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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 NOVEMBER 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01nlbzz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01nnfgk)
Tombstone

Episode 5

Mao's support of the system of communal kitchens exacerbates China's famine disaster. As the peasants give up their allotments and their livestock, they have no means of saving themselves when the kitchens run out of food and close down.

Read by David Yip.

Produced and abridged by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01nlc01)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01nlc03)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01nlc05)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01nlc07)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01nlc1g)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Canon Dr Sam Wells, vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01nlc1j)
"Tina's been walloped a fair few times"; we hear what it's like to work in a care home, and Your news is read by the BBC's North America Editor, Mark Mardell.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01nlc09)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01nlc0c)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01nl9p9)
Hicks Lodge/National Forest

Helen Mark visits Hicks Lodge, a restored open cast mine in Leicestershire, now a haven for wildlife, walkers and cyclists and other more unusual visitors. Over 100 different bird species have been recorded at Hicks Lodge, which is run by the Forestry Commission and is situated in young woodlands at the heart of the National Forest.

Helen meets Area Forester, Alan Dowell, to find out more about Hicks Lodge and the various walking routes and cycle trails that are available and joins local cyclist, Marc Stapleford for a bike ride through the site of what is now the National Forest Cycle Centre. Helen also hears from Chief Executive of the National Forest, Sophie Churchill, about the background to the Forest itself which covers 200 square miles of Leicestershire, Derbyshire and Staffordshire. They are joined by retired Geography teacher, Dot Morson, and one of her former pupils, Mark Knight. Both are local residents who have seen the landscape around them transformed over the years. And
Stuart Malcolmson and Racheal Bailey of the National Forest Mushing Team give Helen a lesson in dog sledding - one of the more unusual pastimes to be found on the site of a former open cast mine!

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01nnw7r)
Farming Today This Week

A fungus by the name of chalara fraxinea has devastated ash tree populations in parts of Europe. The disease, also known as ash dieback, has now been found in the wild woodlands of Britain. In Farming Today This Week, Anna Hill goes to Wytham Woods in Oxfordshire, an ancient woodland and research wood where there is great concern that this disease threatens its ash trees - the most common tree on the site.

Anna is joined by Clive Brasier, an independent forest pathologist and geneticist, and by Sarah Gurr, Professor of Molecular Plant Pathology at Oxford University.

Anna also goes on a search for dieback with the Forestry Commission's Ben Hogben, sees an infected tree for herself in Norwich and, with the spotlight now on the international trade in plants, hears a report from a nursery in Devon that still grows its own ash.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Rich Ward.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01nlc0f)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01nnw7t)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Evan Davis. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01nnw7w)
Jan Ravens and Charley Pride's Inheritance Tracks

Richard Coles and JP Devlin with actress and impressionist Jan Ravens

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 GI Britain (b01nnw7y)
Episode 1

Based on new interviews with surviving GI's and their brides, and more than 150 archive interviews from both the Imperial War Museum and the National Library of Congress, Martha Kearney presents the first of two programmes exploring the wartime GI years and their social and cultural impact.

Marking the 70th anniversary, Martha tells the story of how the number of American servicemen based in the UK grew to more than 1.5 million from the start of 1942 through to 1944. The programme evaluates the military importance of the GI's, the integration of British and American troops and the sometimes difficult relationship between their commanders.

The arrival of large numbers of ebullient young men from an alien culture inevitably made a huge impression on British society. For many Britons the GI's were 'over sexed, over paid and over here' and misunderstandings on both sides frequently led to tension and hostility.

Racial tensions sometimes spilled over into violence, notably at the so-called Battle of Bamber Bridge in 1943 when Black and White GI's fought in the streets of the village near Preston.

The programme evokes Rainbow Corner, the American Red Cross Club near London's Piccadilly Circus where servicemen went for food, entertainment or even just a hot shower. Luxuries were available there of which most Britons could only dream.

In the aftermath of VE day, it is believed that around 70,000 British girls married American GI's with many girls emigrating immediately. Unofficial estimates also suggest that around 9,000 illegitimate children were born after the war as a result of relationships with serving GI's.

Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01nnw80)
Andrew Pierce of the Daily Mail looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

It's not what any prime minister could want. A few weeks before he sets off to a summit with other European leaders, his backbenchers defeat him in the Commons. They combined with Labour to demand David Cameron insists on a real-terms cut to the EU Budget - not a mere freeze as looks much more likely.

Here the Conservative rebel, Sarah Wollaston, says her constituents are sick of wasteful spending by the EU. But the former Lib Dem leader, Sir Menzies Campbell, draws a comparison between the position of David Cameron and the fate of a predecessor at Number 10, John Major.

Many observers were surprised that Labour supported a rebel Tory amendment. Is the Opposition's position on Europe hardening ? Or were they just taking political advantage? Labour MP Frank Field is a long-term Eurosceptic. His colleague, Keith Vaz, used to be the Minister for Europe. Here they look to the future.

There've been some stunning successes for MPs who wage particular parliamentary campaigns. Here, Labour's Andy Burnham tells the story of his involvement with the Hillsborough campaign. And the Conservative, Robert Halfon, describes his efforts to keep down the cost of fuel.

Finally, the Liberal Democrat, John Thurso, outlines the options for a massive refurbishment of the Palace of Westminster which could see MPs and peers move to temporary accommodation for up to five years.

Peter Mulligan is the Editor.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01nnw82)
Sweet nostalgia - Yesterday's Greece and French chocolate

Despatches from correspondents across the globe, introduced by Kate Adie.
Will Ross describes the terror in Northern Nigeria as Boko Haram fights for an Islamic state, while the heavy-handed response of the security forces only inflames the conflict. Censorship, fear and fascism - Theopi Skarlatos tells us why Golden Dawn is becoming Greece's worst nightmare as she laments the vanishing of the Athens of her childhood. Shambolic India: business may be booming but Anu Anand is frustrated by frequent power cuts, broken toilets and burst balloons. Dave Edmonds explains why so many are happy to donate billions to Princeton in New Jersey, one of the world's richest universities. And Joanna Robertson on why the sweet-toothed French president reminds some of a small chocolate-covered bear.
Producer: Lucy Ash.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01nnw84)
Child Benefit, Car Insurance and Pension Projections

Child benefit cuts: Around a million families are being written to, to be told how their child benefit could be cut. In January, households where at least one person earns more than £50,000 will have child benefit effectively reduced or stopped. If you're the new partner of a divorced parent, the changes could affect your salary. Paul Lewis interviews the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, David Gauke and Lin Homer, HMRC chief executive and permanent secretary, about who will be affected and how.

Car insurance: Money Box has been hearing complaints about car insurers rolling on customers' policies for another 12 months - against their wishes. The practice of providing a customer with continuous cover, unless they cancel, is called "auto-renewal". The insurance industry says it keeps people covered - and on the right side of the law - if they forget to renew their insurance. But Money Box is hearing of cases where customers are being "auto-renewed" against their wishes - sometimes facing cancellation charges to get out of their old policies. Paul Lewis interviews Malcolm Tarling, from the Association of British Insurers.

Pension projections cut by FSA: Projected investment returns on pension plans must be reduced from 2014, according to the Financial Services Authority (FSA). The City regulator wants investment firms to show more realistic, and also less optimistic, potential returns than those currently used. It says this will reduce the chances of investors getting a "false impression" of the value of their potential future pensions. Pension firms are currently meant to give three different rates of return - 5%, 7% and 9% - and to revise them down if a product appears unlikely to achieve this. The new projection rates will be cut to 2%, 5% and 8%. Paul Lewis discusses the changes with Tom McPhail of Hargreaves Lansdowne.

The electrical retailer Comet went into administration on Friday, raising questions for its 6,600 staff and for customers awaiting deliveries. Its 236 branches are open today under the supervision of administrators Deloitte. Paul Lewis explains what to do about gift cards, vouchers, and deliveries.

Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b01nlblg)
Series 78

Episode 9

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. Panellists include Jeremy Hardy, Jo Brand and Lloyd Langford.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01nlc0h)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01nlc0k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01nlbxz)
School of Music, Cardiff University

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the political discussion and debate programme from the Cardiff School of Music at Cardiff University with Home Office Minister Jeremy Browne MP, his shadow, the labour MP Chris Bryant, Iron Maiden lead singer Bruce Dickinson who also runs Cardiff Aviation in the city and Leanne Wood the Leader of Plaid Cymru.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01nnw86)
A chance for Radio 4 listeners to have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions from Cardiff. Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet us using #bbcaq. Topics up for discussion include the EU budget vote - Labour voted with Tory rebels calling for a real cut in the EU budget. As the Government launches its Airport capacity inquiry - the audience heard the panel debate whether Cardiff Airport could become a hub or sixth runway for Heathrow. Is the coalition working? And the question of MPs expenses after the resignation of Denis MacShane.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01mnxtk)
The Martin Beck Killings

The Man Who Went Up in Smoke

by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö
Dramatised for radio by Katie Hims.

Having just arrived on a beautiful, remote island for his much-needed Summer break with his wife and young children, Detective Inspector Beck is summoned back to Stockholm, where he is sent on a seemingly pointless and unofficial mission to Budapest, in search of a missing journalist. It is only when Beck has pretty much given up on the case that the truth finally emerges.

Original Music composed by Elizabeth Purnell

Directed by Mary Peate.


SAT 15:45 Key Matters (b01hy2xt)
Series 3

E Major

In "Key Matters" Ivan Hewett explores the way in which different musical keys appear to have unique characteristics of their own. In this third programme, Ivan is joined by violinist, Professor Paul Robertson, to explore the bright and energetic key of E major. This key has traditionally been employed by composers for ecstatic music, such as Spring in Vivaldi's Four Seasons. But as Paul points out, sometimes a really great composer will take the key of E major and combine it with such subtle ideas, that the results become sublime, such as the slow movement of Schubert's String Quintet.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01nnw8b)
Weekend Woman's Hour

The launch of the Woman's Hour Power List. Jenni Murray talks to chair of the judges Eve Pollard about the search for the 100 most powerful women in the UK. DCI Caroline Goode Goode was the police officer who tracked down, arrested and prosecuted the killers of Banaz Mahmod, the victim of an honour killing. Banaz had been to the police five times to say that she believed she would be killed by her family after leaving her husband. Are foster children being denied normal family life through unnecessary restrictions on the decisions their carers can take? Julia Bradbury on Wainwright walks. Sophie Wright on how to avoid throwing away food, and cook well on a budget.
Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Emma Wallace.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01nnw8d)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01nnw8g)
Pricing

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan and his guests discuss the science of pricing goods and services. How do companies decide what to charge - and how much of it is educated guesswork as to what they can get away with?

In the studio are Roger Mavity, chief executive of the Conran Group; Rita Clifton, branding expert and former chairman of Interbrand; Scott Malkin, founder and chairman of Value Retail which owns the outlet shopping centre Bicester Village.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Innes Bowen.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01nlc0m)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01nlc0p)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nlc0r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01nnw8j)
Robert Bathurst, Huey Morgan, Diana Quick, Richard Smyth, Robin Ince and Joss Stone

Clive gets Cold Feet with actor Robert Bathurst, whose career has seen him Wild At Heart and who plays hapless landowner Sir Anthony Strallan, who jilted Lady Edith at the altar in 'Downton Abbey'. In his new play, Robert is the consultant to a patient convinced that a military dictator is his father in a darkly comic story touching on race, mental illness and 21st century British life. 'Blue/Orange' is on tour until Saturday 1st December.

Clive revisits Brideshead with actress Diana Quick and talks to her about playing Julia Flyte; the beautiful and mercurial belle of the Flyte clan in 'Brideshead Revisited'. Diana's now starring as 'Kettle', a selfish woman embroiled in a tale about a family facing the loss of their beloved French holiday home. 'Mother's Milk' is showing at cinemas from Friday 9th November.

Robin Ince shares some toilet humour with author and cartoonist Richard Smyth, whose book 'Bum Fodder: An Absorbing History of Toilet Paper', details the origin of the humble loo roll and how our ancestors coped without it. Richard also gets to the bottom of how toilet paper even played a part in British espionage during World War II.

Clive squares up to musician, broadcaster and native New Yorker Huey Morgan and talks to him about life as a DJ on BBC Radio 2 and 6 Music and his other job as rock 'n' roll Renaissance Man and Fun Lovin' Criminal. Huey's come a long way from the ladies man who twinkled his wise-guy way through his Fun Lovin' 90's and is now going solo. He performs 'Fall Into Me' from his debut solo album 'Say It To My Face'.

And more music from a lady who needs no introduction, Grammy Award-winning soul singer-songwriter Joss Stone performs 'Teardrops' from her album 'The Soul Sessions Volume 2'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01nnw8l)
Xi Jinping

In a few days a 59-year-old man will almost certainly ascend to one of the most powerful positions in the world. His name is Xi Jinping and the signs are he's about to become the President of China. There have been no debates, no campaign ads, and no forensic interviews. Getting a measure of the man is not easy. But in the course of this edition of Profile Tim Franks talk to some of those who have been closest to him.

Producer: Kai Wang.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01nnw8n)
Tom Sutcliffe and guests Ekow Eshun, Andreas Whittam Smith and Linda Grant offer sharp, critical discussion of the week's cultural events.

The much hyped Silver Lion winning film "The Master", directed by Paul Thomas Anderson and starring Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams comes under scrutiny. Set in post World War 2 America, it explores a familiar narrative trope, the relationship between master and pupil, but in a very unfamiliar and deeply cinematic way, and through the prism of a cult which bears many parallels with the Church of Scientology - of whom Tom Cruise is a member, and co-incidentally starred in an earlier film by the director, Magnolia

"Dear Life" by Alice Munro - winner of the Man Booker International Prize in 2009, a lifetime career award - is a new collection of short stories from the writer who has never written a novel, and whom other writers such as Jonathan Franzen and AS Byatt compare to Chekhov and Flaubert. Now 81, this collection may well be her last. It includes 14 short stories,as well as a postscript which contains four illuminating autobiographical pieces, from a writer who has always been reluctant to reveal much about her private life.

Lucy Kirkwood's new play NSFW premieres at the Royal Court Jerwood Theatre downstairs. NSFW is an acronym for Not Safe For Work and refers internet sites not thought suitable for office viewing. Set in the cut throat world media world, its a timely new comedy which exposes power games and privacy in the age of Photoshop and how they impact on gender politics. Starring Janie Dee and Julian Barratt, star of The Mighty Boosh.

Seduced by Art, Photography Past and Present at the National Gallery is the first exhibition to explore the historical link between fine art - including the Old Masters - and photography, foregrounding the work of great photographers from Julia Margaret Cameron and Roger Fenton to Rineke Dijkstra and Sam Taylor Wood. What is the connection between the history of painting, the earliest decades of photography and work by some of the most innovative photographers active today?

And a new adaptation of Charles Dickens's "Nicholas Nickleby" on BBC Daytime Television, "Nick Nickleby" starring Adrian Dunbar and Linda Bassett. A five-part adaptation, stripped across weekday afternoons, it has been updated to reflect concerns and questions about modern Britain. Dickens' exploration of corruption within private boarding schools is transposed to care-homes for the elderly. Just as Dickens did, the drama invites the audience to reflect on how the vulnerable suffer when the pursuit of profit is valued more than human kindness.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01nnw8t)
Tuning In

The press fulminated, the enthusiasts were frustrated, and the radio manufacturers fumed. Despite the fact that Marconi had invented radio before Queen Victoria had celebrated her Diamond Jubilee in 1897, radio in Britain took another 25 years to begin an official service to listeners. But when, on November 14th 1922 the British Broadcasting Company's station at Marconi House radiated to an awaiting nation "This is 2LO calling" for the first time under the company's name, it marked the start of the first and most distinguished public-service radio station in the world.

As part of the celebrations to mark nine decades of the BBC, historian Dominic Sandbrook explores the long and involved pre-BBC history of radio in Britain, how Britain's broadcaster got going and developed into an institution dedicated to entertainment, education and information, discovers why Australian diva Dame Nellie Melba was involved, and how the improbably-named Captain Plugge made his first commercial broadcast to Britain, sponsored by Selfridges department store, from the Eiffel Tower. From Marconi to Savoy Hill via an old army hut in Essex, the story of the early radio in Britain.

Producer: Simon Elmes.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01nkt24)
The Gothic Imagination

Frankenstein, part 1

A new production of Mary Shelley's heart-breaking modern myth of obsession, pride and the need for love.

While sailing through the Arctic wastes, Captain Walton picks up an unexpected passenger. Close to death the man begins to tell Walton his strange and terrible story. 1 of 2

Dramatised by Lucy Catherine.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01nlc0t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b01nl8gh)
The Morality of Drone Attacks

The RAF top brass were out on parade in Lincolnshire this Friday. At a time of defence cuts it was something for them to celebrate; the dust was being blown off one of its old formations. 13 Squadron RAF Waddington may not stir evocative Battle of Britain images, but in its own way this was modern warfare history in the making. The RAF has just doubled the number of Reaper drone aircraft it flies and for the first time they'll be controlled via satellite from this small base in rural Lincolnshire. The pilots will never have to face enemy fire; they won't even set foot in Afghanistan. It will all be done via a computer screen. As fate would have it, this all happened in the same week human rights lawyers launched an action to sue Foreign Secretary William Hague over the alleged use of UK intelligence in assisting US drone attacks in Pakistan. The case, at the High Court, was brought on behalf of Noor Khan, whose father was killed in a US unmanned drone strike which killed around 40 people at a tribal gathering. Since 2004, CIA drones have targeted suspected militants with missile strikes in the Pakistani tribal regions, killing thousands of people. The program is controversial because of questions about its legality, the number of civilians it has killed and its impact on Pakistan's sovereignty. And the drone campaign against al Qaeda is spreading to other countries as well, with 4 attacks in North Yemen this month, the latest on Sunday killing 3 people. To their supporters, drones are an extremely effective way of targeting our enemies; a just and proportionate response to terrorism protecting both civilian life and the life of our soldiers. Do the ends justify the means or are drone attacks immoral acts of assassination which have caused the deaths of hundreds of innocent civilians? Are drones inherently more moral or immoral than any other weapon? In the age of the drone do we need to re-draw the moral, ethical and legal principles of just war? The Moral Maze looks at the morality of drone attacks. Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Giles Fraser. Witnesses: Richard Kemp - Former Commander, British Forces in Afghanistan; former Chair, COBRA Intelligence Group, Chris Cole - Drone Wars UK, Dr Peter Lee - Senior Lecturer in Air Power Studies, King's College London Dept. War Studies, Paul Schulte - Non-Resident Senior Associate, Carnegie Europe & Carnegie Nuclear Policy, former civil servant at the MOD.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b01nl66z)
(9/12)
In Spain, why would Mr Kipling have preferred not only a sponge cake to a woman, but also a crown and a bull?

