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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 25 AUGUST 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01m19r9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m451j)
Daniel Tammet - Thinking in Numbers

The Art of Maths

Written by Daniel Tammet.
Read by James Anthony Pearson.

Daniel Tammet's essay, taken from his new collection, explores how beauty and creativity inform the work of mathematicians.

Daniel Tammet is hailed the world over for his unique intelligence shaped by high-functioning autistic savant syndrome. His idiosyncratic world view provides new perspectives on the universal questions of what it is to be human and how we make meaning in our lives.

Abridged and produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m19rc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m19rh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m19rk)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01m19rm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m19xj)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4 from Wales with the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01m19xl)
A listener who was once shot tells us why he thinks British gun control laws are too tough; we hear why listening to The Archers is like watching "endless newsreels of war zones"; and Nicholas Parsons reads Your News.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01m19rp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01m19rr)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01m1837)
Gwent Levels

Helen Mark explores the Gwent Levels, an extensive low lying area on the north side of the Severn Estuary in South Wales registered as a Historic Landscape of Outstanding Interest. The area has a rich archaelogical past and tell a fascinating story of the recent social history of Wales and the battle between man and river, as well as being home to Magor Marsh, the last fenland on the Levels.

Helen meets Kevin Dupe, Reserve Manager of the Newport Wetlands to find out how the Reserve fits into the history of the area and Chris Hurn who gives Helen a sense of the interaction between man and wildlife, a sense of change, and an idea of the friendships had on the Levels. Artist, Jill Hobbs, tells Helen how she uses her love of this landscape to create her own representations of it and Helen also climbs the tower at Redwick Church with Rick Turner for a birds eye view of this landscape. Archaeologist, Nigel Nayling, gives Helen a sense of the ancient history of the area and gamekeeper, Paul Cawley explains the importance of conservation for such an important area.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Elizabeth Pearson.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01m473q)
Farming Today This Week

Take British fruit, sugar, and lemon juice. Boil, and get a multimillion pound industry. More than 185,000 tonnes of jam and preserves are made from British fruit, at a value of £355 million per year. Caz Graham visits a Staffordshire farm where jam making is part of the diversification strategy. Plus, we a blackcurrant grower who's cashing in on the vogue for artisan jam, and we find out how jam making keeps the cultivation of some rare fruit alive.

Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01m19rt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01m47d9)
Morning news and current affairs presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01m47f0)
Neil Oliver, Anne Marie Ward, Spitfire pilots, face blindness, Emma Thompson's Inheritance Tracks

Sian Williams & John McCarthy with archaeologist and broadcaster Neil Oliver; Anthony Weir tells the story of his failed attempt to live with a pygmy tribe; open-water swimmer Anne Marie Ward reveals her plans to swim the Bering Straits; Alison describes her experience of living with face-blindness; Jackie Palmer explains why she loves the sound of a telephone exchange; a group of former Spitfire pilots share their wartime memories, and actress Emma Thompson shares her Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 In Praise of the Lido (b01m47q3)
The lapping of warm water...the giggle of childish laughter...the squelch of sun lotion and splash! - a sweltering city-dweller cools off in his favourite summer oasis, the lido!

To the strains of 'Lido Shuffle', Stephen Smith is dipping his toe in the waters of this great national institution, alas now in jeopardy.

On a morning swim, comedian Arthur Smith confides, "These will be the early ones - the ones who actually have swum two miles before they've even had a croissant". "Unthinkable", Arthur laughs.

Lidos were dreamt up in the 30s as a poor man's Riviera: the rich were going to the South of France for the summer, but on a good day at the Lido, you could almost believe that you were on the Croisette at Cannes rather than Tooting Bec; that it was caviar in your hand rather than a bloater paste sandwich.

In their heyday, thousands would turn out for the entertainment there....the early beauty contests brought people in their droves. Design guru and lido lizard, Stephen Bayley, says this country had never seen anything like it. "We regard them with fastidious distaste nowadays but they must have been unbelievably exciting in 1957".

John Ling - now in his 70s - remembers it well. He grew up in Ipswich near the Broomhill lido. "The air was electric", he tells Steve. He was a lifeguard at the lido, dated at the lido, and when he got married bought a house just opposite the lido!

The pools were nearly killed off by the advent of the package holiday in the 1960s and 70s, which meant that ordinary people could finally go to the real Med for themselves; suddenly, the lido looked very homespun and even naff. But many have survived and have a devoted following.

Former Labour spin doctor, Alastair Campbell, is one of those devotees. He confesses he found time to go to his local lido in Parliament Hill during his number 10 days....and that he made phone calls from the pool.
"Who to?" Steve asks. "If I told you I'd have to kill you!" Campbell teases.

We hear of the routine of a lido....the man who will only put his clothes in one cubicle - the no 10. He's been doing it for years. "I don't know how it happened...it's an even number thing", he laughs.

"I'm slightly obsessive compulsive about stroke counting" says another.

It's all in the life of a lido....

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b01m47x8)
Memory

Exploring the mysterious realm of memory, Bridget Kendall discusses with her three guests how and why memories are formed, and what impact they have.

Dorothy Bohm is one of Britain's most important documentary photographers of the twentieth century. Now aged 88, she sees her photos as a way of capturing time and holding it.

So what is memory? Raymond Tallis is a professor of geriatric medicine and a former researcher in clinical neuroscience, who now writes about science from a philosophical point of view. He says that memory is a profoundly mysterious experience and it is impossible to give a neurological account of how memories are formed.

The Russian-born writer and broadcaster Zinovy Zinik contributes some memories of his own, including his experience of unravelling his family history, which formed the backbone of his most recent book, "History Thieves".


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01m47xb)
Kate Adie hosts correspondents around the world as they tell their stories.

Mark Lobel attends a memorial service for the South African miners killed by police while striking for better pay and working conditions.

Mike Thompson is 'embedded' with the army in the West African Republic of Mali. Can it win back the north of the country from Islamist militants?

David Willey recalls his first visit to Beijing nearly fifty years ago - an extraordinary trip where he saw Chairman Mao and briefly met the last Emperor of China.

As Italians enjoy the last few days of their annual August break at the seaside Dany Mitzman reflects on the contradictory charms of the Riviera Romagnola.


SAT 12:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01m47xd)
What Next for the Big Banks?

Big British banks are now widely accused of damaging the economy by failing to support their customers.

In the final programme in this series, Michael Robinson asks what went wrong with Britain's banks and assesses what the future holds for the industry in the wake of the rate-fixing scandal.

ProducerPhillip Kemp

Presenter Michael Robinson.


SAT 12:30 Chain Reaction (b01m19nz)
Series 8

Tim Minchin talks to Caitlin Moran

Comedian and musician Tim Minchin is not well but still has a great time putting the world to rights in his attempt to interview journalist and author, Caitlin Moran, despite having no questions and no voice.

The talk tag show where the guest is the next interviewer.

Producer: Carl Cooper

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01m19rw)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01m19ry)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01m19p5)
Greenbelt Festival, Cheltenham Racecourse

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a panel discussion of news and politics from the Greenbelt Festival, Cheltenham Racecourse with writer and human rights activist, Joan Smith; police historian and former Chief Constable of Gloucestershire, Timothy Brain; author and commentator, James Delingpole; and Rector of St James's Piccadilly, The Revd Lucy Winkett.

Producer: Kirsten Lass.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01m48vw)
Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The topics discussed on Any Questions? were: Anders Breivik, Prince Harry and The Sun newspaper, GCSEs, rape and assisted dying. The Questions included:

Is there anything we can learn from the way Norwegian society and the Norwegian justice system have handled the aftermath of last year's massacre?

Was the Sun newspaper courageous, stupid or merely pragmatic to publish naked pictures of Prince Harry when the internet means we have no more secrets?

Is it fair that my sister's GCSEs were marked with higher grade boundaries this year than mine were?

In the light of the Tony Nicklinson case and today's news in Mr L's case, who is best qualified to make life and death decisions for others, or should decisions be avoided altogether?

Should I be grateful that George Galloway and Todd Aitken have clarified what actually constitutes rape?

Producer: Anna Bailey.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00csq07)
These Are the Times

Age of Reason

The second and final part of Trevor Griffiths' two-part life of Thomas Paine, These are the Times.

In Part 2, Age of Reason, Paine is again embroiled in a revolutionary situation. This time it's in France, where the struggle and outcome are totally different from his American experience.

All his high hopes for change, and his work for a new Constitution and the rule of Law are swept away by the Terror. He is attacked as a dangerous influence in England, imprisoned in France and makes it back to America - but to an unexpected reception.

Music by John Tams

Director: Clive Brill
Producer: Ann Scott
A Greenpoint production in association with Richard Attenborough for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01m495b)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Post-Natal Psychosis

Post-natal psychosis with Jo Lyall who was diagonsed after the birth of her second son and Alain Gregoire, consultant in peri-natal psychiatry at Winchester Mother and Baby Unit; interview with Victoria Vardy who was abandoned by her mother as a baby; interview with Nina Bawden, who died this week, recorded in 1994; discussion with Dr James Boys and Jay Kleinberg on why Ayn Rand has become the darling of America's political right; listeners' feedback on infidelity; interview with writer Naomi Alderman on her new book, The Liar's Gospel; interview with food writer Anna del Conte on summer Italian food. Presented by Jane Garvey.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01m495d)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news with Ritula Shah.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b01m19xl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01m19s0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01m19s2)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m19s4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01m499v)
Seth MacFarlane, Delilah, Nikki Bedi, Dom Joly, Adil Ray and Amy Shindler

Nikki chats to Family Guy and masterful crooner, Seth MacFarlane; the multi-talented comedy writer and performer who is not only singing with the John Wilson Orchestra at the Proms on August 27th but also has a new album out on the same day - 'Music is Better Than Words'. But is it? Nikki finds out.

The Loose Ends studio steams up with the writer and actress, Amy Shindler. Perhaps most well-known to Radio 4 listeners for her role as Brenda Tucker in 'The Archers', Amy is also a co-author of a spin-off of 'Fifty Shades of Grey' - 'Fifty Shelves of Grey' - a brilliantly funny collection of literary classics, artfully condensed and erotically remastered. 'Jane Eyre' will never be the same again...

Jon is introduced to the comedian and presenter, Adil Ray, otherwise known as Mr Khan - the self-appointed Muslim community leader and star of a new BBC One sitcom, 'Citizen Khan'. Set in the capital of British Pakistan, Sparkhill, Birmingham, the series follows the trials and tribulations of Mr Khan and his long-suffering family. The first episode is broadcast on Monday 27th August at 10.20pm.

Does the Abominable Snowman really exist? Nikki meets comedian turned professional Monster Hunter, Dom Joly, to talk about his new book 'Scary Monsters and Super Creeps', the product of months of outlandish expeditions across the globe in search of such elusive creatures as the Hibagon in Japan and the Ogopogo in Canada.

With music from the trip-hop inspired soulful pop princess, Delilah, who sings her new single 'Shades of Grey' from her Top 5 debut album 'From The Roots Up'.

And five-piece London folk-rock group 'Dry The River' perform 'Bible Belt' from their recently released debut album 'Shallow Bed'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:02 Profile (b01m499x)
Lee Pearson

If nine-times gold medal winner Lee Pearson adds a further three golds to his collection at the London 2012 Paralympics, he could surpass the modern era record haul of 11.

Dressage champion Pearson was born with a condition called arthrogryposis which twisted his limbs.

He won a Children of Courage medal in 1980 aged six, with Margaret Thatcher insisting on carrying him up the stairs of number 10.

An outspoken character on various issues, including the levels of funding in disabled sport and the recognition that goes with it, Pearson has a 100% record in his field, having won gold in every event at every Games he has ever competed in.

So what drives him? And how will he cope with the pressure knowing that if he continues his winning streak in London in the coming weeks, he will be one of the most successful Paralympians in history?

Presenter: Gerry Northam
Producer: Kate O'Hara.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01m49cd)
Bidisha and her guests actor Kerry Shale and writers Natalie Haynes and Paul Morley review the week's cultural highlights including Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan.

Serena Frome is the narrator of Ian McEwan's new novel. A Cambridge graduate recruited by MI5 in the early 70s, her first assignment beyond lowly paper-pushing involves the covert funding of anti-Communist writers. Her target is Tom Haley - an English graduate and aspiring writer working at Sussex University - but her interest in him becomes more than just professional.

Soul Sister is a musical that features the songs of Ike and Tina Turner and tells the story of the couple's tempestuous relationship on and off stage. Emi Wokoma plays the role of Tina and Chris Tummings is Ike in the production which has just opened at the Savoy Theatre in London.

The Nigerian film industry - also known as Nollywood - is still comparatively young and typified by small budgets and fairly basic production values, but director Mahmood Ali Balogun has tried to raise its standards with his family drama Tango With Me. Genevieve Nnaji and Joseph Benjamin play Lola and Uzo who seem like the perfect couple until a shocking act of violence on their wedding night darkens their lives and threatens their marriage.

Walking is an installation on the Norfolk coast by the avant garde American director and playwright Robert Wilson, or - more precisely - three installations along a three mile stretch of coast near Holkham between which visitors walk at a snail's pace dictated by 'angels' in yellow ponchos.

Danish director Birger Larsen has worked on Nordic noir hits Wallander, The Killing and Those Who Kill. Now he has come to Nottingham to shoot Robert Jones's crime drama Murder for BBC2. Karla Crome stars as Coleen - a young woman who shares a flat with her sister Erin. One night Stefan (Joe Dempsie) comes to the flat and by the end of the evening Erin has been murdered. But Coleen and Stefan's accounts of what happened are very much at odds with each other.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01m49vh)
Your Starter for Ten: 50 Years of University Challenge

Fifty years after episode one was shown on ITV, the geek fest that is University Challenge has not only survived but also flourished.

In this Archive on 4, former Radio 4 controller now Master of St Peter's college Oxford, Mark Damazer, pays tribute to his favourite quiz.

Delving into its history he uncovers a programme that began against the backdrop of a shake up in Britain's university system and came from the entrepreneurial spirit of Manchester's Granada studios.

Mark meets former contestants like Gail Trimble, Sean Blanchflower and Luke Pitcher who have all won the coveted University Challenge title. Through personal anecdotes from the archives from Bamber Gascoigne and in a new interview with Jeremy Paxman, Mark discovers how competing students have, across the decades, delighted its hosts.

Mark Thompson and ITV's John Whiston debate how University Challenge works as piece of television and why it has endured for half a century.

The show has ever been controversial. In a protest about Oxbridge being allowed to enter so many college teams, Manchester University, which included future broadcaster David Aaronovitch, answered most of the questions with silly answers. David tells Mark why he regretted taking his place on the team. Quentin Smith, now a lawyer, was the man behind the Manchester University controversy and tells his version of the story for the first time.

There are also plenty of starters for ten: What sort of brain do you need to be good at it? Has it got deliberately easier or harder? And how do you put together the best team? Answers will be revealed in this loving homage to one of Britain's most admired television shows.

Produced by: Jo Meek
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01m0f2b)
Thomas Mann - Buddenbrooks

Episode 2

Dramatised by Judith Adams with original music by Nico Muhly.

Michael Maloney, Barbara Flynn. Joseph Millson and Clare Corbett star in this story of an old Hanseatic merchant family fighting to keep their commercial supremacy in the changing world of 1840s Europe.

Four generations of Buddenbrooks try to sustain their inheritance - a once highly successful trading company in the port of Lubeck on the Baltic Sea - in a world where the old ways no longer seem to work. It's 1848, and the revolutionary tide running through Europe has finally reached Lubeck. Will the old merchant families hold on to power? Of the Buddenbrook children, only Tom remains to learn the business. Toni is in Hamburg married to Herr Grunlich, and Christian has gone to England but would rather be in Valparaiso.

Harmonium and Flute by Rick Juckes
Technical Presentation by David Fleming Williams

Directed by Chris Wallis
An Autolycus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01m19s6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Education Debates (b01m1721)
Episode 1

In the first of three debates to mark the most dramatic reforms in education in decades, John Humphrys asks leading education thinkers what we should teach.

Whether it's to get to university, to launch a fulfilling career, or to be a useful member of society, what our children learn at school today will profoundly shape their lives, the society we live in and the health of our economy in the 21st Century.

The web gives today's schoolchildren access to previously unimaginable amounts of knowledge - and yet across Europe there has been social unrest among young people who are angry and terrified that what they know will be meaningless in a future with no jobs.

At home, Government reforms have led to big changes in the national curriculum, increased university fees and parents running their own schools.

