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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01mnpjv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01mqr4m)
Joseph Anton

Episode 5

Five extracts from the autobiography of Salman Rushdie.

The author travels to India and absorbs the storytelling culture completely.
Then he tends to an ailing father. Then he delivers the manuscript that will
shape the rest of his life..

Reader Zubin Varla
Producer Duncan Minshull.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01mnpjx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01mnpjz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01mnpk1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01mnpk3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01mqr97)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Ed Kessler, Director of the Woolf Institute for Abrahamic Faiths, Cambridge.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01mqr99)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01mnpk5)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01mnpk7)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b01mqq9q)
Series 22

Richmond Park, London, with Artist Nicola Hicks

In this series of Ramblings Clare Balding is going on wildlife walks around the UK.

Today she is in Richmond Park in London with internationally renowned sculptor and artist Nicola Hicks M.B.E. Nicola's work focuses on animals sculpted in straw and clay and drawn on huge sheets of paper. Dynamic and distinctive, it has gained wide critical and public acclaim. Her statues of a dog in Battersea Park and a giant beetle in Bristol have become local landmarks.

Twenty years ago, Hicks grew tired of the pressures of the London art scene and decided to make her artistic love of wildlife a reality. She decided to move her growing family to Cumbria and become a sheep farmer. It was steep learning curve with many joys and setbacks. As Clare and Nicola explore the surprisingly rich wildlife habitats of Richmond Park, she discusses her acclaimed artwork, her deep love of British countryside and wildlife and the highs and lows of adapting to rural living.

Having just taken the decision to sell the farm and the rolling hills to return to London for good, Nicola shares with Clare her excitement and sadness at the transition. Can you really find walking and wildlife satisfaction in London? Nicola shows Clare how, she passionately believes, you can find natural beauty, insects and animals as rich and diverse as that in the countryside.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01mtr30)
Farming Today This Week

Charlotte Smith discusses the impending badger cull pilot in Gloucestershire, which is part of the Government's cattle TB control policy. The disease has cost taxpayers £500 million over the last ten years and in 2011 it led to the slaughter of 26,000 cattle in England. Charlotte meets one of the cull organisers and visits Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust's farm, where badger vaccination is underway. She also discusses whether enough has been done to speed the progress of a TB vaccine for cattle.

The presenter is Charlotte Smith and the producer is Sarah Swadling.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01mnpk9)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01mtr32)
Morning news and current affairs presented by John Humphrys and Evan Davis, featuring:

0752
The government's Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell has been accused of branding a policeman a "pleb" after he refused to let him leave Downing Street via his usual exit. He denies he used the word but has apologised for comments he made during the incident. The Daily Telegraph's deputy editor, Ben Brogan and the political editor of the Sunday Times, Isabel Oakeshott, discuss how the debacle will affect the Conservative party.

0810
A day of violent protests across major cities in Pakistan has left at least nineteen people dead, as thousands demonstrated against an anti-Islamic video made in the United States. In Karachi, police clashed with rioters as they torched banks and cinemas. Taji Mustafa is the spokesman for Hisbut Tahrir, a global Islamic political party which David Cameron has said he wants to see banned in this country.

0823
People across the United Kingdom have tonight reported seeing large meteors in the night sky. There have been sightings in Northern Ireland, parts of central Scotland including Edinburgh and Glasgow, the Midlands and East Anglia. Evan Davis hears from people who saw it.

0827
The latest sports news from Rob Bonnet.

0832
Friday was the first day of the UKIP conference. The Today programme's Evan Davis was at the event in Birmingham to gauge the mood.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01mtr34)
Clarissa Dickson-Wright, John McCarthy in Lyme Regis, Murray Lachlan Young on pasties, Harry Belafonte's Inheritance Tracks

Sian Williams and Richard Coles with cook and food historian Clarissa Dickson Wright, Daniel Bond and Stacey Drinkwater who can't afford a house so they live on a double-decker bus, Linda Cruse who experienced a bout of blindness which changed her life, and former Captain of the QE2, Nick Bates, who describes life on the ocean wave. There's a Sound Sculpture of a rugby ball from Andy Challis, a paean to the Cornish pasty from Murray Lachlan Young, and John McCarthy on location in Lyme Regis. Plus the Inheritance Tracks of the King of Calypso, Harry Belafonte.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b01mtr36)
Series 5

The Lost Colonists

Steve Punt turns private investigator, with the last part of a new series of weird cases.

The Lost Colonists. Punt is called on to examine a map which may hold clues to the mystery of the first English colonists to America who disappeared without trace.

In 1587, Sir Walter Raleigh assembled a group of 118 men women and children to establish a settlement in modern day North Carolina. One of them, John White, shortly came back to England for supplies and when he returned to the island of Roanoke where he'd left them, they had completely vanished. A mysterious sign on a tree offered a clue to their whereabouts but they were never found. John White was also the map draughtsman for the expedition and an intriguing patch has recently been discovered on the map close to Roanoke. Could they be under the patch? Or could this be a very Elizabethan cover-up? Punt sheds gabardine and dons ruff and codpiece to get to the bottom of this 400 year old missing persons case.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b01myzyy)
Aftermath

When everything falls apart, how do you cope? How do you put a country and a people back together again after a traumatic conflict? And how do individuals come to terms with the end of a marriage?

In this episode of the ideas discussion programme, Bridget Kendall brings together three people to discuss the aftermath of trauma on two levels - the personal and the social.

We hear from Somali archaeologist Sada Mire who argues that a nation's cultural heritage is as basic a need as food and shelter when recovering from conflict. And that's learned from her own experience during the chaos of civil war in her country. Today she runs Somaliland's Department of Tourism and Archaeology and is a fellow in the Department of Art and Archaeology at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.

The former Canadian diplomat Scott Gilmore warns that international responses to crises are too ambitious, such as trying to impose democracy within a fiscal year or ignoring people's immediate needs. A former UN peacekeeper, he now tries to use trade and investment to end poverty through his non-profit organisation Building Markets.

And writer and novelist Rachel Cusk, talks about the emotional aftermath of her broken marriage. Born in Canada and raised in America, she is an award-winning author of many novels. Her non-fiction includes A Life's Work: On Becoming a Mother and most recently, Aftermath - on Marriage and Separation. She is divorced from her second husband, a photographer, with whom she has two daughters.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01mtr38)
Damian Grammaticas in China on how accounts of forced abortions from around the country have fuelled a debate on a once-taboo subject: the state's One Child only policy.

Paul Mason tells how Spain's third city Valencia is being buried under a mountain of debt. Now the chemists are running out of prescription drugs.

Gabriel Gatehouse is in Kenya where questions are being asked about an outbreak of factional violence. Is it simply a matter of local feuding or should national politicians shoulder some of the blame?

Steve Rozenberg's been to meet the hardline president of Chechnya and ask him questions about the Islamicisation of his Russian republic.

And Georgia Paterson Dargham chronicles how Beirut is increasingly feeling the effects of the Syrian conflict. She tells us how some residents in the Lebanese capital are wondering: has the time now come to get out?


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01mtr3b)
Most high street banks are now using automated calls to alert customers to an unusual transaction and to ask them if they have made it. Santander says it is making around a thousand calls a day just to verify cheque payments. But how do you, as a customer, know it's actually the bank calling and not a fraudster trying to obtain your details? Bob Howard reports and Paul Lewis talks to Richard Koch from the bank industry body UK Payments.

Inflation fell slightly this week. But the long term prognosis is not so good. Paul Lewis talks to economist and ex-Monetary Policy Committee member, Andrew Sentance, about his fears for inflation.

Four major energy companies are offering free home insulation to any householder. You don't have to be a customer of that firm and your personal or family circumstances or income aren't taken into account. It sounds too good to be true - but it isn't if you act quickly. There is also more money going begging for updating heating systems but that is confined to low income households of particular types. Paul Lewis talks to Jessica Forster, Energy doctor at the Energy Saving Trust to find out what deals are available.

If you're declared bankrupt but still need a bank account for your wages, your benefits or to manage payments, then your choices are now much reduced. By fifty per-cent, in fact. From this week, the Co-operative Bank has stopped offering a bank account to new customers who are undischarged bankrupts. Which leaves only Barclays on the high street willing to provide them. So why has Coop pulled out? Paul Lewis talks to the Cooperative Bank's Head of Banking, Robin Taylor, and to Mike McAteer, Director of The Financial Inclusion Centre.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b01mqr5j)
Series 78

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. Panellists are Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton, Rebecca Front and Kevin Day.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01mnpkc)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01mnpkf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01mqr5q)
Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire with Sir Menzies Campbell of the Liberal Democrats, Maria Eagle, Shadow Transport Minister, Paul Nuttall, Deputy Leader of the UK Independence Party and Lisa Jardine, historian and Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority.

Producer: Isobel Eaton.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01mtr3d)
Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The topics discussed on Any Questions? were: Andrew Mitchell, capital punishment, three parent babies and GCSE reform. The Questions included:

What does Andrew Mitchell's outburst tell us about the arrogance of politicians?

Is it time to reinstate capital punishment when two young policewomen were shot dead just doing their duty only two days ago?

Is it better to apologise for breaking a promise?

Will a trinity of parents be better than two?

Are Michael Gove's GCSE reforms more backwards than forwards?

Producer: Anna Bailey.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01bh91t)
Michael Morpurgo - Private Peaceful

Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo dramatised by Simon Reade with music by Coope Boyes and Simpson.

In WW1 over 300 British soldiers were executed by firing squad, some for desertion and cowardice. Many were traumatised by shell-shock. Some 90 years later they received posthumous pardons from the British Government, after a campaign helped by Michael Morpurgo's novel Private Peaceful .
Recorded on location in Iddesleigh - the Devon village where the book is set with Michael Morpurgo playing the Vicar and Nicholas Lyndhurst Seargent Hanley

The Organist was Marjorie Cleverdon
Music - Coope Boyes and Simpson.

Directed on location by Susan Roberts.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01mtr3g)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Tessa Jowell as she steps down from the Labour front bench; Margaret Aspinall and Jenni Hicks discuss the Hillsborough campaign for justice; Nigel Slater; we discuss the problems of staging musicals depicting domestic violence; Kimbra; Darren Day on why some women fall for the appeal of a bad boy. Presented by Jane Garvey.
Produced by Emma Wallace.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01mtr3j)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news, presented by Ritula Shah.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01mqqb9)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

The mere mention of the word "Europe" in the media these days conjures up images of economic crisis - riots, bailouts, 12-figure debts, emergency summits. And yet the European Union remains the world's largest economy, its GDP some 10 per cent larger than that of the US. So is the idea that Europe is in terminal decline exaggerated? Evan asks his guests if Europe's current woes are just bumps on the road towards greater prosperity.

And on a lighter note - silos, those invisible barriers which often develop inside organisations. Conventional wisdom says that they inhibit communication and can lead to dysfunctional, isolated units. Evan's guests debate whether they're such a bad thing after all.

In the studio are Rachel Lomax, former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England and non-executive director of several companies including HSBC and BAA; Moray MacLennan, Chief Executive of advertising agency M&C Saatchi Worldwide; Phil Bentley, Managing Director of British Gas.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Innes Bowen.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01mnpkh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01mnpkk)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01mnpkm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01mtr6w)
Stephen K Amos, Mark Watson, Emma Freud, Funmi Olawumi, Jens Lekman

Ever dreamt you were the child of a superstar? Well funny man Stephen K Amos has. Stephen joins Clive to chat about his hilarious and poignant new memoir 'I Used to Say My Mother Was Shirley Bassey' which charts his journey from playing the class clown to playing the Hammersmith Apollo.

Cyberqueen and Guardian journalist Aleks Krotoski will be surfing in to whisk Clive off on a global tour of the digital world ahead of her new series for BBC Radio 4, 'The Digital Human'. In the first programme on Monday 1st October at 4.30 pm Aleks looks at how different cultures are using technology to express their identity and culture.

And it's not often you get to meet a man who sparked a social revolution but as 'father' of the contraceptive pill, American chemist Carl Djerassi did just that. And when he's not busy changing the world Carl is penning novels and dramas - or "science-in-theatre' as he prefers to call them. His latest play 'Insufficiency' considers the curious specialism of 'bubbleology' - that's the science of bubbles to me and you - which has its world premiere on Monday 24th September at London's Riverside Studios.

Emma ties the knot with comedian, and critically acclaimed writer Mark Watson. Keeping it snappy they chat about Mark's latest novel, 'The Knot' which sketches the story of a wedding photographer who is hiding a secret.

From wedding bells to the bittersweet notes of love - Sweden's Jens Lekman plays his new single 'I Know What Love Isn't' from his forthcoming album of the same name.

And Nigerian diva Funmi Olawumi performs 'Ijo Ayo' from her solo debut album 'Funmi Ti De' showcasing her style of traditional and contemporary Yoruba music. Funmi plays live at Ronnie Scotts in London on Sunday September 23rd.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01mtr8k)
Pete Cashmore

Edward Stourton profiles Pete Cashmore, one of the world's most popular bloggers and tweeters, who founded the successful social media news website Mashable.

He started it as a teenager in his bedroom in Scotland seven years ago and hired his first writer two years later. His company is now based in the US and employs 80 staff. His website attract millions of readers, and three million follow him on Twitter. The 27 year old has been described as "the Brad Pitt of the blogosphere".

Cashmore is also one of the founders of the Social Good Summit, which takes place in New York this weekend to coincide with UN Week. The conference aims to connect people from all over the globe via social media.

So will Pete Cashmore become a billionaire web entrepreneur and philanthropist? And what does he mean when he says he has been a "lifelong fan of unicorns"?

Producers: Arlene Gregorius and Hannah Barnes.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01mtr8m)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests cultural historian Christopher Frayling, writer Sarfraz Manzoor and historian Kathryn Hughes review the week's cultural highlights

Brad Pitt stars as enforcer/hitman Jackie Cogan in Andrew Dominik's film Killing Them Softly - based on George V Higgins' 1974 novel Cogan's Trade. Cogan is called in to set things right after an illegal poker game is robbed. Set against the background of the runup to the 2008 presidential election, the film draws parallels between the need for economic stability in America's financial institutions and in its increasingly corporate criminal enterprises.

Caryl Churchill's new play Love and Information at the Royal Court in London is a collection of 57 short fragments featuring more than 100 characters. Directed by James Macdonald, the succession of short scenes is performed in a white gridded box by a cast which includes Linda Bassett and Sarah Woodward.

Building Stories by Chris Ware is not a conventional graphic novel. It comes in a box containing 14 separate books, pamphlets and posters. Together they tell the stories of the inhabitants of a down-at-heel tenement in Chicago. The order in which the separate elements are read is entirely up to the reader.

Happy Birthday Edward Lear: 200 Years of Nature and Nonsense at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford is an exhibition which celebrates the bicentenary of the artist's birth. Although it contains some of his nonsense poetry and illustrations, it mainly concentrates on the foreign landscapes and natural history paintings that he worked on throughout his life.

Homefront written by Sue Teddern is a new drama series on ITV1 which follows the lives of a group of mothers and wives of soldiers serving in Afghanistan. Claire Skinner plays the fiancee of a commanding officer, trying to find her feet in a world which combines the normality of domestic life with constant pressure and anxiety.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01mtr8p)
The Debate of Our Times

Giles Dilnot delves into the archives of Radio 4's Any Questions and other television and radio discussion programmes to find out if political debate has changed in this country. Walking the corridors of Westminster and Whitehall, he meets Kenneth Clarke, Shirley Williams, Diane Abbott, and Tony Benn, among others, and asks if they think debate has dumbed down? Tony Benn recalls key moments like the dropping of the little known 14 day rule, or the first broadcast of Parliament in 1975, "When the transmitter was switched on, my voice was the first that was heard and I thought about it very carefully, what I would say", but did it impact on political debate outside the House of Commons? Conservative former Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke thinks the quality of debate is more to do with who is talking, "Every generation has people who are superb at debating and every generation has people who can bore the hind leg off a donkey", but Labour's Diane Abbott believes debate is less than it once was because "professional politicians have been managed to death" which leads to the "killing off of political discussion and public engagement". So Giles asks long standing presenter Jonathan Dimbleby and also the Independent's chief political columnist Steve Richards to compare different decades. And Giles is astonished, when he listens back over five decades of debate about the topics the public really care about such as education or health, to discover that the substance of what is being discussed has not really changed. So, is it possible to say whether debate has declined, or not?
Producer: Kirsten Lass.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01mnqms)
John Steinbeck - The Grapes of Wrath

Episode 3

By John Steinbeck
Dramatised by Donna Franceschild

A Pulitzer Prize winning novel about economic migration and the endurance of the human spirit set against the backdrop of America's Great Depression and Dust Bowl.

Just as the Joads money and food run out, they find work on a peach farm. But Tom discovers they're breaking a strike led by their old friend Casy the Preacher. Tom and Casy are ambushed by a Deputy Sheriff and a mob of vigilantes and Casy is killed. In his fury, Tom hits back before running for his life.

The Joad family's dream of a promised land is about to end.

Director: Kirsty Williams.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01mnpkp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Bringing Up Britain (b01mqq78)
Series 5

Digital Kids

Mariella Frostrup returns with a new series of the programme that explores the complex realities of parenting in today's Britain.

In the first programme of the new series, she is joined by a panel of experts and commentators to discuss raising 'digital kids'. Can tablet games really help nurture or educate the under-fives? Should older primary school-age children engage with age-appropriate social networking sites as a form of 'training' - or should they be protected from the online world, however safely controlled, until much later?