Tom Sutcliffe puts this and other mind-bending questions to the regulars from Wales and the Midlands, in the latest heat of the cryptic quiz. David Edwards and Myfanwy Alexander play for Wales, while the defending champions from the Midlands are Rosalind Miles and Stephen Maddock. There's a lot at stake, as whichever team wins today's contest may stand a strong chance of taking the Round Britain Quiz title for 2012.

Tom will also have the answer to the question he left unanswered at the end of last week's edition - and will be setting a new teaser for this week.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Return to Oasis (b01nkt28)
Benghazi, Tobruk, Tripoli - they are all places with resonance for a disappearing generation of British soldiers who fought in the western desert in the Second World War. This programme revisits a remarkable anthology of poems that grew out of the experiences of those that took part.

The Oasis anthology was edited by a group of soldier-poets in Cairo in 1943. Unlike their forbears, the poets of the First World War, none was above the rank of corporal. And the poems they gathered together represent the missing voices of war - the men and women from all branches of the services of the citizen army that fought its way from the Nile delta to Tunis.

The poetry evokes the boredom and the terrifying activity of war, the minutiae of daily life, the alien but beautiful environment of the desert, reflections on lost comrades and dead enemies, the purpose and the pointlessness of war.

The original print run of 5,000 copies quickly sold out. The war ended and people returned to their lives. Then in the late 1970s the surviving original editors came together again. They launched an appeal via the press for further unpublished poems. Manuscripts came in by the thousand. They were edited and combined with the original anthology in Return to Oasis, perhaps the most complete poetic account of the collective war experience.

Mike Greenwood returns to the western desert as veterans gather in El Alamein to mark the 70th anniversary of the campaign. He talks to military historian Julian Thompson and veterans to evoke a world at war in the western desert, discusses the Oasis anthology with poet Owen Sheers and professor of literature Antony Rowland - and we hear the poems in readings and archive.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 04 NOVEMBER 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01nnvz3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Casual Cruelty (b01np0zt)
Trial by Combat

Martin Jarvis directs Joanne Whalley in a tale of loneliness and mysterious pilfering at a humble boarding house - or is this actually a strange method of seeking companionship?

American author Shirley Jackson's work has been described as the 'literature of psychological suspense'. Writing from the 1940s into the 1960s, her style of 'creeping unease' was hugely popular, initially with readers of magazines such as Collier's, Good Housekeeping, Harper's, The New Republic, The New Yorker, and Woman's Home Companion.

After Jackson's early death in 1965, at the age of 48, her story collections began a marked revival of interest in her work. In recent years she has received increasing attention from literary critics and a new generation of readers. Her deceptively simple, apparently realistic style, often cloaking chilling or darkly hidden agendas, has influenced writers like Neil Gaiman, Stephen King and Nigel Kneale among others.

Director: Martin Jarvis

Producer: Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis & Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01nnvz5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01nnvz7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01nnvz9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01nnvzc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01np0zw)
The bells of St Thomas' Church, Norbury, Stockport.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01nnw8l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01nnvzf)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01np0zy)
This Is My Vigil

There are many different types of vigils; from waiting at the bedside of a loved one who is ill or dying, to peacefully praying for peace in a conflict. Sometimes we choose to keep vigils, but sometimes they are thrust upon us - like waiting for someone to return from being in danger. In this edition of Something Understood, Mark Tully asks why people hold and participate in vigils.

Mark Tully speaks to Dr Shelia Cassidy, who believes that vigil is part of the very fabric of life. Her own life has been full of vigil. We hear about her most important personal experience, when she was in jail in Chile and threatened with execution or life imprisonment. That night she stayed awake, arguing with God. She explains how, in this personal vigil, she tried to abandon herself to the will of God - like Jacob wrestling with the angel.

A pioneer of the hospice movement and of palliative medicine, Dr Sheila Cassidy has also helped many people to keep vigil as they die. She explains that she has learned we all have to keep vigils during our lives.

Sheila also sees prayer in general as a type of vigil; it's a time to leave one's mind open to whatever comes, and to wait for God.

With readings from Rabindranath Tagore on patience and Christopher Reid on the vigil he held at his dying wife's bedside, and music from John Tavener and Joan Baez, Mark Tully explores what role hopeful "watching and waiting" can play in our lives.

The readers are Gareth Armstrong, Emily Bevan and Simon Tcherniak.

Produced by Jo Coombs.
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b01np100)
The Night Island

As dusk begins for this weeks Living World ornithologist Chris Sperring travels by boat over to Skomer where he is joined by David Boyle, an ecologist researching two of our most mysterious seabirds, the Manx Shearwater and the storm petrel.

A visitor to Skomer island in the daytime in late summer will find sea the strewn with rafts of guillemots, razorbills and puffins, which scatter, leaving watery trails of sunlit footprints across the surface, or dive deep to make a pathway for the approaching boat. But at night a more dramatic wildlife spectacle unfolds as storm petrels and tens of thousands of nocturnal Manx shearwaters return to their burrows, skimming the air like half-seen shadows and tumbling clumsily to the ground.

Once the day flying seabirds have fallen quiet, in the semi-moonlit night Chris and David sit on a cliff edge waiting with anticipation for the first birds to come in from the sea; soon bat like shapes fly around their heads as the sparrow sized storm petrels begin to arrive. Although few in number on the island, storm petrels give a clue to the islands other and much bigger nocturnal seabird, the Manx shearwater. Moving further into the island Chris discovers that these true global seabirds, who travel thousands of kilometres from Wales to South America in a year, have difficulty landing and walking as their legs and feet are designed for swimming and digging. A true seabird.

Sitting amongst the huge Manx shearwater breeding colony, birds begin to crashland all around them and with so many birds all calling at once, the intensity of their discordant cries smothers the island in a nocturnal blanket of noise.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01nnvzh)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01nnvzk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01np102)
The murder of Northern Ireland prison officer, David Black, will stir old fears for his community. William Crawley talks to the Rev. Tom Greer whose church Mr David attended.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Matt Wells visits one of the worst hit areas New York, to hear how Catholic and Jewish blue collar workers are starting to rebuild. Matt talks to William about how religious and ethical issues are feeding into the election ahead of Tuesday's vote.

With the Church of England on the cusp of electing a new leader, philosopher Roger Scruton examines where the Church of England now stands, through his own experiences.

A drive by President François Hollande to legalise gay marriage is shaping up as an epic battle. John Laurenson reports from France.

Kevin Bocquet reports on Church of England plans to merge three Yorkshire dioceses into one.

We hear from a man who's celebrating 80 years singing for his church choir this Sunday. Might it be a record?

And as more of Britain's tree species are threatened with deadly diseases, we explore the spiritual and sacred significance of woodland and trees.

The Coptic Church will announce its new Pope this Sunday. Anthony O'Mahoney joins the programme to explain the process which ends with a blindfolded child picking a name from pot.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01np104)
Emmaus UK

Terry Waite presents the Radio 4 Appeal for Emmaus UK, a charity which works with homeless people.
Reg Charity:
To Give: 1064470
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Emmaus UK.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01nnvzm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01nnvzp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01npb0r)
Remembering Hidden Lives
On All Souls Day, Sunday Worship from St Martin-in-the-Fields explores ideas of memory. There is an awareness that memories are suppressed and also that some people are suppressed in the collective consciousness of church and society. The service reflects on these difficult and sometimes painful realities and how memories might be healed by God and the lost restored.
Leader: the Revd Richard Carter
Preacher: the Revd Dr Sam Wells, the new vicar of St Martin's
The choir of St Martin-in-the-Fields is directed by Andrew Earis and accompanied by Nicholas Wearne.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01nlby1)
Understanding Contemporary China 4/4

Martin Jacques presents a personal view on how best to understand the unique characteristics and apparent mysteries of contemporary China, its development and its possible future. In a new series of talks he sets out the building blocks for making sense of China today.

In his final talk, he asks how the undemocratic Chinese state can enjoy legitimacy and authority in the eyes of its population. He argues that the Chinese state is held in such high esteem because it is seen as the embodiment, protector and guardian of Chinese civilization. The state is seen as an intimate, a member of the family indeed - in fact, the head of the family. It is a remarkable institution which will come to exercise interest and fascination outside China.

Martin Jacques is the author of 'When China Rules the World'.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01npb0t)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paul Mason.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01npb0w)
For detailed synopses, see daily episodes

Writer ..... Nawal Gadalla
Director ..... Julie Beckett
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

Alistair Lloyd ..... Michael Lumsden
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Josh Archer ..... Cian Cheesbrough
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge..... Angela Piper
Matt Crawford..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy..... Sunny Ormonde
Christine Barford..... Lesley Saweard
Jolene Perks..... Buffy Davis
Fallon Rogers..... Joanna Van Kampen
Joe Grundy..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy..... Trevor Harrison
William Grundy..... Philip Molloy
Nic Grundy..... Becky Wright
Emma Grundy..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy..... Barry Farrimond
Neil Carter..... Brian Hewlett
Mike Tucker..... Terry Molloy
Brenda Tucker..... Amy Shindler
Jim Lloyd..... John Rowe
Paul Morgan..... Michael Fenton Stevens
James Bellamy..... Roger May.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01npb0y)
Tidjane Thiam

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is businessman Tidjane Thiam.

He's chief executive of the Prudential, but he's about as far from the archetypal "man from the Pru" as you can get.
The seeds of his success were sown amid the complex political terrain of the Ivory Coast with an extended family heavily involved in politics and a father imprisoned for his beliefs. His life quickly took on an international flavour from West Africa to Morocco, Paris to Washington, but in his early 30s a coup in his homeland left him high and dry. He says "I had no job, no career, nothing at all. It taught me a lot about myself. If you've been in a situation where you have nothing there's nothing much you're afraid of."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 The Museum of Curiosity (b01nl675)
Series 5

Hughes, Czerski, Finkelman

Professor of Ignorance at the University of Buckingham, Professor John Lloyd CBE is joined by comedian Jimmy Carr for the fifth series.

Three guests are invited to donate one item each and explain why it deserves a place in the museum.

John and Jimmy welcome comedian Sean Hughes, physicist Dr Helen Czerski and cuneiform expert Dr Irving Finkel.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01npb10)
Lard

Loving lard - Tim Hayward delves into the guilty pleasure of eating animal fat. Lard is so unfashionable that the word is used as an insult. But Tim goes on a mission to reclaim lard and argue that it can be enjoyed as part of a healthy diet.

Science journalist Gary Taubes is researching saturated animal fats and says that eating lard is healthy. Food writer Oliver Thring visits restaurant Quo Vadis where chef Jeremy Lee is a lard evangelist. And Tim hears about gourmet Italian lardo di colonnata.

Presented by Tim Hayward and produced by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01nnvzr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01npb12)
The latest national and international news with Shaun Ley, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The Invention of... (b01npb14)
Spain

Episode 2

September 11th in Barcelona is celebrated annually as the national day of Catalonia. This year more than a million people marched through the city, waving their distinctive flags - many want independence from Madrid. This is clearly a critical moment in Spanish history, but the mood of separation is not new.

In The Invention of Spain, Misha Glenny explores flashpoints and fragmentation in the Spanish monarchy's territorial possessions - from the revolts of Catalonia in both 1640 and 1714, to the emergence of the United Provinces, or the Dutch, as a nation separate and free from their Habsburg overlords.

"This was a David and Goliath struggle. The Spanish army was indisputably the strongest in Europe," says Ben Kaplan of UCL. ""For this smattering of rebels living in this marshy bogland was adventurous at best, and suicidal at worst."

With contributions from Cayetana Alvarez de Toledo, Felipe Fernandez Armesto and Sir John Elliott. Misha Glenny is a winner of a Sony gold. Producer Miles Warde previously collaborated with him on The Invention of Germany.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01nlbl2)
Humshaugh

Eric Robson chairs the third episode of GQT's North of England tour to mark the programme's 65th anniversary, this week recorded in Humshaugh in Northumberland.

With Anne Swithinbank, Matt Biggs, and Bob Flowerdew on the panel the team take questions from a gardening audience in the same town that the programme visited back in 1947.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. How do I achieve a truss of greenhouse grown ripe tomatoes?

A. Tomatoes need starting at the end of January or beginning of February, in a heated propagating case or on a sunny windowsill. Alternatively you can bypass this stage by buying young plants. Less feeding and watering only when necessary will push the plant into producing ripened fruit. Dandelion leaves, banana skins and ripe tomatoes release ethylene, which also encourages ripening.

Q. Last year I planted an asparagus bed with one-year-old plants, but this year there has been no growth. Should I hope for improvement or dig it up and plant something else?

A. Slugs and asparagus beetles may have made it appear that there is no growth. As they come into growth, you will probably need to put down a slug control, such as ferric phosphate slug pellets or a nematode slug solution.

Q. We have a Ginkgo Biloba tree. I understand that it can be propagated from cuttings, but am yet to have any success. What would the panel recommend?

A. These trees have male and female plants and are normally propagated from seed. The small shell within the fleshy part of the seed can be put into a multi-purpose compost and kept outside over the winter, at which point it should germinate. If you only have a male tree, you can try to grow from cuttings - take hardwood cuttings now or softer cuttings in the summer, keep them under a cloche to protect them from the weather, and plant them into a gritty soil.

Q. What does the panel recommend I grow in my solar room? It is only heated by the sun - so is warm in summer and cold in winter (although frost-free).

A. Plants in containers which have been outside over the summer can be moved inside, such as olive plants, citruses, Bird of Paradise or Bougainvillea. Scented-leaved Pelargoniums can stay attractive through the winter. Of the citruses, the lemon is the easiest to grow, tangerines or satsumas are also advisable. Succulents and cacti will prevent too much water vapour entering the air. Climbers such as Trachelospermum Jasminoides has white fragrant flowers and would grow nicely. Mediterranean or African bulbs, such as Lachenalia, are also suggested.

Q. Which make the best plants for show - leeks grown from seed or from pods?

A. Once a leek is about to produce a flowerhead, cut it off. After two weeks, take the leek out of the ground and it will produce a cluster of bulbs. These can be planted out in August for winter, though they will probably not be suitable for showing. A pod will be vegetatively exact to the existing show leek, whereas the seed will show variation.

Q. I garden on the eastern edge of the wood, where the soil is heavy and damp. Early in the year there are Snowdrops, but after that groundcover is dominated by Creeping Buttercup. Could the panel suggest an alternate, attractive groundcover plant that would hold back the buttercup and encourage wildlife.

A. Learn to love the Buttercup! You could introduce a Ranunculus Ficaria, or Celandine. The 'Brazen Hussy' variety has dark leaves, which would introduce nice variety of colour. You could also add a Lamium, or a Vinca Minor. Leucojum, the Summer Snowflake, or ferns such as Dryopteris filix-max (male fern) or the Soft Shield ferns.

Q. What is the expected life span of a modern shrub Rose?

A. They should last 40-50 years with no trouble, though you should thin out the older wood, which will encourage regeneration.

Q. I love collecting free food from the hedgerows. Which free foods do the panel forage for?

A. Sloes, for the gin, Elderflowers for pancakes or Champagne and Crab Apples for cider!

Q. I have two overgrown Blackcurrant bushes in my garden, How should they be pruned and can I chop them back to the base?

A. With a sharp saw, cut out the older, non-productive stems from the base, over the course of 4 or 5 years in an annual cycle. Once it has been well pruned, give it a general fertilizer in the spring. If the plant gets large, swollen buds, it may have Blackcurrant reversion virus. If so they probably needs removing.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b01npb16)
Sunday Edition

Fi Glover presents a Sunday Edition dedicated to mental health, with conversations between those who have suffered from psychosis and depression, and those who have stood by them. Conversations from Cumbria, Scotland, Leeds and Berkshire prove that it's surprising what you hear when you listen,

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01npb18)
The Gothic Imagination

Frankenstein, part 2

The second part of a new production of Mary Shelley's heart-breaking modern myth of obsession, pride and the need for love. In attempting to find some peace from his troubles, Frankenstein has gone walking in the mountains, where he is about to come face to face with what he most hates and fears.

Dramatised by Lucy Catherine.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b01npb1b)
David Almond - Skellig

David Almond talks about his prize winning novel, Skellig, which is loved by children and adults alike.

Skellig is the story of what happens when a Newcastle boy finds a strange man living in the garage of his new home.

Michael sets out to help the ill Skellig recover. With him is his new unconventional friend Mina, who David Almond says is the star of the book. She introduces Michael to the worlds of nature and evolution, and to William Blake's poetry, his drawings of angels, his views on education. David says that when Mina walked into the book she brought Blake with her.

David Almond's story centres on the imaginations of children - is Skellig an Angel, or perhaps a man evolving into a bird? In the programme, David refuses to confirm either, saying that to him, Skellig is as much of a mystery as he is to the reader.

Recorded at the Lit and Phil Library in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne. James Naughtie presents.

December's Bookclub choice : The Boy with the Top Knot by Sathnam Sanghera.

