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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 AUGUST 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01lv846)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01lv7xw)
Kate Summerscale - Mrs Robinson's Disgrace

Episode 5

"The judges were presented with a singular case on Monday 14 June, a month after they had heard their first divorce suit. Henry Oliver Robinson, a civil engineer, was petitioning for the dissolution of his marriage on the grounds that his wife, Isabella, had committed adultery, and he submitted as evidence a diary in her hand."

These bare facts - the angry husband and the incriminating words - are, in the author's hands, shaped to tell a riveting story, that says much about the individuals involved and the social world they moved in...

The revealing of Isabella's diaries has caused much ado, and forced what will be an unforgettable trial
in a sweltering summer in London.

Reader Emma Fielding
Producer Duncan Minshull.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01lv84b)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01lv84d)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01lv84g)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01lv84j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01lv895)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Mark Coffey.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01lv897)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01lv84l)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01lv84n)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01lv4p6)
Ireland - Peat

The peat bogs of Ireland's midlands have become a battlefield, with opinions divided on how they should best be managed in the future. Helen Mark looks beyond the present-day arguments and travels to Counties Longford, Roscommon and Offaly to find out how attitudes to the bog have evolved over centuries. From the Iron Age Corlea trackway, an oak road discovered just a few years ago, perfectly preserved in peat, to startling evidence of early Christian links with Africa and memories of childhood days spent peat cutting , Helen explores what the bog has to tell us - and what it might have in store for the future.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Moira Hickey.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01lz359)
Farming Today This Week

Across America farmers are surveying the remnants of the crops they planted just a few months ago - ruined by scorching temperatures and little rain. Up to a quarter of the corn in some states has already been lost due to drought. And it's impact will soon be felt here at home with experts predicting a 10% rise in UK food prices over the next twelve months.

In this special programme, Anna Hill is at the Missouri State Fair to witness the plight of Mid West farmers living through the worst drought in four generations and asking politicians what can and is being done.

This programme is presented by Anna Hill and produced on location in the USA by Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01lv84q)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01lz35c)
Morning news and current affairs presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01lz35f)
Tamsin Greig, Sally Becker, Ray Davies, Benjamin Grosvenor Inheritance Tracks.

Richard Coles & John McCarthy with actress Tamsin Greig; listener Lalage Cambell who sealed a friendship thanks to a washed-up wallet; Sally Becker, aka the Angel of Mostar, who carried the Olympic flag at the Opening Ceremony; Sophie and Louis Staley who organised their parents' wedding; and Dan Fox who sprang his friend from a Kabul gaol with the aid of a kipper tie. We meet the 90 year old Tottenham barber whose shop was trashed during last year's riots, JP Devlin gets a tour of The Kinks recording studio with frontman Ray Davies; and piano prodigy Benjamin Grosvenor shares his Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 10:30 In the Lounge with Rich Morton (b01cwszp)
For many casual listeners, the music usually defined as 'lounge' may conjure up something kitsch and outdated, bringing to mind the world of Austin Powers or the sentimental, string-sodden arrangements of their parents' record collections. As comedian, composer and lounge aficionado Rich Morton discovers, there's a large and healthy subculture of lounge lovers who view it as anything but outdated. For the past twenty years, clubs devoted to lounge music have been thriving, and several successful series of lounge compilations have brought obscure and sought-after tracks by some of the greatest 20th century pop and jazz performers to the ears of a new generation.

As a composer and collector of lounge tunes, Rich goes in search of the alchemy that produces a lounge classic: whether it's the voice of a Rat Pack regular, the tight brassy arrangement of a Neil Hefti or a Quincy Jones, the timeless simplicity of a Burt Bacharach or Tony Hatch melody - or simply a mood, something indefinable, laid-back, evocative of a time and a place that's anywhere but here.

Rich meets fellow lounge collectors, club owners and composers - with the shared passion for a music that's often overlooked or derided but, as the programme reveals, constantly being reinvented. New technology means that classic tracks are being re-discovered and shared as never before, producing fascinating advances and musical hybrids within lounge culture.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b01lz35h)
Mental Health

One in three of us will be affected by mental illness at some time during our lifetime. It can take various forms from the most common - depression, to psychotic illness. Kendall's guests explore the way mental illness is viewed and treated around the world, and what can be done to help.

The Indian psychiatrist Vikram Patel is at the forefront of a campaign to promote global mental health. His non-governmental organization in Goa pioneers ways to treat mental health problems in places with few resources, a theme he has also written about in his book "Where There's No Psychiatrist".

Matthew Johnstone is an artist and writer based in Sydney. He first experienced depression in his mid-20s and he describes how he tried to cover it up so he could continue his successful advertising career. In his bestselling illustrated book "I Had a Black Dog", Johnstone used the character of a black Labrador to communicate his experience. He now works part-time as the Creative Director of the Black Dog Institute in Australia.

Gwen Adshead is a forensic psychiatrist and psychotherapist at Broadmoor, Britain's highest security institution for offenders with mental disorders, well known in Britain because it's where the country's most notorious killers are sent if the court declares them "criminally insane'. She believes that learning to tell your own story is the key to getting to grips with all sorts of mental illness, even for her patients.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01lz36n)
French police have been placed on higher alert after rioting in the northern city of Amiens. Christian Fraser says the unrest poses a growing challenge to the new president, Francois Hollande.

Government forces have been re-deployed from north-east Syria. Orla Guerin believes the Kurds, who've long wanted to establish their own homeland in that area, see this as a window of opportunity.

There've been more protests in Delhi against corruption in public life. But Mark Tully wonders if public support for the anti-corruption movement is ebbing away.

How will life change in Egypt now there's a president from the Muslim Brotherhood? It's a question exercising many including foreign visitors to Cairo like Edwin Lane. He speculates whether time might soon be called on the capital's thriving bar scene.

And Daniel Nasaw tells of the difficulties and the embarrassments an American can face when he decides to get to grips with Farsi, the language of the Iranians.


SAT 12:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01lz7vz)
Peer to Peer Lending

Big British banks are now widely accused of damaging the economy by failing to support their customers.

In the third programme of this four-part series,Michael Robinson reports on initiatives to do without banks altogether. With so-called peer to peer lending, borrowers and investors are matched directly through sophisticated websites promising better returns to investors and cheaper loans to borrowers.

The programme shows how the systems work, examines the possible pitfalls and asks whether such direct contacts, without the intervention of banks might form a significant part of the future financial landscape.

At least one senior Bank of England official thinks it might.


SAT 12:30 Chain Reaction (b01lv7ys)
Series 8

Derren Brown interviews Tim Minchin

Last week's interviewee, Illusionist Derren Brown, dispenses with the trickery and gets inside the mind of Tim Minchin by cleverly asking him some questions then listening to the answers. They talk beliefs, magic, music and Minchin.

Producer ..... Carl Cooper

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01lv84s)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01lv84v)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01lv7yz)
Bourne End, Buckinghamshire

Shaun Ley chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Bourne End, Buckinghamshire with panellists Simon Heffer of the Daily Mail; Professor Susan Greenfield CBE of Oxford University; Debbie Bannigan of the drug and alcohol recovery charity Swanswell; and Sir David Bell, vice chancellor of Reading University and former Chief Inspector of Schools.

Producer: Miles Warde.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01lz7w1)
Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The topics discussed on Any Questions? were: Julian Assange, assisted suicide, education and rail.

The Questions included:

Can the panel advise the government on how to achieve a peaceful and low cost solution for the current crisis of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London?

The decision of the High Court to defer the case of Tony Nicklinson's assisted suicide back to parliament seems a cruel delay in an emotive situation. What are the panel's views?

Is the decline in the A-star-A pass rate at A-Level caused by weaker students, poorer teaching, harder exams, government interference, or a combination of these factors?

We know it costs lots of money to operate, maintain and improve Britain's railways, but who should pay for this, rail users only, or taxpayers and businesses more generally?

As we are on the river Thames, the setting for Jerome's Three Men In A Boat, who would the panel choose as their crew and why?

Producer: Anna Bailey.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00cps4n)
These Are the Times

Common Sense

The first part of Trevor Griffiths' two-part life of Thomas Paine, These are the Times.

Part 1, 'Common Sense', starts with Paine's arrival in America in 1774, a penniless immigrant from England. He finds himself in the middle of the ferment of the struggle for American Independence and sets about writing for the cause with such passion and brilliance that General Washington has his words read out to the soldiers before a crucial battle. But he makes enemies as well as friends in high places.

Music by John Tams

Directed by Clive Brill
Produced by Ann Scott
A Greenpoint production in association with Richard Attenborough for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01lz7y7)
Judy Murray, Camille Paglia, Queens of Comedy

Judy Murray on Andy, Jamie and sibling rivalry; Olympic gold medal winning Anna Watkins on the impact female success at the 2012 Games could have on women and sport; Joyce Grenfell, Beryl Reid and Victoria Wood - we celebrate the queens of television comedy; how to teach your children about equality; and which feminist classics make a good summer read?
Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Ruth Watts.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01lz7y9)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news with Patrick O'Connell.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b01lv897)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01lv84x)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01lv84z)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01lv851)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01lz7yc)
Clive Anderson, Nile Rodgers, Greg Proops, Meursault, Lillian Boutte

Clive asks 'Whose Line is it Anyway?' as he chats to Greg Proops, the American stand-up whose caustic gags and lengthy diatribes have been relished by audiences worldwide. 'The Funniest Man in the World' is now back at the Edinburgh Fringe, charming festival goers at the Assembly Rooms with an hour of vitriol and profanity.

Clive finds out why politics is the new rock 'n' roll from the award-winning columnist and broadcaster, Steve Richards. His topical fringe show lifts the curtain on British politics and invites the audience to take part and ask questions at a time when politics is all shook up.

Jan Ravens may not be a dead ringer for Arthur Smith but as a former Strictly contestant she's in her element at the Ballroom venue where she's starring as the mother of a struggling alcoholic in the world premiere of 'The Intervention' by David Florez.

Continuing on the family theme, Clive meets musical legend Nile Rodgers, whose autobiography 'Le Freak', reveals a life as extraordinary as his career. A real rags to riches story from one of the founder members of Chic whose written more hit songs than he's had hot dinners - although sometimes mixing the two as his book recalls scarfing down burgers with Diana Ross.

Music comes from Edinburgh's very own critically acclaimed indie-rock band, Meursault. They perform 'Flittin'' from their new album 'Something for the Weakened'.

And New Orleans' Musical Ambassador, Lillian Boutte, makes sure things are Sweet and Hot in the Loose Ends tent and performs 'Strong Medicine' with The Tom Finlay Trio. Oh la la - Mardi Gras? You bet!

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01lz7yf)
Dame Helen Ghosh

The most senior official at the Home Office is resigning after a 33-year civil service career.
Dame Helen Ghosh - who has led the department since January 2011 - will take up the role of director general of the National Trust.
She is one of a number of permanent secretaries who have left the civil service this year. She said she was "torn about leaving" but the chance to work for the National Trust was "a rare opportunity".
Dame Helen Ghosh has worked in Government since 1979 for both Conservative and Labour Ministers. Her tenure included controversy at Defra over the Rural Payments Agency and more recently at the Home Office with concerns over the Border Agency.
Chris Bowlby assesses her career and the qualities that propelled her to the senior ranks in Whitehall and asks what they tell us about the approach she is likely to bring to her new role.
Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01lz7yh)
Bidisha and guests Dreda Say Mitchell, Maeve Kennedy and Cahal Dallat review the week's cultural events including BBC Two's new drama serial Parades End starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Rebecca Hall and Alan Ayckbourn's new comedy Surprises which opens at Chichester Festival Theatre this week.

Ford Maddox Ford's key modernist novel Parades End, published as a series of four books between 1924 and 1928, is adapted for BBC television by Britain's foremost playwright, Sir Tom Stoppard, the first television drama he has written in almost 30 years. With a stellar cast including Benedict Cumberbatch, Rebecca Hall, Stephen Graham, Rupert Everett, Miranda Richards and Anne-Marie Duff, Parades End explores a formative period of British history - from the twilight years of the Edwardian era to the end of the First World War.

Naomi Alderman follows well trodden literary footsteps from Norman Mailer to Robert Graves in re-telling the story of Jesus Christ in her third novel The Liars' Gospel. Her narrators are Mary / Miryam, Iehuda of Qeriot / Judas, Caiaphas - the High Priest of the Temple and Bar Avo / Barrabas. Her first novel - Disobedience - won the Orange Prize for New Writing. How will her prose match up to telling one of the most well known stories in the world?

Take This Waltz stars Michelle Williams, whose previous films include My Week With Marilyn, Blue Valentine and Brokeback Mountain and is directed by Sarah Polley whose last film, Academy Award nominated Away From Her, starred Julie Christie as an older woman suffering from dementia. This film explores the age old question of what long term relationships do to love, sex and our images of ourselves.

Alan Ayckbourn explores the impact of long term relationships on love and sex in his new play - his 76th - Surprises which opens in a double bill with Absurd Person Singular at the Chichester Festival Theatre this week. Like Comic Potential he sets this play in the future in which humans have the ability to time travel and thus shape their own destiny. There are also robots, and much humour is derived from an android - Gorman - who develops the capacity for human emotion, played to great effect by Richard Stacey.

And seven years since the release of Ry Cooder's last ground breaking album - Chavez Ravine - the election of a new US President is marked by Cooder with the release of a new album - Election Special. Tracks such as Mutt Romney Blues, Guantanamo and The Wall Street Part of Town explore themes which resonate strongly in America and resurrects a genre now out of fashion - the protest song. Will we all be marching along?

Producer: Hilary Dunn.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01lz7yk)
Anthony Burgess: A Clockwork Archive

Anthony Burgess is best known as the author of A Clockwork Orange, published 50 years ago.

Burgess was born in 1917 in one of the poorest areas of North Manchester. It was entirely unpredictable that such a major literary figure and polymath would spring from such a humble background.He remained in Manchester until he graduated from the University, but never went back to live there and was careful to disguise his Northern accent.

Paul Morley - a fellow Northern exile - visits some of the key landmarks of Burgess's early life - Xaverian College where he was taught by strict Catholics from the Xaverian Brothers; the Free Trade Hall where he heard the Hallé Orchestra; Central Library where he began a lifelong process of self-education.

Paul also considers Burgess's continuing passion for writing classical music; his first creative ambition was to be a composer. He wrote over 200 pieces of pieces of classical music, including full-length symphonies and a ballet. Very little of his music was performed during his lifetime, but it is now attracting interest from musicians and academics.

Burgess's legacy includes not only 33 published novels, two autobiographies and a large amount of journalism but a previously unheard archive of about 800 audio cassettes and home movies. Paul Morley visits The International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester, which is cataloguing this rich, diverse and remarkable archive.

Contributors include Dr Andrew Biswell, biographer of Anthony Burgess and Director of The International Anthony Burgess Foundation; Paul Philips, author of a book about Burgess's music; and Dr Kevin Malone an expert on the music Burgess himself wrote for his own dramatized version of A Clockwork Orange.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01lsts9)
Thomas Mann - Buddenbrooks

Episode 1

Dramatised by Judith Adams with original music by Nico Muhly.

Michael Maloney and Barbara Flynn star in this story of an old Hanseatic merchant family fighting to keep their commercial supremacy in the changing world of 1840s Europe.

Four generations of Buddenbrooks try to sustain their inheritance - a once highly successful trading company in the port of Lubeck on the Baltic Sea - in a world where the old ways no longer work.

Harmonium and Flute by Rick Juckes.
Technical Presentation by David Fleming Williams.

Produced by Chris Wallis
A Watershed production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01lv853)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 In Pursuit of Dignity (b01lv26v)
Edward Stourton chairs a debate from the "Understanding Human Dignity" conference organised by the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales and Queen's Belfast. What is the relationship between human dignity and human rights? How do you define human dignity in the context of issues surrounding assisted dying, sexuality or freedom? To discuss these issues are Fr David Hollenbach a Jesuit and Professor of Human Rights and International Justice at Boston College in the United States; Denise Reaume, Professor of Law at Toronto University; Chris McCrudden, Professor of Human Rights and Equality Law at Queen's Belfast and Jeremy Waldron who teaches legal philosophy at New York University and is also Professor of Political and Social Philosophy at Oxford.