And Mariella and her guests will explore how parents can help equip teenage children to negotiate the wilds of the internet, from cyberbullying to 'sexting'.

So, Mariella asks, to what extent has the digital world simply sharpened problems that have always faced parents - and how far has it wrought a radical change in the nature of teenage life, and what parents need to know and do to help their children through it?

With Professor Tanya Byron, Professor Lydia Plowman, Julie Johnson, Helen King (Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre) and Professor Sonia Livingstone.

Producer: Phil Tinline.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b01mqmm1)
(3/12)
Wales take on the Midlands in the latest contest of the 2012 series, with Tom Sutcliffe in the chair. Rosalind Miles and Stephen Maddock of the Midlands are defending their champions' title. The Welsh team of Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards will be hoping to wrest back the trophy this year.

They face the trademark cryptic and complex questions of Round Britain Quiz, which could require knowledge of everything from classical mythology to cinema, and from zoology to pop music.

Tom will also be providing the answer to the question left dangling at the end of the previous programme, which was: 'A castaway composer, a Tom Stoppard play and a football manager with a strong connection to Watford - in which order might you put them on?'

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01mnqmx)
Roger McGough with a selection of poetry requests about secrets, art, nostalgia and libraries. The readers are Pippa Haywood, Patrick Romer and Harry Livingstone.

Serendipity guides Roger from poems about babies, Dutch masterpieces and the wonders of libraries. There's a poem by the playwright Bernard Kops about the charms of Whitechapel Library, Aldgate East, which closed a few years ago. There's also a poem by one of the less well celebrated poets of The Dymock group, as Wilfred Gibson recalls a summer evening in the company of those friends. Keats urges us to let our fancy roam, and there's a man who earns his keep by 'hunting for haddocks' eyes/Among the heather bright' and working them 'into waistcoat-buttons/In the silent night' in a parody by Lewis Carroll.
Producer: Sarah Langan.



SUNDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01mtq83)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Lost in the Lanes (b01mtsh6)
Calling

A series of three stories written by new writers to radio. The stories in this series are all set in and around the famous Lanes of Brighton.

More often than not the various journeys lead them beyond the winding Lanes of centuries past and into the Lanes of today, where the antique shops stand beside the more modern examples, from treasures to cupcakes, and on across roads, into the place of markets stalls and cafes, buskers and the vibrant life - the North Laines.

Episode 2: Calling
By Emma Darwin.

Twelve-year-old Tom and his sister first came to Brighton after they lost their father in the great storm of 1883. They left their mother at her new job in the big house and walked to their lodgings in the Lanes. But in the middle of the night Tom hears their mother calling for them. And in trying to find her, he finds his own future.

Read by Philip Voss

Produced by Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01mtq85)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01mtq87)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01mtq89)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01mtq8c)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01mtsh8)
The bells of St. Edward's, Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01mtr8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01mtq8f)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01mtshb)
Food for Life

That food is not simply fuel is a point conceded by most cultures, but at the same time there are lots of conflicting messages about how it should affect our lives in other ways. As we veer between famine, food mountains, food fads, what Michael Pollan has described as "national eating disorders", religious and spiritual rituals and national feasting, Julia Neuberger attempts to unravel some of the complexities of the modern relationship with food.

She looks at a range of literature from the food criticism of Brillat-Savarin to the novels of Emile Zola and the memoirs of Benjamin Franklin. With music from Kurt Weill and Puccini.

The readers are Neil Dudgeon and Joe Kloska.

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01mtshd)
Sarah Swadling is out on the water in Essex finding out how John Labbett, who farms oysters, is coping with an emerging disease threat. He says that Oyster Herpes can kill up to 90% of young Pacific oysters on an infected farm in a day, although it doesn't affect human health. John also cultivates Native oysters, which were historically important in Essex, and he tells Sarah that rebuilding stocks is his passion.

This programme is presented and produced by Sarah Swadling.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01mtq8h)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01mtq8k)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01mtshg)
NOTE: During the interview with Abdel Bari Atwan, whilst talking about Al-Qaeda and the film ‘Innocence of Muslims’, Mr Atwan said that Channel 4 had had to withdraw another film about Islam. We would like to make it clear that Channel 4 did not cancel any transmissions of their film but on security advice, did reluctantly cancel a small post-transmission screening event for invited guests.

Following the murder of two police officers in Greater Manchester this week, the Rev'd James Halstead, whose parish includes the estate where the shootings took place, talks to Edward Stourton about the impact on the community. Canon David Wilbraham, National Police Chaplain, talks about the impact on the police of losing two colleagues in the line of duty.

Edward Stourton talks to Abdel Bari Atwan, Editor of the London based pan-Arab newspaper al-Quds, about how al-Qa'ida is profiting from the Arab Spring.

Professor Ted Cantle enquiry into the 2001 Oldham riots concluded they were the result of people living 'parallel lives', but in a speech this weekend he will say that multiculturalism is no longer working in Britain.
Oldham based Catholic Priest Fr Phil Sumner discusses the future of multiculturalism with him, whilst Kevin Bocquet reports from Oldham on what progress has been made toward a more integrated community.

This week the Catholic Church organised a conference to discuss how Catholic Social Teaching might help FTSE 100 business leaders restore public trust in their companies. Trevor Barnes reports.

Steven Nimmo, a funeral director from Dorset, explains his high tech, interactive way to remember the departed.

On her visit to the USA this week, Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi finally received the Congressional Gold Medal she was awarded in 2008. While feted abroad, Suu Kyi faces criticism from human rights groups due to her silence over the treatment of the Muslim Rohingya group. Benedict Rogers is a human rights campaigner with Christian Solidarity Worldwide and talks to Edward Stourton about this group.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01mtshj)
The Hepatitis C Trust

Lesley Jenkins presents the Radio 4 Appeal for The Hepatitis C Trust
Reg Charity:1104279
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope The Hepatitis C Trust.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01mtq8m)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01mtq8p)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01mtshl)
celebrating Harvest, from Flemington-Hallside Parish Church, Cambuslang, Lanarkshire,
with the Revd Neil Glover.
Hymns: Come you thankful people, come (Tune: St George's Windsor)
Monarch and Maker (Tune: Highland Cathedral)
O Lord, our God throughout the earth (Tune: Tramps and Hawkers)
While earth remains (Tune: Arirang)
Great is thy faithfulness (Tune: Faithfulness)
Now thank we all our God (Tune: Nun Danket)
Musical Director: Anna Glover. Organist: Jonas Cedervall.
Producer: Mo McCullough.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01mqr5s)
Sweet charity

"Much of what some would call my eccentric wardrobe derives from charity shops...By temperament, I'm a historian and the sense of an object with a provenance somehow ties me more securely to the present" writes Sarah Dunant.

As she rummages for bargains in her local charity shop, Sarah reflects on the history of charity shops and their growing importance in times of austerity.

Producer Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01mtshn)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week, presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01mtshq)
For detailed descriptions see daily programmes

Writer ..... Mary Cutler
Director ..... Rosemary Watts
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Christine Barford ..... Lesley Saweard
Jolene Perks ..... Buffy Davis
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Mike Tucker ..... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Brenda Tucker ..... Amy Shindler
Caroline Sterling ..... Sara Coward
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Rhys Williams ..... Scott Arthur
Darrell Makepeace ..... Dan Hagley
Arthur Walters ..... David Hargreaves
Pawel Jasinski ..... Max Krupski
Iftikar Shah ..... Pal Aron.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01mtshs)
Goldie Hawn

Kirsty Young's castaway is Hollywood's prototype dizzy blond, Goldie Hawn.

Like most things in Tinseltown the image is somewhat at odds with the reality. Goldie is an Academy Award winner and producer who's been on the A list for 40-odd years, starring alongside Peter Sellers, Walter Matthau and Woody Allen. She's now transmuted from fantasy pin-up to best selling author - she writes parenting manuals and spearheads a childhood learning initiative.

She tells Kirsty about her journey from dancing in sleazy go-go bars to bagging an Oscar, how she coped with the difficulties her early success brought her and how she met her husband of 29 years, Kurt Russell.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01mqmsb)
Series 64

Episode 7

Nicholas Parsons challenges another panel to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Panellists Paul Merton, Pam Ayres, Charles Collingwood and Miles Jupp join him at the Regal Cinema in Evesham, Worcestershire.

Paul Merton talks about Keeping A Chimp As a Pet; Pam Ayres ponders The Pros and Cons of Knitting; Miles Jupp reveals Three Things He's Given Up Lately and Charles Collingwood explains what Marilyn means to him.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01mtslv)
Food and the Cinema

Tom Parker Bowles looks at the cinema eating experience: from popcorn and nachos to three course meals, there's now every kind of food available to nibble on whilst at the movies. But is it right that we should eat in such a distracted way? Isn't it a ticket to obesity?

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01mtq8r)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01mtslx)
The latest national and international news with Shaun Ley, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Ireland's Troublesome Priests (b01mtslz)
Early this summer, hundreds of Catholic priests gathered in Dublin, with the whiff of rebellion on their nostrils. They are demanding modernisation of their church, which they say, has lost touch with its people. But the people are also rebelling, not only going to Sunday mass in ever smaller numbers, but organising their own rebel groups to protest against a church which, they say is out of touch with the modern world

Ruth McDonald meets the dissident Priests, some of whom have been censured by Rome, demanding relaxation of rules relating to women, homosexuality, divorce and even their own celibacy, but the church is taking tough line telling them that strict church teaching is not open to interpretation, even by them.

As the campaign gains pace with series of meeting across Ireland, Ruth asks what the future is for the faith in a country where Catholicism and the state were, at one time, one and the same, and asks how The Vatican will deal with Irelands Troublesome Priests.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01mqr56)
Ness Botanic Gardens

Peter Gibbs chairs a horticultural debate with Anne Swithinbank, Matthew Wilson and Bunny Guinness at Ness Botanic Gardens, South Wirral. In addition, Toby Buckland explores the plant-hunting history of Ness Botanic Gardens.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4

Questions answered in the programme:
Q. What prize produce would the panel be proud enough to enter in a horticultural show?
A. The panel's kale, runner beans and asparagus have all done well despite the bad weather.

Q. Should my dad give up his garden and grow crops, and how much would he need to be self-sufficient?
A. John Seymour suggested that in 12sq metres of raised beds, you could feed one person for a whole year. A greenhouse would be recommended.

Q. We have found ground-nesting bees in the border. Are they friends or foes?
A. Give them a wide berth, and watch out for the vibrations from a lawnmower or a strimmer.

Q. Could the panel recommended flowering herbaceous plants that remain upright, with unblemished petals, even after a period of wet weather?
A. Mid-late summer flowering perennials, such as Echinacea, Rudbeckia or Agapanthus. Physostegia, Chelone and Phlox are also recommended.

Q. Can the panel recommend plants and containers suitable for my life travelling around the country in my motor home.
A. Keep some houseplants such as Lilies in pots, Streptocarpus or Begonias (Begonia Corallina). Geranium Rozanne also does well in a container. Alternatively you have a trailer transporting a portable cold frame!

Q. Is it a good idea to scarify the lawn in autumn as well as spring?
A. Autumn is the best time to scarify.

Q. How long can you keep dahlia tubers going for? Mine are losing their vigor after seven years.
A. They can lose their vigor as a result of the weather when planted out in the wet. However, seven years is a good innings!

Q. When should I prune my mature fruit trees?
A. You shouldn't prune plums after august, as there is a higher chance of them getting silver leaf. They should be pruned in the summer. You can prune pears and apples in the winter, and that is the best time to do them.

Q. Will the nut of a curly hazel become a curly hazel if planted?
A. No. The tree is grafted and the nut will revert to type.

Q. What is the planning distance of edible plants in a raised bed?
A. Intercropping and catch cropping can be employed in a small bed. You can use things like the 'three sisters', with sweet corn, runner beans and courgette in the same area. Variable growth should be expected.

Q. What would the panel recommend as an autumnal plant for a community-planting project using Wellington boots?
A. Small Christmas trees. Stipa Tenuissima could be used to create an illusion of hair coming out of the boot. Sempervivum, the house leek, can be use to stud the Wellington down the sides.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b01mtsm1)
The Invasion of Iraq

For ordinary Iraqis the US-led invasion, which began in March 2003, was a time of fear and insecurity. Lubna Naji was a 17-year old schoolgirl living with her sister and her aunts in Baghdad when the aerial bombardment of the city started. In this edition of Witness she talks to Robin Lustig about the confusion, the claustrophobia and her family's attempts to keep the anxiety at bay.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01mtsm3)
Thomas Hardy - Far From the Madding Crowd

A Farmer Just Beginning

Young farmer Gabriel Oak sees an ideal wife in Bathsheba Everdene, but she turns him down, believing in true romance. As she becomes rich, he is ruined, and the tables turn.

Thomas Hardy's classic tale dramatised by Graham White.

Bathsheba ...... Alex Tregear
Gabriel Oak ...... Shaun Dooley
Boldwood ...... Toby Jones
Troy ...... Patrick Kennedy
Liddy ...... Lizzy Watts
Fanny ...... Hannah John-Kamen
Maltster ...... Robert Blythe
Jan ...... Joe Sims
Joseph ...... Sam Alexander
Henery ...... Patrick Brennan
Billy ...... Don Gilet
Cain ...... Harry Livingstone
Aunt ...... Tracy Wiles
Maryann ...... Amaka Okafor

Musicians: Colin Guthrie, Chris Davies, Lauren Swift

Director: Jessica Dromgoole

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01mtstx)
AN Wilson on his novel, The Potter's Hand

A.N Wilson talks about his latest novel based on the life of Josiah Wedgwood - The Potter's Hand - and discusses the importance of the Wedgwood family, the company and the Potteries to him personally

When it comes to international literature, English readers are the worst-served in the Western world. So what literary classics we are missing out on? Mariella discusses the best of European literature with Ruediger Wischenbart, a specialist in book markets across Europe, Jane Aitken, founder and MD of Gallic Books, and Christopher Maclehose whose eponymously named imprint specializes in translated literature - and who, when he was at Quercus, famously picked up Stig Larsson after he had been turned down by 15 publishers.

Jamie Andrews, lead curator of the British Library's Writing Britain: Wastelands to Wonderlands, discusses Waterlands - how our rivers and seascapes have been the source of inspiration for many of the great literary classics.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01mtstz)
Roger McGough presents a selection of listeners poetry requests, in company this week with poet Hugo Williams. Hugo chooses some favourite poems from listeners' requests and reads some of his own work.
The readers are Simon Williams and Siobhan Redmond.

Producer Christine Hall.


SUN 17:00 China's New Iron Rice Bowl (b01mqpgt)
Rana Mitter travels to Beijing to find out how China's Government is aiming to improve welfare for its 1.3 billion citizens - with a surprising purpose.

Over the last few decades, as market reform has driven China's dizzying economic rise, it has primarily been known as a nation of producers. Meanwhile, in the early years of the reform era, the Maoist 'iron rice bowl' - the cradle-to-grave welfare state, was allowed to rust and fall away. But now the Chinese Government is aiming to improve healthcare and housing, education and pensions, with the aim of fostering a nation of consumers. This, they argue, will help build a stable economy that buys its own goods, rather than relying on selling them to a recession-bound West. But that will only happen, the Government reasons, if people feel secure enough to spend rather than save.

So Rana goes to visit a young Chinese PR executive and keen online shopper in her smart central Beijing flat - and discovers that she has only clambered onto the housing ladder with the aid of years of parental saving. He meets other young professionals who can't get onto the ladder as house prices have risen so high, but who nonetheless expect little support from the state. Will the huge affordable housing programme change how much they feel able to spend?

And if hundreds of millions of Chinese are now members of a new middle class, however pressured, hundreds of millions more are urban migrants. Migrants' rights to welfare are restricted by the 'hukou' system of residency registration. This means that, having left the countryside to help build the new China, they are no longer entitled to full welfare provision. Rana talks to one such migrant in her family's tiny room to find out what this means for her son's education and her own healthcare. Will the hukou system be relaxed, as the Government has hinted? If not, her son will not be allowed to stay on into high school. And he visits another man who was driven to extreme measures to ensure his hukou-less wife's medical treatment. But in a community centre for old people in the heart of the capital, he meets grateful pensioners who have been helped through tough times by the newly-revitalised system for caring for the retired.

So - if young people's elderly relatives are looked after, if urban migrants are integrated into the welfare system, if healthcare and housing provision improve, perhaps such reforms will help grow the new nation of consumers the Government want to see. Or perhaps, as some of those Rana meets contend, it would it be better simply to raise ordinary people's wages. As China's political system gears up for change at the top, this question will be the most crucial one to affect China's social and economic model in the decade to come.

Producer: Phil Tinline.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01mtr8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01mtq8t)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01mtq8w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01mtq8y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01mtsw2)
There's something of a rural theme to John Waite's Pick of the Week on Sunday.
A sight-seeing trip by Bullnose Morris reveals a chocolate-box picture of Devon eighty years ago, at least in the eyes of the man who invented "ye olde Englande" travel writing. Then there's passion among the hayricks - and a stirring among the smocks - in Thomas Hardy's bucolic bonk-buster, Far from the Madding Crowd. All that, plus a newcomers' guide to the Archers, which will probably put them off listening to it ever again.