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Workshop (b01npb1d)
Series 2

Episode 1

Ruth Padel and the The Dove Cottage Poets in Grasmere work on some poems in progress. Tough love for poems.

Poetry Workshops are gathering all over the country. In the back rooms of pubs, in libraries and in front rooms, poets meet to hone their craft and sharpen their verse. Ruth Padel begins a new series of programmes by working with The Dove Cottage Poets in Grasmere.
Going behind the scenes of the poems, the group are ruthless yet supportive as they chuck out words and redraft; listening, pruning and testing their work as they go. The theme for this week's poems is fathers, apt of course for the home-place of Wordsworth, the father of English romanticism.
The group discuss the techniques, inspiration, wordplay and imagination that make poetry so enjoyable and rewarding. As well as working on their own poems, the group bravely try out a writing exercise to warm up their poetry muscles, focussing on line endings by experimenting with a very famous poem by William Carlos Williams. They also consider a poem by a much loved poet associated with the area; Norman Nicholson.
Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01nl77n)
Too Many Chiefs?

In April next year, the SNP government in Scotland will merge 8 existing constabularies to create a single national police force. This is intended to bring efficiency savings by cutting out duplication of functions and gaining the economies of scale. But the move is proving controversial amid fears that it will damage local accountability and lead to worsening services in some areas.
Next month in England and Wales elections will be held for 41 Police and Crime Commissioners to oversee a continuing patchwork of local forces. The Westminster government sees the Commissioners as signs of its commitment to 'localism'. But seven years ago, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of police said the fragmented network of local forces was 'not fit for purpose'. So, given the cuts the police are facing, is it time for a radical re-organisation south of the border? Gerry Northam investigates.
Producer: Nicola Dowling.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01nnw8l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01nnvzt)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01nnvzw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nnvzy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01npb7z)
This week, the mild-mannered Welshman who melted the Iron Lady; what's God going to think of what Jimmy Savile's been up to. It's fifty years of the Beatles, so we've got the man who was at Sunday school with John Lennon and later turned down a place in the fab Four line up. And Mark Gatiss goes native and plays a Geordie push bike pizza delivery boy. So, in the words of my favourite song of the week - and you don't want to miss this twenties classic I assure you..I'll B-B-C-ing you for Pick of the Week.

Land of the Rising Sums - Radio 4
Midweek - Radio 4
Johnnie Walker Meets Dionne Warwick - Radio 2
Thought for the Day - Clifford Longley - Today - Radio 4
Afternoon Drama - Gwynfor v Margaret - Radio 4
GI Britain - Radio 4
Radio 3 Live In Concert on Monday 29 October
The Essay- Painting Genesis - Radio 3
Gone Too Soon - The Story of Amy Winehouse - Radio 1 Xtra
The Big Discussion with Jonathan Cowap - Radio York
Living With Mother - Radio 4
Archive on 4 - Tuning In - Radio 4.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01npb81)
The atmosphere is still tense as Ed and Emma search for a new car. Ed suggests a slightly more expensive car will be safer and cheaper in the long run - he will get another job to fund their expenses. Emma wonders where Ed will find time.

Ed pores over job advertisements in the newspaper while George plays rather rambunctiously and complains about his drink. George relates all the treats and activities he gets up to with Will, until Emma snaps.

George asks Emma if he can stay with Will more often, thinking it would make her happier as she would have fewer money worries. Emma states that seeing her son less would not make her happy and attempts to soothe a worried George.

Leonie makes a surprise visit after hearing about James's car crash. She suggests that there is a silver lining to James's accident as it has brought the two of them back together. They seal their reconciliation with a kiss.
Leonie announces her plans to stay in Ambridge and look after her 'brave soldier.' Matt excuses himself and ignores Lilian's pleas for company. If he can't relax in his own home he may as well work.


SUN 19:15 Meet David Sedaris (b01npb83)
Series 3

Rubbish; Jesus Shaves

The multi-award winning American essayist brings more of his wit and charm to BBC Radio 4 with the final edition in a series of audience readings. This week moving to the British countryside has its downsides exposed in "Rubbish" and the eye-opening experience of learning French at a Paris language school is considered in "Jesus Shaves".

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Boom Pictures Cymru production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Alice Munro - Dear Life (b01npb85)
Pride

Alice Munro was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013. She is widely regarded as a doyenne of the short story form, a writer whose acuity and compassion shines through all her work. These stories are from her 2012 collection, Dear Life.

Set mostly in the small towns and quiet domestic surroundings of her native Canada, Munro, as always, captures the ordinary and reveals the extraordinary that lies beneath. Life is laid bare, and the complicated emotions of normal lives resonate long after the final page is turned.

Today in Pride, an old man remembers his past and a friendship that might have grown in other circumstances.

The reader is Garrick Hagan
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01nlbl8)
Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations.

Presented by Roger Bolton, this is the place to air your views on the things you hear on BBC Radio.

This programme's content is entirely directed by you.

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01nlbl6)
Hans Werner Henze, Emanuel Steward, Jacques Barzun, Yash Chopra, Terry Callier

On Last Word this week:

Hans Werner Henze, one of the great post-war German composers, remembered by fellow composer Mark Antony Turnage.

Boxing trainer Emanuel Steward, who coached Lennox Lewis and others to world titles.

Eminent cultural historian and philosopher Jacques Barzun, author of more than 40 books.

Indian director Yash Chopra, who made some of the best-loved Bollywood films.

And tributes to jazz and soul singer Terry Callier from DJ Gilles Peterson and Paul Weller.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01nnw84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01np104)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01nl67f)
Labour, the Left and Europe

The crisis in the eurozone means that fundamental changes to the European Union are on the agenda. Conservative politicians have called for a re-appraisal of the UK's relationship with a more integrated and potentially less democratic EU. Yet Labour's leadership is curiously quiet on the topic.

Edward Stourton talks to leading figures in Labour's policy debate and finds out what rethinking is going on behind the scenes.

Producer: Chris Bowlby.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01npbcm)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01npbcp)
A look at how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01nl9pc)
Francine Stock meets with French director Jacques Audiard to discuss his award-winning film Rust and Bone, an ominous story on the sunlit Cote d'Azur.

Irish charmer Chris O'Dowd, on playing the impromptu manager of an Australian girl group, The Sapphires, touring war-torn Vietnam.

Neil Brand is behind the piano to deconstruct Jonny Greenwood's score to one of the most anticipated films of the year, Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master.

And historian Ian Christie looks at the Ealing films with a dark heart.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01np0zy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 05 NOVEMBER 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01nnw0w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01nl8g5)
The UK strip and lap-dancing industry; blue jeans

Growth of the strip clubs - Why has erotic dance and stripping become a staple of the night time economy in the UK? Kate Hardy tells Laurie Taylor why her research suggests that the proliferation of these clubs has little to do with the demands of male customers. Instead, it's a by product of the economics of an industry which maintains its profits, even during a recession, by passing the financial risks on to its workers. Also, the anthropologist, Daniel Miller asks what the ubiquity of blue jeans tells us about our individual and social lives. He's joined by the sociologist, Sophie Woodward.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01np0zw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw0y)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01nnw10)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw12)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01nnw14)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01npgmz)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Canon Dr Sam Wells, vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01npgn1)
Residents will no longer be able to apply for 'village green status' simply to save land already earmarked for development under new plans being discussed by MPs. Campaigners say the change in the law will automatically lead to the loss of public spaces. The Government says a change in the law is needed to stop these so called "vexatious claims" , which are getting in the way of building affordable homes and boosting the rural economy.

And more mushrooms are being eaten in the UK than ever before. Last year shoppers took home more than 180,000 tonnes, making it the third most popular item in the vegetable aisle alongside potatoes and tomatoes.

This programme is presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01nnw16)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01npgn3)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague and Evan Davis, including:

0750
Today is the last full day of campaigning in the US presidential election. James Naughtie reports from where both candidates converged on the same town in Iowa over the weekend.

0810
It has been a week since a ban on the import of Ash trees came into force, in an attempt to halt the spread of the deadly fungal disease affecting Ash trees. Tom Feilden sets out what has changed since the ban came in last week and Martin Ward, UK chief plant health officer, outlines why it took so long to tackle it.

0820
This week is the last full week of campaigning for police and crime commissioners across England and Wales. Nick Howe, senior lecturer in criminology at the University of Derby, explains what police commissioners will do.

0823
The Canadian government is trying to encourage Polish workers living in the UK to move to Canada to help boost the country's labour market. Wiktor Moszczynski, author of Hello I'm your Polish Neighbour, who works with the Polish community in Ealing, and Anita Prazmowska, Professor of International History at London School of Economics, analyse the work ethic of the Poles that have come to the UK.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01npgn5)
Political Divide: Mary Robinson and Michael Ignatieff

Start the Week is at BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival in Gateshead to debate whether the world is becoming a more divided place. Andrew Marr discusses the state of politics with the former President of Ireland Mary Robinson and the writer-turned-politician Michael Ignatieff, while the Israeli author Amos Oz asks whether entrenched ideas have increasingly polarised debate.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01npgn7)
Michael Holroyd - On Wheels

Episode 1

Michael Holroyd confronts an army of automobiles in this charming memoir. Weaving together personal stories and historical anecdote, he traces his relationship with cars through a lifetime of biography.

Learning to drive was no easy matter for Michael. The lessons required military precision when practising how to get in and out of his car correctly. His biographical subjects also had their difficulties: Bernard Shaw drove with reckless gusto when overtaking his eightieth year; Vita Sackville-West's car became a chamber for sudden romantic assignations and getaways; Augustus John and his family careered through vulnerable villages as the poor vehicle, piled high with bohemian friends, stuttered and jerked along in first gear.

Wry, thoughtful and very funny, On Wheels is an elegy to the glamour of the car. Subtle and perceptive, Michael Holroyd finds surprising ways to understand the past and challenge our view of the future.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01npgnc)
US election and women; Malala's blog; Power List and the Media

How women's votes can sway the US election; Malala in her own words; the Power List and the media; thirty years on from the publication of a 'bible' on assertiveness, is it still needed as much today?
Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nphnn)
The Righteous Sisters

Episode 1

by Jane Purcell.

The true story of English sisters Louise and Ida Cook (better known as romantic novelist Mary Burchell), whose love of opera led them into a life of danger, rescuing Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany.

1/5 Civil servants may be 'safe until they're nailed down in their coffins', but when music comes into the lives of young Ida and Louise, romance and adventure come with it.

Translations by Johannes Mirbach

Original research by Louise Carpenter

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


MON 11:00 The Gaza Surf Club (b01nphnq)
Violence and conflict have never been very far from the tiny Palestinian territory of Gaza. Damaged buildings and empty spaces in Gaza City still bear witness to Israeli military attacks in 2008 and 2012 in response to rockets fired into Israel by militant groups.

But one thing Gaza does have in its favour is the sea. Long sandy beaches stretch right down the territory's west coast and on summer weekends it seems that most of Gaza's one-and-a half million residents are enjoying themselves on the beach. And that's where you'll find members of the Gaza Surf Club, a group of young Palestinians who ride the waves off the coast of this troubled territory.

In Gaza Surf Club we meet Mahmoud El Reyashi, Yousef Abo Ghanem and Ibrahim Nehad, three members of the Club in their teens and early twenties who take their boards, turn their backs on the land with its hardships, politics and conflict, and immerse themselves in the surf. In Gaza the unemployment rate is 44% and the average per capita income is just $2 a day. Young men are vulnerable to being drawn into a cycle of radicalism and violence but Mahmoud, Yousef and Ibrahim have defied this, finding in surfing freedom, optimism and even hope for the future.

One source of hope is the fact that many of the boards they use were originally donated by Israelis and Jews who believe that surfing transcends national and religious barriers. We meet surfing legend Dorian 'Doc' Paskowitz, a 91 year old Jewish-American who in 2007 arrived at the Erez border crossing, the main Israeli checkpoint into Gaza, with fifteen surfboards. He'd been inspired to travel the twelve thousand miles from his home in California by a newspaper picture of two Palestinians surfers sharing one beaten-up old surfboard between them. Fifty years earlier Doc Paskowitz had brought surfing to Israel and now he was doing the same for Gaza.

The relationship between the Israeli government and Hamas who control Gaza means that few surfboards are currently making it across the border into Gaza but members of the Club are still in regular contact via Facebook with fellow surfers in Israel and across the world. And they're learning new surfing skills from Matt Olsen, the son of an American diplomat who has known Gaza since childhood. We join Matt as he helps members of the Club with setting up their own surf shack, a place to hang out and recruit new members on Gaza City's Sheikh Hazdien Beach.

Gaza Surf Club is a portrait of life in Gaza through the eyes of a group of young Palestinian surfers. The programme gives a fresh perspective on the issues which beset this troubled territory and shows how a community has overcome divisions and tensions. It's about common humanity and passion rather than a divided people. In a territory where every scrap of land is weighed down with history and bloodshed, surfing allows you to leave the land behind and discover freedom.

After all, if you can surf together, you can live together.


MON 11:30 Ayres on the Air (b01n6yj5)
Series 4

Winter

Popular poet Pam Ayres concludes her series of poetry and sketch shows about the seasons with a look at winter.
.
Subjects include that magic combination of cold weather and broken boilers; the art of comparing ailments with an update of the Yuletide song The 12 Days of Christmas and, as we reach the end of the Winter season ,Pam tells how to fan the dying flame of passion, come Valentine's Day.

Poems include: Who's Had My Scissors, Ever Since I Had Me Op and Insomnia.

With Felicity Montagu and Geoffrey Whitehead

Producer: Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in October 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01nphns)
Behind the scenes of the hair extension industry, and stopping the cowboy builders

Ever wondered where the hair in hair extensions comes from? Or how much cash you could get for your own hair? We look behind the scenes in the world of hair extensions. What are the risks? What are the different types? Is the demand for hair extensions putting up the price of wigs on the NHS?

New pro-biotic formula baby milk is being sold in the UK which tells parents to make up the formula at lower temperatures than government guidelines. Is it safe? We find out.

And - if you want to hire a builder for your home extension, it's time to stop dreaming and start being more hard-headed. We have advice on how not to be ripped off by rogue builders.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Paul Waters.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01nnw18)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01nphnv)
National and international news presented by Edward Stourton. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz8v)
Series 1

Germany - PI Kemal Kayankaya

German author Jakob Arjouni returns periodically to write fiction featuring his Turkish PI Kemal Kayankaya. Mark Lawson visits him in Berlin to discuss the way his crime novels have reflected upon events including re-unification and the war in Yugoslavia, and drawn on more recent debates about what view of Islam it's appropriate to show in cartoons and films.

Producer: Robyn Read.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01npb81)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00vy10v)
Everything

By Oliver Emanuel. The story of a 14-year-old girl who spends seven days in a refuge for runaways.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b01nphnx)
(10/12)
Why could you be forgiven for thinking a Labour Prime Minister, a Daphne du Maurier novel and a Fred Astaire film had caused a surprising amount of fuss?

Tom Sutcliffe puts this and many other cryptic teasers to the regular panellists from the South of England and the North of England, in the latest contest of the mind-bending quiz. As always, he'll be available to provide just the right amount of help when the teams seem to be struggling - but the more help he has to give them, the fewer points they'll win.

Marcus Berkmann and Marcel Berlins play for the South of England, and Jim Coulson and Adele Geras for the North.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01npb10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Justice Between the Covers (b01nphnz)
From labyrinthine and interminable cases through the court of Chancery to the black arts of lawyerly intervention in marriage, stolen inheritance, identity fraud, blackmail and open theft - classic fiction is a treasure trove of legal storytelling and legal history.

Here the law has been deployed as plot device, as social criticism, as ferocious satire or allegory or in fascinating close up - illuminating how law was actually practiced and experienced by all social classes at least as vividly as professional legal journals, newspapers or records of the day.

But did classic novels also help shape the law they represent? To what extent has our legal system been influenced by the transforming force of great fiction, its powerful depictions of the law and, ultimately, the justice system? Weaving together the literary and the legal, Helena Kennedy QC uses her lawyerly skill and a warm love of literature to show how fiction has had its own part to play in the unfolding story of law, not only the transformations brought about by campaigning literature of the Victorian era such as Dickens' 'Bleak House' (agitating for the reform of the English courts) but also in broader cultural terms: the law presented as a metaphysical, brooding and sometimes sinister presence, driven by as much by obscure and unending bureaucracy as by justice and equity (powerfully depicted by Franz Kafka)

But fiction has also championed the ideal of law and positive legal redress, and in contrast with the cynicism of Dickens and Kafka Helena traces the rise of the great 'Lawyer Hero' of American writing in the Civil Rights era, as novels like 'To Kill A Mockingbird' directly intervened in debates about desegregation and constitutional equality in early 1960s America,

This will be new and surprising territory for presenter and listener alike: Helena unravels these much loved works of fiction, exploring what they were trying to say about law and justice, the power of having a reading public and what they had in their transformative sights.

Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b01nphp7)
Series 2

Augment

Aleks Krotoski explores the digital world. In today's programme have we all become cyborgs without even knowing it?

We've always extended our human bodies ever since we first picked up rocks or sticks as tools, it's part of human nature. So are the digital tools of today any different? Aleks asks just how far we've come and are willing to go to become one with our technology and become cyborg.

Aleks hears from film maker Rob Spence better known as Eyeborg about the reaction he gets to the camera he has where his right eye used to be. It's a different type of eye artist and composer Neil Harbisson uses, born entirely colour blind Neil uses an electronic eye on an antenna attached to his skull to hear colours it's now such a part of how Neil perceives the world that he hears the colours in his dreams!

Brandy Ellis is a very different type of cyborg; having suffered from depression for years she opted to have electronics implanted in her brain to control her symptoms. Her feelings are literally regulated by a machine.

Ultimately Aleks finds out from anthropologist Amber Case how we're all every bit as cyborg as Rob, Neil or Brandy in how we coexist symbiotically with our digital devices.