Producer: Mark O'Brien.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b01lswv0)
Another edition of the 48th series of Quote... Unquote, the popular quotations programme presented and devised by Nigel Rees. The guests this week are the author and actor Charlie Higson, radio presenter Martin Kelner, comedian Nat Luurtsema and critic Stephanie Merritt. The reader is Peter Jefferson.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


SAT 23:30 An Outcast of the Islands: Lady Grange (b01lstsf)
While making 'A Requiem for St Kilda' for Radio 4 (which won the Sony Feature Award), writer Kenneth Steven and producer Julian May came across the extraordinary story of Rachel, Lady Grange. The wife of James Erskine, Lord Justice Clerk of Scotland, she enjoyed a fashionable life in C18th Edinburgh. Their relationship soured - Grange kept a mistress in London - and they separated. Rachel, desperate to see her children, began accost her husband in the street. She had incriminating information, that Erskine had held meetings with Jacobite sympathisers at their house. Times were dangerous, so Erskine had his wife abducted.

She was dragged through the Highlands, and shipped to St Kilda. She spoke no Gaelic, the St Kildans no English. After seven years she smuggled messages to her solicitor in Edinburgh. They arrived two years after she wrote them and provoked a scandal. Her lawyer sent a ship, the Arabella, to rescue her - an early example of sending a gunboat. But Erskine (who had already held her funeral) had Rachel spirited away again. She was taken from island to island, and at last to Skye, where she died in 1745 - the very year when Prince Charlie landed.

Kenneth Steven visits the Special Collections Department of Edinburgh University Library, where, amazingly, one of Lady Grange's letters from St Kilda survives, describing in great detail the brutality of her abduction, and naming names.

He meets Margaret Macaulay, author of 'The Prisoner of St Kilda', who spent 7 years researching the story. He retraces her journey from Edinburgh to her final resting place in the far north of the Isle of Skye.

Siobhan Redmond reads from Lady Grange's letters, and Kenneth responds to her story with a series of new short lyric poems.

Producer: Julian May.



SUNDAY 19 AUGUST 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01m0d95)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lyf69)
We Are Stardust, We Are Golden...

The Carpenter

Read by Stuart Milligan.

These three short stories were commissioned by Radio 4 to mark the 40th anniversary of the famous Woodstock Music Festival. With different themes reflecting that momentous time, We Are Stardust We Are Golden concludes with The Carpenter by Laura Barton.

The story is told from the point of view of Mike, whose marriage to the woman he met at the festival has not worked out as they had both planned and hoped for. The dramatic events of one afternoon have him wondering what really happened to the girl he met there and whether things could have been different.

Producer: Cherry Cookson
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m0d97)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m0d99)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m0d9c)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01m0d9f)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01m0f1m)
The bells of Durham Cathedral.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01lz7yf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01m0d9h)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01m0f1p)
Life on Hold

What does it mean for our ordinary lives to be unexpectedly interrupted? When we struggle with a bereavement, caring for a loved one or attempt to recover after being suddenly uprooted, we can feel that time has come to a stand still.

Elaine Storkey reflects on the moments when we experience an unexpected pause in our normal lives and how we learn to set them in motion again.

With readings from John Milton, Anne Enright and Nahida Izzat and music by Paul Robeson, Bach and Mahalia Jackson.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b01m0f1r)
Little Owls

The little owl is not only our smallest breeding owl, but is also our only introduced one. Little owls, which aren't much bigger than a mistle thrush, were introduced to the UK from Continental Europe in the second half of the 19th century. Since then they have prospered and unlike many introduced species, have been generally welcomed.

For Living World, Miranda Krestovnikoff visits a Wiltshire village which is home to a thriving population of the owls. This is the study area of Emily Joachim, a Ph.D student at the University of Reading who for four years has been following the breeding success of little owls in nest-boxes around an equestrian centre. The boxes, some of which are converted army ammunition boxes, allow her access to the owl chicks and to monitor how the birds are faring from season to season. This is important because she and other ornithologists suspect that little owls are declining in parts of England and Wales, and the reasons for this are not clear. While Emily's study can't produce easy answers, it is showing what the owls eat, and how they cope with variations in climate.For example, one study pair raised a record five chicks even in this recent damp spring, showing that they are robust and capable of adapting to the worst English summer for some time.

Together Miranda and Emily have intriguing glimpses of the owls and hear their distinctive call as dusk falls. Emily also has good advice for anyone with little owls on their land and who wants to keep them there.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01m0d9k)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01m0d9m)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01m0f1t)
This week Patriarch Kirill of Moscow, head of the Russian Orthodox Church is visiting Poland to meet senior Polish Roman Catholic bishops to sign a document of reconciliation and in the aftermath of the "Pussy riot" trial what's the significance of the protest? Peter Van Dyke reports from Moscow

Beyond the bright lights of midtown Manhattan, a dozen representatives from different churches, were introduced to a variety of Christian, Jewish and Muslim communities around the city, and the different ways in which they worship the same god. Matt Wells reports.

A Gallup Poll shows Africa as the most devout region of the World while the USA is becoming less religious. Professor Douglas Davies explores the findings

Plans have been drawn up to urge communities and churches to work closely together to prevent "ritual abuse" in cases such as Victoria Climbie and Kristy Bamu. Simon Bass from Churches Child Protection and Bishop Joe Aldred spokesperson for Black Churches discuss.

Interview with Eva Loeffler, daughter of Sir Ludwig Guttman, father of the Paralympic Games and how his Jewish faith influenced his work and life.

On the 400th anniversary of the Pendle Witch Trials Kevin Bocquet explores the history and joins a commemorative walk.

Is religious belief causing sick children to suffer needlessly? We hear from Jeremy Howat, the father of a child who was written off by doctors but survived, followed by a discussion with Rev Jim Linthicum - Great Ormond St Hospital Chaplain & Dr Andrew Ferguson, Christian Medical Fellowship.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01m0f1w)
Streetwise Opera

Matthew Peacock, founder of the charity Streetwise Opera, and Pamela Cooke, a former Streetwise performer, make the Radio 4 Appeal on their behalf.
Reg Charity: 1092931
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Streetwise Opera.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01m0d9p)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01m0d9r)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01m0f1y)
A service anticipating the Paralympic Games and exploring the encounter with God through disability. Led by The Revd Yvonne Stone, from the Olympic Chaplaincy Team in Coventry. The preacher will be Dr Mike Townsend, Chair of Through the Roof and a Trustee of the Royal National Institute for the Blind. With the Coventry Singers, directed by Paul Leddington Wright. Producer, Mark O'Brien.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01lv7z1)
Sherlock Holmes and the Romance of Reason

John Gray reflects on the enduring appeal of Sherlock Holmes at a time when we've lost confidence in the power of reason alone to solve problems. "Seeming to find order in the chaos of events by using purely rational methods, he actually demonstrates the enduring power of magic."
Producer:
Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01m0f20)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01m0f22)
Writer ..... Simon Frith
Director ..... Kim Greengrass
Editor ..... John Yorke

David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Kathy Perks ..... Hedli Niklaus
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Mike Tucker ..... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Natalie Hollins ..... Maddie Glasbey
Pawel Jasinski ..... Max Krupski
Darrell Makepeace ..... Dan Hagley
Rosa Makepeace ..... Anna Piper
Arthur ..... David Hargreaves
Joyce ..... Ann Beach.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b01m2vmg)
60s Girl Singers

In this edition of The Reunion, Sue MacGregor reunites five women whose pop success helped make the sixties swing.

When people think about the music of the sixties, generally they think of The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, but the girl singers of the period were also highly successful and important. In the UK alone, Cilla Black had seventeen top forty hits, Dusty Springfield and Sandie Shaw had fifteen and Petula Clark had thirteen. This doesn't include the success they all enjoyed abroad: these girls were international stars having hits all over Europe and in the United States.

But success did not always bring happiness and, for many of the girl singers of the period, there were major lows alongside the dizzying highs. The sixties may have been swinging, but it wasn't an easy time for the women of the period who, as well as having to navigate the vagaries of a career in show business, often found themselves the focus of enormous attention from the media and the public. It wasn't always welcome. The gulf between their public lives and their private lives was sometimes huge.

Joining Sue MacGregor is: Petula Clark, the child star of the 1940s whose career went stratospheric in the 1960s; Sandie Shaw, the barefoot pop princess who won the Eurovision Song Contest; Helen Shapiro, Britain's first teen pop star who was supported by The Beatles, Jackie Trent, singer and songwriter who wrote hits for Petula Clark, Scott Walker and many others; and Vicki Wickham, the legendary producer of Ready Steady Go who went on to manage Dusty Springfield.

Producer: Brian McCluskey
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01lswv8)
Series 64

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons challenges Paul Merton, Miles Jupp, Pam Ayres and Charles Collingwood to speak for 60 seconds. From 2012.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01m0f24)
A Guide to Spice, part 1: Cloves

Sheila Dillon embarks on a journey through the world of spice, starting with the clove. She follows the story of the clove from a harvest in Africa to sauce making with chef Jeremy Lee.

A culinary prize since the 3rd century BC, cloves have been a source of conflict and competition for centuries. They're still one of the most popular spices in our kitchen cupboards.

Reporter Nick Maes travels to Zanzibar, one of the world's leading producers of cloves, to find out how the dried, unopened flower buds are grown and then processed. He hears how years of decline have been reversed and plantations extended.

Along with Jeremy Lee, Niki Segnit, author of The Flavour Thesaurus, provides a helpful guide to flavour combinations and the uses of cloves in cooking.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01m0d9t)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01m0f26)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Mexico Rising (b01l7qxh)
If you imagine a lazy Mexican lounging in the sun, think again. Mexicans are the hardest workers in the world, according an OCED survey. The Mexico economy is amongst the top twenty in the world - and still growing despite the global economic crisis and drugs problems which have cost 60,000 lives over the past five years.

BBC's Central America correspondent Will Grant challenges the stereotypes as he investigates how foreign investment and exports are driving the economy. The richest man in the world is Mexican.

In 1994, after the so-called Tequila crisis when Mexican defaulted on US debt and devalued the peso, signing of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the sell-off of state-owned assets and companies kick-started the economy again.

Mexico now has free trade agreements with more than 40 countries - with growing export sectors such as the automobile, electronics and aviation industries. On the doorstep of the United States - the largest consumer market in the world - Mexico is looking to overtake China in US trade and this year hosted the G20.

But all the same, when the new Government takes over in November, it faces not only the challenges of drugs and corruption but also huge inequality in income and wages. The Mexico economy also relies on 23 billion dollars of remittances sent back to families by Mexicans crossing into the States to find work.

Will Grant talks to industry leaders, workers, politicians and economists about the state of the Mexico economy and how it will survive the global downturn.

Presented by Will Grant

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01lv7yg)
Hazlemere

Eric Robson visits Nicholas Parsons in his Buckinghamshire garden while Anne Swithinbank visits the Jodrell Laboratory at Kew Gardens to investigate the use of biological controls in the greenhouse.

Questions in the programme:
Q. I am quite successful growing courgettes from seed. However, some of my smaller fruit are turning yellow at the tip. Why is this?
Wet weather will cause the courgette flowers to rot. Next time you experience a really wet summer, try twisting off the flowers before they start to rot.

Q. I'm looking to reduce an area of scrub, mainly bramble, nettle etc and replace it with shrubs to attract bees. Which shrubs would the panel recommend?
First, be sure to clear the bramble roots well.

Planting suggestions: Dog roses, Ivy (for off-season flowering) and hawthorne.

Q. What is the secret of getting Crocosmia and Agapanthus to flower?
Agapanthus would need over-wintering indoors, ideally. Failing that, pot them up in the winter and insulate with fleece and bubblewrap. In spring, make sure they are exposed to adequate levels of sunlight.

Q. Is there a selective weedkiller which would kill the moss and weeds in my lawn but spare my violets?
Most lawn weedkillers target all broad-leaved plants, including violets. You would be better off manually digging up the weeds.

Q. How should Nicolas Parsons prune his Clematis 'Nelly Moser'?
In early spring, cut back to top-most large buds. This will give you the earliest bloom.

Q. What can I plant in my 6-inch bed - clay soil, shady and windy - located between my house wall and five-foot fence?
Try bedding plants in troughs.
Tolmiea menziesii or 'Piggyback plant'
New Guinea Impatiens
Heuchera

Produced by Amy Racs & Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b01m0f28)
Woodstock

The Woodstock music festival, held 43 years ago this weekend, has come to symbolise much of the idealism of the 1960s.

Hear from one man whose life was changed by those 3 days of peace, love and chaos in August 1969.

Patrick Colucci was training to become a Roman Catholic priest when he decided on the spur of the moment to join the stream of young people heading for a dairy farm in the Catskills in New York state.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01m0f2b)
Thomas Mann - Buddenbrooks

Episode 2

Dramatised by Judith Adams with original music by Nico Muhly.

Michael Maloney, Barbara Flynn. Joseph Millson and Clare Corbett star in this story of an old Hanseatic merchant family fighting to keep their commercial supremacy in the changing world of 1840s Europe.

Four generations of Buddenbrooks try to sustain their inheritance - a once highly successful trading company in the port of Lubeck on the Baltic Sea - in a world where the old ways no longer seem to work. It's 1848, and the revolutionary tide running through Europe has finally reached Lubeck. Will the old merchant families hold on to power? Of the Buddenbrook children, only Tom remains to learn the business. Toni is in Hamburg married to Herr Grunlich, and Christian has gone to England but would rather be in Valparaiso.

Harmonium and Flute by Rick Juckes
Technical Presentation by David Fleming Williams

Directed by Chris Wallis
An Autolycus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01m0f2d)
Aminatta Forna presents Open Book

Pat Barker won the Booker prize in 1995 for her novel The Ghost Road, the last in her Regeneration trilogy set during the First World War. Five years ago she returned to the Great War with the first in her new trilogy Life Class, based around the students studying at The Slade School for Art. Now she's publishing the second, Toby's Room, bringing back many of those original characters. Set in both 1912 and 1917, it bookends Life Class and follows the story of Elinor Brooke, and her journey to find the truth when her beloved brother Toby is reported "Missing, Believed Killed".

Over the years many writers find they are asked the same questions time and time again including - what does the title mean? how autobiographical is it? and where do your characters come from? Authors DJ Taylor and Linda Grant discuss the questions never to ask an author.

We continue our series exploring how writers have been inspired by the landscape. Jamie Andrews, lead curator of the British Library's Writing Britain: Wastelands to Wonderlands discusses the impact of industrialisation on our great literary classics from the novels Middlemarch and North and South and the poems of William Wordsworth to the lyrics of John Lennon.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 The Seafarer (b01m0f2g)
'There I heard nothing but the roaring sea
and ice-cold wave

At times birdsong was my only comfort
gannet's cackle and curlew's cry'

The Seafarer is one of the oldest poems in the English language, yet it still has power over our imaginations. Poet Simon Armitage immerses himself in its watery landscape to discover why it still holds us in its grip.

Last year, The Seafarer was brought to life in the bowels of the Royal Festival Hall. Here in this eerie, ship-like space, cellist Oliver Coates (artist-in-residence at the Southbank Centre), director/designer Netia Jones and sound designer David Shepherd created an extraordinary setting for the poem. Visitors were invited below decks to experience The Seafarer through sound, film and the words of a new translation by Amy Kate Riach.

This programme offers a chance to hear the translation once again - dramatically rendered by the actor Kenneth Cranham. Accompanied by sound effects and music from The Seafarer installation, the poem is delivered orally just as it would have been by the poet (or poets) who first fashioned it.

It's hard to be sure how Anglo-Saxon poets would have worked, but Simon Armitage speaks to academics (Professor North and Eric Lacey of University College London; Dr Jennifer Neville of Royal Holloway) and writer Kevin Crossley-Holland to find out what we know of the poets of this period.

It's likely that The Seafarer was composed by an early Christian poet (its second half is strongly Christian in tone), but the poem is remarkable for its ability to speak to readers who do not share the poet's faith. The programme explores the universal draw of one of the first sea poems in our island's literature.

Producer: Isabel Sutton
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 Game Changer: 20 Years of the Premier League (b01lt2vj)
Big business or community concern, club or corporation? Journalist Jim White reports on the first 20 years of England's Premier League when it has established itself as the most marketable and valuable domestic football competition in the world. But with new overseas players, managers and owners, has the sport become divorced from the communities it came from? Or is it accurately reflecting modern Britain?


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01lz7yf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01m0d9w)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01m0d9y)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m0db0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01m0f2j)
Liz Barclay makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

What do Alice Cooper and Steptoe and Son have in common? What's Phil Jupitas' phobia? And how many languages was Puppet on a String released in? You never know when you might come across those questions in a pub quiz. So for the answers, the authentic American sounds of the Dodge Brothers and Memphis Jug bands and much more, join Liz Barclay for Pick of the Week

Steptoe and Son - Radio 4
Before They were Famous - Radio 4
Octavia - Radio 4
Political Animals - Radio 4
I'm Suzy and I'm a Phobic - Radio 4
Mark Goes To Memphis - Radio 2
Crossing Continents - Radio 4
Generation E - Radio 4
The Reunion - Radio 4
Archive on 4 - Radio 4
Sound British Adventure - Radio 4
Front Row - Radio 4

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Bernadette McConnell.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01m0f2l)
Adam showers Ian with gifts and a booking at Milo's restaurant. He says it is a big 'thank you' for his support for the last few weeks.or is it because of his guilt over his night with Pawel?