Programmes featured this week:

Radio 4 - Book of the Week - Joseph Anthony
Radio 4 - Start The Week
Radio 4 - Short Cuts
Radio 3 - Nightwaves
Radio 3 - In Tune (B for Boogie Woogie)
World Service - Your World - Waiting in Line
5Live - Breakfast
Radio 4 - H V Morton - Travelling into the Light
Radio 4 - Classic Serial - Far From the Madding Crowd
Radio 4 - John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme
Radio 4 - Messy Isn't it? The Life and Works of Richard Brautigan
Radio 3 - In Tune (Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain plays Dick Barton theme)

Producer: Helen Lee.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01mtsw4)
Josh and Phoebe are collecting the eggs at Willow Farm. Phoebe knows Hayley and Neil are finding it tough to keep on top of it at the moment, so she wants to help. Josh is happy to help too.

Lilian's meeting Jennifer at The Bull and Matt decides to join her. Kenton tells him about his adventures abroad, and how the time alone with Jolene has made all the difference.

Fallon tells Kenton she's disappointed with the comedy night but Kenton is proud that she tried something different. Kenton is enjoying getting back into a routine after his trip with Jolene but feels like a spare part because of Rhys and Fallon's efficiency. He tells Fallon that he and Jolene want to treat the two of them to a night out as a thank you. Fallon's not sure Rhys would want to go but Kenton tells her he was up for it when Kenton asked him.

Jennifer notices that Lilian's not herself. Lilian reveals that Paul Morgan's back working in the area. Jennifer knows Lilian had very strong feelings for him but Lilian thinks things are best left well alone.


SUN 19:15 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b015p8sr)
Series 4

Sarah Millican

Marcus Brigstocke invites comic Sarah Millican to eat Chinese food with chopsticks and read The Joy of Sex.

Whether the experiences are banal or profound, the show is about embracing the new and getting out of our comfort zones.

The title comes from the fact that the show's producer and creator Bill Dare had never seen the film Star Wars.

Producer: Bill Dare

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2011.


SUN 19:45 Where Were You... (b01mtt0x)
The Indivisible

Read by Hattie Morahan

Where were you when Kennedy was shot? That was the starting point for this series in which five writers are asked to build a story around a significant historical event and explore it in fiction. As well as the assassination of JFK, the writers explore the meltdown of Chernobyl, the Tottenham riots, Columbine and the splitting of the lithium atom.

People often ask the "Kennedy Question" to highlight the magnitude of the event itself. And occasionally we find ourselves in the thick of the moment. But just as interesting are the polarities, disjunctions and weird connections between the moment that shakes the world and the life of the everyday.

Episode Three: The Indivisible by Nick Walker.

It's 14 April 1932. In Rutherford's laboratory in Cambridge, Cockroft and Walton fire a proton beam to split a lithium atom and make a breakthrough in the science of nuclear fission. But elsewhere, on a station platform, a mother says goodbye to her son and feels her own world splitting apart.

Nick Walker is part of the Coventry-based mixed media experimentalists Talking Birds whose work has been presented extensively in the UK as well as in Sweden, Ireland and the USA. He has worked with some of the country's leading new work theatre companies including Stan's Cafe, Insomniac, and Theatre Instituut Nederlands. He is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often been featured on BBC Radio 4, including Arnold In A Purple Haze (2009), the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010), Life Coach (2010) and Dig Yourself (2011) - all of them Sweet Talk productions.

Produced by: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01mqr5d)
Serious news or tabloid tittle-tattle? Some Feedback listeners feel those photos of the Duchess of Cambridge got too much coverage on Radio 4's news output. Roger put your concerns to Mary Hockaday, Head of the BBC Multimedia Newsroom.

And the BBC's new Director General George Entwistle, barely settled behind his desk, finds Feedback knocking at the door with a bulging volume of listener comments and suggestions. Mr Entwistle has already announced that he holds the audience closest to his heart, so listen in George, the Feedback audience has plenty of ideas for you.

And a new era of the Radio 1 Breakfast show begins on Monday when Nick Grimshaw starts his reign. But what makes a great Breakfast Show? Feedback sends out a man well equipped to find out - avid Radio 1 fan, 16 year old Ollie Dean. Speaking to previous hosts Sara Cox and Tony Blackburn and the man brave enough to produce Chris Evans, Dan McGrath, Ollie uncovers some vital advice for new boy Nick.

And finally, have you ever wondered what happened to Tony Blackburn's on-air canine friend Arnold? Tune in to find out.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01mqr5b)
Prof Sid Watkins, Bill Moggridge, Stanley Long, George Hurst and Ken McManus

Matthew Bannister on:

Professor Sid Watkins, the neurosurgeon who transformed safety in Formua One Motor Racing. We hear from Bernie Ecclestone, Sir Jackie Stewart and Murray Walker.

Bill Moggridge who designed the first lap top computer

Stanley Long - the British film director whose low budget X certificate film "Adventures of a Taxi Driver" made more money in the UK in 1976 than Scorsese's "Taxi Driver".

George Hurst, the conductor who transformed the fortunes of the BBC Northern Symphony Orchestra and inspired generations of British conductors, including Sir Simon Rattle who pays tribute.

And Ken McManus, leader of the Mohawks - one of Britian's last great circus horse riding acts.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01mtr3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01mtshj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01mqmyw)
Political Prejudice

If you think that you are rational and unprejudiced, Michael Blastland hopes you will be open minded enough to listen to the evidence which suggests that you are probably not.

We might think our views about global warming, nanotechnology or the value of IQ tests are based on scientific evidence. But the beliefs we hold about these issues often say more about our ability to screen out the evidence we dislike than it does about the scientific facts.

Michael Blastland investigates the causes of our cognitive biases and our remarkable ability to not let the facts get in the way of a deeply held belief.

Contributors include:

Jonathan Haidt, Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia
Dan Kahan, Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology at Yale Law School
Roger Scruton, philosopher.

Producer: Chris Bowlby.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01mtt0z)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01mtt11)
Episode 122

A look at how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01mqq9v)
Francine Stock discusses prototype vibrators with Jonathan Pryce, star of Hysteria.

Critic Adam Smith reassesses Peter Falk and Gena Rowlands in John Cassavetes A Woman Under The Influence.

Oliver Stone's Savages sees Benicio del Toro in a familiar role as the bad-ass Mexican; he discusses Hispanic stereotypes.

And an oddity from North Korea - Comrade Kim Goes Flying - the first ever UK/Belgian/North Korean co-production.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01mtshb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01mtq9y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01mqq6w)
Ethnic pay gap, racial segregation

Segregation: a Global History of Divided Cities' Laurie Taylor talks to Carl Nightingale, the author of a groundbreaking new book about the ideology and practice of racial segregation in the city. Traversing continents and millennia, he analyses the urban divide from its imperial origins to postwar suburbanisation; from the racially split city of Calcutta to the American South in the age of Jim Crow. Finally, he considers the extent to which separation by race continues to deform the contemporary city. Also, the sociologist Malcolm Brynin, charts the causes and consequences of pay gaps between different ethnic groups in the UK.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01mtsh8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqb0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01mtqb2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqb4)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01mtqb6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01mvy07)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Ed Kessler, Director of the Woolf Institute for Abrahamic Faiths, Cambridge.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01mvy09)
The National Sheep Association say it's a good time to be in the industry as lamb and wool prices remain high. Shrinking flocks in key exporting countries like New Zealand and Australia, are helping to push prices up for UK farmers. However, whilst overall the situation is good, Bob Walker talks to one hill farmer in the Peak District who says he is at an economic disadvantage because his lambing starts later.

Whilst it's good news overall for sheep, there are fears it is bad news for pig farmers. High feed costs are leading to many having to reduce or even get rid of their entire herd. Polly Procter visits one farmer in Gloucestershire who says he cannot afford to farm pigs any more.

Farming Today was presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01mtqb8)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01mvy0c)
Morning news and current affairs presented by Sarah Montague and Evan Davis, including:

0752
John Terry has announced he will no longer play for England, as he appears before an FA disciplinary panel today facing a charge of using racist language during a match last year. Mark Palios, former chief executive of the Football Association, gives his reaction.

0810
The Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg speaks to Sarah Montague from the Lib Dem conference in Brighton where he has faced some tough questions from delegates over the damage caused by breaking his promise on tuition fees.

0822
The Conservative Party chairman Grant Shapps has gained some recent notoriety over the revelation that when running an internet business before becoming an MP, he traded under a pseudonym, Michael Green. Heather McGregor, who runs an executive search company but who also writes as a character called Mrs Moneypenny in the Financial Times, explains the benefits of having an alter ego.

0831
General Motors is suspending production for a week at the Vauxhall plants in Ellesmere Port and Luton, due to the fact that sales in the eurozone have been slow. Sir Nick Scheele, former president and chief operating officer of Ford, and Prof Karel Williams, a car industry expert, debate the health of the British car industry.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01mvy0f)
Grimm Tales with Philip Pullman

On Start the Week Andrew Marr celebrates myth and fairy tales. With the coming 200th anniversary of the first edition of the Grimm Brothers' Tales, Philip Pullman presents new versions of his favourite stories, from the classic quests and romance to the lesser-known tales of villainous kings and wicked wives. Sara Maitland explores the idea that these fairy tales are intimately connected to forests. The theatre director, Tim Supple looks east to the tales of life and death in One Thousand and One Nights. And at the Royal Opera House, Keith Warner, presents his production of the vast, mythical world of Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01mxvcn)
Rupert Everett - Vanished Years

Episode 1

As a writer, the actor Rupert Everett has been compared to David Niven, Noel Coward and Lord Byron: wickedly observant, very British and extremely funny. And his new memoir Vanished Years gives full rein to those powers as Everett writes about the travails of a precarious career - fighting for good roles, effortlessly glamorous at parties.

Everett found fame in Britain with Another Country and Dance with a Stranger, and acclaim in Hollywood with My Best Friend's Wedding. But we meet him in the twilight world of a film finished but not released - and he's not confident it will restore his fortunes. However, at one of the many glamorous parties he attends, Everett has a flash of inspiration: to write Mr Ambassador - an American TV sitcom starring, of course, Rupert Everett in the title role.

And so begins an adventure in Hollywood, diving into the cut throat world of the networks and the pilot episode, where dreams and fortunes can be made or broken.

In the first episode from his memoir, Rupert finds his career at a crossroads. The parties are still glamorous and star-studded, the roles less so.

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment Limited production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01mvy0k)
Tori Amos, Page Three, cheese and Lib Dem women

Performance from Tori Amos, what makes the perfect cheeseboard, the latest campaign against page three girls, Lib Dem women at Westminster - is there a problem? And HRT, the subject of this week's drama.
Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Sarah Crawley.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mvy0m)
Feminine Forever

Episode 1

by Caroline & David Stafford.

Set in the 1970s, against a background of increasingly politicised feminism, a new comedy series about women, HRT and the joys of growing old disgracefully.

1 of 5

Directed by Marc Beeby

The series is loosely based on some of the ideas and attitudes contained in a book, published in 1966 and powerfully influential at the time. The book, Feminine Forever by Robert A. Wilson MD, advanced the notion that the menopause is a disease - much like diabetes - for which modern science luckily has the cure: Hormone Replacement Therapy. Recent discoveries in the field of menopausal therapy, says Dr Robert, may serve to prolong for many women - and for the men who love and admire them - that wonderfully happy aura of love and adoration that full femininity inspires. Only 15% of women are able to grow old gracefully. The rest are suffering from a serious, painful and often crippling disease - the menopause.
Although this series is a gentle comedy - much in the manner of 2010's highly successful The Year They Invented Sex by the same authors - it explores and explodes the prevailing attitudes that underlay these views of women, their sexuality, and the roles ascribed to them (particularly in relation to age) - views that may not be quite as 'historical' as we might like to imagine.


MON 11:00 The Spanish Ambassador's Suitcase: Stories from the Diplomatic Bag (b01mvzfr)
Episode 1

Matthew Parris opens the diplomatic bag to reveal some of the funniest, most striking and memorable despatches sent home by British diplomats down the ages. Diplomats toiling in obscure posts know that by employing a bit of wit and style their reports can end up being read by senior Ministers - even by the Queen.

In an interview for this programme, Sir John Major recalls the curious tale of a racehorse given to him as a gift by the President of Turkmenistan in 1993. The stallion had to make an epic train journey across the former USSR, overcoming an attack by bandits. Despatches by a junior diplomat recounting her subsequent efforts to rescue the horse from the clutches of the Moscow railway bureaucracy - aided only by her ingenuity and a carriageload of melons which had also made the journey - reached 10 Downing Street.

The former British High Commissioner in Sierra Leone, Peter Penfold, reads from his 1998 despatch in which the worlds of Westminster and West Africa collide.

And we venture into the Saharan desert with the Spanish Ambassador to try to find out what's inside his unfeasibly large suitcase.

These new programmes follow a previous BBC Radio 4 series Parting Shots, which looked at the last despatches ambassadors sent before quitting a post.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.


MON 11:30 Everyone Quite Likes Justin (b01mvzft)
Series 2

Episode 4

Justin's still living with his father-in-law, still working with his ex-wife and still calling on his Gran for her words of wisdom.

Now he also has to cope with a game of golf.

Starring Justin Moorhouse, Anne Reid and Paul Copley.

Sitcom written by Justin Moorhouse and Jim Poyser.

Justin ..... Justin Moorhouse
Gran ..... Anne Reid
Lisa ..... Christine Bottomley
Bryn ..... Lloyd Langford
Ray ..... Paul Copley
Tanya ..... Victoria Elliott
Charlie ..... Mark Chatterton
Barbara ..... Kathryn Hunt

Recorded in front of an audience in Manchester.

Producer: Steven Canny

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01mvzfw)
Neighbours hacking your wifi, printing tickets at home, and subsidising your holiday

Got wifi at home? If it's not properly secured, cyber criminals or even your neighbours could use it to steal your identity.

If you buy a ticket for an event online and are offered the option of printing it out at home, you might think you're doing the agent a favour. After all, you're using your own printer, your own ink and your own paper. So is it fair for some agencies to charge you up to £3.00 to print your ticket?

Have you ever visited a friend abroad and then begged them to bring back some proper Yorkshire tea or lemon curd or British crisps? A new website called Please Bring Me dot com might be able to help.

Not going to University and don't know what to do? Then the Guide to Not Going to University might just be the thing because as it says on the back cover - university is not the only path to success.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01mtqbb)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01mvzlj)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 Deborah Bull's Dance Nation (b01mvzll)
The Dance of Old England

Dancer, writer and broadcaster, Deborah Bull looks at what we know - or have imagined - about the dances of Old England, including May Day events like the 'Obby 'Oss Festival in Cornwall, Cecil Sharp's late-Victorian nostalgia fueled folk dance revival and early accounts of Morris dancing.

Deborah also tries out some of the moves devised by miners from the Northumberland coalfields with a team of rapper sword dancers.

Producer: Hannah Rosenfelder
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01mtsw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b01mw08j)
The Deportation Room

by Hannah Khalil

Amira, a student in London, is taking some drawings to an exhibition back home in Gaza. But when she lands at Cairo airport, she can't seem to get any further...

The Deportation Room is based on the testimony of people travelling in or out of Gaza who have spent time in a waiting room at Cairo airport.

Directed by Mary Peate

In 2011, playwright Hannah Khalil had a chance encounter with a Palestinian who had spent several days in a room underneath Cairo airport on his way back to Gaza. It became clear that whilst the room was well known amongst Palestinians, there was very little evidence of its existence. Little by little, Hannah found people who agreed to be interviewed about their stay in the room. The Deportation Room is a dramatised account of a fictional young woman's journey back to Gaza, with verbatim accounts from people who have stayed in the room, performed by actors.

Thanks go to Aser El Saqqa, Laila El-Hadad, Ruba Monzir and to others interviewed who asked to remain anonymous.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b01mw08l)
(4/12)
The North of England make their first appearance of the 2012 series in today's edition of the cryptic quiz, with Tom Sutcliffe in the chair. The North of England team consists of the scientist and crossword-setter Jim Coulson and the award winning writer Adele Geras. Opposing them this week are the South of England team of Marcel Berlins and Marcus Berkmann.

As always they'll need to grope for snippets of half-remembered knowledge in all kinds of fields, from classic cinema to children's literature and from the Bible to football. Typical of this week's questions is:

How would you expect Lord Attenborough to address General Melchett's adjutant, the heroine of the Forfarshire, and the 'mother' of Nibs, Slightly, Tootles, Curly and the Twins?

All of this week's questions are laid out on the Round Britain Quiz pages of the Radio 4 website so you can play along with the teams.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b01mw08q)
BBC International Short Story Award 2012

East of the West

The next of the ten shortlisted short stories in contention for the BBC International Short Story Award 2012. In East of the West by Miroslav Penkov the division between East and West is the backdrop for this story about a broken hearted man reflecting on love and loss.

The BBC Short Story Award is well established as one of the most prestigious for a single short story. The Award is celebrating the Olympic year by going global, and for one year only it reflects the richness and versatility of the short story internationally, with a shortlist of ten rather than the usual five. The winner and the runner-up will be announced live on Front Row on Tuesday, 2nd October. The story will be available as a free download following broadcast.

Read by Paul Hilton
Abridged by Viv Beeby
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 16:00 The Barlow-Morgenstern Method (b01j2bmn)
Comedian and songwriter Tony Hawks discovers an unusual reference work, Harold Barlow and Sam Morgenstern's Dictionary of Musical Themes, which takes him on an unexpected journey into the complex world of musical plagiarism.

Along the way he talks to the country's top musicologist, a West End musical director, composer Debbie Wiseman MBE and Neil Innes, who not only won a plagiarism case, but also wrote the Beatles parody The Rutles.

