Toynbee. The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Iain Duncan Smith will be challenged to outline the philosophy behind his decisions on reforming the welfare state, as well as responding to the views of contributors and listeners.

Producers:Elaine Lester, Sharmini Selvarajah
Editor:Andrew Smith.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01p01gn)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01p0fpj)
National and international news with Edward Stourton. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Letters from Germany (b01p3jwv)
Marina Schuster

Marina Schuster is a leading member of Germany's FDP Free Democratic Party; often compared to the Liberal Democrats in Britain. In her roll as party spokeswoman on human rights she has a keen interest in the way Germany is perceived in a global and European context.
In this, the second of Radio Four's 'Letters from Germany' Marina writes of her beliefs about the country she serves and the changes in that perception over the last year.

The European Economic crisis has been broadly portrayed as a tale of north versus south with the north, and particularly Germany, portrayed as either the frugal, hardworking nation forced to prop up its profligate southern neighbours, or as the heavy-handed bully forcing those same neighbours into yet more penury. With each developing twist, starting first in Greece and then Spain, Portugal and Italy, Germany has been the 'other' side. Pressure has built and attitudes have become stark and, much to the horror of many in Germany, old and ugly stereotypes have been unleashed. It reached something of a watershed during Chancellor Angela Merkel's recent visit to Athens with Nazi flags there to greet her.

In this series Radio Four invites a range of leading German figures, a writer, a politician, a churchwoman, a historian and an economist, to write a letter putting forward their notion of national identity and the version of Germany they believe should inform the views of their British and broader European partners.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01p0bn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01p0fpl)
Beryl: A Love Story on Two Wheels

As an ill child, Beryl Burton was told never to exercise. And then she met a young cyclist called Charlie: "The first year I pushed her, the second year I rode with her, and the third year she was at the head of the bunch".

Maxine Peake writes and stars in this true love story of Beryl Burton, a working class mum from Morley in Leeds who, with no financial backing or training, combined farm work with global domination in all areas of cycling competition from the 1950s to 1970s.

Drama is intertwined with contributions from Charlie Burton, now in his 80s, and their cycling champion daughter, Denise Burton Cole. Their perspective provides an intimate, funny and moving portrayal of Beryl, recorded on bikes in various locations around Saddleworth and in Harrogate.

Cast includes residents of Saddleworth as cyclists and Morley Club supporters

Contributors:
Charlie Burton
Denise Burton Cole

Sound Engineer Sound Designer: Eloise Whitmore
Assistant Producer: Cath Ames
Production Assistant: Claire Ennion
Executive Producer: Melanie Harris

Directed and produced by Justine Potter
A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b01p0fpn)
Helen Castor is joined in the studio by Dr Rhodri Hayward from Queen Mary University of London and Martin Ellis, Curator at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.

Listener Caroline Melliar Smith tells the heart-breaking story of how she discovered that her mother's sister had her son taken away from her and was locked up in a mental institution for life in the 1930's. Her aunt was suffering from post natal depression. Is this the tip of a family-history iceberg, or was Alex simply unlucky to miss out on new advances in psychiatry?

In Sussex, Tom Holland joins archaeologists working on what they are describing as a crime scene investigation. Nearly 100 years ago, a skull and jaw bone was found in a gravel pit in the village of Piltdown. The newspapers of the day claimed the discovery as evidence of a Darwinian missing link between apes and humans. By 1953 Piltdown Man was shown to be more of a schoolboy fraud. Dr Matt Pope from University College London sets out the facts of the case while, in Cheltenham, Dr Phil Toms explains how the use of a relatively new technique known as luminescent dating might help to deliver more detail of this ice-age site. Back in the studio, Helen Castor talks to Dr Miles Russell of Bournemouth University who, in a new book called "Piltdown Man - Case Closed", points a finger of suspicion at the person he thinks carried out a fraud which, for nearly 40 years, changed the history of human evolution.

Finally, in our regular Making Historians feature, TV's Michael Wood explains how comics, Ladybird books and what he saw as a slight on the reputation of the Anglo Saxons by a Second World War military hero led him into a career as an historian.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b01p0fpq)
Series 1

Ray Davies (the A-Side)

John Wilson continues with his new series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 5, A-side. 'Lola Versus Powerman And The Moneygoround, Part One' & 'Muswell Hillbillies' - Ray Davies goes back to the early 1970s and the making of two classic Kinks albums. Marking a period of transition for the group (as they left one British record label for an American one), both were concept albums, tackling such broad themes as corruption within the music industry and the destruction of old communities via urban regeneration. In a revealing interview, Ray Davies considers the power of the lyric and the importance of place in his song-writing. He also performs exclusive live versions of songs from the two albums.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 16:00 Care to Be a Nurse? (b01p0fps)
Christina Patterson explores why nursing sometimes goes wrong, and investigates what can be done to put it right.

After she herself experienced nursing at its worst, in 2011 Christina spoke out in a Radio 4 Four Thought talk. In this programme she follows up, investigating the extent of poor nursing, asking why it happens so often, and getting to the bottom of what can be done to improve it.

As she speaks to her fellow patients, healthcare experts, politicians, and doctors, nurses and managers across the NHS, Christina hears about everything from faulty training programmes to inadequate regulatory regimes. But could the solution be something simpler to describe and much harder to deliver?

Producer: Giles Edwards.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01p0fpv)
Frances O'Grady and Ruth Richardson

Frances O'Grady, General Secretary Designate of the TUC, brings 'the intellectual equivalent of a Hollywood weepie' as her choice of a good read. It's the powerful Booker prize-winning novel, 'The Gathering' by Irish novelist, Anne Enright. Meanwhile the medical historian Ruth Richardson chooses TS Eliot's landmark poem written in the shadow of the Second World War, 'Four Quartets'. The presenter Harriett Gilbert nominates a children's classic, 'The Box of Delights' by John Masefield.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01p0fz1)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Includes Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01p01gq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Bleak Expectations (b01p0fz3)
Series 5

A Re-Excited Life Made Distinctly Dangerous

The Victorian comedy adventure sees Pip and his friends travel to India in their quest to thwart the evil machinations of smooth but sinister genius Mr Gently Benevolent.

Gasp as our heroes struggle with super-intelligent tigers, giant snakes, and secret gin!

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ...... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ...... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ...... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ...... James Bachman
Clampvulture ...... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ...... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ...... Susy Kane
Viceroy Roy Weiss ...... Mark Evans

Producer: Gareth Edwards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01p0h5n)
David and Ruth are at the livestock show putting the finishing touches to Wiggo their prize Hereford steer. Despite being pipped to first prize by rival Peter Bennett and his impressive Angus, David gets a good price at auction. He and Ruth discuss Ed and Emma. They should have seen it coming and helped earlier. They agree not to insist on the notice period on Rickyard Cottage.
Emma tells Susan not to get George an expensive Christmas present. Ed wouldn't be happy and he's still blaming himself for their situation. Susan says he's made a real success of the business. It's only a blip. Kathy joins them and mentions Jamie and his tree surgery training. He loves it but is exhausted by the end of the day. Kathy thinks he'll be good at it but worries for his safety.
When David and Ruth commiserate with Eddie regarding Ed, he has no idea what's going on. It's all news to him. He goes to see Emma and Susan makes a hasty exit. Emma explains that Ed didn't want anyone to know they were moving out. Eddie can't understand why Ed didn't say something. He tells Emma to make sure Ed knows he and Clarrie are there for them.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01p0h5q)
Great Expectations; Bryan Ferry; Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong

With Mark Lawson.

Bryan Ferry discusses The Jazz Age, a new album of instrumental versions of his greatest hits including Love Is The Drug, Virginia Plain and Avalon.

Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong are the writing duo behind Channel 4 comedies Peep Show and Fresh Meat. In the week that Peep Show began its eighth series and the current series of Fresh Meat ends, they reflect on their unusual collaborative methods and the perils of getting to know the actors too well.

Helena Bonham Carter, Ralph Fiennes and Robbie Coltrane star a new film adaptation of Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, directed by Mike Newell. Rachel Cooke reviews.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p0h5s)
Baby Powder and Perfume

The Club Owner

By Janice Okoh. Everything is about sex. Except sex. Sex is about power. Or perhaps the lack of it. When a lap dancer fears she's being stalked by a regular punter and the local 'gentleman's' club faces closure, a small community is forced to confront its feelings on the sex industry.

Part 2. The Club Owner
Eddie struggles to keep his business afloat as the club comes under attack from all directions.

Director ..... Helen Perry.


TUE 20:00 The Hackers (b01p0h5v)
Governments do it, companies do it, criminals do it. But in recent years some of the highest profile computer hacks have come from so-called hacktivist groups. Each week hackers target a new organisation or government website. Many of these hacker activists claim to belong to the amorphous group known as Anonymous or an off-shoot of it. Their aim? To wrest control of the internet from states and big corporations and give it back to the people. Or simply to have fun.
The FBI, the Metropolitan police, the US Senate, Sony, PayPal and Visa have been some of the highest profile victims of the hackers. More often than not the attacks come in the form of DOS, or denial of service, attacks - effectively flooding websites with requests so that they crash. In some cases the hackers have managed to steal personal and financial records from the organisations and then post them online. Sometimes the reason given by the hackers for these attacks is as a response to official actions taken against Wikileaks or attempts by the authorities to close down certain websites, such as free music download sites.
The FBI and police have had some success in tracking down some of the hackers - many of them just teenagers.
In "The Hackers" Simon Cox delves into the strange world of hacktivism, as he tracks down some of these hackers and speaks to those trying to catch them.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01p0h5x)
Banking for beginners

Blindness for Beginners looks at the potential problems facing newly blind people when dealing with banking and monetary matters.
Peter White is joined by Diane Roworth CEO of York Blind and Partially-Sighted Society and David Clarke who is a bank manager for Clydesdale Bank.
They look at how to sort notes and coins; banking options; and gadgets to assist you with tasks including signing documents and telling the size of bank notes.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b01p0h5z)
Polygraph Testing for Sex Offenders

Mandatory polygraph tests for sex offenders could be introduced by the end of 2013, following a pilot trial in the Midlands was judged to be a success.

