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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 OCTOBER 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01ngp1n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01njy7v)
Into the Abyss

Episode 5

Read by Barbara Barnes.

The astonishing true life adventure story of a plane crash in the wilds of northern Canada and the four men who survived to tell the tale.

On a wintry October night in 1984, nine passengers boarded a Piper Navajo commuter plane bound for remote communities in the far north of Canada. Only four people - strangers from wildly different backgrounds - survived the night that followed: the pilot, a prominent politician, an accused criminal and the rookie policeman escorting him.

The title is taken from the American mythologist Joseph Campbell who explored mankind's quest for meaning and adventure: 'It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life'.

The author, Carol Shaben, is the daughter of Larry Shaben a politician in the Alberta Legislature who survived the crash. Using extensive interviews with all the remaining survivors and their families, as well as investigation reports and court records, she reconstructs the events leading up to the fatal crash and unravels the enduring impact it had on the four survivors and the bonds they formed that night on the mountain.

Episode Five:
Erik becomes a campaigner for aviation safety and warns of the dangers of pilot fatigue. He takes to the air once again. Larry organises a reunion.

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ngp1q)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ngp1s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ngp1v)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01ngp1x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ngrzl)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with the Revd Neil Gardner, Minister of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01ngrzn)
"We drove Dracula country in a Communist car." A listener's Cold War trip behind the Iron Curtain in a Wartburg. iPM reunites Annette Thomas with the East German motor, as Eddie Mair, Jennifer Tracey and Harriet Cass cram inside to drive down memory lane. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01ngp1z)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01ngp21)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b01ngnwb)
Series 22

Steve Backshall

Clare Balding walks with naturalist, author & TV presenter, Steve Backshall. Together they stroll along his favourite stretch of the Thames from Bourne End to Boulter's Lock in Buckinghamshire.

Steve is best known for presenting CBBC's 'Deadly 60', and has recently started writing children's fiction - his first book is 'Tiger Wars', about a group of renegade children who become involved with tiger poaching in India.

He spends a lot of time filming abroad so Clare was lucky to catch up with him on his home patch. As they wander along the Thames, Steve explains that his love of the outdoors began when - as a child - his parents sent him and his sister out to play and told them not to come back until it was dark. This kind of 'feral' (as he put it) freedom developed in him an enduring passion for the natural world.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01nk141)
Farming Today This Week

This week the pilot culling of badgers in England was postponed until next summer.

On Tuesday the Government announced that the controversial culling policy would now not take place this year, but that they remain 'absolutely committed' to it. On Thursday there was an extended debate in the House of Commons ending in a non-binding vote against the policy and in favour of a vaccination programme and greater biosecurity on farms.

As farmers continue to lose cattle to the disease, Charlotte Smith asks what's next in the fight to tackle the very real problem of tuberculosis in cattle.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Rich Ward.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01ngp23)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01nk143)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Evan Davis, including:

0747
Two years ago large areas of the country ground to a halt because of gritting problems during bad weather. But stockpiling and the use of modern technology might be about to change that. Councillor Peter Box, chair of the LGA's Economy and Transport Board, reveals what plans are in place.

0750
If you have ever thought that a lot of modern art is rubbish, you may be in the company of experts. The BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz has been speaking to curators of some of museums that display it, and has found they do think some of it is bad.

0757
A ceasefire took place in Syria yesterday because of the Eid holiday, but it was unsuccessful. The BBC's James Reynolds and Chatham House's Syria expert Rime Allaf discuss claims by the Syrian military that they were responding to what they called "terrorist attacks".

0810
A TV documentary has resulted in many people coming forward with their claims of abuse by the late Jimmy Savile, his associates, and others unrelated. The Today programme speaks to Mary who suffered sexual abuse for 11 years as a child, and former DPP Ken MacDonald to find out what's being done to tackle the problem today.

0819
Oxford University's Tim Stanley and television writer Lisa Holdsworth debate which pieces of television reflect our changing society the best.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01nk145)
Phil Redmond, Kate Fox, and Hazel O'Connor's Inheritance Tracks

Richard Coles and Sian Williams meet TV screenwriter and producer Phil Redmond, hear the story of Addisu Demissie and Junaid Jemal Sendi, two professional Ethiopian dancers and choreographers who used a dance project to move from the harsh streets of the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa to London's West End, share the sound sculpture of listener Lynn Tolmon who rejoices in the evocative squeak of a Victorian gate latch in Anfield, talk to Sean Enright who was held hostage at gunpoint in a London street, thrill to the recollections of the current owner of ventriloquist dummy Archie Andrews, listen to poetry from Newcastle with poet Kate Fox and revel in Hazel O Connor's Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 The Big B at 70 (b01nk147)
Amitabh Bachchan is the biggest star in Bollywood and a cinematic colossus in Indian cinema for 40 years.

To mark his 70th birthday in 2012, Sarfraz Manzoor looked back over his career.

Producer: Mark Rickards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01nk149)
Steve Richards of The Independent looks behind the scenes at Westminster
The organisation at Number Ten is often criticised for not controlling the agenda. David Cameron is currently accused of "not having a grip". What are the requirements for a successfully Prime Minister's office? Steve Richards talks to Baroness Sally Morgan who worked with Tony Blair, Sheila Gunn who was John Major's press secretary, and Anthony Seldon who has written a history of Number Ten.
If it's hard for the Prime Minister to control events, how well do the whips in the House of Commons control rebellious MPs? A new play at the National Theatre, This House, tells the story of the 1974-79 Labour government where the dark arts of the whips were zealously employed to support a minority government
How does today's House of Commons compare? Andrew Percy a Conservative MP who has rebelled a few times and Jon Ashworth an opposition whip look at 21st century whipping.
Plus former Culture Secretary and BBC journalist Ben Bradshaw on the BBC's handling of the Savile affair.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01nk14c)
Inside Brazil's Valley of the Dawn Cult

The BBC's foreign correspondents take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01nk14f)
PPI Cold Callers

One man's victory against nuisance cold callers. We hear from a Money Box listener who told a PPI claims company that if they didn't stop calling him, he'd invoice them for his time. When the company called him again two days later, he sent them an invoice for £195. When that got no response he filled a case against the company at the small claims court. A couple of months of wrangling later, they paid up. Find out how he did it - and whether you could try the same tactics to get salespeople to stop calling you. We talk to the the Telephone Preference Service and the Information Commissioners Office.

Your love life and the taxman. Millions of parents will be getting a letter in the next few weeks from HM Revenue and Customs telling them how their child benefit could be cut. From January, households where at least one person earns more than £50,000 will have child benefit effectively reduced or stopped. And accountants are warning that if you're the new partner of a divorced parent, the changes could affect your salary. Money Box examines the details and hears warnings about the confusion the child benefit changes will bring for over a million families who will be forced to fill in self-assessment tax return forms.

Emerging markets: Some advisers will tell you that ever since the global financial crisis hit four years ago, in the Western world, the best returns have been in the emerging markets - countries which are less developed. But many will also say that you have to have a big appetite for risk if you're going to put your money there. The potential for profits and growth may be real, but so is the risk that a market might bomb and you lose your money. So, commonly, investors will only put a small fraction of their money in such regions . But that's lazy thinking, according to Jerome Booth, who's head of research at Ashmore Investment Management. He's got a whopping 95% of his personal wealth in emerging markets, and tells us why he thinks that's the wisest thing to do. Will you end up agreeing with Jerome, or heeding the words of Louise Oliver from Taylor Oliver Chartered Financial Planners, who advises caution?


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b01ngrx4)
Series 78

Episode 8

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig.Panellists are Jeremy Hardy, Hugo Rifkind, Roisin Conaty and Kevin Day.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01ngp25)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01ngp27)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01ngrxb)
Blackheath Halls, London

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the political discussion and debate programme from Blackheath Halls in South London. Guests include the former Home Secretary, Charles Clarke, David Elstein from Open Democracy, Dr Katherine Rake from the Family and Parenting Institute and Economic Secretary, Sajid Javid. Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01nk14h)
A chance for Radio 4 listeners to have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? Call Anita Anand 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet using #bbcaq. Topics include the Savile scandal, GDP figures - the end of recession? Should convicted prisoners have the right to vote? The Scout Associations wants to ban nick names to stop bullying - a step too far? Government proposals to cap child benefit at two children for the unemployed.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01mnxnw)
The Martin Beck Killings

Roseanna

Roseanna is the first in the Martin Beck series, written over ten years from 1965 - 1975 by the husband and wife writing team of Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö. Featuring the intriguing, dogged, intuitive complex figure of Detective Inspector Martin Beck and his colleagues in the National Police Homicide Department in Stockholm, the books set a gold standard for all subsequent Scandinavian crime fiction, and for much of the best crime fiction in Britain and America written since the 1960s. The books have been admired and imitated by crime writers and readers ever since their publication; now Radio 4 offers audiences the opportunity to discover just why the books have been so acclaimed by those in the know.

The use of crime and police procedure to hold up a mirror to society and its most dysfunctional elements is commonplace now, but that's because Martin Beck paved the way for subsequent generations of European crime writers whose fallible heroes - Kurt Wallander, John Rebus etc. - make the best fist they can of their own lives whilst trying to tackle the violence around them.

The books were written deliberately to give an unsentimental, realistic portrait of Sweden in the mid-sixties: not the liberal place it was thought to be, but a society suffering from a stifling bureaucracy and a creeping rottenness behind the surface sheen. Confronting the dark side of this society are stubborn, logical, anti-social Detective Inspector Martin Beck, his closest friend Detective Inspector Lennart Kollberg - overweight, hedonistic, opinionated; Detective Inspector Frederick Melander, with a memory like a card-index file and a noxious pipe clamped in his jaws, and their colleagues in the murder squad.

In Roseanna, they are faced with the body of an unknown girl found in a canal dredger. The long investigation ends with a risky and frightening sting.

Dramatised for radio by Jennifer Howarth
Original music by Elizabeth Purnell
Directed by Sara Davies.


SAT 15:45 Key Matters (b01hl41k)
Series 3

B Minor

In "Key Matters" Ivan Hewett explores the way in which different musical keys appear to have unique characteristics of their own. In this first programme, Ivan is joined by choral conductor, Simon Halsey, to explore the serious and somewhat austere key of B minor. This key seemed to acquire its flavour from Bach's use of it in his famous B Minor Mass and this tradition continued through Liszt's Piano Sonata in B minor and the final heartbreaking movement of Tchaikovsky's Pathetique Symphony.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01nk14m)
Dionne Warwick; P.D. James; Teaching about porn

James Cracknell and Beverley Turner on the impact of his brain injury on their marriage; legendary soul singer Dionne Warwick on 50 years in the music business; pornography - is the classroom the place to teach the difference between real sex and screen sex?; Tina Nash on the relationship with a man so violent he destroyed her sight; why one san-pro ad has gone viral; writer P.D. James on her cautious beginnings as a novelist; the power of being a big sister.
Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Anne Peacock.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01nk14p)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news, presented by Patrick O'Connell.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01ngnwq)
The World of Sport

Evan Davis meets three of the sport sector's top business brains and gets them to share their stories of reinvention and the secrets of their industry. Evans hears from the darts, snooker and boxing promoter, Barry Hearn, who is also chairman of Leyton Orient and creator of the televised fishing contest, Fishomania. Former Formula 1 boss Max Mosley gives the inside story on how his sport became a hit in the Far East. And former managing director of IMG India explains how the Indian Premier League turned cricket into a showbiz sporting sensation.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01ngp29)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01ngp2c)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ngp2f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01nk14r)
Charles Dance, Mark Thomas, Helen Czerski, Suzi Quatro, Arthur Smith, The Unthanks and Gregory Alan Isakov

Clive conspires with Jewel In The Crown Charles Dance about his career playing bureaucrats and villains in blockbusters like 'Alien 3' and 'The Golden Child'. His new Channel 4 thriller 'Secret State' was inspired by Chris Mullen's novel 'A Very British Coup' and is a classic story of one man against the system which begins on Wednesday 7th November at 22.00.

And that's just the tip of the iceberg! Clive sets sail with oceanographer Helen Czerksi, who puts her courage to the test in the most extreme environments. She's one of the team of scientists and adventurers on expedition to the Arctic to explore the creation, life and death of icebergs. 'Operation Iceberg' is on BBC Two Tuesday 30th October and Thursday 1st November at 21.00.

Arthur Smith's flying low with original 'rock chick' Suzi Quatro who shot to fame in the seventies with hits like 'Devil Gate Drive' and played bass in American sitcom 'Happy Days'. Her new show is a personal reflection on her life in show business: 'Suzi Quatro...Unzipped' is Live At The Hippodrome, London from Monday 29th October until Saturday 3rd November.

Clive enjoys some Comic opera with influential activist and comedian Mark Thomas. He's on a UK tour with 'Bravo Figaro' the true tale of his father - a builder with a passion for opera, his degenerative disease and Mark's attempt to put an opera on in a bungalow in Bournemouth.

The Unthanks open the musical floodgates to perform 'Great Northern River' from their album 'Diversions Vol. 3: Songs from the Shipyards'.

And there's a torrent of instrumental talent from Gregory Alan Isakov, who performs 'Master & A Hound' from his album 'This Empty Northern Hemisphere.'

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01nk14t)
Alexei Navalny

Lucy Ash profiles the Russian lawyer and anti-corruption campaigner Alexei Navalny, who this week topped a ballot to elect leaders of the opposition to President Putin.
He came to prominence as a leader during the anti-Putin demonstrations in Moscow last December, the biggest such rallies since the end of the Soviet Union.
He has also been fighting against corruption through a website that invites the public to report suspected cases to the police or prosecutors.
One of his tactics, was to become a minority shareholder in major Russian oil companies, banks, and ministries to ask awkward questions about holes in state finances. Those holes are huge. Last year Dmitri Medvedev - then President now PM - said that a trillion roubles-thirty-three billion dollars- disappears annually on government contracts.
Aleksey Navalny's anti graft campaign has won him popularity across a wide spectrum of Russian society, including nationalists with far right connections. This has unsettled many of more liberal supporters. And in a week when three other opposition activists have been charged with causing mass unrest, does he have what it takes to challenge the tough man in the Kremlin?
Producer Arlene Gregorius.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01nk14w)
Tom Sutcliffe and guests writers Maev Kennedy and David Aaronovitch and author Dreda Say Mitchell review the week's cultural highlights.

James Bond with Daniel Craig is back and in the new film Skyfall, directed by Sam Mendes, 007 becomes M's only ally as MI6 comes under attack, and a mysterious new villain emerges with a diabolical plan. Bond's latest mission has gone horribly awry, resulting in the exposure of several undercover agents. The villain must be stopped at any cost.

Secret State is a political conspiracy thriller tv series exploring the relationship between democratically elected government, big business and the banks. This is thrown into relief when a massive industrial accident leaves many people dead and raises awkward questions about the US petrochemical company involved.

The latest novel by Roddy Doyle, Two Pints, features a collection of humorous dialogues between two Irish men in a Dublin pub. Their conversation, which has been inspired by a year's worth of news, ranges from the missing Colonel Gaddafi and Greek debt to mourning the deaths of Whitney Houston and Maeve Binchy.

55 Days a new play by Howard Brenton is set in the period immediately after the capture of King Charles I by Oliver Cromwell's armies in December 1648. The drama follows the chain of events and reasoning that led to Charles's execution 55 days later and stars Mark Gatiss as the doomed king.

An exhibition of The Hospital Drawings by Barbara Hepworth reveals the remarkable series of drawings and paintings made by the artist during the late 1940s, illustrating surgeons at work in operating theatres within Post-War Britain.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01nk1d0)
Time Travel: The Politics of Time

As we prepare to put the clocks back tonight, Sean Street travels back in time through archive recordings to explore the ways in which we have tried to control time itself - from its standardisation in the 19th century, brought about by the railways, to modern day political decisions about time-zones and when Summer Time should start and end.

Most of us remember we get an extra hour in bed tonight - but when we get up for work on Monday morning will it be lighter or darker? Why do we bother to change the clocks? Should we change our time-zone and join Central European Time and consign GMT to the past? And what exactly is time? Can it be controlled or does it control us as it marches on relentlessly making us older day by day? All these ideas have been debated throughout the years, but are we any nearer being able to define or explain what time is?

With help from curators at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, Sean Street's journey into past recordings takes him backwards and forward across the many time-zones of Russia, into China's single time-zone, to Venezuela's deliberately political adoption of a half-hour time-zone and to Samoa, who recently travelled forward in time by losing a whole day.

However, if you want to experience Time Travel yourself, listen to the repeat of this programme tonight on BBC Radio 4 Extra which starts and ends at 1am in the hour the clocks go back!