Producer: Isobel Williams
A Bite Yer Legs production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01mw08s)
Russia

The recent jailing of three young women for staging a political protest in a cathedral in Moscow has highlighted the relationship between the Government and the Russian Orthodox Church. Ernie Rea's guests today are Canon Michael Bordeaux from the Keston Institute for the Study of Religion and Communism, Father Andrew Phillips,a Russian Orthodox priest, and the BBC's former Moscow correspondent, Martin Sixsmith.


MON 17:00 PM (b01mw08v)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01mtqbd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b01mw08x)
Series 64

Episode 8

Nicholas Parsons challenges another panel to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Panellists: Jenny Eclair, Tony Hawks, Kevin Eldon and Alun Cochrane.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01mw08z)
Ed struggles to find something for breakfast. George has a letter from school about Karate classes and is keen to join but Emma's worried about the cost. Not wanting George to keep missing out, Ed suggests they pay in instalments. But Emma doesn't want everyone knowing about their financial situation.

Emma finds the courage to ask Ruth for an advance on her wages. Ed's annoyed when he finds out but agrees that seeing George's face light up when they tell him he can go to karate makes it worthwhile. Emma asks Ed what he wants to do for his birthday. He says that because money's tight he'll just have a drink at The Bull.

Over coffee with Christine, Jim flicks through a copy of Borsetshire Life. Not impressed, he tells her he was once interviewed for a magazine which put a spotlight on important local figures. Christine suggests he pitches a similar article to Borsetshire Life. She persuades him to approach Ruth to ask if she'll be his first subject, as a pioneer for women in agriculture. Ruth's not comfortable with publicity and turns him down. Christine asks if he's giving up on the idea already. Jim presumes she knows him better than that.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01mw091)
Holy Motors, The Paradise, BBC Short Story contender

With Kirsty Lang.

The French film Holy Motors, which provoked boos and cheers at the Cannes film festival, arrives in UK cinemas this week. The cast includes Kylie Minogue as an enigmatic singer. Jason Solomons and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh debate whether the film adds up to more than its parts.

The Paradise, a new TV drama series, is a romance set in a glamorous department store in 1875. It's based on a novel by Zola, given a British setting - and the love it depicts includes the female customers' adoration of the products on sale. Biographer Kathryn Hughes reviews.

The RSC's latest production of Much Ado About Nothing, directed by Iqbal Khan, is set in contemporary India. Writers Jatinder Verma and Hardeep Singh Kohli have done the same for Moliere's The Miser, transporting it from 17th century France. A forthcoming Radio 3 production of Ibsen's A Doll's House, adapted by Tanika Gupta, takes place in 19th century India, rather than Norway. Iqbal Khan, Hardeep Singh Kohli and Tanika Gupta discuss how relocating these dramas to India offers new perspectives on classic works.

The latest contender for the £15,000 BBC International Short Story Award is Australian Chris Womersley. He's also a crime writer, and explains why he enjoys working in shorter forms. His story is broadcast tomorrow at 3.30pm.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mvy0m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Luck Be a Lady Tonight (b01mqmyt)
Journalist and former Sky News presenter Marverine Cole looks at how gambling is becoming increasingly popular among women in the UK.

A reformed problem gambler herself, Marverine embarks on a rather personal journey to find out why more and more women are taking to gambling. For years it was associated more with men than women, so why the sudden surge in female interest?

Marverine examines the attractions of gambling but also tries to find out why, for her and others, it turned into so-called 'problem gambling'. She hears from women for whom the odd flutter is just a bit of fun and eavesdrops on a group session for women for whom gambling became an out of control addiction.

Producer: Ashley Byrne
A Made in Manchester Limited Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01mw15s)
Social Epidemiology

In Britain, the health gap is growing - in the wealthiest parts of the country, people are living on average more than a decade longer than in the poorest parts.

An academic discipline which tries to work out why this health gap exists has also grown.

It's called social epidemiology. You've probably never heard of it, but the science has influenced governments of both the left and right. So what answers has it thrown up?

The most famous comes from the Whitehall II study of civil servants, led by Sir Michael Marmot, which found that people who are in high-pressure jobs, over which they have low control, are at greater risk of heart disease, because of the stress their lowly position causes.

The idea that how much control you have over your work and life affects your health has generated talk in policy-making circles about the need to empower people.

But the evidence is contested. When economists look at the same data, they see something different.

David Aaronovitch hears the arguments.

Contributors:
Sir Michael Marmot, professor of epidemiology and public health at University College London
Anna Coote, former UK health commissioner
Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield
George Davey-Smith, professor of clinical epidemiology at Bristol University
Johan Mackenbach, chair of the department of public health at Erasmus University, Rotterdam
Angus Deaton, professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University

Producer: Ruth Alexander.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01mqq9x)
Quentin Cooper asks how climate computer modelling is being used to determine future UK energy policy. Also on the programme how flies could help feed livestock; could growing protein on larvae be an ingenious solution to food shortages? And how bumblebees find their food in the wild - the first study to look at their behaviour outside the laboratory.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01mvy0f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01mtqbg)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01mw1kt)
In a rare interview, we hear from Syria's foreign ministry.

Abu Hamza and four other terror suspects are to be extradited to face trial in the US.

So-called 'anti-jihad' adverts appear in New York subways - should they have been permitted?

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01mw1kw)
Rose Tremain - Merivel: A Man of His Time

Episode 6

Rose Tremain returns triumphantly to one of her best loved characters, in the long awaited sequel to her Booker short-listed best-selling novel, Restoration, published in 1989.

Seventeen years after the events related in Restoration, Merivel, a man of wit, wisdom and not a little passion, is facing a crisis. Older and perhaps a little wiser, with his daughter on the brink of adulthood and his dearest friends ageing too, life on his Norfolk estate is no longer sufficiently satisfying. How to reinvigorate his life and find new purpose?

In today's episode: After his sojourn in France, Merivel has returned to Bidnold, to find his beloved Margaret in the grip of the deadly typhus. But a surprise visitor brings solace and perhaps hope.

The reader is the stage and screen actor Nicholas Woodeson.
The abridger was Sally Marmion and the producer was Di Speirs.


MON 23:00 Don't Log Off (b01jxrmt)
Series 2

Episode 2

Alan Dein crosses the world on a series of late night excursions via Facebook and Skype, discovering the real life dramas behind the online profiles.

Among those he connects with are Bryan, whose relationship with his Russian girlfriend has been conducted entirely through Google Translate, and Bill, who stood in a phone box, holding a gun to his head as he came out to his wife.

Alan also catches up with Amir, who in the last series was trying to leave Iran, and finds out why he was so keen to go.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.


MON 23:30 The Philosopher's Arms (b01lhgw8)
Series 2

Theseus' Ship

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink.

Each week presenter Matthew Sweet takes a puzzle with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, John Stuart Mill and Wittgenstein. All recorded in a pub with an audience, who'll have their own contributions to make - but whose assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Propping up the bar this year will be philosophers such as Julian Baggini and Nigel Warburton, and academic experts on memory, the law, art and computers. We'll be meeting bald men, a woman who used to be a man, and a woman who can't remember being a girl. Plus music from The Drifters - a far more philosophical group than you'd ever imagine.

This programme is a repeat

The producer was David Edmonds.



TUESDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01mtqc9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01mxvcn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqcc)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01mtqcf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqch)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01mtqck)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01n2m4n)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Ed Kessler, Director of the Woolf Institute for Abrahamic Faiths, Cambridge.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01mw2d2)
After the wettest summer in 100 years, the UK has again been battered by torrential rain. Heavy downpours, equivalent to almost a month's worth of rain have fallen in parts of the South West, Northern England and Scotland. Peter Gibbs from the BBC weather centre tells Farming Today that we are in the middle of an unusual weather system.

Farmers growing maize as an energy crop for biogas are trialling plots of wildflowers to add to the mix. Anna Hill goes to meet Oliver Knowland who is pioneering the use of flowers for energy in the UK.

As the tupping season starts for sheep, vet Nick Hart gives advise on how to lessen the risk of Schmallenberg virus. He says its hoped those ewes which had the disease last year could now be immune.

Farming Today was presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01mw2d4)
Morning news and current affairs presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague, including:

0750
The message from police to Megan Stammers, the 15-year-old girl who is thought to be in France with her maths teacher, is she should come home, and that she is not in trouble. Chief Inspector Jason Tingley of Sussex Police, has the latest information. And Mark Williams-Thomas, a criminologist and former child protection expert with Surrey Police, and Dr Jennifer Wild, senior research fellow in Clinical Psychology at Oxford University, discuss how families and authorities should best deal with such events.

0810
The radical cleric Abu Hamza will be extradited to the United States to face a court later today. Lawrence Whitehouse, whose wife was killed when they were both taken hostage in a kidnapping organised by Abu Hamza in Yemen in 1998, gives her reaction.

0817
The Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Danny Alexander, talks to Sarah Montague as the Liberal Democrat conference draws to a close.

0834
Dr Ben Goldacre, author of the book Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients, and Stephen Whitehead, the chief executive of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, debate claims that pharmaceutical companies do not publish enough of the data from drug trials.

0846
A survey published in the German daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung found that 63 per cent of Germans were worried about inflation. Anne Applebaum, director of political studies at the Legatum Institute, and Prof Michael Cox, professor of international relations at the London School of Economics discuss where national preoccupations or psychoses come from.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01mw2d6)
Sunetra Gupta

Jim Al-Khalili meets Sunetra Gupta, a scientist and novelist. As a Professor of Theoretical Epidemiology she studies infectious diseases such as flu and malaria and explains how a mathematical equation can be as beautiful as a Keats poem.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01mw2d8)
Sarfraz Manzoor talks to Liz Jones

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes. This week he meets the best known of all the confessional columnists, Liz Jones, from The Mail on Sunday's 'You' Magazine.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01mxvlf)
Rupert Everett - Vanished Years

Episode 2

As a writer, the actor Rupert Everett has been compared to David Niven, Noel Coward and Lord Byron: wickedly observant, very British and extremely funny. And his new memoir Vanished Years gives full rein to those powers as Everett writes about the travails of a precarious career - fighting for good roles, effortlessly glamorous at parties.

Everett found fame in Britain with Another Country and Dance with a Stranger, and acclaim in Hollywood with My Best Friend's Wedding. But we meet him in the twilight world of a film finished but not released - and he's not confident it will restore his fortunes. However, at one of the many glamorous parties he attends, Everett has a flash of inspiration: to write Mr Ambassador - an American TV sitcom starring, of course, Rupert Everett in the title role.

And so begins an adventure in Hollywood, diving into the cut throat world of the networks and the pilot episode, where dreams and fortunes can be made or broken.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment Limited production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01mw2db)
Chinese migrant workers, GDP and unpaid work, Page Three, finding a job you love

Chinese migrant workers; Changing your life to find a job you love; Page 3; Dame Pauline Green on women's co-ops around the world; Should unpaid work, like housework and caring for elderly parents, be counted as part of GDP? Presented by Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mw2dd)
Feminine Forever

Episode 2

by Caroline & David Stafford.

Set in the 1970s, against a background of increasingly politicised feminism, a new comedy series about women, HRT and the joys of growing old disgracefully.

2 of 5

Trevor has arranged for Eileen to see a doctor...

Directed by Marc Beeby.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b01mw2dg)
Series 3

Episode 4

Can the world's marine environments remain healthy and functioning under the influence of man, from pollution to over fishing and climate change? In Saving Species this week, Brett Westwood looks in depth at some of the issues and research being carried out into the species which depend upon this often abused natural resource.

Our reporter Helen Scales travels to the Gambia, where issues of oyster overfishing are having a devastating effect not only on the native oysters that were once plentiful in this area but also the coastal mangrove swamps which are now under threat. Can local community efforts being put into action reverse this environmental problem?

In Florida, Howard Stableford joins marine researchers for an evening on a sandy beach. Shunning the bright lights and partying tourists he follows the fortunes of loggerhead turtles coming to breed along this stretch of coastline. In a race against time, climate change is having a destabilising effect on the sex ratio of turtle hatchlings and therefore poses a real threat to the long term viability of the species.

And closer to home, we look at the 2012 breeding season of some of our breeding seabirds. How have they fared this summer which has seen unseasonal summer storms batter our coastline at a time when many seabird researchers are discovering a mixed picture in terms of breeding success? So what are the causes of this instability?

Also in the programme - News from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot. And we'll update you on the activities of the Open University's iSpot.

Producer : Sheena Duncan
Presenter : Brett Westwood
Editor : Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b01mw2dj)
Series 14

Bach's St Matthew Passion

Bach's St Matthew Passion was written in 1727 and was probably first performed as part of the Good Friday Service at Thomaskirche in Leipzig. This programme explores ways in which Bach's St Mattew Passion touches and changes people's lives. Guitarist Andrew Schulman describes what happened when he was played this music whilst he was in a coma. James Jacobs talks about the St Matthew Passion providing solace in difficult times during childhood. And singer Emma Kirkby, conductor Paul Spicer and musical historian Simon Heighes explore how the music works and what it's like to perform.

Producer: Rosie Boulton.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01mw2dl)
Call You and Yours - Do you need to go to university to be successful?

On Call You and Yours we'll be asking do you need to go to university to be successful?

More than four hundred thousand students are just starting their new courses across the country, and have committed to spend at least three years and in the region of fifty thousand pounds in getting a degree.

But is university the only path to getting solid qualifications? If you didn't apply or didn't get in, are you left feeling flat and directionless?

We'll be discussing the alternatives. For example, can vocational learning or apprenticeships provide you with the skills you need without the debt? And how easy is it to 'think differently' when the headlines are still telling us about the 716,000 16-24 year olds who are unemployed?

We want to hear from you if you're at this crossroads in your life and struggling to make decisions about your future. If you're an employer, do you disregard people without a degree or do you prefer to harness a young person's raw potential? And tell us about other routes you've taken to get the job you want.

03700 100 444 is the phone number to call or you can e-mail via the Radio 4 website or text us on 84844.

Presenter : Winifred Robinson
Producer Karen Dalziel.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01mtqcm)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01mw2dn)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Deborah Bull's Dance Nation (b01mw2dq)
The Permitted Embrace

Dancer, writer and broadcaster Deborah Bull, looks at the link between dance and courtship and the enduring appeal of dance as a vehicle for getting up close and personal.

The scandalous Elizabethan dance, La Volta, and other courtly dances offered a rare opportunity for people to assess up-close the attributes of their potential romantic partners. Regency country dances have so often been central to the romance in screen adaptations of Jane Austen's novels. But the introduction of the Waltz into British society in the early nineteenth century caused outrage.

Producer: Hannah Rosenfelder
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01mw08z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01mw2ds)
The Beat Goes On

Inspired by the election of Police and Crime Commissioners in England and Wales. The drama explores the tensions that are sparked when politics and policing are mixed.
Peter Livermore is a newly elected Police and Crime Commissioner who passionately believes he can be a force for good and make a difference to how his community is policed. He learns hard lessons about the realities of contemporary policing, and political compromise when he clashes with a Chief Constable with an iron will and no interest in having her position undermined.

Writer...Peter Bleksley
Producer ... Stephen Wright.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b01mw2dv)
Series 2

The Space between Us

Nina Garthwaite presents a showcase for delightful and adventurous short documentaries. A selection of brief encounters, true stories, radio adventures and found sound.

In The Space Between Us, Nina explores the difficulties and delights of distance. We travel to the outer reaches of the galaxy in the intriguing "audio movie" Made Out of Meat and take a joyful journey to the middle of absolutely nowhere with the writer Ian Sansom.

We hear tales of family tussles over living space, a pop song constructed around a gap in understanding between scientists and the general public, and a look at the spaces in our speech patterns as the comedian Dan Schreiber explores the importance of a well placed...pause in the delivery of a joke.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4

The items featured in this programme were:
Mind the Gap
Featuring Dan Schreiber

Tears, Gravity and Distance
Produced by Karl James

They're Made Out of Meat
Produced by Jonathan Mitchell

Silent Comedy
Featuring Dan Schreiber

Nowhere
Produced by Rachel Hooper

The Table
Produced by Katie Burningham

Higgs Boson!
Produced by Mad Genius.


TUE 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b01mw2dx)
BBC International Short Story Award 2012

A Lovely and Terrible Thing, by Chris Womersley

Chris Womersley's story about a man who is forced to confront his shortcomings as a husband and a father when he witnesses a startling event.

Read by Richard Dillane
Produced by Gemma Jenkins.

The next of the ten shortlisted short stories in contention for the BBC International Short Story Award 2012. The BBC Short Story Award is well established as one of the most prestigious for a single short story. The Award is celebrating the Olympic year by going global, and for one year only it reflects the richness and versatility of the short story internationally, with a shortlist of ten rather than the usual five. The winner and the runner-up will be announced live on Front Row on Tuesday, 2nd October. The story will be available as a free download following broadcast.


TUE 16:00 Things We Forgot to Remember (b00fz8fb)
Series 4

The League of Nations

Michael Portillo re-examines the reputation of the League of Nations. Born out of the carnage of World War One it has been damned for failing to avoid a second conflict. But is that a fair judgement?

As an institution set up in the aftermath of a terrible conflict and amidst hopes that such horrors would never be repeated, it seems only right that the League of Nations should be deemed one of history's great failures. But in exploring the origins and works of the League Michael Portillo finds a number of things that have been forgotten in the over-whelming desire to lump the failings of the interwar years on a single identifiable scapegoat.

With the help of a former UN Ambassador and historians who have analysed the finer details of what happened at League meetings and conferences, he establishes a rounder picture of the League, both in its failings and successes. It did, after all resolve a number of border conflicts, very similar to the ones that had sparked the First World War. It also rescued the ailing Austrian economy and brought together the greatest Economists of the world who were given the opportunity to formulate global financial plans that formed the basis of the post Second World War economic system.