MON 17:00 PM (b01nphp9)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nnw1b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b01npjp9)
Series 5

Pascoe, Abrahams, Aldrin

Professor of Ignorance at the University of Buckingham, Professor John Lloyd CBE is joined by comedian Jimmy Carr for the fifth series.

Three guests are invited to donate one item each and explain why it deserves a place in the museum.

John and Jimmy welcome comedian Sara Pascoe, Ig Nobel founder Marc Abrahams and Astronaut Dr Buzz Aldrin.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01npjpc)
Kirsty reports early for duty at Jaxx - eager to make a good impression with her new manager, she tells Fallon. Naomi doesn't appear to be as keen to impress, duping Fallon into giving staff an hourly break under the guise that it was Kenton's policy. Kirsty tells Fallon she may have been deceived.

As David and Kenton set up the village bonfire display, Fallon rings querying the break system at Jaxx. Kenton suggests he was pretty relaxed about breaks during quiet periods but didn't have a hard and fast rule.

Fallon has a discussion with Naomi, who isn't best pleased at being questioned. Kirsty hints that she knows why Fallon got the manager role over Naomi.

Robert and Lynda are apprehensive about James and Leonie's reconciliation. Lynda is also concerned about the cohesion of her Christmas show and Robert suggests a master of revels is needed. Lynda has the perfect person in mind and approaches Kenton at the firework celebrations.

After checking with Jolene, Kenton agrees to be Lynda's Lord of Misrule. He also discovers that Jolene misses working with Fallon.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01npjpf)
Anna Friel in Uncle Vanya, The Sapphires, letters from the Mary Whitehouse archive

With Mark Lawson.

Anna Friel returns to the stage in a new production of Chekhov's Uncle Vanya, with a cast which also includes Ken Stott, Laura Carmichael and Sam West. Writer and performer Viv Groskop reviews.

In 1964, a devoutly Christian Shropshire schoolteacher co-launched a Clean Up TV campaign - and it turned her into a media star. Mrs Mary Whitehouse wrote letters of complaint to programme-makers, politicians, pop stars and playwrights. A selection of her correspondence, preserved in the archives of her National Viewers And Listeners Association, has now been published. Its editor Ben Thompson discusses her targets and the reactions to her attacks.

Chris O'Dowd stars as a talent scout in The Sapphires, an Australian film about four Aboriginal women who form a group - Australia's answer to The Supremes - and whose first gig is to travel to Vietnam in 1968 to sing for the troops. Kate Mossman reviews.

The Charles Dickens novel Nicholas Nickleby receives a modern makeover in a new TV adaptation, where penniless hero Nick finds himself fighting corruption within care homes. Novelist Kamila Shamsie discusses this latest updating of Dickens, and reflects on other adaptations of literary classics, including works by Jane Austen, Chaucer and Shakespeare.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nphnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Document (b01npjph)
GCHQ: Keeping the Last Great Secret

A document left in a pub, its chance discovery and scandals already facing the secret services in post-war Britain are the subject of the latest in Mike Thomson's Document series.

The document was a journalist's notebook. Passing through the hands of a barmaid, a landlord and the local police, it got perilously close to disclosing vital secrets about British surveillance - secrets that thousands of workers had taken strenuous efforts to preserve.

Why had a journalist been able to conduct interviews about all this? What impact would the revelations have had on the secret services, our foreign policy and our relations with America?

These questions confronted senior security service officials at a moment when they were already deep in the greatest peacetime crisis they faced in the twentieth century.

The last thing they needed, in the fevered weeks after the flight to Moscow of the Soviet spies Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean, was the threat of yet another major breach of security.

In this edition of Document, Mike discovers exactly how close they came to facing a fresh calamity.

Producer: Tom Alban.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01npjpk)
Left Turn to Catholic Social Teaching?

Catholic Social Teaching embodies a tradition of thought which goes back to Aristotle; yet its proponents say that it offers the sharpest critique of rampant capitalism in our present time. Charting a course through the dichotomies of capital versus labour, the free market versus welfare state, public versus private, its aim is to redraw the social and political landscape and put human dignity and virtue back at the centre. Matthew Taylor, former policy advisor to New Labour, ponders the tradition and asks what it might offer to post credit crunch polities which are looking for ways to regenerate.

There is no doubt that it has captured the policy zeitgeist. A whole programme of public lectures, seminars and events is rolling out to feed the demand for more information. Business people, academics and players from both Left and Right are attending, looking for an ethical alternative for our time.

So exactly what do its core principles, which include ideas like 'solidarity', 'subsidiarity', and the 'common good', offer practising Labour party politicians which they cannot find elsewhere? Jon Cruddas, currently responsible for the Labour Party's policy review, and Labour Peer Maurice Glasman, say they find Catholic Social Teaching 'inspirational'. On the Right, free marketers like Professor Philip Booth of the IEA, also point to its prescience. Is this more than a political fad? And will political enthusiasts for Catholic Social Teaching inevitably be forced to engage with issues such as abortion and euthanasia?

Presenter: Matthew Taylor
Producer: Sue Davies
Editor: Nicola Meyrick.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01nl9pf)
In a few weeks the Government will unveil its new energy bill. Recently energy sources and prices have occupied a lot of headlines, and a couple of weeks ago much was made over an industrial process to convert air into petrol. What links all these things together is the often under-reported issues surrounding energy storage. John Loughhead and Malcolm Wilkinson discuss the various challenges and possible solutions to storing electrical energy to bridge the gaps between a varying energy demand and an intermittent renewable supply.

Just a little over a decade ago a massive international effort went into the first sequencing of a human genome. This week, scientists writing in the journal Nature present a study that has sequenced the genomes of over a thousand individuals, from many different countries. It hopes to provide a reference map of local variabilities to help researchers understand indicators of disease or medicinal effectiveness in individuals.

Also on the programme; the real threats to British trees. Ash dieback may be in the headlines but between 3 to 4 million larches have been felled since 2009, horse chestnuts are seldom being replanted because of the destruction caused by the leaf miner moth and bleeding canker and will the elm ever recover from Dutch elm disease? Professor Clive Brasier, Andrew Halstead and Dr. Micheal Pocock discuss the 10 current epidemics that are infecting trees in Britain.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01npgn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01nnw1d)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01npjpm)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01npjpp)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 6

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 6:
Madame Picot begins to feel guilty and Madame Beck is determined to blacken Agnès' name. In the past, Agnès goes to live with Jean Dupère, the man who found her as a baby.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b01npjpr)
Series 1

Billy Bragg (the B-Side)

John Wilson launches a major new series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios.

Programme 1, Side B. 'Talking With The Taxman About Poetry' - Having discussed the making of his self-proclaimed 'difficult' third album (in the A-side of the programme), Billy Bragg responds to questions from the audience.

He considers the state of protest songs today, reveals what music he is writing at the moment and explains what poetry he would discuss with today's taxman. And he plays excerpts from the album live in front of the audience.

Future Programmes will include Paul Weller talking about the Jam's last album, 'The Gift'; Suzanne Vega recalls the making of 'Solitude Standing', the album that made her a worldwide superstar; and Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone takes us back to the seminal Zombies' record 'Odessey and Oracle'

Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01npjpt)
Ministers will "scythe through reams of planning red tape" to rejuvenate the UK economy, according to the Communities Secretary, Eric Pickles.
MPs debate the Government's Growth and Infrastructure Bill which critics say will create a developers' charter.
Work and Pensions ministers face renewed criticism of the work capability assessment.
In the Lords, Government plans to introduce individual voter registration are shelved indefinitely until a row between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats over boundary changes is resolved.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 06 NOVEMBER 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01nnw27)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01npgn7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw29)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01nnw2c)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw2f)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01nnw2h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ns3sx)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Canon Dr Sam Wells, vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01npjs8)
Invasive American Signal crayfish are found in a Scottish river for the first time causing concern for the salmon industry.

Farmers will be prosecuted if they spread mud on country roads. Mercia Police have issued the stern warning after mud was cited as a contributory factor in a traffic accident,

More flooding is unavoidable if the UK gets even average rainfall this winter. That's the warning from the British Geological Survey following the wettest summer in 100 years.

And Anna Hill visits a hot steamy warehouse in East Anglia to see how British farmers are meeting the growing taste for mushrooms.

Farming Today was presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01npjsb)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including:

0750
The US is to decide who will be their next president. Correspondent Alastair Leithead reports from Nevada and Dr Adam Smith, senior lecturer in American history at University College London, examines how close the outcome will be.

0810
People across England and Wales will be able to vote for the first ever police and crime commissioners. Home Secretary Theresa May outlines the need for such a big change.

0822
Today presenter James Naughtie reports from the US on the day of the US presidential election.

0832
China is to hold its once in a decade party congress and unveil the new generation of leaders. Dr Yiyi Lu, a researcher at the Beijing think tank Chang Chu, and Daniel Bell, professor of political theory at Tsinghua university in Beijing, describe the power struggle and how it will affect the global community.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b01npjsd)
Graduate Employment

Jonathan Freedland looks at graduate employment today and in the 16th century. Among Jonathan's guests are David Blunkett and actor Nigel Planer - Neil in 'The Young Ones' - who provides the historical readings.

As graduates today grapple with the difficulties of finding suitable employment, they might reflect on the experiences of graduates in the 16th century. In response to the Reformation, university education had undergone significant expansion - but when the newly qualified youngsters went out into the world, they found very few jobs waiting for them. Among them was dramatist Christopher Marlowe. Some say that the alienation which followed was a contributing factor in the English Civil War.

Alongside David Blunkett, Jonathan is also joined by historian Professor Nandini Das, Phil Baty of Times Higher Education magazine, Conservative MP Kwasi Kwarteng and Shiv Malik, author of the book 'Jilted Generation', to debate the lessons for today.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


TUE 09:30 In Alistair Cooke's Footsteps (b01npjsg)
Setting off from New York

Alvin Hall sets off on a roadtrip through the USA revisiting Cooke's Letter from America.

Letter from America was Alistair Cooke's weekly radio broadcast that ran continuously for 58 years on the BBC, from 1946 to 2004. The BBC will be making available the entire archive - over 900 programmes - on the Radio 4 website, from November 1st. Cooke had set himself a challenge that seemed deceptively simple: to explain the United States to Britain and the world. His Letters achieved that and more. He was an acute observer, a marvellous story teller, a man who loved America but saw it in intensely clear terms - a country that was both great and sometimes terribly flawed in its greatness.

All the major issues, all the significant stories were grist for his writer's mill. The Korean War and the Cold War, desegregation, the assassinations of the Kennedys and Martin Luther King, the fall of Nixon, the rise of Reaganomics, immigration, September 11 and the George W Bush presidency.

But eight years after his death are the Letters still relevant? For Alvin Hall, the answer is emphatically yes. Crisscrossing America he tests the insights and observations of Cooke on subjects as diverse as desegregation and jazz, the American Dream and immigration. And Hall discovers that Alistair Cooke remains as fresh and insightful as he ever was when he wrote and spoke over all those years about an America he loved and understood so well. Alvin Hall is an internationally renowned financial educator, television and radio broadcaster, bestselling author, and regular contributor to magazines, newspapers, and websites. He is an unabashed admirer of Alistair Cooke and Letter from America.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01ns0qx)
Michael Holroyd - On Wheels

Episode 2

Michael Holroyd confronts an army of automobiles in this charming memoir. Weaving together personal stories and historical anecdote, he traces his relationship with cars through a lifetime of biography.

Learning to drive was no easy matter for Michael. The lessons required military precision when practising how to get in and out of his car correctly. His biographical subjects also had their difficulties: Bernard Shaw drove with reckless gusto when overtaking his eightieth year; Vita Sackville-West's car became a chamber for sudden romantic assignations and getaways; Augustus John and his family careered through vulnerable villages as the poor vehicle, piled high with bohemian friends, stuttered and jerked along in first gear.

Wry, thoughtful and very funny, On Wheels is an elegy to the glamour of the car. Subtle and perceptive, Michael Holroyd finds surprising ways to understand the past and challenge our view of the future.

Episode 2 of 5
Despite holding some unusual views on driving, Michael Holroyd finally gets hold of a driving licence, thanks to a colourful array of instructors. He then sets about passing on his new wisdom to the writer Margaret Drabble.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01npjx9)
Alexandra Shulman; Amy Childs; women and gaming

Women and computer gaming - what sort of gamer are you?; the second in our series of blogs from Malala Yousufzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot by the Taleban; and the life and times of Noor Inayat Khan - WWII undercover agent, George Cross recipient, and now the first British Muslim woman to be commemorated with a statue. Plus, the Woman's Hour Power List - Vogue Editor Alexandra Schulman tells us who really wields the power in the world of fashion, and she joins TOWIE's Amy Childs to discuss the polarising appeal of the adult romper suit, affectionate known as the 'onesie'
Presenter Aasmah Mir
Producer Susannah Tresillian.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01npjxc)
The Righteous Sisters

Episode 2

by Jane Purcell.

The true story of English sisters Louise and Ida Cook (better known as romantic novelist Mary Burchell), whose love of opera led them into a life of danger, rescuing Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany.

2/5 1934. Don Giovanni in Salzburg, and Charles Boon in London, change the sisters' lives forever.

Ida Cook ('Mary Burchell') ..... Liza Sadovy
Louise Cook ..... Susie Riddell
Mitia Mayer-Lismann ..... Carolyn Pickles
Clemens Krauss ..... Tom Frederic
Charles Boon ..... James Lailey
Viorica Ursuleac ..... Sarah Thom
Elsie Unwin ..... Eleanor Crooks
Opera-goer ..... Stephanie Racine

Translations by Johannes Mirbach

Original research by Louise Carpenter

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b01npjxf)
Series 3

Wildcats and tooth fungi

Scottish wildcats are seen as an iconic emblem of the unspoilt wilderness of Scotland. It has been suggested that there may be fewer than one hundred pure bred wildcat in Scotland, with some studies concluding that this species may actually be rarer that the Amur tiger or even extinct as a genetic species. Saving Species reporter Karen Partridge travels to Scotland to meet Kerry Kilshaw from the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, University of Oxford; in the hope of finding one of the last wildcats for herself and in doing so looks at the role genetics is playing in preserving this species.

Professor Lynne Boddy from Cardiff University travels to the New Forest in search of a very rare fungus, the bearded tooth fungus (Hericium erinaceus). This species is commonly grown commercially however in the wild it is one of the rarest fungi's in the UK and it's importance in the woodland ecosystem as a wood-recycling fungus is giving conservationists cause for concern.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.


TUE 11:30 Swansong (b01npjxh)
Big Country's Driving to Damascus

Stuart Maconie presents Swansong Ep 3 this week looking at Big Country's 1999 album Driving To Damascus.

Big Country were one of the most successful acts of the 1980's - with a dual guitar sound that's been likened to Thin Lizzy in Kilts- their epic Celtic anthems ontracks like 'Fields of Fire' and 'In A Big Country' sold millions both in the UK and the States. Singer and guitarist Stuart Adamson had previously tasted the limelight with his post-punk outfit The Skids - but it was the mainstream success of Big Country with their uniquely Scottish sound and lyrics emphasizing the plight of the working man that heralded their worldwide fame and to Adamson brought its associated troubles.

In summer 1999 the band entered Rockfield Studios in Monmouth to record Driving To Damascus - it would be their last full album with Adamson. Swansong Ep 3 features honest and revealing interviews with guitarist, Bruce Watson, drummer Mark Brzezicki, album's producer Rafe Mckenna, Eddi Reader and Stuart's daughter Kirsten Adamson who then aged 14 sang backing vocals on the album.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01nq1br)
Call You and Yours: Why are so many children missing out on adoption?

Just over a year ago the Prime Minister launched a major adoption and fostering campaign calling for more people to come forward as adopters and foster parents. He promised tough action to deal with local authorities who were failing in their basic responsibilities to carry out adoption cases swiftly and efficiently.

But how much have things changed? In the last year the courts have concluded the cases of 5,000 children and decided adoption is best for them. However most of them have nowhere to go.

Tomorrow, on Call You & Yours, we're trying to assess why things haven't improved. We want to hear from you if you have been trying to adopt in the last year? How long have you been trying? Is the process as hard as we are led to believe? Or have you successfully adopted and found it all pretty straightforward? What age is the child you have adopted? Did you feel supported throughout? Or have you been adopted? What was that like?

We want to hear your experiences.

03700 100 400 is the phone number to call or you can e-mail via the Radio 4 website or text us on 84844.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Maire Devine.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01nnw2k)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01nq1bt)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz91)
Series 1

Scotland - DI John Rebus

Mark Lawson visits Edinburgh to meet Ian Rankin and discuss the way his novels featuring DI John Rebus reflect the building of the Scottish parliament, the G8 summit and debates over Scottish independence.

Producer: Robyn Read.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01npjpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01nq1bw)
Warrior Class

The title refers to the cut and thrust and horse-trading of the American political machine. If accepted into the ruthless game of the Warrior Class, you understand that it's about politics for politics sake. If not - you risk getting dumped and, once the apparatchiks stop working on your behalf, it's very difficult to rise back on your own.

Julius Lee is a local assemblyman who explodes onto the political scene from nowhere, makes a great speech suggesting he could be a congressional candidate and the Republican answer to Obama. The party puts down seed money to begin marketing him. They groom him to take back a seat that has been held by a Democrat for twenty years.

Julius is Chinese, Christian, an ex-marine with a Harvard law degree. He's steely and principled but he knows that 'moves' have to be made.One of the necessary steps is to make sure no skeletons from the past undermine or ruin his meteoric rise. That's where things start to unravel. There's a bitter ex college girlfriend whose description of him is not exactly appealing. She wants a favour in return for keeping quiet.

This tale of backstage life in American politics is the work of Kenneth Lin, a graduate of the Yale School of Drama. He's a political addict engaged in observing the intersection of politics, media and morality.