Has there ever been a more important time to come back to the fundamental questions of education? In this first programme, leading educationalists including Anthony Seldon, Estelle Morris and Rachel Wolf debate what we should teach.

In programme two, John Humphrys asks a panel including union leader Mary Bousted and cognitive scientist Prof Guy Claxton.

And in the final debate, Schools Minister Nick Gibb, Shadow Education Secretary Stephen Twigg, local schools champion Melissa Benn and Prof James Tooley, an expert on private schools for poor children, discuss who should teach.

Produced by Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b01m0lgj)
Another edition of the 48th series of Quote... Unquote, the popular quotations programme presented and devised by Nigel Rees. The guests this week are author Louise Doughty, writer and broadcaster Natalie Haynes, newsreader Nicholas Owen and columnist Hugo Rifkind. The reader is Peter Jefferson.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


SAT 23:30 The Seafarer (b01m0f2g)
'There I heard nothing but the roaring sea
and ice-cold wave

At times birdsong was my only comfort
gannet's cackle and curlew's cry'

The Seafarer is one of the oldest poems in the English language, yet it still has power over our imaginations. Poet Simon Armitage immerses himself in its watery landscape to discover why it still holds us in its grip.

Last year, The Seafarer was brought to life in the bowels of the Royal Festival Hall. Here in this eerie, ship-like space, cellist Oliver Coates (artist-in-residence at the Southbank Centre), director/designer Netia Jones and sound designer David Shepherd created an extraordinary setting for the poem. Visitors were invited below decks to experience The Seafarer through sound, film and the words of a new translation by Amy Kate Riach.

This programme offers a chance to hear the translation once again - dramatically rendered by the actor Kenneth Cranham. Accompanied by sound effects and music from The Seafarer installation, the poem is delivered orally just as it would have been by the poet (or poets) who first fashioned it.

It's hard to be sure how Anglo-Saxon poets would have worked, but Simon Armitage speaks to academics (Professor North and Eric Lacey of University College London; Dr Jennifer Neville of Royal Holloway) and writer Kevin Crossley-Holland to find out what we know of the poets of this period.

It's likely that The Seafarer was composed by an early Christian poet (its second half is strongly Christian in tone), but the poem is remarkable for its ability to speak to readers who do not share the poet's faith. The programme explores the universal draw of one of the first sea poems in our island's literature.

Producer: Isabel Sutton
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 26 AUGUST 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01m464m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Robin Black - If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This (b00sm5bj)
If I Loved You

'If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This' is the debut collection by US author Robin Black, whose work has drawn comparisons with that of Lorrie Moore and Alice Munroe. This week's selection of stories of loss, love and redemption chart the very everyday lives of suburban American families with wisdom, humour and humanity.

A woman struggles to make sense of the insensitivities of a new neighbour, while she tries to come to terms with her own, very imminent demise.

Robin Black's stories and essays have appeared in numerous US magazines and newspapers, where she has also won several awards, but this is her first published collection. She is currently teaching creative writing at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania, and lives with her family in Philadelphia.

Reader: Debora Weston
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m464p)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m464r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m464t)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01m464w)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01m4bty)
The bells of St.Mary's Church, Lymm, Cheshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01m499x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:02 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01m464y)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01m4bvq)
Intimations of Mortality

Death is a subject we are often reluctant to discuss. It is often considered morbid to do so. It has commonly been described as the last taboo. However, some argue that a sense of our own mortality plays a vital part in our understanding of life. Further, that demystifying the process of death can be essential to getting the most out of life.

Mark Tully considers the advantages of being open to the intimations of mortality which we may come across daily.

In conversation with Baroness Rabbi Julia Neuberger he discusses attitudes to risk, memento mori and living legacies. With readings from Virginia Woolf, Kabir and music by Nitin Sawnhay and Gustav Mahler, he asks whether being open to intimations of mortality can bring more to life.

The readers are Helen Ryan and Kenneth Cranham.

Produced by: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01m4bvs)
Orchid Meadow has one of the biggest milking sheep flocks in the UK, near Shaftesbury in Dorset.

Sarah Swadling meets John Ryrie, the shepherd who runs the farm, and Crispin Tweddell, who owns it. Crispin's day job is running a private equity firm which has backed businesses like the Pitcher and Piano bar chain and the clothing company Boden.

Sarah finds out what led him to start farming, and why he chose sheep milking rather than a more mainstream enterprise. John has also made a career switch,swapping Scotland and a job with the pharmaceutical company behind Dolly the Sheep for about a thousand organic Friesland ewes.

This programme is presented and produced by Sarah Swadling.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01m4650)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01m4652)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01m4bwc)
With a search for God throwing up nearly two billion internet hits, this special edition of Sunday explores the impact of the internet on religion.

Trevor Barnes turns virtual religious tourist as he explores the digital world in search of God.

From Tweeting to computer gaming, we hear how the internet and technology is transforming the tradition church service.

Kevin Bocquet reports on the transformative effect of the internet on the Muslim world.

And how is morality defined and shaped in the globally vast and digitally distant world of cyberspace?

To debate some of these issues William Crawley is joined by the 'Digitalnun', Sister Catherine Wybourne, the blogging Bishop, Alan Wilson and Vicky Beeching whose award winning blog ponders the line between spirituality, philosophy and technology.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01m4bwf)
Dementia UK

Jim Broadbent presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Dementia UK
Reg Charity: 1039404
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Dementia UK.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01m4654)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01m4656)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01m4c1p)
Perspectives of Paradise

As thousands gather at Cheltenham Racecourse for the annual creative celebration and exploration of faith, ethics and the arts, this service reflects on three biblical perspectives of paradise through the very distinct atmosphere of the Greenbelt Bank Holiday weekend.
With Brian Draper of the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity, Paula Gooder, Canon Theologian of Birmingham and Guildford Cathedrals, the Rev Dr Kate Coleman, Chair of the Evangelical Alliance Council, the Rev Richard Coles, and performance poet El Gruer.
Music directors: Ewan King and Peter Gunstone. Producer: Simon Vivian.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01m19p7)
The trouble with 'freedom'

"We like to tell ourselves an uplifting story in which freedom expands whenever tyranny is overthrown" writes John Gray. "We believe that...when a dictator is toppled the result is not only a more accountable type of government but also greater liberty throughout society".

But Gray believes otherwise. Using the nineteenth century liberal John Stuart Mill and his god-son Bertrand Russell, he advances his argument that liberty is one thing, democracy another.

"The reality" he says "is that when a tyrant is toppled we can't know what will come next".

Producer:
Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01m4c1r)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week, presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01m4c1t)
Writer ..... Simon Frith
Director ..... Jenny Stephens
Editors ..... John Yorke & Vanessa Whitburn

David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Kathy Perks ..... Hedli Niklaus
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Mike Tucker ..... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Brenda Tucker ..... Amy Shindler
Wayne Foley ..... Ian Brooker
Rhys Williams ..... Scott Arthur
Tracy Horrobin ..... Susie Riddell
Midwife ..... Stephanie Racine
Darrell Makepeace ..... Dan Hagley
Rosa Makepeace ..... Anna Piper
Arthur Walters ..... David Hargreaves
Joyce Walter ..... Ann Beach.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b01m4c1w)
Ugandan Asians

Sue MacGregor gathers together a group of Asians who were forced to flee from Uganda by Idi Amin in 1972.

Manzoor Moghal was a businessman and a prominent member of the Asian community when he was forced to leave; Tahera Aanchawan was training to become a physiotherapist; Councillor Ravi Govindia, now leader of Wandsworth Council, was completing his A levels; Chandrika Joshi, now a dentist, was 14 years old when her family were expelled; and the writer and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown was a young student at the time.

Asians had first arrived in Uganda in the late 19th century under British colonial rule. They prospered in trade, business and the professions and, by 1972, they were at the centre of the Ugandan economy. But when Amin came to power he declared they were "bloodsuckers." He claimed he'd had a dream in which God had ordered him to expel all the Asians from Uganda. He stated Britain should take responsibility for any Asian with British citizenship and gave them 90 days to leave.

As the Asians made urgent plans, stories emerged of looting and attacks by Amin's army. Houses and shops were abandoned. Each family was allowed to take just £50 in cash and two suitcases with them.

British Prime Minister Edward Heath agreed Britain should accept all those with British passports. A resettlement board was set up to help the Asians find accommodation, but many faced hostility from those supporting Enoch Powell's anti-immigration campaign. Despite often high levels of education, they were forced to take whatever work they could find. Many took factory jobs and others started their own businesses but, in the next few years, the Ugandan Asians changed the face of urban Britain.

Producer: Sarah Cuddon
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01m0lgq)
Series 64

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons challenges Paul Merton, Gyles Brandreth, Janey Godley and Hannibal Buress to speak for 60 seconds. From 2012.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01m4c33)
A Guide to Spice, part 2: Vanilla

Do you know how vanilla beans are hand pollinated? Do you know why harvested vanilla pods are wrapped in hot blankets?

Sheila Dillon reveals all as she continues her exploration of the modern spice world by looking at vanilla.

Reporter Vanessa Kimbell travels to Uganda to meet Lulu Sturdy, a British furniture designer who inherited a run down estate in Uganda, and within a decade has turned it into an influential source of quality vanilla beans. She follows this year's harvest and hears the incredible effort involved during the careful processing of the pods.

Chef Jeremy Lee and Niki Segnit, author of The Flavour Thesaurus provide a guide to flavour combinations and cooking techniques with vanilla.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01m4658)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01m4c3r)
What policy measures can turn around the UK economy? Lord Howard, Lord McFall and John Pugh discuss proposals from the economist Jonathan Portes, glass manufacturer Barbara Beadman and venture capitalist Jon Moulton. Presented by Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b01m4c77)
Margaret Maughan

When Margaret Maughan won Britain's first-ever gold medal in the Paralympics, there was no crowd, no podium, and almost no Margaret! They had to drag her off the coach going back to the rudimentary Olympic village. As no one was keeping the score in the archery competition, she had no idea she'd won, let alone the fact that there was a ceremony.

The incident was typical of the first Paralympics which took place in Rome in nineteen sixty. Paralympic villages these days are fully wheelchair accessible, each athlete has an assistant to help with any special needs, and athletes can get advice about anything from diet to the very latest equipment. In Margaret's first games the accommodation was on stilts, and they had to be carried in and out by soldiers. Undignified it might have been, but Margaret didn't seem to mind! It was typical of the times, and in No Triumph, No Tragedy, Margaret, now eighty-five, tells her story with the laconic acceptance of her generation.

It had been typical of her treatment since a road accident in Malawi only a year earlier left her paralysed and in a wheelchair. After being flown home, she was taken to Stoke Mandeville Hospital, then more or less just a row of huts, though offering what was at the time the most sophisticated treatment around for those with spinal injuries. It was run by Ludwig Guttmann, who Margaret clearly greatly admired, even though he ran the place a bit like an army camp. Discipline was tough; trips to the local pub which got out of hand were greeted with a firm dressing-down, and threats that you might have to leave.

He would put up with no feeling sorry for yourself, and it was Guttman who decreed that sport was therapy, and turned what began as sports days into the start of an international phenomenon--the Paralympics. A few hundred competitors went to the first games: now it's around four thousand. Then, hardly anyone noticed them go; now, there are hour upon hour of television coverage. Then, they begged time off work, if they were lucky enough to have a job; now people like Oscar Pistorius and our own Tanni Gray Thompson are household names.

But Margaret's story shows how these rudimentary games were symptomatic of attitudes back in the fifties and sixties. She might have got a gold medal in Rome, but when they put her on the train back to her home town in Preston, she and her wheelchair had to travel in the guard's van. Although she was a qualified teacher, it was assumed that no way could she control a class: she was offered a job stamping cards; there were no benefits, and no anti-discrimination legislation; but Margaret Maughan wonders on the programme whether present generations had the same get up and go as she and her friends. She's delighted that the Paralympics is now a major international festival, but she speculates whether some of the camaraderie has been lost along the way.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01m19nn)
South Devon

Peter Gibbs and the GQT team tackle gardening questions in South Devon. The panellists are Anne Swithinbank, Matthew Wilson and Bunny Guinness. In addition, Toby Buckland goes in search of miniature plants at Babbacombe Model Village, whilst Anne Swithinbank goes in search of the largest Torbay Palm.

Q1. Are there any organic treatments for bindweed, I have tried careful digging.
Try covering area with black polythene to draw the weed up.

Q2. My Weeping Fig houseplant has been dropping its leaves for several months. Does it need feeding?
It may be a question of sunlight. Weeping Figs do not like unidirectional light, so try revolving the plant once in a while. Also, keep away from dry, winter air.

Q3. Can mycorrhizal fungi benefit plants other than roses?

Q4. Lately, why are we suffering with so many plant problems eg latest Fuchsia Gall mite? Are we not controlling plant imports properly?

Q5. Help, my Bleeding Heart plant is dying!
No need to worry! It's dying back as it should, at the end of the season.

Q6. I have three blueberry plants in pots in a greenhouse with no fruit. Why?
Blueberries prefer being outdoors, They need a winter chilling and acidic soil.

Q7. There are so many plant feeds on the market. Is it fine to use a general, all-purpose feed or should I use specific feeds?
You may not need a feed at all. The majority ornamental plants don't need feeding. Edible crops will need feeding or soil enrichment.

Q8. My wife is apparently trying to murder my favourite squeeze - a lemon and an orange tree. They have been taken out the greenhouse and are shedding leaves. Should they even be outside?

The lemon tree should survive in outdoors in a sheltered, South Devon garden.
The orange will rely on a getting a decent summer, but would be better off in a greenhouse.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b01m4c8y)
The Suicide of Yukio Mishima

Yukio Mishima, the celebrated Japanese author, killed himself in very public circumstances in Tokyo in 1970.
Henry Scott Stokes was working as a foreign correspondent in Japan at the time and knew the great writer well. He remembers the day of Mishima's death, and his long-standing interest in ritual suicide.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01m4c90)
Thomas Mann - Buddenbrooks

Episode 3

The final part of Thomas Mann's Nobel Prize winning story of a 19th Century merchant family struggling to keep pace with changing times. J Thomas and Gerda's son Hanno shows no aptitude for business, but may make a great musician.

Dramatised by Judith Adams with original music by Nico Muhly.

Technical presentation by David Fleming Williams

Produced and directed by Chris Wallis
An Autolycus Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01m4c92)
Dreda Say Mitchell presents a special on Tartan Noir

Open Book goes north of the border to explore Tartan Noir - the new generation of Scottish crime writers who continue to dominate the literary scene.
Glasgow based author Denise Mina joins Edinburgh writer and publisher Allan Guthrie to discuss the importance of place in this increasingly popular genre, while Stuart MacBride, writer of the DS Logan McRae books, takes us on a tour of his inspirational Aberdeen setting.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01m5d2r)
Roger McGough challenges the notion that 'Happiness writes white' as he begins a new series with a cheering selection of poetry.
There are poems celebrating a sense of freedom in summertime by Elizabeth Jennings and Robert Frost. There's a delicate poem by Norman MacCaig about the beauty of rain and a selection of poems about weddings including a moving and joyful one that Ted Hughes wrote about the day he married Sylvia Plath. With Plath in her pink woollen knitted dress and Hughes beside her in his thrice dyed corduroy jacket, he talks of being subjected to a strange tense: that of the spellbound future.
Even poets not known for their cheeriness, Emily Dickinson and Charles Bukowski have happiness pouring out of them.
There are also poems about the joys of gardens by Kipling and the ancient Chinese poet Po Chu-i, and a beautiful Ethiopian tribal love poem.
The readers are Pippa Haywood, Patrick Romer and Harry Livingstone.
Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 The Future Is Halal (b01m0pq2)
You've heard of halal meat, but what about halal paintbrushes, halal perfume or halal holiday resorts?

A recent report by The Economist proclaimed to businesses: ignore the Sharia-conscious consumer at your peril. The global Muslim population is now 1.8 billion and rising fast; it's predicted that Muslims will account for 30% of the world's population by 2025. More than half are under 25 and many are tech-savvy, brand-conscious and increasingly flexing their consumer muscle. In response, there's been an explosion of goods and services aimed at Muslims.

While Britain has been slow to wake up to this new consumer trend, other countries are already reaping the economic rewards of serving Muslim needs. Malaysia has become the leader in halal certification and in promoting the global halal industry. Each year Kuala Lumpur hosts World Halal Week, bringing together a remarkable array of Islamic scholars, scientists, producers of halal products and services and big multinational companies. Malaysia is also home to the first international university to teach Islamic finance.

There are many concerns about how to ensure credible halal certification. Nonetheless, this new drive to meet Muslim consumer demand beyond halal food is bringing together religion and business in an unprecedented way - and giving Islam a new identity in the 21st century.