Of course, in pushing for the setting up of the United Nations it was expedient to establish clear water between a system that appeared to have failed and a new one which might be able to learn the harsh lessons of the interwar years.

Producer: Tom Alban

(repeat).


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b01mw358)
Series 28

Edith Wharton

"If only we'd stop trying to be happy we could have a pretty good time." Edith Wharton is as well known for her wit as for her novels. Born in 1862, she was the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize, for The Age of Innocence in 1921. She is nominated by Naomi Wolf, the provocative American commentator and author of The Beauty Myth.
Presenter Matthew Parris is also joined in the studio by Janet Beer and Avril Horner.

The producer is Jolyon Jenkins.

From 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01mw35b)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Includes Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01mtqcp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Secret World (b01mw35d)
Series 3

Episode 3

From Miranda Hart to Sean Connery - Jon Culshaw and friends imagine the private lives of the famous.

The comedy impressions series examining the bizarre and private lives of public people.

Starring:

Jon Culshaw
Margaret Cabourn Smith
Julian Dutton
Debra Stephenson
Lewis Macleod
Duncan Wisbey

Written by Bill Dare, Julian Dutton and Duncan Wisbey

Created and produced by Bill Dare.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01mw35g)
Matt asks Brenda to send a letter to Jazzer, giving him notice to terminate his flat rental. Brenda gets a phone call from Tom who's having success at the food fair with people enjoying his food samples.

Matt has been in and out all day and Lilian wants to know what he's up to. He opens up the car boot where she discovers her packed suitcase and tickets to Paris. Lilian is delighted but needs time to get dressed up.

Tom is going through feedback with Brenda about the ready meals. It's positive but Tom is anxious that he doesn't have any confirmed orders. On the other hand, if the business takes off they'll be really busy and they've got a wedding to plan!

After struggling to find something suitable to wear, Fallon feels like cancelling her evening with Rhys. Brenda reminds her it's a free night out. At the restaurant, Fallon and Rhys have promised not to talk about work but find it hard to make conversation. Rhys starts talking about weightlifting before Fallon stops him, bored with the topic. They start to talk about the comedy night and finally relax and they decide to finish the night with a dance.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01mw5hw)
Bruce Willis in Looper, Ashley Jensen, BBC Short Story author

With Mark Lawson.

In the new sci-fi thriller Looper, time-travel exists, but is illegal and only available on the black market. Organised crime bosses send their victims into the past, to be murdered by a Looper - a hired gun. Bruce Willis plays a successful Looper who is sent back in time to assassinate his younger self, played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Writer Matt Thorne reviews.

Ashley Jensen, best known for her TV roles in Extras and Ugly Betty, talks about working with Ricky Gervais, relocating to Hollywood, the appeal of her Scottish accent and returning to the stage in Alan Ayckbourn's A Chorus of Disapproval, with Rob Brydon and Nigel Harman.

The phrase Plan B has entered current debates about the economy - but it's also a London musician, it appears in the title of the latest Van Morrison album and it's the name of a Hollywood production company. Craig Leyland from the Oxford English Dictionary discusses the origins of the phrase, and its many re-appearances.

This year - in celebration of the Olympics - the BBC's National Short Story Award has become an International Short Story Award. Front Row has been interviewing the 10 authors shortlisted for the £15,000 prize. Tonight American novelist Adam Ross discusses his story, In The Basement, to be broadcast tomorrow at 3.30pm.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mw2dd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01mw5j0)
Green on Blue

In the first of a new series, Gerry Northam investigates the rising number of so called "green on blue" attacks in which Afghan soldiers and policemen have turned their guns on British and other international troops.

With more than 50 NATO troops killed in insider attacks this year, is enough being done to protect those working as mentors?

The US has invested over $50 billion on developing independent Afghan security forces but according to a US Government audit, the majority of Afghan troops remain heavily reliant on American help and support. Even widespread illiteracy remains a problem.

Meanwhile the impact of the recent attacks is huge - undermining the trust that's needed between the Afghan forces and the coalition troops getting them ready to take over the security in 2014.

So how reliable is the screening of new Afghan recruits? And, with continuing questions over their loyalties and capabilities, can there be an effective withdrawal in two years' time?

Presenter: Gerry Northam
Producer: David Lewis.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01mw5j2)
Can't See, Will Cook series finale

For a couple of years we've been covering the pleasures and pitfalls of cookery for the visually impaired. Can't see Will Cook has included making vegetable Christmas loaf, lemon drizzle cake and a Lebanese Fish Dish. Today we round off the series as Mohamad Khalife prepares sea bass. Sue Cramb who teaches hospitality at Queen Alexandra College, offers some practical tips and some encouragement for those who are put off by the risk of getting burned by hot ovens or cut by sharp knives,

Produced by Lee Kumutat.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01mw5j4)
'SARS-like' virus, reflux heartburn, corrective baby helmets

In Inside Health this week Dr Mark Porter asks whether headlines identifying a 'SARS Like' virus may cause unnecessary alarm. While this new virus and SARS are both members of the same family, virologist John Oxford explains that they are more like cousins that behave differently.

And should you be worried about the shape of your baby's head? Lots of parents are. Margaret McCartney questions the growing trend for corrective helmets to treat so called 'flat head syndrome'.

Plus Mark Porter visits the first NHS hospital to offer a new approach to treating heartburn.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01mw2d6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01mtqcr)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01mw5j6)
The BBC apologises to the Queen

President Obama speaks at the United Nations

A report on an 11 year old preacher in the United States

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01mw5j8)
Rose Tremain - Merivel: A Man of His Time

Episode 7

Rose Tremain returns triumphantly to one of her best loved characters, in the long awaited sequel to her Booker short-listed best-selling novel, Restoration, published in 1989.

Seventeen years after the events related in Restoration, Merivel, a man of wit, wisdom and not a little passion, is facing a crisis. Older and perhaps a little wiser, with his daughter on the brink of adulthood and his dearest friends ageing too, life on his Norfolk estate is no longer sufficiently satisfying. How to reinvigorate his life and find new purpose?

In today's episode: Returning from his French adventures and with Margaret out of danger, Merivel turns his attention to his old patients, including his old lover, Lady Violet Bathurst. And the King remains an unpredictable guest.

The reader is the stage and screen actor Nicholas Woodeson.
The abridger was Sally Marmion and the producer was Di Speirs.


TUE 23:00 Clayton Grange (b01mw5jb)
Series 1

Episode 1

Anthony Head leads a team of brilliantly stupid scientists.

This is Clayton Grange, top secret Scientific Institute with a government brief to solve the global fuel crisis, cheer people up and make war just a bit more gentle. Meet the scientists who are a bit rubbish at life. And not much better at science.

Comedy by Neil Warhurst with extra material by Paul Barnhill.

Saunders ..... Anthony Head
Geoff ..... Neil Warhurst
Roger ..... Paul Barnhill
Jameson ..... Stephanie Racine
Helen/Bunty ..... Don Gilet
Alan Dobson ..... Paul Stonehouse

Director: Marion Nancarrow

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


TUE 23:30 The Philosopher's Arms (b01lsyrh)
Series 2

What Makes a Fake a Fake?

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink.

Each week presenter Matthew Sweet takes a puzzle with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, John Stuart Mill and Wittgenstein. All recorded in a pub with an audience, who'll have their own contributions to make - but whose assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Propping up the bar this year will be philosophers such as Julian Baggini and Nigel Warburton, and academic experts on memory, the law, art and computers. We'll be meeting bald men, a woman who used to be a man, and a woman who can't remember being a girl. Plus music from The Drifters - a far more philosophical group than you'd ever imagine.

This programme is a repeat.

The producer was Estelle Doyle.



WEDNESDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01mtqdn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01mxvlf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqdq)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01mtqds)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqdv)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01mtqdx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01n2m4d)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Ed Kessler, Director of the Woolf Institute for Abrahamic Faiths, Cambridge.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01mw5qx)
Three cows and a calf in Wales have been found to have antibodies to the Schmallenberg virus, which affected England last year but has never been identified in Wales before. Anna Hill talks to the President of the Welsh Branch of the British Veterinary Association, Bob Stevenson.

As the RSPCA calls for dairy products from non-cull areas to be labelled as 'Badger Friendly', Anna hears from an MEP who thinks the labelling idea is 'unethical', whilst the charity say they want to 'give the power back to the consumer'.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Rich Ward.


WED 06:00 Today (b01mw5qz)
Morning news and current affairs presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, including:

0743
JK Rowling's latest book The Casual Vacancy is published tomorrow. The BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz sheds light on the adult fiction book's likely reception.
.
0752
Lawyer John Kirkhope and public law professor Adam Tompkins discuss the impact of the Queen's recently reported statement on Abu Hamza.

0810
Nick Clegg said yesterday that there was a debate to be had in the next Parliament about benefits for wealthier pensioners; Labour MP Frank Field and Conservative MP Mark Reckless share their thoughts on possible changes to the system.

0821
The Today programme hears from Jacky Hyams, the author of a new book on World War II's female civilian Spitfire pilots, and one of the veterans, Joy Lofthouse.

0832
In the last of his reports from the US, Justin Webb visits from Nasa's base in central Florida to hear how the superpower is facing up to a more competitive future.

0842
Liberal Democrat Energy Secretary Ed Davey joins the programme live from the party's conference in Brighton.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01mw5r1)
Sir John Major, Caitlin Moran, Andy Torbet, Colin Blumenau

Andy Torbet spent ten years in the British forces as a paratrooper, diver and bomb disposal officer before turning his hand to television. He co-presents the BBC Two series Operation Iceberg in which a team of adventurers and scientists travel to the Arctic to chart the life cycle of icebergs.

The former Prime Minister, Sir John Major, uses his own unconventional family past to tell the story of British music hall in his book, 'My Old Man: a personal history of Music Hall'. His father Tom Major was a music hall performer who, with his first wife Kitty, toured as Drum and Major. Sir John reflects on his father's life and explores the origins of music hall in the pleasure gardens of the 18th century to its decline with the arrival of radio and cinema. 'My Old Man: a personal history of Music Hall' is published by Harper Press.

Caitlin Moran is a columnist and writer. Her new book Moranthology is a collection of her columns written during the last 20 years. She looks back on her early life, raised with seven siblings on a Wolverhampton council estate, and how she turned to writing and journalism at 15. Moranthology is published by Ebury.

Colin Blumenau is an actor who is directing Mansfield Park at the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds. He is also directing a rehearsed reading of Lovers' Vows, the scandalous play which is featured in Jane Austen's novel. Written by Elizabeth Inchbald, the play causes consternation in Mansfield Park with its moral ambiguity and daring themes.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01mxtqn)
Rupert Everett - Vanished Years

Episode 3

As a writer, the actor Rupert Everett has been compared to David Niven, Noel Coward and Lord Byron: wickedly observant, very British and extremely funny. And his new memoir Vanished Years gives full rein to those powers as Everett writes about the travails of a precarious career - fighting for good roles, effortlessly glamorous at parties.

Everett found fame in Britain with Another Country and Dance with a Stranger, and acclaim in Hollywood with My Best Friend's Wedding. But we meet him in the twilight world of a film finished but not released - and he's not confident it will restore his fortunes. However, at one of the many glamorous parties he attends, Everett has a flash of inspiration: to write Mr Ambassador - an American TV sitcom starring, of course, Rupert Everett in the title role.

And so begins an adventure in Hollywood, diving into the cut throat world of the networks and the pilot episode, where dreams and fortunes can be made or broken.

In episode three of his memoir, the sitcom idea starts its hazardous journey to pilot show reality.

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment Limited production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01mw5r3)
Aspirations of seven-year-olds, Payscales, Opera Divas

We hear the analysis of a study of 11,000 7 year olds and compare what they said they wanted to do with what they actually became.The government is discussing regional pay for public sector workers - how would that affect women? The Prima Donnas and Divas in opera, and an interview with Claire Macdonald who ran the Kinloch Lodge Hotel on the Isle of Skye for nearly forty years.
Presented by Jenni Murray.
Produced by Ruth Watts.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mw5r5)
Feminine Forever

Episode 3

by Caroline & David Stafford.

Set in the 1970s, against a background of increasingly politicised feminism, a comedy series about women, HRT and the joys of growing old disgracefully.

3 of 5

Trevor and Eileen visit Judy's commune.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


WED 11:00 Gay on the Inside (b01mxtsf)
For anyone, no matter what's led them to being there, prison can be terrifying.

For anyone who's gay, it can be particularly frightening, lonely... and dangerous. Some try to hide their sexuality. Some dare to come out or find themselves "outed". Some have sex. Some even fall in love.

In Gay On The Inside, Stephen Fry, who is a former prisoner himself having spent time inside for credit card fraud at the age of 17, uncovers surprising stories and shares his own recollections of the atmosphere in jail - including his thoughts on how far the country really has come in tacking homophobia.

We hear from Mark, pacing up and down the landing outside his cell in HMP Brixton. Mark couldn't abide his cell mate, told him to pack his stuff and get out. Why? Because his cell mate was gay.

It's not always easy to be yourself on the wings of a prison like Brixton or HMP Parc near Cardiff, according to serving inmate Daniel. On the outside he'd always been openly gay but, as he reveals in the programme, life in prison is different.

In stark contrast, Hayley in HMP Styal says being gay in a women's prison is like being in a candy shop. It's also a complicated place where being straight on the outside doesn't stop you having a girlfriend on the inside. Suzie, Nicky and Ashleigh have strong views and reveal them in the documentary.

We also hear from Paul, who made the bravest of moves, to 'come out' on the wings. He has since been released and was surprised at how accepting his fellow prisoners were of his decision.

Produced by Jo Meek and Steve Urquhart
A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b01llcp6)
Series 5

Hovering Chops

More shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave.

The careful eco-balance of shop is under threat when a new butcher (played by Barry Howard) sets up shop in Lenzie with a dazzling array of award winning sausages and forthright chat. The current butcher incumbent, Mutton Jeff (played by Sean Scanlan), is particularly upset that his chop empire is under threat and calls upon Ramesh and the Lenzie Local Retail Traders Association to put a stop it.

The staff of 'Fags, Mags and Bags' are on a tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has lovingly built the business up over the course of 30 years, and is ably assisted by his sidekick Dave. But then there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok - both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business so Ramesh is keen to pass them all his worldly wisdom whether they like it or not.

Written by and starring Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01mwvkf)
Abandoned patients and an end to private clamping

Ever wondered what it's like to be homeless in San Francisco? Or eat your way through Queens? Now you can find out with Vayable.com the online marketplace which promises to show you the hidden secrets only the locals know.

Floods have hit Morpeth again - so what does it mean for houseowners?

Abandoned patients? We report how some GPs surgeries have rejected patients that are seen as too problematic.

Have you got a cupboard full of useless phone chargers? O2 and HTC plan to sell their phones without the charger included. It's the first step in a bid to eliminate the waste of the 100 million chargers left unused across the UK. Will the single standard charger for all handsets work?

From the 1st of October, clamping on private land will no longer be allowed. The AA are warning that cowboy wheel clampers could turn their attention to illegal parking ticket rackets.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01mtqdz)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01mwvkh)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Deborah Bull's Dance Nation (b01mwvkk)
The Strictness of Ballroom

Dancer, writer and broadcaster Deborah Bull looks at the emergence of dance as a competitive activity.

She charts the rise of the genteel, restrained English Style of ballroom dancing as a defence against the 1920s 'invasion' of the Charleston, the Black Bottom and other American imports, feared by polite society as wild and uncontrolled.

As she sweeps across the floor with a leading teacher of ballroom dance, Deborah discovers that, when the stiff upper lip combined with the irrepressible urge to dance, the craze for competitive dancing was born - a craze that has seen many incarnations, most recently with the spectacular success of Strictly Come Dancing.

Producer: Hannah Rosenfelder
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01mw35g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b010dq74)
Amelia Bullmore - The Bat Man

by Amelia Bullmore.

When his wife died three years ago, Christopher fled London for a simpler existence in Cornwall, where he has settled on bat protection as his mission. Colette and her noisy daughters rent the holiday cottage next door and disturb the peace - both his and that of his beloved bats.

Stars Bill Nighy as Christopher, Katherine Parkinson as Colette, Jenny Agutter as Biddy and Sean Baker as Rory.

directed by Mary Peate.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01mwvkm)
Benefits

Major changes in benefits are coming.

On 1 October new penalties begin for people who get their claims wrong - including a fixed £50 penalty for filling in your claim form wrongly or not telling DWP about a change of circumstances.

From January Child Benefit will be taxed for anyone with an income above £50,000 and will disappear for anyone with an income above £60,000.

In April, council tax benefit will be scrapped and replaced by local schemes called council tax support which could be different in every local council area. There will also be a cap on the total amount of benefit that can be paid. And Disability Living Allowance will be replaced by personal independence payments - a huge change for many disabled people coming hot on the heels of the restrictions on employment and support allowance.

And in October 2013 what the Government calls the biggest change in welfare benefits for 60 years begins as Universal Credit starts to replace six means-tested benefits and tax credit.

With one of the biggest shake ups in the benefit system in decades, are you clear about how these changes will affect you?
If you have claimed benefits and never had to pay Council Tax are you worried you may have to now?
Are you disabled and need advice about what the "objective assessment" test may mean?
Are you aware of the new Universal Credit benefit coming in October 2013?
Paul Lewis will be joined by:

- Phil Agulnik, Entitledto.com
- Will Hadwen, Welfare Rights Advisor, Working Families.
- Jean French, Head of Advice & Information, Carers UK

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Sally Abrahams
Lines open at 1pm. The number to ring : 03700 100 444 from 1pm Or e mail the programme: moneybox@bbc.co.uk.