Producer: Andy Cartwright
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01ng1v2)
The Gothic Imagination

Dracula, pt 2

2/2 Bram Stoker's disturbing vampire tale of horror, in a new version by Rebecca Lenkiewicz. Lucy Westenra is dead, but Professor Van Helsing is determined to find out the true cause of her death, track it down, fight it and defeat it forever.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01ngp2h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b01ngmjp)
Moral Authority of Institutions

Bloody Sunday, Leveson, Hillsborough, Chilcott, Mid Staffordshire NHS, Savile - just some of the more notable examples of public inquiries of the last few years and hardly a week goes by without a call for another hearing into some perceived scandal or injustice. MPs, police, journalists, NHS carers, local government, the church - it seems there's hardly any major institution left in this country that hasn't been undermined by scandal and in the name of 'transparency' many institutions seem willing, even eager, to expose their inner workings and problems. At the heart of these cases there are of course victims who need answers and redress and we're told that by exposing these institutions or organisations to transparent public scrutiny "lessons will be learnt". Institutions are an essential component of civil society; a focus for shared values and solidarity; can we expect our institutions to function properly in an atmosphere of constant critical scrutiny? Has this ever growing clamour for inquiries, often fuelled by freedom of information requests, just undermined their moral integrity? In our pursuit of transparency have we sacrificed the moral authority of some of the very organisations that are vital to the moral wellbeing of our society? In an age dominated by new social networks, is this process an essential part of re-defining social solidarity or is the passion for openness actually generating a kind of corrosive suspicion that destroys trust not just in institutions but in our day-to-day lives?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Giles Fraser.

Witnesses: Nicholas Rengger - Professor of Political Theory & International Relations, University of St Andrews, Phillip Blond - Respublica, Dr Karl Mackie - Chief Executive, Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution and Oliver Kamm - Leader Writer and columnist for The Times.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b01ng404)
(8/12)
Why might you find Julia Roberts and King Lear's daughters on a pedestrian crossing in Louisiana?

This is just the first of the mind-bending puzzles the teams in today's contest have to tackle. Alan Taylor and Michael Alexander of Scotland take on Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney of Northern Ireland, in a return fixture following Northern Ireland's victory a few weeks ago.

Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair, to award points and to give the teams the gentlest of verbal nudges when they seem to be struggling. As usual the programme features two questions devised by Round Britain Quiz listeners. The programme was recorded in County Antrim: but does this give the Northern Ireland team any home advantage?

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Learning to Love Dafydd (b01ng26d)
Gwyneth Lewis, the first Welsh Poet Laureate whose giant words light up the front of the Wales Millennium Centre, has never been able to come to terms with the great Welsh language poet Dafydd ap Gwilym.

He's the Welsh equivalent of Chaucer or Shakespeare and has been hugely influential on contemporary Welsh poetry, from Dylan Thomas to the bardic competitions on Radio Cymru. But Gwyneth's teenage self found him sexist and laddish and a representative of a tradition she rebelled against.

As a Welsh language poet Gwyneth feels she can't avoid Dafydd any longer and needs to face him head on. She visits the ruined abbey at Strata Florida in West Wales where he worked and was buried, meets songwriter and former lead singer of Catatonia Cerys Matthews and Welsh poet and language activist Menna Elfyn, and goes in search of him in the poetry competitions at the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Actor Steffan Rhodri brings Dafydd ap Gwilym's poetry to life.

Gwyneth tries to come to terms with her heritage and learn to love Dafydd - and see if she can write a poem directly to him.

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.



SUNDAY 28 OCTOBER 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01njzbf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Casual Cruelty (b01nk240)
The Lottery

Stacy Keach reads Shirley Jackson's celebrated story, The Lottery, first published in the New Yorker in 1948. The inhabitants of a small farming community in Vermont gather each year for what we begin to realise is a
frightening local lottery.

American author Shirley Jackson's work has been described as the 'literature of psychological suspense'. Writing from the 1940s into the 1960s, her style of 'creeping unease' was hugely popular, initially with readers of magazines such as Collier's, Good Housekeeping, Harper's, The New Republic, The New Yorker, and Woman's Home Companion.

After Jackson's early death in 1965, at the age of 48, her story collections began a marked revival of interest in her work. In recent years she has received increasing attention from literary critics and a new generation of readers. Her deceptively simple, apparently realistic style, often cloaking chilling or darkly hidden agendas, has influenced writers like Neil Gaiman, Stephen King and Nigel Kneale among others.

Director: Martin Jarvis

Producer: Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis & Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01njzbh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01njzbk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01njzbm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01njzbp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01nk242)
The bells of St Mary Magdalene, Mortehoe, Devon.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01nk14t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01njzbr)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01nk244)
The Book of Misers

Starting with Al-Jahiz's 9th century "Book of Misers", Mark Tully looks at one of our old vices and asks whether it can ever bring positive results.

Scrooge, Silas Marner, Ebenezer Balfour, dozens of proudly mean skinflints in Al-Jahiz's great satire, the archetype of the miser is familiar to all cultures and is as old as money itself. Mark Tully asks how we should view it - is it funny, sinful, harmless or a kind of madness - and can it, surprisingly, have benefits?

With readings from Moliere and William Cowper and music ranging from The Beatles to Gounod and Vaughan Williams to Zain Bhika, Mark examines all that is stingy and mean. The readers are Emily Raymond and Toby Jones.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01nk246)
Farmer of the Year finalist: Tom Rawson

Adam Henson is in Yorkshire for this week's On Your Farm to visit the third finalist vying to become the BBC Farmer of the Year. Tom Rawson is a dairy farmer with a new model of farming. As well as acting as a consultant who turns struggling farms around, Tom is also involved in managing four farms across the UK. What's different is that Tom hires cows from investors and then the investors get a return from the milk sold. Adam and fellow judge, Christine Tacon, have spent the last three weeks visiting all three finalists and the winner will be announced at the BBC Food and Farming Awards on the 28th of November in Birmingham.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01njzbt)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01njzbw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01nk248)
The Tablet's Christopher Lamb has just returned from Rome and talks to Edward Stourton about the six new Cardinals announced this week and the expulsion from the Society of Pius X of the Holocaust denying Bishop Williamson.

This week the global expo "Co-operatives United" takes place in Manchester. The world's co-operative sector comprises 1.4 million businesses across the world and supports a third of the world's population. It all started with the Rochdale Pioneers in 1844, as Russell Gill from the Co-operative Group tells Edward Stourton.

When Barack Obama won the White House in 2008, 94% of African-Americans voted for him, and more black voters than ever before turned out to cast a ballot. But four years on, many conservative-minded black churchgoers are struggling with the President's decision to embrace same-sex marriage. With the race in effect tied, the President can no longer count on their support as Matt Wells reports from the crucial election battleground of Ohio.

The musicians of Mali have gained global recognition for their unique sound, but a recent influx of militants who want to impose their brand of Salafi Islam on the country, has declared war on music. Andy Morgan once managed the Grammy Award Winning Malian band, Tinariwen, and talks to Edward Stourton.

What is the future for Christians in the Middle East post-Arab Spring? This week a conference in Southwark Cathedral brought together Christian leaders from Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Israel and the Occupied Territories. Trevor Barnes reports.

Are Christians the most persecuted religion in the world? Rupert Shortt, Religion Editor of the Times Literary Supplement, has spent the last few years researching this question for his new book "Christianaphobia" and tells Edward Stourton what he has found.

In the light of the Savile case we explore to what extent being part of an organisation influences an individual's moral choices, with guests Dr John Blenkinsopp, of Teeside University Business School, Professor Roger Steere - Visiting Professor of Organisational Ethics at the Cass Business School, and Donald Findlater, Director of Research and Development at the child protection charity the Lucy Faithfull Foundation.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b01nk24b)
Tibet Relief Fund

Tsering Passang presents the Radio 4 Appeal for Tibet Relief Fund
Reg Charity:1061834
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Tibet Relief Fund.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01njzby)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01njzc0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01nk24d)
Live from Eccleston Methodist Church. The Revd Stephen Poxon, Chair of Lancashire Methodist District has walked to every Methodist community he serves, praying in and for each of the churches and schools. How can Christian prayer transform community so Christians reflect and meet the changing needs of the 21st Century? Leader: The Revd Janet Pybon. Director of Music: Sue Guenault. With Eleanor Hey (French Horn). Producer: Claire Campbell Smith.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01ngrxd)
Who are the Chinese? 3/4

Martin Jacques presents a personal view on how best to understand the unique characteristics and apparent mysteries of contemporary China, its history, development and its possible future. In a new series of talks he sets out the building blocks for making sense of China today.

In this third talk, he explores the nature of race in China. Over 90 per cent of the Chinese population regard themselves as belonging to the same race, the Han. This is a stark contrast to the multi-racial composition of the world's other populous states. Chinese ethnic identity stems from a process of integration and of cultural identity. What defines the Chinese above all is a sense of cultural achievement. Martin Jacques argues that the Han identity has provided the glue which has held China together and has given the Chinese people an admirable confidence. But this strong sense of pride in who they are can also have a downside: a tendency to look down on others.

Martin Jacques is the author of 'When China Rules the World'.

Producer: Nina Robinson.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01nk24g)
The Sunday morning magazine programme with Britain's best newspaper review. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.
We discuss how safe are children?
Desert warfare in WWII and the modern day.
Political broadcasting in the USA.
Reviewing the newspapers: Conservative peer Patience Wheatcroft, comedy producer John Lloyd and former Children's Laureate Michael Morpurgo.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01nk24j)
For detailed descriptions see daily episodes

Writer.....Carole Simpson Solazzo
Director....Rosemary Watts
Editor.....Vanessa Whitburn

Kenton Archer..... Richard Attlee
David Archer..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer..... Felicity Finch
Elizabeth Pargetter..... Alison Dowling
Tom Archer..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge..... Charles Collingwood
Matt Crawford..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy..... Sunny Ormonde
Peggy Woolley..... June Spencer
Fallon Rogers..... Joanna Van Kampen
Joe Grundy..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy..... Trevor Harrison
William Grundy..... Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy..... Barry Farrimond
Neil Carter..... Brian Hewlett
Hayley Tucker..... Lorraine Coady
Brenda Tucker..... Amy Shindler
Lynda Snell..... Carole Boyd
Kirsty Miller..... Annabelle Dowler
James Bellamy..... Roger May
Rhys Williams..... Scott Arthur
Iftikar Shah..... Pal Aron.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01nk24l)
Hilary Devey

Hilary Devey, businesswoman and TV star is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs.

The very incarnation of entrepreneurial spirit, Hilary Devey built a haulage network business from scratch, which now employs nearly eight thousand people and has an annual turnover of £100 million. She has a successful media career and is one of the current incumbents of the TV programme Dragons Den.

The real drama in her life has happened off screen. The skeleton in her parents' closet reappeared in her own life. She's been married and divorced three times, her only child has battled drug addiction and a severe stroke nearly killed her in 2009.

Despite this, she remains ambitious and energetic in the business world and says that there's no such thing as a glass ceiling.

Producer: Alison Hughes.


SUN 12:00 The Museum of Curiosity (b01ng413)
Series 5

Roberts, Cottrell Boyce, Nyman

Professor of Ignorance at the University of Buckingham, Professor John Lloyd CBE is joined by comedian Jimmy Carr for the fifth series.

Three guests are invited to donate one item each and explain why it deserves a place in the museum.

John and Jimmy welcome screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce, actor/writer/magician Andy Nyman and anatomist Dr Alice Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01nk24n)
Football and Food

John Inverdale looks at innovations in the food offerings at football grounds that aim to give fans and players alike a better eating experience than the traditional burger and pie. He visits League Champions Manchester City who are leading the way in the food revolution.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01njzc2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01nk274)
The latest national and international news with Shaun Ley, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The Invention of... (b01nk276)
Spain

Episode 1

Catalonia, Castille, Galicia and the Basques ... it's been said that many of Spain's problems come from the pretence that she is one country. In The Invention of Spain Misha Glenny explores whether this is true. Three documentaries, from 1492 to 1898, from Columbus to El Desastre, tell the story of the rise and fall of an empire. But they also reveal the fractured state of a nation, both in history and now.

"I can't imagine Spain ever cohering - if it did it wouldn't be Spain." Felipe Fernandez Armesto.

The first programme begins in the annus mirabilis of 1492, when the last Moors in Granada surrendered, Columbus discovered the New World, and an edict was published expelling the Jews. This year is frequently cited as the birth of modern Spain, but behind the national mythology another story lurks. "The birth of this embryonic Spain is rooted in the idea of exclusion," says one contributor, "and that is a very nasty thing to have in your history."

Misha Glenny is a former BBC correspondent and winner of a Sony gold. Producer Miles Warde has previously collaborated with Misha Glenny on The Invention of Germany, Garibaldi's Grand Scheme and The Alps. Contributors include Sir John Elliott, Inigo Gurruchaga of El Correo newspaper, Mia Rodriguez Salgado and Madrid MP Cayetana Alvarez de Toledo.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01ngrwr)
Stamford

The GQT team visit Stamford in Lincolnshire, with Eric Robson in the chair and Pippa Greenwood, Bunny Guinness and Bob Flowerdew taking questions from the local gardening audience.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b01nkt22)
Sunday Edition

Fi Glover presents a Sunday Edition dedicated to men's conversations. Regrets about words of thanks unspoken, guilt about religion denied, hope for the future - and the joy of playing at cowboys - it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01nkt24)
The Gothic Imagination

Frankenstein, part 1

A new production of Mary Shelley's heart-breaking modern myth of obsession, pride and the need for love.

While sailing through the Arctic wastes, Captain Walton picks up an unexpected passenger. Close to death the man begins to tell Walton his strange and terrible story. 1 of 2

Dramatised by Lucy Catherine.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01nkt26)
Dawn French on her novel Oh Dear Silvia

Dawn French talks about her latest novel Oh Dear Silvia, the ambitious story of a comatose woman whose family and friends gather around her bedside to impart their feelings toward her and how much the writing of it was informed by the illness and subsequent death of her Mother.

What would Britain be like if Germany had won the Second World War? A what if question that CJ Sansom, famous for his sixteenth century Shardlake series, has turned his attention to with Dominion, his thriller set in a 1952 Britain which had surrendered to Germany in the aftermath of Dunkirk twelve years earlier.

Along with Owen Sheers, whose first novel Resistance was set in the Welsh borders after Invasion in 1944, they discuss why this era so appeals to the writer's imagination

Ian Sansom discusses Paper: An Elegy, his book exploring our relationship with this material and the importance it's had on the development of our modern history.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Return to Oasis (b01nkt28)
Benghazi, Tobruk, Tripoli - they are all places with resonance for a disappearing generation of British soldiers who fought in the western desert in the Second World War. This programme revisits a remarkable anthology of poems that grew out of the experiences of those that took part.

The Oasis anthology was edited by a group of soldier-poets in Cairo in 1943. Unlike their forbears, the poets of the First World War, none was above the rank of corporal. And the poems they gathered together represent the missing voices of war - the men and women from all branches of the services of the citizen army that fought its way from the Nile delta to Tunis.

The poetry evokes the boredom and the terrifying activity of war, the minutiae of daily life, the alien but beautiful environment of the desert, reflections on lost comrades and dead enemies, the purpose and the pointlessness of war.

The original print run of 5,000 copies quickly sold out. The war ended and people returned to their lives. Then in the late 1970s the surviving original editors came together again. They launched an appeal via the press for further unpublished poems. Manuscripts came in by the thousand. They were edited and combined with the original anthology in Return to Oasis, perhaps the most complete poetic account of the collective war experience.

Mike Greenwood returns to the western desert as veterans gather in El Alamein to mark the 70th anniversary of the campaign. He talks to military historian Julian Thompson and veterans to evoke a world at war in the western desert, discusses the Oasis anthology with poet Owen Sheers and professor of literature Antony Rowland - and we hear the poems in readings and archive.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01ng83c)
Public, Private and Profitable

The midnight collapse of the Government's plans for the West Coast main railway line once again raises questions about the outsourcing of public services to private providers.
Public bodies of all kinds now face massive budget cuts and are under pressure to deliver savings. As a result, across the country, public services of all kinds are now up for tender in the hope they can be delivered more cheaply by the private sector.
With relatively straightforward things such as refuse collection, there's general agreement that experience to date shows outsourcing can work, and can save the taxpayer money.
But with complex services in education, health or transport, the picture is far less clear.
Michael Robinson investigates the outsourcing of these complex public services and uncovers another, as yet unreported, example of huge profits being earned by major private companies at taxpayers' expense.
Producer: Rob Cave.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01nk14t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01njzc4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01njzc6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01njzc8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01nkt3c)
Sheila McClennon presents her choice of the best BBC radio this week-
Some alternative ways of playing the piano - please have your ping pong balls and some forks ready. We look at the world weary Swedish detective who paved the way for today's Scandi crime heroes. How The Police's best album turned out to be their last. Why MPs are debating what to do with a lost and found King and how remembering The Song of Hiawatha at the Royal Albert Hall eighty years ago can still bring a tear to the eye.