But is this burgeoning international industry simply driven by the desire for business profit or is it really supporting Muslim values? And how far will these halal products and services cross-over to non-Muslim consumers? Navid Akhtar investigates.

Producer Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01m499x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:02 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01m465b)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01m465d)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m465g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01m5d8b)
Some fascinating facts on BBC radio this week: The pop star Rihanna will only be truly empowered when she buys herself a ' nice cardigan', ballet music might be more enjoyable without the er, ballet. Halal isn't just meat, it's a holiday, and when pop and classical music collide it forms an unholy alliance. Join Miriam O'Reilly for her Pick of the Week.

Rock n Roll in Four Movements - Radio 4
Twenty Minutes - Ballet and Musicians - Radio 3
Book of the Week - Thinking in Numbers - Radio 4
Archive on Four - Your Starter for Ten - 50 Years of University Challenge - Radio 4
The Alien Birds Have Landed - Radio 4
Political Animals - Radio 4
The Future is Halal - Radio 4
Outlook - World Service
Chain Reaction - Radio 4
Fry's English Delight - Radio 4
Stevenson in Love - Radio 4
What's the Point of Pubs? - Radio 4.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01m5d8d)
Freddie's very excited at the Stables fun day. He does well in the clear round competition, and even Lily has to admit he's a natural. Elizabeth remarks that Shula must be proud of Daniel, doing so well on Topper. She knows it means a lot to the twins to see their father's horse in action.

Shula's worrying about Bunty and Reg, her dead husband's parents. She's struggling to care for them since Bunty's fall, and can't persuade them to move somewhere more appropriate. Elizabeth tentatively offers to help, but Shula says she can manage.

Mike and Vicky are anxiously awaiting the results of the amniocentesis. At lunch with Roy and Hayley the atmosphere's strained. Vicky's keen to start clearing out Mike's study in readiness for nursery conversion, but Mike's reluctant and irritable. Hayley tries to smooth the waters and offers a helping hand for whenever they're ready. Roy seizes on the fact that Mike must be tired being a roundsman down. Mike's happy to go along with this as an excuse for his mood.

Later Roy reassures Hayley it was nothing they'd done. It's likely that Mike and Vicky are still adjusting to the baby. Roy doesn't think they could really expect anything else.


SUN 19:15 Tonight (b01m183t)
Edinburgh Special

Rory Bremner and the team return for a one-off episode of Tonight, coming from the Ed Fringe festival. It's the topical satire show that digs that bit deeper into national, international and, for this episode, particularly Scottish politics. Rory's mantra is that it's as important to make sense out of things as it is to make fun of them. In this Braveheart of satirical comedy shows, Rory Bremner leads the charge, with satirist Nick Doody, guest comedian Susan Morrison and impressionist Lewis MacLeod bringing up the rear. Veteran satirist and Tonight performer Andy Zaltzman also plays his part, but from the safety of his holiday in France.

This is half an hour of stand-up, sketches, and investigative satire. And at the core of the show is Rory's interview with Joyce McMillan of The Scotsman and Iain MacWhirter of The Herald, two of the most informed guest commentators on the Scottish political scene. More global crises, more political scandal, more brilliant impressions...and some devolution thrown in: a shot in the arm for satire lovers everywhere.

Presenter: Rory Bremner
Producers: Simon Jacobs & Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Comic Fringes (b01m5ddy)
Series 8

'Sorry for Your Loss'

Recorded live last week in front of an audience at this year's Edinburgh Fringe Festival, James Acaster is the second of three literary comedians specially commissioned by BBC Radio 4 to write and perform their own short stories.

Coming up next week: a story by Mark Watson.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01m19nv)
Do you know which Hitchcock film features a scene set at the very top of the statue of Liberty? No? Well, according to several listeners the producers of Radio 4's landmark series The New Elizabethans don't either. Listeners think they have spotted a clutch of factual inaccuracies in the series.

In the first of the new series of Feedback, Roger asks the editor Andrew Smith if they are right. He also discusses the reservations of one listener who actually featured in the series, the New Elizabethan Professor Stuart Hall.

How is the BBC performing in the marathon that is this summer of sport? In the brief lull between the Olympics and Paralympic Games we hear your verdict on the coverage. And why were listeners abroad unable to hear many Radio 4 programmes when the Games began?

Plus the latest instalment of Operation Drop Out, and Feedback wants to have its very own jingle. All musical (and non-musical) styles accepted. Please send us your magnum opuses. Or should that be magna opera?

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Produced by Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01m19ns)
Nina Bawden, Tony Scott, Eileen Beasley and Scott McKenzie

Matthew Bannister on

The writer Nina Bawden, author of Carrie's War, The Peppermint Pig and many other acclaimed books for children and adults. Michael Morpurgo pays tribute.

The movie director Tony Scott, best known for action thrillers like Top Gun, Crimson Tide and Man on Fire.

The campaigner Eileen Beasley who refused to pay her rates until the bill was printed in the Welsh language. She was taken to court fourteen times and had her furniture confiscated.

And the singer Scott McKenzie who, in the sixties, urged us all to go to San Francisco with flowers in our hair.


SUN 21:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01m47xd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01m4bwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b01m183p)
Join the Crowd

Short of cash to start a business? Instead of going to the bank for a loan, asking for cash from friends or family, or meeting with venture capitalists, how about asking hundreds or thousands of strangers on the internet to buy your product or a share in your company?
It's called crowdfunding, and it's a strategy that was first adopted by filmmakers and musicians. Now more and more businesses are using crowdfunding websites to raise capital.
Peter Day meets some of the businesses turning to this innovative form of fundraising as well as some of the founders of high-tech companies matching up entrepreneurs with investors.
He also finds out more about the potential risks and asks whether crowdfunding will remain a niche business tool or an idea that will transform the way entrepreneurs raise money.
Producer: Mike Wendling
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01m5dj1)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01m5dj3)
Episode 118

Dennis Sewell of The Spectator analyses how the papers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01m1839)
Matthew Sweet meets with director James Marsh to discuss his IRA drama Shadow Dancer, starring Clive Owen and Andrea Riseborough.

Northern Ireland correspondent for the Independent newspaper David Mckittrick looks at the portrayal of the IRA on film.

Mark Gatiss continues his selection of biopics - this week, Carey Grant as Cole Porter in Night and Day.

Director Bart Layton on his compelling drama-doc The Imposter, which tells the story of a Frenchman who convinces a Texan family he is their son who has been missing for several years.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01m4bvq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 27 AUGUST 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01m466f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01m171n)
Italian Family 1: Milan

Italy, home to the Pope and the Holy See, perhaps the most Catholic of all countries, is undergoing a peculiarly un-Catholic crisis; it now has one of the lowest birth rates in the world. There are so few children being born that if the current trend persists, traditional Italians are at risk of dying out in just a handful of generations. How can the nation famed for Romanticism, for enormous affectionate families, for Mamma Mia and for an enviable certainty that all you need is good food, good wine and your family around you, be the same nation that no longer gives birth? Laurie travels to Milan to unpick the tangled interactions between the individual, the family, the church and the state and discovers why Italians are delaying parenthood and in many cases rejecting having a family altogether.
The first of three special editions on the crisis of the Italian family.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01m4bty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m466h)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m466k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m466m)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01m466p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m5dvw)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4 from Wales with the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01m5dvy)
Farming groups voice their concerns about the publication of names and addresses of farmers on an anti-badger cull website. As the proposed start of the cull approaches, campaigning group the Badger Trust - who are not connected to the website say that taking direct action cannot be condoned under any circumstances.

Meanwhile, Jeanne Berry who is running for the Independent Police Commissioner in Gloucestershire for 'The Badger Party', tells Farming Today why she is so concerned about the planned pilot culls.

There are nearly 6000 cooperatives in the UK, run by and for their members. Jim Paice, the Agriculture Minister says he thinks cooperative working has an important role to play in the future for British farming. Kate Allum, the Chief executive of the largest dairy cooperative in the UK, tells Farming Today why she believes it's beneficial for farmers to be part of a cooperative.

Farming Today is presented by Caz Graham and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01m466r)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01m5dw0)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Amanda Vickery on... Men (b01m5dw2)
The Sailor

Amanda Vickery explores the history of masculinity through six different archetypes of the ideal man. This week: the Sailor.

From the defeat of the Armada to the Battle of Trafalgar, the sailor was the most virile poster boy of British manhood. Any boy worth his salt wanted to run away to sea. National wealth rested on maritime trade and it was the sailor who ensured that Britain ruled the waves. The bravest were lionised and none more so than Horatio Nelson.

Professor Vickery begins on location in Nelson's flagship HMS Victory, with Quintin Colville, curator of naval history at the National Maritime Museum. She explores how it was that Nelson became a symbol of the nation, with historian Kathleen Wilson. And there is new research from David Turner, author of a history of disability, about what happened to less famous sailors who were disabled by war. Were they still men?

Sources include songs, 19th century romantic novels, and cinematic representations of Nelson.

Amanda Vickery is Professor of Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. She has made several series in creative collaboration with producer Elizabeth Burke, the most recent of which was Voices from the Old Bailey.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke.
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:30 Head to Head (b01m5dw4)
Series 4

Morality and Freedom

Edward Stourton continues to revisit broadcast debates from the archives - exploring the ideas, the great minds behind them and echoes of the arguments today.

Perhaps better known as a novelist, Iris Murdoch was also a recognised philosopher. By 1972 when she encountered fellow Oxford thinker David Pears for the film Logic Lane, she had already written 14 novels and made valuable contributions to moral philosophy. The dominant school up until that time had used a logic of language to help distinguish right from wrong, almost turning morality into a science. However, a new wave of European thought was bringing the debate away from prescribing meta-ideas and back down to individual choice.

At the heart of the debate was the issue of freedom of action. Could humans actually control their behaviour or were we pre-programmed to act in particular ways in certain situations? In this debate, Pears brings up the age-old debate of determinism versus free will - but further to that was a belief that, through self-knowledge, we could reclaim some control over our actions and therefore act in morally good ways.

So to what extent should we know ourselves in order to become better people - in a deep Freudian sense or simply by noticing our thoughts and reactions? By considering the practical concerns of everyday people and life, and what constitutes a good life, can this knowledge inform a new moral philosophy? Murdoch's ideas are as relevant today as ever.

In the studio dissecting the debate are Galen Strawson, Professor of Philosophy at Reading University, and Justin Broackes, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Brown University in the United States.

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m5dw6)
Ross King - Leonardo and the Last Supper

Episode 1

Leonardo and the Last Supper tells the fascinating story of what went on behind the scenes when Leonardo da Vinci was commissioned to paint what became one of history's greatest masterpieces.

Working as pictor et ingeniarius ducalis (duke's painter and engineer) for Lodovico Sforza, the de facto ruler of Milan, Leonardo was engrossed with a commission to create a monumental equestrian statue. But with unrest at home and abroad Lodovico had another use for the seventy five tons of bronze that his artist required.

Read by Nigel Anthony and abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions.

Producer: Jane Marshall.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m5dw8)
Woman's Hour and Men's Hour: A Secrets Special

People reveal the secrets they've been keeping from their partners, family and friends in this joint Woman's Hour and Men's Hour special programme. Presenters Jane Garvey and Tim Samuels team up to hear the perspectives of men and women from around the UK - and explore the motivations for and impact of keeping secrets. Listeners share their experiences from finding out they were adopted to discovering there had been a murder in their family. Professor Carol Smart talks about secrets within families, and the author Jill Dawson discusses secrets as a plot device in fiction. Plus not being open about your sexuality and hiding problems with gambling or debt. The show will be jointly broadcast on Radio 4 and 5 live - a radio first for the two programmes.

Producer Louise Corley.
Presenters Jane Garvey and Tim Samuels.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m5dwb)
Craven: Series 3

Episode 1

The police drama by Amelia Bullmore, starring Maxine Peake, returns for a new series - with a strange case that is set to get more bizarre as the week unfolds.

"You have to be careful of the bizarre, because one man's odd is another man's system."

The episode begins when the body is found of a strangled man, with a missing finger and an extra front tooth. For Craven, alarm bells ring and she suspects the trade mark maiming of criminal mastermind Tony Lau.
The trail leads the team to a domestic address that has been converted into a cannabis factory.

This popular series is created by an all female production crew in Manchester and stars Maxine Peake as DCI Sue Craven.

Produced by Justine Potter
A Red Production Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 The Summerland Story (b01m5dwd)
Stephen Smith travels to the Isle of Man to find out about the little-discussed entertainment innovation Summerland, the prosperity it brought to the Island for three summers and the terrible fire that destroyed it in 1973, killing 50 people.

Summerland was the brainchild of local architect James Phillips Lomas and hoped to reverse the decline in the Manx tourist trade in the late 1960s. The complex was spread out over seven levels, rising 96 ft above sea level and covering 3.5 acres of the Douglas seafront. The use of futuristic materials, like bronze tinted acrylic Oroglas, to clad the building gave the impression of sunshine indoors all year round - and offered an appealing alternative to the cheap Mediterranean package holidays that were becoming available.

Summerland opened to the public in 1971 and soon became the entertainment hub of the island, for both tourists and locals. It was celebrated from a civic perspective and brought a new lease of life to the tourist trade until it came to an untimely end two years later.

On 2nd August 1973, a fire was started just outside the building and quickly spread. Within minutes the building was engulfed in flames and all floors above the entrance level were destroyed. There were an estimated 3000 people inside Summerland that night - of which 50 lost their lives.

A 49 day public hearing on the island found that there were "No villains" in the disaster and as such no-one was held to account.

Forty years since the peak of its prosperity, Stephen Smith finds out what the building meant to the island, how the events of that tragic night unfolded and why such an important event is rarely spoken about.

Produced by Jenny Clarke
A Bite Yer Legs production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Bleak Expectations (b00wlgnn)
Series 4

A Life Destroyed Then Repaired and Rehappied

Pip in the company of Pippa, the Reverend Fecund and Harry Biscuit, now just a brain in a jar, have tracked Mister Benevolent to the heart of the vast Russian Empire.

But when they find him, he is at the head of a mighty army. Who will triumph in the final battle between good and evil? Will Harry get a new body? Will Mister Benevolent detonate his infamous cheese bomb? And what is the correct way to spell Czar?

As fate decides these crucial questions it seems there are a few surprises in store for Pip.

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ..... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ..... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ..... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ..... James Bachman
Grimpunch ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ..... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ..... Susy Kane
Reverend Godly Fecund ..... David Mitchell

Producer Gareth Edwards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2010.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01m5dwg)
Young People and the Modern Media

Today - young people and the modern media.

We hear about a new social media platform for four-year-olds and the magazine aimed at turning teenagers into entrepreneurs.

And, Fifty Shades of Grey has been accused of normalising erotica but would you be happy to let your 13 year-old read it? Films, video games and even music carry ratings or age guidance these days, but not books. Should there be a similar ratings system for literature?

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Paul Waters.


MON 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m5fnh)
John Hume/David Trimble

Jim Naughtie on John Hume and David Trimble who shared the Nobel Peace Prize after the Good Friday Agreement and whose lives help to illuminate the complex politics of Northern Ireland.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


MON 12:57 Weather (b01m466t)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01m5fnk)
Syrian rebels say they've shot down one of the regime's helicopters in the capital, Damascus. We ask what more the international community can do to end the violence. And we hear from one woman imprisoned by Syrian security forces.

As the G20 group of nations discuss what action to take over rising food prices, we'll debate what can be done to make our meals more affordable.

And Essex Police say they are taking seriously the search for a lion, after sightings by holiday makers near Clacton.

Presented by Shaun Ley.


MON 13:45 Poetic Justice (b01m5fnm)
Treadmill

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 1, Treadmill is recorded inside HMP Brixton, a busy South London prison for adult males. Prisoners write poems to their younger selves and to those who may be at risk entering the vicious circle of crime and incarceration.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler
A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01m5d8d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b012fts1)
Nick Payne - The Day We Caught the Train

BAFTA winner Olivia Colman, star of Broadchurch, Rev and a score of other hits, heads up the cast in this quietly intense play about Sally, a woman beset by one problem after another.

Rain, a problematic car, a problematic cat and Harold - everything seems to conspire against Sally to prevent some quality time with David.

Written by Olivier Award nominee and Devine Award-winning playwright Nick Payne.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in July 2011.


MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b01m5fnp)
Another edition of the 48th series of Quote... Unquote, the popular quotations programme presented and devised by Nigel Rees. The guests this week are the broadcaster Samira Ahmed, actor Simon Jones, historian Dominic Sandbrook, and journalist Dominic Lawson. The reader is Peter Jefferson.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01m4c33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Lewis's Return Home (b01m5fnr)
Get Carter, starring Michael Caine, has been voted the best British film of all time in some recent polls, but its author, Ted Lewis, and his novel, Jack's Return Home - on which the film is based - are all but forgotten.

In the 30th anniversary of Lewis's untimely death, and as Radio Four broadcasts a new adaptation of the novel, the poet and critic Sean O'Brien traces the life-story and legacy of the multi-talented Ted Lewis.

Lewis's widow, Jo, and daughters, Sally and Nancy - who have never spoken about him in public before - recall his meteoric rise to fame as well as his later struggles. His agent, Toby Eady, old art-school friend, Ron Burnett, biographer Nick Triplow, and novelist Nicholas Blincoe contribute their thoughts and memories.

Sean O'Brien, who himself grew up in Hull, re-locates Lewis back in his own landscape on either bank of the river Humber, as he attempts to locate Lewis, in the literary sphere, as far more than a writer of tough genre fiction.

Just as Jack's Return Home describes a journey from 1960s gangland London home to Scunthorpe, so Sean traces Lewis's life-story. He follows the journey from Lewis's grammar school in isolated Barton on Humber to his art college in Hull, then on to success in swinging sixties London - as an animator on the Beatles's Yellow Submarine as well as a novelist and writer for Dr Who and Z Cars - culminating in his final return to unfashionable Scunthorpe back in the Lincolnshire wolds.

As Sean O'Brien concludes his journey, he reflects on the fact that most of Lewis's nine novels are currently unavailable, and hopes that this anniversary might be the beginning of a whole new era in the afterlife of a talented British artist and writer.

Producer Beaty Rubens.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01m5hjz)
Baptists

Ernie Rea is joined by three prominent Baptists: Dianne Tidball, Ruth Gouldbourne and Peter Morden to discuss the history of the Baptist Church and its significance today. This year marks the 400th anniversary of the first Baptist congregation in England and Baptists form the biggest Protestant denomination in the world but what do they stand for? Ernie's guests discuss the often bloody history of the Baptists from their origins as a persecuted dissenting movement in the seventeenth century. And they consider what Baptists contribute to Britain today. Are they still a voice of protest, speaking out for justice and for religious freedom?


MON 17:00 PM (b01m5hk1)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m466w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b01m5hk3)
Series 64

Episode 4

Nicholas Parsons challenges Tim Vine, Jason Byrne, Gyles Brandreth and Paul Merton to speak for 60 seconds. From 2012.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01m5hk5)
Fallon and Rhys are planning a lock-in at The Bull for Harry's goodbye drinks. Fallon thinks they should consider a comedy night soon as well, in the upstairs function room. She saw a comic in Edinburgh, Tug Fowler, who'd be ideal. He's expensive, but they need to speculate to accumulate.

Rhys is dubious, especially when Fallon shows him some video footage of the comedian. He thinks it's late night material and isn't sure if they'd get enough people to go. Fallon thinks it would be fine with the right publicity, and accuses Rhys of being happy to coast along. Rhys responds that on the contrary he agrees with pushing things along, just not over a cliff...

Lilian discovers multiple phone messages from Arthur Walters regarding a water leak, and asks Darrell if he'll pop round to the house to look at it. Guilty Darrell agrees. When he gets there he's shocked at the damage to Joyce and Arthur's personal items, and quickly fixes the leak.

When suspicious Lilian quizzes him about the cause of the problem, floundering Darrell has to admit it was all part of the job Matt's had him doing at the Walters' house. Lilian's not impressed.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01m5hk7)
Adrian Lester takes questions from young actors

In a special edition recorded at the Radio 1 Academy in Hackney, Mark Lawson talks to Adrian Lester, star of the BBC TV drama Hustle, who also answers questions from an audience of young actors.

Adrian Lester reflects on his career so far, which includes Rosalind in an all-male production of As You Like It, along with leading roles in musicals, television and film.

He also offers advice to young people hoping to follow in his footsteps. Their questions cover topics such as how to make a living as an actor, the experience of going to drama school, and what you can learn from sharing a stage with Hollywood stars.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m5dwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The F-Word: A History of Federalism (b01m5hk9)
The euro zone crisis boils along like a tea kettle left screaming on the stove. But once this situation is resolved, the fundamental problem of the euro will remain; it's a single currency serving 17 countries - with 17 different governments, operating on 17 different electoral timetables, setting 17 different tax policies. Can 17 into 1 ever go?

Some have suggested Europe's single currency needs an independent central bank, a single fiscal policy, and a single democratically elected government to oversee the economy it serves.

There's a word for this arrangement among states. Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher knew it well: Federalism. Federalism was fine for America but she was dead set against it for Europe.

That was more than twenty years ago. Now the F-word is resurfacing in the euro debate. Jorg Asmussen, the German representative on the board of the European Central Bank, recently gave a speech in Berlin calling for greater federalism to strengthen the euro.

Presenter Michael Goldfarb looks at the history of federalism, the intellectual theories behind it and its successes and failures.

From the Act of Union between England and Scotland, arguably the first act of federalism in history, to the debates surrounding the creation of the American Constitution, Michael interviews not just British and American historians, but also contemporary European politicians and policy makers. How relevant is federalism in the euro-zone crisis? And how could a federal United States of Europe work?

Presented by Michael Goldfarb

Producer: Julia Hayball
A Wise Buddah Creative Ltd production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b01m182v)
Bulgaria's Criminal Football

No fewer than 15 football club bosses have been murdered in Bulgaria's top football league in the last decade alone. In this edition of Crossing Continents Margot Dunne investigates reports that many have been deeply involved in mafia businesses.

There are continuing reports that the game is riddled with corrupt practices including match-fixing and the illegal procurement of European Union passports for overseas players.

Crossing Continents examines these claims, attending a match which has allegedly been fixed in advance and speaks to a player who says he was offered money to throw a match.

The programme also meets Todor Batkov, chairman of one of the country's best known football clubs, Levski Sofia, who accepts that corruption in the national game is as deep rooted as ever.

Producer: Ed Butler.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01m183c)
As public interest in the red planet reaches a peak and NASA's Rover Curiosity begins tentatively to roll across the Martian surface, their next lander - called InSight - is announced to some fanfare. Based on an older, simpler, static probe, InSight will look for "Marsquakes" and teach us about the deep seismic structure of Mars. But as the former head of Science and Robotic Missions at the European Space Agency, now President of the Royal Astronomical Society, Prof David Southwood tells Quentin, there is some disappointment for planetary scientists, and fears that with budgetary cuts jeopardising many planned missions, Curiosity could be the last hurrah for this golden age of Martian exploration.

A global challenge to invent a new toilet that doesn't need water, electricity or a septic system, doesn't pollute and costs less than five cents a day is being worked on by scientists around the world. Professor Sohail Khan from Loughborough University is one of the winners of the "Reinvent the Toilet" competition run by the Gates Foundation. His team's design is based on hydrothermal carbonisation - a sort of pressure cooker which converts waste into something that looks and smells like coffee.

When a bomb explodes in a warzone, it produces a blast wave and then a thermal heat wave that can reach temperatures of over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Scientists in the USA have developed a camouflage make-up designed to protect exposed skin for 15 seconds - and in some cases up to a minute - from this intense heat. Professor Robert Lochhead and a team at the University of Southern Mississippi were commissioned by the Department of Defence to develop the make-up. It protects soldiers from the searing heat of roadside Improvised Explosive Devices as well as providing traditional camouflage. Field trials are now underway. The team used silicones, which absorb radiation at wavelengths outside the intense heat spectrum, instead of the traditional hydrocarbon ingredients used in cosmetics.

Age-related hearing loss is inevitable and irreversible, but now British birdwatchers are worried it could be affecting their ability to record and survey, accurately, bird species with higher-pitched song. Eminent birder, Richard Porter, put the peregrine among the pigeons when he admitted his inability to hear certain species' birdsong in an article in British Birds magazine. At the RSPB's annual British Bird Fair, he tells Quentin that he's concerned that higher range hearing loss could be distorting the all-important surveys of British birds. Acknowledging the possibility of an "age hearing" effect on the data, Andy Clements, Director of the British Trust for Ornithology, outlines new research, planned for the Autumn, to measure volunteers' hearing abilities and cross reference this with known bird populations.


MON 21:30 Amanda Vickery on... Men (b01m5dw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01m466y)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m5hkc)
The Taliban kill 17 people in Helmand, apparently for attending a party. How strong is the Taliban hold on Afghanistan?

A new spike in violence in Syria - can a regional spillover be avoided?

And the struggle to keep France's Mont St Michel separate from the mainland.

With Felicity Evans.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m5hkf)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 6

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 6 of 10: The first spades cut the ground of the cemetery, but the miners' digging disturbs more than the earth.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b01m0ppt)
Chris Ledgard examines how we hear speech through background sound, and discovers that his own inability to hear voices in a crowd may be due to a little-known condition called King-Kopetzky syndrome.

Beginning with bar staff in Cardiff who use earplugs on a busy night, Chris discovers that we humans are surprisingly adept at grabbing small lumps of speech and filling in the gaps. He also discovers how room acoustics contribute to what scientists call the "cocktail party problem"; asks if exposure to aircraft noise can affect schooling, and discovers how the right mood music can make a policemans life easier on a Saturday night in Brighton.


MON 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgnk8)
Micky Flanagan: What Chance Change?

Episode 3

The cockney comedian charts his life story during the 1990s - returning to education and becoming a teacher. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in June 2010.



TUESDAY 28 AUGUST 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01m467s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m5dw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m467v)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m467x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m467z)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01m4681)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m5gn6)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4 from Wales with the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01m5gn8)
Following recent protests by UK dairy farmers over the price they are paid for milk, the UK Government is encouraging farmers to join together to form cooperatives and producer groups. The systems are used widely across Europe. In this special programme, Charlotte Smith visits the Netherlands where over 85% of dairy farmers are in co-operatives compared to around 30% in the UK.

She talks to the Chairman of Friesland Campina, Piet Boer, on his dairy farm to find out how the system enables it to pay their 14,000 farmers more than European average. Since it was set up, it has become multi-national with a global turnover of 10 billion euros a year. She asks if British farmers could see similar success if more of them worked together.

This programme is presented by Charlotte Smith and recorded on location the Netherlands by Anne-Marie Bullock.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01m5grw)
Justine Greening on Heathrow Airport expansion and the West Coast mainline franchise, how should public sector pay levels be set, and which votes count in the US election?


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01m5gth)
Dame Ann Dowling

A world in which planes are silent may sound like a pipe dream; but University of Cambridge engineer, Dame Ann Dowling, and her team proved it is possible to build an aircraft that barely makes any noise. A brilliant mathematician and a keen pilot, Ann now heads of one of the largest engineering departments in Europe. Her design for a silent aircraft could improve the quality of life for millions of people living near airports worldwide: so does she mind that it never got off the ground? Jim talks to Ann Dowling about mathematics, engines and how she always wanted to do something useful.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01m5gy0)
Paddy O'Connell meets Chantal

Paddy O'Connell explores a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life. When Paddy was 11 his father died which, of course, meant that his mother was widowed.

In the first of two programmes, Paddy meets Chantal who was widowed in 1995 and left to bring up three children alone. They discuss the initial reactions; the process of gradually moving on with your life; when - if ever - is it the right time to remove your wedding rings; and - if you do meet someone new - what role does the memory of your first partner play in your new relationship.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m5gyw)
Ross King - Leonardo and the Last Supper

Episode 2

Despite his reputation in Milan, Leonardo da Vinci had reached his forties without having created a public masterpiece proportionate to his talents. His frustration at his lack of achievement was compounded when the seventy five tons of bronze he needed to complete a monumental equestrian statue, was requisitioned to be turned into weapons. And then Lodovico Sforza commissioned him to paint a wall in a Dominican refectory.

Nigel Anthony reads from Leonardo and the Last Supper by Ross King.
Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m5hhr)
Dame Tanni Grey-Thompson

We look ahead to the Paralympic with Dame Tanni Grey-Thompson. Sandi Toksvig on her new novel Valentine Grey. Imogen Heap talks about the everyday sounds that provide the inspiration for her music. And Is Independent living - the right path for mothers with learning disabilities?

Presenter Jane Garvey.
Producer Lucinda Montefiore.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m5hht)
Craven: Series 3

Episode 2

Starring Maxine Peake.

The case involving a cannabis farm and a strangled, maimed South East Asian man's body is getting more and more bizarre as there are indications of serious organised crime at its heart.

The web of crime is getting ever more tangled, with more severed fingers than bodies and the hopeful shrines left in the Cannabis factories suggest desperate people in need of help and hope.

And then there's Craven's regular irregular love life with ex colleague Macca, which is about to hit serious problems when their unusual set up is challenged.

Producer: Justine Potter
A Red Production Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Helping Hamlet: Can Science Cure Procrastination? (b01m5hhw)
Scientists estimate that up to 20 per cent of the world's population are chronic procrastinators who put off completing tasks to the last minute and damage their wealth, health and happiness in the process. Can chronic procrastinator Rowan Pelling find a solution to her problem by talking to experts and fellow sufferers?


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b01m5hhy)
Series 14

Dvorak's New World Symphony

While for many, it will be always associated with brown bread, the Largo from Dvorak's New World Symphony is an enduring a piece that never fails to move and inspire. We hear from the anti- apartheid campaigner Albie Sachs, who explains that through whistling the theme while in solitary confinement, he was able to make contact with the wider world and kept his spirit and hope alive.
Margaret Caldicott recalls the important role the piece played in her mother's life while in a Japanese prisoner of war camp.
Producer Lucy Lunt.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01m5hj0)
Tackling the obesity problem

The government has been accused of "conniving with the food industry" and ignoring scientific evidence on obesity by a former advisor. Critics are also concerned that only a handful of companies have heeded voluntary guidelines launched last year to label food in restaurants with calorie counts and to reduce saturated fats, salt and sugar in food products.

So should the Government be doing more to monitor what is going into our food and introducing tougher regulation forcing the food industry to reduce fats and sugars? Or should you the consumer be doing more to stay healthy?

Call us on 03700-100-400 before ten, 03700 100444 after ten, or email us via our website; leave us a message or a name and number where we can call you back. You can also text us on 84844. Or tweet @BBCRadio4 during the programme, using the hashtag #youandyours.


TUE 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m5hkm)
Doreen Lawrence

The New Elizabethans: Doreen Lawrence. Jim Naughtie considers the achievement of the mother of murdered teenager, Stephen Lawrence, whose campaign for justice revealed uncomfortable truths about British society.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01m4683)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01m5hnl)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Poetic Justice (b01m5hnn)
Hope

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 2: Hope
Recorded inside HMP Styal, a women's prison near Manchester, where Mr Gee hears about the despair of imprisonment and the importance of family bonds from a group of women who find reason to be optimistic about their time in prison.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler
A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01m5hk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Brief Lives (b01m5jpg)
Series 5

Episode 3

Brief Lives by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly.
Another story from the Manchester paralegal team. Declan investigates why a father wants his estranged daughter arrested for defrauding him out of hundreds of pounds worth of gifts and a sad Frank visits his ailing father figure.

Producer/Director Gary Brown
Original music by Carl Harms.


TUE 15:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b01m5jkl)
Series 2

Morality and the Law

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink.

Each week presenter Matthew Sweet takes a puzzle with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, John Stuart Mill and Wittgenstein. All recorded in a pub with an audience, who'll have their own contributions to make - but whose assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Propping up the bar this year will be philosophers such as Julian Baggini and Nigel Warburton, and academic experts on memory, the law, art and computers. We'll be meeting bald men, a woman who used to be a man, and a woman who can't remember being a girl. Plus music from The Drifters - a far more philosophical group than you'd ever imagine.
This programme is a repeat
Producer: David Edmonds
Editor: Jeremy Skeet.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b01m5jlk)
Britain's Wilderness

The first attempt in England to turn a landscape back into a wilderness is 10 years old this year.

In this week's Costing The Earth, Miranda Krestovnikoff visits Ennerdale Valley, on the Western edge of the Lake District, to find out how the scheme is progressing.

Rewilding, as the scheme has become known, allows natural processes to take place, in order to return the habitat to as natural an environment as possible. The landscape has been managed in such a way that natural flora and fauna have been encouraged back to the valley. Miranda meets those involved in returning the valley to a wilderness.

In order for the project to be be a success, the major land owners in the valley: the National Trust, the Forestry Commission, Natural England and United Utilities have all been working together.

