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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 AUGUST 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01ljrjl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01ljwlx)
Tubes: Behind the Scenes at the Internet

Episode 5

Written by Andrew Blum.

The author discovers how our data is stored, what a 'cloud' really is and pays a visit to the headquarters of Google and Facebook.

You write an email. You hit send. It appears ten thousand miles away. How did that happen?

In April 2011, a seventy-five year old woman deprived Armenia of its Internet access when she sliced through a buried cable with her garden spade. That January, Egyptian authorities simply switched off 70% of the country's Internet connections in an attempt to quell a revolution. In 2009, a squirrel chewed through a wire in Andrew Blum's backyard, slowing his broadband to a trickle and catapulting him on a quest to find out what this so-called 'Internet' actually is.

This is the Internet as you've never seen it before. It's not a concept. It's not a culture. It's most certainly not a cloud. It's a mass of tubes.

But what tubes! Hundreds of thousands of miles of fibre-optic cable, criss-crossing the globe, pulsing with trillions of photons of light, linking us via anonymous exchanges in secretive locations with vast data-warehouses where our online selves are stored in banks of spinning hard-drives.

In Tubes, Andrew Blum takes us behind the scenes of this hidden world and introduces us to the remarkable clan of insiders and eccentrics who design and run it everyday. He explains where it is, how it got there, what it looks like, how it works - and what happens when it breaks.

Reader: John Schwab
Abridger: Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ljrjn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ljrjq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ljrk2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01ljrl2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ljwty)
Short reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01ljwv0)
'I know that God thinks differently'. Reverend David Page and his partner Howard discuss their feelings after David was forbidden to preach in his local church by the Church of England, because he is gay. We also hear from 16-year-old Ayesha Fihosy, an aspiring Olympic fencer, about the sacrifices she has made for her sport. Plus Andy Swiss reads a bulletin of listeners' news. With Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01ljrmg)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01ljrmw)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01ljl5j)
Lughnasa Festival

The festival of Lughnasa (pronounced Loon-asa) is an ancient Celtic celebration of the harvest, with its roots in County Meath in Ireland. The god Lugh is said to have established the festival in honour of his foster mother Tailtiu, who had exhausted herself by clearing forest land for agriculture. Helen Mark visits Teltown in Meath, which is said to have taken its name from that of Tailtiu, to see how Lughnasa is celebrated there today.

Presenter : Helen Mark
Producer : Moira Hickey.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01lsqk0)
Farming Today This Week

Around 1.5 million hectares of Barley is grown here each year, putting it in the top three most common crops in the UK. This week Charlotte is with Will Dickenson in Hertfordshire as he revs up the combine for his first harvest of 2012.

Used primarily for animal feed and brewing, barley has been grown in the UK since the stone age. We follow the the crop's progress from the field to the distillers and the breweries.

This programme is presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Angela Frain in Birmingham.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01ljrmy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01lsqk2)
Morning news and current affairs presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01lsqk4)
Richard Coles & John McCarthy with broadcaster Joan Bakewell; listener Kirsteen Steel who turned detective to recover her father's stolen submarine bell; Jeremy Marks who in the 1980s ran a course to help gay people suppress their sexuality; moon rock investigator Joe Gutheinz; Olympic cycling pace setter Peter Deary; JP Devlin talks to the last surviving crew member of the Enola Gay which dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima; there's a poem from the Edinburgh Festival; and agony aunt and author Virginia Ironside shares her Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 10:30 The Bricklayer's Lament (b01lsqk6)
Back in December 1958, German musician and humorist Gerard Hoffnung was asked to speak at the Oxford Union in a debate entitled "This House Believes Life Begins at 38". Luckily, the BBC was on hand to record the debate and they managed to capture Gerard giving a hilarious comic speech, which included the now legendary Bricklayer's Lament story.

This half hour documentary, narrated by Jack Dee, tells the story of the speech and how The Bricklayer's Lament really came about. It includes contributions from Ian Hislop, who was a fan from an early age, and Inspector Morse creator Colin Dexter, who was taught by Gerard during the Second World War.

The programme will reveal how an early incarnation of the R4 comedy panel show Just a Minute was to play a pivotal role in the eventual success of The Bricklayer's Lament.

The programme also features many classic clips of Gerard Hoffnung speaking at the Oxford Union debate, as well as other recordings he made in the fifties. These include snippets of the hilarious interviews he gave to the Canadian broadcaster Charles Richardson.

Also included are revealing interviews with Gerard's widow, Annetta, who shares her memories of this amazingly talented man.

The Bricklayer's Lament is a fascinating insight into how this recording came about and a loving tribute to a unique personality who entertained so many generations.

Produced by Paul Russell
An Open Mike Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b01lsqk8)
Night

Three specialists in the dark hours take Bridget Kendall on a trip through the night.