In Tune The Piano A-Z : Radio 3
The Gothic Imagination - Frankenstein - Radio 4
Foreign Bodies - Radio 4
Swansong - Radio 4
Victoria Derbyshire - Radio 5Live
The Invention of Spain - Radio 4
The Real Rachman - Radio 4
Afternoon Drama - What Love Sounds LIke - Radio 4
Into The Abyss - Radio 4
Sumptuous Was The Feast - Radio 3

Produced by Helen Lee
email us at: potw@bbc.co.uk.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01nkt3f)
Fraught Lilian's trying to juggle assuaging Matt's petulance with attending to the demands of James. Matt disappears to the pub. A call from Paul provides welcome calm. He suggests a bell might be useful for James.

Tom thinks Fallon will be great at Jaxx, though he admits he'll miss her at the Bull. Jolene agrees. But she's a bit worried about spiky Naomi's reaction to it all. Jolene gets a call from Lilian, and passes instructions to Matt to take home the bell from the bar.

Will asks if he can take George and Keira to the safari park at half term, and have George overnight. Emma's conflicted, but agrees. She can't compete with it, but at least it's a treat for the children. Ed explores the possibility of night work in the supermarket, but Emma won't hear of it.

Later Emma's struggling with a Halloween costume for George. She tells Ed the car needs looking at, and he counters ruefully that they'll need more heating oil soon. It's a bleak picture. When Will turns up with a cute, shop-bought costume for George, it's the last straw. Putting her homemade effort in the bin, Emma laments that she's rubbish.


SUN 19:15 Meet David Sedaris (b01nkt53)
Series 3

Easy Tiger; Possession

The multi-award winning American essayist brings more of his wit and charm to BBC Radio 4 with a series of audience readings. This week the perils of learning a foreign language by audio tape in "Easy Tiger" and when crossing the line in property desire in "Possession".

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Boom Pictures Cymru production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Alice Munro - Dear Life (b01nkt55)
Gravel

Alice Munro was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013. She is widely regarded as a doyenne of the short story form, a writer whose acuity and compassion shines through all her work. These stories are from her 2012 collection, Dear Life.

Set mostly in the small towns and quiet domestic surroundings of her native Canada, Munro, as always, captures the ordinary and reveals the extraordinary that lies beneath. Life is laid bare, and the complicated emotions of normal lives resonate long after the final page is turned.

Today in Gravel, a woman remembers a life-changing winter when she was very young and tries to assuage her sense of complicity.

The reader is Laurel Lefkow
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01ngrwy)
Presented by Roger Bolton, this is the place to air your views on the things you hear on BBC Radio.
This programme's content is entirely directed by you.

Are radio programmes about prisoners too sympathetic? In this week's Feedback, Roger meets two programme makers to discuss your questions on the rights and wrongs of radio about prisons.

Rex Bloomstein is the presenter and co-producer of Radio 4's Dying Inside, which looked at the experiences of the growing number of older prisoners, over 40% of whom are men convicted of sexual offences. Rosie Dawson produced The Bishop and the Prisoner following the Rt Rev James Jones, the Church of England's Bishop for Prisons, as he talked to prisoners, politicians and pundits about the prison system.

One listener has tried six times to get a ticket to watch the recording of Just a Minute - and still had no luck. Another was turned away from a recording of the Today programme even though she had a ticket. She compares the BBC to a low-cost airline. We put your concerns about radio recordings to Francesc Rivas, Studio Audience Manager.

As the allegations surrounding Jimmy Savile continue to make the news, we hear your reactions to the way the BBC is covering the story.

Plus the art of reading aloud. After many listeners were underwhelmed by the acclaimed actress Anna Maxwell Martin's rendition of a recent Book of the Week, we ask what makes a good reader?

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01ngrww)
George McGovern, Fiorenzo Magni, Paul Kurtz, Mike Morris, Roy Bates

On Last Word this week:

Senator George McGovern, who lost to Richard Nixon in the 1972 Presidential election, is remembered by Gary Hart and Henry Kissinger.

Italian cycling champion - and three times winner of the Giro d'Italia race - Fiorenzo Magni.

Paul Kurtz, founder of the 'skeptic' and humanist movements.

TVAM presenter Mike Morris is remembered by her fellow presenter Anne Diamond.

And Major Roy Bates, the self-styled prince of a disused sea fort which he dubbed the free state of Sealand.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01nk14f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01nk24b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01ng4h5)
The School of Hard Facts

E.D. Hirsch is a little-known American professor whose radical ideas about what should be taught in schools are set to have a profound effect on English schools. A favoured intellectual of the Education Secretary, Michael Gove, Hirsch advocates a curriculum strongly grounded in facts and knowledge. He also believes that there are certain specific ideas, works of literature and scientific concepts which everyone should know so that they can be active participants in society.

Presenter Fran Abrams interviews Hirsch about his ideas. She considers their likely impact on English schools and speaks to the former English schools minister, Nick Gibb MP, who championed Hirsch's ideas when he was in government. He explains the reasons for bringing Hirsch's ideas across the Atlantic and how they could counteract what he describes as a prevailing left-wing ideology among teachers.

Fran also visits London's Pimlico Academy which is pioneering a "Hirsch-style" curriculum in its new primary school. She talks to the young women leading this experiment: Anneliese Briggs and Daisy Christodoulou.

Daisy was once dubbed "Britain's brightest student" after captaining the successful Warwick University team on "University Challenge". She discusses why she finds Hirsch's ideas so compelling. She also explains why, in her view, he stands in a proud left-wing tradition that champions knowledge as power, a view that contrasts with Nick Gibb's more right-of-centre take on Hirsch's ideas.

Fran also talks to Professor Sir Michael Barber, chief education adviser to Pearson and former policy implementation director to Tony Blair in Downing Street, and to a former leading member of the Government's expert panel on the curriculum, Professor Andrew Pollard.

Producer Simon Coates.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01nkt5y)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01nkt60)
A look at how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01ngnwd)
Daniel Craig, Sister, The Shining

Daniel Craig on being James Bond, working with Sam Mendez and Her Majesty the Queen.

Actor Martin Compston discusses his new film Sister, set in the seedy underbelly of the Swiss ski slopes.

Is Stanley's Kubrick's film The Shining just a horror film? Or is it about the Holocaust, the moon landing, or the massacre of Native Americans? A new documentary, Room 237, claims it's about all three - and more. We hear from its director, Rodney Ascher. Plus Sir Christopher Frayling and critic Adam Smith discuss the pros and cons of film theory.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01nk244)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 29 OCTOBER 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01njzd6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01ngmcq)
Trouble at work, travellers vs tourists

Trouble at work: Laurie Taylor considers the findings of the largest UK study on ill treatment in the workplace ever undertaken. He's joined by the researchers, Ralph Fevre and Amanda Robinson, who claim that organisations which are well versed in modern management practices may create a culture in which bullying, harassment and stress thrive. Also, travellers versus tourists - Lara Week's research questions whether or not those seeking 'authentic culture' provide more to foreign countries than those who stick to the 'tourist trail'

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01nk242)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01njzd8)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01njzdb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01njzdd)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01njzdg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01nkwx5)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with the Revd Neil Gardner, Minister of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01nkwx7)
The wet summer in the UK has meant that significantly less - and poorer quality - fodder has been produced on farms. Harvests around the world were also hit by the weather, and the price of feed has rocketed. The National Farmers' Union tells us that an increase in production costs, especially for dairy farmers, may lead to a shortage of milk and higher prices for consumers.

As the Department for the Environment and Rural Affairs finally bans imports of ash trees, we ask the Secretary of State Owen Paterson why it took so long. Shireen Chambers of the Institute of Chartered Foresters says that we have an increasing problem with imports of diseased plants and suggests that global trade in plants needs to be more tightly controlled.

Finally, increased interest from supermarkets and consumers in native beef breeds such as shorthorn cattle is good news for farmers who had previously seen decades of decline in demand for their product in the UK.

The presenter is Charlotte Smith and this programme was produced in Birmingham by Polly Procter.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01njzdj)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01nqvj9)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and James Naughtie, including:

0746
Around 20% of the working population now falls below the living wage, accountants KPMG says. Mark Constantine, founder of the Lush cosmetic chain, and Mike Cherry, national policy chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, debate whether workers need to be paid more than the minimum wage.

0810
Many of the patients who faced ill-treatment at a private hospital investigated by BBC Panorama have had new alerts raised over their safety since being moved to other facilities. Mark Goldring, chief executive of Mencap, outlines his view that Winterbourne View was closed too quickly. Lib Dem MP Paul Burstow, a former care service minister, discusses if this shows the the system has become more sensitised and picking up problems.
Winterbourne View patients in new care safety alerts

0820
The celebrated author Philip Pullman is now retelling 50 of the tales by the Brothers Grimm to mark the bicentenary of their publication. Mr Pullman and author Neil Gaiman, look at the significance of the stories and discuss how they can be retold.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01nkwxc)
Torture, terrorism and secrets

On Start the Week the journalist Ian Cobain reveals how torture has been systematically used by the British from WWII to the War on Terror, via Kenya and Northern Ireland. David Anderson QC reviews the risks posed by terrorism in the UK. Extraordinary rendition and the language of concealment form the heart of Clare Bayley's new play, and there are more secrets uncovered by the criminal barrister-turned-crime writer, MR Hall.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01nkwxf)
Tombstone

Episode 1

"I call this book Tombstone. It is a tombstone for my father who died of hunger in 1959, for the 36 million Chinese who also died of hunger, for the system that caused their death and perhaps for myself for writing this book."

Yang Jishen's book is banned in China. It is a passionate and angry account of one of the 20th century's most shocking man-made disasters. Based on an array of new sources and personal testimonies and written by someone who was a Communist Party insider with remarkable access to official archives, Tombstone is as significant and powerful a work as Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago.

Read by David Yip.

Produced and abridged by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nkwxh)
Fostering, cooking on a budget

Are foster children being denied normal family life through unnecessary restrictions on the decisions their carers can take? The global picture for women on boards. Sophie Wright on how to avoid throwing away food, and cook well on a budget. Gay rights in Uganda: we speak to activist Malika Zouhali-Wourall and Naome Ruzindana, a maker of the new film, Call Me Kuchu.
Presented by Aasmah Mir
Produced by Kirsty Starkey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nkwxk)
Une Vie

Episode 1

1/5 Adrian Penketh's adaptation of Maupassant's first novel. Jeanne de Lamare - a sheltered and naive country aristocrat - leaves her convent education filled with thoughts of love and romance.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 11:00 Land Of The Rising Sums (b01nkxkv)
Alex Bellos visits Japan, on a quest to discover why Asian cultures seem so much better at maths and numbers than many western countries.

He looks at the cultural difference in the Japanese approach to numbers and asks whether there is something fundamental in Japanese culture that keeps them at the upper end of international numeracy league tables.

Alex explores the language used to describe numbers themselves, the songs taught in schools to teach children their times tables, and the passion the Japanese still show for the ancient but fool-proof abacus, even in the computer age.

He also visits the national abacus competition in Kyoto to see the incredible mathematical feats achieved by children as young as 5 and discovers why abacus users actually use a different part of the brain to most people doing mathematical problems, and whether this could be the key to their superior number skills.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2012.


MON 11:30 Ayres on the Air (b01n20gw)
Series 4

Autumn

Pam Ayres continues her series of poetry and sketch shows about the seasons.

Autumn includes - what to donate to the harvest festival, interesting things to put on a bonfire, checking out retirement homes in the Autumn of one's life and choosing a suitable evening class for your husband.

Her poems include: I Don't Want to Go to School Mum and The Harvest Hymn.

With Felicity Montagu and Geoffrey Whitehead.

Producer: Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in October 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01nkxkx)
Local food, health and safety changes, rail franchising

How important is the Tablet and television in changing the future of retail

Will the proposed changes to health and safety law make it harder for employees to take their employer to court?

It's week 3 of our special You and Yours series on Rail Franchising when we'll be looking at the infrastructure that surrounds the trains - track improvements, station facilities and upgrades, and new ticketing systems

The elderly victims of mail order scams who continue to spend their life savings on goods they don't really want or need because they've been told they only need to follow the rules to get their fortune

And why we're enjoying locally sourced food when we eat out

Presenter: Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01njzdl)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01nkxkz)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01nkxl1)
Series 1

UK - Commander Dalgliesh and Chief Inspector Wexford

PD James's Adam Dalgliesh and Ruth Rendell's Reginald Wexford first appeared in novels written in 1962 and 1964.

Mark Lawson continues his series about the way crime fiction has depicted modern European history by looking at the shifts in UK society they have encountered from rural racism and road rage to fears about changes in the Church of England and the rise of an environmental movement.

Producer: Robyn Read

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.

Catch an extended interview with PD James on the Front Row Crime Writers' Archive.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01nkt3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b01nlbfp)
Gwynfor v Margaret

By Rob Gittins.

The true story of Gwynfor Evans's dramatic political battle with Margaret Thatcher.

It's 1979 and Margaret Thatcher's Conservative party have swept to power with a landslide victory. The new Home Secretary, William Whitelaw, announces the Government's intention to abandon a manifesto commitment to a Welsh language TV channel. In response, Gwynfor Evans the legendary Welsh nationalist and former leader of Plaid Cymru, announces that if Thatcher refuses to keep her promise, he will embark on a hunger strike and, if necessary, starve himself to death.

A dramatic countdown begins - a political duel between the first female British Prime Minister, eager to stamp her mark on history, and Britain's first Welsh nationalist MP, now in his twilight years and universally regarded as one of the gentlest men in politics.

The battle would ignite fierce unrest across Wales and its dramatic result would help define Thatcher's premiership.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b01nl66z)
(9/12)
In Spain, why would Mr Kipling have preferred not only a sponge cake to a woman, but also a crown and a bull?

Tom Sutcliffe puts this and other mind-bending questions to the regulars from Wales and the Midlands, in the latest heat of the cryptic quiz. David Edwards and Myfanwy Alexander play for Wales, while the defending champions from the Midlands are Rosalind Miles and Stephen Maddock. There's a lot at stake, as whichever team wins today's contest may stand a strong chance of taking the Round Britain Quiz title for 2012.

Tom will also have the answer to the question he left unanswered at the end of last week's edition - and will be setting a new teaser for this week.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01nk24n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 In Seven Days: Inside a Historic Campaign (b01nlf05)
Artist Nicola Green had the unique opportunity to travel across America with Barack Obama and his team between August 2008 and January 2009. Given unprecedented access to the campaign trail, she followed Senator Obama from nomination through to his election as President. The series of portraits she made of this historic campaign are captured in seven silkscreen images which hang in Washington's Library of Congress.

"In Seven Days - Inside an Historic Campaign" is a montage programme telling the story of that campaign as seen through Nicola's eyes. She describes how it all began and how she left her husband - MP David Lammy - and her two small children behind, to make seven trips from the UK to America, joining Obama and his team on the campaign trail.

Nicola talks about the hundreds of drawings she made, photographs she took and interviews she conducted, to tell the story of the events that unfolded and how she captured them in the seven silk-screen prints.

Alongside Nicola we hear a from others involved in the 2008 campaign, historians from the Library of Congress in Washington and the Walker Gallery in Liverpool where Nicolas work will be exhibited in 2013, and other political artists who talk about the challenges of distilling thousands of pictures into one iconic image.

We also hear how this deeply personal journey unfolded and became not just a story of political and historical change, but also a story about the past, the future and what Obama symbolized for the American people and the world.

Producer: Angela Hind
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b01nl671)
Series 2

Tales

Aleks Krotoski looks at whether how we tell stories has changed with the digital world. And it looks like it has much more to do with our distant past that we might think.

She begins by looking at the online phenomena of the Slender Man a supernatural figure that's been appearing in pictures, blogs and YouTube movies since 2009 and is described as the first great myth of the web.

Aleks speaks to AS Byatt to understand what story is for before examining how modern online storytelling bears a striking resemblance to oral traditions of medieval times. To see this in action she explores the growth of the Slender Man myth and how its community based evolution mimics how legends grew in the past.

But for many of these stories they still don't make the most of what the digital world has to offer storytellers. For this Aleks turns to Alison Norrington one of the world's leading proponents of trans-media stories.


MON 17:00 PM (b01nl673)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01njzdn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b01nl675)
Series 5

Hughes, Czerski, Finkelman

Professor of Ignorance at the University of Buckingham, Professor John Lloyd CBE is joined by comedian Jimmy Carr for the fifth series.

Three guests are invited to donate one item each and explain why it deserves a place in the museum.

John and Jimmy welcome comedian Sean Hughes, physicist Dr Helen Czerski and cuneiform expert Dr Irving Finkel.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01nl677)
Josh plucks up the courage to suggest to Neil that he takes over the hens. Neil, caught off guard, says he can't say yes just like that. He'll have to see what Hayley says. Josh works on them all, convincing them of his reliability and commitment. David and Ruth are happy, as long as his schoolwork doesn't suffer and he can manage the early mornings. And Neil points out it would be doing Hayley a favour. A three month trial period is agreed, and pizza is proposed by way of celebration.