Miranda discovers how successful the rewilding project has been and whether or not schemes of this type are worth attempting elsewhere in the UK: a country that has very little wilderness that has been untouched by human hands. She also finds out the vital role visitors to the area play in keeping the landscape alive.

Presenter: Miranda Krestovnikoff
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b01m5jth)
Reading aloud

How to stand and hold your head, what to do with your hands and how to make appropriate facial expressions - these were skills studied by people who read aloud to their friends at home in the 18th century. Chris Ledgard discusses domestic reading in the great age of elocution with Oxford University's Abigail Williams and explores the instruction manuals which helped people mimic the great readers of their time. Chris meets modern families who read to each other and visits a primary school to brush up on his own reading skills.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b01m5jtk)
Series 28

Juvenal

Matthew Parris invites writer and comic Natalie Haynes to explain why her nomination for a Great Life is a Roman poet about whose life we know very little. Dr Llewelyn Morgan of Brasenose College Oxford helps her explain the enduring appeal of this scurrilous writer.

On the face of it, Juvenal's life is hard to defend as a Great one. In the first place - as Dr Llewelyn Morgan, lecturer in Classical Languages and Literature at Oxford, confirms - we know very little about his life. He may have been a first-generation Roman from a Spanish family; he may have served in army; he may have been sent into exile. None of this can be confirmed. What we do know is that he uses his Satires to rant and rail against women, foreigners, gays and the upstarts who are all ruining Rome - which might make him hard to love. But Natalie Haynes, veteran of the stand-up circuit and now a writer and critic, finds Juvenal an indispensable part of her life and is very happy to explain why.

Producer Christine Hall

From 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01m5jvl)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news. Includes Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m4685)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Isy Suttie: Pearl and Dave (b0196rpc)
Isy Suttie ('Dobby' from Channel 4's 'Peep Show' & double British Comedy Award nominee.) recounts a moving love story involving a socially awkward childhood neighbour (her first pen pal) and a 'well-bred' girl from Surrey - the titular Pearl and Dave. She interweaves the narrative with her own tales of failed relationships, internet dating and eventual happiness, much of which is told through song. Adapted from her sell out Edinburgh 2011 Edinburgh show of the same name. From BBC Radio Comedy.

"I'm overjoyed to be doing my Edinburgh show on Radio 4. Having spent a month playing to audiences who'd been rained on all day, some of them dashing in late, I advise listeners to wrap up warm, eat a hearty meal and leave enough time for the journey from the sofa to the radio." Isy Suttie Nov 2011.

The Producer is John Pocock.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01m5jw1)
Ed and Emma's money troubles continue. George is suffering the effects, with a picnic planned in place of a theme park trip. Ed leaves to collect the cage traps for the badger vaccination programme, leaving Emma's to cope alone with two irritable children.

Helping store the traps, David hopes Ed's early mornings will be worth it, given that he's not being paid this year. Ed hopes to get freelance work. He agrees it would be nice if he could afford for George to go to the theme park some time.

Lilian tackles Matt about the leak at the Walters' house. She tells him he needs to be careful. They're an elderly couple; what if they get ill or have an accident? Matt denies the leak was deliberate. He admits the couple would be better housed somewhere smaller, and that they could do with selling their house, but he'd hardly want to damage Amside's own property, would he? He tries to shift the blame on to Darrell, and gives him a pep talk for Lilian's benefit.

Meanwhile Lilian gives the Walters her mobile number, telling Matt she hopes there won't be any more out of hours 'emergencies'.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01m5jw7)
Mrs Biggs, Joyce Carol Oates, Berberian Sound Studio

With Mark Lawson.

Sheridan Smith takes the lead role in the new ITV1 drama series Mrs Biggs, which focuses on the story of Charmian, the wife of notorious train robber Ronnie Biggs. It follows her as she falls in love with Ronnie, discovers his role in the Great Train Robbery, and then secretly emigrates to Australia with him. Sarah Crompton reviews.

The American author Joyce Carol Oates discusses her prolific writing career, and how her memoir about becoming a widow brought new readers with different reactions to her work. She also reflects on America's great post-war writers.

Toby Jones (Frost/Nixon, Harry Potter, The Hunger Games) stars in the film Berberian Sound Studio, directed by Peter Strickland. Jones plays a mild-mannered sound effects specialist, whose work on a 1970s Italian horror film finds him stuck in a small room with only the grisly and sinister sounds for company. Critic Mark Eccleston gives his verdict.

William Letford discusses his debut poetry collection Bevel, and how his work as a roofer since the age of 15 has inspired his writing. Letford often inscribed poems onto the joists of the roofs he worked on.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m5hht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Lifecycle of a Bullet (b01m5k37)
A deadly weapon and an economic cornerstone, the impact of a bullet spreads far and wide. In this documentary BBC Defence Correspondent Caroline Wyatt takes an extraordinary journey through the defence industry as she tracks the fate of a bullet. From manufacture to gun barrel, Caroline tracks her bullet from the docks where the explosive propellant are imported, through the Cheshire factory where it is machined, to testing and out to its final destination - war.
With its deep historical roots, its reliance of raw materials from all over the world and its central role in the economy this most basic of military equipment involves a huge cross-section of British society, all working for a war effort that sees millions of rounds produced every week of the year. By the time she sees the shot fired, Caroline will have met the huge variety of people employed in its creation.
As she tracks the bullet's journey, Caroline will ask what would happen to our economy if peace bloomed in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how people feel about making products that are designed to kill.
Producer: Lucy Proctor.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01m5k39)
We speak to three visually impaired people about their experiences of the Olympics and their expectations of the Paralympics. We then discuss with Shaun McCarthy, Chair of the Commission for Sustainable London 2012 about what was hoped for the Olympics when it came to diversity of Olympic and Paralympic volunteers, accessibility of venues and access to the sporting action for visually impaired spectators. We then look past the games to what kind of legacy we can expect for future big sporting events.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01m5k3c)
BP reax, fibroids, access to notes, botox

As many as 2 million people in the UK may have been misdiagnosed with high blood pressure - getting treatment they don't need. But how many of them have so-called "white coat hypertension" - where their blood pressure shoots up at the very sight of their doctor or nurse? For patients with high readings in the surgery doctors can offer "ambulatory" machines for them to take home, which monitor blood pressure round-the-clock. Bryan Williams who's professor of medicine at University College, London, led the team which drew up the latest blood pressure guidelines for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, or NICE. He says that anyone considering monitoring their own blood pressure at home should take measurements both in the morning and evening whilst sitting down - and work out the average over four days. The British Hypertension Society has a list of approved home blood pressure monitors on their website.

NICE has also just approved the use of Botox injections to help people with chronic migraine that hasn't responded to other treatments. But it's been a controversial decision - Botox is expensive, and no miracle cure. It was initially rejected and is still not endorsed by NICE's equivalent in Scotland. Consultant neurologist Dr Fayyaz Ahmad has had some success with patients at his private clinic outside Hull. One of them is Dawn Cook, who's just had her third round of injections. She's suffered from headaches since she was 7 years old.

Would you like to read your medical notes? The Government has pledged that everyone will have online access to NHS records by October 2015. So will this change the way doctors write about their patients?
Professor Steve Field - who's Chair of the NHS Future Forum and one of the driving forces behind the plan - hopes that it will mean more plain English that's easy to understand. His own surgery will give patients online access early next year.

One in 4 women develop fibroids at some time - benign, non cancerous growths in the wall of the uterus which can cause heavy painful periods. Surgery might be suggested to help wtih the discomfort - using keyhole techniques via the abdomen or vagina - a procedure known as myomectomy. But in recent years some less invasive techniques have become available to help relieve symptoms.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01m5gth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01m4687)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m5k3f)
The Republican Convention starts its meeting in Florida to nominate Mitt Romney to challenge President Obama in November's election;

Free speech in Argentina - we have a special report;

On the eve of the Paralympic Games, China's changing attitudes to disability.

With Felicity Evans.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m5k3h)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 7

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 7 of 10: Still recovering from the attack in his bedroom, Baratte starts to make some changes.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Jack's Return Home (b01m5k3k)
Episode 1

It's 1970 and Jack Carter, a gangland enforcer, has returned to his hometown of Scunthorpe to investigate the suspicious death of his brother Frank in a car crash. Ted Lewis's British crime classic became famous as the cult movie Get Carter. A new version for radio by Nick Perry.

Jack Carter . . . . . Hugo Speer
Margaret . . . . . Katherine Dow Blyton
Doreen . . . . . Laura Molyneux
Mrs Garfoot . . . . . Tracy Wiles
Eric . . . . . Ben Crowe
Keith . . . . . Joe Sims
Other parts played by Sam Alexander and Patrick Brennan

Director: Toby Swift

Studio Managers: Anne Bunting, Keith Graham, Alison Craig.
Editor: Anne Bunting.
Production Co-ordinator: Lucy Collingwood.


TUE 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgnvw)
Ross Noble Goes Global

Episode 3

Travelling from rainy Sligo to busy Dublin - the comedian learns to play the penny whistle - badly. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in April 2002.



WEDNESDAY 29 AUGUST 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01m4693)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m5gyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m4695)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m4697)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m4699)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01m469c)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m5lqp)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4 from Wales with the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01m5lqr)
An ad campaign claiming 'Red Tractor Pork is High Welfare Pork' has been banned by the Advertising Standards Authority. The British Pig Executive, which represents the industry, argues the decision was based on a technicality and doesn't reflect badly on Red Tractor standards. Also in the programme: we continue our examination of the role co-operatives could play in the future of UK farming, and we find out about the golden wheat from Shropshire which will be on the Paralympic winners' podium.

Presenter: Georgina Windsor
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


WED 06:00 Today (b01m5lqt)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:

0751
The Paralympic Games open today and the film director Stephen Daldry has devised a spectacular opening ceremony in the Olympic Stadium in East London. Sir Philip Craven, president of the International Paralympic Committee, and Marc Woods, a Paralympic swimmer, discuss the upcoming festival of sport.

0810
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg told the Guardian today that "if we want to remain cohesive as a society people of very considerable personal wealth have got to make a bit of an extra contribution". Susan Kramer, Liberal Democrat Treasury spokeswoman in the Lords, shares her view on the need for a new wealth tax.

0821
Is there any truth at all in all the rumours and sightings of big cats? Stephen Harris, professor of environmental sciences at Bristol University and who has investigated a number of reports, explains what he believes is out there.

0830
More than 430,000 people have fled the north of the Mali since Islamist extremists took control in April, and the crisis follows a major drought which has left more than four-and-a-half million people threatened by malnutrition. The Today programme's Mike Thomson has been talking to a family forced to flee their home to escape both problems.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01m5n7j)
Clarence Adoo, Simon Gough, Duncan Hamilton, Kate Tempest

Libby Purves is joined by Clarence Adoo, a member of the British Paraorchestra, Simon Gough, to talk about his relationship with his great uncle, the poet Robert Graves, sports writer Duncan Hamilton and poet/rapper Kate Tempest.

Musician Clarence Adoo is a founding member of the British Paraorchestra. Set up by the conductor Charles Hazlewood, the orchestra is made up of disabled musicians playing a range of instruments from the harp to the sitar. Clarence was a top trumpeter with the Northern Sinfonia when he was paralysed from the neck down in a car accident in 1995. He now makes music on a computer called 'Headspace'. The orchestra features in a Channel Four documentary Paraorchestra and they will be performing at the Southbank in London as part of the Unlimited festival.

Simon Gough is the son of actor Michael Gough and actress-cum-journalist Diana Graves. In his book, The White Goddess - An Encounter, Simon recalls the complicated relationship with his great-uncle, the poet Robert Graves. The book describes Simon's time with Graves in Deya, Majorca, and his uncle's beautiful muse Margot who they were both in love with. The White Goddess - An Encounter is published by Galley Beggar Press.

Duncan Hamilton is a sports writer and two-time winner of the William Hill Sports Book of the Year. His book, 'The Footballer Who Could Fly' was inspired by his father's devotion to Newcastle United. But it is also an exploration of the bond between father and son through 'the beautiful game' and how football became their only connection. 'The Footballer Who Could Fly' is published by Century.

Kate Tempest is a poet, rapper, playwright and writer. Her new show 'Brand New Ancients' is an hour long spoken story that she tells over a live orchestral score. The story follows two families as they intertwine and collide. 'Brand New Ancients' runs at the Battersea Arts Centre in London from September 4th, as part of the theatre's Cook Up season.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m7sbp)
Ross King - Leonardo and the Last Supper

Episode 3

By the time he was commissioned to paint his 'Last Supper' in the refectory of the Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, Leonardo da Vinci would have seen many representations of this famous scene in Florence and Milan. But he was never an artist to follow in others' footsteps and, typically, his approach to capturing one of the most dramatic passages in the Bible was unique.

Nigel Anthony reads from Leonardo and the Last Supper by Ross King.
Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m5n7l)
The civil service, Jacqueline Wilson, Ann Romney

Jacqueline Wilson joins Jenni to talk about her new book, Four Children And It - a reworking of E Nesbit's book. She'll also be discussing the themes and trends of current childrens literature. Who is Ann Romney and can she connect with US voters? As Ann Romney addresses the Republican convention this week we profile the wife of the Republican Presidential nominee. And does the UK Civil Service need reform to stop top women leaving the service? Presented by Jenni Murray.

Producer Anna Bailey.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m5n7n)
Craven: Series 3

Episode 3

Starring Maxine Peake.

Craven's new boss is unlikely to give her any slack and the discovery of the "Green Tsunami" of Cannabis factories in Manchester seems to be throwing up an ever increasing list of missing people.

An illegally trafficked Vietnamese immigrant who was caught gardening the crop at a Cannabis factory is not helping, and Craven can't concentrate because her regular irregular lover Macca has finally called the shots and their relationship appears to be over.

Not one of Craven's best days.

Producer: Justine Potter
A Red Production Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 The Island (b01m5n7q)
"The Island" is what everyone calls it. The Isle of Sheppey is a forgotten corner of Kent, an island 11 miles long tucked behind London at the mouth of the Thames and the Medway. The harbourmaster looks out from her high-tech tower within a Napoleonic era fortress over thousands of craft who plough the strait heading for the port of Sheerness, laden with bananas and cars. At the far end of the island from the port, vast acreages of caravans and dumpy chalets spread in serried rows from the sea's edge, ready to house East-End families for the long summer break. In between, birdsong-filled marshland fringes the water and the wind ceaselessly tears through the high-standing reeds. Sheppey boasts three prisons and once housed glass factories ('the Bottleworks') and Royal Doulton ceramics ('the Potteries'). The steelworks recently closed and now only Sheerness port, with its huge inflow and outpouring of motor vehicles and soft fruit, timber and wood-pulp keep industrial wheels turning. Unemployment is high, and prospects are low.

A modern road bridge now connects the island with the rest of Kent, which many regret; yet Sheppey remains a lonely place and not easy to reach; special, they say; strange, other.

Jean, Glenn, Ray and the rest of their large extended family have lived almost all their lives on Sheppey - they tell a tale of hard lives, tough times, and of a place they love, that has shaped their lives and that they'd not leave willingly.

Reporter: Sara Parker
Producer: Simon Elmes.


WED 11:30 Brian Gulliver's Travels (b01m5n7s)
Series 2

Gravinia and Plumpf

Brian Gulliver, a seasoned presenter of travel documentaries, finds himself in a hospital's secure unit after claiming to have experienced a succession of bizarre adventures.

More memories as Brian relives his adventures in Gravinia, a land where the military are revered above everything.

Brian Gulliver ..... Neil Pearson
Rachel Gulliver..... Mariah Gale
Fillick ..... Marcus Brigstocke
Chaplain ..... Adrian Scarborough
Guest ..... Tracy Wiles
Host..... Patrick Brennan
Stegga ..... Barunka O'Shaughnessy
Barista..... Harry Livingstone
Dragit ..... Nick Mohammed
Glugas Hold ..... Dan Tetsell

Producer: Steven Canny

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01m5n7v)
How do you rate your cinema?

With Winifred Robinson.

Tell us about your last cinema experience - was it value for money? How are cinemas recouping costs in the recession?

The London 2012 Games were going to be the greenest ever - so were they? We ask Shaun McCarthy, Chair of the Commission for a Sustainable London 2012.

Taxi Apps - Using GPS location technology, taxi booking apps like Hailo, Kabbee and Get Taxi are trying to connect us to the nearest minicab or black taxi. So how well do they work and are they fair?

CVAs: an increasing number of large UK businesses opt for Company Voluntary Arrangements as a way of avoiding going into administration but can they simply use this as a way of getting out of paying their debts in full?