The controversial test is often called a "lie detector". It measures physiological arousal such as increased heart rate, respiration and sweating and the assumption is that these responses can be used to assess whether somebody's telling the truth or not.

In the pilot study, convicted sex offenders who'd served their sentence and were out on licence in the ecommunity, were judged to be more than twice as likely to admit to risky behaviour if they'd been given a polygraph test. The Ministry of Justice, subject to parliamentary time and approval, wants to roll out compulsory testing within 12 months in England and Wales.

Dr Jane Wood, a forensic psychologist from the University of Kent and one of the authors of the Midlands polygraph pilot evaluation, describes the results which so impressed the Ministry of Justice and then Claudia Hammond hears from both sides of the polygraph debate: Dr Sharon LeaI, from the International Centre for Forensic Research in Psychology at the University of Portsmouth, who criticises the lack of evidence around polygraph use and Don Grubin, Professor of Forensic Psychiatry at Newcastle University who says the polygraph can play an important role in the management of dangerous sex offenders.

Birdsong

Will the song of a blackbird make us happier than the caw of a crow ? These and other questions will be answered by Eleanor Ratcliffe from the University of Surrey who's studying the benefits of birdsong on our wellbeing and our behaviour.

The Psychology of Disfigurement

Our looks are our "social currency" so what happens when our appearance is radically altered by disfigurement ?

How people cope, psychologically, with dramatic changes to the way they look is the subject of a major new research project, and the results challenge many myths about who copes best.

"Time is a great healer", "women care about their looks more than men", "the more serious the disfigurement, the harder it is to cope", are all beliefs challenged in this new study.

Claudia Hammond hears one woman's story, academic researcher, Amanda Bates, about how she coped with her visible difference and she talks to Nichola Rumsey and Diana Harcourt from the Centre for Appearance Research in Bristol.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b01p0fpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01p01gs)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01p0h61)
Government's welfare-to-work programme condemned as "worse than doing nothing". Police say late Liberal MP, Cyril Smith, abused young boys in 1960s. And four more Tibetans set themselves on fire in escalating protest against Chinese rule. Presented by Robin Lustig.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01p1x0k)
The Mighty Walzer

Episode 2 of 10

From the beginning Oliver Walzer is a natural - at ping-pong. Even with his improvised bat (the Collins Classic edition of 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde') he can chop, flick, half-volley like a champion.

At sex he is not so natural, being shy and frightened of women. But with tuition from Sheeny Waxman, fellow member of the Akiva Social Club Table Tennis team, his game improves. And while the Akiva boys teach him everything he needs to know about ping-pong, his father Joel Walzer teaches him everything there is to know about 'swag'.

Unabashedly autobiographical, this is a hilarious and heartbreaking story of one man's coming of age in 1950's Manchester.

Howard Jacobson won the Mann Booker in 2010 for "The Finkler Question", but this is his masterpiece.

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b01p0bmz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01p0h63)
Susan Hulme with the day's top news stories from Westminster, where the Chairman of the BBC Trust, Lord Patten, was grilled by MPs over the size of the payoff for the former Director General George Entwistle. Also, should some NHS treatments be restricted to save money? And what the Governor of the Bank of England, Mervyn King, thinks of the man hired to replace him. Editor: Alan Soady.



WEDNESDAY 28 NOVEMBER 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01p01hm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01p4ns5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01p01hp)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01p01hr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01p01ht)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01p01hw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01p0hht)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with Church of Scotland Elder, Alison Twaddle.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01p0hhw)
Potato imports have doubled over the past couple of months following the worst harvest for 35 years. Industry experts say shoppers should expect to pay more for their spuds which have suffered after the drought and then weeks of heavy rain.

Meanwhile, Sarah Swadling catches up with farmer, John Hebditch as he surveys the parts of his land currently 6 feet under water. John, who farms on the flood plains on the Somerset levels says he expect the area to flood once in every 5 years, but it has been covered twice this year already.

And the wait is nearly over until the winner is announced for the BBC Farmer of the Year. Anna Hill recaps on this years fabulous farming nominees.

The programme is presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


WED 06:00 Today (b01p0hhy)
Morning news and current affairs, with James Naughtie and Justin Webb, featuring:

0810
Police say the late MP Sir Cyril Smith was a sex abuser of boys in the late 1960s. Vera Baird QC, who was solicitor general in the last Labour government, has just been elected as police and crime commissioner for Northumbria, and Alan Collins, from the law firm Pannone which represents men who say they were abused by Cyril Smith, examine the implications that this will have for historic cases.

0817
The prime minister will receive a copy of the Leveson report today. The BBC's political editor Nick Robinson outlines why the politics will be difficult when it is published tomorrow.

0820
Aviation enthusiasts looking for 36 Spitfires which they believe to have been buried at an airfield in Burma in 1945 believed they have located them. David Cundall, a Lincolnshire farmer, has been on the quest for these planes for 16 years, describes the search.

0834
The government is moving towards the minimum pricing of alcohol in England. A public consultation begins today, but ministers appear committed to the policy. Home Office minister Damien Green explains that the real argument is over the price - should it be 40p or 50p per unit?

0838
Today new rules are announced to limit the impact of so called "chuggers", or street fundraisers, on England's high streets. Sally de la Bedoyere, chief executive of the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association, and Marjorie Wallace, chief executive of the mental health charity Sane, discuss the impact of the new legislation.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01p0hj0)
Bill Kenwright, Joe Brown, Katrina van Grouw, Liam Carson

Libby Purves meets musician Joe Brown; theatre producer Bill Kenwright; artist and taxidermist Katrina van Grouw and writer Liam Carson.

Joe Brown MBE is one of the original rock 'n'roll stars to come out of the UK. Over the last five decades he has played guitar with Gene Vincent; Eddie Cochran and Johnny Cash and topped the charts with his band Joe Brown and the Bruvvers. His new album, 'The Ukulele Album', is a tribute to the instrument and includes his version of Pinball Wizard; Mr Blue Sky and The Ace of Spades. Joe Brown is currently touring the UK.

Bill Kenwright CBE is a leading West End theatre producer and film producer. He is also chairman of Everton Football Club. He is currently a judge on a new Sky Arts series, the Nation's Best Am Dram. During the course of the series amateur theatre groups compete to perform in the West End helped by celebrity mentors including Roger Allam; Richard Wilson and Dame Harriet Walter.

Katrina van Grouw is a fine artist; taxidermist and a former curator of the ornithological collections at the Natural History Museum. Her book, 'The Unfeathered Bird', features over 300 drawings representing 200 bird species. Each drawing is based on an actual specimen that she prepared. 'The Unfeathered Bird' is published by Princeton University Press.

Writer Liam Carson is the founder and director of the IMRAM Irish Language Literature Festival which showcases the Irish language in modern literature. In his memoir, 'Call Mother A Lonely Field', he writes about his father's love of language and the complex relationship between a son thinking in English and a father dreaming in Irish. 'Call Mother A Lonely Field' is published by Seren.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01p4ntb)
The Black Count

Episode 3

Tom Reiss's new biography about the novelist Alexandre Dumas' father reveals that he led life of derring-do that is captured in his son's great novels, The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers. Today, General Dumas proves himself on the battlefield and encounters Napoleon Bonaparte for the first time.

Read by Hugh Quarshie.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01p0hj2)
Heather Headley; Seven Deadly Sins

Heather Headley star of The Bodyguard musical. How are the Seven Deadly Sins viewed today? We discuss with author, Alex Clark.
Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Kirsty Starkey.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p0hj4)
Baby Powder and Perfume

Episode 3

By Janice Okoh. Everything is about sex. Except sex. Sex is about power. Or perhaps the lack of it. When a lap dancer fears she's being stalked by a regular punter and the local 'gentleman's' club faces closure, a small community is forced to admit their feelings on the sex industry.

Part 3. The Police Officer
Stuart wants to make a difference in the community. But is everything as black and white as he thinks?

Director ..... Helen Perry.


WED 11:00 The Goddess of English (b01p0hj6)
India has a new deity, the Goddess of English, worshipped by former Untouchables who see the language as their deliverer from poverty and ignorance. Zareer Masani investigates.

The English language and the educational legacies of the Raj are still hotly contested. Lord Macaulay, the 19th century imperialist who introduced Western education, is reviled by Indian nationalists. The term "Macaulay's Children" is still used by as a pejorative label for anglicised Indians.

Yet Macaulay's ideas have been enthusiastically adopted today by India's Dalits, the former 'Untouchables', For them, English is a liberating force. Their saviour from caste oppression is personified as a goddess, modelled on the Statue of Liberty, in a sari and mounted on a computer.

Zareer visits the elite Cathedral school, where he was a pupil, a English medium school for poorer people, and one that teaches in the local language, Marathi. Talking to teachers, students, business people and politicians, in classrooms, by the pool at the Willingdon club, and in a cramped Dalit flat, Zareer explores the education of upper-class "Macaulay children", and the hunger for English among poor Indians.

English is essential to upward mobility: politicians committed to education in indigenous languages send their own children to English medium schools. Servants spend half their salaries to get their children into these. Yet the teachers themselves might not speak English well. So, is a foreign language really the best medium of instruction for India's educational system? What is the impact on India's indigenous languages? Zareer ponders, too, whether English has now become as native to India as any of its own languages, in its vibrant Indianised form known as 'Hinglish'.

Producer: Julian May.


WED 11:30 Mr and Mrs Smith (b01bwp6g)
The Bathroom

Annabelle is annoyed because Will couldn't stand up to their over-enthusiastic builder. Will is furious at Annabelle for hiring the builder.

Guy mediates, but this week the counsellor has his own problems...

Will Smith's sitcom about a couple in marriage counselling.

Counsellor Guy must mediate another dispute between Will and Annabelle, with flashbacks to the events that spawned the argument, and by the end, the couple find marital equilibrium once more. Sort of.