First, the Oxford Professor of Circadian Rhythms, Russell Foster, who thinks that our biological clock, which measures the 24-hour cycle, is embedded in our genes, making night shift work particularly challenging.

The German photographer Rut Blees Luxemburg refuses to keep regular hours and takes most of her photos at night, using a long exposure to find colour in the dark.

And giving some context, the historian Craig Koslovsky, from the University of Illinois, traces how the people of early modern Europe first took over the night by illuminating the streets and their buildings, enabling them to eat, drink, work and socialise in very different ways.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01lsqkb)
Chris Stewart is in Spain where some farmers are reporting that young people, unable to find employment in the cities in these austere times, are returning to work in the countryside.

The agricultural sector's been holding up reasonably well as parts of the US economy take a hammering. But Paul Adams has been finding out that in the corn fields of Nebraska, drought is the main threat. And farmers there fear they are losing their battle with the elements.

Kate McGeown in the Philippines has been learning that the government in Manila is trying to bring home Filipina domestic workers in Syria who've been caught up in the civil war there. She's been talking to one group who have made it home and have hair-raising tales to tell.

Peter Biles has been to the First World War battlefields of Gallipoli. He wanted to discover more about the place where his grandfather was killed as Allied forces spent months engaged in deadly trench warfare against Turkish troops.

And we hear why they say August in Paris is like a month of Sundays! Joanna Robertson talks of a special atmosphere on the streets of the French capital during the weeks when up to half of its residents are off on holiday. Could it be true what some say: the air there in August is so fresh it's like breathing in the Swiss mountains!?


SAT 12:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01lsqkd)
Local Banking

Big British banks are now widely accused of damaging the economy by failing to support their customers.

In the second programme of this four-part series, Michael Robinson examines one potential solution: banks which aim to return to traditional banking values.

One of these is Handelsbanken - the second largest bank in Sweden. Britain is now its fastest-expanding market. Handelsbanken has no sales targets for loans, no computerised credit checking systems for customers, no bonuses for managers, no advertising. This bank aims do business directly between local managers and local customers.

Staff and customer satisfaction at such banks are at the top of the charts, but how far can such human-centred banking fill the gap left by the dominant British giants?


SAT 12:30 Chain Reaction (b01ljwn3)
Series 8

Chris Addison interviews Derren Brown

Comedian Chris Addison gets the rare chance to talk to the amazing Derren Brown about magic, comedy, art, faith and Hitler.

Episodes in the chain include:

Rebecca Front being interviewed by the man who knows her best, her big brother, Jeremy Front.

Rebecca Front talking to her Thick Of It co-star and fellow non-nudist, Chris Addison, about working with Armando Iannucci and embracing his middle-classness through stand-up;

Chris Addison in a rare interview with the actually-really-nice-and-he-doesn't-do-any-of-that-weird-stuff-in-real-life, Derren Brown;

Derren Brown chatting hair, beliefs and Tim Minchin with comedy musical megastar and fellow sceptic Tim Minchin;

A poorly Tim Minchin being handed tissues whilst attempting to interview with no questions a not-at-all-poorly and hilarious Caitlin Moran.

Caitlin Moran getting to spend time and talk shoes, Bananarama and women with her comedy hero Jennifer Saunders.

And.

Jennifer Saunders turning up a week later to find the series has ended. Probably. We weren't there because the series had ended.

Produced by Carl Cooper

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in 2012.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01ljrnd)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01ljrpj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01ljwsl)
Media City, Salford

Eddie Mair chairs a live discussion of news and politics from the BBC Philarmonic studio in Salford, Manchester,
with panellists Maajid Nawaz of the counter extremism think tank Quilliam; novelist A L Kennedy; Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, founder of the Black Farmer sausage range; and Father Christopher Jamison of the Catholic church's National Office for Vocation.
Producer: Miles Warde.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01lsqkg)
Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The topics discussed on Any Questions? were: the Olympic legacy, discrimination, sport in schools, banks and riots.

Questions included:

By the time we leave the studio tonight we shall have won about 60 medals, at a cost of nine billion pounds. That's 150 million pounds per medal. Was it worth it?

What forms of discrimination have panel members faced in this country?

Do the panel agree with Boris Johnson that all pupils should have two hours of sport a day as he did at Eton?

As we mark the first anniversary of the riots in London and Manchester, and in light of the recent banking scandals, does the panel believe we may have been locking up the wrong criminals?

Producer: Anna Bailey.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00t0wf5)
The Moscow Prodigal

Vasily returns to Moscow after ten years in England. His attempts to build a new life there have not been a success - he has been eking out an existence as a minicab driver. At the airport he is met by his childhood friend, Andrei, who now works for the Minister of the Interior. Andrei's expansive manner and expensive air of money and power seem to hint at a more thuggish way of climbing the ladder.