Sales of lesser-known species of fish are on the rise in all major UK supermarkets, but does eating them mean eating more sustainably?

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Vibeke Venema.


WED 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m5n7x)
Tim Berners-Lee

The New Elizabethans: Jim Naughtie on Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web and unlikely hero of the Olympic opening ceremony. Berners-Lee is a key figure in the digital revolution that has re-fashioned social lives, working practices and the flow of information around the globe.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer Clare Walker

Presenter James Naughtie.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01m469h)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01m5n7z)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Poetic Justice (b01m7sbr)
Crosswords

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 3: Crossroads
Recorded inside HMP YOI Brinsford, a Young Offenders' establishment in the West Midlands. Mr Gee encourages a group of young men to listen to the advice of older men serving long term prison sentences, talking about the disastrous decisions they made as youngsters. He encourages the teenagers to write to their families and loved ones in poetry.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler
A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01m5jw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01m5nlq)
Jonathan Myerson - Do You Know Who Wrote This?

by Jonathan Myerson

The BBC's Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones stars as himself in this wicked comedy about internet fakery by the creator of Number 10.

When stay-at-home mum Ali finds herself lampooned on a mothers' chat site by 'BumsTooBig' and 'BubblyMummly', she can't help wishing she knew the real identity of her tormentors. But when her wish comes true, she finds she's unleashed an unstoppable global revolution.

Produced and Directed by Jonquil Panting.


WED 15:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01m47xd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01m5k3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01m5nls)
Italian Family 2: Naples

Italy, home to the Pope and the Holy See, perhaps the most Catholic of all countries, is undergoing a peculiarly un-Catholic crisis; it now has one of the lowest birth rates in the world. There are so few children being born that if the current trend persists, traditional Italians are at risk of dying out in just a handful of generations. How can the nation famed for Romanticism, for enormous affectionate families, for Mamma Mia and for an enviable certainty that all you need is good food, good wine and your family around you, be the same nation that no longer gives birth? Laurie travels to the South of Italy and visits the sole-remaining glove maker in Naples, in an attempt to discover whether the Italian family business is heading for extinction. He also explores whether organised crime is a distortion of Italian family values - or their logical extension.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01m6n45)
Chris Blackhurst on Leveson letter

In today's programme with Steve Hewlett:

Independent editor Chris Blackhurst's shocked reaction to a letter from the Leveson Inquiry; Stuart Cosgrove, C4's head of diversity, on the difference the Paralympics could make to the channel; former PCC chairman Sir Christopher Meyer on the fallout from the Sun's publication of the Harry photos and the impact this could have on Leveson; Jane Kinninmont of Chatham House on the widening range and varied goals of Arabic TV channels.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01m5nlv)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m469k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 When the Dog Dies (b013229w)
Series 2

Temptation

Ronnie Corbett reunites with the writers of his hit TV comedy 'Sorry', Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent, in the second series of their Radio 4 sitcom.

Ronnie plays Sandy Hopper, who is growing old happily along with his dog Henry. His grown up children, both married to people Sandy doesn't approve of at all, would like him to move out of the family home so they can get their hands on their money earlier. But Sandy's not having this. He's not moving until the dog dies. And not just that, how can he move if he's got a lodger? His daughter is convinced that his too attractive lodger Dolores (Liza Tarbuck) is after Sandy and his money.

Luckily Sandy has three grandchildren and sometimes a friendly word - a kindly hand on the shoulder can really help a Granddad in the twenty-first century. Man and dog together face a complicated world. There's every chance they'll make it more so.

Episode Three - Temptation
Generous Sandy splashes out just a little - with his sponsorship of son-in-law Blake's noble efforts in a charity marathon. Too late, he discovers he's splashed out a whole lot. But the promise is signed, his generosity even announced on the net. Is there a way round this? Listeners should have a pencil and paper handy.

Cast:
Sandy ..... Ronnie Corbett
Dolores ..... Liza Tarbuck
Mrs Pompom ..... Sally Grace
Ellie ..... Tilly Vosburgh
Blake ..... Jonathan Aris
Damon ..... Stephen Critchlow

Producer: Liz Anstee
A CPL production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01m5nqk)
Despite Rhys's reservations, Fallon's booked the comic Tug Fowler for three weeks' time, to coincide with Jolene and Kenton's return. She wants them to see what a success it will be.

Plans are underway for Harry's leaving party. Harry apologises to Mike for his sudden departure and thanks him for the work. Mike's gracious but declines an invitation to the party. Jazzer laments that he still hasn't found a new flatmate, and Harry's promise of two more weeks' rent is little comfort. Harry bequeaths Jazzer some kitchen appliances, which Jazzer privately plans to sell.

At the party, Rhys quizzes Jazzer about Fallon's apparent personality change. She seems on a mission to prove something, at the expense of common sense. Evasive Jazzer pleads ignorance. For her part Fallon claims Rhys has become a stick in the mud. But they all raise a glass to Harry.

Mike and Vicky are on still on pins about the test results. Mike's talking to Jamie about another chainsaw course when the phone rings. It's difficult news, and at the beginning of a sleepless night for the couple, Mike assures Vicky that they'll find a way through it.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01m5nqm)
The e-book debate - threat or opportunity?

Mark Lawson chairs a debate on whether e-books and digital distribution represent a terminal threat or a new chance for authors, traditional publishers, agents and bookshops, in a session recorded at the Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate.

Contributors include authors Steve Mosby and Stephen Leather, literary agent Philip Patterson, Ursula Mackenzie, Chair of Publishers Association, and independent bookseller Patrick Neil.

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m5n7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 The Education Debates (b01m5nqp)
Episode 2

How should we teach? Why are we obsessed with testing? Are we really exploiting the benefits of the internet and technology? And to what extent can young people teach themselves?

Britain's education system is going through a period of huge upheaval. A new curriculum comes in next year, the way children are tested is being revamped, and academies and free schools now have new freedoms to teach what and how they want.

The internet means children can access untold amounts of knowledge and new ways of learning - as well as interact with each other and their teachers in ways that were unimaginable just ten years ago. So how are schools and pupils responding to these dramatic advances?

John Humphrys chairs a panel of leading education experts including cognitive scientist Professor Guy Claxton and union leader Mary Bousted to ask how we should teach.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01m5nqr)
Series 3

Ian Robertson: The Winner Effect

Ian Robertson is Professor of Psychology at Trinity College, Dublin.

He argues that success and being a winner has an effect on us that is "as strong as any drug" - and so does that mean there is a neurological explanation to the old idea that power corrupts?


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01m5jlk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01m5n7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01m469m)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m5nqt)
Paralympic opening ceremony - Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, Britain's most successful paralympian talks about the importance of the games and the legacy for disability in UK; President Assad appears on TV but can he survive as Syria's leader? A new report exposes Putin's wealth. Tonight with Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m5nqw)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 8

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 8 of 10: To the consternation of those around him, Baratte asks Heloise Godard to move in with him.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Political Animals (b01m5nt0)
Series 1

Sybil

Sybil, Chief Mouser to the Cabinet Office 2007 to 2008, reflects on her troubled life with Gordon and Alistair.

Series of scurrilous talks given by well-known, if unreliable, Downing Street cats, who relate their trials and tribulations under four different Prime Ministers.

Starring Tracy Wiles.

Written by Tony Bagley.

Director: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


WED 23:15 Before They Were Famous (b01m5nt2)
Series 1

Episode 3

Ian Leslie presents a new Radio 4 comedy show which brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of some of the world's best known writers. A project of literary archaeology, Leslie has found evidence in the most unlikely of places - within the archives of newspapers, periodicals, corporations and universities - showcasing the early examples of work by writers such as Jilly Cooper during her brief and unfortunately unsuccessful foray into the world of war reporting, and Hunter S Thompson in his sadly short-lived phase working in the customer relations department for a major American Airline.

These are the newspaper articles, advertising copy, company correspondence and gardening manuals that allow us a fascinating glimpse into the embryonic development of our best loved literary voices - people we know today for their novels or poems but who, at the time, were just people with a dream...and a rent bill looming at the end of the month.

Produced by Anna Silver and Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgp34)
That Mitchell and Webb Sound

Episode 3

Who will succeed Zorro? Can pensioners understand the futures trade? Stars David Mitchell and Robert Webb. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast in September 2009.



THURSDAY 30 AUGUST 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01m46bg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m7sbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m46bj)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m46bl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m46bn)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01m46bq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m67yp)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4 from Wales with the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01m67yr)
The UK's biggest fresh milk processor, Robert Wiseman, says it's changing the way it sets milk prices. It wants to introduce a more transparent system and rebuild trust along the supply chain. The company's announced it will work with farmers to develop a new formula for calculating how much milk is worth, rather than simply putting a price on the table. Roddy Catto, Chairman of the Wiseman Partnership Board and one of the dairy farmers hammering out this new pricing mechanism, tells Farming Today the time is right for these talks.

Also, with nearly 300 community owned village shops and thousands of community food enterprises, the Plunkett foundation tells Farming Today why it believes smaller co-ops are becoming increasingly popular. Rich Ward visits Cultivate Oxford, a one year old 'co-operative social enterprise'. It uses its "veg van" to take fresh produce directly from farm to customer.

Swaledales have grazed upland Yorkshire and Cumbria for more than a century. Jules Hudson of Open Country talks to Kenneth Hird about his flock of Swaledales and why he's concerned about the future of the breed.

Presenter: Caz Graham.
Producer: Ruth Sanderson.


THU 06:00 Today (b01m67yt)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by John Humphrys and Evan Davis, including:

0743
This week a book will be published telling the tale of the rivalry between the French president Francois Hollande's ex-wife, Segolene Royal, and his mistress and current partner. Benedict Paviot, London correspondent for France 24, and Pierre Haski, who co-founded the news website Rue 89, debate is this indicates a clear departure from the days when this kind of private affair would not have got out into the open in France.

0810
As the 2014 deadline for the withdrawal of Coalition and ISAF forces in Afghanistan approaches, and Taliban attacks increase, what options are left for the West and what has been achieved since operations began in 2002? Sir Sherard Cowper-Coles, former British ambassador to Afghanistan, and Colonel Richard Kemp, former commander of UK forces in the country, discuss Afghanistan's future.

0820
Anna Marie Roos, an historian of early modern English chemistry and medicine, and Melanie Reid, a writer for the Times, discuss last night's Paralympic opening ceremony.

0834
Thousands of foreign students could be deported from the UK following a decision by the government to strip the London Metropolitan University of its right to teach them. Damian Green, the Minister of State for Immigration, explains why the government has made such a decision.

0839
The Islamist onslaught in Mali has led to big problems for the nation's world famous Festival in the Desert, held annually by Tuareg nomads just outside the town of Timbuktu. As Mike Thomson reports, the event cannot be held in Mali anymore and a new location has yet to be found.


THU 09:00 Fry's English Delight (b01m67yw)
Series 5

Conversation

Stephen Fry explores the many facets of human conversation, from banter and gossip to drama and debate.

He hears how the art of conversation has been interpreted over the decades and how rare it is today to find time for lingering conversation. We visit a nursery to hear budding pre-school conversationalists and the School of Life where people can take classes in how to improve conversational skills. One student says, "So many of our daily conversations are superficial. I want to learn how to make conversation an adventure."

Broadcaster Fi Glover joins Stephen in the studio to discuss her experience of conversation on air. She explains how a broadcast interview can also be a conversation and warns that the word "because" can be a conversation-stopper.

Philosopher Theodore Zeldin has spent a lifetime discussing conversation. He's also the thinker behind an idea known as the Menu of Conversation where strangers are encouraged to share intimate and thought provoking talk over a menu of discussion points. He says, "People are mysterious creatures. In my mind a good conversation doesn't get going for at least an hour."

We also hear from Paul Abbott, screen writer and creator of the TV series Shameless, about conversation from the dramatist's view point. "Conversation is at the centre of my life. I've become a genius at tracking multiple conversations. I'm constantly listening out for the patterns behind the way people talk to each other."

And food writer Claudia Roden describes the marriage that is food and conversation, from the intimacy of the kitchen to the open forum of the dinner table.

Producer: Sarah Cuddon
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 09:30 Twin Nation (b01460f1)
Episode 3

Nicholas and Michael Rotgans are identical twins, in fact their genes are so similar its beyond science to tell them apart. Yet Nicholas is gay and Michael isn't.

Edi stark asks the twins what its like to have such a major difference between and finds out what it can tell the rest of us about how sexual identity is determined.

Producer: Peter McManus.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m7nqd)
Ross King - Leonardo and the Last Supper

Episode 4

Whilst he was painting The Last Supper, Leonardo was living in the Corte Vecchia in Milan and, typically for this restless artist, he found many distractions from the job in hand. Surrounded by assistants and with a patron who had many other entertaining tasks for his 'pictor et ingeniarius' to complete, progress on his masterpiece was slow and more than a little experimental.

Nigel Anthony reads from Leonardo and the Last Supper by Ross King.
Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m68v3)
Gender Marketing Pens; Free Childcare; Intimacy

Designs for women - the power of gender marketing - do we really need pens for women? The Yorkshire council expanding its free childcare. What to avoid when preparing your child for school. Ziyad Marrar on the illusive nature of true intimacy. And Dr Jessica Malay joins us to discuss Renaissance author, Lady Anne Clifford - survivor of two unhappy marriages and a legal battle to inherit her father's estate.
Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Sarah Johnson.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m68v5)
Craven: Series 3

Episode 4

Starring Maxine Peake.

The statistics across the globe for modern day slavery are around 27 million and Craven is fast discovering that the trade is still very much alive and well in Manchester.

The Cannabis factory discoveries have revealed the tip of the iceberg of illegally trafficked Vietnamese children and adults, brought in to work as gardeners in a serious case of organised crime.

On top of that there's a "blobby gingernut" on the loose who escaped from a factory where his accomplice was left with a hammer in his head, more bodies to account for...... and then there's a phone call. What Craven really doesn't need is this news from her mother. But when did her relationship with her mother ever feel convenient? And where is Craven's on-off relationship with Macca now?

Producer: Justine Potter
A Red Production Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01m68v7)
Gold and Governance in Romania

Tessa Dunlop travels to Romania to investigate why a proposed open-cast gold mine has caused the longest-lasting political storm in the country since the end of Communism.

The mine, in the rural community of Rosia Montana in the Transylvanian mountains in western Romania, would be Europe's largest. Its supporters, including most locals, say it would bring much-needed jobs to the area, which has suffered very high unemployment since the last mine closed there a few years ago, after two millennia of gold mining.

But opponents, ranging from local shopkeepers to NGOs in Bucharest and abroad, argue that the project would destroy what they see as the area's only chance for more sustainable development: turning the 2000-year old Roman mines located in those same mountains into tourist attractions, perhaps as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

The mining company admits that many of the Roman galleries would be destroyed by the open-cast mine, but they are largely inaccessible anyway. As a quid pro quo, the company is already restoring those galleries that will be protected, to make them accessible and a tourism destination.

Is the destruction of the majority of the Roman mines a price worth paying for the restoration of a few? Or is the conflict about something else entirely?

Some campaigners admit that their real fight is not with the company, but with the government, because they suspect official corruption. Meanwhile politicians say it is easier to cut public salaries than to give the go-ahead to a big project like this, precisely because of the ensuing suspicion of sleaze.

The project is seen as a test case for prosperity, transparency and good governance for Romania.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.


THU 11:30 The Floating World of Hokusai (b01m68v9)
Author Audrey Niffenegger catches Hokusai's 'Great Wave' to trace the ripple effect of the self-proclaimed 'Old Man Mad About Painting'. Frenetic, eccentric and possessed by his talent, Hokusai's words and images have caught the imagination of a new generation of artists and thinkers, 200-years after his earliest successes.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01m68vc)
Payday Loans and Identity Fraud

There are concerns that some payday loan companies are not doing robust enough checks on people taking out loans, leaving themselves open to fraud. We hear from a man who had his identity stolen by fraudsters who then used his information to take out a payday loan.

We hear from Gavin Wright, an unemployed father who managed to find a job through the social network Twitter with his "Need a job Norwich" account. Are social networks a good way to look for work?

We are less likely to trust information about protecting the environment if it comes from the water companies than from the government, research from The Fabian Society has found. What can utilities companies do to get their message across?

A family run shop in Gerrards Cross has formed a partnership with Sainsbury's in order to stay open. Fishers and Sainsbury's will share the same shop premises in future. Paul Fisher, whose family has run the shop for nearly one hundred years, explains how it will work.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Olivia Skinner.