Ed tries to cheer fragile Emma up over the phone. He reassures her they've got great half term treats lined up for George. He has to hang up abruptly when a cow's injured. He has no choice but to call Alistair.

Emma confides to worried Neil that she's not looking forward to the vet's verdict. While Ed's with Alistair he asks if there's any work at The Stables. Alistair doubts it.

Ed admits to Emma he's worried about the vet fees, but at least they've been putting money aside for the anticipated household bills. Emma confesses she's had to use that money on basics. It's all gone.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01nl679)
Tom Wolfe in conversation with Mark Lawson

Mark Lawson interviews the American writer Tom Wolfe, as he publishes a new novel, Back to Blood, which is set amidst the wealth, sex and crime of contemporary Miami.

It's now 25 years since Wolfe published his first novel, the controversial best-seller Bonfire Of The Vanities, and his new book is also a dissection of racial tension in urban America. The writer reflects on what, if anything, has changed in the intervening years. In a wide-ranging conversation, Wolfe also discusses political correctness, online pornography, his chances of winning a Nobel Prize and why he believes the French ruined American literature.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nkwxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Document (b01nl67c)
The British Gunner and the Irish Civil War

Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series.

Dublin 1922. Irish rebel leader Michael Collins has signed a new Treaty with Britain. The new Irish Free State is taking shape.

But even as Collins was establishing the Free State, a rebellion from within Irish Republican ranks broke out against the new state and the Treaty with Britain. The anti-Treaty forces seized the 'Four Courts' legal complex in central Dublin.

Meanwhile, in London, the former Chief of the Imperial General Staff, Sir Henry Wilson, was assassinated by Republicans outside his Chelsea home.

The British Government urged Michael Collins their recent foe - and now fellow national leader - to act.

Mike visits Dublin to examine what a soldier's forgotten memoir reveals about Britain's true role at the start of the Irish Civil War.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01nl67f)
Labour, the Left and Europe

The crisis in the eurozone means that fundamental changes to the European Union are on the agenda. Conservative politicians have called for a re-appraisal of the UK's relationship with a more integrated and potentially less democratic EU. Yet Labour's leadership is curiously quiet on the topic.

Edward Stourton talks to leading figures in Labour's policy debate and finds out what rethinking is going on behind the scenes.

Producer: Chris Bowlby.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01ngnwg)
Seven members of a panel convened by Italy's Civil Protection Department in the days prior to the L'Aquila earthquake of 2009 have this week been sentenced to six years each in prison. The trial has been watched eagerly around the world by seismologists and earthquake specialists around the world.

The men - fours scientists, two engineers and a government official - were found guilty of manslaughter for downplaying the risks of a big earthquake happening, after months of weaker tremors. But did the scientists get too close to a political role in those confused days? Will the verdict deter other scientists from offering their advice in future?

Prof Tom Jordan, who chaired an International Committee formed at the request of the Italian government to look into risk communication gives his thoughts on the verdict, and Dr Roger Mussen and Prof Robert Holdsworth give a UK view on the consequences for science.

Dr Jacob Dahl is trying to decrypt one of the oldest known written languages, proto-Elamite. He's putting hi-tech images of over 1000 clay tablets online, and hopes that with international cooperation he'll have cracked the code in the next two years.

And Dr Leonel Dupuy describes his breakthrough in the development of a see-through soil which will revolutionise crop studies, enabling extraordinarily highly detailed images of root systems in vivo.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01nkwxc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01njzdq)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nl67h)
America braces itself for Hurricane Sandy - we report on the latest developments and the political impact.

Ed Miliband calls for a change in approach to mental health.

Afghanistan's first female rapper.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nl67k)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 1

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch one morning twenty years ago; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins finally unfolds.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with a sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused throughout with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 News Quiz USA (b01nl67m)
The News Quiz gets a US makeover with an all-American panel.

With the US election in balance this year, turmoil in the Middle East, financial insecurity all around - not to mention Pippa Middleton threatening to move to New York - a team of US comedians dissect the headlines as the News Quiz format crosses the Atlantic.

The host is Andy Borowitz - New York Times columnist, brain behind the Borowitz Report and Time magazine's top Twitterer (and the creator of the Fresh Prince of Bel Air!). The panel include legendary political humorist PJ O'Rourke, and top US stand ups Dean Obeidallah, Eugene Mirman and Jena Friedman.

Producer: Sam Bryant.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nl67p)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster.



TUESDAY 30 OCTOBER 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01njzfm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01nkwxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01njzfp)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01njzfr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01njzft)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01njzfw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ns15q)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with the Revd Neil Gardner, Minister of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01nl68l)
Following the ban on live ash tree imports, Farming Today hears a warning that the global trade in plants means the UK is wide open to new diseases. Professor Mike Shaw from the British Society for Plant Pathology says the limited testing done at UK borders inevitably misses some diseased plants.

The Government announces a review into the risks posed by Chinese lanterns, which farmers claim are eaten by cattle, sheep, and horses - often with fatal consequences.

And reporter Heather Simons visits an organic farm in Shropshire, to see how one farmer is preparing his animals for the winter.

Presented by Sarah Swadling and produced in Birmingham by Rich Ward.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01nl6h4)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb, including:

0750
Storms in poor countries kill tens of thousands of people and devastate lives for years, that is not going to happen in New York and New Jersey but Storm Sandy has still had a pretty huge impact. The BBC's correspondent in New York Ben Thompson has the latest from the city.

0810
The latest research shows that about 4,000 women every year endure unpleasant or even disfiguring treatment for cancers that may not threaten their lives at all. Myriam Pryke and Diane Dally explain their similar experiences but very different reactions.

0820
The Bodleian Libraries are hosting a special one-day event to celebrate the gift of papers that belonged to the poet Cecil Day-Lewis and his wife, actress, Jill Balcon. Tamasin Day-Lewis explains her view that her father should be better remembered as a wonderful poet.

0831has seen kidnapping and killing take place on a staggering scale. The Today programme's Tom Bateman reports
In Mexico, the war between the country's rival drug cartels from Mexico on the country's "disappeared".


TUE 09:00 The Public Philosopher (b01nl6h6)
Series 2

Welfare

The eminent American political philosopher Michael Sandel is Radio 4's "Public Philosopher." Now, as America prepares for its Presidential elections, he is going on the road in America with a unique mission to challenge ordinary voters and lay bare the deeper moral questions bound up in the noisy Romney and Obama campaigns.

In this week's programme, Professor Sandel is at Harvard, his home university in the intellectual heartland of New England. Much of the debate between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama has been about welfare policy, social security and healthcare. Underlying this, Professor Sandel believes, is a moral and philosophical disagreement about the nature of the American dream itself.

Earlier this year, Obama was attacked for his remarks about the role of government. "Somebody helped to create this unbelievable American system that we have that allowed you to thrive," the President said. "If you've got a business, you didn't build that. Somebody else made that happen." Republicans saw this as an attack on business and accused Obama of stifling the idea of individual success at the core of the American dream. The right's policies are more focussed on individual choice -- lowering taxes and opposing, for example, the type of universal health care policy which Obama has enacted.

Against this backdrop, our public audience will be asked: "Who Built It? Is the American vision of individual responsibility for one's own success a myth?" Michael Sandel weaves through these issues with the help of philosophers past and present.

Producer: Mukul Devichand.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01nnf6t)
Tombstone

Episode 2

When Yang Jishen's father died of starvation he thought it was just a personal tragedy but then he discovered his experience had been repeated in families throughout China. His research reveals what he calls "a tragedy unprecedented in world history, when tens of millions of people starved to death during a period of normal climate patterns and with no wars or epidemics."

Read by David Yip

Produced and abridged by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nl6h8)
Woman's Hour Power List

The launch of the Woman's Hour Power List. Jenni Murray talks to chair of the judges Eve Pollard about the search for the 100 most powerful women in the UK. DCI Caroline Goode Goode was the police officer who tracked down, arrested and prosecuted the killers of Banaz Mahmod, the victim of an honour killing. Banaz had been to the police five times to say that she believed she would be killed by her family after leaving her husband. The police failed to act and Banaz was killed. DCI Caroline Goode joins Jenni in the studio.
Produced by Ruth Watts.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nl6hb)
Une Vie

Episode 2

2/5 Adrian Penketh's adaptation of Maupassant's first novel. Jeanne de Lamare - a sheltered and naive country aristocrat - has married a smallminded local landowner, and begins to adapt to the disappointments of life.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b01nl6hd)
Series 3

Citizen Science / Giant Harvestman

Recently the term Citizen Science has evolved to describe amateurs working with professionals at public events such as Bioblitz events, which were first held in 1996 in Washington DC. These involve an intense period of biological surveying within a defined area and so Brett Westwood travels to Oxford to attend the World's first Urban Bioblitz and find out for himself what over 1000 coordinated events in one weekend hope to achieve.

But can the amateur really add to the science? Many scientific communities, such as an academic study by Jeremy Thomas (Professor of Ecology at Oxford) and colleagues acknowledged that without the input from these amateur wildlife watchers much of today's understanding of the natural world would be impossible. Brett Westwood discusses this with Dr Helen Roy who has recently been asked to review the benefit of amateur observations for the scientific community.

Meanwhile, Andrew Dawes travels to Sheffield to meet Paul Richards, an invertebrate specialist, who recently found a species of giant harvestman measuring 20 centimetres across at his local bioblitz. But what effect is this alien species having on the native harvestmen, as well as on flora and fauna?

And Sarah Pitt joins Daniel Hargreaves on the shores of Blagdon Lake in Somerset as he goes in search of the Nathusius' pipistrelle - a small species of bat rarely seen in many parts of the UK.

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open Universities iSpot.

Producer : Mary Colwell
Presenter : Brett Westwood
Editor : Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Swansong (b01nl6hg)
The Holy Bible by Manic Street Preachers

Stuart Maconie presents the story of The Holy Bible - the last album to feature full contributions from Richey James Edwards. Richey is credited with design and guitar for the album. In reality he gave no musical contribution to the record yet wrote 75% of the lyrics and fashioned the record's core subject material - namely a thesis on prostitution, capital punishment, American globalization and the Holocaust.

The album 'The Holy Bible' was released on 30 August 1994. Richey disappeared from the Embassy Hotel, Bayswater, London, at approximately 7am on 1 February 1995 and was never seen again. He was officially pronounced 'presumed dead' on 23 November 2008.

Swansong features new contributions from Manic Street Preachers - James Dean Bradfield and Nicky Wire, plus Manics’ biographer Simon Price, and Keith Cameron - contributing Editor of Mojo magazine.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01nl6hj)
Call You and Yours: We're out of recession, but how does it feel for you?

Last week we had some good news. The double-dip recession was officially declared over by the Office for National Statistics. David Cameron said that the good news will keep on coming.

However critics say living standards are falling and Living Wage research by KPMG has revealed that nearly 5million workers in the UK are not earning enough to maintain a decent standard of living.

On Call You & Yours, we're trying to assess the state of the economy via your experiences. What are the pressures facing your household? Are you feeling more confident about the future? Will you be spending more money or are the recent hikes in energy costs making you think twice? Whether you're a householder or a business, let us know how it feels for you.

Call Julian Worricker on 03700 100 444 or you can e-mail via the Radio 4 website or text on 84844.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Vibeke Venema.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01njzfy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01nl6hl)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz73)
Series 1

Sicily - Inspector Rogas

Leonard Sciascia used crime stories to highlight Mafia crimes. The Sicilian was the author of novels including The Day of the Owl, A Simple Story and Equal Danger - which features Inspector Rogas.

Paul Bailey, Gianrico Carofiglio, Andrea Camilleri and Petra Reski discuss with Mark Lawson the influence of Leonardo Sciascia and the continuing presence of the Mafia in Italian life.

Producer: Robyn Read

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01nl677)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01nl6hn)
Notes to Future Self

When thirteen year old 'Philosophy Rainbow'- better known as Sophie - is diagnosed with a terminal illness, she, her mother Judy, and her sister Calliope, return to live with their grandmother Daphne in Birmingham.

Reunited for the first time in years, the three generations of women must try to prepare themselves for the inevitable loss of Sophie from their lives, while Sophie herself must come to terms with her own mortality.

As Sophie counts down the last weeks days, and minutes, of her life, tensions simmer and emotions bubble to the surface. At times Sophie hates her family; they have their futures, the rest of their lives to look forward to. But Sophie has her Future Self. Someday, she believes she'll come back as someone else. Then she'll have a different future. The future denied her now. And she leaves her Future Self some notes, some advice to remember, because after all, all stories about death are really stories about how to live.

Adapted for radio by Lucy Caldwell from her stage play, Notes to Future Self is a brave and poignant story of a young girl facing death before she even really knows what life means.

Producer/Director....Heather Larmour

Playwright and novelist Lucy Caldwell's theatre credits include the award-winning 'Leaves', 'Guardians' and 'Notes to Future Self'. For radio she has written the Imison Award-winning 'Girl from Mars', 'Avenues of Eternal Peace' and 'Witch Week' a dramatization of Diana Wynne Jones' novel. In 2011 Lucy won the The Rooney Prize for Irish Literature and was awarded the prestigious Dylan Thomas Prize for her novel 'The Meeting Point'. 'Notes to Future Self' first premiered in Birmingham in 2011.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b01nl6hq)
As Black History Month draws to a close a heritage consultant from south east London asks whether this annual celebration has served its purpose and where does our large Asian community fit in to all this?

In Birmingham our first British-born black-writer, Norman Smith, takes us back to the West Midlands of the 1970's when a powerful mix of reggae and family testimony fuelled his passion for the past.

Tom Holland is in Ripon discovering the life and times of Saint Wilfrid, the forgotten pioneer of the Roman Catholic Church in Britain. And we catch up on your letters and emails as we highlight the latest happenings in the history community.

Find us on Facebook or Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b01nl6hs)
Series 1

Billy Bragg (the A-Side)

John Wilson's series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios.

Programme 1, A-side. 'Talking With The Taxman About Poetry' - Billy Bragg reveals how the self-proclaimed 'difficult' third album was written and created with a guitar he bought when he was out shopping for swimming trunks (he claims he still swims naked as a result)... he explains how a film about the James Brothers helped him write "There's Power In A Union'... and describes how Andy Kershaw's inability to shut up led him to writing 'Levi Stubbs' Tears'. And he plays excerpts from the album live in front of the audience.

In the B-side of the programme, it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions and Billy considers the state of protest songs today, reveals what music he is writing at the moment and explains what poetry he would discuss with today's taxman.

Other programmes include Paul Weller talking about The Jam's final album, 'The Gift'; Suzanne Vega recalls the making of 'Solitude Standing', the album that made her a worldwide superstar; and Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone takes us back to the seminal Zombies' record 'Oracle And Odessey'

Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b01nl6hv)
DIY Law

Joshua Rozenberg looks at DIY law - what it is like to represent yourself as a litigant in person and whether the CPS should be allowed to shut down private prosecutions. Producer Wesley Stephenson.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01nl6hx)
John Finnemore and Peter Hitchens

Cabin Pressure star and writer John Finnemore, and Peter Hitchens, columnist and author, talk about the books they love to presenter Harriett Gilbert.

Who did murder the Princes in the Tower? For Peter Hitchens Josephine Tey still has the answer, in The Daughter of Time.

John Finnemore loves A Landing on the Sun by Michael Frayn, which provokes argument as to whether it is a happy book or a terribly sad one.

And Harriett Gilbert chooses something that makes her laugh: What's My Motivation? by Michael Simkins, his self-deprecating memoir of the life of an actor who's never made it to the big time.

Producer: Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01nl77b)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Includes Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01njzg0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Rudy's Rare Records (b01nl77d)
Series 4

It's Grim Up North

Adam attends a business conference to network and is determined to leave his dad behind. He fails. Not only does Rudy attend but he knows the guest speaker.

Father and son comedy set in the finest old-school record shop in Birmingham. Starring Lenny Henry, Larrington Walker and some terrific tunes.

Rudy's Rare Records is a tiny down at heel old reggae record shop in Birmingham - one of a dying breed; a place with real soul, stacked with piles of vinyl, where the slogan is "if we don't have it - them don't mek it". It's owned by the charismatic, irrepressible Rudy Sharpe (Larrington Walker), reluctantly helped out by his long-suffering neurotic son Adam (Lenny Henry) and Handsworth's first, black, surly girly goth, Tasha (Natasha Godfrey). Rudy has recently married his long-term love interest Doreen (Claire Benedict) who is enjoying the challenge of getting the Sharpe men in shape.