After trying to tempt Mike with cookies for a few moments of his time, Vicky manages to get him to squeeze a rare night out at The Bull into his busy schedule.

On their way to the restaurant, Adam and Ian stop off at The Bull. Rhys is pranking Fallon with the suggestion that there is a coach load of hungry football supporters outside, waiting for their table. Frustrated with Rhys and the usual music nights, Fallon is looking for bigger things. Rhys thinks it will be impractical and too much work for them.

At Milo's restaurant, Adam has a taste for nights out and suggests to Ian that they should go out more often. But Ian's happy with a quiet life. Adam is uneasy when Ian contrasts that with Pawel's free and easy one-night-stand existence.

At the pub, Vicky reveals she has done some research into the amniocentesis but Mike doesn't want to talk about it until they meet the midwife the next day.


SUN 19:15 Dilemma (b01m0f2n)
Edinburgh 2012

Sue Perkins presents a special edition of the panel show that puts moral and ethical dilemmas to a panel of guests until they admit that they'd behave appallingly, recorded at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Guests include Marcus Brigstocke and Bridget Christie, and subjects include disabled parking spaces, adverts, and life imprisonment. This is a show where there are no 'right' answers - but there are, however, some deeply damning ones.

Dilemma was devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


SUN 19:45 Comic Fringes (b01m0f2q)
Series 8

'The Three Times I Dumped Eleanor, and the Manner of her Death'

Russell Kane leads a brilliant line-up of literary comics who've been specially commissioned by BBC Radio 4 to write and perform their own short stories in front of a packed audience, recorded yesterday at this year's Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Coming up over the next two Sundays will be stories written and read by James Acaster and Mark Watson.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b01lv7yn)
The great playing field sell off?

Playing the fields

The Olympics were supposed to inspire a generation to take up sport. No wonder, then, that people are depressed about the government's record of selling off playing fields. But what do the numbers really tell us?

RIP RPI?

We explain why a weird flaw in the way the retail price index (a key inflation measure) is calculated is dry and technical - but far more important than you might think.

David's line

Our final listener question for TV's Yan Wong: If Solomon - son of King David - had about a thousand wives and concubines, as the Bible says, wouldn't it be the case that by the time of Jesus - many generations later - pretty much everyone in Israel could claim to be a descendant of King David?

20mph roads

It was reported recently that the number of people killed or injured on 20mph roads has risen by nearly a quarter. Does that mean 20mph roads are less safe than we thought? Or is there another explanation?

Thinking in Numbers

On More or Less we think numbers help us to understand the world. But for Daniel Tammet, they're a lot more important than that. For him, numbers don't just help him to understand the real world. They're his ticket to being a part of it. We've been talking to Daniel - a mathematical savant - about his new book, "Thinking in Numbers".

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Richard Knight.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01lv7yl)
Sid Waddell, Helen Gurley Brown, Lord Morris of Manchester, Dr Aubrey Leatham and Carlo Rambaldi

Matthew Bannister on

The Geordie darts commentator Sid Waddell who drew on his classical education when describing the pub sport

Helen Gurley Brown the editor of Cosmopolitan magazine who encouraged women to enjoy sex and celebrate their achievements in the workplace

Lord Morris of Manchester, who as the Labour MP Alf Morris campaigned tirelessly for the rights of disabled people.

Carlo Rambaldi the movie special effects artist who gave life to ET and the monster in Alien.

And Dr Aubrey Leatham, the eccentric cardiologist who introduced heart pacemakers to the UK and once did his ward round on roller skates.


SUN 21:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01lz7vz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01m0f1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b01lv5vc)
Coal Comfort

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel, and the dirtiest, despite talk of "clean coal". It is the single biggest emitter of the greenhouse gas CO2. But with reserves of over 100 years, much more than for oil and gas, it's here to stay. In the US, almost half of all electricity comes from coal, about double the rate of the UK. With China and India fuelling their economic growth with coal, demand will stay high. So will we have to live with the environmental consequences or can coal become green? Peter Day travels to the US to find out.
In North Dakota coal is mined in a modern, open pit operation using electric draglines. One of the biggest hopes for minimising the impact of coal burning on climate change is to capture and store the resulting carbon dioxide. Peter visits the Great Plains Synfuels plant in North Dakota which burns coal to turn it into synthetic natural gas and captures about half of the resulting CO2 to pipe it to Canada for underground storage in a depleted oil field. Adjacent to the Synfuels plant is a coal-fuelled electricity power station, Antelope Valley. Unlike their neighbours, Antelope Valley decided against carbon capture and storage because adapting the plant would cost hundreds of millions of dollars. But if even a place like Antelope Valley, that could benefit from their neighbour's pipeline and other infrastructure can't do CCS in an economically viable way, what chance is there for other coal-burning power plants? While coal remains king, its status is being challenged not just by those concerned about climate change, but also by other fossil fuels such as shale gas and new oil fields. How will coal fight back? Or does it not need to, as the world cannot do without it anyway?
Producer Arlene Gregorius
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01m0f43)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01m0f45)
Episode 117

David Aaronovitch of The Times analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01lv5tz)
Matthew Sweet meets with Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger to talk action heroes, male masculinity, and 19th century poetry.

Star of The Birds and Marnie, Tippi Hedren, discusses her troubled relationship with Alfred Hitchcock.

And Mark Gatiss selects another of his favourite biopics - Stephen Frear's Prick Up Your Ears, a study of playwright Joe Orton and his doomed relationship with his lover, Kenneth Halliwell.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01m0f1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 20 AUGUST 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01m0dby)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01lv26j)
Breaking rules; Wall Street women

The first generation of women to establish themselves on Wall Street began their careers in the 1960s. Laurie Taylor hears from Melissa Fisher about her in depth study of the working lives of the women at the heart of America's financial centre, and Liz Bolshaw joins the discussion to bring a comparison with women in The City of London.
Also, Beth Hardie joins Laurie to discuss her new report on youth crime in Peterborough called Breaking Rules. Does morality have a role in preventing people committing crime? Her study uncovers its importance.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01m0f1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m0dc0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m0dc2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m0dc4)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01m0dc6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m0h5z)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Mark Coffey.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01m0h61)
Dave Howard hears there's bad news for brassicas. Scottish broccoli growers estimate a third of their crop could be lost due to bad weather.

Welfare campaigners, Compassion in World Farming say banning egg producers from trimming the beaks of laying hens is long overdue. Meanwhile, the British Egg Information Service argue it's a vital procedure to stop hens pecking or cannibalising other birds. Government funded research is now underway to investigate if hens can be kept in intensive systems without beak trimming.

And the farmers producing fruit for jam. Farming Today meet the UK's largest blackcurrant grower to see how the berries travel from field to boxed and frozen in the packing house.

Presented by Dave Howard.
Produced by Ruth Sanderson in Birmingham.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01m0dc8)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01m0h63)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including whether the most expensive social housing should be sold off, and the man with the deepest singing voice.


MON 09:00 Amanda Vickery on... Men (b01m0jm6)
The Lover

Amanda Vickery explores the history of masculinity through six different archetypes of the ideal man - archetypes which still have an echo today.

In this third programme of the series, she explores the 18th century Lover: from irresistible seducer to lusty husband.

Professor Vickery begins on location in the bizarre erotic caves created by Sir Francis Dashwood on his estate near West Wycombe, which are built to resemble the most intimate space of a woman's body. Dashwood and his friends would drink there and have sex with prostitutes - although there was no shortage of women volunteering to join him.

Historian Faramerz Dabhoiwala, author of The Origins of Sex, tells the story of the caves and analyses the art of seduction as practised by 18th century seducers Casanova and Boswell. Historian Karen Harvey guides us through some strange 18th century erotica, and Hannah Greig introduces a diary which reveals the married sex life of a Manchester wigmaker: "Tis not hard doing it twice per day. I've seldom missed, through variety".

Amanda Vickery is Professor of Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. She has made several series in creative collaboration with producer Elizabeth Burke, the most recent of which was Voices from the Old Bailey.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke.
A Loftus Audio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:30 Head to Head (b01m0kj4)
Series 4

Women's Lib

Edward Stourton continues to revisit broadcast debates from the archives - exploring the ideas, the great minds behind them and echoes of the arguments today.

When the two women in this week's programme met for this head to head in 1974, the Women's Liberation Movement was reaching its heights. They both wanted sexual equality, but they had very different ideas about the means to achieve it.

Sally Oppenheim thought reforming the law could solve the woman question. As a Conservative MP, she was working on further anti-discrimination legislation to add to the Equal Pay Act that had already been passed by that stage.

But for radical feminist and psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell, gradual reform was not the way forward. She believed the status of women could not be elevated by laws alone because the roots of inequality lay deep, both in the fabric of society and the minds of women. Social structures would need to be torn down, starting with the role of women as wives and mothers.

Oppenheim was sceptical of these "second wave" feminists and their extreme position: how dare they prescribe such a widespread drastic change to the nature of womanhood.

On to today and, with a new brand of Tory feminism and indeed radicalism, on what lines is the equality debate fought now? How has the argument moved on?

In the studio dissecting the debate are Lynne Segal, Professor of Psychology and Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, and Julie Bindel, who is an activist and journalist.

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m0kj6)
Daniel Tammet - Thinking in Numbers

Counting to Four in Icelandic

Written by Daniel Tammet.
Read by James Anthony Pearson.

First of five extracts from Daniel Tammet's new book of essays that celebrates "the science of imagination": mathematics. Today's essay explores the different ways in which cultures across the world approach and describe numbers.

Daniel Tammet is hailed the world over for his extraordinary mind and unique intelligence shaped by high-functioning autistic savant syndrome. He perceives words and numbers as shapes, colours, and emotions, and holds the European record for reciting the mathematical constant Pi to 22,514 decimal places. For Tammet, numbers are beautiful and illuminate our everyday thoughts and lives. His idiosyncratic world view gives us new perspectives on the universal questions of what it is to be human and how we make meaning in our lives.

Abridged and produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m0kj8)
Infidelity phone-in

Phone-in on infidelity. We want to hear your experiences of infidelity. How important is being faithful and what constitutes cheating anyway?. Is it sex, is it a kiss, or is it a series of soul-baring conversations? And does it have to mean the end of your relationship - or, can it make you both stronger? If you've experienced infidelity, been unfaithful yourself, or just helped your friends through it - we want to hear from you.
Presented by Jane Garvey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m0kjb)
Crisis

Episode 1

Martha's posting to Agok, in South Sudan, gives her the chance to make amends for the mistake that caused her to be sent home from her last posting. As Project Manager, she's in charge of a small team facing an escalating crisis, with more and more refugees arriving across the border from the North, and violence never far under the surface. As Martha gets to know her team, she also becomes aware of the tensions within the group, as well as the challenges they all face.

Writer: Tina Pepler
Director: Sara Davies.


MON 11:00 The Cabinet of Animosities (b01m0kjd)
The Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb exhibits objects left behind at the end of love affairs. Everyday things: the shared belongings, mementos and gifts that are no longer wanted - or are wanted too much.

In this audio-guide for radio, Cathy FitzGerald takes a tour of its woebegone collection and meets the broken-hearted lovers who have donated objects from all around the world. Tales of love won and lost, told through the things we give, the things we treasure, and the things we fling at one another when it all goes wrong.

Produced by Cathy FitzGerald and Matt Thompson
A Rockethouse production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Bleak Expectations (b00wdjvk)
Series 4

A Now Tricky Life Woefully Miseried Up

Pip and Harry have escaped the exploding desert island, but Harry has been transformed into a dinosaur.

Now they must catch Mister Benevolent and prevent him taking over the world, but the trail has lead them to France. Here they must face unimaginable horrors including a bacon free breakfast and a deadly confrontation in a cheese mine.

But there is a glimmer of hope in the form of The Scarlet Pimple.

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ..... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ..... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ..... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ..... James Bachman
Grimpunch ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ..... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ..... Susy Kane
Reverend Godly Fecund ..... David Mitchell
Frenchman ..... Mark Evans

Producer Gareth Edwards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2010.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01m0kjg)
Radio 4's consumer affairs programme with Julian Worricker. Is prison the right place for inmates with severe physical disabilities? The government has brought in a 'fund of last resort' for asbestos victims - does it go far enough? The problems surrounding the Google tablet Nexus 7, and have you got an 'experience' to offer. We'll be looking at the website where you can buy another person's skills.


MON 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m0h65)
Salman Rushdie

The New Elizabethans: Salman Rushdie

James Naughtie portrays the British Indian novelist Salman Rushdie, whose celebrated novel Midnight's Children takes the moment of India's Independence as its starting point and won him the Booker Prize.

"The Satanic Verses" was more controversial. When it was published, Ayatollah Khomeini issued a fatwa against him. Copies of the novel were burned on British streets and Rushdie had to live under police protection for several years.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Clare Walker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01m0dcb)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01m0lgd)
National and international news with Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 The Alien Birds Have Landed (b01m0lgg)
The Pheasant

Alison Steadman tells the story of why and how so many birds that make up the avifauna of Britain are aliens from elsewhere. Programme one: pheasant.
Producer: Tim Dee


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01m0f2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b012942d)
Gilda and her Daughters in Looking for Goldie

Comedy drama by award winning film maker Carine Adler. Eccentric Romanian Gilda finds herself in the middle of yet another family argument, as her bickering daughters fight for their deceased father's fortune. Thankfully Gilda's toy boy lover Vip is on hand to provide a welcome distraction.

Produced and directed by Charlotte Riches.


MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b01m0lgj)
Another edition of the 48th series of Quote... Unquote, the popular quotations programme presented and devised by Nigel Rees. The guests this week are author Louise Doughty, writer and broadcaster Natalie Haynes, newsreader Nicholas Owen and columnist Hugo Rifkind. The reader is Peter Jefferson.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01m0f24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Magic Theatre of Hermann Hesse (b01m0lgl)
Hermann Hesse is the biggest-selling author in the German language - responsible for Steppenwolf, a 'bible' for the '68 generation; Siddhartha, which influenced aspects of the New Age movement; and The Glass Bead Game, which is now inspiring game designers.

In this programme, the reasons for the durability of his iconic status are examined by those for whom his appeal has survived beyond a youthful fixation.

Peter Owen is the publisher who first introduced Hesse's work to Britain in the 1950s. John Wilson is a Professor of mathematics at Oxford University and keen musician who has attempted to interpret the rules of Hesse's Nobel Prize-winning Glass Bead Game. Eric Zimmerman is a New York-based games designer who found inspiration in Hesse's writing for a game that evaluates cultural aesthetics. Johnny Flynn is a singer-songwriter who fell under the spell of Hesse's fascination with eastern mysticism. Susanne Voelker runs the Hesse museum in south-west Germany and believes the author's influence is felt by readers of all generations and demographics who are making life decisions.

The Magic Theatre of Hermann Hesse weaves together their testimonies with readings from Hesse's work and music from both his own time and from ours.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01m0h67)
Witchcraft & Child Abuse

Ernie Rea explores the relationship between African churches, witchcraft & child abuse with expert guests: Pastor Mahele Tangata, pastor of a Congolese Church in North West London; Romain Matondo, Co-ordinator for the Congolese Family Centre; and Dr Richard Hoskins, an expert on witchcraft-based child abuse cases. The Metropolitan police reports that it has investigated 83 'faith based' child abuse cases involving witchcraft in the last ten years. A belief in witchcraft is common to some traditional African religions and to some elements of Christianity; but accusing children of witchcraft seems a comparatively modern phenomenon. Where does it come from? What can be done to prevent it? And are the churches concerned doing enough?

Producer: Charlotte Simpson.


MON 17:00 PM (b01m0lgn)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m0dcd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b01m0lgq)
Series 64

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons challenges Paul Merton, Gyles Brandreth, Janey Godley and Hannibal Buress to speak for 60 seconds. From 2012.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01m0lgs)
Mike and Vicky are discussing the test results with the midwife and learn there is a chance their baby will have Down's syndrome. The midwife tells them that the only way to know for sure is to have an amniocenteses, which has the risk of miscarriage.
It is a lot of information for Vicky and Mike to take in - especially when they are told that if they are considering a termination they would have to make the decision for an amniocenteses soon.
At the Walters', Darrell is fixing taps and Joyce rewards him with cake. As they eat she reminisces about her time at The Laurels. She says how kind Elona was to her and how Darrell is the same, until a phone call from Matt drags him away for another job.
Mike and Vicky talk over their hospital visit. Vicky is unsure about the risk. But Mike is worried about the impact any kind of baby will have on their lives and struggles with the uncertainty of it all. Vicky decides to book an appointment for the amnio.
Darrell's eager to get back to the mess he left at the Walters' but Matt has a list of other jobs for him first.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01m0lgv)
Tom Stoppard, The Watch, Tony Scott remembered, cellist Natalie Clein

With Mark Lawson.