WED 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b01mwvkp)
BBC International Short Story Award 2012

In the Basement, by Adam Ross

Adam Ross's unsettling story about a dinner party conversation which reveals more about the guests and their relationships than they were perhaps intending.

Read by Trevor White
Abridged by Miranda Davies
Produced by Gemma Jenkins

The next of the ten shortlisted short stories up for the BBC International Short Story Award 2012. The BBC Short Story Award is well established as one of the most prestigious for a single short story. The Award is celebrating the Olympic year by going global, and for one year only it reflects the richness and versatility of the short story internationally, with a shortlist of ten rather than the usual five. The winner and the runner-up will be announced live on Front Row on Tuesday, 2nd October. The story will be available as a free download following broadcast.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01mzmz3)
Race in an English village; decoding organisation

Bletchley Park, the decoding organisation, was at the heart of British intelligence operations in the Second World War. A mythology has grown around its secret activities, which some claim shortened the war by several years. Professor Christopher Grey talks to Laurie Taylor about his seminal research into the romance and reality of Bletchley Park. They're joined by Professor Anthony King. Also, race and 'belonging' in an English village. The social anthropologist, Katharine Tyler, explores the attitudes of white residents to their British Asian neighbours in a semi suburban village in the Midlands.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01mwvkr)
Philippa Kennedy has been appointed as Ombudsman for The Sun. She will consider complaints and correct errors but how independent of the newspaper will she actually be?

Channel 4 will screen footage of volunteers in a scientific study taking MDMA. David Glover, Commissioning Editor for "Drugs Live", responds to criticism that the programme risks glamorising drug use.

And could a levy on monthly broadband bills be an effective way of subsidising print journalism? David Leigh of The Guardian thinks so, John Gapper of the FT is not so sure.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett
Producer: Richard Hooper.


WED 17:00 PM (b01mwvkt)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01mtqf1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Party (b01mwvkw)
Series 3

The Grundy

The prospective politicians visit Phoebe and 'The Grundy' in hospital.

Satirical comedy about a group of young idealists trying to make waves with their new political party.

Written by Tom Basden.

Simon .... Tom Basden
Duncan .... Tim Key
Jared .... Jonny Sweet
Mel .... Anna Crilly
Phoebe .... Katy Wix
Male Nurse .... Jot Davies

Producer .... Julia McKenzie.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01mwvky)
Jim wants to pick Lynda's brains about Borsetshire Life but Lynda wants to talk about the meeting at Ambridge Hall to discuss the Christmas show. Lynda has Shakespeare in mind. Jim suggests one of the history plays but she wants something lighter, like Much Ado About Nothing.

Tom and Tony are lifting carrots, which aren't in great shape because of the bad weather. Pat arrives to say that the casuals are working on the spuds. Tom is distant and asks his mum to take over and Pat wonders if he's okay. She goes to talk to Tom to see what's bothering him. He reveals that he is worried about Brenda's commitment to their relationship.

Brenda pops in on Vicky to give her a lift to an appointment with the midwife. Vicky is nervous and hopes that she has done enough research about bringing up a baby with Down's syndrome.

Afterwards Vicky helps Lynda to set up for the meeting. Lynda asks how her appointment was and Vicky says that the midwife was impressed with her knowledge.

Brenda brings Tom good news when she tells him that Speakman's holiday company have put in a large order for their range. They go out for a meal to celebrate.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01mwvl0)
Muse interviewed, Andy Williams remembered, Short Story contenders

With Mark Lawson.

The death of the singer Andy Williams at the age of 84 was announced today. Michael Grade pays tribute to one of the most high-profile performers of the 1960s and 1970s, and we hear the voice of Andy Williams himself, recalling his early career, from a Front Row interview in 2007.

Matt Bellamy and Dom Howard from the band Muse reflect on their new album, and how it's influenced by science, and discuss the pressures of performing at the Olympic closing ceremony. And after 18 years together, they also consider tensions within the band and their gruelling tour schedules.

This year - in celebration of the Olympics - the BBC's annual National Short Story Award has become the BBC International Short Story Award. Front Row is interviewing the 10 authors shortlisted for the £15,000 prize. Tonight novelists Carrie Tiffany and Julian Gough discuss their stories, to be broadcast tomorrow and on Friday.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mw5r5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Bringing Up Britain (b01mwvl2)
Series 5

Bedrooms and Battlegrounds

Mariella Frostrup and her guests examine the hidden politics of the childhood bedroom.

We'd all like our children's bedrooms to be places of peace, of bedtime stories and good night kisses. But often a child's bedroom is an area fraught with tensions. It's the place where children want to be private and put up their own posters, so they can use the space to forge their own identity. Yet parents often battle with their offspring for control of that space too, over issues like tidiness and the time a child actually goes to sleep.

In "Bringing Up Britain" we explore the way in which the notion of the bedroom evolves and changes as children grow. What do youngsters need from their bedrooms and how do they manage to create private spaces when they have to share?

We also investigate the bedroom as a place of night fears - the domain of imaginary monsters and children being scared of the dark.

And we explore how, as divorce rates have increased, children increasingly have two different sleeping spaces in the houses of separated parents. How do they differentiate those bedrooms and what effect does it have on a bedtime routine?

Programme guests are Dr. Sian Lincoln, from John Moores University in Liverpool whose recent book on "Youth Culture and Private Space" explores issues around bedrooms, Simon Williams, professor of Sociology at Warwick University who's investigated the politics of sleeping spaces, psychologist Dr. Pat Spungin, an expert on teenagers and sleeping routines and Professor Russell Foster from Oxford University who specialises in sleep and circadian rhythms.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01mwvl4)
Series 3

Margaret Heffernan: Whistleblowers

Entrepreneur Margaret Heffernan challenges the negative view of whistle-blowers and argues that people who dare to speak uncomfortable truths are vital to the success of businesses and other organisations.

All too often important information is available, but acting on it is avoided because it would cause conflict. As a former CEO, she believes that a positive attitude to dissent is the key to progress.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01mwvl6)
Apocalypse Then and Now

During the Vietnam War two million tons of American bombs were dropped on the tiny nation of Laos, more than the combined weight dropped on Japan and Germany during World War Two. The environmental impact was horrific, destroying forests, killing endangered wildlife and poisoning water supplies. For forty years the people of rural Laos have had to live with the constant fear of stepping on one of the thousands of unexploded bombs that litter the countryside.

Bomb clearance has been partial and sporadic but the sudden influx of mining companies coupled with the building of new roads and hydro-electric dams is speeding things up. Farmland which has been unusable for decades is being bought up, cleared of bombs and sold on to developers. In 'Costing the Earth' Tom Heap and Georgia Catt hear how the tough work of the bomb clearance teams is altering the environment of Laos. Local people may be glad to see the back of the American bombs but the roads and mines that replace them are changing the face of the country forever.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01mw5r1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01mtqf3)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01mwvl8)
Violent protest and a general strike in Greece - is Europe entering a winter of discontent?
Analysis of Nick Clegg's speech at the Liberal Democrat conference in Brighton
Gang culture in New Zealand - a special report.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01mwvlb)
Rose Tremain - Merivel: A Man of His Time

Episode 8

Rose Tremain returns triumphantly to one of her best loved characters, in the long awaited sequel to her Booker short-listed best-selling novel, Restoration, published in 1989.

Seventeen years after the events related in Restoration, Merivel, a man of wit, wisdom and not a little passion, is facing a crisis. Older and perhaps a little wiser, with his daughter on the brink of adulthood and his dearest friends ageing too, life on his Norfolk estate is no longer sufficiently satisfying. How to reinvigorate his life and find new purpose?

In today's episode: Merivel must operate on his old lover, Lady Bathurst, to save her life - and his honoured guest makes an offer that he cannot refuse, despite his misgivings.

The reader is the stage and screen actor Nicholas Woodeson.
The abridger was Sally Marmion and the producer was Di Speirs.


WED 23:00 Don't Start (b01mwvld)
Series 2

Pillow Talk

A potential burglary brings out Frank's inner hero.

What do long term partners really argue about? Sharp new comedy from Frank Skinner returns for a second series. Starring Frank Skinner and Katherine Parkinson.

The first series of Don't Start met with instant critical and audience acclaim:
"That he can deliver such a heavy premise for a series with such a lightness of touch is testament to his skills as a writer and, given that the protagonists are both bookworms, he's also permitted to use a flourish of fine words that would be lost in his stand-up routines" - Jane Anderson, Radio Times.

"Writing and starring in the four-parter Don't Start (Radio 4) Frank Skinner gives full rein to his sharp but splenetic comedy. He and his co-star Katherine Parkinson play a bickering couple exchanging acerbic ripostes in a cruelly precise dissection of a relationship" - Daily Mail.

"a lesson in relationship ping-pong".. - Miranda Sawyer, The Observer.
Series 2 follows hard on its heels. Well observed, clever and funny, Don't Start is a scripted comedy with a deceptively simple premise - an argument. Each week, our couple fall out over another apparently trivial flashpoint - the Krankies, toenail trimming and semantics. Each week, the stakes mount as Neil and Kim battle with words. But these are no ordinary arguments. The two outdo each other with increasingly absurd images, unexpected literary references (the Old Testament, Jack Spratt and the first Mrs Rochester, to name a few) and razor sharp analysis of their beloved's weaknesses. Underneath the cutting wit, however, there is an unmistakable tenderness.

Frank says:
"Having established, in the first series, that Neil and Kim are a childless academic couple who, during their numerous arguments, luxuriate in their own, and each other's, learning and wit, I've tried, in the second series, to dig a little deeper into their relationship. Love and affection, occasionally splutter into view, like a Higgs boson in a big tunnel-thing, but can such emotions ever prevail in a relationship where the couple prefers to wear their brains, rather than their hearts, on their sleeves? Is that too much offal imagery?"

Directed and Produced by Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Jon Thoday
An Avalon Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Warhorses of Letters (b01nccjb)
Series 1

Episode 3

Deep in the British Library tucked into the slipcover of a book on the history of Blenheim Palace a packet of extraordinary letters has been discovered.

"Dear Marengo brackets Napoleon's horse close brackets, I've never written a letter like this before...."

Thus begins the first passionate letter from Copenhagen, the Duke of Wellington's horse, to his hero Marengo in this epistolary equine love story. A story of two horses united by an uncommon passion, cruelly divided by a brutal conflict.

Warhorses of Letters stars Stephen Fry as Marengo, the seasoned, famous and just-a-little-bit-short mount of Emperor Napoleon. Daniel Rigby stars alongside him as Copenhagen, the frisky young racehorse who as our story begins is about to be the new mount for the Duke of Wellington. This collection of their moving letters to each other is introduced by Tamsin Greig.

Episode 3 sees our heroes' fortunes fluctuate as the Napoleonic Wars get bloodier and colder making it much harder to send Valentine's cards.

Written by novelists Robert Hudson (The Kilburn Social Club) and Marie Phillips (Gods Behaving Badly - soon to be a feature film starring Christopher Walken and Sharon Stone).

Directed by Steven Canny
Produced by Gareth Edwards.


WED 23:30 The Philosopher's Arms (b01m0phv)
Series 2

Sorites' Heap

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink.

Each week presenter Matthew Sweet takes a puzzle with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, John Stuart Mill and Wittgenstein. All recorded in a pub with an audience, who'll have their own contributions to make - but whose assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Propping up the bar this year will be philosophers such as Julian Baggini and Nigel Warburton, and academic experts on memory, the law, art and computers. We'll be meeting bald men, a woman who used to be a man, and a woman who can't remember being a girl. Plus music from The Drifters - a far more philosophical group than you'd ever imagine.

This programme is a repeat
Producer: David Edmonds
Editor: Jeremy Skeet.



THURSDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01mtqfy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01mxtqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqg0)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01mtqg2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqg4)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01mtqg6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01n2m4g)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Ed Kessler, Director of the Woolf Institute for Abrahamic Faiths, Cambridge.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01mwx60)
A cull of thousands of geese on Orkney raise objections from animal rights campaigners

More than over 2000 geese have already been shot in a pilot cull on Orkney. Its aiming to reduce the population of grey geese on the island. Whilst farmers and conservation groups welcome the cull it has raised strong objections from some animal rights organisations.

Pumpkin crops in Lincolnshire are down by 20%, with warnings that halloween lanterns will be both smaller and more expensive.

The weather has also impacted the cider apple crop this year.Like other alcohol tax on the drink has risen year on year above inflation. Simon Russell, from the National Association of Cider Makers appeals to the government for more help.

Autumn is one of the most critical times of the year for sheep farmers as they get their flocks ready for the start of this year's breeding season. In Wales the lamb export market has increased by almost 20% on last year and its now worth around £133 million. Polly Procter visits Myrrdin Davies on his farm in North Wales and finds out that it's an invigorated industry.

Farming Today was presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


THU 06:00 Today (b01mwx62)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01mwx64)
The Ontological Argument

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Ontological Argument. In the eleventh century St Anselm of Canterbury proposed that it was possible to prove the existence of God using reason alone. His argument was ridiculed by some of his contemporaries, but was analysed and improved by later thinkers including Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz. Other philosophers have been less kind, with the Enlightenment thinker David Hume offering one possible refutation. But the debate continued, fuelled by interventions from such heavyweights as Immanuel Kant and Kurt Gödel; and it remains one of the most discussed problems in philosophy.

With:

John Haldane
Professor of Philosophy at the University of St Andrews

Peter Millican
Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford

Clare Carlisle
Lecturer in Philosophy of Religion at King's College London

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01mvy0h)
Rupert Everett - Vanished Years

Episode 4

As a writer, the actor Rupert Everett has been compared to David Niven, Noel Coward and Lord Byron: wickedly observant, very British and extremely funny. And his new memoir Vanished Years gives full rein to those powers as Everett writes about the travails of a precarious career - fighting for good roles, effortlessly glamorous at parties.

Everett found fame in Britain with Another Country and Dance with a Stranger, and acclaim in Hollywood with My Best Friend's Wedding. But we meet him in the twilight world of a film finished but not released - and he's not confident it will restore his fortunes. However, at one of the many glamorous parties he attends, Everett has a flash of inspiration: to write Mr Ambassador - an American TV sitcom starring, of course, Rupert Everett in the title role.

And so begins an adventure in Hollywood, diving into the cut throat world of the networks and the pilot episode, where dreams and fortunes can be made or broken.

In episode four of his memoir, Rupert finds Mr Ambassador's path to success is paved with elephant traps.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment Limited production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01mwx66)
Rochdale Safeguarding Children Board Review

Report into Rochdale sexual grooming case - reaction to the Safeguarding Children Board review. Fashion and technology in tights. Why are women reluctant to air their views in mixed groups - we talk to Anita Anand about why she wants more women calling Any Answers? Letting go when children leave home for university or to work away from home - how should parents prepare?
Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Louise Corley.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mwx68)
Feminine Forever

Episode 4

by Caroline & David Stafford

Set in the 1970s, against a background of increasingly politicised feminism, a comedy series about women, HRT and the joys of growing old disgracefully.

4 of 5

Judy has some disquieting news for her parents.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b01mwxkl)
A gun-toting poet and the Vegas blues

Justin Rowlatt visits Las Vegas and learns why America's casino capital has suffered more than most from the economic crisis.

Daniel Nasaw's been learning how the battles of the American Civil War have helped to shape the debate in the current US presidential campaign.

Will Ross has been finding out that many of the rules surrounding adoption are ignored in Nigeria. He's been investigating reports that young girls have been forced to hand over their babies for adoption.

Sarah Birke, reporting from the border between Syria and Turkey, meets a rebel commander who says he'd rather write poetry than go to war.

Gideon Long's been to the remote island in the South Pacific which was the inspiration for Daniel Defoe's castaway classic Robinson Crusoe.


THU 11:30 Big Shot (b01mwxkn)
There was a time when the pop manager was universally understood within the music industry as the father figure holding sway over his stable of artists. A sort of benevolent "Big Shot". There is little doubt the rules of the game have changed as the music industry adjusts to downloads, TV talent shows, social networking and a 24 hour media.

In this programme, we explore the changing role of the music manager with a variety of industry Big Shots. Paul Loasby manages David Gilmour and Jools Holland, and he still thinks a good gimmick can get an artist noticed if handled well. Managers David Enthoven and Tim Clark used to work with King Crimson and Free, but these days they keep a keen eye on the interests of singer Robbie Williams and would like to see the return of a bit more outrage as typified by the punk era.

The programme also looks at the world of Simon Cowell and his TV shows with comment from his former boss Richard Griffiths, now managing One Direction and Leona Lewis.

Writer and broadcaster Paul Morley brings his own brand of insight and sanity as he still believes that the manager plays a vital role in delivering something special to the music hungry fan. But how well are they being served? Is what is on offer appetizing enough? If it is so tasty why are sales so poor?

Produced by John Sugar
A Sugar production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01mwxkq)
NHS Branding, whisky biofuel, and can a collagen drink hold back aging?

The NHS is advertising for a Head of Branding with a salary of £97,000. Is this a good use of public money?

A new collagen drink promises to keep you looking young. But does the science add up?

The government's plans to put public services online by 2015 could prevent 5.4million older people - over half of all people aged 65 or above - from accessing vital services such as their state pension. We join a group of older people learning how to get online and ask them what sorts of issues they face.

We hear about plans to create biofuel from whisky waste products.