Adam.......Lenny Henry
Rudy.....Larrington Walker
Tasha......Natasha Godfrey
Doreen......Claire Benedict
Bernard Sheedy...Justin Moorhouse
Brinsley Forde.....Brinsley Forde
Katerina.......... Liza Sadovy
Attila/Receptionist ......... Adam Nagaitis

Written by Danny Robins

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

Music featured in this episode:

TRAIN TO SKAVILLE * THE ETHIOPIANS
RADIO * RAPHAEL SAADIQ
SHINE * ASWAD
SIMMER DOWN * BOB MARLEY AND THE WAILERS
SWEAT ( A LA LA LA LA LONG) * INNER CIRCLE
JAMAICA IS THE PLACE TO GO * CHARLIE BINGER AND HIS QUARTET
HOT IN HERE * NELLY
LET'S GET IT ON * MARVIN GAYE
RUBY SOHO * JIMMY CLIFF
BE PREPARED * WINSTON SAMUEL
DON'T TURN AROUND * ASWAD
PRESSURE DROP * TOOTS AND THE MAYTALS
GIRLFRIEND IN A COMA * THE SMITHS.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01nl77j)
Paul calls Lilian, and sympathises with her plight. He suggests Matt and James are too alike. He tells Lilian she's a great mum. Lilian recognises she's spoiled her son, and that he's a bit of a mummy's boy. Paul says pointedly that it's not easy keeping two men you love happy.

James is twitching because he's lost a client. He blames his 'non proximity'; the client likes to deal face to face. Lilian's sympathetic, but Matt thinks the client's had a lucky escape - he wouldn't trust James to manage a flea circus. When Lilian goes she leaves Matt instructions on the heating of James's soup.

Having had his fill of rude and demanding James, Matt passes on the soup instructions to irritated Brenda, who in turn serves the soup cold. Tom visits and engages James in chat about Christmassy pork-based snacks. James is soon bored, clanking his bell for attention. Harassed Brenda finally arrives, confiscating the bell until James improves his manners. James is indignant, but Tom thinks Brenda magnificent. Brenda asserts that it serves James right for humiliating her all those years ago. When Matt returns later, Brenda assures him that the afternoon has been very quiet.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01nl77l)
The Master; Seduced by Art; Thomas Adès

With Mark Lawson.

The film The Master is an impressionistic tale of an American war veteran who drifts into a cult led by a charismatic writer. Paul Thomas Anderson's follow-up to There Will Be Blood is partly inspired by the activities of novelist and Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, and the director even invited Scientologist Tom Cruise to a personal screening. Lionel Shriver, author of We Need To Talk About Kevin, delivers her verdict.

Seduced By Art is the National Gallery's first major exhibition of photography. Recent photographs by Martin Parr hang next to a painting by Thomas Gainsborough from 1750, as the exhibition explores the relationship between historical painting, early photography and works created by photographers today. Photographer Jillian Edelstein and art critic William Feaver give their reaction.

In a rare broadcast interview recorded in New York, composer Thomas Adès discusses his opera The Tempest, which he is currently conducting at Metropolitan Opera. He also reveals why he fled from a performance of Britten's Peter Grimes, and why he was unable to produce a score for a libretto written by James Fenton.

And James Grant, film locations manager on Skyfall, talks about the most desirable movie locations world-wide, as Big Ben opens for filming.

Producer Dymphna Flynn.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nl6hb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01nl77n)
Too Many Chiefs?

In April next year, the SNP government in Scotland will merge 8 existing constabularies to create a single national police force. This is intended to bring efficiency savings by cutting out duplication of functions and gaining the economies of scale. But the move is proving controversial amid fears that it will damage local accountability and lead to worsening services in some areas.
Next month in England and Wales elections will be held for 41 Police and Crime Commissioners to oversee a continuing patchwork of local forces. The Westminster government sees the Commissioners as signs of its commitment to 'localism'. But seven years ago, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of police said the fragmented network of local forces was 'not fit for purpose'. So, given the cuts the police are facing, is it time for a radical re-organisation south of the border? Gerry Northam investigates.
Producer: Nicola Dowling.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01nl77q)
How do charities portray blind and visually-impaired people in adverts without upsetting visually-impaired people themselves? Diane Roworth from York Blind and Partially-Sighted Society explains why she took exception to a recent blog from Richard Leaman, CEO of GDBA.
GDBA and RNIB respond to separate adverts they 've published recently which received negative comments from bind people.
Dan Dufour from the Good Agency, talks about trends of images used to fundraise for charities.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b01nl77s)
In the first of a new series, presenter Claudia Hammond reports on the latest developments in neuroscience, mental health and psychology.

Anna Freud was the daughter of Sigmund Freud who pioneered child psychotherapy. She set up the Hampstead War nurseries during the Second World War, which became the Anna Freud Centre after her death in 1982. The Centre is now celebrating its 60th anniversary and Claudia investigates how it has changed and asks what the founder would think of its many new projects, including neuroscience and teenage brains.

Claudia talks to the new Minister with responsibility for mental health, Norman Lamb.

And Rebecca Shaumberg explains why she thinks guilt is a positive characteristic in a leader.


TUE 21:30 The Public Philosopher (b01nl6h6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01njzg2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nl7j9)
Superstorm Sandy: how much damage did it cause and what will the economic impact be?

Bahrain bans all public gatherings.

Five hundred years after Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel was completed.

With Robin Lustig.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nnf6w)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 2

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 2:
Dr Deman discovers a baby adopted by a local celebrity bears a striking resemblance to the one taken away from Agnès when she was just 15. He writes the address in Agnès' file.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Arthur Smith's Balham Bash (b00lk09w)
Series 1

Episode 2

Arthur Smith invites an audience into his home in Balham, south London, for music and comedy.

With Benjamin Zephaniah, Stephen K Amos and Matt Holness

Pippa Evans - as singer-songwriter Loretta Maine - lends a hand.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nl7jc)
A Health Minister says abuse at care homes such as Winterbourne View is a "national scandal" that "has to end".
Answering an urgent question, Norman Lamb says the Government's response to the BBC investigation into the private hospital, near Bristol, "will be robust and clear".
An Energy Minister says the Prime Minister announced the "intent, not the detail" of a plan to put energy customers on the cheapest tariff.
The Government faces pressure in the Lords over the decision to remove child benefit from higher earners.
And the Business Secretary, Vince Cable, tells MPs that a new committee to promote economic growth has yet to get down to work - even though it has met twice.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 31 OCTOBER 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01njzh3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01nnf6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01njzh5)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01njzh7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01njzh9)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01njzhc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ns166)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with the Revd Neil Gardner, Minister of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01nl7w8)
Ash dieback threatens millions of trees in this country. An expert in tree health at Aberdeen University says more resources are needed to tackle tree diseases to prevent permanent damage to the UK's countryside.

Meanwhile, the Food and Environment Research Agency is working with the Forestry Commission to implement the ban on ash imports and enforce the new movement restrictions within the country. Their Chief Plant Health Officer, Martin Ward tells us what they're doing to contain the disease.

With news that the Gangmaster's Licensing Authority has revoked a company's license for breaching labour regulations, their Director of Strategy insists that light touch regulation is adequate in dealing with exploitation.

Finally, we visit a riding stables in Worcestershire to find out what the poor hay harvest this year means for winter feed stocks.

Presented by Sarah Swadling and produced in Birmingham by Polly Procter.


WED 06:00 Today (b01nl7wb)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including:

0750
A woman from Wandsworth in south west London has been detained in a psychiatric unit under the mental health act after admitting killing her two children. Lucy Jolin, of the Birth Trauma Association and sufferer of post-natal depression after the birth of her first son, explains her view that there needs to be much greater awareness of the seriousness of this condition.

0810
The former Conservative minister Lord Heseltine has called for a "comprehensive strategy for wealth creation" to be set out by the government. Lord Heseltine of Thenford, author of "No stone unturned, in pursuit of growth" report explains the findings and the BBC's political editor Nick Robinson explains its potential political impact.

0820
Computers already drive trains, check bus tickets, solve complex mathematical problems, beat humans at chess and conduct countless other tasks. But what happens when they are programmed to write a romantic novel or poem? Philip Parker, professor of management science at European Institute of Business Administration (Insead) in France, explains that he is the "author" of some 200,000 books, mainly non-fiction, created using computer automation.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01nl7wd)
Gina Campbell, Rod Davis, Roger Clarke, Jonathan Lewis

Libby Purves is joined by Gina Campbell, daughter of speed record breaker Donald; journalist and writer Roger Clarke; Rod Davis of the Quarrymen and playwright Jonathan Lewis.

Roger Clarke is a journalist, film critic and the author of 'A Natural History of Ghosts: 500 Years of Hunting for Proof.' He grew up in a supposedly haunted house on the Isle of Wight and become obsessed with ghosts as a child. His book explores the history and class structure of a very British fascination with the supernatural.
'A Natural History of Ghosts: 500 years of Hunting for Proof' is published by Particular Books.

Gina Campbell is the daughter of Donald Campbell who died attempting to break the world water speed record on Coniston Water in 1967. Her book 'Daughter of Bluebird' tells of her experience growing up as part of the Campbell dynasty and how it subsequently shaped her life. 'Daughter of Bluebird' is published by Northern Books.

Jonathan Lewis is a playwright who swapped military training at Sandhurst for the theatre. Based on his time spent in a military hospital, his play 'Our Boys' is an account of the tedium and terror that young soldiers face when recovering from injuries incurred in the line of duty. 'Our Boys' is playing at London's Duchess Theatre.

Rod Davis is one of the original members of the Quarrymen, a skiffle group formed by John Lennon at Quarry Bank School in Liverpool in 1956. Rod was the banjo player but left the band to go to university and the Quarrymen eventually evolved into the Beatles with the arrival of Paul McCartney and George Harrison. The Quarrymen reformed in 1997 and are still performing. The Quarrymen will be performing at The Thunderbolt, Bristol in December.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01nnf8t)
Tombstone

Episode 3

Henan is a rural province north of Shanghai. Xinyang prefecture was the region's main producer of grain and yet the Chinese famine hit hardest in that lush region and one out of every eight residents starved to death. Yang Jishen has spoken to some of the survivors.

Read by David Yip

Produced and abridged by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nl7wg)
Vampires; Julia Bradbury; Powerful women

The enduring fascination of the vampire; Julia Bradbury on Wainwright walks; Are men still scared of powerful women? Domestic violence and child contact. With Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nl7wj)
Une Vie

Episode 3

3/5 Adrian Penketh's adaptation of Maupassant's first novel. Jeanne de Lamare - a naive country aristocrat married to a selfish man, begins to discover how rotten and treacherous adult life is all around her.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 11:00 A Scottish Hotel in the Holy Land (b01nl7wl)
In the Israeli town of Tiberias, situated opposite the Golan Heights and within range of Hezbollah's rockets in Lebanon, you will find The Scots Hotel, owned and run by that well known chain of hoteliers, the Church of Scotland.
Unlikely as it seems, one of the biggest properties owned by the Church of Scotland isn't a grand old kirk dating back to the Reformation or a manse in a well-to-do Scottish postcode, it's Israel's Boutique Hotel of the Year 2008.
Ten short years ago it all seemed so rosy; a plan to build a hotel on the site of a 19th century hospital established by Scots surgeon and medical missionary, David Watt Torrance. Then things took a turn for the worst. The Second Intifada caused widespread disruption across the region and the Israeli government stepped in to halt renovations after an ancient Jewish graveyard was found on the grounds. It opened in May 2004, behind schedule and over budget.
Back home, the Kirk held its nerve despite having to cut back on other international work such as HIV projects in Africa.The General Assembly in 2010 was presented with a stark picture of its finances; churches would have to close, services for the vulnerable would be slashed and vacancies for ministers would go unfilled.
What explains the Church's loyalty to this unlikely project? Angus Roxburgh travels to the Holy Land to explore the complex relationship between the Kirk, Israel and a local Palestinian Christian population in decline.
Producer: Caitlin Smith.


WED 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b01nl7wn)
Series 5

Meter Reading Chic

Fifth series of the hit Radio 4 series, with more shop-based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave.

The staff of Fags, Mags and Bags continue their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built the business up over 30 years and loves the art of the shop. However, he does apply the "low return" rules of the shop to all other aspects of his life. Then there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them whether they like it or not!

In this final episode of the series, Ramesh decides it's time to ponder retirement from the corner shop game, but has to decide who will carry on his shop legacy and take over the Fags, Mags and Bags empire.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01nl7wq)
Teeth whitening, young drivers and energy tariffs

Winifred Robinson and new rules on Teeth Whitening. Who will protect you when it goes wrong? We'll be reporting live from the annual Toy fair and looking at the latest gadgets and games for children.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01njzhf)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01nl7ws)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz7f)
Series 1

Spain - PI Pepe Carvalho

In his Pepe Carvalho novels, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán created a Barcelona-based private eye with a gastronomic passion, whose investigations are set against political developments in post-Franco Spanish society.

Mark Lawson continues his series looking at European history through crime fiction - discussing the books of Montalbán with Antonio Hill and Jason Webster - whose own crime novels depict contemporary Spain.

Producer: Robyn Read

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01nl77j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01nl7wx)
The Trenches Trip

In Jonathan Smith's play, unexpected conflicts emerge within a group of teachers and sixth-formers as they walk through the WWI trenches, tunnels and cemeteries of Flanders, trying to step into the boots of those who died there.

Producer/director: Bruce Young.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01nl8g3)
Energy bills

Earlier this month the Prime Minister surprised the energy industry when he said during Prime Minister's Questions that the government would introduce laws to make suppliers give customers the cheapest tariffs. The energy industry regulator Ofgem waded into the debate with proposals to force suppliers to tell customers about the cheapest gas and electricity tariffs they have on offer and to make bills clearer and simpler. So what affect will these changes have on our bills at a time when three of the biggest energy companies have announced price increases?

Do you understand how your gas and electricity bills are charged at the moment? What experience have you had of switching suppliers? Do you feel you are paying too much fixed monthly payments and are struggling to get them reduced? Are you looking for a better deal?

Whatever your question you can ask Paul Lewis and guests Ann Robinson, energy expert at uSwitch, Christine McGourty, Director of Communications at Energy UK and Theresa Perchard, Director of Policy at Citizens Advice for their advice. Email moneybox@bbc.co.uk or call 03 700 100 444 between 1 and 3pm on Wednesday 31st October.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b01nl77s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01nl8g5)
The UK strip and lap-dancing industry; blue jeans

Growth of the strip clubs - Why has erotic dance and stripping become a staple of the night time economy in the UK? Kate Hardy tells Laurie Taylor why her research suggests that the proliferation of these clubs has little to do with the demands of male customers. Instead, it's a by product of the economics of an industry which maintains its profits, even during a recession, by passing the financial risks on to its workers. Also, the anthropologist, Daniel Miller asks what the ubiquity of blue jeans tells us about our individual and social lives. He's joined by the sociologist, Sophie Woodward.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01nl8g7)
Mark Thompson; Savile Inquiry; Will Wyatt

The former Chief Executive of BBC Broadcasting and author of the BBC's enquiry into another recent crisis -Queengate - Will Wyatt - talks for the very first time about how the Corporation has handled the Savile scandal. Plus David Folkenflik from National Public Radio tells us why the New York Times is beginning to question if Mark Thompson is the right man to be their CEO.
Could a new plan to save Britain's ailing local newspapers work? a question Lorna Tilbian of Numis Securities and Neil Fowler - former editor of the Western Mail, Newcastle Journal and Derby Evening Telegraph.
And as the financial crisis in Greece intensifies journalists are in the firing line of state attempts to shut them up - we hear from the front line.
Presented by Steve Hewlett
Produced by Beverley Purcell.


WED 17:00 PM (b01nl8g9)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01njzhh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b00wv6cd)
Series 6

Tour Guide

After meeting a Tour Operator in the street whilst doing his daily chores, Arthur joins a Tour Bus giving guided journeys around the city - and is, as only Arthur can be, hugely disappointed with his experience.

Misunderstandings and misinformation abound, and after a stop to buy some pies from the market Arthur heads to the Shoulder of Mutton to talk through his annoyance at the day-so-far with Jack.

He comes up with a plan to develop his very own and much improved tours of the city and, not having a bus at his disposal, decides to conduct walking tours.

Whilst starting this new venture in earnest, Arthur's best-laid plans, as usual, don't quite go as he'd hoped...

Cast:
Count Arthur Strong ..... Steve Delaney
Woman/Market Trader/
Shop Assistant/Old Woman ..... Melanie Giedroyc
Tour Operator/Official/
Jack/Old Man ..... Dave Mounfield
Announcer/Tour Guide/
Man/Aussie ...... Alastair Kerr

Producers: Richard Daws, Mark Radcliffe & John Leonard
A Komedia Entertainment & Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01nl8gc)
Joe cuts a cauliflower for appreciative Ed. It will help their meal go further. They can't even afford sweets for Halloween. Joe sympathizes. His new dentures are going to cost a fortune.