Dramatist Tom Stoppard discusses his TV adaptation of Ford Madox Ford's Parade's End, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Rebecca Hall, and his screenplay for Anna Karenina, with Keira Knightley in the title role.

The Watch, the latest vehicle for Ben Stiller, is a comedy about a group of neighbours who have defend the earth from alien invasion. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reveals whether it's out of this world.

Director Tony Scott's credits include Top Gun, True Romance and Enemy of the State. Following the news of his death at the age of 68, Front Row pays tribute with another chance to hear an interview from 2009, in which Tony Scott recalled his approach to shooting action, his love of painting and his relationship with his older brother Ridley.

Cellist Natalie Clein is the latest artist to spend time in A Room for London, a boat-like structure on the roof of the Hayward Gallery, overlooking the Thames in the centre of London. As she prepares to perform a recital to be streamed live online, she talks about her choice of music, which reflects her riverside location.

Producer Dymphna Flynn.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m0kjb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Victim's Voice (b01m0lgx)
Earlier this year a programme produced for the national radio station for prisoners, National Prison Radio, received a coveted Gold Sony Radio Academy Award. BBC Radio 4 now introduces a re-version of this ground-breaking programme, bringing it to a national audience.

The views of victims can sometimes get overlooked in the criminal justice system. In The Victim's Voice, psychologist Professor Tanya Byron invites a group of victims of violent crime into Brixton Prison to come face to face with men serving sentences for committing similarly violent acts. With brutal honesty, Ray, Vi and Michelle, who have all lost loved-ones to serious crimes, talk directly to the prisoners, challenging them to look at the impact of their own actions.

Restorative justice, as this process is known, is a relatively new approach to dealing with the harm done by crime. It aims to facilitate communication between victims and perpetrators, encouraging understanding, empathy and changes in behaviour.

Producer: Marianne Garvey
A Prison Radio Association production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b01lv4np)
Korea Host Bars

South Korean women, tradition says, are hard-working, respectful to family, and know their place in Korea's Confucian hierarchies. But the country's rapid economic development has meant some startling changes below the surface of that conservative social structure. Perhaps the most controversial is the advent of Host Bars - all night drinking rooms where female customers can select and pay for male companions, sometimes at a cost of thousands of dollars a night. Originally set up to cater to off-duty 'hostesses' and female escorts, they're now proving popular with many other women too. The growth of the industry is throwing up new questions for South Korea's sociologists and politicians as they struggle to reconcile the country's traditional values with the effects of its rapid development. The BBC's Seoul correspondent Lucy Williamson reports.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01lv5v1)
A suit that is controlled by the brain is close to enabling a quadriplegic child to kick a football. Neuroscientist Professor Miguel Nicolelis has pledged that he's close to perfecting an entire robotic body suit that will be operated by thought alone. Users will be able to imagine an action, and the brain will send signals to the prosthetic device to complete the action. Based at Duke University, Professor Nicolelis tells Quentin Cooper that his recent research has given him new confidence that his World Cup pledge is deliverable. By placing sensors all over the exo-skeleton, the robotic arm or body suit can now send signals back to the brain, giving the user a sense of touch.

Butterflies in Japan, around Fukushima, have been affected by exposure to radioactive material following the nuclear meltdown 18 months ago, a new study in the journal, Scientific Reports, suggests. Scientists found an increase in leg, antennae and wing shape mutations among the Pale Grass Blue butterfly. Biologist Tim Mousseau from the University of South Carolina studies the impacts of radiation on animals and plants in Chernobyl and Fukushima and says the Japanese research has important implications for life in Fukushima.

Parkinson's Disease is a neurological condition with no cure. It's also very difficult to diagnose because there is no objective test. But now, a UK mathematician could be close to providing a fast and cheap way to make early diagnosis, using voice-pattern recognition. Dr Max Little, a research fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developed an algorithm while studying at Oxford University. Changes to speech is one of the main symptoms of the disease, and by collecting 10,000 voice samples from people around the world, hopes are that the rich voice dataset will be able to identify specific symptoms and provide early diagnosis. Also in the conversation is Dr Keiran Breen, Director of Research and Innovation at Parkinson's UK, who thinks this research will be of benefit.

British scientists are preparing to set off for the Antarctic in an ambitious project to drill down into a sub glacial lake that hasn't seen the light of day for hundreds of thousands of years. Engineers from the British Antarctic Survey are using a giant drill to bore down three kilometres into Lake Ellsworth in an expedition that's been 15 years in the planning. Using high-pressure hot water, Andy Tait, lead drill engineer, describes the challenges and aims of the project.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


MON 21:30 Amanda Vickery on... Men (b01m0jm6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01m0dcg)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m0lgz)
As Greeks ask for more time to meet austerity targets, is it time for Germany to accept it will have to pay out more?

We have a special report from Argentina on the fate of a country which did default on its debts.

And Pakistan's president intervenes in the case of a young girl accused of blasphemy.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m0lh1)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 1

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 1 of 10: A young engineer from Normandy waits in an anteroom in the Palace of Versailles for a meeting with the minister.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b01lsz29)
Preaching

Chris Ledgard listens to the ways in which preachers use words and the power of language to move people, and visits churches and a mosque to find out about the modernising forces at work there.

Contributors:

The Rev'd Canon Simon Butler, St Mary's Church Battersea
Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra
Pastor Kasali Fatai, The Redeemed Christian Church of God, Bristol
Ruth Gledhill, The Times religious correspondent
Max Atkinson, author of Lend Me Your Ears

Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgnbl)
Micky Flanagan: What Chance Change?

Episode 2

Cockney comedian Micky Flanagan's first radio series is about his progression from working-class Herbert to middle-class intellectual and being caught awkwardly between the two. His story is told through reflective interviews, but mainly, Micky's acclaimed stand up comedy. Micky's transition from the mean streets of the East End to the leafy lanes of Dulwich is a fascinating story, with each episode focusing on a different decade of Micky's life.

In this episode Micky takes us through his 1980's, spent running away to New York and being the international lover and player of the East End. He chats to his parents, his sister and his school friends in interviews that shed light on the stand up comedy.

The series is written and performed by Micky Flanagan.

The Producer is Tilusha Ghelani.



TUESDAY 21 AUGUST 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01m0ddf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m0kj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m0ddh)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m0ddk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m0ddm)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01m0ddp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m0ltp)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Mark Coffey.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01m0ltr)
A report claims if we relied only on UK fish 2012's supplies would run out today. The think tank - the New Economics Foundation believes fish in EU waters should be better managed, and that consumers are becoming too reliant on imported fish.

Scientists at Portsmouth University may have found the key to why male shrimps are becoming female. The discovery of a new parasite could also help oyster and mussel farmers.

Thirty thousand fewer Welsh lambs have been sold so far this summer, 10% down on last year, because of the bad weather. Meanwhile, the English sheep industry is wrestling with the problem of persuading cash-strapped consumers to buy a meat which is costing 10% more in the shops this year.

Caz Graham visits a bog in Lancashire which has just been bought by the county's Wildlife Trust. She finds out why putting the wet back into wetland helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01m0ltt)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including whether 'free banking' remains viable in the UK, and plans to open NHS branches abroad.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01m0ltw)
Martin Siegert

For fifteen years, Martin Siegert has dreamt about Lake Ellsworth, a hidden lake buried beneath the Antarctic ice that's been cut off from the rest of the world for millions of years. Having studied data from airborne radar surveys, Martin knew the lake must exist and was determined to find out more. Finally, this winter, a team of British scientists led by Martin will drill through three kilometres of ice to unlock the secrets of this hidden lake. Can life exist in such a cold, dark and isolated place? And if so what form will it take? Martin describes working in Antarctica as being like an episode of Mash and explains why, unlike so many Antarctic scientists, he prefers analysing data to having icy adventures.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01m0lty)
Razia Iqbal talks to Sonia

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe.
Sonia is a young Frenchwoman working for a private investment bank in Paris. Two years ago she decided to wear the hijab to work, an action that has been deeply frowned upon by her employers. She talks to Razia about the importance the headscarf has for her and why she's determined to fight against the discrimination she feels it engenders.
Producer: Anne Marie Bullock.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m44z6)
Daniel Tammet - Thinking in Numbers

Classroom Intuitions

Written by Daniel Tammet.
Read by James Anthony Pearson.

Daniel Tammet's new book of essays celebrates "the science of imagination": mathematics. Today, he recalls how his time as a children's maths tutor helped to illuminate and inform his thoughts on how humans approach and understand numbers.

Daniel Tammet is hailed the world over for his unique intelligence shaped by high-functioning autistic savant syndrome. He perceives words and numbers as shapes, colours, and emotions, and holds the European record for reciting the mathematical constant Pi to 22,514 decimal places. Tammet's idiosyncratic world view gives us new perspectives on the universal questions of what it is to be human and how we make meaning in our lives.

Abridged and produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m0lv0)
Julia Davis, Anna Del Conte, post-natal psychosis

Julia Davis on her new comedy series; Anna del Conte on Italian summer cooking; Post-Natal Psychosis; Royal mothers and sons: Queen Victoria and Bertie. Presented by Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m0lv2)
Crisis

Episode 2

The situation in Agok, where Martha has arrived to manage a small team of international aid workers, is rapidly becoming worse, with hundreds of refugees arriving across the border from the North. Martha's team don't have the medical supplies they need, the drilling rig for the water supply has been held up, and tensions both on the outside and within the team itself are rising. Martha is shocked and upset by an episode which reminds her of a past mistake and her own vulnerability.

Writer: Tina Pepler
Director: Sara Davies.


TUE 11:00 Requiem for a Moth (b010t6nr)
Britain's enthusiasm for moths gets far less attention than its love of bird watching. But "moth-ing" is a fast growing, sociable recreation that draws us closer to the biodiversity of our cities and countryside.

Martin Wainwright seeks out the men and women who pursue the thousands of brightly coloured species of moth.

Composer Sir Harrison Birtwistle talks about his life-long passion for the insects and how his music, receiving its premiere in October 2012, will pay tribute to their enduring appeal.

Martin spends an evening in the woods of Yorkshire welcoming in the new season of moths, and meets Madeleine Moon MP, who reveals why moths are so crucial to our survival and why moth-fancying is a peculiarly British pastime.

Producer: Iain Chambers
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:30 Composing LA (b01m0lv4)
Young British Composer Tarik O' Regan tells the story of how the tradition of Western classical music, its composers and maestros, underpinned the golden age of Hollywood film score.

More or less the entire Hollywood music scene, as it blossomed in the 1930s, looked to serious European and Russian composers for film score composition. Stravinsky, Schoenberg, two of the greatest composers of 'serious' 20th century music, both lived and worked in LA - much to the consternation of the European classical music establishment.

Many composers on the run from Europe in the 1930s would arrive in New York and, failing to make inroads into the concert scene or Broadway (as Kurt Weil had done), continued their journey West. Even as early cinema flourished, America was still struggling to find its own authentic 'classical' music - one that strived to be equal to the European symphonic sound but that had its own voice too. The film score was precisely that.

Meanwhile most of the Hollywood film orchestras were filled with British and European émigré musicians who taught American musicians the European symphonic style that became the hallmark of Hollywood film music. This programme also explores how some of the most successful soundtrack composers today - John Williams and others - are completely caught up in that sound-world.

Presented by Tarik O'Regan, an émigré composer himself who moved to the US, with contributors including Andre Previn, Larry Schoenberg, conductor and composer Esa-Pekka Salonen and music writer Alex Ross.

Produced by Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01m0m7y)
Call You and Yours: Value for money in higher education

Call You & Yours: The cost of a traditional degree at an English university could easily saddle post graduates with debts in excess of £50,000 but what are the alternatives? Could students be cannier in how they buy and complete their qualifications? Is the future perhaps online; a handful of English students are choosing to study abroad now and the Open University has long provided an excellent model for those who want to combine study with their paid employment. Now that students are consumers how will the market in education providers change to meet demand? Call us on 03700-100-400 before ten, 03700 100444 after ten, or email us via our website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours; leave us a message or a name and number where we can call you back. Or text us on 84844. Or tweet @BBCRadio4 during the programme, using the hashtag #youandyours.


TUE 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m0m80)
Anita Roddick

The New Elizabethans: Anita Roddick.

James Naughtie considers the influence of one of Britain's most successful businesswomen, Anita Roddick. She was the first to base a large High Street business on being socially and environmentally conscious. Her cosmetics company The Body Shop championed fair trade long before it became a buzz word.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01m0ddr)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01m0m82)
National and international news with Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 The Alien Birds Have Landed (b01m0m84)
The Canada Goose and Ruddy Duck

Alison Steadman tells the story of how and why the Canada Goose and Ruddy Duck became British Birds. Both started out in North America and only got here thanks to man. The Canada Goose is tolerated but the Ruddy Duck has been shot to extinction in Britain. What is going on?

Producer: Tim Dee


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01m0lgs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Brief Lives (b01m0m86)
Series 5

Episode 2

Brief Lives by Eve Steele. Series Created by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly.
More cases from Frank Twist's paralegal team. A screaming child at an airport being fought over by estranged parents. At first it seems like fall out from a tug of love case involving a foreign father. Then Sarah discovers possible child abuse. Who is telling the truth?

Producer/Director Gary Brown
Original music by Carl Harms.


TUE 15:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b01m0phv)
Series 2

Sorites' Heap

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink.

Each week presenter Matthew Sweet takes a puzzle with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, John Stuart Mill and Wittgenstein. All recorded in a pub with an audience, who'll have their own contributions to make - but whose assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Propping up the bar this year will be philosophers such as Julian Baggini and Nigel Warburton, and academic experts on memory, the law, art and computers. We'll be meeting bald men, a woman who used to be a man, and a woman who can't remember being a girl. Plus music from The Drifters - a far more philosophical group than you'd ever imagine.

This programme is a repeat
Producer: David Edmonds
Editor: Jeremy Skeet.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b01m0phx)
Britain in 2060: The Seas

Rising sea temperatures are already bringing new species to our shores. Sunfish, sea turtles and basking sharks are common sights. But what can we expect to see in the fishing nets by 2060?

The key to the species that visit these shores is the plankton on which they feed. Species of plankton more usually found in areas of the southern Atlantic ocean are now turning up on our shores, and so are the fish and mammals that feed on them.

So will tropical species replace the cod and haddock in Britain's fish and chip shops? Will great white sharks patrol our beaches? Tom Heap takes to the water to predict the state of our seas in fifty years.

Will we all be eating Boarfish and chips? Red Mullet Goujons? Tom Heap asks whether the waters around the UK are set to become home to exotic whales and dolphins such as these pictured below.

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.

All photos courtesy of the Sea Watch Foundation library.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b01m0ppt)
Chris Ledgard examines how we hear speech through background sound, and discovers that his own inability to hear voices in a crowd may be due to a little-known condition called King-Kopetzky syndrome.

Beginning with bar staff in Cardiff who use earplugs on a busy night, Chris discovers that we humans are surprisingly adept at grabbing small lumps of speech and filling in the gaps. He also discovers how room acoustics contribute to what scientists call the "cocktail party problem"; asks if exposure to aircraft noise can affect schooling, and discovers how the right mood music can make a policemans life easier on a Saturday night in Brighton.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b01m0fz3)
Series 28

Leonard Maguire

Matthew Parris finds out why the actor Bill Paterson would nominate for Great Life status a Scottish actor little known outside Scotland. He is Leonard Maguire, who died in 1997 after a career which took in acting on stage, television, film and radio and included some wonderful writing - not bad going for a man who learned English as his third language as a child.

The expert witness is Leonard Maguire's writer daughter, Susie.

Produced by Christine Hall and Sarah Langan.

First heard on Radio 4 in 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01m0ppw)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m0ddt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b01m0k9m)
Edinburgh Special

Mark uncovers the stories and characters that make up Leith in Edinburgh in this special one-off episode of the award winning stand-up comedy show, 'Mark Steel's in Town.'

As attention focuses on the Edinburgh festival, Mark Steel immerses himself in one of Edinburgh's lesser-known districts. Taking tales from the history, highways, and Hibs legends - not to mention the port workers, pub fights, and poetry - that make up this unique corner of Scotland's capital, Mark delivers a half hour of stand-up comedy about Leith. in front of an audience of born and bred Leithers.