And what's important to shoppers when they buy food?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Rebecca Moore.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01mtqg8)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01mwxks)
National and international news with Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Deborah Bull's Dance Nation (b01mwxkv)
Dancing to Our Own Beat

Dancer, writer and broadcaster Deborah Bull, looks at the rise of dancing on one's own and in ways that draw on our most basic rhythms and instincts.

From the explosion of the twist in the early 1960s, through ska and reggae, to street dance today, Deborah considers how many of the dances which have invited us to "dance to our own beat" have come from Africa and the Caribbean. Along the way she learns some of the key ingredients of traditional African dance, evident in so many of our most popular dances.

Producer: Hannah Rosenfelder
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01mwvky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01mwxkx)
Sally Griffiths - Clean Slate

A gripping drama about missing memories and recapturing the past by Sally Griffiths. Ellen Maynard has no recollection of who she used to be following a freak accident. Her husband, Anthony, is determined to win back the woman he loves, whatever the cost.

Starring Amelia Bullmore (Scott and Bailey and Twenty Twelve) as Ellen and Jamie Glover (Noises Off) as Anthony.

Directed by Gemma Jenkins

The writer
Filming has just finished on Sally's second script for the TV series, Midsomer Murders, which she co-wrote with her screenwriting partner, Rachel Cuperman. Their first Midsomer script, Sacred Trust, was broadcast last year. Sally's debut radio play, Haunted, which aired in January 2011, garnered excellent reviews and has been nominated for the prestigious Imison Award.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b01mwzwb)
Series 22

Taxidermists in Boston Spa, West Yorkshire

In this series Clare Balding is going on wildlife walks around the UK.

Today Clare meets taxidermists and life long friends Dave Astley, Mike Gadd and James Dickinson. They follow Mike's daily route along the river Wharfe in West Yorkshire to observe the rich variety of local animals, insects and birds.

Taxidermists might not be the first people who spring to mind when you think about wildlife-lovers. However, the intimate knowledge of the anatomy and behaviour of birds and animals that a successful taxidermist needs, can only be developed through detailed observation of the natural world. So for a taxidermist a walk can become a valuable research trip.

Dave, James and Mike are three of the UK's leading taxidermists. They have worked with exotic animals, repaired museum specimens of extinct creatures and worked with international British Fine artists. They've even created mythical beasts.

Over 20 years the trio have worked and walked together. Clare joins them to find out more about their close and unusual friendship.

Clare accompanies them along the banks of the river to find out about their techniques and the motivation behind their trade. Is it macabre as many might think? On the walk they share their unique insights into viewing the natural world. They seek out kingfishers, wrens and fritillary butterflies.

They share stories from behind the scenes of Britain's thriving, but little known world of taxidermy. They also discuss the profession which they feel is still misunderstood.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01mtshj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b01mwzwd)
BBC International Short Story Award 2012

Before He Left the Family, by Carrie Tiffany

The next of the ten shortlisted short stories in contention for the BBC International Short Story Award 2012. In Before He Left the Family by Carrie Tiffany a teenager struggles with divided loyalties and some confusion about sex.

The BBC Short Story Award is well established as one of the most prestigious for a single short story. The Award is celebrating the Olympic year by going global, and for one year only it reflects the richness and versatility of the short story internationally, with a shortlist of ten rather than the usual five. The winner and the runner-up will be announced live on Front Row on Tuesday, 2nd October. The story will be available as a free download following broadcast.

Read by Gabriel Andrews
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01mwzwg)
This week Francine Stock meets with Kylie Minogue to discuss her transformation in to a French New Wave starlet in Leos Carax's Holy Motors.

Joseph Gordon Levitt describes his preparation for playing the young Bruce Willis in Looper, a film that travels forward (and back) sampling previous sci-fi thrillers.

Tahar Rahim, star of A Prophet and Free Men, discusses Arab stereotyping on the big screen.

And, Neil Brand is behind the piano to look at the trick of referencing and recycling classic scores in contemporary film.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01mwzwj)
The Gravity Fields festival aims to celebrate the legacy of the town's most famous son, Sir Isaac Newton. For eight days the town will be home to talks, exhibitions, science and arts shows, actors and processions. Quentin talks to some of the scientists taking part. Also on the programme the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Silent Spring" the book that launched the environmental movement, and how the Sumatran earthquake in April may be responsible for quakes all over the planet.


THU 17:00 PM (b01mwzwm)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01mtqgb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b01mx27b)
Series 2

Episode 3

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda and Family Guy, records a second series of his hit sketch show.

The first series was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. It featured Winnie the Pooh coming to terms with his abusive relationship with honey, how The Archers sounds to people who don't listen to the Archers and how Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde decided whose turn it was to do the washing up.

This episode doesn't feature any of those things, but it does feature a sketch about messengers, a sketch about the history of alchemy and a sketch... Sketch? "Sketch"? Sorry, you know when you repeat a word so often it starts to go weird? "Sketch". Sketch! Ssssssketch. That's got it, better now. Anyway, there's a sketch about that.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme is written by and stars John Finnemore. It also features Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan. It is produced by Ed Morrish.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01mx27d)
Ed has come in for breakfast. He suggests to Emma that they have a lie-in after his birthday night out but she's not sure whether they have enough money for drinks. They agree that Ed should go out on his own but not tell anyone about their money problems.

Mike and Vicky are also worried about how they'll manage financially when she finishes work but Mike says they'll cope. Mike decides to take on Harry's the milk round permanently to support them.

Keira's making a birthday card for Ed while Emma hangs out the washing. Ruth appears and Emma stops herself from asking for more money.

Jamie helps Mike with felling trees. Mike is impressed with Jamie's knowledge. He asks about college but Jamie's not very enthusiastic about his studies.

Will takes George to The Bull to treat him to a meal. Eddie greets them and explains that he's there to escape from Joe and his false teeth. He's lost his regular set and keeps taking out the uncomfortable spare one. George asks what food Will can afford and reveals that Emma and Ed have been arguing about money.

Will is angry with Ed and Emma for not being careful with money. Eddie defends them saying that George never goes without. But Will is concerned they're not providing properly for his son.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01mx27g)
Front Row - J K Rowling

J K Rowling discusses the inspiration for her new novel The Casual Vacancy, her first book for adult readers, in a wide-ranging conversation with Mark Lawson. She considers her use of strong language and adult themes, and also reflects on her role in the Olympic opening ceremony, her global success with Harry Potter, and whether she will ever return to her most famous character.

Producer Erin Riley.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mwx68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01mx27j)
Annecy Killings

With police still trying to establish a clear motive for the shooting of a British family and a cyclist in the French Alps, Simon Cox asks whether the murders will ever be solved.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01mx27l)
Products

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

If business is about anything, it's about products. Evan's guests come from companies that invent them, manufacture them and sell them and they each tell the story of a product that has shaped the fortunes of their business in some way.

They also discuss the art of dismissal. How easy should it be to fire an employee?

In the studio are Sir George Buckley, former Chief Executive of 3M, the US company behind the Post-it Note and Scotch Tape, and now Chairman of private equity firm Arle Capital; Clara Gaymard, Chief Executive of the French arm of US company General Electric; Ian Cheshire, Chief Executive of home improvement retailer Kingfisher, whose brands include B&Q and Screwfix.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Innes Bowen.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b01mw2dg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01mwx64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01mtqgd)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01mx27n)
Will Spain's prime minister Mariano Rajoy delivers a tough austerity budget but is it too little to late? Charlotte Ashton reports on NHS public health reforms six months after the passing of the Health & Social Care Bill; and the latest on UK floods, with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01mx27q)
Rose Tremain - Merivel: A Man of His Time

Episode 9

Rose Tremain returns triumphantly to one of her best loved characters, in the long awaited sequel to her Booker short-listed best-selling novel, Restoration, published in 1989.

Seventeen years after the events related in Restoration, Merivel, a man of wit, wisdom and not a little passion, is facing a crisis. Older and perhaps a little wiser, with his daughter on the brink of adulthood and his dearest friends ageing too, life on his Norfolk estate is no longer sufficiently satisfying. How to reinvigorate his life and find new purpose?

In today's episode: With Margaret lost to the Court and the death of Clarendon the Bear, Merivel needs new purpose - he determines to rekindle a friendship.

The reader is the stage and screen actor Nicholas Woodeson.
The abridger was Sally Marmion and the producer was Di Speirs.


THU 23:00 Two Episodes of Mash (b01mx27s)
Series 2

Episode 4

Diane, Joe and David have to do 30 minutes of community service as punishment for their crimes against radio.

You can see an animation of their Fishing Sketch by Tom Rourke on the 4 Extra website.

A mix of silly, surreal sketches and banter with Diane Morgan, David O'Doherty, Joe Wilkinson, Paul Harry Allen, Bobbie Pryor, Gary Newman and Aled Jones.

Producer: Clair Wordsworth.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012.


THU 23:30 The Philosopher's Arms (b01m5jkl)
Series 2

Morality and the Law

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink.

Each week presenter Matthew Sweet takes a puzzle with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, John Stuart Mill and Wittgenstein. All recorded in a pub with an audience, who'll have their own contributions to make - but whose assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Propping up the bar this year will be philosophers such as Julian Baggini and Nigel Warburton, and academic experts on memory, the law, art and computers. We'll be meeting bald men, a woman who used to be a man, and a woman who can't remember being a girl. Plus music from The Drifters - a far more philosophical group than you'd ever imagine.
This programme is a repeat
Producer: David Edmonds
Editor: Jeremy Skeet.



FRIDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01mtqhf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01mvy0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqhh)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01mtqhk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01mtqhm)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01mtqhp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01n2m4j)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Dr Ed Kessler, Director of the Woolf Institute for Abrahamic Faiths, Cambridge.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01mx2sc)
New EU rules on how animals are slaughtered in abattoirs will be introduced next year but they won't be as strict as the existing regulations in the UK. Charlotte Smith talks to the Welsh Environment Minister, John Griffiths who says it is important that current high animal welfare standards are not diluted.

Months of wet weather have dealt a double blow to Scottish oilseed rape farmers. This year's yield is down by as much as 50% in some areas and poorer quality means some of the crop will not be as valuable.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Rich Ward.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01mx2sf)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01mtshs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01myxxx)
Rupert Everett - Vanished Years

Episode 5

As a writer, the actor Rupert Everett has been compared to David Niven, Noel Coward and Lord Byron: wickedly observant, very British and extremely funny. And his new memoir Vanished Years gives full rein to those powers as Everett writes about the travails of a precarious career - fighting for good roles, effortlessly glamorous at parties.

Everett found fame in Britain with Another Country and Dance with a Stranger, and acclaim in Hollywood with My Best Friend's Wedding. But we meet him in the twilight world of a film finished but not released - and he's not confident it will restore his fortunes. However, at one of the many glamorous parties he attends, Everett has a flash of inspiration: to write Mr Ambassador - an American TV sitcom starring, of course, Rupert Everett in the title role.

And so begins an adventure in Hollywood, diving into the cut throat world of the networks and the pilot episode, where dreams and fortunes can be made or broken.

In the final episode of his memoir, Rupert Everett's Mr Ambassador is filmed - at last. In front of a live audience. What could possibly go wrong?

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment Limited production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01mx2sh)
Having a good argument, care of terminally ill teenagers, Dame Kathleen Ollerenshaw

A new film "Now is Good" has just been released. It is about a girl who is dying of leukaemia and how she deals with facing death and yet is determined to live her remaining life to the full. In reality, another seventeen girl from Swansea is seriously ill with an undiagnosed illness, she has been in and out of a hospice, discussed the prospect of death with her friends and has her own bucket list of dreams that she wants to fulfil. She speaks to Jenni about her experiences.

On October 1st, Kathleen Ollerenshaw, the acclaimed mathematician who was also a keen politician, celebrates her 100th birthday. We hear her speaking in an earlier interview to Jenni about her life.

And we'll be arguing about arguing. Is a bit of arguing essential for maintaining a healthy relationship between couples or should they be able to maintain a strong relationship without the odd heated debate?

Presented by Jenni Murray.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mx2sk)
Feminine Forever

Episode 5

by Caroline & David Stafford.

Set in the 1970s, against a background of increasingly politicised feminism, a comedy series about women, HRT and the joys of growing old disgracefully Last in the series

5 of 5

Directed by Marc Beeby.


FRI 11:00 The Reluctant Lama (b01mx2sm)
The extraordinary story of Osel Hita Torres, the Spanish boy who was chosen by the Dalai Lama as the living reincarnation of a great Buddhist lama, or teacher. Jolyon Jenkins goes to meet him in Ibiza, where he now lives, having turned his back on his epic destiny.

In 1987, when he was just two years old, Osel Hita Torres was whisked from his family home in Granada and moved to a monastery in southern India. He had a strange childhood, dressed in a yellow hat, seated on a throne with grown men worshipping him and watching his every move as he grew up. He was separated from his parents and his brothers and sisters for many years.

But at the age of 18 Osel decided to leave the monastery, and cut his ties with Buddhism. He went to high school, and later to film school in Madrid. His defection caused a sensation. He is now 27, and living quietly in Ibiza near his mother Maria. She is a committed Buddhist who still believes that her son is a reincarnation and that it was right to send him to the monastery. Osel has now decided to get involved in Buddhism again, and continue his studies, although he refuses to call himself a lama. Despite his years in the monastery, he is very much a westerner. To his followers, however, he's still known as Lama Osel, and every word he utters is considered to be imbued with wisdom. They want him to return and lead them.

Producer: Beth O'Dea

Music featured in the programme - Yang Chen Ma by Ludo Ji, from the CD Organic Nasha.


FRI 11:30 Gloomsbury (b01mx2sp)
Series 1

The Trials of Attempting an Elopement

A stellar cast of Miriam Margolyes, Alison Steadman, Nigel Planer, Morwenna Banks, Jonathan Coy and John Sessions breathes life into the colourfully chaotic characters of Gloomsbury, a riotous comedy about the Bloomsbury Group.

The six-part series from the pen of Sue Limb is an affectionate send up of the infamous literary group whose arty and adulterous adventures dominated the cultural scene in the early 20th century.

The series follows the fortunes of Vera Sackcloth-Vest (Margolyes) - writer, gardener and transvestite - and her urge to escape from the tranquillity of her rather cramped little castle in Kent which she shares with her doting but ambiguous husband Henry (Coy), who is 'something in the Foreign Office'. Vera's heart is forever surging with exotic passion for Ginny Fox (Steadman), a highly-strung novelist who adores her, or the beautiful but shallow Venus Traduces (Banks).

As the scene shifts from Kent to London, and Cornwall to Monaco, this close-knit coterie is divided by misunderstandings, jealousies and rows.

In episode one, Vera longs to elope to Mediterranean sunshine with one of her bosom chums. But her first choice, Ginny, is stubbornly impervious to adventure and Venus Traduces is fully booked for elopements until next April. Will Vera run off instead with the perky waitress at Lyons' Corner house? Meanwhile, what is Vera's husband Henry up to as telegrams fly between him and Archie Pinkerton-Poker at the Foreign Office?

Produced by Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01mx2sr)
Ticketless trains and Birmingham-to-Kashmir buses

A look at the state of local banking in the UK - last year the four biggest banks closed 178 branches between them.

The announcement of plans for a brand new bus route, a 12 day journey direct from Birmingham to Kashmir. The Kashmiri Transport Minister explains why it's a good idea.

Plus, ticketless trains are on the Government's agenda. Will they save you money or just allow train companies to close manned offices?

Presenter: Peter White.
Producer: John Neal.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01mtqhr)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01mx2st)
National and international news with Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Deborah Bull's Dance Nation (b01mx2sw)
Dance Yourself Cheerful

Dancer, writer and broadcaster Deborah Bull looks at moments when dance has been a vital part of the national expression of resilience or, at the very least, an opportunity for escape.

We hear how, during the Second World War, men and women all over Britain turned garrisons, factories and air raid shelters into dance halls, taking up novelty dances like the Siegfried Line Dance, the Blackout Stroll and the Gas Mask Dance. And we discover how the arrival of the GIs, along with the jive, taught the nation a new way to dance.

After trying some jive herself, Deborah looks at Northern soul, punk and acid house as responses to the harsh economic realities and urban decline of the 1970s and 80s.

And what about now? Deborah asks what effect today's hard times might turn out to have on the way we dance.

Producer: Hannah Rosenfelder
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01mx27d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01mx2sy)
Colin Hough - Hard Boiled Eggs and Nuts

by Colin Hough.

Glasgow 1906. Theatre manager Arthur Jefferson is training his sixteen year old son in all aspects of front-of-house. But young Stanley hankers for a life on the stage. His father, a former actor, knows of the perils and is vehemently against his son following in his footsteps. The boy has an ally, however, in his mother Madge. Stanley secretly secures a spot at rival theatre, the Panopticon. His first professional job is not an immediate success and the notoriously rough crowd are initially hostile towards the boy. What he doesn't know is that his father is in the front row and by the time he exits the stage, the career of comedy legend Stan Laurel has been born.

Stan's song was composed by Eoin Millar and the pianist was David McGuinness

Producer/Director ..... Gaynor Macfarlane.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01mx2t0)
Ashton-under-Lyne

Gardeners' Question Time returns to its Northern roots, in the first of a three-part North of England Tour. This week, the team is at the Broadoak Hotel, at the same venue where the first GQT episode was recorded in 1947.