Fallon bumps into Emma in the charity shop, poring over potential purchases for Keira. Fallon's looking forward to her Halloween cocktail event at Jaxx. She tells Emma she ought to come, but downcast Emma isn't in the mood and makes her excuses.

On their way home Emma's car finally and dramatically gives up the ghost on a very busy dual carriageway. Emma has to evacuate the car and calm panicky George. They're rescued by Eddie, who's close by.

When they get home, Emma judges Ed harshly, accusing him of not taking the incident seriously. She can't believe he's told George not to say anything to Will about it. Ed accuses her of mollycoddling George. Eventually Ed admits he feels bad, and Emma calms down. But when Ed points out they'll need another car, Emma's incredulous. How will they afford it? A loan would just mean more debt. They argue bitterly. Emma's ashamed to admit she can't manage, and Ed retorts he feels worse; he can't even provide for his own family.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01nl8gf)
Rust and Bone, Aerosmith, paper art, and hotels on film

With Kirsty Lang.

Rust and Bone, Jacques Audiard's follow-up to his award-winning prison drama A Prophet is an earthy romantic fable about the unlikely relationship between a bare-knuckle boxer and a trainer of killer whales. Marion Cotillard, the star of Rust and Bone, talks to Kirsty, and critic Sandra Hebron reviews the film.

Steven Tyler and Joe Perry from Aerosmith discuss their album, Music From Another Dimension. The band members talk about working with Julian Lennon and Johnny Depp, and why it's been over a decade since they last released new material.

Paper is the subject of a new exhibition, The First Cut, at Manchester Art Gallery. The show features 31 artists from around the world who use this most basic of artistic materials to create their art. Kirsty Lang talks to Rob Ryan, one of the artists involved in the show who is known for his detailed papercuts, and curator Fiona Corridan.

As Secret Cinema launch a Secret Hotel, writer Adam Smith acts as our guide on a whistle-stop tour of the great hotels in film, from The Shining to Psycho, and imagines what your experience might be if you were to stay there.

Producer Ellie Bury.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nl7wj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b01nl8gh)
The Morality of Drone Attacks

The RAF top brass were out on parade in Lincolnshire this Friday. At a time of defence cuts it was something for them to celebrate; the dust was being blown off one of its old formations. 13 Squadron RAF Waddington may not stir evocative Battle of Britain images, but in its own way this was modern warfare history in the making. The RAF has just doubled the number of Reaper drone aircraft it flies and for the first time they'll be controlled via satellite from this small base in rural Lincolnshire. The pilots will never have to face enemy fire; they won't even set foot in Afghanistan. It will all be done via a computer screen. As fate would have it, this all happened in the same week human rights lawyers launched an action to sue Foreign Secretary William Hague over the alleged use of UK intelligence in assisting US drone attacks in Pakistan. The case, at the High Court, was brought on behalf of Noor Khan, whose father was killed in a US unmanned drone strike which killed around 40 people at a tribal gathering. Since 2004, CIA drones have targeted suspected militants with missile strikes in the Pakistani tribal regions, killing thousands of people. The program is controversial because of questions about its legality, the number of civilians it has killed and its impact on Pakistan's sovereignty. And the drone campaign against al Qaeda is spreading to other countries as well, with 4 attacks in North Yemen this month, the latest on Sunday killing 3 people. To their supporters, drones are an extremely effective way of targeting our enemies; a just and proportionate response to terrorism protecting both civilian life and the life of our soldiers. Do the ends justify the means or are drone attacks immoral acts of assassination which have caused the deaths of hundreds of innocent civilians? Are drones inherently more moral or immoral than any other weapon? In the age of the drone do we need to re-draw the moral, ethical and legal principles of just war? The Moral Maze looks at the morality of drone attacks. Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Giles Fraser. Witnesses: Richard Kemp - Former Commander, British Forces in Afghanistan; former Chair, COBRA Intelligence Group, Chris Cole - Drone Wars UK, Dr Peter Lee - Senior Lecturer in Air Power Studies, King's College London Dept. War Studies, Paul Schulte - Non-Resident Senior Associate, Carnegie Europe & Carnegie Nuclear Policy, former civil servant at the MOD.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01nl8gk)
Series 3

Anna Minton: Fuelling Fear with High Security

Anna Minton, author of "Ground Control", argues that the increasingly high security surrounding public and private buildings creates a sense of fear rather than safety.

Alan McInnes, director of Secured by Design responds:

"SBD is awarded when homes and buildings meet a minimum security standard. Security has become a factor in planning because of high levels of crime, inadequate, low grade security fittings by builders in past years and the Crime & Disorder Act which logically required public authorities and police to have crime prevention on their agenda for the benefit of the whole community.

SBD is only one of several strategies, including social and community interventions that are supported by these agencies. Police specialists in each force spend their time advising architects, builders and members of the public about security methods and the principles of designing out crime.

This is a free service. Insurers have no part to play in this. What Anna Minton is complaining about is not SBD but design concepts of particular architects.

Many SBD estates are mixed development and the social housing elements certainly do not stand out as ghettos. SBD is about reducing crime and the fear of crime through a blend of design and realistic physical security.

There are many thousands of homes benefitting from SBD. Independent research in cities and towns around the UK has shown that SBD properties suffer 50% less burglary crime. Just upgrading the doors in Glasgow social housing reduced burglary by 20%, whilst car related crime can fall by 25% and surveys of residents, many of who have not heard of the project, report feeling safer in their home and their community."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Climategate Revisited (b01nl8gm)
Climategate was the term quickly applied in 2009 to the mysterious appearance on the internet of large numbers of emails and documents belonging to some of the world's leading climate scientists.

This happened just a month before the Copenhagen climate change conference, which failed to meet the expectations of many for agreement on international action. The timing may not be coincidental.

For some climate change sceptics, the emails were a disturbing revelation of the real thoughts and manoeuvrings of scientists at the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Centre and their international colleagues. The scientists argue that while some of the phrasing may have been unfortunate, there is nothing in the documents to undermine the validity of mainstream climate science.

Climategate certainly inflamed the debate over climate change, in the UK, the US and elsewhere.

In 2012 the Norfolk Police announced they were abandoning their investigation into who hacked into the university's computer and then distributed what they found.

But what have been the longer-term consequences of this incident, for public opinion, media reporting and international policy-making on climate change? Chris Vallance investigates, asking if this was it a political crime, and, if so, how effective has it been?

Producers: Martin Rosenbaum & Catherine Donegan.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01nl7wd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01njzhk)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nl8gp)
Cameron faces parliament over EU funding; further protests in Portugal as austerity budget proposals go through parliament - Beth McLeod is in Lisbon for the World Tonight; Further revelations about Jimmy Savile, this time from a hospital porter, increase pressure on NHS to respond, Tonight with Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nnf8w)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 3

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 3:
Dr Deman reads of a vicious attack on a nanny with a young baby. He suspects Agnès. In the present, a china doll goes missing from Madame Beck's and Agnès is her chief suspect.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Irish Micks and Legends (b01nl8gr)
Series 1

The Salmon of Knowledge

Aisling Bea and Yasmine Akram become Ais and Yaz and are the very best pals. They take their role as Ireland's freshest story-tellers to the British nation very seriously indeed but haven't had the time to do much research, learn their lines or work out who is doing which parts.

The girls' unconventional way of telling stories involves a concoction of thoroughly inappropriate modern-day metaphors and references to many of the ancient Irish stories.

With a natural knack for both comedy and character voices Yasmine Akram and Aisling Bea will bring you warm, modern re-workings of popular ancient Irish stories.

Today it's the Salmon of Knowledge.

Written and performed by Aisling Bea and Yasmine Akram.

Producer: Raymond Lau.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2012.


WED 23:15 Living with Mother (b01nl8gw)
Series 2

Star Turn

Living with Mother returns for a second series with further tales about sons who have never flown the nest.

Marlon is going to enter Britain's Got Talent, but his amateur Bontempist mother Helen is against it for good reason.

Marlon simply can't sing, but his dogged determination means he cannot back down and he convinces his mother to accompany him on the Bontempi. Poor Helen is in a quandary and feels she should tell her son that he can't sing but, true to form, he ignores any advice given.

Will Helen have the courage to put a stop to her son being humiliated or will she get a taste for fame herself?

Writing about the first series of Living with Mother, Radio Times described it as "Alexander Kirk's astutely-observed comedy series...underpinning each of these tales is a bittersweet poignancy, a moment when the easy laughs are replaced with a lip-trembling insight into the vulnerability, lack of self-confidence and interdependency".

Written by Alexander Kirk

Producer: Anna Madley
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nl8h0)
Sean Curran reports on Prime Minister's Questions and the day's events at Westminster.



THURSDAY 01 NOVEMBER 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01njzjd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01nnf8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01njzjg)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01njzjj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01njzjl)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01njzjn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ns16l)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with the Revd Neil Gardner, Minister of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01nl95z)
Schmallenberg virus has been discovered for the first time in Northern Ireland raising concerns for sheep farmers.

The Forestry Commission tells Farming Today that walkers should wash their feet and avoid lifting leaves and branches to prevent the spread of Chalara - the deadly ash disease.

A National Park in the Mourne Mountains has been shelved by Stormont Environment minister Alex Atwood. The Ulster Farmers' Union says he should scrap all proposals for a National Park.

Farming Today was Presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


THU 06:00 Today (b01nl961)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Justin Webb, including:

0751
The Metropolitan Police has received donations and sponsorship worth more than £22 million over the past five years from dozens of different companies and organisations. Dr Tim Brain, former chief constable of Gloucestershire Police, and Jenny Jones, Green Party member and deputy chair of the Police and Crime Committee at the London Assembly, discuss the moral implications of disclosing the figures and the donations themselves.

0810
Rebel Tory MPs have joined with Labour and other parties to pass an amendment calling for real-terms cuts in spending between 2014 and 2020. Chancellor George Osborne talks about the government's defeat.

0824
It is All Saints' Day today, or All Hallows. The Rev Richard Coles, who written a book called the Lives of the Improbable Saints, outlines the roles of some of the less famous saints.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01nl963)
The Anarchy

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss The Anarchy, the civil war that took place in mid-twelfth century England. The war began as a succession dispute between the Empress Matilda, daughter of Henry I, and her cousin, Stephen of Blois. On Henry's death Stephen seized the English throne and held it for a number of years before Matilda wrestled it from him, although she was chased out of London before she could be crowned.

The Anarchy dragged on for nearly twenty years and is so called because of the chaos and lawlessness that characterised the period. Yet only one major battle ever took place, the Battle of Lincoln in 1141, and any other fighting associated with the conflict was fairly localised. This has led historians to question the accuracy of labelling the civil war as The Anarchy, a name only bestowed on the era in the 19th century. But why did Matilda fail to become the monarch, and what impact did it have on the way England was ruled in centuries to come?

With:

John Gillingham
Emeritus Professor of History at the London School of Economics and Political Science

Louise Wilkinson
Reader in Medieval History at Canterbury Christ Church University

David Carpenter
Professor of Medieval History at Kings College London.

Producer: Natalia Fernandez.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b09d5dgq)
Tombstone

Episode 4

The untold story of Mao's Great Famine and how Xinyang as a main producer of grain was hardest hit by famine. Read by David Yip.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nl965)
Neuroscience and gender; Women and 'soft power'; The most expensive wedding in history

Neuroscience and gender; Women and 'soft power' - who changes what we wear and what we buy? Changing rules for childminders; The most expensive wedding in history. Presented by Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nl967)
Une Vie

Episode 4

4/5 Adrian Penketh's adaptation of Maupassant's first novel. Jeanne believes that conceiving a second child will heal the ache in her heart caused by a loveless marriage in a rotten world.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b01nl969)
The dark secret of a Moscow flat

We hear from a loyal air force pilot who ran foul of Syrian intelligence officers and was accused of planting bombs on military planes. Syrian refugees in Jordan tell us how they fled the war zone but are now desperate to return. In Moscow, there is a new map marking the homes of Stalin's victims and our correspondent makes an uncomfortable discovery about his own flat. Corroborating facts is always a challenge for journalists but it is especially tricky in Libya, where the rumour mill is stuck on overdrive. And we learn why some Californians cough up for presidential campaigns while others can't wait for the elections to be over.
Producer: Lucy Ash.


THU 11:30 What's So Great About ...? (b00ccndx)
Series 1

Method Acting

In the second of three programmes in which Lenny Henry challenges the iconic status of things we often take as read, Lenny Henry goes to New York to question the mystique that surrounds the 'Method' school of acting.

In New York, on still only part-gentrified West 44th Street, stands an old converted redbrick chapel. Just a small plaque indicates that this is the inner sanctum, the private home of The Method. It's the legendary Actors' Studio, the space created in 1947 by Lee Strasberg and others to provide a safe place for some of the world's greatest actors - often the biggest Hollywood stars of their generation - to come and practise their art. Here came Marlon Brando, James Dean, Dustin Hoffman, Lee J Cobb, Jane Fonda, Steve McQueen, Paul Newman, Rod Steiger, Cissy Spacek, Robert de Niro, Shelley Winters and dozens of others and here they listened and rehearsed and criticised and supported their fellow actors and directors. They were all devotees of The Method, a training discipline evolved by Strasberg from the teachings of the great Russian actor and teacher Stanislavski. For many, though, The Method has come to signify 'mumbling and scratching', a sort of slightly inarticulate style of performance that in seeking to be internalised and 'real' ends up just being dull. British actors reputedly despised it and Laurence Olivier is famously said to have told Dustin Hoffman to stop trying to find an interior motivation in his character 'and just ACT, dear boy!'

Seeking enlightenment from stars like Ellen Burstyn and experts and aficionados, Lenny tests his reservations about The Method and finds that when he actually has a go it's not quite so unconvincing as he at first thought...

PRODUCER: SIMON ELMES

(repeat).


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01nl96c)
Booze-free bars, energy complaints, and the legal challenge to a tax on e-books

Simon Callow shares his doggy tales to calm down your best friend this Bonfire Night. The 'party' cities embracing alcohol-free bars. How a court case might affect the price of ebooks and the energy company that's seen complaints go up by almost 80% in a year. Plus more consumer news presented by Winifred Robinson.

Producer: Jon Douglas.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01njzjq)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01nl96f)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz7r)
Series 1

Britain - DCI Jane Tennison

Dame Helen Mirren's portrayal of DCI Jane Tennison created a new image of women police officers in Britain. Lynda La Plante describes the creation of her character and what serving officers taught her about the macho culture of British policing before the millennium.

The Granada TV series which first aired in 1991 was sold around the world. Dutch best seller Saskia Noort and Scottish authors Ian Rankin and Val McDermid discuss its impact with Mark Lawson.

Producer: Robyn Read

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01nl8gc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01nl96h)
The Other Simenon

Teddy Bear

When he wasn't writing Maigret, Georges Simenon produced a huge body of novels and short stories, often tough, gripping and psychologically-penetrating dissections of lives confounded by fate. In The Other Simenon we explore more of his dark tales of human misfortune!
In The Neighbours, Emile Jovis, the director of a Paris travel agency, finds that moving home doesn't always make for a better life. Acting from the best possible motives he decides to uproot his family from their dilapidated flat in the Marais district of Paris to a new development outside the city. All too soon, however, he becomes aware that his wife and son do not share his enthusiasm. And his peace of mind is shattered when he overhears a series of blunt and brusque conversations coming from his neighbours' flat. His irritation on hearing their voices leads to an obsessive interest in their world.
Dramtised by Ronald Frame and starring Jamie Glover and Robin Weaver.

Other parts played by members of the cast.
Producer/Director: David Ian Neville.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01nl9p9)
Hicks Lodge/National Forest

Helen Mark visits Hicks Lodge, a restored open cast mine in Leicestershire, now a haven for wildlife, walkers and cyclists and other more unusual visitors. Over 100 different bird species have been recorded at Hicks Lodge, which is run by the Forestry Commission and is situated in young woodlands at the heart of the National Forest.

Helen meets Area Forester, Alan Dowell, to find out more about Hicks Lodge and the various walking routes and cycle trails that are available and joins local cyclist, Marc Stapleford for a bike ride through the site of what is now the National Forest Cycle Centre. Helen also hears from Chief Executive of the National Forest, Sophie Churchill, about the background to the Forest itself which covers 200 square miles of Leicestershire, Derbyshire and Staffordshire. They are joined by retired Geography teacher, Dot Morson, and one of her former pupils, Mark Knight. Both are local residents who have seen the landscape around them transformed over the years. And
Stuart Malcolmson and Racheal Bailey of the National Forest Mushing Team give Helen a lesson in dog sledding - one of the more unusual pastimes to be found on the site of a former open cast mine!

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01nk24b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01nkt26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01nl9pc)
Francine Stock meets with French director Jacques Audiard to discuss his award-winning film Rust and Bone, an ominous story on the sunlit Cote d'Azur.