Music by Jon Nicholls
Sound design by Peregrine Andrews
Written by Kenneth Lin and adapted by Judith Kampfner

The play was originally produced in New York at Second Stage Theatre 2011. Developed at the South Coast Repertory.

Directed and produced by: Judith Kampfner
A Corporation for Independent Media production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b01nq1by)
History magazine programme.


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b01nq1c0)
Series 1

Suzanne Vega (the A-Side)

The second programme of this new series in which John Wilson talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios, each edition includes two episodes. In Episode 1 (The A side), John asks the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 2, A-side "Solitude Standing". Singer and songwriter Suzanne Vega discusses the influences behind her platinum-selling second album, released 25 years ago, which included hits like "Luka" and the title track.

She explains that it was her manager who saw the potential of "Luka" and convinced her that a song with a social message could be a hit.

She recalls how the tune for "Tom's Diner" came to her while she was walking down Broadway after having been to the real Tom's restaurant.

And she discusses the way in which images and words were part of her life from a very early age and have influenced her work.

In the next programme (The B-side) it'll be the turn of the audience to ask Suzanne the questions.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b01nq1c2)
Sorting Out Extradition and Prisoner Voting

Joshua Rozenberg considers how the tension between politicians' wishes and what the law requires is likely to be resolved in two highly controversial areas of government policy: extradition and the right of prisoners to vote.

The Home Secretary's recent decision to prevent the extradition to the United States of Gary McKinnon prompted disappointment in Washington. But the US welcomed the much-delayed transfer at around the same time of five suspected terrorists, including Abu Hamza al-Masri.

Talking to Alan Johnson MP - the former Labour Home Secretary - and the Conservative MP, Sir Edward Garnier QC - until recently the deputy to the Attorney General - Joshua discovers that the Home Secretary's planned changes to the law on extradition produce divided views - but not in the ways that might be expected. He also considers with an extradition expert how such decisions can be made more quickly in future.

Meanwhile, tensions with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg have risen after the Prime Minister ruled out votes for prisoners during the life of the present government - a statement which appeared to set the government on a collision course with the court. Ministers have only a few more weeks to respond formally to the court's judgment earlier this year that the United Kingdom would be in breach of its obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights if it continued to operate a blanket ban on prisoners' voting.

The Attorney General has now underlined the importance of the issue by telling MPs that the UK should be seen to abide by the judgments of the Strasbourg court. Joshua asks legal experts and politicians if these two seemingly contradictory positions can be reconciled and, if so, how.

Producer Simon Coates.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01nq1c4)
Neil Pearson and Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones

Actor Neil Pearson and Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, the self-described "Black Farmer", talk about the books they love.

Neil Pearson's choice is Coming Up For Air, a little-known novel by George Orwell about an ordinary man who yearns to recapture his childhood. But can we ever go back?

Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones introduces the others to The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, the autobiography of a man who was born into slavery. Does it matter if important first-person testimony is true in every detail?

And presenter Harriett Gilbert's choice is Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin, a European classic about an American man living in Paris who's struggling with his sexuality.

Producer: Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01nq1c6)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Includes Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nnw2m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Rudy's Rare Records (b01nq1c8)
Series 4

Miss Reenie Comes to Stay

Adam's surprise birthday present for his Dad backfires.

Adam has a surprise for his Dad's birthday - his sister Reenie! It backfires when Miss Reenie turns out to be the house guest from hell and plans to stay for 6 months.

Father and son comedy set in the finest old-school record shop in Birmingham. Starring Lenny Henry, Larrington Walker and some terrific tunes.

Rudy's Rare Records is a tiny down at heel old reggae record shop in Birmingham - one of a dying breed; a place with real soul, stacked with piles of vinyl, where the slogan is "if we don't have it - them don't mek it". It's owned by the charismatic, irrepressible Rudy Sharpe (Larrington Walker), reluctantly helped out by his long-suffering neurotic son Adam (Lenny Henry) and Handsworth's first, black, surly girly goth, Tasha (Natasha Godfrey). Rudy has recently married his long-term love interest Doreen (Claire Benedict) which is leaving his best friend Clifton (Jeffery Kissoon) feeling left out - that is until Rudy's sister Miss Reenie comes to stay.

Adam ..........Lenny Henry
Rudy.......... Larrington Walker
Tasha...........Natasha Godfrey
Doreen..........Claire Benedict
Clifton...........Jeffery Kissoon
Miss Reenie.......Angela Wynter
RSPCA Man ........ ..Joe Sims

Written by Paula Hines

Script Editor: Danny Robins
Producer: Katie Tyrrell

SWEET JAMAICA * LORD KITCHENER
DANGER IN YOUR EYES * ASWAD
LORD A MASSIE MASSIE * DANNY D AND THE SHADOWS
NOT ME * ROBERT MITCHUM
GIRL I'VE GOT A DATE * ALTON ELLIS
I'M IN LOVE AGAIN * FATS DOMINO
TOP FORM/OLD MACDONALD * YELLOWMAN
SISTER LOVE * GREGORY ISAACS
BLACK WOMAN * SISTER CAROL
DANGEROUS * KARDINAL OFFISHALL & AKON.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01nq1cb)
Brenda attempts to discuss Matt's poor treatment of her at work, but Tom is more concerned about relaying the success of Gourmet Grills.

Later, Tom receives more good news - Speakman's have renewed their ready meals order. He plans to cook Brenda a celebratory meal and is disappointed when he learns she will be late home.

Jamie has got the job as groundsman with Issac the tree surgeon. Kathy is initially concerned the role will interfere with his college work and hopes he will at least finish this term. However seeing how passionate her son is about the vocation, she agrees he can accept the job and offers to help by paying for the chainsaw course and driving lessons.

Nic and George are shopping when George asks if Nic will buy some cereal. The brand Emma now purchases doesn't taste as nice. Later, Nic expresses her concerns to Will. She isn't happy with his on-going feud with Ed, but does think having George over more would be a good idea. Nic believes Emma and Ed are having money issues and hopes that looking after George more will relieve their financial pressure slightly. She will speak to Emma about it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01nq1cd)
Director Michael Haneke; how to cry on stage; Full English

With Mark Lawson.

In a rare interview, acclaimed director Michael Haneke talks about his most recent film, Amour, which won the Palme d'Or at this year's Cannes Festival. Haneke, whose previous films include Funny Games and The White Ribbon, discusses how he works with actors, and the films he has turned down.

Chekhov's Uncle Vanya, 9 to 5 The Musical and Our Boys are just three of the many current stage productions featuring actresses and actors who have to cry on stage. Actors Laurence Fox, Mariah Gale and Natalie Casey discuss the art of acting tearfully, and Christian Burgess from the Guildhall School Of Music And Drama reveals how he teaches crying.

Full English is a new animated TV comedy series aimed very much at adults, and broadcast late at night. Writer Stephen Armstrong joins Mark to consider adult animation past and present.

The celebrated American composer Elliott Carter has died at the age of 103. In tribute, there's another chance to hear his thoughts on his education, and his views on contemporary music, from a Front Row interview recorded shortly before his 100th birthday.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01npjxc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01nq1cg)
Second-Class Patients?

Britain has 1.5 million people with learning difficulties, and the number is growing. Campaigners say the health service is struggling to cope: the number of specialist nurses is falling, and though extra support is supposed to be available for this vulnerable group, hospitals and other health facilities often struggle even to identify them.

Families say their relatives have been left to die in pain - and in some cases people who were not dying have had 'do not resuscitate' orders placed on their notes without being told. The learning disabled are more likely to be ill, more likely to be obese or underweight and more likely to die prematurely. And with health service cuts starting to bite, are things set to get worse? Fran Abrams reports.

Producer: Gail Champion.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01nq1cj)
Talking cash machines, online games

Listener Geoff Long tries out one of Barclays new talking ATMs and Tony Shearman looks into online games which are accessible to blind and visually-impaired players.
Tony and other listeners had success with onine driving games 1000 Miles, Q9 and audio crossword puzzles
Smart phone apps which he found to work well too are Fruit Machine and Ping Pong.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b01nq1cl)
CBT for psychosis; US elections and mental health

First CBT Psychosis Trial in the Absence of Medication

Antipsychotic medication has long been seen as the first line of treatment for psychosis. In fact, prescriptions are increasing in the UK and around the world. But there's criticism that the effectiveness of these drugs has been over-estimated, and the serious side effects, underestimated.

Now, in the first trial of its kind in the world, treating psychosis when people aren't taking antipsychotics using a talking therapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, or CBT, is being measured in a randomised controlled trial.

It is the first time since the 1970s that a psychological treatment, in the absence of medication, has been put to the test, and the results of this experiment have the potential to transform the treatment options for the many people who have diagnoses of schizophrenia and related disorders.

The trial's being run jointly by Manchester University and Greater Manchester West Mental Health Foundation Trust, and Tony Morrison, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Manchester, is leading the research along with colleagues in the North East of England.

He tells Claudia Hammond that patients should be given more choice about the treatments they're offered instead of medication being the default option.

Trial participants, Natalie and Steve, describe their experience of psychosis and the treatments that have helped them and the Editor of the British Journal of Psychiatry, Peter Tyrer, puts the trial into context.

US Elections and Mental Health

Sixteen per cent of the American population don't have health care insurance and people with mental health problems are over-represented in this group. Daniel Carlat is Professor of Psychiatry at Tufts School of Medicine and he describes to Claudia how insurance companies are reluctant to fund mental health care.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b01npjsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01nnw2p)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nq1dh)
Americans vote in their presidential election. The Home Secretary orders new inquiries into allegations of child abuse at care homes in North Wales. And the Russian President Vladimir Putin sacks his defence minister. Presented by Owen Bennett Jones in Washington and Ritula Shah in London.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nq1dk)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 7

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 7:
Little does Agnès know that a chance meeting with someone from her past will bring back painful memories and threaten to destroy the happiness she has found in Chartres.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Arthur Smith's Balham Bash (b00lp32n)
Series 1

Episode 3

Arthur Smith invites an audience into his home in Balham, south London, for music and comedy.

With comedians Nat Luurtsema, Seann Walsh and Micky Flanagan.

In the kitchen, Arthur learns a thing or two about rock n' roll from guest band Alabama 3 (responsible for the theme tune to The Sopranos).

Pippa Evans - as singer-songwriter Loretta Maine - lends a hand.

Producers: Sam Michell and Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nq1dm)
Keith Macdougall hears the Home Secretary announce an inquiry into allegations of child abuse; there's new protests over the EU's plans for banking union; and fears about the impact of the disease affecting ash trees.



WEDNESDAY 07 NOVEMBER 2012

WED 00:00 America Decides (b01nq7kk)
James Naughtie and Bridget Kendall host coverage of the US presidential election as the results are announced.


WED 05:57 Prayer for the Day (b01ns3tm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Canon Dr Sam Wells, vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields.


WED 06:00 Today (b01nq3sg)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:

0750
Today it will be made clear how much of the UK is infected with the Ash dieback disease. The Today programme's Tom Feilden, speaking from a mixed ash/beech woodland on the South Downs at Storrington in Sussex, examines the consequences of the disease, and its likely impact on woods and wildlife.

0810
US President Barack Obama wins re-election to a second term, defeating Republican challenger Mitt Romney. Former White House spokesman PJ Crowley and Taylor Griffin, a former McCain adviser, analyse the results and the challenges facing both the president and the Republicans..

0823
Researchers in Kazakhstan are reported to have spent two years and millions of pounds trying to come up with an elixir to prolong the life of their leader President Nazarbayev after he set them the challenge in 2010. Roger Highfield, director of external affairs at the Science Museum, and Dr Jennifer Rampling, an expert on elixirs based at Cambridge, discuss the science behind the idea of a life preserving elixir.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01nq3sj)
Dame Stephanie Shirley, Bryan Hymel, Theo Knell, Tom Balmont

Libby Purves meets philanthropist Dame Stephanie Shirley; opera singer Bryan Hymel; former soldier and poet Theo Knell and street entertainer Tom Balmont.

Tom Balmont is a professional street entertainer at London's Covent Garden Piazza where he can be seen unicycling, sword-swallowing and fire-juggling. He is also a member of the Lion Rampant Medieval Display Society, specialising in juggling and sword jumping.

Dame Stephanie Shirley is a technology entrepreneur turned philanthropist. At the age of five she escaped Nazi Germany on the Kindertransport before going on to set up a computer programming company which made her a millionaire many times over. But she has given away most of her fortune and became the Government's founding Ambassador for Philanthropy. Her autobiography 'Let It Go' is published by Andrews UK.

Theo Knell is a former member of the SAS and a poet. He joined the British Army in 1970 aged 18 and remained in the service for next 22 years. He served all over the world from Northern Ireland to the Middle East, Central Africa and the Far East. His book 'Hell For Heroes' is published by Coronet. It tells of his warfare experiences and includes examples of his war poetry.

Bryan Hymel is an American tenor. He is playing Robert in Robert le Diable at the Royal Opera House from December. It's a gothic tale in which the hero, Robert, resorts to the supernatural in his struggle to regain his fortune. Bryan can also can be seen as Enee in David McVicar's Les Troyens which is showing in selected cinemas from November.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01ns0sz)
Michael Holroyd - On Wheels

Episode 3

Michael Holroyd confronts an army of automobiles in this charming memoir. Weaving together personal stories and historical anecdote, he traces his relationship with cars through a lifetime of biography.

Learning to drive was no easy matter for Michael. The lessons required military precision when practising how to get in and out of his car correctly. His biographical subjects also had their difficulties: Bernard Shaw drove with reckless gusto when overtaking his eightieth year; Vita Sackville-West's car became a chamber for sudden romantic assignations and getaways; Augustus John and his family careered through vulnerable villages as the poor vehicle, piled high with bohemian friends, stuttered and jerked along in first gear.

Wry, thoughtful and very funny, On Wheels is an elegy to the glamour of the car. Subtle and perceptive, Michael Holroyd finds surprising ways to understand the past and challenge our view of the future.

Episode 3 of 5
In the third episode of On Wheels Michael Holroyd describes the pleasures of driving a Daf, and the danger of doing so in Northern Ireland. And he gives us a taste of playwright Bernard Shaw's rather individualistic approach to driving.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nq3sl)
Kirstie Allsopp; Helena Kennedy; Malala's blog

Kirstie Allsopp on vintage style. The Woman's Hour Power List - Helena Kennedy looks at who's who in the law. Action for Children on new research into poverty and children in the UK. Who were the great female thinkers of the twentieth century? Part three of the blog of Malala Yousafzai. Presented by Jenni Murray.
Produced by Ruth Watts.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nq3sn)
The Righteous Sisters

Episode 3

by Jane Purcell.

The true story of English sisters Louise and Ida Cook (better known as romantic novelist Mary Burchell), whose love of opera led them into a life of danger, rescuing Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany.

3/5 Ida and Louise travel to Berlin as rescuers, but find themselves leaving as smugglers.

Translations by Johannes Mirbach

Original research by Louise Carpenter

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


WED 11:00 One Day in Summer (b01nq3sq)
Police, coastguards, hoteliers and holidaymakers talk about life in Cornwall on one of the county's busiest days, Bank Holiday Saturday, 25th August 2012.

Behind the traffic jams and the dash for accommodation is the story of an infrastructure under strain and a local housing market out of control. The crowds bring noise, life, litter and trouble. Last year, lifeguards on Perranporth beach in Cornwall dealt with a record 808 separate incidents, as swimmers, surfers, body-boarders, kayakers and kite-surfers all vied for some time and space in the water. Across the South West, lifeboats took to the water in their busiest year on record, and the RNLI helped over 16 000 people.

Cornwall is a unique county. Not because of the scenery, the redundant tin industry or the inflated house prices. It is unique because of the invasion of tourists from up-country that descend on the county's roads, resorts and beaches every summer. It is estimated that up to five million people charge down the A30 to visit Cornwall every summer, most of these from mainland UK. This programme, recorded between sunrise and sunset, is a day-in-the-life of Britain's playground.


WED 11:30 Mr and Mrs Smith (b019rpw8)
The Dinner Party

A year into married life and already things are a little creaky. So, following Will's unimaginative anniversary present (a draining rack), Annabelle's signed them up for a course of marriage counselling.

Counsellor Guy mediates a recent dispute between Will and Annabelle, with flashbacks to the events that spawned the argument...

Will Smith's sitcom about a couple in marriage counselling

Will Smith ..... Will Smith
Annabelle Smith ..... Sarah Hadland
Guy ..... Paterson Joseph
Katrina ..... Tracy Wiles
Doug ..... Simon Bubb
Heather ..... Morwenna Banks

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01nq3sv)
Solid fuel heating, charity status and gift vouchers

Should churches and independent schools be regarded as charities? There are real benefits to charitable status, but what kind of organisations should qualify? The thousands of students in Scotland who have waited weeks for their loans to arrive. For many, drinking a couple of glasses of wine is an enjoyable everyday habit, but what are the real health risks of daily drinking? As the nights draw in, nestling round a real fire sounds like an attractive idea, but with fuel prices increasing, could solid fuel also help to reduce your heating bills?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jonathan Hallewell.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01nnw3v)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01nq3sx)
National and international news presented by Edward Stourton. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz97)
Series 1

Sweden - Kurt Wallander and Lisbeth Salander

If the Martin Beck novels of Sjöwall and Wahlöö set the template for the social commentary found in Scandinavian crime fiction - Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander novels and Steig Larsson's Millennium Trilogy have both used the form to focus on racist attitudes in modern Sweden.

Henning Mankell, Kenneth Branagh, Liza Marklund, Camilla Läckberg and Eva Gabrielsson - Stieg Larsson's partner, share their views about whether the Swedish state can still be held up as an ideal as Mark Lawson continues his series about the way modern European history is reflected through the pages of crime fiction.

Producer Robyn Read.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01nq1cb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01nq3sz)
Two Pipe Problems

A Rose by Any Other Name

In tribute to Richard Briers who co-starred in this series for six years.