Will Smith ..... Will Smith
Annabelle Smith ..... Sarah Hadland
Guy ..... Paterson Joseph
John ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Saskia, Sally ..... Susie Blake
Adam ..... Dan Tetsell
Claudia ..... Tracy Wiles

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01p0hj8)
The Great British Bake Off, dental charges and toll bridges

Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood from TV's 'The Great British Bake Off' talk about the state of British baking. We hear how people are being priced out of healthy eating and we're live at the BBC Good Food Show in Birmingham as the You and Yours Best Local Retailer finalists wait to hear if they're winners in Radio 4's Food and Farming Awards.

Also on today's programme:

Hundreds of boxing fans complain after a pay TV service fails on Ricky Hatton's fight night.

England's Chief Dental Officer explains how to avoid paying far too much for dental treatment.

We examine what plans for a minimum price of alcohol in England and Wales might mean in practise.

And with toll charges phased out on major road bridges across Scotland, is it at all realistic to suggest the same should happen elsewhere in the UK?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01p01hy)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01p0hjb)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Letters from Germany (b01p3jw4)
Michael Sturmer

The leading German historian Michael Stürmer is the third in Radio Four's series 'Letters from Germany' to write about his country's shifting image in the light of the current European economic crisis. Michael, a chief correspondent with Die Welt and at one time a speech writer for Chancellor Helmut Kohl, takes the broad view of Germany's position as seen from his towerblock Berlin office.

The European Economic crisis has been broadly portrayed as a tale of north versus south with the north, and particularly Germany, portrayed as either the frugal, hardworking nation forced to prop up its profligate southern neighbours, or as the heavy-handed bully forcing those same neighbours into yet more penury. With each developing twist, starting first in Greece and then Spain, Portugal and Italy, Germany has been the 'other' side. Pressure has built and attitudes have become stark and, much to the horror of many in Germany, old and ugly stereotypes have been unleashed. It reached something of a watershed during Chancellor Angela Merkel's recent visit to Athens with Nazi flags there to greet her.

In this series Radio Four invites a range of leading German figures, a writer, a politician, a churchwoman, a historian and an economist, to write a letter putting forward their notion of national identity and the version of Germany they believe should inform the views of their British and broader European partners.

Producer: Tom Alban.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01p0h5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01p0hjd)
The Healing of Sergei Rachmaninov

This latest biographical drama by Martyn Wade about the lives of composers tells the remarkable story behind the composition of Sergei Rachmaninov's celebrated and famous 2nd Piano Concerto.

When only 22, Rachmaninov composed his 1st Symphony and, having already established himself as a worthy successor to Tchaikovsky, he awaited its premiere with nervous anticipation. He was in a state of heightened emotion, having dedicated the piece to his lover Anna Lodyzhenskya, the wife of his best friend. His guilty passion for her inspired the work.

The composer Glazunov, who conducts the piece, is drunk and the premiere is a disaster. Rachmaninov is so distraught he fears he will never compose again. A long period of creative block and the impact on his relationship with Anna leave him with no faith in himself. But his cousin Natasha suggests a visit to a hypnotherapist who claims he can cure the composer and enable him to start work on the piece he most wants to compose next - a second piano concerto. Will the treatment work? The play explores an extraordinary period in the life of one of the great composers.

Writer: Martyn Wade
Director: Cherry Cookson
A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01p0hjg)
Floods

There are warnings Britain is facing a national flood crisis, after heavy rainfall across the country. The Environment Agency says more than 900 properties have been flooded during this latest period of bad weather. It's issued flood warning messages to hundreds of thousands of households in the past few days.

Many homes and businesses are counting the cost of the clean-up, whilst rail services are badly disrupted and many roads remain under water. In parts of Cornwall, insurers and surveyors have started assessing the damage.

But there's concern that around 200,000 homes could be left without flood cover next year when an agreement between the government and the Association of British Insurers runs out in June.

If you're affected by the flooding and need answers to your questions, Money Box Live is here for you.

Maybe your home or business has been flooded, what do you need to make an insurance claim?

Will your premiums go up next year?

What happens if vital documents have been destroyed by the floods?

What can you do to protect your property from future flooding?

Perhaps your employer's business has been flooded or left unsafe as a workplace. Are you still entitled to be paid?

If you'd like advice on the consequences of the floods, you can call Money Box Live. Ruth Alexander and a team of experts will answer your calls and emails on flooding. Email moneybox@bbc.co.uk now or call 03700 100 444. Lines open at 1pm, Wednesday.

The guests joining Ruth will be:

Aidan Kerr from the Association of British Insurers

Mary Dhonau, Chief Executive of the 'Know Your Flood Risk' campaign

Julia Durham from Citizens Advice

Producer, Sally Abrahams.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b01p0h5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01p0hnv)
Family funerals; red tape

Red Tape in India - a major new study by the renowned anthropologist, Akhil Gupta, seeks to understand why state bureaucracy hinders the fight against poverty in the world's third largest economy. Laurie Taylor hears about his ethnographic study among officials in charge of development programs in rural Uttar Pradesh. Why is it that the expansion of government programmes have failed to improve significantly the lives of the poorest? Fellow anthropologist, Dr Alpa Shah, joins the discussion. Also, the sociologist, Kate Woodthorpe explores how funeral arrangements illuminate the modern family.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01p0rpd)
Lobbying before Leveson

In today's programme with Steve Hewlett:

The Leveson report is now on the desk of David Cameron ahead of its publication tomorrow. As lobbying continues behind the scenes, The Media Show hears from John Whittingdale MP who is one of those signing a letter against statutory regulation today. He chairs the Commons Media Select Committee which has been looking into issues relating to phone hacking since the first prosecutions. Jurgen Kronig, president of the Foreign Press Association in London and correspondent for Germany's Die Zeit and Amy Chozick of the New York Times look at how the wider Leveson story's being reported abroad. Martin Moore of the Media Standards Trust responds to last week's Media Show interview with Lord Black and explains the MST's argument for statutory support of regulation. Dan Sabbagh of the Guardian reports on last minute negotiations between newspapers to present a more united front on press regulation and looks at the other areas Lord Justice Leveson is likely to cover tomorrow.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01p0rpg)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01p01j2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b01p0rpj)
Series 4

Whitehaven

Comedian Mark Steel returns with a new series, looking under the surface of some of the UK's more distinctive towns to shed some light on the people, history, rivalries, slang, traditions, and eccentricities that makes them unique.

Creating a bespoke stand-up set for each town, Mark performs the show in front of a local audience.

As well as examining the less visited areas of Britain, Mark uncovers stories and experiences that resonate with us all as we recognise the quirkiness of the British way of life and the rich tapestry of remarkable events and people who have shaped where we live.

During this 4th series of 'Mark Steel's In Town', Mark will visit Tobermory, Whitehaven, Handsworth, Ottery St Mary, Corby, and Chipping Norton.

This week, Mark visits Whitehaven, to discuss surrealist pirates, the dubious origins of rum butter, and the unreassuring link between rugby and nuclear power. From November 2012.

Additional material by Pete Sinclair.
Produced by Sam Bryant.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01p0s0q)
Vicky appreciates Mike's support at antenatal class. He feels old, but Vicky says he's the best husband in the room. He'll soon be the best dad too. Vicky remarks how kind everyone's being - including Tom, who's stocking them up with his ready meals. They practice breathing and Vicky can't do it for giggling.

James and Matt fend for themselves, with Lilian apparently shopping in Birmingham. Matt's surprised she's not there. He knows Lilian's upset about Arthur but can't see why she's taking it out on him.

Over a lovely pub lunch with Paul, Lilian pours her heart out over Matt's intransigence and lack of understanding. She feels awful about the unfortunate situation with the Walters. Paul thinks Matt takes Lilian for granted. If she and Paul were a team, they'd have a lot more fun. Lilian feels much better for talking to him, and as they become more intimate Lilian suggests they go up to Paul's room. Paul checks that she's certain - oh yes, she is.

Back at home, Matt's apologetic and attentive. He thinks things are going to be different now. Guilty Lilian says she just doesn't know where she is with him any more.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01p0s0s)
Daniel Radcliffe in A Young Doctor's Notebook, Oliver Sacks, the Hunt

With Mark Lawson.

Daniel Radcliffe and John Hamm star in A Young Doctor's Notebook, a new four-part TV comedy drama based on a collection of short stories by the celebrated Russian writer Mikhail Bulgakov. Including graphic scenes, the series is partly based on the author's experiences as a young country doctor working at the dawn of the Russian Revolution in 1917. Leading neurosurgeon Henry Marsh reviews.

Oliver Sacks' seminal 1985 book The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat described some of the most intriguing case histories he encountered through his work in neurology. Sacks discusses his latest book Hallucinations, a collection of mind-altering episodes experienced by his patients and himself.

The Danish director of Festen, Thomas Vinterberg, has returned to the controversial subject of child abuse for his latest film. The Hunt is the story of a primary school teacher who is accused of exposing himself to one of his pupils and is subsequently ostracized by his friends and community, even though there is no real proof of a crime. Briony Hanson delivers her verdict.

And as Antony Gormley fills the entire space at the White Cube gallery in south London with his vast new sculpture Model, created from 100 tons of weathering sheet steel, Mark and art critic Rachel Campbell Johnston explore the large-scale artwork.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p0hj4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b01p0s0v)
Rationing the NHS

In the week of the 70th anniversary of the Beveridge report that was to lay the foundations for the welfare state, a Conservative MP, who's also a practicing GP, says patients suffering from lifestyle-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes should pay for part of their care. And in a recent online poll more than half of the doctors who took part said smokers and the obese should be denied non-emergency treatment until they changed their lifestyles. We now spend over £90 billion a year on the NHS, but with more spending cuts likely in next week's Autumn Statement how much longer can we afford the principle that treatment should be based on need and be free at the point of delivery? When money is tight and demand for, and costs of health care are increasing, who should the NHS be for? Is it fair for those who look after their health to see their taxes being squandered on treatment for those whose poor health could be described as "self-inflicted". But exactly what is the definition of 'self-inflicted illnesses? Obesity? Alcoholism? And what of injuries sustained while playing sports? It's a moral minefield too - how does one decide which illness is the result of sheer self-indulgence, and which is the result of uncontrollable inner demons at play? And do we blame ourselves for the ills that befall us, or should society take the rap and pay the bill? Is the concept of deserving and un-deserving patients inherently immoral, or a healthy dose of reality? Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by David Aaronovitch with Kenan Malik, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Claire Fox. Witnesses: Dr Steve Davies - Education Director, Institute of Economic Affairs, Joyce Robbins - Patient Concern, Tam Fry - Spokesman for the National Obesity Forum; Chairman of the Child Growth Foundation, Dr Vivienne Nathanson - Director of Professional Activities at the British Medical Association.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01p0s0x)
Series 3

Sara Ziff: The Problem with Fashion

Model and activist Sara Ziff discusses the problems with fashion and modelling. Sara maintains that fashion modelling, far from being a glamorous profession, has a dark side. She argues that what links this dark side within the industry to its sometimes ugly public face is an unhealthy obsession with very young models.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b01p0s0z)
Brain Machine Interfaces

Can reading the mind allow us to use thought control to move artificial limbs?

Neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis, is one of the world's leading researchers into using the mind to control machines. One of his aims is to build a suit that a quadriplegic person can wear and control so that he or she can kick a football at the opening of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. His lab is working on ways of providing a sense of touch to these limbs so that the prosthetics feel more like a part of a person's body and less like an artificial appendage.
Geoff Watts visits Nicolelis' laboratory to see just how near we are to achieving his aim on the football pitch.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01p0hj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01p01j4)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01p0s11)
National and international news and analysis presented by Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01p1xkh)
The Mighty Walzer

Episode 3 of 10

From the beginning Oliver Walzer is a natural - at ping-pong. Even with his improvised bat (the Collins Classic edition of 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde') he can chop, flick, half-volley like a champion.

At sex he is not so natural, being shy and frightened of women. But with tuition from Sheeny Waxman, fellow member of the Akiva Social Club Table Tennis team, his game improves. And while the Akiva boys teach him everything he needs to know about ping-pong, his father Joel Walzer teaches him everything there is to know about 'swag'.

Unabashedly autobiographical, this is a hilarious and heartbreaking story of one man's coming of age in 1950's Manchester.

Howard Jacobson won the Mann Booker in 2010 for "The Finkler Question", but this is his masterpiece.

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Warhorses of Letters (b01p0s13)
Series 2

Episode 1

The romantic correspondence between two of history's most important horses: Napoleon's mount Marengo and the Duke of Wellington's own Copenhagen.

This second series picks up the story of the two lovers sundered by fate as Napoleon returns from Elba. Their letters speak eloquently of love, loss, jealousy and nuts.

Marengo ..... Stephen Fry
Copenhagen ..... Daniel Rigby
Narrator ..... Tamsin Greig

Written by Marie Phillips and Robbie Hudson.

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


WED 23:15 Mission Improbable (b01p0s15)
Series 1

Jungle!

A series of fast-paced mini-adventures written by and starring Anna Emerson, Lizzie Bates and Catriona Knox, known collectively as The Boom Jennies.

Prompted by the pine-fresh fragrance of zoo keeper Amelia's new perfume, adventure journalist Jane is reminded of a story her uncle Norman once told her about a rare midnight orchid found only in the Guatemalan jungle. This is no ordinary flower, but one that gives off a scent with such aphrodisiac properties it makes the person wielding it utterly irresistible.

That's more than enough to convince perennial singleton Lucy that it is high time they all headed to South America. There follows a roller coaster ride of an adventure taking in waterfalls, crocodiles and a gang of ruthless drug smugglers. But our heroes remain unbowed.

Each and every challenge thrown at them is met head-on with courage, determination and deeply inappropriate footwear.

Jane.................Catriona Knox
Lucy.................Lizzie Bates
Amelia..............Anna Emerson
Norman.............Paul Ryan

Written by Anna Emerson, Lizzie Bates and Catriona Knox

Audio production by Matt Katz

Produced by Dave Lamb and Richie Webb

A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in November 2012.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01p0s17)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster, including a clash at Prime Minister's Questions over the government's welfare to work programme. Also, a peer suggests the campaign for Scottish independence could be dealt a blow by some EU countries. Plus, the scene is set for the release of the Leveson report into press standards. And details of what happened when a government minister took questions from Twitter users. Editor: Alan Soady.



THURSDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01p01jz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01p4ntb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01p01k1)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01p01k3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01p01k5)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01p01k7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01p0s9l)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with Church of Scotland Elder, Alison Twaddle.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01p0s9n)
The winner of the 'Farming Today' Farmer of the year is revealed.

Guy Watson ,who runs the largest organic veg box scheme in the UK, takes first prize.

Judges Adam Henson and Christine Tacon praise Guy's passion for the vegetables he grows and his love for seasonal food.

Farming Today was presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


THU 06:00 Today (b01p0s9q)
Morning news and current affairs, with James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:

0810
Lord Justice Leveson will publish his report today. Chris Jefferies, who was wrongly arrested for the murder of Joanna Yates, and won damages from a number of newspapers calls for a stronger, independent press regulator with investigative powers. George Eustice, a Conservative MP and one of the 40 MPs who have signed a letter urging the prime minister to implement all the Leveson recommendations, and David Blunkett, the former Labour home secretary who is part of a cross-party group arguing against any kind of statutory regulation, analyse what will come of the publication of the report.

0820
The famous Barbary Macaque monkeys of Gibraltar are starting to bite people and get cross when they do not get enough chocolate. Dr John Cortes, Gibraltar's minister for the environment, explains how the monkeys are being returned to nature.

0824
Germany is a country which is changing, with many tensions as its composition morphs through immigration. Khu Pham was born in Berlin in 1982, the daughter of immigrants from Vietnam who fled the war there. She has written a book called The New Germans. She explains how many Germans still do not believe she is one of them.

0833
There are fears that the Egyptian revolution is being hijacked. The BBC's Cairo correspondent, Jon Leyne, reports from Tahrir Square on whether Egypt is heading in the same post-revolution direction as Iran.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01p0s9s)
Crystallography

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the history of crystallography, the study of crystals and their structure. The discovery in the early 20th century that X-rays could be diffracted by a crystal revolutionised our knowledge of materials. This crystal technology has touched most people's lives, thanks to the vital role it plays in diverse scientific disciplines - from physics and chemistry, to molecular biology and mineralogy. To date, 28 Nobel Prizes have been awarded to scientists working with X-ray crystallography, an indication of its crucial importance.

The history of crystallography began with the work of Johannes Kepler in the 17th century, but perhaps the most crucial leap in understanding came with the work of the father-and-son team the Braggs in 1912. They built on the work of the German physicist Max von Laue who had proved that X-rays are a form of light waves and that it was possible to scatter these rays using a crystal. The Braggs undertook seminal experiments which transformed our perception of crystals and their atomic arrangements, and led to some of the most significant scientific findings of the last century - such as revealing the structure of DNA.

With:

Judith Howard
Director of the Biophysical Sciences Institute and Professor of Chemistry at the University of Durham

Chris Hammond
Life Fellow in Material Science at the University of Leeds

Mike Glazer
Emeritus Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford and Visiting Professor of Physics at the University of Warwick

Producer: Natalia Fernandez.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01p4nwb)
The Black Count

Episode 4

Tom Reiss's new biography about the novelist Alexandre Dumas' father reveals that he led life of derring-do that is captured in his son's novels, The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers. Today, General Dumas accompanies Napoleon on his ill-fated expedition to Egypt.

Read by Hugh Quarshie.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01p0s9v)
Lady MacMillan; Maeve Binchy's A Week in Winter; women in prison

Lady MacMillan on her life with the choreographer Sir Kenneth MacMillan and on his legacy of ballets. Maeve Binchy's last book, A Week in Winter - we speak to her agent for more than thirty years, Christine Green. Women in prison, after years of proposed reform, is enough being done to safeguard vulnerable non-violent prisoners? We talk to Juliet Lyon of the Prison Reform Trust and Dame Elish Angiolini, the former Lord Advocate of Scotland. And the Woman's Hour Power List: Charlotte Smith tells us about the powerful women in rural affairs, food production and farming.
Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Steven Williams.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p0s9x)
Baby Powder and Perfume

The Punter's Wife

By Janice Okoh. Everything is about sex. Except sex. Sex is about power. Or perhaps the lack of it. When a lap dancer fears she's being stalked by a regular punter and the local 'gentleman's' club faces closure, a small community is forced to admit their feelings on the sex industry.

Part 4. The Punter's Wife
Rani knows her husband loves her. But she not's sure if she can ever be the type of woman he desires.

Director ..... Helen Perry.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01p0s9z)
The Mystery of South Africa's Missing Textbooks

Many schoolchildren in South Africa's northern Limpopo province have gone for months without school textbooks. There was money to buy them. There was also a contract to deliver the books. Yet they didn't arrive. Students and parents are furious with politicians of the governing ANC - and say the problem is due to mismanagement and corruption. They say the issue typifies the faults of the political system, and that their children have been the victims. Rob Walker investigates the mystery of the missing textbooks.


THU 11:30 The Beat Hotel (b01p0sb1)
Think of American writers in Paris and the chances are the first people to come to mind are the Lost Generation of the 1920s - Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Stein and friends. But a period every bit as significant in the development of American letters and the culture more broadly is often overlooked.

Professor Andrew Hussey tells the story of how a dirty, run-down hotel in the medieval heart of Paris became in the late 1950s and early 1960s a bohemian mecca, attracting some of the most important figures of the Beat Generation. And not only did those individuals live there, they also thrived among the more liberal social attitudes than they'd grown up with in America, creating some of their most important work. Allen Ginsberg wrote much of Kaddish, William Burroughs completed Naked Lunch, Gregory Corso rote BOMB; it was here that the famous cut-up technique so important to Burroughs and so influential on modern culture was invented by Bryon Gysin, and also the place where the Dream Machine - a means of inducing drug free hallucinations - was developed by Burroughs' lover Ian Sommerville.

Andrew will also show that the Beats were much more engaged with their French surroundings than has previously been thought, meeting many of the most important European artists of the day and witnessing the frequent violence that the Algerian War brought with it to the streets in their immediate vicinity. He will make clear that the Beat movement - so often identified as strictly American in its focus - was in fact passionately internationalist and a key influence in global avant-garde political aesthetics.