Recorded at the BBC's Potterow venue in Edinburgh during the festival.
Produced by Sam Bryant.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01m0ppy)
A cow's having a difficult labour at Brookfield. Ruth is concerned but wants to avoid getting a vet over. This reminds Emma about her money troubles and about Keith's situation.
Kathy wants to pin Jamie down for a conversation to find out why he's behaving strangely. But he's preoccupied and leaves to ask Fallon for more work at The Bull.
Tracy's trying to get Susan to go and support Keith in court but she won't. Tracy blames 'breaking up' with Ifty on Keith's reputation, even though they never went out. When Emma arrives, Tracy blames her too before storming off. Emma doesn't need any more problems on top of her financial ones.
With a successful new arrival at Brookfield, Ruth's happy that everything has gone back to normal. She sympathises with Emma over her family issues. Susan appears with some chicken pies to cheer Emma up, and promises that she will help out by buying Keira her new shoes.
Rosa is also trying to catch Jamie. After leaving him a voicemail, she gets on her scooter to April Cottage where she finds Kathy instead. Rosa lets slip that Jamie and Natalie have broken up. It's news to Kathy.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01m0pq0)
James Meek, The Three Stooges reviewed, Stockhausen in helicopters

With John Wilson.

Best known for gross-out comedies There's Something About Mary and Dumb And Dumber, the Farrelly Brothers pay homage to the tradition of American slapstick with their take on The Three Stooges. Adam Smith delivers his verdict.

Writer James Meek discusses his latest novel The Heart Broke In, a sweeping family saga set in the digital age.

With a string quartet playing in four helicopters, musicians suspended in the air and a dancing camel, Karlheinz Stockhausen's opera Mittwoch has long been considered almost unstageable. John reports from Birmingham on the eve of the work's world premiere.

Cork Street in London has long been famous for its art galleries. Many notable 20th century artists first came to wider attention there, but now a number of galleries face an uncertain future in the wake of redevelopment plans. The Mayor Gallery, opened in 1925, was the first to open, and its current owner James Mayor explains how Cork Street's role as a centre for visual art is threatened.

Producer Ellie Bury.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m0lv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Future Is Halal (b01m0pq2)
You've heard of halal meat, but what about halal paintbrushes, halal perfume or halal holiday resorts?

A recent report by The Economist proclaimed to businesses: ignore the Sharia-conscious consumer at your peril. The global Muslim population is now 1.8 billion and rising fast; it's predicted that Muslims will account for 30% of the world's population by 2025. More than half are under 25 and many are tech-savvy, brand-conscious and increasingly flexing their consumer muscle. In response, there's been an explosion of goods and services aimed at Muslims.

While Britain has been slow to wake up to this new consumer trend, other countries are already reaping the economic rewards of serving Muslim needs. Malaysia has become the leader in halal certification and in promoting the global halal industry. Each year Kuala Lumpur hosts World Halal Week, bringing together a remarkable array of Islamic scholars, scientists, producers of halal products and services and big multinational companies. Malaysia is also home to the first international university to teach Islamic finance.

There are many concerns about how to ensure credible halal certification. Nonetheless, this new drive to meet Muslim consumer demand beyond halal food is bringing together religion and business in an unprecedented way - and giving Islam a new identity in the 21st century.

But is this burgeoning international industry simply driven by the desire for business profit or is it really supporting Muslim values? And how far will these halal products and services cross-over to non-Muslim consumers? Navid Akhtar investigates.

Producer Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01m0pq4)
Four UK Primary Care Trusts have given up their legal fight to prescribe cancer drug Avastin for macular disease. Manufacturers Novartis are opposing the use of Avastin and had taken the matter to judicial review. The Primary Care Trusts have withdrawn rather than take on the drug giant which markets the alternative drug Lucentis. Avastin is also much cheaper than Lucentis though it hasn't been formally licensed for use in the UK and there are concerns about side effects.

Meanwhile we speak to the man who caused this dilemma, Professor Philip Rosenfeld, who first discovered that Avastin is an effective treatment of macular disease.

Producer:Lee Kumutat.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01m0pq6)
Over-diagnosis: High Blood Pressure

Dr Mark Porter asks whether doctors can try too hard in the early detection of disease and investigates the overdiagnosis of hypertension. This week he discovers that as many as 3 million people who have been told they have high blood pressure may not actually have it - could you be one of them?


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01m0ltw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01m0ddw)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m0pq8)
There's been a surprise increase in government borrowing, what can we read into the news?

A special report from Paul Moss in Argentina

And a discussion on the issue of rape - is it the last taboo?

All that and more with Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m2x0f)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 2

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne.
Read by John Sessions.

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 2 of 10: For the first time in daylight, Baratte visits the church and the neighbourhood of Les Innocents.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Kevin Eldon Will See You Now (b01m0pqk)
Series 1

The One with Anubis, Almighty Jackal-Headed God of the Egyptian Underworld

Comedy's best kept secret ingredient gets his own sketch show. Sketches, characters, sound effects, bit of music, some messin' about, you know...

In this episode, Kevin goes into space, meets a bandit and evokes the powerful gods of Ancient Egypt. Not all at the same time, obviously - that would be weird. No, separately.

Kevin Eldon is a comedy phenomenon. He's been in virtually every major comedy show in the last fifteen years, but not content with working with the likes of Chris Morris, Steve Coogan, Armando Iannucci, Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, Stewart Lee, Julia Davis and Graham Linehan, he's finally decided to put together his own comedy series for BBC Radio 4.

After all the waiting - Kevin Eldon Will See You Now.

Appearing in this episode are Amelia Bullmore (I'm Alan Partridge, Scott & Bailey), Julia Davis (Nighty Night), Rosie Cavaliero (Peep Show), Paul Putner (Little Britain), Justin Edwards (The Consultants) and David Reed (The Penny Dreadfuls) with special guest Phil Cornwell as David Bowie circa 1973.

Written by Kevin Eldon.
With additional material by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris (Flight Of The Conchords, That Mitchell & Webb Sound).

Original music by Martin Bird.

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgndv)
Ross Noble Goes Global

Episode 2

Ross goes to South Africa, where he fails to climb Table Mountain and discovers that Cape Town has very posh monkeys. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in April 2002.



WEDNESDAY 22 AUGUST 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01m0dfq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m44z6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m0dfs)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m0dfv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m0dfx)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01m0dfz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m16p9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Mark Coffey.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01m16pc)
The Ulster Farmers Union says its members are unanimously opposed to the introduction of any National Parks in Northern Ireland. Currently it is the only part of the UK without this kind of protected area. The Stormont Environment Minister Alex Atwood says it would boost tourism and create jobs in the face of growing unemployment.

Milk processors have ten days to comply with farmers' demands to reverse price cuts made in May and June - before their deadline at the beginning of September. Agriculture Minister Jim Paice tells Caz Graham he believes farmers forming producer groups could strengthen the farmers' position in negotiations.

More than 185,000 tonnes of jam and preserves are made from British fruit every year. Ruth Sanderson visits Duerrs, the oldest family owned jam maker in the UK. Its Managing Director says the jam industry has declined over time and now only makes up a quarter of their business.

Farming Today was presented by Caz Graham and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


WED 06:00 Today (b01m16pf)
Morning news and current affairs presented by James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including:

0724
It is the annual weigh-in day at London Zoo when all the animals must line up. Adrian Walls, head bird keeper at the zoo, describes the process.

0810
The Greek PM Antonis Samaras told the German paper Bild, "all that we want is a little breathing space". Mark Lowen reports from Athens on what Greek people are going through as the continent debates their fate. Constantine Michalos, president of the Athens Chamber of Commerce, and Dr Guntram Wolff, a former official at the Bundesbank, debate Greece's future.

0821
The first BBC public television service was established 80 years ago today using the system developed by John Logie Baird. Mike Ryan, the founder of Fusion Futures, and Dawn Airey, former chief executive of Channel Five discuss how the next 80 years will shape the future of television.

0845
Are the Paralympics and Olympics uniting the UK as a country as athletes from each nation are cheered and supported? Trevor Ringland, Northern Ireland Conservative party spokesman for sport, explains why he believes Team UK would be a more appropriate name than Team GB.

0850
The court case involving the self described mastermind of the 9/11 attacks Khalid Sheik Mohammed and four other men is due to restart today at Guantanamo Bay. David Rivkin, a lawyer and prominent conservative commentator on legal issues in the United States, gives his analysis ahead of the trial.


WED 09:00 What's the Point of...? (b01m16ph)
Series 4

Pubs

They've been with us for centuries and are the heart of local communities, but are we falling out of love with pubs? Since 2001 almost 10,000 have called time and pulled their final pint. Those that survive often now look more like restaurants. With beer sales falling and more of us preferring to drink at home, Quentin Letts asks what is the point of pubs?


WED 09:30 The Listening Project (b01jqb90)
Omnibus

Fi Glover presents an omnibus edition of Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: in today's programme, we meet Sarah Jane and Philip, a brother and sister from Wales who talk frankly and, as only siblings can, with affection too, about the pressures and problems that Philip's period behind bars caused the family; from London Margaret and Barry, whose son Jimmy was murdered in a knife fight remember their beloved boy; and a chance to meet David Isay, the award-winning American documentary-maker who came up with the idea of these intimate conversations in the first place. He called it StoryCorps, and ten years on, it's become a US sensation; an initiative so successful that the BBC has, with David's blessing, brought it to Britain as ...The Listening Project.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel

(Repeat).


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m44zx)
Daniel Tammet - Thinking in Numbers

Snowman

Written by Daniel Tammet.
Read by James Anthony Pearson.

Daniel Tammet's new book of essays celebrates "the science of imagination": mathematics. In this extract, he examines the mathematical complexity of snow.

Daniel Tammet is hailed the world over for his unique intelligence shaped by high-functioning autistic savant syndrome. His idiosyncratic world view provides new perspectives on the universal questions of what it is to be human and how we make meaning in our lives.

Abridged and produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m16pk)
Female Bond villains, Naomi Alderman, women in Iran

Female Bond villains; Naomi Alderman on The Liar's Gospel; The enduring myths about rape; Women and university in Iran; Do the parents of the groom have a role in a wedding?. Presented by Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m16pm)
Crisis

Episode 3

Martha begins to wonder if she's up to the demands of her post as Project Manager of a small and overworked team of aid workers near the border in South Sudan. Mistakes and misjudgements are all too easy to make, and the tensions within the team are adding to her feeling of isolation.

Writer: Tina Pepler
Director: Sara Davies.


WED 11:00 In Living Memory (b01m16pp)
Series 16

Episode 4

Chris Ledgard explores how the introduction of the breathalyser to the UK in 1967 changed our drinking and driving habits, and saved thousands of lives every year.

In Britain the Breathalyser Law was given Royal Assent on 10th May 1967 and put into operation on 9th October. Practical and highly portable, it was invented in 1953 by Professor Robert F Borkenstein, and replaced a more cumbersome contraption invented in 1938 and known as the drunkometer.

There was huge opposition to the new breathalyser. Barbara Castle, Transport Minister at the time, faced hostility from the drinks industry, motoring organisations, and even from within her own ranks. She received abusive mail, even a death threat, but her courage paid off. In the first year of the new act, there were 1,152 fewer fatalities, 11,177 fewer serious injuries and 28,130 fewer slight injuries. "The publication of the first figures of the lives we saved were fantastic. It gave a fantastic boost and people saw the hollowness of the claim that 'I have my civil rights and Government hasn't any right to take them off me'."

Chris Ledgard meets police officers, publicans and politicians as he revisits the "have a drink, have a drive" culture of late sixties Britain.


WED 11:30 Brian Gulliver's Travels (b01m16pr)
Series 2

Lessington

Brian Gulliver, a seasoned presenter of travel documentaries, finds himself in a hospital's secure unit after claiming to have experienced a succession of bizarre adventures.

More memories as Brian relives his experiences in Lessington where ignorance reigns.

Neil Pearson stars in series two of Bill Dare's satirical adventure story about a man lost in a fictional world.

Brian Gulliver ..... Neil Pearson
Rachel Gulliver ..... Mariah Gale
Sharol ..... Jo Bobin
Cop ..... Fergus Craig
Cop ..... Colin Hoult
Guide ..... Patrick Brennan
Wife ..... Christine Absalom
Barman ..... Harry Livingstone
Robber ..... Sam Alexander

Producer: Steven Canny

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01m16pt)
Complaints about solicitors published online

The energy regulator Ofgem says that energy companies are profiting from compensation payments. Energy companies are paid compensation when they have to turn off wind farms because the national grid is overloaded with electricity. We hear why the government thinks these profits are unfair on consumers who end up footing the bill.

The legal ombudsman is planning to put complaints about solicitors up on its website for everyone to see. But is reading complaints the best way to find out if a lawyer is any good? We hear from one senior solicitor who is advising the ombudsman to proceed with caution.

The government wants more of us to rent in future. A report from the Department of Communities will suggest that developers will no longer have to commit to build affordable homes but build homes for rental instead. The chair of London's biggest new housing development - in the Olympic Park explains why they are hoping to target families who will rent long term.

The media regulator Ofcom has decided that mobile and broadband company Everything Everywhere can start to roll out 4G - the next generation of mobile broadband technology - from September. Other operators will have to wait until the end of the year for the new spectrum to be auctioned. What can consumers do to take advantage of this new superfast broadband?

You & Yours has heard from pet owners struggling with the problem of fleas. But are fleas on the increase and could this be down to the products we use to de-flea our pets? We hear from a vet who has been tackling the problem pests.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Olivia Skinner.


WED 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m16pw)
Norman Foster

The New Elizabethans: Norman Foster. James Naughtie considers the significance of the British architect whose prolific output has transformed skylines and landscapes around the world.

Foster's breakthrough was his innovative designs for the Willis Building in Ipswich in 1974, an office complex which now has listed status. He is probably best known for his iconic buildings and structures including Wembley Stadium, the Millau Viaduct in France, and 30 St Mary Axe in London, also known as "the Gherkin".

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.
They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


WED 12:57 Weather (b01m0dg1)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01m16py)
National and international news, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 The Alien Birds Have Landed (b01m16q0)
The Little Owl and Eagle Owl

Alison Steadman tells how the Little Owl became British and how the Eagle Owl might too. How should it be decided what makes a British bird?
Producer: Tim Dee


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01m0ppy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01684jr)
Mike Harris - Stevenson in Love

Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes

By Mike Harris.

Based on Robert Louis Stevenson's classic travelogues, journals and personal letters.

Stevenson sets off with a donkey across the Cevennes in France and in the process keeps a journal that later becomes his popular travelogue "Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes." But does his journeying help him to forget the woman he has met and fallen in love with - Fanny Osbourne?

In 1879 and 1880, three years before he was to write 'Treasure Island', Robert Louis Stevenson was a largely unpublished and unsuccessful writer.

Despite his father's wishes, however, he saw his life in literature. In 1876, he had met Fanny Osbourne the woman who was to become his lover and later his wife. At the time of their meeting Fanny was escaping from America with her children - away from a husband who only brought her misery through his serial infidelities.
One of Stevenson's earliest publications was an essay 'On Falling in Love' for The Cornhill magazine.

In 1878 Fanny decided that she had to return to America and to her husband. Stevenson embarked on a walk through the Cevennes with a donkey in 1879 which was later to be published as 'Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes' and in August of the same year he resolved to follow Fanny to America.

His journey was also published - most particularly in 'The Amateur Emigrant'.

Mike Harris' two plays portray these two enormously significant journeys and attempt to capture Stevenson's feelings for Fanny and how they affected him on his travels.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01lz7vz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01m0pq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01m171n)
Italian Family 1: Milan

Italy, home to the Pope and the Holy See, perhaps the most Catholic of all countries, is undergoing a peculiarly un-Catholic crisis; it now has one of the lowest birth rates in the world. There are so few children being born that if the current trend persists, traditional Italians are at risk of dying out in just a handful of generations. How can the nation famed for Romanticism, for enormous affectionate families, for Mamma Mia and for an enviable certainty that all you need is good food, good wine and your family around you, be the same nation that no longer gives birth? Laurie travels to Milan to unpick the tangled interactions between the individual, the family, the church and the state and discovers why Italians are delaying parenthood and in many cases rejecting having a family altogether.
The first of three special editions on the crisis of the Italian family.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01m171q)
Photos of Prince Harry

In today's programme with Steve Hewlett:

After the Olympics, there were calls for those less-prominent events in which Team GB won medals to get wider coverage on tv. Is there really an appetite for this, though, now the excitement has died down? John Fairley of Highflyer TV talks about his plans to run a new tv channel showcasing minority interest sports, London Legacy.