Sandy and William find a cardboard box in the doorway to the Old Beeches; inside, a tiny baby, clutching a small toy. There is no message and no sign of the mother. From the moment Sandy carries the box into the breakfast room, the discovery causes a sensation in the closet world of the home. Everyone is enchanted by the child - a little girl - and horrified at the implications of her being abandoned.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey Production

Written by award winning television and theatre writer Michael Chaplin.
Directed by Marilyn Imrie

Produced by: Catherine Bailey
A Catherine Bailey Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01nq3t1)
Wills and Inheritance

Millions of people in Britain have not made a will. If you're one of them, it means you have no control over where your assets - your property, your investments or your hard-earned cash - will end up when you die. It could also cause extra distress for your family trying to sort out the mess that's been left behind.

And it may mean more of your money going to the Inland Revenue instead of to your nearest and dearest.

If you're living together, but aren't married or in a civil partnership, it's even more important to write a will because without one, there are no special rules that automatically allow the surviving partner to inherit. So they might get nothing. The situation is different in Scotland.

If you're worried about the cost, now might be a good time to get your affairs in order, because November is the annual Will Aid month - when thousands of solicitors around the UK offer to write your will without charging a fee and ask you instead to make a donation to charity.

It's also a good time to get advice on inheritance tax planning - especially if your possessions are worth more than £325,000 or £650,000 for a married couple or those in a civil partnership. Any gifts to beneficiaries above that amount is taxed at 40%.

Tax rules allow you to give away some of your assets tax-free. But do you know what these rules are? Can you give away cash or even a house to your family before you die? What are the tax implications of doing so?
Whatever your question, Vincent Duggleby and a panel of guests are ready to provide you with answers

How do you make a will and how much will it cost?

What information is required?

Do you understand the inheritance laws and how they'll affect your family?

What happens if you're not married or not in a civil partnership?

What is the system in Scotland?

How much can you give away during your lifetime to reduce tax on your death?

How can you protect your digital assets?

Vincent Duggleby will be joined by:

James Brogan, Solicitor at Russel and Aitken Solicitors

Nicola Plant, Partner at Pemberton Greenish Solicitors

Mark Smithson, Senior Tax Manager, Grant Thornton

Producer is Sally Abrahams.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b01nq1cl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01nq3t3)
Couchsurfing - Trauma Advocacy

Ever in need of a new way to travel? 'Couchsurfing', in the form of online social networking, allows users to travel with and stay at the homes of fellow users. It's just one example of how the internet aids face to face intimacy - sometimes amongst strangers. Paula Bialski talks to Laurie Taylor about her book 'Becoming Intimately Mobile' . Based on five years of ethnographic research amongst coach surfers and online hitchhiking website users, it documents new forms of human hospitality and connection. Also, trauma advocates in Croatia. Vanessa Pupavac and Ben Shephard reflect on the growth of compensation schemes for victims of civil war.

Producer:Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01nq3t5)
Channel 4; Leveson; trust in the BBC

As Lord Justice Leveson puts the finishing touches to his forthcoming report into the culture, practices and ethics of the press we speak to a former Editor of The Guardian Peter Preston and the academic Professor Natalie Fenton about why the FT and The Guardian - both previously open to the idea that legislation might be needed to tempt, or force, reluctant media owners to participate, have moderated their positions

We celebrate thirty years of Channel 4 with the founding Chief Executive Sir Jeremy Isaacs and look back at its achievements and the challenges it faces in the future.

And we try to get to the bottom of why the BBC - so long immune from bad ratings on the trust scorecard appears to be suffering too. 76% of us apparently do not trust senior managers at the BBC to tell the truth.

Presenter Steve Hewlett
Producer Beverley Purcell.


WED 17:00 PM (b01nq3t7)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nnw3x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b00x40p1)
Series 6

The Curse of Count Arthur

With all things 'horror' on his somewhat confused mind, Arthur receives a phone call from his good friend Barry Cryer to say that they have somehow lost Barry's briefcase containing the tickets they require to attend a lunchtime Hammer Horror convention at which they are due.

They decide to re-trace their steps from the previous night, which includes taking in a visit to some local haunts and shops, as well as the Shoulder of Mutton.

With the briefcase (and thus the tickets) nowhere to be found, Arthur and Barry are left to decide what they should do - try and get in to the convention by relying on their good names and reputations alone, or risk missing out on the Hammer Horror lunch...?

Cast:
Count Arthur Strong ..... Steve Delaney
Dracula/Himself ..... Barry Cryer
Sally ..... Melanie Giedroyc
Gerry/Jack ..... Dave Mounfield
Shop Assistant/Wally/
Bouncer/Wilf ..... Alastair Kerr

Producers: Richard Daws, Mark Radcliffe & John Leonard
A Komedia Entertainment & Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01nq3t9)
Lilian gripes about Leonie's presence and Matt's absence. However Jennifer points out that at least having Leonie around, Lilian has less to do for James. In a moment to herself, Lilian admits she just wants a little support.

Ruth is on the hunt for a third witch for her Macbeth scene in the Christmas show. She solicits Lilian who initially declines, but accepts when she realises it might be a welcome distraction.

Brian gives Will a bonus for his sterling work on the shoot. Jennifer wants to visit Alice to see how she's getting on with her new job.

Nic speaks to Emma. From Nic's past experience struggling to make ends meet as a single mother, she understands the pressures of money worries and how Ed and Emma might not want to admit that they need help. Emma relays the conversation to Ed, but he is adamant that Will shouldn't be allowed any extra time with his son.

Ed returns from milking early to talk with Emma and apologise for their earlier discussion becoming heated. Emma doesn't want George to be away for another night a week, but concedes it would help financial matters - besides they haven't really got another choice.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01nq3tc)
The Rolling Stones in conversation with John Wilson

With John Wilson.

Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood reflect on life in The Rolling Stones, as they prepare to return to the stage next month.

It's now 50 years since the band's first performance, and they discuss at their early shared love of the blues, the experience of rehearsing and performing, and the future.

Producer John Goudie.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nq3sn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b01nq3tf)
The USA has once again emerged from its presidential electoral bout of soul searching. Candidates for the White House don't just have to have a plan for jobs and the economy, they have to have an inspiring vision and purpose for the nation. The grandiloquent rhetoric that candidates employ when they're setting out this message my sound strange on this side of the Atlantic, but it's no accident that presidents as poles apart as John F Kennedy and Ronald Reagan describe their country as a "shining city upon a hill". It's taken from Matthew's Gospel and Jesus' Sermon on the Mount where He tells His listeners that they are "the light to the world." From the founding Pilgrim Fathers to presidents today there's always been a strong sense in American politics that it is different from other countries; that its founding Enlightenment principles of liberty, equality and individual freedom not only make America exceptional, but also embody the nation with a duty of moral leadership to the rest of the world. The USA is still the richest and most powerful country in the world, but what about its moral capital? There are those who'd argue that America, especially in its foreign policy, has forfeited any claims to moral superiority. Or is this an example of a strong streak of anti-Americanism in the West that's driven by jealousy, prejudice and moral relativism? Many countries around the world and throughout history, including Great Britain, have seen themselves as exceptional with a unique gift to give to the world. Are nations that believe they are "chosen" and their unique status is the moral justification of their actions always going to be a threat to others? Is America guilty of religious nationalism, or do we need the most powerful country in the world to stand up for Western values? Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Melanie Phillips, Kenan Malik, Matthew Taylor and Claire Fox. Witnesses: Mehdi Hasan - political director Huffington Post and writer for New Statesman, Francis Beckett - Writer and historian, Charlie Wolf - Broadcaster, former Communications Director of Republicans Abroad UK, Daniel Hannon - Author "Anglosphere" and MEP for South East England.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01nq41q)
Series 3

James Friel: In Praise of the Single Life

Novelist James Friel, author of "The Posthumous Affair", defends the value and virtues of the single life against the widespread cultural view that being in a couple is a superior state of being.

Four Thought is a series of talks offering a personal viewpoint recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b01nq41t)
Future of Particle Physics

Finding the Higgs boson on July 4th was the last piece in physicists' Standard model of matter. But Tracey Logan discovers there's much more for them to find out at the Large Hadron Collider. To start with there is a lot of work to establish what kind of Higgs boson it is.

Tracey visits CERN and an experiment called LHCb which is trying to find out why there's a lot more matter than anti-matter in the universe today. Dr Tara Shears of Liverpool University is her guide.

Tracey also talks to physicists who are hoping to find dark matter in the debris of the collisions at the LHC. Scientists know there's plenty of dark matter in the universe, from its effects on galaxies, but they don't know what it is. Tracey discovers that this fact isn't stopping the particle physicists carrying out experiments.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01nq3sj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01nnw3z)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nq41w)
In depth analysis of the re-election of President Obama from Washington with Owen Bennett Jones.

Barack Obama may have won a new mandate, but his Republican opponents retained control of the House of Representatives. So will the US be able to overcome the political gridlock that threatens the country with fiscal disaster that could hit the global economy?


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nq420)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 8

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 8:
Robert finds a body in the river and Madame Beck learns of Agnès' past. Agnès agrees to babysit Max but, the day after she hands him back to Brigitte, all hell breaks loose.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Irish Micks and Legends (b01nq4j1)
Series 1

Tir Na Nog

Aisling Bea and Yasmine Akram become Ais and Yaz and are the very best pals. They are taking their role as Ireland's freshest story-tellers to the British nation very seriously indeed but they haven't had the time to do much research, learn their lines or work out who is doing which parts.

The girls' unconventional way of telling stories involves a concoction of thoroughly inappropriate modern-day metaphors and references to many of the ancient Irish stories.

With a natural knack for both comedy and character voices Yasmine Akram and Aisling Bea will bring you warm, modern re-workings of popular ancient Irish stories.

Today it's Tir Na Nog.

Written and performed by Aisling Bea and Yasmine Akram

Producer: Raymond Lau.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


WED 23:15 Living with Mother (b01nq4j3)
Series 2

Told You I Was Ill

Lisa is a hypochondriac and worries about everything. She can't accept the fact that her son has grown up and isn't a baby anymore.

Luke wants to leave home and move in with his girlfriend but he dare not break the news to his Mum. He hasn't actually told her that he's been going out with someone for the past year. The girlfriend gives Luke an ultimatum and he eventually plucks up the courage to tell his mother about her and that she is coming over for tea. Lisa seems OK with it all - but we soon discover that she has a plan.

Writing about the first series of Living with Mother, Radio Times described it as "Alexander Kirk's astutely-observed comedy series...underpinning each of these tales is a bittersweet poignancy, a moment when the easy laughs are replaced with a lip-trembling insight into the vulnerability, lack of self-confidence and interdependency".

Cast:
Luke ..... Daniel Mays
Lisa ..... Linda Robson

Written by: Alexander Kirk

Producer: Anna Madley
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nq4j5)
With David Cameron away, it was deputies' day at Westminster. Nick Clegg and Harriet Harman trade blows at question-time, over changes to the benefit system and over the future of policing. There are also remarks about the departure of the controversial MP Nadine Dorries to take part in a reality TV programme in Australia. Rachel Byrne has the best of the exchanges.
Also on the programme:
* Alan Soady reports on reaction to the re-election of Barack Obama as United States President.
* Simon Jones covers a Commons debate on discrepancies in pay levels in the National Health Service.
* Peter Mulligan follows the latest session of the ongoing inquiry into the future of banking.



THURSDAY 08 NOVEMBER 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01nnw4t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01ns0sz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw4w)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01nnw4y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw50)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01nnw52)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ns3vv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Canon Dr Sam Wells, vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01nq504)
Farmers groups have welcomed plans by Tesco to link the price it pays for beef and pork to the cost of animal feed. Pig farmers say the rising cost of fodder means they are loosing on average £10 per pig and operating below the cost of production is forcing some out of business.

With more than 180,000 tonnes of mushrooms eaten in the UK last year, Charlotte catches up with celebrity chef and mushroom fan - Valentine Warner.

And also in the programme - the Secretary of the State for the Environment, Owen Paterson says DEFRA needs to refocus its activities to try to tackle the crisis facing the UK's ash tree population.


THU 06:00 Today (b01nq7cr)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by John Humphrys and Evan Davis, including:

0742
The New York Times blogger Nate Silver has been hailed as an unexpected star in the business of predicting who will win the US Presidential election. Marcus du Sautoy, professor of maths at New College, discusses whether the formula that Mr Silver used to predict the results could be applied more widely.

0750
The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt has said he wants to make Britain one of the best places in Europe in the way it cares for those with dementia. Jeremy Hunt explains what he will be announcing in a new scheme today.

0810
Today China will begin the process of choosing the men who will lead them over the next ten years. The BBC's world editor John Simpson is in Beijing and has been finding our how much say the people will have in election of their new leader. Stephen Perry, chairman of the 48 Group Club and chief executive of the London Export Corporation, and Dr Zhengxu Wang, deputy director of the China Policy Institute at the University of Nottingham, examine the political direction in which the party wishes to move.

0818
A new book published today argues that here in the west we are often uncomfortable with silence, and underestimate its value. Graham Turner, author of The Power of Silence, and Sister Anne Morris, deputy director of St Beuno's Ignatian Spirituality Centre, analyse the benefits of silence.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01nq7ct)
The Upanishads

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Upanishads, the ancient sacred texts of Hinduism. Dating from about 700 BC, the Upanishads were passed down through an oral tradition in priestly castes and were not written down until the 6th century AD. They constitute the final part of the Vedas, the collection of texts which form the foundation of the Indian Hindu world, and were originally spoken during sacrificial rituals.

Yet the Upanishads go beyond incantations performed during sacrifices, and ask profound questions about human existence and man's place in the cosmos. The concepts of Brahman (the universal cosmic power) and Atman (the deeper soul of the individual) are central to the understanding of the Upanishads. Each individual treatise has its own character. Some are poetic; some are scientific; others are dialogues between kings and sages or metaphysical reflections. More than one hundred Upanishads were produced, thirteen of which are regarded as the canonical scriptures of Hinduism.

With:

Jessica Frazier
Lecturer in Religious Studies at the University of Kent and a Research Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies at the University of Oxford

Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad
Professor of Comparative Religion and Philosophy at Lancaster University

Simon Brodbeck
Lecturer in Religious Studies at the University of Cardiff

Producer: Natalia Fernandez.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01ns1ff)
Michael Holroyd - On Wheels

Episode 4

Michael Holroyd confronts an army of automobiles in this charming memoir. Weaving together personal stories and historical anecdote, he traces his relationship with cars through a lifetime of biography.

Learning to drive was no easy matter for Michael. The lessons required military precision when practising how to get in and out of his car correctly. His biographical subjects also had their difficulties: Bernard Shaw drove with reckless gusto when overtaking his eightieth year; Vita Sackville-West's car became a chamber for sudden romantic assignations and getaways; Augustus John and his family careered through vulnerable villages as the poor vehicle, piled high with bohemian friends, stuttered and jerked along in first gear.

Wry, thoughtful and very funny, On Wheels is an elegy to the glamour of the car. Subtle and perceptive, Michael Holroyd finds surprising ways to understand the past and challenge our view of the future.

Episode 4 of 5
Michael explains the delight the Bloomsbury set took in motor cars, both as objects of desire and locations for illicit assignations. And he explains how the motor car allowed Augustus John to reveal his true, colourful and cavalier character.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nq7cw)
Jessica Ennis; Anna Friel; Meltdown; Malala

Jessica Ennis, one of the golden girls of London 2012 talks about her success at the Olympics, how life has changed since the Games, and her new biography. Presented by Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nq7cy)
The Righteous Sisters

Episode 4

by Jane Purcell.

The true story of English sisters Louise and Ida Cook (better known as romantic novelist Mary Burchell), whose love of opera led them into a life of danger, rescuing Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany.

4/5 1938. A secret weekend in Frankfurt becomes a race against time.

Translations by Johannes Mirbach

Original research by Louise Carpenter

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b01nq7d0)
Driving on Mars

The United States of America: after the election excitement the Obama team start planning for four more years. Paul Adams.

Mali: preparations well advanced for a military operation to repel Islamist rebels from the north of the country. Afua Hirsch.

Oman: the Arab Spring comes calling at the Gulf state once called 'a place of wind and spiders.' Matthew Teller.

Georgia: Can the new government act to restore parts of the country now effectively under Russian control? Martin Plaut.

The USA: A visit to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a realisation that driving on Mars is harder than it looks. Richard Hollingham.

Producer: Tony Grant.


THU 11:30 What's So Great About ...? (b00ps1hd)
Series 2

Samuel Beckett

Lenny Henry questions the iconic status of people or things held dear by many.

Despite having seen Waiting for Godot half a dozen times and studying the work of the modernist Irish writer as part of his degree, Lenny has never really completely tuned in to the work of Samuel Beckett. He sets out to rectify this by talking to a glorious cast of Beckettophiles, who are determined to make the great playwright and poet come alive for him. He talks to actor and director Simon McBurney, actress Fiona Shaw, Beckett's long-term friend and publisher John Calder, and the man who was authorised to write his biography, James Knowlson. Lenny also joins a rehearsal by the Godot Theatre players, some of whom knew the playwright well, and hears their thoughts on tuning in to the Beckett idiom.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01nq7d2)
Interest-only mortgages, British Gas, Tesco farmers, Scottish students and buying wine

Today - we'll be talking about interest only mortgages. Four out of ten mortgages across the UK are interest only, seven out of ten families have no way of paying them off when the mortgage term ends. Is this shaping up to be the next mis-selling scandal? The death of our ash trees is now inevitable - it's just a matter of time. So says the government's senior scientific advisor - what happens when it claims the tree in your garden? And how our wine buying habits have shifted in the downturn.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01nnw54)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01nq7d4)
National and international news presented by Edward Stourton. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz9h)
Series 1

Norway - Harry Hole

Jo Nesbø's novels, featuring detective Harry Hole top best seller lists across the world - the latest example of the boom in Scandinavian crime fiction.