Presenter: Professor Andrew Hussey
Producer: Geoff Bird.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01p0sb3)
Energy Bill, Prof Malcolm Harrington and fake electrical goods

Consumer news with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01p01k9)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01p0sb5)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01p0s0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01p0sb7)
Two Minutes Hate

By Kieran Prendiville

"The horrible thing about the two minutes hate was not that one was obliged to act a part, but, on the contrary, that it was impossible to avoid joining in. Within thirty seconds any pretence was always unnecessary. A hideous ecstasy of fear and vindictiveness, a desire to kill, to torture, to smash faces in with a sledgehammer, seemed to flow through the whole group of people like an electric current, turning one even against one's will into a grimacing, screaming lunatic" George Orwell, 1984

It isn't just the rich and famous who get super-injunctions. A small number of people in Britain, mostly on legal aid, have much more to lose from tabloid exposure than an expensive divorce.

This drama imagines what it is like to be the most hated woman in Britain - fearing the mob and the forces that will lead them to you. Two Minutes Hate explores the fault line between the public interest and the interest of the public.

The protagonist is a young woman whose partner murdered a child. She didn't believe he could do such a thing, which is why she gave him an alibi.

She is of course inspired by the real life Maxine Carr, girlfriend of Ian Huntley, the Soham murderer. As one broadsheet observed: "It is - and will remain - Carr's particular bad luck to have come to public attention at roughly the same time as Myra Hindley died: there was a gaping Hindley-shaped hole in the tabloids Two Minutes' hate slot, and they have simply used her to plug it".

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01p0sb9)
Atlantic College at 50

The 12th century St Donat's castle in South Wales was once home to media mogul William Randolph Hearst - subject of Citizen Kane. Fifty years ago it became the home of Atlantic College, a unique educational establishment bringing together students from around the world in the hope of promoting peace and understanding and to overcome the problems of the Cold War. Felicity Evans explores the campus grounds, meeting students past and present, to find out how an alternative education has influenced their lives. She asks how serving the community and working on the land - including running the organic farm and lifeboat unit - has helped shape their views and plans for the future.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01p03r6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01p0682)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01p0sbc)
This week Francine meets with Ralph Fiennes who, fresh from Skyfall, is now rattling his leg-irons as Magwitch in Mike Newell's Great Expectations.

Critic Ben Walters casts an eye over several films dealing with gay and transgender issues from Laurence Anyways and Keep the Lights On to the documentary, Call Me Kuchu, which paints a harsh picture of life as a homosexual in Uganda.

Then two go psycho in a motorhome in Ben Wheatley's Sightseers. Comedy duo Alice Lowe and Steve Oram on their horror flick about caravanning and rage.

And sticking with the outlandish, graphic novelist Alan Moore discusses his Northampton-style noir which he hopes will form a new model for filmmaking.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01p0sbf)
Dr Dave Reay analyses the latest Energy Bill statement by the Energy Secretary.

An expedition of scientists, helicopter pilots, chefs and engineers embark on a four month mission to eradicate the brown rat from South Georgia. Professor Tony Martin, the team's leader, will be talking to Quentin about how his team will spread rat bait across 94,000 hectares of land.

Olive oil could be used to preserve ancient stone buildings, like York Minster. Synchrotron X-ray methods are used to understand the protective powers of olive oil for stone. Dr Karen Wilson will be joining Quentin on the line from Cardiff.

Also, Quentin talks to Professor Martyn Poliakoff about the new "Romantic Chemistry" exhibition at the Royal Society. The exhibition looks at the most unusual elements discovered by Fellows of the Society during the Romantic period (1780-1825).


THU 17:00 PM (b01p0sbh)
vwith interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01p01kc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Andrew Lawrence: How Did We End Up Like This? (b01p0sbk)
Violence

Andrew Lawrence continues his comic explanation of our development via stand up, sketch and song.

This time, Andrew explores violence.

Sara Pascoe and Marek Larwood assist.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01p0sn8)
Roy tells Lewis that Shires are definitely interested in sponsorship, so fingers crossed. Meanwhile Roy will be busy preparing for the opening of Deck the Hall on Monday. Lewis has set up an ideas meeting for the staff, and Hayley and Bert are quick off the mark. Hayley's suggestion of a Lower Loxley passport scheme is well received. It would give people an incentive to come back, and spend more money. Lewis also likes Bert's idea of an historical exhibition based on real people from above and below stairs.

Jazzer thinks Jim's latest potential interview candidate looks dull, and they take a trip to the pub to get the creative juices flowing. An illuminating chat with Bert yields up Ifty as an interesting subject. Inspired, Jim gets the drinks in as thanks to Bert. Bert rubs salt in for Jazzer by pointing out that Rhys is off work and probably at Jaxx with Fallon.

Roy worries about Vicky still working. Hayley suggests having Mike and Vicky round tomorrow for supper. Before taking Abbie to Grey Gables to discuss the tree dressing with Caroline, Hayley has a chat with downcast Jazzer. Jazzer says Rhys had better treat Fallon right, or he'll have him to answer to.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01p0snb)
Roddy Doyle, Boris Godunov, The Staves, TV Drama The Fear

With Kirsty Lang,

Booker Prize-winning novelist Roddy Doyle talks about his new novella, Two Pints. It's a year's dialogue between two men in a Dublin pub over their pints. Beginning with the landmark Royal visit to Ireland in May 2011 and ending with the Paralympics last September, they set the world to rights and talk about the day's news.

Michael Boyd's last production as Artistic Director of the RSC is an adaptation of Pushkin's Boris Godunov. Theatre critic Andrew Dickson reviews the play and assesses Boyd's tenure.

The Staves are three singing sisters from Watford. They grew up singing harmonies around the kitchen table at home, and are on a sell-out UK tour. Jessica, Emily and Camilla Stavely-Taylor tell Kirsty how it all began.

Peter Mullan stars as Brighton crime-boss-turned-entrepreneur Richie Beckett in a new four-part Channel 4 TV drama The Fear, which chronicles the disintegration of a criminal mind. Crime writer Dreda Say Mitchell gives her verdict.

Producer Penny Murphy.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p0s9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01p0snd)
The Royal British Legion

The Royal British Legion is one of the UK's most iconic charities. It's known for its annual Poppy Appeal and the help it promises veterans of all ages. But former staff, including decorated officers, claim that a major restructuring will impede the Legion's ability to deliver the help that veterans expect. Angus Crawford talks to veterans, former Legion staff, and the charity's chief executive and asks whether the RBL, founded by First World War veterans, is equipped to face the challenges of the 21st century.


THU 20:30 In Business (b01p0sng)
Berlin: Start-Up City

Every city wants to become a high technology business hub, but ambitious entrepreneurs
from all over Europe are rushing to set up shop in Berlin. So-called Silicon Allee is fast
becoming a start-up rival to Silicon Roundabout in London. Peter Day finds out why.
Producer: Caroline Bayley.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b01p0snj)
Series 3

Sausage lichen; Turkmenistan; hen harriers

A very unusual lichen features in this week's programme. Brett Westwood travels to the Brecon Beacons to see the string of sausages lichen. While it is very noticeable in the countryside as it hangs from tree branches as long thin strands like uncombed and sparse straggly hair, its name comes from swellings that occur along the strands at intervals which give the appearance of sausages. Having declined due to industrial pollution, this lichen is now being spotted more regularly in locations in south Wales and there are hopes its fortunes are improving as it spreads east.

Mark Day has been to Turkmenistan this year as part of an international group of scientists invited by the Turkmenistan government to take part in expeditions and an international science conference to explore the Koytendag Nature Reserve. The Koytendag Nature Reserve (formerly known as the Kugitang Nature Reserve, established in 1986) is located in the Lebap province. The globally endangered markhor, a large wild mountain goat, is found in the reserve. The hope is that by exploring the area and its wildlife and through international co-operation, the area will gain worldwide recognition and protection for its unique landscapes, and the wealth of rare plants and animals found in Koytendag as well as bringing benefits to local communities through tourism. Amongst the high peaks, deep canyons and gorges Mark enjoys the sight of different species of vultures wheeling overhead and discovers important botanical sources of mulberry, wild almonds and pistachios.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

Presenter: Brett Westwood
Producer: Sheena Duncan.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01p0s9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01p01kf)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01p0t37)
Lord Justice Leveson's report on regulation of the British press: what form will the legislation take? UN votes in favour of Palestinian observer status; Rwanda's involvement in DRC. Tonight with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01p1y5s)
The Mighty Walzer

Episode 4 of 10

From the beginning Oliver Walzer is a natural - at ping-pong. Even with his improvised bat (the Collins Classic edition of 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde') he can chop, flick, half-volley like a champion.

At sex he is not so natural, being shy and frightened of women. But with tuition from Sheeny Waxman, fellow member of the Akiva Social Club Table Tennis team, his game improves. And while the Akiva boys teach him everything he needs to know about ping-pong, his father Joel Walzer teaches him everything there is to know about 'swag'.

Unabashedly autobiographical, this is a hilarious and heartbreaking story of one man's coming of age in 1950's Manchester.

Howard Jacobson won the Mann Booker in 2010 for "The Finkler Question", but this is his masterpiece.

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 The Headset Set (b01p0t39)
Series 2

Episode 5

Audience sketch show set in the world of a call centre called Smile5, a company that sells anything and everything. Bernie brings her dog in to the office and starts a craze.

Aleesha and other characters ..... Chizzy Akudolu
Bernie and other characters ..... Margaret-Cabourn Smith
Big Tony, Ralph and other characters ..... Colin Hoult
Sailesh, Bradley and other characters ..... Phaldut sharma

Writers ..... Various
Producer ..... Tilusha Ghelani.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01p0t3c)
David Cameron responds to the report of the Leveson Inquiry into newspaper standards. Rachel Byrne covers the Prime Minister's statement and the further reactions of Ed Miliband , Nick Clegg and other MPs to what Lord Justice Leveson recommends.
Also on this programme:
* Scottish National Party MPs complain about the language used by opponents of Scottish independence
* Alan Soady listens to the Energy Secretary Ed Davey as he maps out the Government's energy policy
* Kristiina Cooper reports on exchanges in the Lords on the problem of providing insurance for flood-damaged homes.