How have so-called second screens affected tv viewing habits and what impact does that have on broadcasters? Paul Lee of Deloitte takes Steve through the key findings of his recent research into this, with almost half of younger viewers using their smart phones or laptops while watching tv.

Liz Murdoch is due to follow her father Rupert and brother James tomorrow, delivering the MacTaggart lecture at the Edinburgh TV Festival. Sarah Ellison of Vanity Fair and Dan Sabbagh of the Guardian discuss her ambitions both inside and outside the family's businesses.

And, as the programme learns many UK newspapers have agreed terms to run the Prince Harry photos, will they actually print them? With Dan Sabbagh, lawyer Duncan Lamont examines the options open to editors.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01m171s)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m0dg3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b01m171v)
Edinburgh 2012

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure; regular guest on The Now Show; and popper-upper in things like Miranda and Family Guy, presents a special edition of his sketch show, recorded at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

The first series, broadcast last year, was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. It featured Winnie the Pooh coming to terms with his abusive relationship with honey; how The Archers sounds to people who don't listen to the Archers, and Jekyll and Hyde's tricky housekeeping arrangements. This show won't feature any of those things, but that's ok, because it will feature other things, and they'll be funny too.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme is written by and stars John Finnemore, with Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01m171x)
Eddie's confident before his interview on Radio Borsetshire about the Beast of Ambridge. Joe warns him not to trust Wayne Foley before popping next door for some of Kathy's freshly made scones.
Jamie finally contacts Rosa and they decide to meet up by the river in Jubilee Field - is it a date?
Kathy tells Joe she's concerned that Rosa's a distraction for Jamie when he should be focussing on college. They're interrupted by the start of Eddie's interview.
In Jubilee Field, Jamie talks about his relationship with Natalie. He claims it's good that they're no longer together. He's got his mum pestering him about exams and college but Rosa thinks that you don't need grades to be happy in life.
Eddie's radio interview is underway. He shamelessly plugs his Beast statues (on special offer) but Wayne takes the opportunity to expose the 'Beast' as a wind-up and humiliate Eddie.
Jamie's annoyed that Kathy knows about Natalie. They argue about his future until Jamie finally agrees to go back to college.
Eddie calms down after his interview only to be wound up again by Joe and a prank phone call from the 'Loch Ness Monster' (Jazzer).


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01m171z)
Ian McEwan, recorded before an audience in Edinburgh

Mark Lawson interviews Ian McEwan, as he publishes a new novel Sweet Tooth, in an edition recorded before an audience at the Edinburgh Festival.

Ian McEwan reveals the inspiration for Sweet Tooth, which is set in the early 1970s, and brings together the worlds of British espionage and literary ambition.

He also discusses how he has plagiarised himself, considers the role his family background has played in his life and work, and reflects on whether he would ever write a memoir.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m16pm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 The Education Debates (b01m1721)
Episode 1

In the first of three debates to mark the most dramatic reforms in education in decades, John Humphrys asks leading education thinkers what we should teach.

Whether it's to get to university, to launch a fulfilling career, or to be a useful member of society, what our children learn at school today will profoundly shape their lives, the society we live in and the health of our economy in the 21st Century.

The web gives today's schoolchildren access to previously unimaginable amounts of knowledge - and yet across Europe there has been social unrest among young people who are angry and terrified that what they know will be meaningless in a future with no jobs.

At home, Government reforms have led to big changes in the national curriculum, increased university fees and parents running their own schools.

Has there ever been a more important time to come back to the fundamental questions of education? In this first programme, leading educationalists including Anthony Seldon, Estelle Morris and Rachel Wolf debate what we should teach.

In programme two, John Humphrys asks a panel including union leader Mary Bousted and cognitive scientist Prof Guy Claxton.

And in the final debate, Schools Minister Nick Gibb, Shadow Education Secretary Stephen Twigg, local schools champion Melissa Benn and Prof James Tooley, an expert on private schools for poor children, discuss who should teach.

Produced by Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01m176r)
Series 3

Joe Dunthorne: Lessons from the Mosh Pit

Writer Joe Dunthorne asks what we can all learn about living together from the mosh pit at a rock gig.

Joe asks whether we should we all be a bit more open to social interaction. He contrasts the boisterous pushing and shoving at a rock gig with the quiet carriage on the train.

In one, he argues, everyone rubs along, and if you need something, you say it. The same cannot be said for the quiet carriage.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01m0phx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 What's the Point of...? (b01m16ph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01m0dg5)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m176v)
Latest on assisted dying, in the wake of Tony Nicklinson's death
How politically damaging is the unrest in South Africa for the political future of President Jacob Zuma?
Sectarian violence in Lebanon.
And those naked Prince Harry photos - damaging to the reputation of the Royal Family or not?


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m30hx)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 3

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 3 of 10: Accompanied by Jeanne, the sexton's daughter, Baratte makes his first inspection of the cemetery grounds at Les Innocents.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Political Animals (b01m179f)
Series 1

Humphrey

The notoriously photo-shy Humphrey, Chief Mouser to the Cabinet Office 1989 to 1997, a cat with a robust vocabulary and a pretty earthy view of political life, looks back on his struggles with all things New Labour.

Series of scurrilous talks given by well-known, if unreliable, Downing Street cats, who relate their trials and tribulations under four different Prime Ministers.

Starring James Fleet.

Written by Tony Bagley.

Director: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


WED 23:15 Before They Were Famous (b01m179h)
Series 1

Episode 2

Ian Leslie presents the comedy show which brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of some of the world's best known writers.

A project of literary archaeology, Leslie has found evidence in the most unlikely of places - within the archives of newspapers, periodicals, corporations and universities - showcasing the early examples of work by writers such as Jilly Cooper during her brief and unfortunately unsuccessful foray into the world of war reporting, and Hunter S Thompson in his sadly short-lived phase working in the customer relations department for a major American Airline.

These are the newspaper articles, advertising copy, company correspondence and gardening manuals that allow us a fascinating glimpse into the embryonic development of our best loved literary voices - people we know today for their novels or poems but who, at the time, were just people with a dream...and a rent bill looming at the end of the month.

Produced by Anna Silver and Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgnf6)
That Mitchell and Webb Sound

Episode 2

A macabre celebrity makeover show and the origins of the internet. Stars David Mitchell and Robert Webb. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast in September 2009.



THURSDAY 23 AUGUST 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01m0dh2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m44zx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m0dh4)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m0dh6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m0dh8)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01m0dhb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m182g)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Mark Coffey.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01m182j)
Free range egg producers claim they face losses running into tens of thousands of pounds. They say rising feed prices mean supermarkets will need to pay more for eggs. Farmers are already cancelling orders for new hens because they can't pay for them. The British Free Range Egg Producers Association believes that, if the situation continues, there could be a shortage by Christmas. The British Retail Consortium argues farmers are getting a sustainable price at a time when consumers' spending power is limited. Also in the programme, a forecast that over a third of EU countries aren't ready to comply with new pig welfare rules, coming into force on January 1st 2013.

Presenter: Georgina Windsor
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


THU 06:00 Today (b01m182l)
News and current affairs with James Naughtie and Evan Davis, featuring

0751
A law which would make it an offence to pay for sex is being put to the Northern Ireland Assembly in a draft bill. Lord Morrow, a DUP member who is putting forward the bill, and Catherine Stephens, who describes herself as a sex worker and represents the international Union of Sex Workers, debate the bill.

0810
GCSE exams have apparently been tougher this year to counter for the past upward drift, and the target for schools has also been raised. Glenys Stacey, chief executive of qualifications regulator Ofqual shares her thoughts on whether there is a need to reform GCSEs for something more rigorous.

0818
Head of the Eurogroup Jean-Claude Juncker is "totally opposed" to Greece being forced out of the currency. Gavin Hewitt reports from Berlin where President Hollande of France is due to talk about the euro crisis with Chancellor Merkel and the Greek prime minister.

0822
Professor Jan Morris, head of eligibility at the international federation for athletes, and Francis Dart, a Paralympic silver medallist in Sydney, debate whether athletes with learning difficulties should be eligible for the Paralympics.

0833
After heavy clashes between minority Alawites and majority Sunnis in Lebanon's northern town of Tripoli - a place with the same name as a Libyan city - a tentative ceasefire has been reached. Barbara Plett reports from Tripoli, and Nadim Shehadi, from the Middle East and North Africa programme at Chatham House, shares his thoughts on whether the ceasefire will last.


THU 09:00 Fry's English Delight (b01m182n)
Series 5

Intonation

"It ain't what you say, but the way that you say it". David Blunkett surprises us with song and reveals how important intonation is in his life. Anne Karpf and daughter Lola share some familial secrets and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art lets us observe an intonation class. Stephen himself plays with the intonation of the football results in order to better the record of his team, Norwich City.

Joining Stephen in the studio and bringing some academic grist to the intonational mill is speech coach Dr Geoff Lindsey, who introduces us to some of the concepts and practices of this interesting phenomenon of the English language.

Have you experienced HRT? No, it's not what you're thinking. It's High Rise Terminal - or what Stephen calls "Australian Question Intonation", a particular affliction for the host of this entertaining programme. It's the ending of every sentence with a question, even when it isn't one? Together, Stephen and Geoff try and work out how it works, why it annoys and how the intonation at the end of a sentence can affect its meaning.

Producer: Merilyn Harris
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 09:30 Twin Nation (b0145x7w)
Episode 2

Edi Stark finds out how twins survive when they lose the other half of this unique relationship. Whether at birth, in the prime of life, or towards its end Edi finds out what surviving twins have in common and how its not always losing your lifelong companion that's the worst.

Producer: Peter McManus.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m450m)
Daniel Tammet - Thinking in Numbers

The Cataract of Time

Written by Daniel Tammet.
Read by James Anthony Pearson.

Daniel Tammet's new collection of essays celebrates mathematics as "the science of imagination". In this extract he interrogates how our experience of time changes as we age.

Daniel Tammet is hailed the world over for his unique intelligence shaped by high-functioning autistic savant syndrome. His idiosyncratic world view provides new perspectives on the universal questions of what it is to be human and how we make meaning in our lives.

Abridged and produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m182q)
Ayn Rand, author and philosopher

Why is Ayn Rand the author and philosopher, hugely popular in the late 1950's and 60's finding favour amongst the political right? Should parents be allowed to rely on their religious beliefs to stonewall medical opinion on what's best for their child? The biologist and science writer Aarathi Prasad on how Science is redesigning the rules of sex'. Plus British Glamour since 1950 a spectacular display of more than 60 ball gowns at the V&A. And Annabel Loyd shares the secrets of a great picnic.

Producer Di McGregor.
Presenter Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m182s)
Crisis

Episode 4

The humanitarian crisis facing Martha and her team near the border in South Sudan is escalating. The clinic is overwhelmed, militias are attacking the wells, and when one of the women working in the kitchen went missing, Martha was left with a dilemma she fears she has handled badly. As tensions mount, she turns to one of her team for comfort.

Writer: Tina Pepler
Director: Sara Davies.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01m182v)
Bulgaria's Criminal Football

No fewer than 15 football club bosses have been murdered in Bulgaria's top football league in the last decade alone. In this edition of Crossing Continents Margot Dunne investigates reports that many have been deeply involved in mafia businesses.

There are continuing reports that the game is riddled with corrupt practices including match-fixing and the illegal procurement of European Union passports for overseas players.

Crossing Continents examines these claims, attending a match which has allegedly been fixed in advance and speaks to a player who says he was offered money to throw a match.

The programme also meets Todor Batkov, chairman of one of the country's best known football clubs, Levski Sofia, who accepts that corruption in the national game is as deep rooted as ever.

Producer: Ed Butler.


THU 11:30 Rock 'n' Roll in Four Movements (b01m182x)
When Rock 'n' Roll began, it was music of rebellion, fighting against the strait-laced world of classical music. The two worlds seemed far apart until the late Jon Lord wrote his Concerto for Rock Group and Orchestra which combined the forces of his heavy rock group Deep Purple with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The work was premiered in the Royal Albert Hall in London under the baton of Malcolm Arnold in 1969. From then until the arrival of Punk in the late seventies rockers like the Nice, Emerson Lake and Palmer and Rick Wakeman embraced this hybrid genre with great energy and enthusiasm. Rick Wakeman in particular became known for stage shows which matched the ambition of his music.

Stuart Maconie talks to Rick Wakeman and Keith Emerson about the genre's excesses. We hear from Roy Wood about the early days of the Electric Light Orchestra. And the late Jon Lord, in his last ever recorded interview, talks about his passion for writing classical music, inspired by his early experiment with his Concerto.

Stuart Maconie casts a fairly benevolent eye on the genre - in his view some of it was actually very good. But classical music critic Ivan Hewett is pleased that the genre was largely killed off by punk - although in his view there are more modern examples where classical and pop sensibilities are successfully combined, by the likes of Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead and Damon Albarn.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01m182z)
A New Coffee Chain Launches & Energy Bill Increases

With over 15,000 coffee outlets already in the UK, is there space for another chain? We visit the latest to open, backed by a major supermarket.

Tesco explain why they're switching to traffic light labelling on food after resisting it for years.

As energy firm SSE announce price increases of up to 9%, we look at what's behind these rising energy costs and how to compare deals.

When it comes to drinking wine, we are far more likely to buy Australian, Californian or Italian rather than French. Is that down to our preference in taste or just better marketing? We hear from the British company that is trying to persuade us to fall back in love with French wine.

And the man with the best lawn in Britain - he mows it three times a week. Listeners tell us their best tips for turning a burnt, bald patch into a bowling green.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Steven Williams.


THU 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m1831)
Charles Saatchi

The New Elizabethans: Charles Saatchi

James Naughtie reflects on the high flyer from the advertising world Charles Saatchi. The company he founded with his brother - Saatchi & Saatchi - was one of the most successful ad agencies in the 1980's. Saatchi is also a major art collector, known for his early sponsorship of Damien Hirst and Tracy Emin. He set up The Saatchi Gallery, which he donated to the public in 2010,along with over 200 pieces of art.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


THU 12:57 Weather (b01m0dhd)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01m1833)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 The Alien Birds Have Landed (b01m1835)
The Rose-Ringed Parakeet

Alison Steadman tells the story of how and why the Rose-ringed Parakeet became a British bird. Are alien birds apt expressions of our botched tenancy of the planet? Should we be more careful about how we meddle with nature?
Producer: Tim Dee


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01m171x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b016fs6f)
Mike Harris - Stevenson in Love

The Amateur Emigrant

By Mike Harris.

Based on Robert Louis Stevenson's classic travelogues, journals and personal letters.

In pursuit of the woman he loves Stevenson first catches a steamer to New York and then undertakes a momentous train journey across America - ending in California. But will she leave her husband for him.

In 1879 and 1880, three years before he was to write 'Treasure Island', Robert Louis Stevenson was a largely unpublished and unsuccessful writer.

Despite his father's wishes, however, he saw his life in literature. In 1876, he had met Fanny Osbourne the woman who was to become his lover and later his wife. At the time of their meeting Fanny was escaping from America with her children - away from a husband who only brought her misery through his serial infidelities.
One of Stevenson's earliest publications was an essay 'On Falling in Love' for The Cornhill magazine.

In 1878 Fanny decided that she had to return to America and to her husband. Stevenson embarked on a walk through the Cevennes with a donkey in 1879 which was later to be published as 'Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes' and in August of the same year he resolved to follow Fanny to America.

His journey was also published - most particularly in 'The Amateur Emigrant'.

Mike Harris' two plays portray these two enormously significant journeys and attempt to capture Stevenson's feelings for Fanny and how they affected him on his travels.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01m1837)
Gwent Levels

Helen Mark explores the Gwent Levels, an extensive low lying area on the north side of the Severn Estuary in South Wales registered as a Historic Landscape of Outstanding Interest. The area has a rich archaelogical past and tell a fascinating story of the recent social history of Wales and the battle between man and river, as well as being home to Magor Marsh, the last fenland on the Levels.

Helen meets Kevin Dupe, Reserve Manager of the Newport Wetlands to find out how the Reserve fits into the history of the area and Chris Hurn who gives Helen a sense of the interaction between man and wildlife, a sense of change, and an idea of the friendships had on the Levels. Artist, Jill Hobbs, tells Helen how she uses her love of this landscape to create her own representations of it and Helen also climbs the tower at Redwick Church with Rick Turner for a birds eye view of this landscape. Archaeologist, Nigel Nayling, gives Helen a sense of the ancient history of the area and gamekeeper, Paul Cawley explains the importance of conservation for such an important area.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Elizabeth Pearson.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01m0f1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01m0f2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01m1839)
Matthew Sweet meets with director James Marsh to discuss his IRA drama Shadow Dancer, starring Clive Owen and Andrea Riseborough.