THU 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m68vh)
Diana, Princess of Wales

The New Elizabethans: Jim Naughtie on Diana, Princess of Wales whose glamorous life and untimely death touched the lives of million, shook the nation and changed the Royal Family forever.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


THU 12:57 Weather (b01m46bs)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01m68vk)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Poetic Justice (b01m7nqg)
Reflection

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 4: Reflection
Recorded in Surrey with former prisoners. A remarkable group of people come together to pass on - in poetry - the result of many years of contemplation on events and decisions which led them in to trouble and out of it again.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler
A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01m5nqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b015p86d)
Mark Lawson - The Artist is Thinking

In an intriguing murder mystery in the art world, Mark Lawson pursues a theme which for him holds particular fascination; the desire of the artist to remain illusive and anonymous behind work which is heavily codified and seemingly impenetrable.

When a brilliant young art historian flies in the face of the received wisdom regarding the work of the reclusive Anderson Perrine, the artist feels a distinct invasion of his privacy. He sets about laying a series of false trails but her pursuit of him is unrelenting and he is obliged to take radically evasive action.

'THE ARTIST IS THINKING' by Mark Lawson

THE ARTIST IS THINKING is directed by Eoin O'Callaghan and produced in Belfast for Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01m68vm)
Yorkshire

Jules Hudson is in North Yorkshire to find out about the history of the landscape around Richmond Castle and the surrounding Dales. Founded by the Normans around 1070, just a few years after the Battle of Hastings, Richmond Castle was a formidable addition to the landscape and firmly stamped its authority on the people and the surrounding land. The town of Richmond slowly grew up around it and the castle still sits imposingly above the River Swale. During the First World War, the prison cells at Richmond Castle were used to hold the Richmond 16. The graffiti that survives on the walls of these cells includes that written by these conscientious objectors, sixteen men who were among the first in this country to refuse to fight on moral or religious grounds.
Jules also hears about the landscape history of the Dales around Richmond and the ways in which people down centuries have used the land, including the rich heritage of the lead mining industry.

Presenter: Jules Hudson
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01m4bwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01m4c92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01m68vp)
Matthew Sweet meets with actor Toby Jones to discuss the weird word of the Berberian Sound studio, director Peter Strickland's love letter to Italian horror films of the 1970s. How do you make money from a British film? Producers Lisa Marie Russo and Matthew Justice discuss. Plus, Mark Gatiss rounds off his selection of favourite biopics with Gods and Monsters, starring Ian Mckellan as director James Whale.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01m68vr)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines...

The Kepler spacecraft has spotted a binary star system with more than one planet orbiting. Furthermore, one of the planets could have liquid water.

An image of the rocky base of Mount Sharp on Mars shows a feature which, to a terrestrial geologist, looks exactly like evidence for a river delta.

This week a paper in the Journal of Neuroscience looks at the physical structure of piano tuners' brains. An area in the hippocampus shows changes in size that relate to the amount of time piano tuners have been working, not to their age.

And it is suggested by researchers in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that chimpanzees won't punish thieves unless they are themselves the victim. Could it be that "third party punishment" is unique to humans among the higher primates?


THU 17:00 PM (b01m68vt)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m46bw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b010y376)
Series 4

John Craven's Fjällräven

More shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave.

Written by and starring Donald McLeary and Sanjeev Kohli, Fags, Mags & Bags has proved a hit with the Radio 4 audience with this series picking up a Writers' Guild nomination for best comedy in 2011.

In this episode Dave and the boys are busily organising a surprise 50th birthday party for Ramesh, but will Sanjay manage to keep his trap closed long enough without spilling the beans before the big day.

So join the staff of Fags, Mags and Bags in their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation.

Ramesh Mahju has built up the business over the course of thirty years, and is a firmly entrenched feature of the local area. However, he does apply the "low return" rules of the shop to all other aspects of his life.

He is ably assisted by his shop sidekick Dave, a forty-something underachiever who shares Ramesh's love of the art of shopkeeping, even if he is treated like a slave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons, Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping. But they are natural successors to the business and Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not.

Cast:
Ramesh ..... Sanjeev Kohli
Dave ..... Donald Mcleary
Sanjay ..... Omar Raza
Alok ..... Susheel Kumar
Dr Southwell ..... Kevin Eldon
Mrs Begg ..... Marjory Hogarth
Mrs Armstrong ..... Maureen Carr
Lovely Sue ..... Julie Wilson Nimmo
Bra Jeff ..... Steven McNicol

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01m68vw)
Adam tells David that Brian's been looking at the applicants for the herd manager's job. It's a strong field, and the salary's good. Ruth asks David to look at some overseeded grassland she thinks isn't doing well. David inspects it and agrees with her. They'll have to try again, or plough and re-seed in the spring. With a show of affection to Ruth, David wryly observes that if the only worry they have after their tough year is some patchy germination, things can't be too bad.

The consultant confirms Mike and Vicky's baby has Down's syndrome. He explains gently about the child's development. Mike looks on the bleak side, whereas Vicky is trying to weigh every possibility and seek the positive. The consultant points out that every child has its own personality and is capable of bringing joy. Vicky's moved by this. They have a huge decision to make. They discuss termination, with Vicky set against the idea.

Back home, they are stunned. Mike points out that it was going to be hard enough for them bringing up a baby, and now...it's such a gamble. Vicky insists the baby's a gift; she doesn't care how hard it's going to be. Mike declares they're both getting older. Why spoil their good life? Seeing Vicky's distress, he goes to make tea.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01m68vy)
Bobby Womack, with Damon Albarn and Peter Guralnick

With John Wilson.

Singer and songwriter Bobby Womack is one of soul music's great survivors. He reflects on a career which spans more than half a century, in which he's confronted illness, addiction and controversy.

He discusses his return to the studio for the first time in almost a decade, at the invitation of Damon Albarn, and Albarn himself looks back at the dramatic conclusion to their first recording session for a Gorillaz album.

Bobby Womack also recalls his less-than-positive first reaction to the news that The Rolling Stones had recorded his song It's All Over Now - although he readily admits that his views changed when he received the first of many large royalty cheques.

And music biographer Peter Guralnick charts how singer and entrepreneur Sam Cooke played a key role in Womack's early career: Bobby Womack remembers Cooke's ready advice, which included always to own a good ring and a good watch - valuables which could be pawned if a concert promoter failed to pay up.

Producer John Goudie.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m68v5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01m68w2)
Forensic Science

In The Report this week Hannah Barnes investigates the state of the forensic science industry in the UK. Earlier this year the national forensic science service (FSS) closed, leaving the UK as the only European country without a national service to analyse evidence for criminal investigations. How has the privatisation of the industry impacted our criminal justice system? We hear worries from legal professionals and forensic scientists that the system is increasingly fragmented meaning errors are falling through the cracks. We speak to those at the heart of cases where innocent people have spent time in jail because of DNA mix-ups in private labs.

Presenter: Hannah Barnes.
Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.


THU 20:30 In Business (b01m68w4)
Face the Music

Public spending cuts are putting a big squeeze on orchestras all over the world. Peter Day hears how musicians are trying to find new ways of ensuring that the bands play on.
Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


THU 21:00 Helping Hamlet: Can Science Cure Procrastination? (b01m5hhw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 Fry's English Delight (b01m67yw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01m46by)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m68w6)
How unified is the Syrian opposition? Latest on the South African mining crisis. Concerns for privacy in the use of drones in the UK.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m68w8)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 9

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 9 of 10: Following the rape, Lecoeur is hiding in the charnels of Les Innocents. He Has a pistol. Armed with only a spade, Baratte goes looking for him.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack (b0137yqf)
Series 2

Episode 4

The human chameleon's host of comic characters from a deluded teenager to a nonagenarian Diva.

Multi-paced, one woman Fast Show starring Lucy Montgomery.

With:

Philip Pope
Sally Grace
Waen Shepherd
Natalie Walter

Written by Lucy Montgomery with additional material by Steve Burge, Jon Hunter, Fay Rusling, Abigail Burdess, Suk Pannu, Andy Wolton and Joseph Morpurgo.

Script Editor: Dan Tetsell

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2011.


THU 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgprr)
Cowards

Episode 3

Sketch comedy from Tom Basden, Stefan Golaszewski, Tim Key and Lloyd Woolf.



FRIDAY 31 AUGUST 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01m46cv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m7nqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m46cx)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m46cz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m46d1)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01m46d3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m6b25)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4 from Wales with the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01m6b27)
Eleventh hour negotiations take place today to draw a up a code of practice which dairy farmers say would give them a fairer future. Farmers groups and processors had set today as the deadline for the voluntary agreement on contract terms. Also in the programme, global dairy commodities are gaining in value, but will that necessarily translate into farmgate price increases in the UK? And, dog walkers are being urged to clear up in the countryside and prevent a costly cattle disease.

Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01m6b29)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b01m4c1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m7p7g)
Ross King - Leonardo and the Last Supper

Episode 5

An eyewitness records the fitful progress that Leonardo was making on his masterpiece and the frustration of the prior of Santa Maria delle Grazie at the artist's capricious regime. But when his Last Supper was finally finished, the world came to wonder at this new marvel.

Nigel Anthony reads from Leonardo and the Last Supper by Ross King.
Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m6b50)
Inga Bejer Engh, sperm donation, Astrid Bonfield and Stealing Sheep

On the first day of his trial for the murder of 77 Norwegians last year, Anders Breivik gave a Nazi-style salute. The Chief Prosecutor, Inga Bejer Engh responded by walking over and calmly shaking his hand. It demonstrated that Bejer Engh was not going to be provoked and the trial would be conducted in a fair and reasoned fashion. She will be speaking to Jenni about the prosecution and about the implications of Breivik's twenty one year sentence, for Norway's penal system.

Sperm Donation: Should a man be able to donate sperm without his wife's consent? Or should it be treated as a joint 'marital asset'? To discuss the current assessment that takes place, and the ethical issues involved, Jenni is joined by Dr. Allan Pacey, Fertility Expert at the University of Sheffield and Dr Anna Smajdor, Lecturer in Medical Ethics, University of East Anglia.

In December this year, the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund is being wound up. Over the past fifteen years it has awarded over £100 million to organisations who help the vulnerable and those who have been marginalised in society. Jenni is joined by Chief Executive - Dr Astrid Bonfield - who will be giving her only broadcast interview to Woman's Hour.

Liverpool has always had a vibrant music scene; a guaranteed legacy for the city that spawned The Beatles. But its music is traditionally male-dominated - bands like Gerry & The Pacemakers, The Lightening Seeds, The La's and The Searchers all came from Merseyside. The city is now home to an all-girl, pysch-folk band called Stealing Sheep, and they're moulding a brand new Merseyside sound.

Presented by Jenni Murray.
Produced by Susannah Tresilian.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m6b52)
Craven: Series 3

Episode 5

Starring Maxine Peake.

The case is looking too big to solve and the body count is rising. Craven and Macca may finally get to talk, if her mum doesn't get in the way - but Craven's priorities are exposed when work, family and love life collide.

Craven must find La Thu Huyen if she has any chance of solving this case. And she must work out a strategy to deal with her mother and her lover at home.

This case concludes - Craven returns as an Afternoon Drama on Radio 4 on Monday 3rd September.

Producer: Justine Potter
A Red Production Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 Missing, Presumed... (b01m6cr6)
Episode 2

We've all heard of Madeleine McCann, the missing child who continues to stare out from the pages of the British press - her face frozen in time from the moment she went missing. Yet Madeleine is just one of around 220,000 British children who disappear each year. Although the majority of children who go missing are found in the first 48 hours, some are not.

From abducted children to teenage runaways, these children become the concern of the Missing Persons' Bureau. Many of them are teenagers running away from home to become vulnerable 'sofa surfers' who can fall into harm's way.

Reporter Penny Marshall goes into the Missing Persons' Bureau to understand what happens when missing children fade from the headlines, yet remain unfound. She meets the intelligence officers trying to find the missing, and the family members who are 'living in limbo' - families like the Gosdens, whose 14-year-old son Andrew went missing in 2007 and has never been found.

Presented by Penny Marshall

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Beauty of Britain (b01m6cr8)
Series 3

The Broad Fit Footglove

Series 3 Episode 3
The Broad Fit Footglove

Beauty looks after Ray an ex-footballer who is young at heart. Or is it Beauty who is aging up from spending so much time with the elderly? Beauty becomes protective of Ray when a long lost relative appears out of the blue.

Comedy about a Southern African carer who looks after the elderly written by Christopher Douglas and Nicola Sanderson.

CAST:
Jocelyn Jee Esien ..... Beauty
Duncan Preston ..... Ray
Janine Duvitski ..... Linda
Felicity Montagu ..... Sally
Nicola Sanderson ..... Karen
Phaldut Sharma ..... Anil
Indira Joshi ..... Mrs. Gupte
Don Gilet .... Shawn, Bouncer
Rachel Atkins ..... Yvonne
Christopher Douglas ..... Neil

Written by ..... Christopher Douglas and Nicola Sanderson
Produced by ..... Tilusha Ghelani.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01m6crb)
Paralympic travel, tackling chuggers and banned sports supplements

It's been linked to doping offences by Olympians and Paralympians - now a popular sports supplement has been banned in the UK.

New warnings about travelling during the Paralympics. We followed the advice about the Olympic travel chaos that never was, so will we be as willing to work from home, walk or cycle during the Paralympics?

Plus, Nottingham was the first place in the UK to introduce a workplace parking levy. We examine how it's faired during its first six months.

And we're hoping to speak to the head of the International Paralympic Committee, Sir Philip Craven, about why he doesn't want us to describe Paralympians as disabled.

Producer: Joe Kent
Presenter: Peter White.


FRI 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m6crd)
Alex Salmond

The New Elizabethans: Alex Salmond

Jim Naughtie considers the influence of Alex Salmond, one of the leading Scottish politicians of the Second Elizabethan age. Salmond's passion for an independent Scotland has changed the political geography of the British Isles and may yet change it even more radically.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

Producer: Alison Hughes
They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01m46d5)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01m6crg)
National and international news with James Robbins. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Poetic Justice (b01m7qqx)
Episode 5

It may be surprising to discover that writing poetry is a popular activity among prisoners.

Prison is a place where men and women are forced to look into themselves, where they have the time and the solitude to reflect on their lives and the consequences of their actions. Often this introspection finds an outlet through poetry.

Each day this week, performance poet Mr Gee visits former prisoners, young people who are considered to be at risk of offending, and those currently held in custody.

In each episode, Mr Gee facilitates a poetry-writing workshop. Through the deeply personal discussions that take place during the creative process, and through the poetry produced, we discover moving and powerful accounts of how the participants have been affected by the wounds they have both sustained and inflicted on others.

The goal is to help the participants avoid trouble in the future, helping them understand the roots of their offending behaviour and hopefully reducing the number of potential victims.

Episode 5: Boundaries
Featuring young people in Edinburgh at risk of offending, who give Mr Gee a tour of the local areas where allegiances provide both a sense of community and a source of rivalry and conflict.

Produced by Andrew Wilkie and Adam Fowler
A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01m68vw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b017x5zh)
Terri-Ann Brumby - The Benefit of Time

Debbie Green is dull. Debbie Green is plain. Debbie Green works in Human Resources, where she has few friends, and lives a very mundane existence. That is, until she starts going to visit a hypnotist, who claims to be able to explore people's past lives. And guess what? Debbie, apparently, has had a very eventful past life - she was once Anne Boleyn. Or so Donald Cruikshank her hypnotist excitedly confirms. He is, of course, a charlatan, and he's gulling her. Or is he? Is she gulling him? As the sessions progress, and Debbie starts doing an office round-robin e-mail of her experiences, her popularity at work increases dramatically, as do her career prospects.

In our celebrity-fixated world, what better celebrity to conjure up - and then actually be - than a famous figure of history? And as Debbie climbs that greasy pole to success and high status, she leaves a trail of human devastation in her wake.

Original Music composed by David Chilton

Produced by Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01m6crj)
Norfolk

Eric Robson and the team join gardeners in Norfolk. Bob Flowerdew, Chris Beardshaw and Bunny Guinness are on the panel. In addition, Christine Walkden makes some surprising discoveries about birds' feeding habits.

Produced by Amy Racs & Robert Abel
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Questions answered in the programme:

Q. Which fruit trees should I plant in a new school orchard. I'm particularly interested in peach trees.
The variety 'Avalon Pride' can withstand peach leaf curl. Unfortunately, peach trees would crop during the school holidays. Alternatively, try Apricot. These varieties come recommended: 'Flavourcot' and 'Tomcot'. In addition, medlar, mulberry, quince, Mirabelle plum, fig or 'Golden Hornet' crab apple trees would be suitable.