Mark Lawson talks to Nesbø, Liza Marklund and Gunnar Staalesen about the impact of Norwegian oil on the economy, the divisions caused by the Second World War and the effect of random acts of violence in Sweden and Norway with the assassination of politicians and the killing spree on Utøya island.

Producer Robyn Read.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01nq3t9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01nq7d6)
The Other Simenon

The Neighbours

When he wasn't writing Maigret, Georges Simenon produced a huge body of novels and short stories, often tough, gripping and psychologically-penetrating dissections of lives confounded by fate. In The Other Simenon we explore more of his dark tales of human misfortune!
In The Neighbours, Emile Jovis, the director of a Paris travel agency, finds that moving home doesn't always make for a better life. Acting from the best possible motives he decides to uproot his family from their dilapidated flat in the Marais district of Paris to a new development outside the city. All too soon, however, he becomes aware that his wife and son do not share his enthusiasm. And his peace of mind is shattered when he overhears a series of blunt and brusque conversations coming from his neighbours' flat. His irritation on hearing their voices leads to an obsessive interest in their world.
Dramatised by Ronald Frame and starring Jamie Glover and Robin Weaver.

Other parts played by members of the cast.
Producer/Director: David Ian Neville.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01nq7d8)
Lakeland Adventures

Over 80 years after the publication of 'Swallows and Amazons', Helen Mark visits the Lake District to find out why the lakes and landscapes that inspired some of Arthur Ransome's most famous stories are now the setting for a variety of different and often more daring adventures. From trails to triathlons, ghyll scrambling to zorbing and aqua rolling, there is now something for everyone to be found on the Lakeland fells.

On the lower slopes of Helvellyn, around 1200 people prepare to take part in a trail run designed to test and exhilarate them as they make their way through some of the most dramatic views that Lakeland has to offer. Helen meets the organiser, Graham Patten, to find out more about the people who travel miles to take part and also why the National Park is so keen to promote the area as the UK's Adventure Capital. It's a far cry from the more genteel adventures of sailing, camping and fishing experienced by the Walker children, John, Susan, Titty and Roger, who Arthur Ransome wrote about.

Out on Coniston water Arthur's cousin, Richard Ransome, tells Helen how his own childhood, growing up in the area, was very like something from his cousin's books and how he feels that the magic element of imagination seems to be missing from the adventures of today. Helen is given a demonstration of ghyl scrambling by a group of adventurers who describe the thrill this gives them. And finally, Helen meets John Nettleton and Jenny Massie, whose own adventures climbing and running on the screes and fells of this landscape began at a time when they almost had their own bit of Lakeland to themselves.

Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01np104)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b01npb1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01nq7db)
Ben Affleck on directing and starring in his Iranian hostage thriller, Argo.

Director Sally El Hossaini on her award-winning debut, My Brother The Devil, set in the crime-ridden estates of Hackney.

And director Paul Thomas Anderson talks about The Master, his enigmatic film that's generating so much debate.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01nq7dd)
Climate change alone could wipe out wild Arabica coffee by the end of this century, according to new research published in the journal PLOS One. Commercially grown Arabica coffee is from limited genetic stock and the loss of the wild crop could have significant implications for the sustainability of high quality coffee. Dr. Aaron Davis, Head of Coffee Research at Kew Gardens, who led the study, discusses the findings with global crop wild relative expert Dr. Nigel Maxted from the University of Birmingham.

A haul of stone blades from a cave in South Africa suggests that early humans were already masters of complex technology more than 70,000 years ago. The journal Nature reports on the new find which suggests that early humans passed on this knowledge down the generations. Dr. Curtis Marean, an archaeologist at Arizona State University in Tempe, who led the team that found the bladelets and Dr. Matthew Pope from the University College London argue that this could be the earliest evidence of truly modern human behaviour.

Finally why are birds migrating to the UK literally falling out of the sky and dying - Graham Madge from the RSPB explains more.


THU 17:00 PM (b01nq7dg)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nnw56)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Andrew Lawrence: How Did We End Up Like This? (b01nq7dj)
What We Wear

Andrew Lawrence continues his comic explanation of our development via stand up, sketch and song.

This time, Andrew discusses what we wear.

Sara Pascoe and Marek Larwood assist.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01nq7dl)
Fallon is looking for new staff, as Naomi has quit her post at Jaxx. Fallon remarks that everyone was given a fair chance during the recruitment process. But Kirsty says she'd voiced her concerns to Don Sandland. When Naomi was acting manager, staff weren't happy.

Kenton is reworking the rota with Rhys to accommodate Nic and Jamie when Fallon calls with a job proposition for Rhys.

After some gentle encouragement from Kenton, Lynda agrees to play Prospero in the Elizabethan Christmas. Lynda informs Rhys that she senses a palpable crackle between Fallon and Rhys as Beatrice and Benedict.

The consultant's report has arrived at Lower Loxley. Though it suggests the business is still viable, Elizabeth has some big decisions to make. She considers converting the old dairy block into wedding accommodation.

Rhys declines Fallon's offer to work at Jaxx. He doesn't want to leave Kenton and Jolene. Kirsty wonders if Fallon had ulterior motives in hiring Rhys, perhaps thinking it would allow them to get closer. Fallon denies she was interested in anything but filling the bar position.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01nq7dn)
Alan Bennett's play People; Michael Winterbottom's film Everyday

With Mark Lawson,

Alan Bennett's new play People stars Frances de la Tour as a former model living in her family's crumbling stately home. The comedy, staged at the National Theatre, focuses on the future preservation of the house, with options ranging from a heritage site to location hire for a porn film. Writer Kate Saunders reviews.

Ukrainian writer Andrey Kurkov - whose books include Death and the Penguin - talks to Mark about how he was almost seduced by the Writer's Union into being an official writer in the old Soviet Union, why his books might not be considered Ukrainian literature by some, and how he was helped by the protection mafia while trying to sell his books on the streets of Kiev.

Director Michael Winterbottom's latest film Everyday was filmed over five years and portrays a family living through a prison sentence, with John Simm as the prisoner and Shirley Henderson as his wife. Their children are very young at the start of the story, but visibly age in the course of the film. Writer and critic Bidisha gives her verdict.

The powerful Mughal Empire dominated the Indian subcontinent from the 16th to the 19th century. The British Library has brought together over 200 objects, including paintings and literature, to create a major exhibition examining the entire reign of the Mughals. Curator Malini Roy discusses what the exhibits reveal.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nq7cy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b01nq1c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01nq7dq)
Financial Services

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan and his guests discuss financial services. They have the power to enrich an economy - or to ruin it completely. But what kind of makeover do they need to get them fit for the 21st century? Should the industry be more innovative and clever - or just a bit more old-fashioned and simple?

Joining Evan in the studio are former fund manager David Pitt-Watson; Martin Gilbert, chief executive of Aberdeen Asset Management; Richard Ward, chief executive of insurance market Lloyd's of London.

Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Innes Bowen.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b01npjxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01nq7ct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01nnw58)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nq7ds)
China's once in a decade meeting to select new leadership; Cameron warns of gay 'witch hunt'; also, will the internet remain relatively open and free of government control? Presented by Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nq7dv)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 9

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 9
Following the accusation that she hurt baby Max, Agnès disappears. Alain has a good idea where she'll be and heads for the cathedral crypt. Madame Beck continues her hate campaign.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 The Headset Set (b01nq7dx)
Series 2

Episode 2

Sketches set in a call centre called Smile 5, a mail order catalogue company that sells anything and everything. On the Smile 5 call centre floor, Bernie is excessively angry over her missing lunch.

Aleesha and other characters ..... Chizzy Akudolu
Bernie and other characters ..... Margaret-Cabourn Smith
Big Tony, Ralph and other characters ..... Colin Hoult
Various characters ..... Lucy Montgomery
Sailesh, Bradley and other characters ..... Phaldut sharma

Script editor: James Kettle.

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nq7dz)
Sean Curran hears the defence secretary unveil plans to boost the number of part-time soldiers; a former minister explains why he gave aid to Rwanda on his last day in office; and peers ask how they can stop being the world's largest parliamentary chamber outside China.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



FRIDAY 09 NOVEMBER 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01nnw63)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01ns1ff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw65)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01nnw67)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01nnw69)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01nnw6c)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ns3wr)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Canon Dr Sam Wells, vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01nq2sb)
How the genetic history of Britain's ash trees may help save them. A new report from Scottish Natural Heritage indicates a dramatic decline in the number of seabirds in Scotland. And as the wild mushroom foraging season gets underway, Farming Today travels to the damp undergrowth of Epping Forest and the New Forest where there are concerns about the effect of foraging on the habitat.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Rich Ward.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01nq2sd)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, including:

0742
The Iranian blogger Sattar Beheshti was arrested over a week ago for what police said were "actions against national security on social networks and Facebook". Masih Alinejad, an Iranian journalist based here in the UK, explains his contact with Mr Beheshti.

0752
A row has broken out before the opening of Alan Bennett's new play, People. Today presenter James Naughtie met Alan Bennett at the National Theatre and asked him what the new play was about.

0810
Since BBC Two's Newsnight broadcast accusations by a victim of abuse in north Wales that a senior Conservative MP was involved in his abuse in the 1980s and that a previous inquiry failed to investigate, the internet has been awash with the names of potential perpetrators. The BBC's home editor
Is there a witch-hunt?
Mark Easton provides analysis and David Aaronovitch, Times columnist, and David Hencke, an investigative journalist, discuss how should we deal with issues like this on the internet.

0820
The verdict is expected in the trial of one of the world's most prominent dealers in Stradivarius violins, Dietmar Machold, who is accused of embezzlement and serious fraud. Professor Tasmin Little, of the Royal Academy of Music, explains why the trial in Vienna has been described as the biggest case of fraud in the international trade in rare musical instruments.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01npb0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01ns1k9)
Michael Holroyd - On Wheels

Episode 5

Michael Holroyd confronts an army of automobiles in this charming memoir. Weaving together personal stories and historical anecdote, he traces his relationship with cars through a lifetime of biography.

Learning to drive was no easy matter for Michael. The lessons required military precision when practising how to get in and out of his car correctly. His biographical subjects also had their difficulties: Bernard Shaw drove with reckless gusto when overtaking his eightieth year; Vita Sackville-West's car became a chamber for sudden romantic assignations and getaways; Augustus John and his family careered through vulnerable villages as the poor vehicle, piled high with bohemian friends, stuttered and jerked along in first gear.

Wry, thoughtful and very funny, On Wheels is an elegy to the glamour of the car. Subtle and perceptive, Michael Holroyd finds surprising ways to understand the past and challenge our view of the future.

Episode 5 of 5
In the final episode, Michael Holroyd describes playwright Bernard Shaw's enthusiastic, if cavalier, approach to driving - only thwarted by the outbreak of world war. For Michael Holroyd, however, it was the satnav that did for him.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nq2vj)
Helen Fielding; Martha Payne; Power List Expert Witness; Malala and the repercussions in Pakistan; Surrogacy in India

She was the EveryWoman icon for the thirtysomething generation, and now Woman's Hour can reveal that Bridget Jones is coming back. After over ten years in LA Helen Fielding is back in the UK and back at her desk, writing the third Bridget Jones book. Will it be cigarettes and alcohol intake, or will it be Twitter and Pinterest? Helen Fielding joins Jenni to explain why she has decided it is time to bring Bridget Jones back, and why she retains such a hold on people's hearts.

It started as a nine-year-old's blog about her school lunch but then the local council tried to ban it and after that there was just no stopping it. So far Martha Payne's site, Neverseconds, has raised over £120,000 for charity and now Martha, with a bit of help from Dad, is publishing a book.

We've come so far from the protest marches and songs of only fifty years ago, and campaigning across a global, digital platform has never evolved faster than now. So what makes a successful campaigner - is it power or influence? And who are today's most powerful and effective women campaigners? Continuing our Power List series - co-editor and co-founder of the campaigning magazine Red Pepper, Hilary Wainwright, joins Jenni to discuss.

Almost one million people worldwide have signed their name to call on both the Pakistan government and the United Nations to achieve Malala Yousafzai's aim - that every girl has the opportunity to go to school. Gordon Brown will declare tomorrow Malala Day, a global day of action in support of the 32 million girls around the world who are not at school. But what are the repercussions in Pakistan itself? Orla Guerin is the BBC's Islamabad Correspondent, and joins us from there.

Every year, hundreds of couples travel from their homes in Britain, America and Europe to the Gujarati city of Anand, near Ahmedabad. Anand is India's Milk City - a million litres of milk are produced here every day, and it's the centre of the country's dairy industry. But these visitors are not coming for milk. They're coming for children. Surrogacy is big business in India. And it's controversial - with newspaper headlines, both here and in India, attacking the idea of 'wombs to rent'. Clare Jenkins recently went to the Akanksha Infertility Clinic in Anand to hear from some of those involved.

Presented by Jenni Murray. Produced by Susannah Tresilian.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nq2wm)
The Righteous Sisters

Episode 5

by Jane Purcell.

The true story of English sisters Louise and Ida Cook (better known as romantic novelist Mary Burchell), whose love of opera led them into a life of danger, rescuing Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany.

5/5 August 1939. No one knows when the Western borders will close, but Ida attempts a last case in Berlin.

Translations by Johannes Mirbach

Original research by Louise Carpenter

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


FRI 11:00 What's in a Name? (b01nq2zp)
Impiaz - yes. Oisin - yes. Musa - yes. Ayisat - yes. Araya - yes. Tianna - yes. Taking the register at the start of the school day at one London primary school says much about names in 21st century Britain.

As a child growing up in 1980s Britain, journalist Sangita Myska desperately wanted a name her white English friends could pronounce. She says getting someone to pronounce her name was like sending it through a verbal mincer: Sanjeeta, Fangita, Sageeta, Sangria. As she tries to book a table in a restaurant, we hear just what this feels like when you have a "foreign" sounding name.

Years of garbled pronunciations and awkward corrections later, she now believes those challenges have helped her forge her sense of identity.

Sangita talks to other people whose names have had a huge effect on their lives and work. Over honey cake with Rabbi Lionel Blue, he tells Sangita "I'd much rather be called Pete. I don't feel like being labelled. I'd like to be something like Pete Brown or Pete Smith or Pete Jones or something like that. It would mean I'd finally graduated into English life".

She meets poet Musa Okwonga, who describes how his surname led to his family being expelled from Uganda under Idi Amin's regime....and later influenced many of his career choices. He wanted to study English at university. But in the jobs market he thought he'd get nowhere with a name like his. So he did law at Oxford.

Shahid Iqbal and Richard Brown (one and the same person) explains why he has both names. One for his personal life - and one for business. "People would cancel contracts when they heard my name".

Producer: Adele Armstrong
Original music by Giles Hayter.


FRI 11:30 Polyoaks (b01ns7vz)
Series 2

A Question of Psychology

Have you ever wondered about the profitability of mental health? Or why your locum looks familiar? Or what's so fascinating on your doctor's computer? Or what that funny rash is? And how long he's had it? These and other questions may well be answered in this brand new series of the Radio 4 satire set in Polyoaks, that flagship of enlightened West Country General Practice at the forefront of a constantly reforming NHS.

Nigel Planer stars as Dr. Roy Thornton and Simon Greenall as his brother Dr. Hugh Thornton in a clinic always at odds with itself over diagnoses, funding, clinical commissioning groups, Jeremy Hunt and the ever more dubious commercial activities of their associate, TV's Dr. Jeremy (David Westhead), who's still diagnosing with Google, selling patent remedies and generally teetering on the brink of any number of malpractice suits.

If you want to know what it's really like to live and work in the brave new world of modern health care - or why your GP often has that confused expression on their face - visit Polyoaks and ask for a second opinion.

CAST:
Dr. Roy Thornton .................... Nigel Planer
Dr. Hugh Thornton .................. Simon Greenall
TV's Dr. Jeremy ...................... David Westhead
Betty Crossfield ...................... Jane Whittenshaw
Nurse Vera Duplessis .............. Polly Frame
Mr. Devlin ............................... Phil Cornwell
The Practice's patients and associates were played by Mel Hudson and Duncan Wisbey.

Polyoaks is written by Dr. Phil Hammond and David Spicer and directed by Frank Stirling.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01nq3d7)
Longer lorries, the man who wants us to live without money, Caribbean tourism after Hurricane Sandy

A new study suggests longer lorries could be good for the UK economy, carrying more light-weight goods in one go. They're used abroad so why not here? We put the pros and cons to the test.

Mark Boyle is the man who lived without money and wants more of us to do the same. He's on to tell us why.

And we report on the Caribbean tourist destinations trying to pick themselves up after Hurricane Sandy.

Presented by Peter White.

Producer: Jon Douglas.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b01nq3fv)
Ranjit and Sara: It Started in a Coffee Shop

Fi Glover presents this conversation about how spaghetti bolognese for breakfast in an Oxford coffee shop caused an English girl and an Indian Brahmin to meet and fall in love in Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01nnw6f)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01nq3fx)
National and international news with James Robbins. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnzb2)
Series 1

Russia and Ukraine - Erast Fandorin

Boris Akunin sets his Erast Fandorin novels in nineteenth century Russia whilst Andrey Kurkov describes twenty first century Ukraine.

Mark Lawson looks at the influence of Bulgakov and Dostoevsky on Russian crime fiction and compares the inside view with those created by outsiders including Martin Cruz Smith and Tom Rob Smith.

Producer Robyn Read.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01nq7dl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00w236w)
Moeran's Last Symphony

Written by Martyn Wade.

A dramatic portrait of the last weeks in the life of the English composer E.J. Moeran [1894-1950]. After the triumphant reception of his First Symphony, a second was commissioned by the prestigious Halle Orchestra. Tortured by the end of his marriage to the cellist Peers Coetmore and by residual pain from injuries received in the Great War, he hoped that Kenmare in Ireland - a place of previous inspiration - would provide the right setting for creativity. But this was to prove the biggest battle of his life.