Northern Ireland correspondent for the Independent newspaper David Mckittrick looks at the portrayal of the IRA on film.

Mark Gatiss continues his selection of biopics - this week, Carey Grant as Cole Porter in Night and Day.

Director Bart Layton on his compelling drama-doc The Imposter, which tells the story of a Frenchman who convinces a Texan family he is their son who has been missing for several years.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01m183c)
As public interest in the red planet reaches a peak and NASA's Rover Curiosity begins tentatively to roll across the Martian surface, their next lander - called InSight - is announced to some fanfare. Based on an older, simpler, static probe, InSight will look for "Marsquakes" and teach us about the deep seismic structure of Mars. But as the former head of Science and Robotic Missions at the European Space Agency, now President of the Royal Astronomical Society, Prof David Southwood tells Quentin, there is some disappointment for planetary scientists, and fears that with budgetary cuts jeopardising many planned missions, Curiosity could be the last hurrah for this golden age of Martian exploration.

A global challenge to invent a new toilet that doesn't need water, electricity or a septic system, doesn't pollute and costs less than five cents a day is being worked on by scientists around the world. Professor Sohail Khan from Loughborough University is one of the winners of the "Reinvent the Toilet" competition run by the Gates Foundation. His team's design is based on hydrothermal carbonisation - a sort of pressure cooker which converts waste into something that looks and smells like coffee.

When a bomb explodes in a warzone, it produces a blast wave and then a thermal heat wave that can reach temperatures of over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Scientists in the USA have developed a camouflage make-up designed to protect exposed skin for 15 seconds - and in some cases up to a minute - from this intense heat. Professor Robert Lochhead and a team at the University of Southern Mississippi were commissioned by the Department of Defence to develop the make-up. It protects soldiers from the searing heat of roadside Improvised Explosive Devices as well as providing traditional camouflage. Field trials are now underway. The team used silicones, which absorb radiation at wavelengths outside the intense heat spectrum, instead of the traditional hydrocarbon ingredients used in cosmetics.

Age-related hearing loss is inevitable and irreversible, but now British birdwatchers are worried it could be affecting their ability to record and survey, accurately, bird species with higher-pitched song. Eminent birder, Richard Porter, put the peregrine among the pigeons when he admitted his inability to hear certain species' birdsong in an article in British Birds magazine. At the RSPB's annual British Bird Fair, he tells Quentin that he's concerned that higher range hearing loss could be distorting the all-important surveys of British birds. Acknowledging the possibility of an "age hearing" effect on the data, Andy Clements, Director of the British Trust for Ornithology, outlines new research, planned for the Autumn, to measure volunteers' hearing abilities and cross reference this with known bird populations.


THU 17:00 PM (b01m183f)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m0dhg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b010t5wm)
Series 4

Ayabassa Alan

More shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave.

Written by and starring Donald McLeary and Sanjeev Kohli, Fags, Mags & Bags has proved a hit with the Radio 4 audience with this series picking up a Writers' Guild nomination for best comedy in 2011.

In this episode, which guest stars Kevin Eldon, the new dance craze Ayabassa sweeps the town. Meanwhile Dave finds a new friend in the shape of the local doctor which puts Ramesh's nose out.

So join the staff of Fags, Mags and Bags in their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation.

Ramesh Mahju has built up the business over the course of thirty years, and is a firmly entrenched feature of the local area. However, he does apply the "low return" rules of the shop to all other aspects of his life.

He is ably assisted by his shop sidekick Dave, a forty-something underachiever who shares Ramesh's love of the art of shopkeeping, even if he is treated like a slave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons, Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping. But they are natural successors to the business and Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not.

Cast:
Ramesh ..... Sanjeev Kohli
Dave ..... Donald Mcleary
Sanjay ..... Omar Raza
Alok ..... Susheel Kumar
Dr Southwell ..... Kevin Eldon
Mrs Begg ..... Marjory Hogarth
Mrs Armstrong ..... Maureen Carr
Lovely Sue ..... Julie Wilson Nimmo
Bra Jeff ..... Steven McNicol

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01m183h)
Matt urges Brenda to delay payment on various bills. Things aren't looking good unless they sell one of their properties.

David's not sure about Ruth's suggestion of a party to celebrate a return to normality but David's not sure. Ruth tries to get Adam to persuade him but David is anxious about being called as a witness to court and leaves.

Adam talks to Ruth about the new cropping for the dairy at Home Farm. Ruth's not too enthusiastic but sympathises on what a big decision it must have been. David appears with some good news. The thugs in court have all pleaded guilty so he doesn't have to be a witness. He's ready for that party now.

After seeing flustered Vicky in the shop, Brenda visits her at home but Vicky's still not herself. Brenda tries to talk about the baby but Vicky's mind is focussed on her hospital appointment the next day.

Darrell's frustrated at being kept from going to the Walters' and Matt's annoyed that he's just not getting the hint. Their cashflow problem means that a property needs to sold, and he's got the Walters' house in mind so he wants Darrell to do something to encourage them to move on.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01m183k)
Booker T, novelist cricketers and Charlie Brooker's new comedy

With John Wilson.

Organist Booker T Jones, leader of Booker T and the M Gs, remembers the day he created the classic tune Green Onions, and discusses the mystery surrounding the death of his drummer.

Junot Diaz won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with his first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. His new book, This is How You Lose Her, is a collection of short stories around the theme of infidelity. He explains why despite many similarities between his own life and that of his characters, his books may not be as autobiographical as they seem.

AA Milne, JM Barrie and Arthur Conan Doyle were among the writers who played in the Authors cricket team, a group of enthusiasts who last took to the crease in 1912. 100 years on, the team is being revived and includes Tom Holland, Nicholas Hogg and Dan Stevens. John reports on their match against actors' team The Gaieties.

Charlie Brooker's new spoof TV crime drama stars John Hannah as DCI Jack Cloth: A Touch of Cloth parodies the last decade of British police procedurals, good and bad. Denise Mina reviews.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m182s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01m183m)
University Fees

Students starting university this Autumn will see a three-fold increase in fees - and they say they want value for money. But with universities experiencing a squeeze on the funding they receive from Government, can they give students what they want?

Reporter Phil Mackie reports that some universities are now running courses at a loss - and hears from consultants who warn that a number of institutions are unlikely to be financially viable in the longer term. They warn that the changes to the university funding system could have potentially "devastating consequences."

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.


THU 20:30 In Business (b01m183p)
Join the Crowd

Short of cash to start a business? Instead of going to the bank for a loan, asking for cash from friends or family, or meeting with venture capitalists, how about asking hundreds or thousands of strangers on the internet to buy your product or a share in your company?
It's called crowdfunding, and it's a strategy that was first adopted by filmmakers and musicians. Now more and more businesses are using crowdfunding websites to raise capital.
Peter Day meets some of the businesses turning to this innovative form of fundraising as well as some of the founders of high-tech companies matching up entrepreneurs with investors.
He also finds out more about the potential risks and asks whether crowdfunding will remain a niche business tool or an idea that will transform the way entrepreneurs raise money.
Producer: Mike Wendling
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


THU 21:00 Requiem for a Moth (b010t6nr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 Fry's English Delight (b01m182n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01m0dhj)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m183r)
Eurozone leaders meet to discuss their approach to Greece.

A special report from Norway on the eve of the verdict of Anders Breivik.

And Singapore's education success story - what could we learn?

With Ritula Shah.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m30jm)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 4

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 4 of 10: Before travelling to Valenciennes to recruit labour, Baratte spends an unusual late night with the organist, Armand.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Tonight (b01m183t)
Edinburgh Special

Rory Bremner and the team return for a one-off episode of Tonight, coming from the Ed Fringe festival. It's the topical satire show that digs that bit deeper into national, international and, for this episode, particularly Scottish politics. Rory's mantra is that it's as important to make sense out of things as it is to make fun of them. In this Braveheart of satirical comedy shows, Rory Bremner leads the charge, with satirist Nick Doody, guest comedian Susan Morrison and impressionist Lewis MacLeod bringing up the rear. Veteran satirist and Tonight performer Andy Zaltzman also plays his part, but from the safety of his holiday in France.

This is half an hour of stand-up, sketches, and investigative satire. And at the core of the show is Rory's interview with Joyce McMillan of The Scotsman and Iain MacWhirter of The Herald, two of the most informed guest commentators on the Scottish political scene. More global crises, more political scandal, more brilliant impressions...and some devolution thrown in: a shot in the arm for satire lovers everywhere.

Presenter: Rory Bremner
Producers: Simon Jacobs & Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgngh)
Cowards

Episode 2

Cowards: Sketch show with a comic slant on human frailties. With Tom Basden, Stefan Golaszewski and Tim Key. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in November 2008.



FRIDAY 24 AUGUST 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01m0djc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01m450m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01m0djf)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01m0djh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01m0djk)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01m0djm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m19mt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Mark Coffey.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01m19mw)
Hundreds of badgers have been vaccinated in Wales as part of it's TB eradication programme. Caz Graham talks to the Welsh chief vet to assess how the badger vaccination programme is progressing after the first three months.

Ruth Sanderson visits a farm in Essex to taste heritage fruits like mulberries, quince and medlar used to make jam for Tiptree. And dairy farming the woolly way, Sarah Swadling visits a sheep milking parlour!

Presented by Caz Graham.
Produced by Clare Freeman in BBC Birmingham.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01m19my)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b01m2vmg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01m451j)
Daniel Tammet - Thinking in Numbers

The Art of Maths

Written by Daniel Tammet.
Read by James Anthony Pearson.

Daniel Tammet's essay, taken from his new collection, explores how beauty and creativity inform the work of mathematicians.

Daniel Tammet is hailed the world over for his unique intelligence shaped by high-functioning autistic savant syndrome. His idiosyncratic world view provides new perspectives on the universal questions of what it is to be human and how we make meaning in our lives.

Abridged and produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01m19n2)
Women Farmers, Victoria Vardy and Dame Fanny Waterman

Women produce over fifty percent of all food grown worldwide. In sub-Saharan Africa, they grow around 90 percent of the food, yet little global investment is being made to support women farmers. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that if women were given better access to training and agricultural technology, they could increase production on their farms by 20 to 30 percent, and reduce the number of hungry people in the world by up to 150 million. So why is the value of women farmers not being recognised? Misogyny is a constant in standup comedy, but jokes about rape and domestic violence seem to be on the increase. By making it easier to laugh at violence against women, do we make it harder to take it seriously?. Twenty five years ago Victoria Vardy was abandoned as a newborn baby on the steps of the Co-op in Chesterfield. She was adopted at nine months old and now lives in Manchester. Although she had a happy upbringing she has always wondered about her roots. Now, she's taken to YouTube to publicly appeal for answers about her birth with a short film entitled Who is Katy Elder? - the name she was originally given when she was found. Almost fifty years ago Dame Fanny Waterman came up with the idea of organising a piano competition in her home city of Leeds. The Leeds International Piano Competition is now one of the biggest piano competitions in the world and attracts hundreds of entrants. At 92, Dame Fanny still continues to be involved in every aspect of the competition. She joins Jenni to discuss the competition and her musical life.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m19n4)
Crisis

Episode 5

As Martha's team try to deal with an ever-increasing number of refugees fleeing across the border from the North, she has a crisis of her own to deal with inside the compound. Tina Pepler's drama reaches a gripping conclusion.

Writer: Tina Pepler
Director: Sara Davies.


FRI 11:00 Missing, Presumed... (b01m19n6)
Adults

Behind the oak doors of a 17th Century Hampshire Mansion lie thousands of missing persons files - hundreds of stories of broken families, false identities, lies, deception, and loss. This is the Missing Persons' Bureau, the national point of contact for all the country's missing people and unidentified human remains. From abandoned babies to lost children and missing adults, the Bureau tracks the living and identifies the dead. They currently have more than 1000 unidentified people on their books: those who died unnoticed and unnamed.

In this programme, reporter Penny Marshall goes inside the UK Missing Persons' Bureau to find out why people go missing and discover what happens after someone disappears, speaking to intelligence officers, police and the families involved to reveal the many stories which lie behind its walls.

Presented by Penny Marshall

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Beauty of Britain (b01m19n8)
Series 3

Episode 2

EPISODE 2 'GROOMZILLA'

Beauty faces a tough decision as Ade presses her to accept his marriage proposal. Why do all the good men want to go home? Will Ade remain in Britain for Beauty? Her elderly client, Miss Carter is also looking to leave Stoke on Trent, to 'go bumming around europe'.

Comedy about a Zimbabwean carer who looks after the elderly.

CAST:

Jocelyn Jee Esien .... Beauty
Paterson Joseph ..... Ade
Felicity Montagu ..... Sally
Nicola Sanderson .... Karen, QVC host
Rosie Cavaliero ..... Michelle, Lisa, Waitress
Anne Reid ..... Miss Carter
Christopher Douglas ..... Various.

ABOUT THE SERIES:

Beauty of Britain is about one woman's progress through a foreign country as she searches for personal fulfilment, a sense of belonging and a pair of Jimmy Choos she can walk to church in. Beauty works as a carer for the Featherdown Agency, which is based in Stoke. She sees herself as an inspiration to other African girls hoping to live the dream in Britain.

The series stars Jocelyn Jee Esien as Beauty and guest stars Maureen Lipman, Robert Bathurst, Anne Reid, Felicity Montagu and Paterson Joseph. It is written by Christopher Douglas (Ed Reardon's Week, Davd Podmore's World of Cricket) and Nicola Sanderson.

The series breaks the embarrassed silence about what happens to us when we get old and start to lose our faculties. It shows the process in all its chaotic, tragi-comedy but from the point of view of an economic migrant, Beauty, whose Southern African Shona background has taught her to respects age. Beauty sees Britain at its best, its worst and sometimes without its clothes on running the wrong way down the M6 with a toy dog shouting 'Come on!'.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01m19nb)
Alcohol at petrol stations, Sibelius software, car insurance and Nespresso.

What's the difference between a shop and a petrol station? It might depend on how many customers buy fuel or how much money the garage makes from its shop. In England and Wales, legislation allows garage shops to sell alcoholic drinks only if their 'primary use' isn't fuel sales. Up to 3000 petrol stations are licensed to sell alcohol, but West Yorkshire Police have successfully challenged the process.

While many high streets are struggling in competition with online sales and out-of-town retail, some are thriving. What are the factors making them successful, and can other town centres learn from them?

Nestle wants to stop other coffee-makers from selling capsules for its Nespresso machines. A German court has rejected the firm's bid to prevent two Swiss manufacturers from producing their own versions. We look at the issue of consumables and the extent to which manufacturers can control consumer choice.

Many of the world's musicians and composers use Sibelius software to arrange and edit printed music. Thousands of concerned users have signed an online petition about the software's future after its parent company, Avid, closed its development office in London. We look at the rights and expectations of people buying software.

Adding another driver to your car insurance policy can reduce the cost, but what other factors dictate the price? What are the legal and legitimate options that can be used to save money?


FRI 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01m19nd)
Goldie

The New Elizabethans: Goldie.

James Naughtie considers the contribution of musician, artist, actor and DJ Goldie to the rise of dance music and club culture over the past 25 years. Goldie began as a graffiti artist but was interested in the breakbeat scene. After visiting America in the late 80's he turned his attention to music - particular jungle and drum & bass. He is well known for his innovations in these genres and indeed his debut album "Timeless" in 1995 is acknowledged as a classic. Goldie continues to DJ all over the world.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01m0djp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01m19ng)
National and international news with Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 The Alien Birds Have Landed (b01m19nj)
The Starling and Blackbird

Alison Steadman tells the story of how and why the Starling is hated in North America and the Blackbird in New Zealand. Historically as much as today we have meddled with nature. It's a risky business. Can we undo our mistakes or is it too late?
Producer: Tim Dee


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01m183h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01m19nl)
Lindsay Williams - A Little Bit of Latitude

A Little Bit of Latitude

When Marie wakes up the morning after a drunken first night at Latitude Festival, the last thing she expects is to be arrested by festival security for a suspected assault. With her boyfriend missing, her clothes soaked in blood and her memory hazy, Marie decides to take drastic action to find out the truth. A comic drama recorded on location at Latitude Festival.

Written by Lindsay Williams
Produced by Charlotte Riches
Directed by Nadia Molinari.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01m19nn)
South Devon

Peter Gibbs and the GQT team tackle gardening questions in South Devon. The panellists are Anne Swithinbank, Matthew Wilson and Bunny Guinness. In addition, Toby Buckland goes in search of miniature plants at Babbacombe Model Village, whilst Anne Swithinbank goes in search of the largest Torbay Palm.