Irish charmer Chris O'Dowd, on playing the impromptu manager of an Australian girl group, The Sapphires, touring war-torn Vietnam.

Neil Brand is behind the piano to deconstruct Jonny Greenwood's score to one of the most anticipated films of the year, Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master.

And historian Ian Christie looks at the Ealing films with a dark heart.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01nl9pf)
In a few weeks the Government will unveil its new energy bill. Recently energy sources and prices have occupied a lot of headlines, and a couple of weeks ago much was made over an industrial process to convert air into petrol. What links all these things together is the often under-reported issues surrounding energy storage. John Loughhead and Malcolm Wilkinson discuss the various challenges and possible solutions to storing electrical energy to bridge the gaps between a varying energy demand and an intermittent renewable supply.

Just a little over a decade ago a massive international effort went into the first sequencing of a human genome. This week, scientists writing in the journal Nature present a study that has sequenced the genomes of over a thousand individuals, from many different countries. It hopes to provide a reference map of local variabilities to help researchers understand indicators of disease or medicinal effectiveness in individuals.

Also on the programme; the real threats to British trees. Ash dieback may be in the headlines but between 3 to 4 million larches have been felled since 2009, horse chestnuts are seldom being replanted because of the destruction caused by the leaf miner moth and bleeding canker and will the elm ever recover from Dutch elm disease? Professor Clive Brasier, Andrew Halstead and Dr. Micheal Pocock discuss the 10 current epidemics that are infecting trees in Britain.


THU 17:00 PM (b01nl9ph)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01njzjs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Andrew Lawrence: How Did We End Up Like This? (b01nl9pk)
Communication

Andrew Lawrence continues his comic explanation of our development via stand up, sketch and song.

This time, Andrew discusses Communication.

Sara Pascoe and Marek Larwood assist.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01nl9pm)
Will discovers the truth, and Emma makes a big decision.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01nl9pp)
John Goodman, Orhan Pamuk, Andrew Rawnsley on Secret State

With Mark Lawson.

Actor John Goodman discusses his latest role in Argo, Ben Affleck's film about a high-risk cinematic solution to the Iranian hostage crisis in the late '70s, which is based on a true story.

Secret State is a new TV adaptation of Chris Mullin's novel A Very British Coup. Gabriel Byrne stars as the Deputy Prime Minister thrown into the limelight when his boss disappears. Political journalist Andrew Rawnsley reviews the programme.

Orhan Pamuk was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2006, recognized for novels including Snow and My Name is Red. Silent House is his second novel and has just been translated into English for the first time. The Turkish writer reflects on what makes his writing political and why Silent House is oddly prophetic.

As the Vatican newspaper gives its blessing to the new James Bond movie, Papal expert John Cornwell surveys the history of the Catholic Church's complex relationship with cinema.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nl967)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b01nl6hv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01nl9pr)
Pricing

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan and his guests discuss the science of pricing goods and services. How do companies decide what to charge - and how much of it is educated guesswork as to what they can get away with?

In the studio are Roger Mavity, chief executive of the Conran Group; Rita Clifton, branding expert and former chairman of Interbrand; Scott Malkin, founder and chairman of Value Retail which owns the outlet shopping centre Bicester Village.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Innes Bowen.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b01nl6hd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01nl963)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01njzjv)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nl9pt)
President Obama resumes his campaign for re-election after storm Sandy. Dissident republicans are blamed for the murder of a police officer in Northern Ireland. And are Britain's gastropubs getting too posh? Presented by Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nnfgr)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 4

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch twenty years ago; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins finally unfolds.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with a sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused throughout with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 4:
Madame Beck accuses her cleaner Agnès of stealing a china doll from her apartment and seems intent on blackening her name in Chartres.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 The Headset Set (b01nl9pw)
Series 2

Episode 1

A fast-moving audience sketch show set in the world of a call centre called Smile5, a company that sells anything and everything. This week, a new Guy called Scott starts work at Smile 5, while sketches include a man calling to complain about a faulty bowl.

Aleesha and other characters ..... Chizzy Akudolu
Bernie and other characters ..... Margaret-Cabourn Smith
Big Tony, Ralph and other characters ..... Colin Hoult
Sailesh, Bradley and other characters ..... Phaldut sharma

Writers ..... Various

Script editor ..... Dan Tetsell/James Kettle.

Producer ..... Tilusha Ghelani

WELCOME TO SMILE5!

Smile5 is a mail order catalogue company selling everything from Rolex watches to lawnmowers, from financial products to phone and broadband, from holidays to health insurance. And somewhere in a brown-field wasteland miles from the nearest town, it runs one of the largest call centres operating in the UK. This is the world of The Headset Set.

Each episode features a host of sketches set eavesdropping on both sides of the bizarre, horrific and ludicrous business-customer relationship. The remaining sketches are set in the Smile5's offices. We meet four of the call centre's employees:

Sailesh - Officially the team leader, Sailesh has recently moved from Bangalore seemingly bringing a wealth of call-centre experience and an admirable work ethic lacking in his fellow Headsetters, which the others resent him for.

Bernie - As she's been here longer than anyone, she refuses to recognise Sailesh's authority. She also refuses to learn how to use anything more technologically advanced than a 1980s trim phone.

Aleesha - A self-loathing street-wise cynic who resents having to work at Smile 5. Or in fact, having to work at all.

Big Tony - Tony spends most of his time on the phone, but not necessarily on Smile 5 business. He's always running some sort of dodgy scam, like a minicab office from his desk.

Other sketches feature Smile5's unsympathetic counsellor and the head of training Ralph, who trains the most inept of the call centre staff, such as the child-like Bradley.

The series stars Chizzy Akudolu (Holby City), Margaret Cabourn Smith (Fresh Meat, Miranda), Colin Hoult (Being Human; Life's Too Short), Lucy Montgomery (Armstrong and Miller; Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack) and Phaldut Sharma (Eastenders)

WRITERS

This is a team written sketch show originated by Stephen Carlin and James Kettle. Established sketch writers such as Stephen Carlin, James Kettle, Jon Hunter and Colin Hoult are joined by the best comedy writers to have emerged from recent 'open door' radio shows. These recent Radio 4 and 4 extra shows, Recorded for Training Purposes and Newsjack, gave new comedy writers an opportunity to hone their skills.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nl9py)
Rachel Byrne with the day's top news stories from Westminster.



FRIDAY 02 NOVEMBER 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01njzkp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b09d5dgq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01njzkr)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01njzkt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01njzkw)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01njzky)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ns190)
Radio 4's daily prayer and reflection with the Revd Neil Gardner, Minister of Canongate Kirk, Edinburgh.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01nl9wj)
Feeding turnips to sheep can reduce the spread of E.coli bacteria in livestock. The discovery was made by scientists at the University of Aberdeen.

Anna Hill is in the forests of Norfolk to track down 'Ash dieback' the tree disease which has been found in at least 100,000 trees in the UK. Plant Pathologist Dr Mark Coleman from the University of East Anglia says the disease is now part of the landscape.

Also in the programme, global wine production is at its lowest point for nearly 40 years according to industry experts. The reduction is being blamed on bad harvests in key wine making regions.

Farming Today was presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01nl9wl)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including:

0751
Industry experts are now estimating the compensation bill lenders will have had to pay for miss-sold Payment Protection Insurance (PPI) could reach as much as £18bn making it the most aggressively miss-sold retail product in UK banking history. Cliff D'Arcy writes for the Financial Times but used to create marketing campaigns at the Bank of Scotland to persuade people to buy PPI, and John Howard, former chair of the Financial Standards Authority consumer panel, examine the issues that consumers and banks are facing.

0810
The government commissioned inquiry into airports starts today. London Mayor Boris Johnson and Baroness Valentine, chief executive of London First, debate the expansion of Heathrow over versus a new airport in east London.

0820
The broadcaster Danny Baker has reacted angrily to discovering that his daily radio show on BBC London is to be dropped. Jim White of the Telegraph and Andrew Gimson, political journalist and writer, analyse the importance of making a dignified exit.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01nk24l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01nnfgk)
Tombstone

Episode 5

Mao's support of the system of communal kitchens exacerbates China's famine disaster. As the peasants give up their allotments and their livestock, they have no means of saving themselves when the kitchens run out of food and close down.

Read by David Yip.

Produced and abridged by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01nl9wn)
Team v Solo Sports, The Power List: Devolution and Marginalisation; Karen Edwards and French Airforce in York.

Presented by Jenni Murray.According to the England Netball Association a million women and girls in the UK play the game regularly. But when it comes to exercise and sport many women prefer to exercise alone rather than teaming up with other women? What are the benefits of going solo compared to the camaraderie of competing in a team. As part of our series to find the most powerful women in Britain, we'll be asking: who are the influential women outside of London, and do they get overlooked? Are your opportunities to wield power limited if the decision makers are in the capital and you're in Glasgow or Manchester or Newcastle? Karen Edwards' daughter, Becky Godden-Edwards, disappeared in 2003. Last year Christopher Halliwell confessed to murdering Becky, and another young woman, Sian O'Callaghan. Halliwell was jailed for life at Bristol Crown Court in October for killing Sian, but prosecutors have been unable to charge him with Becky's murder after police ignored rules when arresting him. Karen Edwards explains why she's fighting to have the police officer involved in Halliwell's arrest cleared of any wrongdoing. And Geoff Bird meets veterans and the families of some of the French airmen who were based at RAF Elvington near York during World War II.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nlbf9)
Une Vie

Episode 5

5/5 Adrian Penketh's adaptation of Maupassant's first novel. In this final episode, we see the coda to the detailed story so far of Jeanne de Lamare, in which we see a whole life pan out.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 11:00 Fathers' Daughters (b01nlbfc)
Nihal Arthanayake is the father of two small children - the second is a girl. Through his work on his Asian Network phone-in programme, Nihal began to discover that being the father of a girl in the Asian community was not always straightforward. This programme is his quest to find out about that relationship in Britain's South Asian communities and to investigate the issues that arise from cultural expectations.

The programme speaks to a number of Asian women from different religious and cultural backgrounds about their experiences with their fathers. Some of them have disturbing stories - women who have suffered from violent and abusive fathers, women who were forced into disastrous marriages, women who were cut out of their father's will and not treated equally to sons, women who attempted suicide. Some have cut all ties with their fathers and, as a consequence, the rest of their families. We hear from a girl whose father was liberal until the surrounding community convinced him to change his behaviour towards his daughter - but also talk to a father and his daughter who show the other side of the story with a loving, close and mutually respectful relationship.

The programme is backed up by opinion and statistics from experts in the field. Interviews include Dr Aisha Gill, Reader in Criminology with particular expertise in health and criminal justice responses to violence against ethnic minority women in the UK; Aina Khan, Senior Solicitor in Family Law; and Polly Harrar of The Sharan Project.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Gloomsbury (b01nlbff)
Series 1

He's Got to Be Stopped

Vera Sackcloth-Vest is bracing herself for the departure of her adored husband Henry on a Foreign Office posting to Romania.

Her friends Ginny and Lionel Fox have come down to Sizzlinghurst to support her, along with her slightly demented devotee Venus Traduces. Whilst maintaining a veneer of cheerful serenity, Vera is inwardly desperate and hatches several intricate plots to detain him: an ominous dream, a succession of spurious telegrams, an extensive repertoire of ailments. She even attempts, disastrously, to persuade the cook to stage a staff crisis.

Meanwhile, down in the gazebo at midnight, Venus encourages Henry to resist all Vera's attempts to detain him as she will surely give in at the last moment and go with him to Romania.

Cast:
Vera Sackcloth-Vest ..... Miriam Margolyes
Henry Mickleton ..... Jonathan Coy
Mrs Gosling ..... Alison Steadman
Venus Traduces ..... Morwenna Banks
Lionel Fox ..... Nigel Planer
Mrs Ginny Fox ..... Alison Steadman
Mr Gosling ..... Nigel Planer

Produced by Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01nlbfh)
Basic bank accounts and breakfast biscuits

Banking groups are cutting the services they offer with the basic bank account making it harder to access or manage money. Consumer Focus wants the government to guarantee a minimum set of features on the accounts held by eight million UK consumers.
Britain's second largest producer of nappies, Kimberley-Clark, are axing their premium brand product Huggies; in fact bar Italy they are pulling out of Europe altogether. What's behind the move and are other brands like Kleenex Tissues also in danger.
Two years ago it did not exist but now the breakfast biscuit market is worth £35 million and growing at a rate of 156% per year. What's behind the rise and rise of this sector and are they any good?
Next year, Ireland is holding a Gathering. Everyone is invited and Terry Wogan tells us what it is all about.
The former Formula One driver turned farmer, Jody Scheckter, has been ordered to change the label on his organic ale by the Drinks' industry's self-regulator. Sometimes criticised for leniency, why have they moved to sanction such a small producer?
If you are unlucky enough to find your home threatened by floods what can you do to protect it? Bob Walker reports on the growing number of flood resistant products.
The BBC reporter struck down by Bell's Palsy tells us about living with this little known or understood condition and what sufferers can do about it.
How do you know if your power meter is recording your usage and not your neighbour's and what to do about it if it is?


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b01nlbfk)
Pat and Beth: Foetal Alcohol Syndrome

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, with this conversation between Pat and her adoptive daughter, Beth. Beth's birth mother was an alcoholic and Beth has struggled with major health problems .

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01njzl0)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01nlbfm)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b01mnz8f)
Series 1

Italy - Inspector Montalbano

Andrea Camilleri discusses the influence of both the Spanish writer Montalbán and Belgian author Georges Simenon on the creation of his Sicilian detective Inspector Montalbano.

In a conversation recorded at his home in Rome with Mark Lawson, he describes the way he uses his crime stories to comment upon the effects of both the Mafia and Berlusconi's leadership on Italian society today.

Producer: Robyn Read

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01nl9pm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00vkyz7)
Gracey and Me

By Gillian Plowman

Kate (Harriet Walter) returns to South Africa to meet Gracey (Jenny Jules), the woman she betrayed twenty-five years ago when she was a ten-year-old staying with her godparents in a luxury suburb of Johannesburg during the height of apartheid. The repercussions of that betrayal have profoundly affected both women, psychologically and physically.

The play takes Kate on a journey into her past. Beauty was the daughter of the housemaid, Gracey, who has illegally secreted her into the hut in the garden where she lives. The two children are swimming together when Kate tells Beauty she has made the water dirty because she is black. The altercation between the two children escalates and the horrific scene becomes a metaphor for the apartheid era as Kate plays out what she has observed of the treatment of black people by white people, making her drink the dog's water from a bowl on the floor. Gracey discovers them and unleashes the untold anger of her life upon Kate. Kate retaliates by revealing the secret of Beauty's presence in the hut to her Godparents, resulting in Gracey and her daughter being banished.

This haunts Kate as an adult but when she finally confronts her past, events unfold which threaten her life, as the play reveals the brutality of the legacy left by apartheid.

Directed by Annie Castledine

Produced by Catherine Bailey
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01nlbl2)
Humshaugh

Eric Robson chairs the third episode of GQT's North of England tour to mark the programme's 65th anniversary, this week recorded in Humshaugh in Northumberland.

With Anne Swithinbank, Matt Biggs, and Bob Flowerdew on the panel the team take questions from a gardening audience in the same town that the programme visited back in 1947.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. How do I achieve a truss of greenhouse grown ripe tomatoes?

A. Tomatoes need starting at the end of January or beginning of February, in a heated propagating case or on a sunny windowsill. Alternatively you can bypass this stage by buying young plants. Less feeding and watering only when necessary will push the plant into producing ripened fruit. Dandelion leaves, banana skins and ripe tomatoes release ethylene, which also encourages ripening.

Q. Last year I planted an asparagus bed with one-year-old plants, but this year there has been no growth. Should I hope for improvement or dig it up and plant something else?

A. Slugs and asparagus beetles may have made it appear that there is no growth. As they come into growth, you will probably need to put down a slug control, such as ferric phosphate slug pellets or a nematode slug solution.

Q. We have a Ginkgo Biloba tree. I understand that it can be propagated from cuttings, but am yet to have any success. What would the panel recommend?

A. These trees have male and female plants and are normally propagated from seed. The small shell within the fleshy part of the seed can be put into a multi-purpose compost and kept outside over the winter, at which point it should germinate. If you only have a male tree, you can try to grow from cuttings - take hardwood cuttings now or softer cuttings in the summer, keep them under a cloche to protect them from the weather, and plant them into a gritty soil.

Q. What does the panel recommend I grow in my solar room? It is only heated by the sun - so is warm in summer and cold in winter (although frost-free).