Here Bob Flowerdew, Bunny Guinness and Paul Peacock tackle the audience's gardening queries. In addition, Eric Robson remembers the GQT panellist Bill Sowebutts, born in Ashton-Under-Lyne.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

Questions answered in the programme:
Q. Why has it taken two local monkey puzzle trees so long to produce fruit? Are they true fruit or a nut?
A. They are nuts. Monkey puzzles have both male and female trees, so both must be present for pollination. They are also very large trees, which could explain why they take a long time to come to fruit.

Q. How do you know when to pick green jalapeno chili peppers?
A. It depends upon the variety. Find out what size your particular variety should be and use that as a guide. Jalapenos should be about 4 inches long, although low light and warmth this summer may have affected growth. You can keep them on the plant and pick them when you need.

Q. The leaves on my Victoria plum tree all have tiny holes in them. What is doing this and how can I discourage it without affecting next year's crop?
A. The damage may have been done by slug worms or caterpillars. However, this may be the result of shot hole caused by a bacterial canker. Give the tree food and water (if needed) to improve its health.

Q. Can the panel advise on saving seeds for next year? Should they be left on the plant or picked and dried?
A. Generally let the seeds dry off on the plant, then pick them and put them into a brown paper bag. You can cut the plants and hang them to dry with the seeds still attached. Take care to avoid any humidity or the seeds will rot.

Q. [1947 Question] How deep do plants and flowers need to be dug in? In areas with a lot of ground water, the trenches can flood. Is there another way of digging in plants and vegetables?
A. [2012 Answer] Raised beds are a good way of improving drainage and keeping the beds warmer.
A. [1947 Answer] Long parsnips and carrots may need to be dug in deeper, but other vegetables do not need to be as deep. Try and run trenches into a sump or neighbour's garden.

Q. My cherry tree blossoms every year and fruits, but the fruits drop off the tree when they are still small and green. Why is this happening?
A. They may not be being pollinated. A Morello is one of the best pollinating partners for most cherries and may help. Alternatively, a dose of lime may aid stone production.

Q. Should I take the flower heads off my Hydrangea stems now or should they be left over winter?
A. If we have a cold winter, the dead flower heads can protect the buds, but a wet winter can cause the flower heads to go mouldy. The panel advise to leave them unless they start to look very wet.

Q. The roots of a silver birch tree have started lifting up flagstones and breaking up tarmac. Is removal of the tree and its roots the only option?
A. A hard prune may result in associated die-back of the root system, but if the damage is already being done it suggests the root system is already of such a size that the problem will persist. The tree does probably need to be removed entirely.

Q. Fourteen years ago I planted a Wisteria, but as yet it has not flowered. How can we encourage this?
A. If a plant is growing happily, it may delay flowering. Shortening the long shoots in August and then in winter can help, as can potash or woodash.


FRI 15:35 BBC National Short Story Award (b01mx2t2)
BBC International Short Story Award 2012

The iHole, by Julian Gough

The next of the ten shortlisted short stories up for the BBC International Short Story Award 2012. The iHole is Julian Gough's satirical tale about contemporary desires for the latest must have gadgets and technical innovations.

The BBC Short Story Award is well established as one of the most prestigious for a single short story. The Award is celebrating the Olympic year by going global, and for one year only it reflects the richness and versatility of the short story internationally, with a shortlist of ten rather than the usual five. The winner and the runner-up will be announced live on Front Row on Tuesday, 2nd October. The story will be available as a free download following broadcast.

Read by Andrew Scott
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01mx2t4)
Andy Williams, Charlie Richardson, Gertrude Hughes, Herbert Lom and Eva Figes

Matthew Bannister on

Andy Williams - the crooner who sold millions of records. His friend Sir Michael Parkinson pays tribute.

East End gangster Charlie Richardson who was convicted in the so-called "torture trial" and ended up on the same prison landing as his great rivals the Kray twins.

Gertrude Hughes, the Methodist missionary who set up a polio hospital in China and an orphanage in India,

The actor Herbert Lom, best known as Inspector Clouseau's increasingly lunatic boss in the Pink Panther films

And the feminist writer and novelist Eva Figes.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01mx2t6)
Is an apology really an apology if you keep repeating the original offence? No it isn't, say many Feedback listeners. After security correspondent Frank Gardner told the Today programme about remarks made to him by the Queen, the BBC has apologised for a breach of confidence. But in this week's Feedback, listeners explain why they feel that by reporting the story, the BBC is in fact repeating the mistake.

Many, if not most listeners find it hard to hear a programme if speech is competing with music. So do producers really appreciate this fact when using music in programmes? Roger Bolton talks to Victoria Shepherd, producer of the series A History of the Future, about the thinking behind her use of music.
And Operation Drop Out is resurrected after a flurry of technical problems plague the networks. Radio 2 explains why programmes disappeared off air for over a minute, and Radio 4 goes one better with multiple glitches plaguing a recent edition of Any Questions. Feedback talks to the plucky announcer who kept the show on the road.

And is Ed Stourton "a plonker"? After mispronouncing the name of the Scottish town Banchory in a recent edition of Profile, many of its inhabitants think he might be. Do you know how to pronounce it?

Presented by Roger Bolton

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01mx2t8)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01mtqht)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b01mx2tb)
Series 78

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. Panellists are Jeremy Hardy, Francis Wheen, Andy Hamilton and Bob Mills.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01mx2td)
In Paris, Lilian is fretting about the office but Matt insists that this trip is all about pleasure.

Christine asks Jim how his talk with Lynda about Borsetshire Life went. Jim has been put off the idea. Christine cleverly plays on his ego. It's for the best because the magazine doesn't suit him, she says.

Rhys and Fallon are listening to a playlist she made. They share a laugh about their night out and Rhys's DVD collection. Fallon mentions that she's going to audition for the Christmas play. Rhys tells her that he's going back to Wales for a family wedding anniversary and Fallon wants to make him a playlist for the journey.

Jim is shocked to find Joe's teeth at the bar. Joe's grateful to have them back and asks Jim what Much Ado About Nothing is about. Jim explains. He thinks an adaptation of Dickens would be better, but they both agree that Lynda would never change her mind.

Matt takes Lilian to a restaurant and tells her that the holiday is his way of saying he loves her. He hopes she has forgiven him for the situation with Darrell and the Walters. Lilian has and suggests that they go straight back to the hotel.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01mx2tg)
The Thick of It, Cerys Matthews, Lucy Liu in Elementary

With Kirsty Lang

The plot lines from the BBC political comedy The Thick of It - school breakfast club closures, texting in cabinet meetings and the launch of a community bank - have been an uncannily accurate reflection of recent announcements from our real-life politicians. Kirsty Lang talks to Sean Gray and Ian Martin, both writers on The Thick of It, and wonders if they have been gazing into a crystal ball or have a mole in Westminster.

Singer Cerys Matthews gives the verdict on a new Country Music album which celebrates the women who were pioneers in a field previously dominated by men. Matthews, who has lived in Nashville, assesses the influence of artists such as Kitty Wells, Dolly Parton and Tammy Wynette.

The adventures of Sherlock Holmes are set to hit our screens again, this time in the US-produced series Elementary. It comes hot on the heels of Guy Ritchie's films and the BBC TV series Sherlock. Boyd Hilton discusses this latest version, starring Jonny Lee Miller as Sherlock Holmes and Lucy Liu as his sidekick Dr. Watson.

New Yorker cartoonist Chris Ware discusses his non-linear graphic novel, Building Stories. It comes in the form of a big box containing 14 separate strands of narrative, in different shapes and sizes, which when pieced together in a random order build a picture of a New York Brownstone building and the psychological landscape of its inhabitants.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01mx2sk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01mx2tj)
St Catherine's Primary School, Bletchingley

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from St. Catherine's Primary School, Bletchingley, Surrey with the Minister for Business and Enterprise, Michael Fallon, the Shadow Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, Sadiq Khan, the Director-General of the National Trust, Fiona Reynolds and the Deputy Leader of the House of Commons, Liberal Democrat MP Tom Brake.

Producer: Isobel Eaton.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01mx2tl)
Mouthing Off

"For moneyed Americans", writes Sarah Dunant "perfect dentistry is a matter of course". For Europeans- and she counts herself within that number - the situation is rather different!

Sarah takes a sideways look at teeth through the ages...and dentistry in times of austerity.

And for those whose chief loathing is a mouthful of shining American teeth, she offers hope. "Yaeba", the latest craze to hit Japan where young fashonista girls are getting their teeth cosmetically altered to appear more crooked!

Producer Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b0144pw7)
John Godber - September in the Rain

Jack and Liz are in Blackpool for one last time. John Godber's classic stage play tells the touching and funny story of a marriage through a lifetime of holidays together.

Directed by Toby Swift

John Godber is one of the country's most successful and prolific playwrights. Famously he was identified as the third most performed playwright in the UK after Shakespeare and Alan Ayckbourn. September in the Rain, written very early in his career, dates from 1983 and drew heavily on his grandparents' relationship. A play for two actors, it was originally performed by the author and his now wife, Jane. They resume their partnership for this radio production many years after last performing it together.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01mtqhw)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01mx2w8)
Fierce fighting in Syria - we speak to Turkey's foreign minister.

Labour delegates demand concrete policies as party prepares for conference.

And a special report from Venezuela, where elections test Chavez's promises to the poor.

With Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01mx2wb)
Rose Tremain - Merivel: A Man of His Time

Episode 10

Rose Tremain returns triumphantly to one of her best loved characters, in the long awaited sequel to her Booker short-listed best-selling novel, Restoration, published in 1989.

Seventeen years after the events related in Restoration, Merivel, a man of wit, wisdom and not a little passion, is facing a crisis. Older and perhaps a little wiser, with his daughter on the brink of adulthood and his dearest friends ageing too, life on his Norfolk estate is no longer sufficiently satisfying. How to reinvigorate his life and find new purpose?

In today's episode: Sir Robert sets out for Switzerland, and has a lusty encounter on the road to what may prove true love and enlightenment.

The reader is the stage and screen actor Nicholas Woodeson.
The abridger was Sally Marmion and the producer was Di Speirs.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b01mw358)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 The Philosopher's Arms (b0150pj1)
Series 1

Moral Disgust

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms. A place where moral dilemmas, philosophical ideas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink. Matthew Sweet presents with a live audience.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01mvy0m)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01mvy0m)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01mw2dd)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01mw2dd)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01mw5r5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01mw5r5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01mwx68)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01mwx68)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01mx2sk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01mx2sk)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01mqr5s)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01mx2tl)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01mqmyw)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01mw15s)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01mtr3d)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01mqr5q)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01mx2tj)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01mtr8p)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 MON (b01mw08q)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 TUE (b01mw2dx)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 WED (b01mwvkp)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 THU (b01mwzwd)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:35 FRI (b01mx2t2)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01mtsh8)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01mtsh8)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b01mw08s)

Big Shot 11:30 THU (b01mwxkn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01mw1kw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01mw5j8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01mwvlb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01mx27q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01mx2wb)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01mqr4m)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01mxvcn)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01mxvcn)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01mxvlf)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01mxvlf)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01mxtqn)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01mxtqn)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01mvy0h)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01mvy0h)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01myxxx)

Bringing Up Britain 22:15 SAT (b01mqq78)

Bringing Up Britain 20:00 WED (b01mwvl2)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01mtshn)

China's New Iron Rice Bowl 17:00 SUN (b01mqpgt)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01mnqms)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01mtsm3)

Clayton Grange 23:00 TUE (b01mw5jb)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01mwvl6)

Deborah Bull's Dance Nation 13:45 MON (b01mvzll)

Deborah Bull's Dance Nation 13:45 TUE (b01mw2dq)

Deborah Bull's Dance Nation 13:45 WED (b01mwvkk)

Deborah Bull's Dance Nation 13:45 THU (b01mwxkv)

Deborah Bull's Dance Nation 13:45 FRI (b01mx2sw)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01mtshs)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01mtshs)

Don't Log Off 23:00 MON (b01jxrmt)

Don't Start 23:00 WED (b01mwvld)

Drama 14:15 MON (b01mw08j)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01mw2ds)

Drama 14:15 WED (b010dq74)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01mwxkx)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01mx2sy)

Everyone Quite Likes Justin 11:30 MON (b01mvzft)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 WED (b01llcp6)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01mtr30)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01mvy09)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01mw2d2)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01mw5qx)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01mwx60)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01mx2sc)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01mqr5d)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01mx2t6)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01mw5j0)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01mwvl4)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01mtr38)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b01mwxkl)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01mw091)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01mw5hw)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01mwvl0)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01mx27g)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01mx2tg)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01mqr56)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01mx2t0)

Gay on the Inside 11:00 WED (b01mxtsf)

Gloomsbury 11:30 FRI (b01mx2sp)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b01mw358)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b01mw358)

I've Never Seen Star Wars 19:15 SUN (b015p8sr)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01mwx64)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01mwx64)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01mw5j2)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01mw5j4)

Ireland's Troublesome Priests 13:30 SUN (b01mtslz)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 THU (b01mx27b)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01mqmsb)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b01mw08x)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01mqr5b)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01mx2t4)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01mtr6w)

Lost in the Lanes 00:30 SUN (b01mtsh6)

Luck Be a Lady Tonight 20:00 MON (b01mqmyt)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01mqq9x)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01mwzwj)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01mnpjv)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01mtq83)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01mtq9y)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01mtqc9)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01mtqdn)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01mtqfy)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01mtqhf)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01mw5r1)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01mw5r1)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01mwvkm)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01mtr3b)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01mtr3b)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01mnpk3)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01mtq8c)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01mtqb6)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01mtqck)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01mtqdx)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01mtqg6)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01mtqhp)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01mtq8f)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01mnpk5)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01mtq8k)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01mtq8p)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01mnpkp)

News 13:00 SAT (b01mnpkf)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01mtshd)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b01mw2d8)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01mtstx)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01mtr3j)

PM 17:00 MON (b01mw08v)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01mw35b)

PM 17:00 WED (b01mwvkt)

PM 17:00 THU (b01mwzwm)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01mx2t8)

Party 18:30 WED (b01mwvkw)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01mtsw2)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01mnqmx)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b01mtstz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01mqr97)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01mvy07)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01n2m4n)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01n2m4d)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01n2m4g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01n2m4j)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b01mtr8k)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01mtr8k)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01mtr8k)

Punt PI 10:30 SAT (b01mtr36)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01mtshj)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01mtshj)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01mtshj)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b01mqq9q)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b01mwzwb)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b01mqmm1)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b01mw08l)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01bh91t)

Saturday Drama 21:00 FRI (b0144pw7)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01mtr34)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01mtr8m)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b01mw2dg)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b01mw2dg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01mnpjz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01mtq87)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01mtqb2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01mtqcf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01mtqds)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01mtqg2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01mtqhk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01mnpjx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01mnpk1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01mnpkh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01mtq85)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01mtq89)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01mtq8t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01mtqb0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01mtqb4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01mtqcc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01mtqch)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01mtqdq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01mtqdv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01mtqg0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01mtqg4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01mtqhh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01mtqhm)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b01mw2dv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01mnpkm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01mtq8y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01mtqbd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01mtqcp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01mtqf1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01mtqgb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01mtqht)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01mtshb)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01mtshb)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b01mw2dj)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01mvy0f)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01mvy0f)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01mtshl)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01mtshg)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01mtshq)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01mtsw4)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01mtsw4)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01mw08z)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01mw08z)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01mw35g)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01mw35g)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01mwvky)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01mwvky)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01mx27d)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01mx27d)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01mx2td)

The Barlow-Morgenstern Method 16:00 MON (b01j2bmn)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01mqqb9)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01mx27l)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01mqq9v)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01mwzwg)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01mtslv)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b01myzyy)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b01mw2d6)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b01mw2d6)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01mwvkr)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b01mqr5j)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b01mx2tb)

The Philosopher's Arms 23:30 MON (b01lhgw8)

The Philosopher's Arms 23:30 TUE (b01lsyrh)

The Philosopher's Arms 23:30 WED (b01m0phv)

The Philosopher's Arms 23:30 THU (b01m5jkl)

The Philosopher's Arms 23:30 FRI (b0150pj1)

The Reluctant Lama 11:00 FRI (b01mx2sm)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01mx27j)

The Secret World 18:30 TUE (b01mw35d)

The Spanish Ambassador's Suitcase: Stories from the Diplomatic Bag 11:00 MON (b01mvzfr)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01mtslx)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01mw1kt)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01mw5j6)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01mwvl8)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01mx27n)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01mx2w8)

Things We Forgot to Remember 16:00 TUE (b00fz8fb)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01mqq6w)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01mzmz3)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01mtr32)

Today 06:00 MON (b01mvy0c)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01mw2d4)

Today 06:00 WED (b01mw5qz)

Today 06:00 THU (b01mwx62)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01mx2sf)

Two Episodes of Mash 23:00 THU (b01mx27s)

Warhorses of Letters 23:15 WED (b01nccjb)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01mnpk7)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01mnpk9)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01mnpkc)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01mnpkk)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01mtq8h)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01mtq8m)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01mtq8r)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01mtq8w)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01mtqb8)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01mtqbb)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01mtqbg)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01mtqcm)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01mtqcr)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01mtqdz)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01mtqf3)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01mtqg8)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01mtqgd)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01mtqhr)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01mtqhw)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01mtt0z)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01mtt11)

Where Were You... 19:45 SUN (b01mtt0x)

Witness 14:45 SUN (b01mtsm1)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01mtr3g)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01mvy0k)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01mw2db)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01mw5r3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01mwx66)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01mx2sh)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01mvzlj)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01mw2dn)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01mwvkh)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01mwxks)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01mx2st)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01mvzfw)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01mw2dl)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01mwvkf)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01mwxkq)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01mx2sr)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01mqr99)