E.J. Moeran, acclaimed as one of the greatest unsung heroes of English composition, wrote works of exceptional, beautiful lyricism including a stunning Cello Concerto. But his personal life was a disaster. An early dependence on alcohol, partly to relieve the pain from a bad shrapnel wound to the head, led to his wife leaving him as he was struggling to fulfil this exciting new commission. In Kenmare he is befriended by a new pupil, Patrick, who is touchingly encouraging and their relationship becomes important to them both, but ultimately it cannot save him from his dramatic and extraordinary death.

Tim McInnerny, who plays Moeran, is well known from his numerous TV appearances including Blackadder and his role in the film Notting Hill. Author Martyn Wade has written many critically acclaimed radio plays, including an award-winning portrait of the life of composer Percy Grainger, and Classic Serial dramatisations of the Trollope novels.

Directed and Produced by Cherry Cookson
Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01nq3h7)
Postbag Edition

This week the team is in the GQT potting shed in Sparsholt to tackle listeners' questions as Eric Robson hosts a postbag edition of Gardeners' Question Time, with Matthew Wilson, Christine Walkden and Anne Swithinbank on the panel.

Produced by Robert Abel
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions:

Q. I have two species of Acer Palmatum, or Japanese Maple, both around 8 years old. I transplanted one, the leaves of which have gone a beautiful deep red rather than the usual rust colour. What affects this change?

A. This is almost certainly to do with stress, so you may need to transplant them every year! Pelargoniums react in the same way to stress.

Q. An Echium Pininana seed has taken root in a large stone pot alongside an established Cercis Canadensis. The Cercis Canadensis lost a lot of top growth this winter. Will separating them mean losing them both?

A. Echium Pininana should be fine to be transplanted and bedded out, taking great care with the large taproot. Alternatively, as the Echium is a biennial, it will die after flowering and could be left in the same pot until that happens. However, if the top of the Cercis Candensis does not return after pruning, it may be lost.

Q. Should autumn leaves be removed from flower and shrub borders?

A. Under trees and shrubs where there is capable ground cover, they can be left. Around small or delicate groundcover plants, I will remove them, mulch them down and then return them.

Q. How do I prevent grass growing in my long gravel path?

A. Lifting the gravel and laying a geotextile or terram beneath it will suppress the growth of grass. Alternatively, you could sprinkle seeds and add flowers to the grass. A very light spraying of glyphosate once a year would help. Alternatively a flame gun could be used to deal with weeds.

Q. Due to the wet weather, my garden is overgrown with weeds. Can I leave it for the frost to kill off or do I need to weed it?

A. Between now and Christmas is a good time to weed. Next year it would be advisable to apply mulch and cover any weeds you can't pull up. The frost won't help you!

Q. Last Christmas I bought a red Poinsettia which was very healthy. I planted it out and it is now a large, healthy and green plant. How do I make the red colour come back?!

A. The poinsettia requires short days, so the exclusion of light (14 hours of darkness in every 24) is important for flowering.

Ash Dieback Disease

Ash dieback is a serious disease caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea. The disease causes leaf loss and crown dieback in affected trees and can lead to tree death. Chalara Fraxinia is considered to be so serious a threat that the government's COBRA emergencies committee met to discuss it.

The Forestry Commission would like the public to help spot affected ash trees and to report them. The Commission's website has useful photos and a video guide on how to spot the symptoms and how to report suspected cases.

You can find this here: www.forestry.gov.uk/chalara

There is also a smart-phone app that has been developed by the University of East Anglia that shows symptoms and allows suspected cases to be reported. More information on this app can be found at: http://ashtag.org/

Affected trees can be reported using the following contacts:
In England and Wales, on the Chalara helpline: 08459 33 55 77 or email: plant.health@forestry.gsi.gov.uk

In Scotland, to Forestry Commission Scotland: 0131 314 6156 or email: fcscotlandenquiries@forestry.gsi.gov.uk

The Forestry Commission are appealing for everyone to think about bio security - in other words the possibility that fungus could be spread on footwear, clothing, gardening tools, even our pets - and, if out and about in gardens, parklands or countryside, to think about the need to clean anything that might have come in contact with the ground or the trees themselves before venturing out again.


FRI 15:45 First for Radio (b01nq3kw)
Series 1

She Wiped the Surface

Four acclaimed novelists write their first stories for radio. In She Wiped The Surface, Louisa Young, describes how a mother happily arranges her daughter's birthday party, but this masks a family bereavement. How to cope?

Reader Emma Fielding
Producer Duncan Minshull.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01nq3lv)
Clive Dunn, Elliott Carter, Lord Lofthouse, Han Suyin, Brian Cobby

Matthew Bannister on

The actor Clive Dunn - best known as Corporal Jones in Dad's Army. We have tributes from fellow cast members and the show's writer Jimmy Perry.

Also the American composer Elliott Carter - Sir John Tavener tells us he was one of the greats of the twentieth century.

Lord Lofthouse of Pontefract - the former miner who became a Labour MP and then deputy speaker of the House of Commons.

Han Suyin, the Chinese-born author best known for her romantic novel "A Many Splendoured Thing"

And the voice of the speaking clock, Brian Cobby.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01nq3lx)
Presented by Roger Bolton, this is the place to air your views on the things you hear on BBC Radio.

Can the future of radio really be digital when only 5% of the UK's 34 million vehicles have digital car radios? Earlier this week the Drive 2 Digital conference aimed to spread D-Love about digital on the move, but Feedback listeners still have questions. Roger invites one listener to join Tim Davie, the BBC's Director of Audio and Music, and Ford of Britain's Steve Humbles to find out more about DAB coverage at home and on the move.

And Feedback's postbag has been brimming over with messages of alarm after BBC East announced it would be axing its popular The Naked Scientists programme from January. "Vital for public understanding of science", "making listeners more science literate", were just some of the things said about the programme. But does it fulfil the BBC's remit for local radio? Mick Rawsthorne, Head of Local and Regional Programming for BBC East, doesn't think so.

Finally, where would the BBC be without its listeners? Well it would certainly have some bigger gaps in its archive. No 'Music While You Work' or John Peel's early 'Top Gear' Radio 1 shows. That is, at least, until the Listeners' Archive was launched to mark the Corporation's 90th birthday. Since then, home-grown recordings have been sent into the BBC to help plug the gaps. We meet the team sifting through the gems.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b01nq3m5)
Thea and Brigitte: Forgiving the Past

Fi Glover presents this conversation between two friends born in Germany; the Jewish father of one was killed at Treblinka, the other is the daughter of a German soldier. An astonishing lesson in forgiveness that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01nq4hd)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01nnw6h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b01nq4pp)
Series 38

Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week in stand-up and sketches with Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, Mitch Benn and special guests Andi Osho, and Tina C. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01nq508)
Lilian and Leonie are nursing James back to health at The Dower House when Brenda arrives needing contracts signed. A flustered Lilian snaps at Brenda. She ends a phone call with Paul when Leonie enters the kitchen with more requests from James.

As Lilian is tiding away her son's clothes, she sees more than she bargained for when interrupting James and Leonie in the bathroom. As she hastily retreats, Brenda arrives for the contracts. She questions how Lilian expects to run her business if she is never around. Quite a scene ensues when Leonie and a half-naked James emerge from the bathroom. Leonie chastises Brenda for questioning Lilian's work ethic.

Tom has some good news. The ready meal company are on board with his Christmas hamper idea. However Brenda is not in a good mood after her day at work. She wants to be alone rather than go out with Tom.

Lilian discusses the afternoon's antics with Paul. She feels like a stranger in her own home due to Matt's continual absences and James and Leonie's constant canoodling. Paul suggests they meet up for a coffee.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01nq50b)
Jeff Wayne; The Orphan of Zhao

With Kirsty Lang.

Jeff Wayne has made a new version of his 1978 hit album The War Of The Worlds, now starring Liam Neeson as the narrator, stepping into Richard Burton's shoes - with Ricky Wilson, Gary Barlow and Joss Stone taking on the roles sung originally by David Essex, Justin Hayward and Julie Covington. Jeff Wayne reflects on the original appeal of HG Wells' story, and the aspects of the show he has now changed.

Gregory Doran's first production since taking over as Artistic Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company is a Chinese play called The Orphan of Zhao - which dates from 4th Century BC and has been described as the Chinese Hamlet. The production generated some debate, covered on Front Row, as the cast includes few Asian actors. Front Row sent critic Andrew Dickson to see the play, as it takes to the stage.

Crime Stories is a new daily TV drama, which follows two detectives as they spend their day in a police station talking to witnesses and suspects connected to a particular crime. The dialogue is part-improvised, and one of officers is played by a retired real-life policewoman, making her acting debut. Crime writer NJ Cooper reviews.

Five pianos - stripped bare and hanging above pools of water - play themselves while the voices of people such as William S Burroughs and Malcolm X echo within a vast concrete hall. This is Stifter's Dinge, a composition by German composer Heiner Goebbels, inspired by the Austrian author, painter, and poet Adalbert Stifter. Jeremy Summerly of the Royal Academy Of Music shares his impressions of his encounter with the work.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nq2wm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01nq50d)
The National Railway Museum, Shildon, County Durham

Jonathan Dimbleby presents the political discussion and debate programme from the National Railway Museum at Shildon in Co Durham. Guests include John Redwood MP, Lord Steel the former leader of the Liberal Party, Commentator Charlie Wolf and Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rachel Reeves MP.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01nq50g)
Rich man, poor man

Mary Beard on the long history of the rich looking down their noses - sometimes with a hearty Roman snort - at the poor.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Foreign Bodies (b01nq50j)
Omnibus

Wallander, Hole, Rebus, Fandorin and Kayankaya

Mark Lawson continues his series looking at the way shifts in modern European society have been depicted in crime fiction.

In Germany, Mark Lawson meets Jakob Arjouni to discuss his Turkish PI Kemal Kayankaya and the way events including the war in Yugoslavia and re-unification have fed into his writing. Outside the Scottish parliament building, Ian Rankin describes the changes in Scottish politics which his Rebus stories have charted and the links he sees with Scandinavia - where authors including Jo Nesbo, Henning Mankell, Stieg Larsson and Liza Marklund have tackled racism and the increasing gap between rich and poor in their novels. In Russia, the tradition of crime writing is less developed and Boris Akunin and Andrey Kurkov reflect on their different approaches.

Producer: Robyn Read.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01nnw6k)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nq50l)
A former resident of a care home in North Wales apologises for making false allegations of sexual abuse against a Conservative peer. And the UK is to end almost all of its aid payments to India by 2015, citing the country's economic progress and status. Presented by Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nq50n)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 10

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 10:
Philippe confronts Brigitte about baby Max. Madame Picot, feeling guilty, tries to put things right and Madame Beck spots something shocking in Abbé Paul's deanery.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01nq1c4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nq51c)
Mark D'Arcy reports on an attempt to put internet pornography on a virtual top shelf as the House of Lords debates plans designed to protect children from online porn. In the Commons, MPs spent the day debating a series of private members bills. Plans to tackle the abuse and misuse of disabled parking permits have cleared the Commons. MPs also approved measures to clampdown on rogue scrap metal dealers. Mark also reports on calls for select committees to be given more powers.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b01nq51f)
Isabel and Annie: Young Ambition

Fi Glover presents a conversation uploaded by listeners Isabel and Annie, grandmother and granddaughter, who share a ring and the amazing story of Isabel's early achievements in Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01nphnn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01nphnn)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01npjxc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01npjxc)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01nq3sn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01nq3sn)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01nq7cy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01nq7cy)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01nq2wm)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01nq2wm)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01nq1c4)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01nq1c4)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01nlby1)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01nq50g)

Alice Munro - Dear Life 19:45 SUN (b01npb85)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b01nq1cl)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b01nq1cl)

America Decides 00:00 WED (b01nq7kk)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01nl67f)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01npjpk)

Andrew Lawrence: How Did We End Up Like This? 18:30 THU (b01nq7dj)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01nnw86)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01nlbxz)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01nq50d)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01nnw8t)

Arthur Smith's Balham Bash 23:00 TUE (b00lp32n)

Ayres on the Air 11:30 MON (b01n6yj5)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01np0zw)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01np0zw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01npjpp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01nq1dk)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01nq420)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01nq7dv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01nq50n)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01nnfgk)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01npgn7)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01npgn7)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01ns0qx)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01ns0sz)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01ns0sz)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01ns1ff)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01ns1ff)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01ns1k9)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b01npb1b)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b01npb1b)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01npb0t)

Casual Cruelty 00:30 SUN (b01np0zt)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01nkt24)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01npb18)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 18:30 WED (b00x40p1)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01npb0y)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01npb0y)

Document 20:00 MON (b01npjph)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00vy10v)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01nq1bw)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01nq3sz)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01nq7d6)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00w236w)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01nnw7r)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01npgn1)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01npjs8)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01nq504)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01nq2sb)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01nlbl8)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01nq3lx)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01nl77n)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01nq1cg)

First for Radio 15:45 FRI (b01nq3kw)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 MON (b01mnz8v)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 TUE (b01mnz91)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 WED (b01mnz97)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 THU (b01mnz9h)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 FRI (b01mnzb2)

Foreign Bodies 21:00 FRI (b01nq50j)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01nq41q)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01nnw82)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b01nq7d0)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01npjpf)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01nq1cd)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01nq3tc)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01nq7dn)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01nq50b)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b01nq41t)

GI Britain 10:30 SAT (b01nnw7y)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01nlbl2)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01nq3h7)

In Alistair Cooke's Footsteps 09:30 TUE (b01npjsg)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01nq7ct)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01nq7ct)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01nq1cj)

Irish Micks and Legends 23:00 WED (b01nq4j1)

Justice Between the Covers 16:00 MON (b01nphnz)

Key Matters 15:45 SAT (b01hy2xt)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01nlbl6)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01nq3lv)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b01nq1c2)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b01nq1c2)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b01np100)

Living with Mother 23:15 WED (b01nq4j3)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01nnw8j)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b01nq1by)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b01npjpr)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b01nq1c0)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01nl9pf)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01nq7dd)

Meet David Sedaris 19:15 SUN (b01npb83)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01nlbzz)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01nnvz3)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01nnw0w)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01nnw27)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01nnw4t)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01nnw63)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01nq3sj)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01nq3sj)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01nq3t1)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01nnw84)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01nnw84)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b01nl8gh)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b01nq3tf)

Mr and Mrs Smith 11:30 WED (b019rpw8)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01nlc07)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01nnvzc)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01nnw14)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01nnw2h)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01nnw52)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01nnw6c)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01nnvzf)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01nlc09)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01nnvzk)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01nnvzp)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01nlc0t)

News 13:00 SAT (b01nlc0k)

One Day in Summer 11:00 WED (b01nq3sq)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01nl9p9)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01nq7d8)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01nnw8d)

PM 17:00 MON (b01nphp9)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01nq1c6)

PM 17:00 WED (b01nq3t7)

PM 17:00 THU (b01nq7dg)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01nq4hd)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01npb7z)

Poetry Workshop 16:30 SUN (b01npb1d)

Polyoaks 11:30 FRI (b01ns7vz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01nlc1g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01npgmz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01ns3sx)

Prayer for the Day 05:57 WED (b01ns3tm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01ns3vv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01ns3wr)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b01nnw8l)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01nnw8l)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01nnw8l)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01np104)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01np104)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01np104)

Return to Oasis 23:30 SAT (b01nkt28)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b01nl66z)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b01nphnx)

Rudy's Rare Records 18:30 TUE (b01nq1c8)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01mnxtk)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01nnw7w)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01nnw8n)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b01npjxf)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b01npjxf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01nlc03)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01nnvz7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01nnw10)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01nnw2c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01nnw4y)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01nnw67)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01nlc01)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01nlc05)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01nlc0m)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01nnvz5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01nnvz9)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01nnvzt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01nnw0y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01nnw12)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01nnw29)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01nnw2f)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01nnw4w)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01nnw50)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01nnw65)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01nnw69)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01nlc0r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01nnvzy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01nnw1b)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01nnw2m)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01nnw3x)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01nnw56)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01nnw6h)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01np0zy)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01np0zy)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01npgn5)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01npgn5)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01npb0r)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01np102)

Swansong 11:30 TUE (b01npjxh)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01npb0w)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01npb81)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01npb81)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01npjpc)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01npjpc)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01nq1cb)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01nq1cb)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01nq3t9)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01nq3t9)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01nq7dl)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01nq7dl)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01nq508)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01nnw8g)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01nq7dq)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b01nphp7)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01nl9pc)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01nq7db)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01npb10)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01npb10)

The Gaza Surf Club 11:00 MON (b01nphnq)

The Headset Set 23:00 THU (b01nq7dx)

The Invention of... 13:30 SUN (b01npb14)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b01npb16)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b01nq3fv)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b01nq3m5)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b01nq51f)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b01npjsd)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b01npjsd)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01nq3t5)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:00 SUN (b01nl675)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b01npjp9)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b01nlblg)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b01nq4pp)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01nnw80)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01npb12)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01npjpm)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01nq1dh)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01nq41w)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01nq7ds)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01nq50l)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01nl8g5)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01nq3t3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01npjpt)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01nq1dm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01nq4j5)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01nq7dz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01nq51c)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01nnw7t)

Today 06:00 MON (b01npgn3)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01npjsb)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01npbcm)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01npbcp)

What's So Great About ...? 11:30 THU (b00ps1hd)

What's in a Name? 11:00 FRI (b01nq2zp)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01nnw8b)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01npgnc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01npjx9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01nq3sl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01nq7cw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01nq2vj)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01nphnv)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01nq1bt)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01nq3sx)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01nq7d4)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01nq3fx)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01nphns)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01nq1br)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01nq3sv)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01nq7d2)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01nq3d7)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01nlc1j)