Q. I've a lichen-type growth on my Acer and Salix. What is it and how do I treat it?
Lichen is a sign of clean air, moist atmosphere, but most importantly, that your trees are struggling a little. Try feeding them.

Q. When and how should I take cuttings from a Brugmansia?
Broadly speaking, you can prune and propagate at any time. To propagate: take 20-30cm cuttings, insert half-way into loam-based compost. Keep moist and cover with half plastic bottle.

Q. I grow Gardeners Delight tomatoes in an unheated greenhouse. Can the panel recommend larger tomatoes which are as flavoursome?
The varieties recommended were: Marmande, Pink brandywine, Alicante, Shirley.

Q. I've 7 x 7ft Hebe which is very woody. Can I prune it? I've been advised to dig it up.
You can prune them, but it's best to wait until the end of May/early June when they are in full growth. Prune it in stages, i.e. half the stems one year and the other half, the next. You may want to take a cutting incase the plant does not grow back.

Q. When a tree is pollarded or regularly pruned, is the root system reduced? I'm thinking of a Catalpa.
Yes, regularly pruning can reduce a tree's root system. Summer pruning can also cause the root system to die back.

Q. How can I encourage my hydrangea to flower?
Many hydrangeas will only flower on one year-old wood. Also, try feeding with potash.

Features
The varieties mentioned in Matthew Biggs' Eucalyptus feature are:

Eucalyptus paucilfora, Eucalyptus niphophila, Eucalyptus archeri, Eucalyptus risdonii, Eucalyptus stellulata, Eucalyptus Crenula, Eucalyptus Globulus.


FRI 15:45 Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Europe (b01m6crl)
How to See Europe by the Skin of your Teeth

Read by Mark Little.

The Hitch-hiker's Guide to Europe was the book most often stolen from British libraries in the 1970s. Mark Little reads from the young travellers' bible that nestled in every student rucksack forty years ago as they set off to explore Europe on £10 a week. Australian Ken Welsh was the hitcher who inspired thousands to follow "the infinite miles of tarmac and pot-holes which criss-cross the world, the magic ribbon which can lead to a thousand other worlds."

With a great deal of humour, some common sense and a spirit of recklessness lost to today's youngsters, Welsh's book covered everything from How To Hitch ("Providing a driver isn't obviously bombed out of his mind, my rule is to take any car that stops which has its bonnet pointed even vaguely in the direction I want to go...") to tips on How To Survive ("If you make the mistake of getting in with a fast driver who won't stop, make sounds which suggest you're about to throw up all over his upholstery...")

Re-reading it forty years on it's surprising what a different world it was then for the young traveller. There seemed to be more trust around (hitch-hikers are a rarity nowadays), and no real worries about roughing it far from home without the comfort of a mobile phone and by relying on the black markets, pawn shops or even blood banks when cash machines were simply not an option.

Produced by Neil Cargill
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01m6crn)
Neil Armstrong, Meles Zenawi, Carlo Curley and Phyllis Diller

Matthew Bannister on

The first man to set foot on the moon, Neil Armstrong. We hear the story of that historic voyage plus his classmates at school, his fellow Korean war pilot and the Professor who taught alongside him after he left NASA.

Also: the flamboyant Carlo Curley who made it his mission to bring organ music to the widest possible audience.

Meles Zenawi, Prime Minister of Ethiopia, once a darling of the West, he lost international support after his violent crackdown on the opposition

And Phyllis Diller, said to be America's first female stand up comedian.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01m6crq)
Is BBC radio suffering from an increase in technical problems? Many listeners think so, and over the last few months have sent in a flood of examples as part of Feedback's Operation Drop Out. Dropped lines, disappearing interviewees and correspondents who sound like Daleks. Roger asks technology controller Peter Coles what is going on. And the Today programme's Foreign Affairs Correspondent Mike Thomson reveals how a dropped line left him AWOL in North Korea.

History was made this week when Radio 4's Woman's Hour and 5Live's Men's Hour got together for a joint programme, broadcast simultaneously on both networks. Was it love across a crowded studio? And what did the listeners make of it? Roger gets the gossip from presenters Jane Garvey and Tim Samuels and editors Alice Feinstein and Gloria Abramoff.

In the hunt for Feedback's very own jingle, we reveal some lyrical, wry and frankly epic listener compositions. Do keep them coming.

And finally, we plan to hand a bound volume of your suggestions to the new Director General George Entwistle on his first day in the job, Monday 17th September. So let us know what you think should be in his in-tray.

Presented by Roger Bolton

Produced by Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01m6crs)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m46d7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Chain Reaction (b01m6crv)
Series 8

Caitlin Moran talks to Jennifer Saunders

The interviewee on the previous show, Caitlin Moran returns to interview her comedy hero, Jennifer Saunders. They talk shoes, Bananarama and women in comedy.

Talk tag show where the guest is the next interviewer.

Producer: Carl Cooper

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01m6d06)
Darrell's brooding about Joyce and Arthur, and Elona's had a bad day. She asks him to fix the washing machine, but he needs to see Matt first.
Darrell confronts Matt with his discomfort at their treatment of the Walters, and the fact that he's had to take the blame in front of Lilian. It's not fair. Matt insists it's equally unfair to keep an elderly couple in a house they can't cope with. He asks Darrell to give all the pipework a thorough check. Uncomfortable Darrell makes to refuse, but Matt says if he's got a problem he can take his tools elsewhere. Darrell declares he might just do that.
At home the washing machine row continues. Darrell wishes everyone would just leave him alone.
Lilian confides to Adam it's not always easy working with family. Thinking aloud, she asserts grimly that maybe she needs to choose how she wants to react. Spotting Fallon's 'comedy night' flyers in the shop she observes that everyone needs a laugh once in a while.
Lynda notices Vicky's distress. Vicky tells her that Down's has been confirmed, and about Mike's stance. She loves him, and she's desperate for him to want the baby too.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01m6d08)
Opera star Alfie Boe, TV drama The Bletchley Circle, organist Cameron Carpenter

With John Wilson, including an interview with singer Alfie Boe, as he publishes an autobiography My Story, about his rise from car mechanic in Blackpool to international opera, music and recording star.

ITV1's new murder mystery drama, The Bletchley Circle, stars Anna Maxwell Martin and Rachael Stirling. Set in 1951, the series follows four highly intelligent women who were code-breakers at Bletchley Park during WWII. Having returned to civilian life, the four women reunite to use the skills they acquired during the war to crack a murder case. Natalie Haynes reviews.

As Cameron Carpenter prepares for two afternoon Proms taking place this weekend, John met the flamboyant and unconventional organist while he rehearsed late into the night on the Royal Albert Hall's Grand Organ. Subjects up for discussion included Cameron's special organ shoes, why size doesn't matter, and how the launch of his digital organ looks set to rock the organ world.

And film critic Jason Solomons reports from the Venice Film Festival, which got underway this week.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m6b52)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01m6d0b)
Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, with the former Conservative MP, author and broadcaster Edwina Currie, the Chief Political Correspondent of The Independent, Steve Richards, the Chief Executive of the gay rights organisation, Stonewall, Ben Summerskill and the Sunday Times Columnist, Minette Marrin.

Producer: Isobel Eaton.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01m6d0d)
The alchemy of memory

John Gray explores the role of memory in giving meaning to our lives. Through the writings of J.G. Ballard, he reflects on how we struggle to preserve our past but at the same time sometimes long to leave it behind.

Gray praises the power of Ballard's imagination - and his enchanting fables - to make good all this.

His conclusion is upbeat. "Through the alchemy of memory the leaden buildings in which [Ballard] wandered as a boy became the golden vistas of his fiction, and the traumas of his childhood were transmuted into images of fulfilment".

Producer:
Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b01m6d0g)
Freud: The Case Histories

The Wolf Man

Deborah Levy's dramatisation of Sigmund Freud's iconic case study 'The Wolf Man- The History of an Infantile Neurosis' translated by Louise Adey Huish.

It is 1910 when the depressed son of a wealthy Russian landowner arrives in Vienna. Sergei Pankejeff, 24 years old, is suffering from debilitating fears and phobias. Freud's treatment of Pankejeff is centred around an enigmatic dream his patient had as a very young child; a dream of white wolves. Freud invites Sergei to return to his childhood as a means of understanding his current depression. Analysing the child inside the man Freud unlocks the meaning of the wolves that haunt Sergei's dreams

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01m46d9)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m6d33)
A judge dismisses a Russian oligarch's billion dollar damages claims - but should this case have been heard in London at all?

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney says he will 'restore the promise of America' but can he deliver?

And Israelis' fears in the face of a new Egypt.

With Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m7qr1)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 10

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 10 of 10: The miners have built a pyre for their dead comrade and hold a vigil in the ruins of the church.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b01m5jtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgpss)
On the Hour

Episode 3

Ireland hits the headlines, as the programme celebrates its 33rd birthday. Chris Morris fronts the news satire. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in May 1992.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01m5dwb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01m5dwb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01m5hht)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01m5hht)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01m5n7n)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01m5n7n)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01m68v5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01m68v5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01m6b52)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01m6b52)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 MON (b01mgnk8)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 TUE (b01mgnvw)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 WED (b01mgp34)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 THU (b01mgprr)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 FRI (b01mgpss)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01m19p7)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01m6d0d)

Amanda Vickery on... Men 09:00 MON (b01m5dw2)

Amanda Vickery on... Men 21:30 MON (b01m5dw2)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01m48vw)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01m19p5)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01m6d0b)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01m49vh)

Beauty of Britain 11:30 FRI (b01m6cr8)

Before They Were Famous 23:15 WED (b01m5nt2)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01m4bty)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01m4bty)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b01m5hjz)

Bleak Expectations 11:30 MON (b00wlgnn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01m5hkf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01m5k3h)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01m5nqw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01m68w8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01m7qr1)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01m451j)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01m5dw6)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01m5dw6)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01m5gyw)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01m5gyw)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01m7sbp)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01m7sbp)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01m7nqd)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01m7nqd)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01m7p7g)

Brian Gulliver's Travels 11:30 WED (b01m5n7s)

Brief Lives 14:15 TUE (b01m5jpg)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01m4c1r)

Chain Reaction 12:30 SAT (b01m19nz)

Chain Reaction 18:30 FRI (b01m6crv)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01m0f2b)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01m4c90)

Comic Fringes 19:45 SUN (b01m5ddy)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b01m5jlk)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01m5jlk)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b01m182v)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b01m68v7)

Drama 14:15 MON (b012fts1)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01m5nlq)

Drama 14:15 THU (b015p86d)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b017x5zh)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 THU (b010y376)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01m473q)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01m5dvy)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01m5gn8)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01m5lqr)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01m67yr)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01m6b27)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01m19nv)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01m6crq)

Fixing Broken Banking 12:00 SAT (b01m47xd)

Fixing Broken Banking 21:00 SUN (b01m47xd)

Fixing Broken Banking 15:00 WED (b01m47xd)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01m5nqr)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b01m6d0g)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01m47xb)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01m5hk7)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01m5jw7)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01m5nqm)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01m68vy)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01m6d08)

Fry's English Delight 09:00 THU (b01m67yw)

Fry's English Delight 21:30 THU (b01m67yw)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01m19nn)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01m6crj)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b01m5jtk)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b01m5jtk)

Head to Head 09:30 MON (b01m5dw4)

Helping Hamlet: Can Science Cure Procrastination? 11:00 TUE (b01m5hhw)

Helping Hamlet: Can Science Cure Procrastination? 21:00 THU (b01m5hhw)

Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Europe 15:45 FRI (b01m6crl)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b01m183p)

In Business 20:30 THU (b01m68w4)

In Praise of the Lido 10:30 SAT (b01m47q3)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01m5k39)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01m5k3c)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01m5k3c)

Isy Suttie: Pearl and Dave 18:30 TUE (b0196rpc)

Jack's Return Home 23:00 TUE (b01m5k3k)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01m0lgq)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b01m5hk3)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01m19ns)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01m6crn)

Lewis's Return Home 16:00 MON (b01m5fnr)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01m499v)

Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack 23:00 THU (b0137yqf)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01m183c)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01m68vr)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01m19r9)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01m464m)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01m466f)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01m467s)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01m4693)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01m46bg)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01m46cv)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01m5n7j)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01m5n7j)

Missing, Presumed... 11:00 FRI (b01m6cr6)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01m19rm)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01m464w)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01m466p)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01m4681)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01m469c)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01m46bq)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01m46d3)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01m464y)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01m19rp)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01m4652)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01m4656)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01m19s6)

News 13:00 SAT (b01m19ry)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 13:30 SUN (b01m4c77)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01m4bvs)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b01m5gy0)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01m4c92)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01m4c92)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01m1837)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01m68vm)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01m495d)

PM 17:00 MON (b01m5hk1)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01m5jvl)

PM 17:00 WED (b01m5nlv)

PM 17:00 THU (b01m68vt)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01m6crs)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01m5d8b)

Poetic Justice 13:45 MON (b01m5fnm)

Poetic Justice 13:45 TUE (b01m5hnn)

Poetic Justice 13:45 WED (b01m7sbr)

Poetic Justice 13:45 THU (b01m7nqg)

Poetic Justice 13:45 FRI (b01m7qqx)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b01m5d2r)

Political Animals 23:00 WED (b01m5nt0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01m19xj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01m5dvw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01m5gn6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01m5lqp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01m67yp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01m6b25)

Profile 19:02 SAT (b01m499x)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01m499x)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01m499x)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b01m0lgj)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b01m5fnp)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01m4bwf)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01m4bwf)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01m4bwf)

Robin Black - If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This 00:30 SUN (b00sm5bj)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00csq07)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01m47f0)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01m49cd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01m19rh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01m464r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01m466k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01m467x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01m4697)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01m46bl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01m46cz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01m19rc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01m19rk)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01m19s0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01m464p)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01m464t)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01m465b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01m466h)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01m466m)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01m467v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01m467z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01m4695)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01m4699)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01m46bj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01m46bn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01m46cx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01m46d1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01m19s4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01m465g)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01m466w)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01m4685)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01m469k)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01m46bw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01m46d7)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01m4bvq)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01m4bvq)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b01m5hhy)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01m4c1p)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01m4bwc)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01m4c1t)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01m5d8d)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01m5d8d)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01m5hk5)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01m5hk5)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01m5jw1)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01m5jw1)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01m5nqk)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01m5nqk)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01m68vw)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01m68vw)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01m6d06)

The Education Debates 22:15 SAT (b01m1721)

The Education Debates 20:00 WED (b01m5nqp)

The F-Word: A History of Federalism 20:00 MON (b01m5hk9)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01m1839)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01m68vp)

The Floating World of Hokusai 11:30 THU (b01m68v9)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01m4c33)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01m4c33)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b01m47x8)

The Future Is Halal 17:00 SUN (b01m0pq2)

The Island 11:00 WED (b01m5n7q)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b01m5gth)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b01m5gth)

The Lifecycle of a Bullet 20:00 TUE (b01m5k37)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01m6n45)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 MON (b01m5fnh)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 TUE (b01m5hkm)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 WED (b01m5n7x)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 THU (b01m68vh)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 FRI (b01m6crd)

The Philosopher's Arms 15:00 TUE (b01m5jkl)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01m68w2)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b01m4c1w)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b01m4c1w)

The Seafarer 23:30 SAT (b01m0f2g)

The Summerland Story 11:00 MON (b01m5dwd)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01m4c3r)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01m5hkc)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01m5k3f)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01m5nqt)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01m68w6)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01m6d33)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01m171n)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01m5nls)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01m47d9)

Today 06:00 MON (b01m5dw0)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01m5grw)

Today 06:00 WED (b01m5lqt)

Today 06:00 THU (b01m67yt)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01m6b29)

Tonight 19:15 SUN (b01m183t)

Twin Nation 09:30 THU (b01460f1)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01m19rr)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01m19rt)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01m19rw)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01m19s2)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01m4650)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01m4654)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01m4658)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01m465d)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01m466r)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01m466t)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01m466y)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01m4683)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01m4687)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01m469h)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01m469m)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01m46bs)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01m46by)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01m46d5)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01m46d9)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01m5dj1)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01m5dj3)

When the Dog Dies 18:30 WED (b013229w)

Witness 14:45 SUN (b01m4c8y)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01m495b)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01m5dw8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01m5hhr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01m5n7l)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01m68v3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01m6b50)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b01m0ppt)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b01m5jth)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01m5fnk)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01m5hnl)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01m5n7z)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01m68vk)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01m6crg)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01m5dwg)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01m5hj0)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01m5n7v)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01m68vc)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01m6crb)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01m19xl)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b01m19xl)