FRIDAY 30 NOVEMBER 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01p01l8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01p4nwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01p01lb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01p01ld)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01p01lg)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01p01lj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01p0vf2)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with Church of Scotland Elder, Alison Twaddle.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01p0vf4)
As Thanet District Council has backed down over its ban on controversial live animal exports from Ramsgate, we get reaction from the National Farmers' Union and an animal welfare charity.

For the first time, the genetic code of wheat has been sequenced in a way which can help plant breeders develop new varieties, with the potential to increase yield and reduce disease. Anna Hill meets one of the scientists that carried out the research.

And as the cost of this week's flooding begins to be counted, Caz Graham goes to the Eden Valley in Cumbria to see how farmers can play their part in reducing flooding by changing how they farm.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Polly Procter.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01p0vf6)
Morning news and current affairs, with John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including: 0749
Only 0.58% of the residents of Liberia have access to public electricity. Outside the capital city, public power is practically unheard of, just one of the very obvious results of the carnage caused to the country's infrastructure by the years of civil war. Today programme presenter Evan Davis reports on the difficulties this presents to those living and working there.

0810
Sir Brian Leveson's long awaited report has recommended a tougher form of self-regulation backed by legislation should be introduced to uphold press standards. Gerry McCann, father of Madeleine, and Culture Secretary Maria Miller give their reactions to the suggestions made by the report, and the BBC's political editor Nick Robinson comments.

0833
Scientists in Cambridge have developed a way of making stem cells from blood. Dr Amer Rana, of Cambridge University who carried out the research, explains how the new science could treat cardiovascular disease.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01p067p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01p4nxc)
The Black Count

Episode 5

Tom Reiss's new book reveals that the father of the writer, Alexandre Dumas, led a life of derring-do that is captured in his son's novels. Today, relief at escaping the rigours of campaigning in Egypt turns to disillusion on reaching the Neapolitan coast.

Read by Hugh Quarshie.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01p0vf8)
Love letters; Leveson Inquiry; fear of missing out; Power List - Expert Witness on female scientists, the police

Presented by Jenni Murray. Mick Jagger's old flame, Marsha Hunt, is about to auction at Sotheby's the love letters he wrote to her in the summer of 69. When love letters can come back to haunt you, is declaring your love in writing still worth the risk?
Feminist campaigners are closing in on the media - protesting against Page 3, offensive news coverage and the rarity of women on our screens and radios. What difference will the Leveson report make to the way the media treats women?
Unlike disciplines such as physics, chemistry or engineering, where female students are thin on the ground, the number of women and men earning undergraduate degrees in the life sciences is evenly balanced, a trend that carries on into the PhD phase. But as you move up the academic career ladder the less visible women become. Professor Nancy Rothwell discusses who are the women scientists in the top jobs.
And Jackie Malton, a former Detective Chief Inspector and the inspiration for the character of Jane Tennison in the TV drama Prime Suspect, considers how much power women wield in the police force?
Do you follow complete strangers on Twitter? Constantly update your Facebook status and insist on sleeping with your smartphone next to your pillow? If the answer is yes, then you might be suffering from FOMO - the fear of missing out. Jenni speaks to a FOMO addict who says that women are particularly prone to this habit.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p0vfb)
Baby Powder and Perfume

The Dancer

By Janice Okoh. Everything is about sex. Except sex. Sex is about power. Or perhaps the lack of it. When a lap dancer fears she's being stalked by a regular punter and the local 'gentleman's' club faces closure, a small community is forced to admit their feelings on the sex industry.

Part 5. The Dancer
Colette is forced to re-think her future career plans as her hopes and dreams are viciously challenged.

Director ..... Helen Perry.


FRI 11:00 Touchline Tales (b01p0vfd)
Series 3

Episode 1

Old friends Des Lynam and Christopher Matthew return with a third series of the programme in which they head to sporting venues, in order to enjoy, observe, reminisce and trade tales about some of the greatest pleasures in their lives. This time round, they muse and mutter during a training session at a boxing gym and they reminisce and recount their own experiences of Real Tennis during the British Open. But they begin the series amongst the youthful of a school rugby match at Rugby School.

As a commentator and friend of sporting stars, Des has a fund of stories to tell, and insights to reveal, about the men and women in professional sport - their lives, their characters, their training regimes, their triumphs and their disasters. But Christopher more than matches him with his own experiences as a lifelong spectator at the highest levels of sport (and, like Des, an occasional participant at the lowest), as well as with his observations on sporting events he finds himself attending for the first time.

Indeed, amusing, informative and entertaining talk between old friends is what these programmes are all about.

Recorded entirely on location, their extended discourses have been edited down to a seamless half hour - with each programme capturing the atmosphere, the passion, the frustration, the humour and, at times, the sheer quaintness, of entertainments regularly enjoyed by millions of people up and down the land.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


FRI 11:30 Polyoaks (b01p0vfg)
Series 2

Strange Dr Love

In the NHS satire by Dr. Phil Hammond and David Spicer, a general practice somewhere in Bristol is faced with challenges and opportunities in equal measure as they adjust to another 'biggest shake-up of the NHS in a lifetime'.

This week, Hugh is asked to chair a new government commission, so Polyoaks needs a locum. Practice Manager Betty, ever economic, appoints the cut-price option.

Everyone is relieved that curmudgeonly Hugh is out of the way, but Roy is suspicious of the interloper and Hugh's big political opportunity is not turning out quite the way he hoped.

Dr. Roy Thornton.....................Nigel Planer
Dr. Hugh Thornton..................Simon Greenall
TV's Dr. Jeremy........................David Westhead
Betty Crossfield.......................Jane Whittenshaw
Nurse Vera Duplessis..............Polly Frame
Mr. Devlin..................................Phil Cornwell
Dr. Derek Love..........................Darren Benedict
Mr. Oberman and Mr. Raisey......David Holt

Polyoaks is written by Dr. Phil Hammond and David Spicer
Directed by Frank Stirling
Produced by David Spicer
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 Food and Farming Awards (b01p0vfj)
BBC Food and Farming Awards 2012

Sheila Dillon and Valentine Warner present the 13th, annual, BBC Food & Farming Awards, featuring Angela Hartnett, Raymond Blanc, Paul Hollywood and Countryfile's Adam Henson.

Recorded at the BBC Good Food Show, inside the NEC, Birmingham, chefs, food writers and drinks experts announce the winners in nine different categories, from Best Street Food or Takeaway to Best Food Market.

The event was the climax of a six month search for the best of British food and drink and the event proved to be a rich mix of food stories are on offer. A perfect start to Christmas morning.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b01p0vfl)
Claudia and Isabella - Sisterly Hierarchy

Fi Glover hears a conversation between sisters Claudia and Izzy, recorded when Claudia was 11 and Izzy 10; they're close, but Claudia will always be the older sister.

This conversation was first broadcast on R4 on 30/11/2012.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01p01ll)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01p0vfn)
National and international news with Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Letters from Germany (b01p3jw6)
Margot Kaessmann

In the fourth of our series 'Letters from Germany' Prof Margot Käßmann the former Bishop of Hannover and one of the most senior figures in the German church, writes about her country and the way it is perceived.

The European Economic crisis has been broadly portrayed as a tale of north versus south with the north, and particularly Germany, portrayed as either the frugal, hardworking nation forced to prop up its profligate southern neighbours, or as the heavy-handed bully forcing those same neighbours into yet more penury. With each developing twist, starting first in Greece and then Spain, Portugal and Italy, Germany has been the 'other' side. Pressure has built and attitudes have become stark and, much to the horror of many in Germany, old and ugly stereotypes have been unleashed. It reached something of a watershed during Chancellor Angela Merkel's recent visit to Athens with Nazi flags there to greet her.

In this series Radio Four invites a range of leading German figures, a writer, a politician, a churchwoman, a historian and an economist, to write a letter putting forward their notion of national identity and the version of Germany they believe should inform the views of their British and broader European partners.

Producer: Tom Alban.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01p0sn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01p0vfq)
Series 5

At the Dawning

By Nick Warburton. Trevor Peacock stars as inspirational chef Warwick Hedges who runs an upmarket restaurant in the Cambridgeshire Fens with his son Jack. It's been raining for weeks and the river has risen to danger level.

Directed by Claire Grove

Trevor Peacock is a brilliant character actor best known as the bumbling Jim Trott in The Vicar of Dibley. At 81 he is still at the top of his game appearing alongside Maggie Smith, Tom Courtenay, Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins and Michael Gambon in Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut film Quartet. Other recent appearances include Much Ado About Nothing at the National Theatre, playing Stephen Fry's father in the TV series Kingdom and four series of On Mardle Fen for R4.

Nick Warburton won the Peter Tinniswood Award for the Best New Play on Radio. His series The Peoples Passion went out to great acclaim last Easter on R4. His afternoon play, Friday When It Rains (TX October), was Radio Times Choice. Nick dramatised 'Father and Son' and 'The Snow Goose' for R4's Classic Serial. His original radio plays include Our Late Supper with Marcia Warren. Other work includes 6 episodes of Thrush Green and Moonfleet for Radio 4. Plays for stage and radio include Conversation from the Engine Room, which won the 1985 BBC/Radio Times Award, The Messenger for Radio 3, an adaptation of Tolstoy's Resurrection, A Grove of Straight Trees (short-listed for the BBC/Radio Times Drama Award), and A Soldiers' Debt (entered for the Prix Italia).


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01p0vfs)
Oxfordshire

Chaired by Eric Robson, the GQT team is in Oxfordshire for this week. Taking the audience's questions are Pippa Greenwood, Matthew Wilson and Anne Swithinbank.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. I like colourful, blousy hanging baskets. I have given up using Busy Lizzies because of the virus and Petunias didn't work well. Can the panel suggest a flower I can use instead?