Q1. Are there any organic treatments for bindweed, I have tried careful digging.
Try covering area with black polythene to draw the weed up.

Q2. My Weeping Fig houseplant has been dropping its leaves for several months. Does it need feeding?
It may be a question of sunlight. Weeping Figs do not like unidirectional light, so try revolving the plant once in a while. Also, keep away from dry, winter air.

Q3. Can mycorrhizal fungi benefit plants other than roses?

Q4. Lately, why are we suffering with so many plant problems eg latest Fuchsia Gall mite? Are we not controlling plant imports properly?

Q5. Help, my Bleeding Heart plant is dying!
No need to worry! It's dying back as it should, at the end of the season.

Q6. I have three blueberry plants in pots in a greenhouse with no fruit. Why?
Blueberries prefer being outdoors, They need a winter chilling and acidic soil.

Q7. There are so many plant feeds on the market. Is it fine to use a general, all-purpose feed or should I use specific feeds?
You may not need a feed at all. The majority ornamental plants don't need feeding. Edible crops will need feeding or soil enrichment.

Q8. My wife is apparently trying to murder my favourite squeeze - a lemon and an orange tree. They have been taken out the greenhouse and are shedding leaves. Should they even be outside?

The lemon tree should survive in outdoors in a sheltered, South Devon garden.
The orange will rely on a getting a decent summer, but would be better off in a greenhouse.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Gotta Dance! (b01m19nq)
Keeping the Faith

The legendary Gene Kelly was born a hundred years ago this year.
Three stories which celebrate dance and its power to move, inspire and bring together.

'Keeping the Faith' by Zoe Strachan.
In this poignant story, two people, generations apart, find a connection through the magic of moving to music.

Read by Julie Austin.

Producer: Patricia Hitchcock.

Zoë Strachan is an award-winning novelist who also writes plays, libretti, short stories and essays. Her most recent book is Ever Fallen in Love, currently shortlisted for the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust Book Awards. The Lady from the Sea, an opera for which she wrote the libretto (music by Craig Armstrong), premieres at the Edinburgh International Festival in August 2012.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01m19ns)
Nina Bawden, Tony Scott, Eileen Beasley and Scott McKenzie

Matthew Bannister on

The writer Nina Bawden, author of Carrie's War, The Peppermint Pig and many other acclaimed books for children and adults. Michael Morpurgo pays tribute.

The movie director Tony Scott, best known for action thrillers like Top Gun, Crimson Tide and Man on Fire.

The campaigner Eileen Beasley who refused to pay her rates until the bill was printed in the Welsh language. She was taken to court fourteen times and had her furniture confiscated.

And the singer Scott McKenzie who, in the sixties, urged us all to go to San Francisco with flowers in our hair.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01m19nv)
Do you know which Hitchcock film features a scene set at the very top of the statue of Liberty? No? Well, according to several listeners the producers of Radio 4's landmark series The New Elizabethans don't either. Listeners think they have spotted a clutch of factual inaccuracies in the series.

In the first of the new series of Feedback, Roger asks the editor Andrew Smith if they are right. He also discusses the reservations of one listener who actually featured in the series, the New Elizabethan Professor Stuart Hall.

How is the BBC performing in the marathon that is this summer of sport? In the brief lull between the Olympics and Paralympic Games we hear your verdict on the coverage. And why were listeners abroad unable to hear many Radio 4 programmes when the Games began?

Plus the latest instalment of Operation Drop Out, and Feedback wants to have its very own jingle. All musical (and non-musical) styles accepted. Please send us your magnum opuses. Or should that be magna opera?

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Produced by Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01m19nx)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01m0djr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Chain Reaction (b01m19nz)
Series 8

Tim Minchin talks to Caitlin Moran

Comedian and musician Tim Minchin is not well but still has a great time putting the world to rights in his attempt to interview journalist and author, Caitlin Moran, despite having no questions and no voice.

The talk tag show where the guest is the next interviewer.

Producer: Carl Cooper

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01m19p1)
Vicky's in a tizz, packing in preparation for their visit to the hospital. Mike wants her to slow down and think about what she's doing.

At The Bull, Rhys is recounting to Fallon the prank phone calls Jazzer made to Eddie about the Beast of Ambridge. She doesn't think Wayne was fair during the radio interview. Harry's returning next week to collect his things, so they plan a leaving party. They rub along all right until Rhys' larking about touches on Fallon's lack of boyfriend. Irritated, she pulls rank.

Arthur takes Darrell through some of his stamp collection and the conversation turns to moral values which makes guilty Darrell uneasy. Matt phones Darrell to get a 'progress' report. Darrell assures him that the special job has been done.

After the amniocentesis, Mike is busy fussing over Vicky to make sure she's comfy. She's anxious about the test and the next few days. He tells her to rest but neither of them are looking forward to the long wait.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01m19p3)
Harrogate Crime Writing Festival Special

Mark Lawson reports from the annual Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate, with guests including Harlan Coben, Ann Cleeves and John Connolly.

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m19n4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01m19p5)
Greenbelt Festival, Cheltenham Racecourse

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a panel discussion of news and politics from the Greenbelt Festival, Cheltenham Racecourse with writer and human rights activist, Joan Smith; police historian and former Chief Constable of Gloucestershire, Timothy Brain; author and commentator, James Delingpole; and Rector of St James's Piccadilly, The Revd Lucy Winkett.

Producer: Kirsten Lass.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01m19p7)
The trouble with 'freedom'

"We like to tell ourselves an uplifting story in which freedom expands whenever tyranny is overthrown" writes John Gray. "We believe that...when a dictator is toppled the result is not only a more accountable type of government but also greater liberty throughout society".

But Gray believes otherwise. Using the nineteenth century liberal John Stuart Mill and his god-son Bertrand Russell, he advances his argument that liberty is one thing, democracy another.

"The reality" he says "is that when a tyrant is toppled we can't know what will come next".

Producer:
Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b01m4bk3)
Freud: The Case Histories

Dora

Deborah Levy's dramatisation of Sigmund Freud's iconic case study 'Dora' translated by Shaun Whiteside.

1899 finds a father imploring Sigmund Freud to treat his daughter after discovering her intention to end her life. When Dora first comes to Freud she suffers from a loss of voice, a debilitating cough and a limp. Dream analysis is the key to unlocking the causes of Dora's condition, and as Freud's treatment continues, secrets, seduction and betrayal are uncovered.

Directed by Elizabeth Allard

Deborah Levy's dramatisation of "The Wolfman: A History of Infantile Neurosis" can be heard at the same time next week. Deborah Levy writes fiction, plays and poetry. Her work has been staged by the Royal Shakespeare Company, and she is the author of several novels. Her latest is the acclaimed "Swimming Home" which was broadcast as a Book at Bedtime and is on the longlist for this year's Man Booker Prize.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01m0djt)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01m19p9)
Anders Behring Breivik, who killed 77 people in Norway last year is jailed for 21 years. We debate how the Norwegian justice system has dealt with such a horrific crime.

Jonty Bloom investigates why today's revised GDP figures mean different things for different parts of the UK.

And we meet the stars of the British Paralympic goalball team.

With Felicity Evans.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01m30p7)
Andrew Miller - Pure

Episode 5

By Andrew Miller
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by John Sessions.

It's Paris in 1785. The cemetery of Les Innocents is the oldest in the city, but it is overflowing and can no longer hold on to its dead. Newcomers to the quarter are overpowered by the smell. It taints the breath and food of the locals. And some believe it can even taint the mind.

By order of the King, the church and cemetery are to be destroyed and every last bone rehoused. The place is to be made sweet again. It shall be made pure.

Charged with the task, Jean-Baptiste Baratte - a young engineer from Normandy - arrives in Paris. And thus begins "A year of bones, of grave-dirt, relentless work. Of ... chanting priests. A year of rape, suicide, sudden death. Of friendship too. Of desire. Of love...A year unlike any other he has lived."

Episode 5 of 10: In Valenciennes, Baratte meets Lecoeur, a former colleague from his days at the mines, to recruit workers for the excavation of les Innocents.

Andrew Miller was born in Bristol. He studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in 1991 and finished a PhD in Critical and Creative Writing at Lancaster University in 1995. He lives in Somerset.

His first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published in 1997 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction). His third, Oxygen (2001), was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel Award. One Morning Like A Bird (2008) was also produced by Sweet Talk for Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4.

Pure is Andrew Miller's sixth novel and won the Costa Book Of The Year award in 2011.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b01m0fz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgnhf)
On the Hour

Episode 2

Reports of a right royal shocker, plus Alan Partridge with all the sport. Chris Morris fronts the news satire. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in May 1992.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01m0kjb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01m0kjb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01m0lv2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01m0lv2)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01m16pm)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01m16pm)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01m182s)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01m182s)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01m19n4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01m19n4)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 MON (b01mgnbl)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 TUE (b01mgndv)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 WED (b01mgnf6)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 THU (b01mgngh)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 FRI (b01mgnhf)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01lv7z1)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01m19p7)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b00lyf69)

Amanda Vickery on... Men 09:00 MON (b01m0jm6)

Amanda Vickery on... Men 21:30 MON (b01m0jm6)

An Outcast of the Islands: Lady Grange 23:30 SAT (b01lstsf)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01lz7w1)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01lv7yz)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01m19p5)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01lz7yk)

Beauty of Britain 11:30 FRI (b01m19n8)

Before They Were Famous 23:15 WED (b01m179h)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01m0f1m)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01m0f1m)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b01m0h67)

Bleak Expectations 11:30 MON (b00wdjvk)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01m0lh1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01m2x0f)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01m30hx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01m30jm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01m30p7)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01lv7xw)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01m0kj6)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01m0kj6)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01m44z6)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01m44z6)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01m44zx)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01m44zx)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01m450m)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01m450m)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01m451j)

Brian Gulliver's Travels 11:30 WED (b01m16pr)

Brief Lives 14:15 TUE (b01m0m86)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01m0f20)

Chain Reaction 12:30 SAT (b01lv7ys)

Chain Reaction 18:30 FRI (b01m19nz)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01lsts9)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01m0f2b)

Comic Fringes 19:45 SUN (b01m0f2q)

Composing LA 11:30 TUE (b01m0lv4)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b01m0phx)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01m0phx)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b01lv4np)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b01m182v)

Dilemma 19:15 SUN (b01m0f2n)

Drama 14:15 MON (b012942d)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01684jr)

Drama 14:15 THU (b016fs6f)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01m19nl)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 THU (b010t5wm)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01lz359)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01m0h61)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01m0ltr)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01m16pc)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01m182j)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01m19mw)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01m19nv)

Fixing Broken Banking 12:00 SAT (b01lz7vz)

Fixing Broken Banking 21:00 SUN (b01lz7vz)

Fixing Broken Banking 15:00 WED (b01lz7vz)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01m176r)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b01m4bk3)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01lz36n)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01m0lgv)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01m0pq0)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01m171z)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01m183k)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01m19p3)

Fry's English Delight 09:00 THU (b01m182n)

Fry's English Delight 21:30 THU (b01m182n)

Game Changer: 20 Years of the Premier League 17:00 SUN (b01lt2vj)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01lv7yg)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01m19nn)

Gotta Dance! 15:45 FRI (b01m19nq)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b01m0fz3)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b01m0fz3)

Head to Head 09:30 MON (b01m0kj4)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b01lv5vc)

In Business 20:30 THU (b01m183p)

In Living Memory 11:00 WED (b01m16pp)

In Pursuit of Dignity 22:15 SAT (b01lv26v)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01m0pq4)

In the Lounge with Rich Morton 10:30 SAT (b01cwszp)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01m0pq6)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01m0pq6)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 WED (b01m171v)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01lswv8)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b01m0lgq)

Kevin Eldon Will See You Now 23:00 TUE (b01m0pqk)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01lv7yl)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01m19ns)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b01m0f1r)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01lz7yc)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 TUE (b01m0k9m)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01lv5v1)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01m183c)

Mexico Rising 13:30 SUN (b01l7qxh)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01lv846)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01m0d95)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01m0dby)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01m0ddf)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01m0dfq)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01m0dh2)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01m0djc)

Missing, Presumed... 11:00 FRI (b01m19n6)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b01lv7yn)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01lv84j)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01m0d9f)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01m0dc6)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01m0ddp)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01m0dfz)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01m0dhb)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01m0djm)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01m0d9h)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01lv84l)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01m0d9m)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01m0d9r)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01lv853)

News 13:00 SAT (b01lv84v)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b01m0lty)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01m0f2d)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01m0f2d)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01lv4p6)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01m1837)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01lz7y9)

PM 17:00 MON (b01m0lgn)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01m0ppw)

PM 17:00 WED (b01m171s)

PM 17:00 THU (b01m183f)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01m19nx)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01m0f2j)

Political Animals 23:00 WED (b01m179f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01lv895)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01m0h5z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01m0ltp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01m16p9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01m182g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01m19mt)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b01lz7yf)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01lz7yf)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01lz7yf)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b01lswv0)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b01m0lgj)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01m0f1w)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01m0f1w)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01m0f1w)

Requiem for a Moth 11:00 TUE (b010t6nr)

Requiem for a Moth 21:00 THU (b010t6nr)

Rock 'n' Roll in Four Movements 11:30 THU (b01m182x)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00cps4n)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01lz35f)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01lz7yh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01lv84d)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01m0d99)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01m0dc2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01m0ddk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01m0dfv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01m0dh6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01m0djh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01lv84b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01lv84g)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01lv84x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01m0d97)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01m0d9c)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01m0d9w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01m0dc0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01m0dc4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01m0ddh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01m0ddm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01m0dfs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01m0dfx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01m0dh4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01m0dh8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01m0djf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01m0djk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01lv851)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01m0db0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01m0dcd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01m0ddt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01m0dg3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01m0dhg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01m0djr)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01m0f1p)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01m0f1p)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01m0f1y)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01m0f1t)

The Alien Birds Have Landed 13:45 MON (b01m0lgg)

The Alien Birds Have Landed 13:45 TUE (b01m0m84)

The Alien Birds Have Landed 13:45 WED (b01m16q0)

The Alien Birds Have Landed 13:45 THU (b01m1835)

The Alien Birds Have Landed 13:45 FRI (b01m19nj)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01m0f22)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01m0f2l)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01m0f2l)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01m0lgs)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01m0lgs)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01m0ppy)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01m0ppy)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01m171x)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01m171x)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01m183h)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01m183h)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01m19p1)

The Cabinet of Animosities 11:00 MON (b01m0kjd)

The Education Debates 20:00 WED (b01m1721)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01lv5tz)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01m1839)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01m0f24)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01m0f24)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b01lz35h)

The Future Is Halal 20:00 TUE (b01m0pq2)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b01m0ltw)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b01m0ltw)

The Listening Project 09:30 WED (b01jqb90)

The Magic Theatre of Hermann Hesse 16:00 MON (b01m0lgl)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01m171q)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 MON (b01m0h65)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 TUE (b01m0m80)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 WED (b01m16pw)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 THU (b01m1831)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 FRI (b01m19nd)

The Philosopher's Arms 15:00 TUE (b01m0phv)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01m183m)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b01m2vmg)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b01m2vmg)

The Seafarer 16:30 SUN (b01m0f2g)

The Victim's Voice 20:00 MON (b01m0lgx)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01m0f26)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01m0lgz)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01m0pq8)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01m176v)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01m183r)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01m19p9)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01lv26j)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01m171n)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01lz35c)

Today 06:00 MON (b01m0h63)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01m0ltt)

Today 06:00 WED (b01m16pf)

Today 06:00 THU (b01m182l)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01m19my)

Tonight 23:00 THU (b01m183t)

Twin Nation 09:30 THU (b0145x7w)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01lv84n)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01lv84q)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01lv84s)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01lv84z)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01m0d9k)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01m0d9p)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01m0d9t)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01m0d9y)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01m0dc8)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01m0dcb)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01m0dcg)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01m0ddr)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01m0ddw)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01m0dg1)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01m0dg5)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01m0dhd)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01m0dhj)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01m0djp)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01m0djt)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01m0f43)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01m0f45)

What's the Point of...? 09:00 WED (b01m16ph)

What's the Point of...? 21:30 WED (b01m16ph)

Witness 14:45 SUN (b01m0f28)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01lz7y7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01m0kj8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01m0lv0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01m16pk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01m182q)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01m19n2)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b01lsz29)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b01m0ppt)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01m0lgd)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01m0m82)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01m16py)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01m1833)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01m19ng)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01m0kjg)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01m0m7y)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01m16pt)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01m182z)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01m19nb)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01lv897)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b01lv897)