A. Plants in containers which have been outside over the summer can be moved inside, such as olive plants, citruses, Bird of Paradise or Bougainvillea. Scented-leaved Pelargoniums can stay attractive through the winter. Of the citruses, the lemon is the easiest to grow, tangerines or satsumas are also advisable. Succulents and cacti will prevent too much water vapour entering the air. Climbers such as Trachelospermum Jasminoides has white fragrant flowers and would grow nicely. Mediterranean or African bulbs, such as Lachenalia, are also suggested.

Q. Which make the best plants for show - leeks grown from seed or from pods?

A. Once a leek is about to produce a flowerhead, cut it off. After two weeks, take the leek out of the ground and it will produce a cluster of bulbs. These can be planted out in August for winter, though they will probably not be suitable for showing. A pod will be vegetatively exact to the existing show leek, whereas the seed will show variation.

Q. I garden on the eastern edge of the wood, where the soil is heavy and damp. Early in the year there are Snowdrops, but after that groundcover is dominated by Creeping Buttercup. Could the panel suggest an alternate, attractive groundcover plant that would hold back the buttercup and encourage wildlife.

A. Learn to love the Buttercup! You could introduce a Ranunculus Ficaria, or Celandine. The 'Brazen Hussy' variety has dark leaves, which would introduce nice variety of colour. You could also add a Lamium, or a Vinca Minor. Leucojum, the Summer Snowflake, or ferns such as Dryopteris filix-max (male fern) or the Soft Shield ferns.

Q. What is the expected life span of a modern shrub Rose?

A. They should last 40-50 years with no trouble, though you should thin out the older wood, which will encourage regeneration.

Q. I love collecting free food from the hedgerows. Which free foods do the panel forage for?

A. Sloes, for the gin, Elderflowers for pancakes or Champagne and Crab Apples for cider!

Q. I have two overgrown Blackcurrant bushes in my garden, How should they be pruned and can I chop them back to the base?

A. With a sharp saw, cut out the older, non-productive stems from the base, over the course of 4 or 5 years in an annual cycle. Once it has been well pruned, give it a general fertilizer in the spring. If the plant gets large, swollen buds, it may have Blackcurrant reversion virus. If so they probably needs removing.


FRI 15:45 First for Radio (b01nlbl4)
Series 1

Steak

Four acclaimed novelists write their first stories for radio. Steak by Evie Wyld, describes how a group of male barflies in small town Australia are unsettled by the appearance of Mariella..

Reader Mike Sengelow
Producer Duncan Minshull.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01nlbl6)
Hans Werner Henze, Emanuel Steward, Jacques Barzun, Yash Chopra, Terry Callier

On Last Word this week:

Hans Werner Henze, one of the great post-war German composers, remembered by fellow composer Mark Antony Turnage.

Boxing trainer Emanuel Steward, who coached Lennox Lewis and others to world titles.

Eminent cultural historian and philosopher Jacques Barzun, author of more than 40 books.

Indian director Yash Chopra, who made some of the best-loved Bollywood films.

And tributes to jazz and soul singer Terry Callier from DJ Gilles Peterson and Paul Weller.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01nlbl8)
Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations.

Presented by Roger Bolton, this is the place to air your views on the things you hear on BBC Radio.

This programme's content is entirely directed by you.

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b01nlblb)
Paul and Lorraine: Pulling Through Together

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, with this moving conversation between a mother and son. Traumatized by his experiences in Bosnia, former soldier Paul tried to take his own life. Lorraine was there for him..

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01nlbld)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01njzl2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b01nlblg)
Series 78

Episode 9

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. Panellists include Jeremy Hardy, Jo Brand and Lloyd Langford.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01nlblj)
An elated Jim rings Mike to tell him that the article about him has been accepted by Borsetshire Life. Jim visits Christine to give her the news over a cheese scone. Christine admits that she used reverse psychology to spur Jim into writing the article. They continue to chat and work through the crossword.
Will goes to Rickyard Cottage to find Ed there instead of Emma. The brothers are tense with each other as Will tells Ed he's aware of their financial problems. Before Ed can shut the door in his face, Will suggests that he and Nic have George more often. The argument escalates, especially when Will mentions the car breaking down. Will accuses Ed of not providing for George properly, and Ed retaliates by shutting the door.
James is hobbling around looking for painkillers. He's glad that Matt is away. He tells Lilian that he never trusted the 'slippery eel'. Lilian snaps and goes for a lie down. She calls Paul, who lends a sympathetic ear to her troubles.
Mike checks up on Ed at Grange Farm. Ed takes the opportunity to ask Mike if he has any work. Mike has nothing to offer but wishes he could help.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01nlbxx)
The Shining, Lucy Kirkwood, Colm Toibin, Some Girls

With Kirsty Lang.

As the longer, American version of The Shining is released in the UK for the first time, a new documentary about the film's obsessive fans is also in cinemas. Room 237 documents the various theories about Stanley Kubrick's horror classic and what it really means. Jon Ronson, the director of Stanley Kubrick's Boxes, gives his response to the documentary and the longer version of The Shining.

Lucy Kirkwood is one of the UK's most high-profile young playwrights. Her new play NSFW examines society's attitudes to women's bodies through daily life at men's magazine Doghouse and women's publication Electra. Lucy Kirkwood explains why the subject appealed to her and what she makes of the 'political playwright' tag.

Colm Toibin, whose award-winning novels include Brooklyn and The Master, discusses his new novel The Testament of Mary, which explores the life of Mary, mother of Jesus, in her old age.

Some Girls, a new TV drama series, focuses on a group of 16-year-old girls who play on the same school football team and live on the same inner city estate. We follow them as they make their journey through adolescence, taking in boys, sex, teachers and heartbreak along the way. Rosie Swash reviews.

Producer Penny Murphy.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01nlbf9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01nlbxz)
School of Music, Cardiff University

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the political discussion and debate programme from the Cardiff School of Music at Cardiff University with Home Office Minister Jeremy Browne MP, his shadow, the labour MP Chris Bryant, Iron Maiden lead singer Bruce Dickinson who also runs Cardiff Aviation in the city and Leanne Wood the Leader of Plaid Cymru.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01nlby1)
Understanding Contemporary China 4/4

Martin Jacques presents a personal view on how best to understand the unique characteristics and apparent mysteries of contemporary China, its development and its possible future. In a new series of talks he sets out the building blocks for making sense of China today.

In his final talk, he asks how the undemocratic Chinese state can enjoy legitimacy and authority in the eyes of its population. He argues that the Chinese state is held in such high esteem because it is seen as the embodiment, protector and guardian of Chinese civilization. The state is seen as an intimate, a member of the family indeed - in fact, the head of the family. It is a remarkable institution which will come to exercise interest and fascination outside China.

Martin Jacques is the author of 'When China Rules the World'.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.


FRI 21:00 Foreign Bodies (b01nlby3)
Omnibus

Wexford, Dalgliesh, Montalbano, Carvalho, Rogas and DCI Jane Tennison

Mark Lawson continues his series about the way crime fiction has depicted modern European history - looking at the shifts in UK society charted by PD James and Ruth Rendell - from rural racism and road rage to fears about changes in the Church of England. Their male inspectors Dalgliesh and Wexford were followed by DCI Jane Tennison in Lynda La Plante's Prime Suspect - a TV series which mirrored real police employment practices and which spawned female leads from Val McDermid's Carol Jordan to The Killing's Sarah Lund.

The surrealist influenced novels of Montalban and his Barcelona gourmet PI Pepe Carvalho are discussed by Antonio Hill and Jason Webster. They explore the impact of setting novels in the Catholic country of Spain where post Franco, the transition to democracy and the role of the monarchy provide a rich contemporary history.

In Italy an engagement with modern politics involves grappling with the influence of the Mafia - a plotline which you find in the novels of both Andrea Camilleri and his predecessor Leonardo Sciascia. Mark Lawson travels to Rome to meet the creator of the Sicilian Inspector Montalbano.

Producer: Robyn Read.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01njzl4)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01nlby5)
Syrian 'war crimes', Obama and Romney are in Ohio as the US Election Campaign enters its last days, What does the Three Gorges Dam tell us about modern China? With Ritula Shah.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01nnfbr)
The Cleaner of Chartres

Episode 5

The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Lesley Manville

There is something special about the ancient cathedral in Chartres with its mismatched spires, astonishing stained-glass and strange labyrinth. And there is something special too about Agnès Morel, the mysterious woman who is to be found cleaning it each morning.

No one quite knows where she came from - not the diffident Abbé Paul who discovered her sleeping in the north porch; nor lonely Professor Jones whose chaotic existence she helps to organise; nor Philippe Nevers whose neurotic sister and newborn child she cares for; nor even the irreverent young restorer, Alain Fleury, who works alongside her each day and whose attention she catches with her tawny eyes, colourful clothes and elusive manner. And yet everyone she encounters would surely agree that she has touched their lives in subtly transformative ways, even though they couldn't quite say how.

But with a chance meeting in the cathedral one day, the spectre of Agnès' past returns, provoking malicious speculation from the prejudiced Madame Beck and her gossipy companion Madame Picot. As the rumours grow more ugly, Agnès is forced to confront her history, and the mystery of her origins unfold.

The Cleaner of Chartres is a compelling story of darkness and light, of traumatic loss and second chances. Told with sparkling wit and beguiling charm, but infused with deeper truths, it speaks of the power of love and mercy to transform the tragedies of the past.

Episode 5:
Dr Deman takes Agnès to see Jean Dupère and Professor Jones begins teaching her to read. In the past, Maddy, a nurse at the clinic, convinces Agnès to say that the baby isn't hers.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01nl6hx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01nlby7)
The Northern Ireland Secretary briefs MPs on the shooting of the prison officer David Black - in a statement to the Commons, Theresa Villiers condemned the "cowardly and evil" attack. Mark D'Arcy also reports on the significance of this week's Conservative rebellion and Government defeat over the European Union Budget, and has the latest on the state of the buildings of the Palace of Westminster which may lead to MPs and Peers having to move out to allow extensive and expensive repair work to go ahead.
Editor: Rachel Byrne.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b01nlby9)
Peter and Ross: Psychosis

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. Peter talks to his son Ross about the impact his psychosis has had on their relationship.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01nkwxk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01nkwxk)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01nl6hb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01nl6hb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01nl7wj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01nl7wj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01nl967)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01nl967)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01nlbf9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01nlbf9)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01nl6hx)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01nl6hx)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01ngrxd)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01nlby1)

A Scottish Hotel in the Holy Land 11:00 WED (b01nl7wl)

Alice Munro - Dear Life 19:45 SUN (b01nkt55)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b01nl77s)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b01nl77s)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01ng4h5)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01nl67f)

Andrew Lawrence: How Did We End Up Like This? 18:30 THU (b01nl9pk)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01nk14h)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01ngrxb)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01nlbxz)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01nk1d0)

Arthur Smith's Balham Bash 23:00 TUE (b00lk09w)

Ayres on the Air 11:30 MON (b01n20gw)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01nk242)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01nk242)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01nl67k)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01nnf6w)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01nnf8w)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01nnfgr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01nnfbr)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01njy7v)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01nkwxf)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01nkwxf)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01nnf6t)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01nnf6t)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01nnf8t)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01nnf8t)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b09d5dgq)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b09d5dgq)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01nnfgk)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01nk24g)

Casual Cruelty 00:30 SUN (b01nk240)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01ng1v2)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01nkt24)

Climategate Revisited 21:00 WED (b01nl8gm)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 18:30 WED (b00wv6cd)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01nk24l)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01nk24l)

Document 20:00 MON (b01nl67c)

Drama 14:15 MON (b01nlbfp)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01nl6hn)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01nl7wx)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01nl96h)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00vkyz7)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 WED (b01nl7wn)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01nk141)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01nkwx7)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01nl68l)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01nl7w8)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01nl95z)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01nl9wj)

Fathers' Daughters 11:00 FRI (b01nlbfc)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01ngrwy)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01nlbl8)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01ng83c)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01nl77n)

First for Radio 15:45 FRI (b01nlbl4)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 MON (b01nkxl1)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 TUE (b01mnz73)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 WED (b01mnz7f)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 THU (b01mnz7r)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 FRI (b01mnz8f)

Foreign Bodies 21:00 FRI (b01nlby3)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01nl8gk)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01nk14c)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b01nl969)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01nl679)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01nl77l)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01nl8gf)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01nl9pp)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01nlbxx)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01ngrwr)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01nlbl2)

Gloomsbury 11:30 FRI (b01nlbff)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01nl963)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01nl963)

In Seven Days: Inside a Historic Campaign 16:00 MON (b01nlf05)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01nl77q)

Irish Micks and Legends 23:00 WED (b01nl8gr)

Key Matters 15:45 SAT (b01hl41k)

Land Of The Rising Sums 11:00 MON (b01nkxkv)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01ngrww)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01nlbl6)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b01nl6hv)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b01nl6hv)

Learning to Love Dafydd 23:30 SAT (b01ng26d)

Living with Mother 23:15 WED (b01nl8gw)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01nk14r)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b01nl6hq)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b01nl6hs)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01ngnwg)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01nl9pf)

Meet David Sedaris 19:15 SUN (b01nkt53)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01ngp1n)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01njzbf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01njzd6)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01njzfm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01njzh3)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01njzjd)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01njzkp)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01nl7wd)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01nl7wd)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01nl8g3)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01nk14f)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01nk14f)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b01ngmjp)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b01nl8gh)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01ngp1x)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01njzbp)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01njzdg)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01njzfw)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01njzhc)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01njzjn)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01njzky)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01njzbr)

News Quiz USA 23:00 MON (b01nl67m)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01ngp1z)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01njzbw)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01njzc0)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01ngp2h)

News 13:00 SAT (b01ngp27)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01nk246)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01nkt26)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01nkt26)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01nl9p9)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01nk14p)

PM 17:00 MON (b01nl673)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01nl77b)

PM 17:00 WED (b01nl8g9)

PM 17:00 THU (b01nl9ph)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01nlbld)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01nkt3c)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01ngrzl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01nkwx5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01ns15q)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01ns166)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01ns16l)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01ns190)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b01nk14t)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01nk14t)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01nk14t)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b01nk24b)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01nk24b)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01nk24b)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b01ngnwb)

Return to Oasis 16:30 SUN (b01nkt28)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b01ng404)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b01nl66z)

Rudy's Rare Records 18:30 TUE (b01nl77d)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01mnxnw)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01nk145)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01nk14w)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b01nl6hd)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b01nl6hd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01ngp1s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01njzbk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01njzdb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01njzfr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01njzh7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01njzjj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01njzkt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01ngp1q)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01ngp1v)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01ngp29)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01njzbh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01njzbm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01njzc4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01njzd8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01njzdd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01njzfp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01njzft)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01njzh5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01njzh9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01njzjg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01njzjl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01njzkr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01njzkw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01ngp2f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01njzc8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01njzdn)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01njzg0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01njzhh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01njzjs)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01njzl2)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01nk244)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01nk244)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01nkwxc)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01nkwxc)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01nk24d)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01nk248)

Swansong 11:30 TUE (b01nl6hg)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01nk24j)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01nkt3f)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01nkt3f)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01nl677)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01nl677)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01nl77j)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01nl77j)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01nl8gc)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01nl8gc)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01nl9pm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01nl9pm)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01nlblj)

The Big B at 70 10:30 SAT (b01nk147)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01ngnwq)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01nl9pr)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b01nl671)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01ngnwd)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01nl9pc)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01nk24n)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01nk24n)

The Headset Set 23:00 THU (b01nl9pw)

The Invention of... 13:30 SUN (b01nk276)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b01nkt22)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b01nlbfk)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b01nlblb)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b01nlby9)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01nl8g7)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:00 SUN (b01ng413)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b01nl675)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b01ngrx4)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b01nlblg)

The Public Philosopher 09:00 TUE (b01nl6h6)

The Public Philosopher 21:30 TUE (b01nl6h6)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01nk149)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01nk274)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01nl67h)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01nl7j9)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01nl8gp)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01nl9pt)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01nlby5)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01ngmcq)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01nl8g5)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01nl67p)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01nl7jc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01nl8h0)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01nl9py)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01nlby7)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01nk143)

Today 06:00 MON (b01nqvj9)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01nl6h4)

Today 06:00 WED (b01nl7wb)

Today 06:00 THU (b01nl961)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01nl9wl)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01ngp21)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01ngp23)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01ngp25)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01ngp2c)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01njzbt)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01njzby)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01njzc2)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01njzc6)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01njzdj)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01njzdl)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01njzdq)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01njzfy)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01njzg2)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01njzhf)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01njzhk)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01njzjq)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01njzjv)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01njzl0)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01njzl4)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01nkt5y)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01nkt60)

What's So Great About ...? 11:30 THU (b00ccndx)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01nk14m)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01nkwxh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01nl6h8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01nl7wg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01nl965)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01nl9wn)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01nkxkz)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01nl6hl)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01nl7ws)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01nl96f)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01nlbfm)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01nkxkx)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01nl6hj)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01nl7wq)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01nl96c)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01nlbfh)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01ngrzn)