A. Pelargoniums, particularly ivy-leaved varieties, would do well in the wet weather, unlike Petunias. Plectranthus would offer a good combination in terms of foliage, as will Helichrysums. Balcon Geraniums are also suggested, as are Fuchsias, particularly from a specialist nursery.

Q. I have a 4-year-old Campsis growing on a south- and west-facing wall, but it hardly flowers. I prune in spring, feed with potash and improve the soil with compost. How can I improve flowering?

A. Campsis can be shy to flower. It is possible that the quality of the soil is too good or too nitrogen-rich, so restricting the roots and creating stress might prompt flowering.

Q. I have a potted greengage tree that I would like to transplant. When would be the best time and where in the garden would benefit it most?

A. A sheltered spot with a reasonable amount of sun will be best location. Autumn is a good time to transplant, but being in a container over winter could result in damage to the roots, so the sooner you can plant it out, the better.

Q. What is the best way of getting rid of Field Bindweed permanently? I have recently removed a hedge as a result of Bindweed?

A. The simplest (chemical) way to remove Bindweed is to use Glyphosate, applied in springtime during active growth. If you would prefer not to use chemicals, train newly emerging shoots up a bamboo cane, which will aid manual removal. Covering the area where the hedge was in black polythene will draw the bindweed roots to the surface to aid removal.

Q. I'm thinking of planting Sweet Woodruff in the dry shade under a trampoline. Do the panel have any other suggestions?

A. Geranium Nodosum or Lamiums would also do well in that environment. Alternatively you could sink the trampoline and plant ferns beneath it.

Q. I have an 18in tall Holly tree, which I would like to reach maturity but also want to remove 45 percent of its lower branches. Should I do this whilst it is growing, or once it has reached maturity?

A. Some can be removed when the plants are still quite small, but do not remove all of it at once as that could stunt the tree. This is best done gradually.

Q. I have what I think is a Rambling Rose. It has pretty, small, pink flowers, but the leaves and flowers only grow from around 2-3m up the stems. Is it possible to encourage growth lower down?

A. The best treatment for a Rambling Rose is to remove the oldest stems every year, aiming to remove all the original stems over a period of three years. Train some of the more flexible stems towards the horizontal, which improves flowering potential.

Q. My Robinia Pseudoacacia is slowly dying and losing its leaves. Why is this happening and what can I do?

A. This is probably the result of one of the Phytophthora soil-borne diseases and there is unfortunately nothing that can be done. The Robinia will need to be removed and should be replaced with something herbaceous rather than woody. Gleditsias, such as Gleditsia triacanthos Sunburst, are tougher than Robinias, but are from the same family so shouldn't be planted in the same spot. Ptelea Trifoliate 'Aurea', the Golden Hop Tree, is in a different family so might be worth trying.

Q. I have grown a Colocasia Esculenta from a tuber, which now has four shoots. How should I keep it over the winter, as I have an unheated greenhouse? Would it be possible to divide the plant?

A. Let it die right back and bring the pot of tubers inside the house. Keep then dry, but with occasional watering. Replant them in March or April and then move them outdoors when you can. You can split them at the point when you replant.

Q. We would like to adapt some of our allotment plots to allow the less able or active gardener to continue gardening as age begins to take its toll. Do the panel have any tips?

A. You could pair these gardeners with new allotment holders, which would be mutually beneficial. Also, you could offer a smaller-sized plot to both old and new members.

You could pair these gardener.


FRI 15:45 The BBC and All That (b01p0vfv)
Episode 2

Roger Eckersley was persuaded in 1923 to give up his loss-making chicken farm and join the newly formed BBC. He stayed there for the rest of his career, holding many positions including Director of Entertainment.

Eckersley's memoirs, The BBC and All That, published in the 1940s, include beautifully drawn descriptions of the first month in the now iconic Broadcasting House, after the BBC moved there in 1932 from Savoy Hill. He often smuggled in small groups of friends for unofficial tours of the hidden areas of the BBC, including drama studios, sound effects stores and the boiler room in the basement - his favourite.

He had a wonderfully unstuffy and rebellious nature - surprisingly appropriate for a BBC that was regarded by the Establishment of the time as an unruly upstart. He relished tales of being banned from broadcasting live football commentaries, so paying a string of eye-witnesses to leave the ground at regular intervals and give descriptions of the action they had just seen. He was part of the Pronunciation Committee when George Bernard Shaw and poet laureate Robert Bridges almost came to blows over the how to say "acoustic", and found himself in a discussion about jazz with Queen Mary during which, he learned from an appalled friend afterwards, he had persisted in calling her "My Dear".

The BBC and All That brings to life once more the feelings of awe and excitement experienced by the radio pioneers who worked within the walls of the brand new Broadcasting House.

Abridged and Produced by Neil Cargill

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 The Media Show (b01pgqss)
Lord Justice Leveson

First, last year, David Cameron called on Lord Justice Leveson to recommend a new regulatory system for the press. Then, yesterday, after he'd made his recommendations, Leveson LJ passed responsibility for the next steps back to the government - they, he said, must decide "who guards the guards". Where does that leave the industry, whose own plans for self-regulation were rejected by the inquiry? How much of the Leveson scheme can they accept and what can or should they now offer to meet the calls for independent self-regulation?

To explore the behind-the-scenes negotiations, Steve Hewlett talks to a range of editors tasked with finding a solution: Peter Wright, former editor of the Mail on Sunday, Chris Blackhurst, editor of The Independent, John Witherow, editor of the Sunday Times, Trevor Kavanagh, associate editor of The Sun and Anne Pickles, associate editor of The Cumberland News and the News and Star which are part of the Cumbrian Newspaper Group.

Producer Beverley Purcell.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b01p0vqp)
The art of polling, Kevin Pietersen, stacking lego

On More or Less this week Tim Harford looks at three polls carried out to gauge the public's opinion on press regulation gave vastly different answers despite being carried out by the same polling company. Tim talks to the Peter Kellner, President of online polling company YouGov.
Would you send Kevin Pietersen out to bat if your life depended on him scoring a century?
Have two thirds of millionaires really left the country as claimed by the Daily Telegraph this week?
What percentage of drinks might be affected by the introduction of a minimum price for alcohol.
And how high could you build a Lego tower before the bottom brick collapses? Ruth Alexander dons her safety goggles to find out?


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b01p0vqr)
Margaret and Marie-Therese - Brought Up By Nuns

Fi Glover presents a conversation between Margaret and Marie-Therese, friends since they met in a Belfast children's home run by Catholic nuns.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01p0vqt)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01p01ln)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b01p0vqw)
Series 38

Episode 4

Leveson Reports: in the week that Lord Justice Leveson released his hotly anticipated debut report on the media, Angela Barnes and Pippa Evans join Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and the team to look at the week's big stories. With Jon Holmes, Mitch Benn and Laura Shavin. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01p0vqy)
Ed tells Mike about the move from Rickyard Cottage. The cut in the milk price hasn't helped matters. Mike says there's nothing he could do about that. Mike's concerned to know that Ed's business is sound, and Eddie later reassures him it is.
Eddie and Joe see an opportunity in the tree dressing, which should mean less effort and still the chance to sell their turkeys and mistletoe. They pay Ed a visit and Ed susses out that Eddie's concerned. Eddie tells Ed how proud he is of what Ed has achieved. Eddie admits doing a lot wrong himself when he was younger - but he can see Ed's committed and hardworking.
Matt wants to talk properly and takes Lilian to lunch. He wants to fix things, but Lilian wonders if they can be fixed. She'd hoped things were going to be different after Paris, but Matt's still just focused on himself. Lilian brings up the Walters again. Matt promises to do everything just right for Joyce in her new flat. Lilian insists that she helps as she feels personally involved. Matt implores Lilian to stick with him and they'll be unstoppable. But Lilian's heard this before. She's not sure she can trust him any more. He promises her she can.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01p0vw2)
The Mouse and His Child; Sightseers; Robert Greene; Cecilia Bartoli

With Kirsty Lang.

Following the huge success of Matilda, the RSC has a new Christmas show for family audiences. The Mouse and His Child is based on a book by Russell Hoban, and features the adventures of two wind-up mice, a purple elephant, and Manny Rat who pursues the mice as they try to find their home. Writer Jamila Gavin reviews..

Writer Robert Greene has inspired rappers such as Jay-Z and 50 Cent and attracted hard-to-reach readers, including prisoners, with his best-selling books which reveal strategies to gain influence and power. Greene discusses whether he has mellowed with his new book which focuses on obtaining Mastery.

Mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli has established a reputation for releasing challenging material which doesn't follow the opera hits formula. Her latest release is Mission, an exploration of the life and work of largely forgotten Italian composer Agostino Steffani. She explains why Steffani merits revival and how writer Donna Leon became involved in the project.

A caravan trip around England turns into a killing spree in the bleak comedy film Sightseers, an unsettling mixture of Mike Leigh and Grand Guignol. Critic Natalie Haynes goes along for the ride.

Producer Ellie Bury.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01p0vfb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01p0vw4)
Pinner Parish Church, Middlesex

CORRECTION - Contrary to the statement made by Baroness Pauline Neville Jones in this edition of Any Questions we would like to clarify that Ed Richards, the Chief Executive of Ofcom, is not an active member of the Labour Party

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Pinner Parish Church in Pinner, in Middlesex. Guests include the Shadow Foreign Secretary Douglas Alexander MP, Business Secretary Vince Cable MP, Baroness Pauline Nevile Jones and Editor of The Spectator Fraser Nelson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01p0vw6)
Are students getting their money's worth?

Mary Beard reflects on why universities are being consumed by "customer satisfaction" surveys.

"When you're paying up to £9000 a year for the privilege of being at university, you want to make it pretty clear if you feel you're not getting your money's worth", she writes.

But the deluge of forms - asking students for their views on the content, presentation, organisation of the course and the quality of the handouts will - she argues, do little to improve "the learning experience".

She admits having a "tweak of nostalgia for that old era before the tick-box, when brave students would tell their famous professors to their face that their lectures were rubbish"!

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b019qblm)
Stephen Wakelam - The Jinx Element

by Stephen Wakelam

Edith Wharton's private life was as dramatic as many of her novels. An encounter with a journalist was to have a seismic effect on her marriage and her work.

Directed by Sally Avens

Pullitzer prize winning author Edith Wharton had a long career, which stretched over forty years and included the publication of more than forty books, many of which have been made into films including 'The House of Mirth'. A born storyteller her novels are justly celebrated for their vivid settings, satiric wit, ironic style, and moral seriousness. Her characters are often trapped in bad relationships or confining circumstances. Her own life stands as an example of the obstacles that a woman of her time and place had to overcome to find self-realization. Stephen Wakelam's play tells the story of Edith's affair with the journalist Morton Fullerton through the eyes of her friend and fellow writer Henry James. Age 47 Edith embarked upon a relationship which made her reassess her own marriage to Teddy Wharton, a platonic relationship that did not allow her to share her intellectual and artistic interests.

Stephen Wakelam has written many successful radio plays including 'Adulteries of a Provinical Wife' about Flaubert writing Madame Bovary and 'What I Think of My Husband' about Thomas Hardy.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01p01lq)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01p0vwq)
Tens of thousands of Egyptians have been protesting in Cairo against President Morsi and a new draft constitution approved by the country's Islamist-dominated parliament. Britain is to withhold millions of pounds of aid to Rwanda because of claims that it's helping rebels in the Democratic Republic of Congo. And thousands of people have signed a petition calling on David Cameron to implement in full the Leveson report. Presented by Philippa Thomas.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01p1xsy)
The Mighty Walzer

Episode 5

From the beginning Oliver Walzer is a natural - at ping-pong. Even with his improvised bat (the Collins Classic edition of 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde') he can chop, flick, half-volley like a champion.

At sex he is not so natural, being shy and frightened of women. But with tuition from Sheeny Waxman, fellow member of the Akiva Social Club Table Tennis team, his game improves. And while the Akiva boys teach him everything he needs to know about ping-pong, his father Joel Walzer teaches him everything there is to know about 'swag'.

Unabashedly autobiographical, this is a hilarious and heartbreaking story of one man's coming of age in 1950's Manchester.

Howard Jacobson won the Mann Booker in 2010 for "The Finkler Question", but this is his masterpiece.

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01p0fpv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01p0vxp)
Mark D'Arcy with the day's news stories from Westminster. MPs and Peers debate and mostly approve
a series of Private Members' Bills, including legislation to remove legal discrimination against people serving on juries or as Company Directors, or as Mps, on mental health grounds. Also in the programme: has the Government sold off the wreck of a famous battleship? Editor: Rachel Byrne.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b01p0vxr)
Gwen and Yumi - Chapter and Verse

Fi Glover presents a conversation between grandmother and granddaughter, Gwen and Yumi. Despite a 63 year age gap they love to talk... mainly about books.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01p09p6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01p09p6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01p0h5s)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01p0hj4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01p0hj4)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01p0s9x)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01p0s9x)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01p0vfb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01p0vfb)

55 and Over 11:30 MON (b01p09pb)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01p0fpv)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01p0fpv)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01ny0fr)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01p0vw6)

Alexandre Dumas - The Count of Monte Cristo 15:00 SUN (b01p0680)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b01p0h5z)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b01p0h5z)

Andrew Lawrence: How Did We End Up Like This? 18:30 THU (b01p0sbk)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01p02nf)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01ny0fp)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01p0vw4)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01p2wd0)

Astray 19:45 SUN (b01p07lf)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01p03qw)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01p03qw)

Bleak Expectations 18:30 TUE (b01p0fz3)

Blues Run the Game 15:30 SAT (b01nxh4s)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01p0bnf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01p1x0k)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01p1xkh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01p1y5s)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01p1xsy)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01nxzcb)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01p09p2)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01p09p2)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01p4ns5)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01p4ns5)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01p4ntb)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01p4ntb)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01p4nwb)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01p4nwb)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01p4nxc)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b01p0bmv)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01p067k)

Care to Be a Nurse? 16:00 TUE (b01p0fps)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01nx3pm)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b01nxwmt)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b01p0s9z)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01p067p)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01p067p)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01p0fpl)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01p0hjd)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01p0sb7)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01p0vfq)

Eddie Goes Country 10:30 SAT (b01p2w7d)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01p027n)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01p09nw)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01p0fp6)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01p0hhw)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01p0s9n)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01p0vf4)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01nxt2p)

Food and Farming Awards 12:00 FRI (b01p0vfj)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01p0s0x)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01p02n9)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01p0bn7)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01p0h5q)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01p0s0s)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01p0snb)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01p0vw2)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b01p0s0z)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01nxzcx)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01p0vfs)

Hardeep's Sunday Lunch 13:30 SUN (b01nx3ph)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:00 SUN (b01nxh2s)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b01p0bn3)

In Alistair Cooke's Footsteps 09:30 TUE (b01p0fpd)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b01nxxzl)

In Business 20:30 THU (b01p0sng)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01p0s9s)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01p0s9s)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01p0h5x)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01nxzd1)

Letters from Germany 13:45 MON (b01p09pj)

Letters from Germany 13:45 TUE (b01p3jwv)

Letters from Germany 13:45 WED (b01p3jw4)

Letters from Germany 13:45 FRI (b01p3jw6)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b01p03r0)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01p02sc)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b01p0fpn)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 WED (b01p0rpj)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b01p0bnh)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b01p0fpq)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01nxwn8)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01p0sbf)

McLevy 14:15 MON (b01p0bms)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01nxzb7)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01p01c4)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01p01dz)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01p01gb)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01p01hm)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01p01jz)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01p01l8)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01p0hj0)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01p0hj0)

Mission Improbable 23:15 WED (b01p0s15)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01p0hjg)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01p02nc)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01p02nc)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b01nxw2g)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b01p0s0v)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b01ny0fc)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b01p0vqp)

Mr and Mrs Smith 11:30 WED (b01bwp6g)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01nxzbh)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01p01cd)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01p01f7)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01p01gl)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01p01hw)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01p01k7)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01p01lj)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01p01cg)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01nxzbk)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01p01cl)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01p01cq)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01nxzc2)

News 13:00 SAT (b01nxzbt)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01p0682)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01p0682)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01nxwn4)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01p0sb9)

Open Sesame: Science in the Desert 20:00 MON (b01p0bn9)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01p02nk)

PM 17:00 MON (b01p0bn1)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01p0fz1)

PM 17:00 WED (b01p0rpg)

PM 17:00 THU (b01p0sbh)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01p0vqt)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01p0686)

Poetry Workshop 23:30 SAT (b01nx3rp)

Poetry Workshop 16:30 SUN (b01p0684)

Polyoaks 11:30 FRI (b01p0vfg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01ny0gg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01p09nt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01p0fp4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01p0hht)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01p0s9l)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01p0vf2)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b01p03b4)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01p03b4)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01p03b4)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01p03r6)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01p03r6)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01p03r6)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b01nxh1t)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01mnxxd)

Saturday Drama 21:00 FRI (b019qblm)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01p027s)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01p03b6)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b01p0snj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01nxzbc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01p01c8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01p01f3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01p01gg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01p01hr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01p01k3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01p01ld)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01nxzb9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01nxzbf)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01nxzbw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01p01c6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01p01cb)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01p01cv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01p01f1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01p01f5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01p01gd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01p01gj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01p01hp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01p01ht)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01p01k1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01p01k5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01p01lb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01p01lg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01nxzc0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01p01cz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01p01ff)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01p01gq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01p01j2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01p01kc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01p01ln)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01p03qy)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01p03qy)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01p09p0)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01p09p0)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01p067h)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01p03r4)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01p067m)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01p0688)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01p0688)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01p0bn5)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01p0bn5)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01p0h5n)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01p0h5n)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01p0s0q)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01p0s0q)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01p0sn8)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01p0sn8)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01p0vqy)

The BBC and All That 15:45 FRI (b01p0vfv)

The Beat Hotel 11:30 THU (b01p0sb1)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01nxwn6)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01p0sbc)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01p067r)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01p067r)

The Goddess of English 11:00 WED (b01p0hj6)

The Golden Age 19:15 SUN (b01p068b)

The Hackers 20:00 TUE (b01p0h5v)

The Headset Set 23:00 THU (b01p0t39)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b01p0bmz)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b01p0bmz)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b01p067y)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b01p0vfl)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b01p0vqr)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b01p0vxr)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b01p0fpb)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b01p0fpb)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01p0rpd)

The Media Show 16:00 FRI (b01pgqss)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b01ny0fh)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b01p0vqw)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01p0snd)

The State of Welfare 10:00 TUE (b01p0fpg)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01p02n7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01p067t)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01p0bnc)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01p0h61)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01p0s11)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01p0t37)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01p0vwq)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01nxw23)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01p0hnv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01p0bnk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01p0h63)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01p0s17)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01p0t3c)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01p0vxp)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01p027q)

Today 06:00 MON (b01p09ny)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01p0fp8)

Today 06:00 WED (b01p0hhy)

Today 06:00 THU (b01p0s9q)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01p0vf6)

Touchline Tales 11:00 FRI (b01p0vfd)

Vasily Grossman from the Frontline 00:30 SUN (b014m1pz)

Walking on Planet C 11:00 MON (b01p09p8)

Warhorses of Letters 23:00 WED (b01p0s13)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01nxzbm)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01nxzbp)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01nxzbr)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01nxzby)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01p01cj)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01p01cn)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01p01cs)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01p01cx)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01p01f9)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01p01fc)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01p01fh)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01p01gn)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01p01gs)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01p01hy)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01p01j4)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01p01k9)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01p01kf)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01p01ll)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01p01lq)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01p089g)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01p08bh)

When Harry Potter Met Frodo: The Strange World of Fan Fiction 16:00 MON (b01p0bmx)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01p02nh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01p09p4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01p0hj2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01p0s9v)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01p0vf8)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01p09pg)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01p0fpj)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01p0hjb)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01p0sb5)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01p0vfn)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01p09pd)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01p0hj8)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01p0sb3)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01ny0gj)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b01ny0gj)