Back at his mother's flat Vasily embraces his brother, but there is little brotherly love. Whilst their ailing mother celebrates her eldest son's return Vasily begins to calculate the value of her central Moscow flat. His brother Sasha simmers with resentment at the way he has been left to care for their mother, but he still has scruples when Vasily explains his plans to profit from the sale of the flat. Soon Vasily is drawn into the world of new money and old power struggles which his friend Andrei is all too keen to introduce him to.

"The Moscow Prodigal" strips away contemporary Russia's veneer of newly acquired wealth to expose the brutal networks of self-interest where ties of friendship and family are all too easily broken by the lure of easy dollars.

This is the first of three plays in the mini-season "Russia Actualnyi" which sets out to explore life in Russia now.

Written by Michael Butt based on an original idea by Vitaly Yerenkov.
Technical production by Scott Lehrer, Grammy winner and Tony winner for Broadway theatre sound design; Music specially composed by Gene Pritzker.

Directed by Judith Kampfner
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Making Tracks (b01lhgw0)
Metropolis

Cultural commentator Paul Morley explores a history of popular music through some of the iconic recording studios in which classic albums were created.

Without them music as we know it would simply not exist. At its most basic, there'd be no technology to capture the sounds envisaged by the musicians and created and enhanced by the engineers and producers... and there'd be no music for the record companies to market and distribute. But more than that, the studios actually played a crucial part in the structure and fabric of the music recorded there - the sounds enhanced by the studio space itself... the potential and shortcomings of the equipment and technology housed in the cubicles... and the ability and 'vision' of the engineers and producers operating it all to find the new sound that makes the recordings sound different and fresh.

In the final programme of the series Paul Morley ventures to West London and one of the last major studio complexes to be built in the heyday of the music industry. But without an exalted musical history to fall back on and decades of experience to help run it, how do you go about creating a world-class facility frequented by the likes of Amy Winehouse, Mick Jagger and Rihanna... and how do you keep it going when all around you are closing their doors?

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01lsqkj)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week. Today: what does the departure of Louise Mensch mean for women in parliament? Edwina Currie comments. The family secrets of the postwar generation. How well represented are women in the police force? The pick of crime fiction for summer reads. Is "underparenting" the best way to occupy a child? Lorraine Candy comments. What's it like to grow up as a British Asian man sometimes juggling different sets of expectations? And how to cook the perfect tiramisu with restaurateur Russell Norman. Presented by Jenni Murray.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01lsqkl)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news with Ritula Shah.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b01ljwv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01ljrpl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01ljrpn)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ljrpq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01lsqkn)
DOOM, Adjoa Andoh, Andy Hamilton, Anneka Rice and Jonathan Harvey

The Dead Donkey makes the headlines this week as Clive chats to Andy Hamilton about his new comedy, 'Just Around the Corner', co-written with Guy Jenkin, and part of Channel 4's Funny Fortnight. It's the story of a suburban family set in the flooded, warm and bank-free future - a kind of "Mad Max meets The Good Life".

From one dog-eat-dog world to another - Clive finds himself in the Roman Capital with actress Anjoa Andoh who is currently playing the part of Portia in Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at the Noel Coward Theatre in London. It's a famliar story of power politics, bloody murder, corruption and treachery in this spectacular RSC production transposed to an African setting.

Jo Bunting meets Beautiful Thing Jonathan Harvey whose debut novel 'All She Wants' introduces us to loveable Liverpudlian girl, Jodie McGee - the girl next door who becomes 'the girl off the telly'. In Jodie's words: 'This is my story. It's dead tragic. You have been warned.'.

And it's Challenge Clive as he pulls on his jumpsuit and races to meet golden girl Anneka Rice to find about her new BBC1 series, 'The Flowerpot Gang'. Alongside Phil Tufnell and Joe Swift, their goal is to transform neglected outdoor plots of land into inspiring and life-changing spaces for communities across Britain.

Music comes from the masked hip-hop maverick, DOOM whose album, JJ Doom 'Key to the Kuffs', features Beth Gibbons and Damon Albarn. JJ comes from the initals of collaborator producer / vocalist Jneiro Jarel. This is DOOM's debut radio performance, perhaps after it, he'll call himself LE DOOM? And he plays 'Winter Blues'.

And Scottish folk musician, James Yorkston, plays 'Border Song' from his new album, 'I Was A Cat From A Book'

Producer Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01lsqkq)
Dave Brailsford

British cycling is enjoying unprecedented success and cyclists are now household names. Dave Brailsford, the performance director of the British cycling team, has been widely credited with Britain's rise to the top. His winning methods include combining an encyclopaedic knowledge of the sport with an obsessive work ethic, relentlessly crunching numbers and other data in a constant quest for any competitive advantage, however small. But he's not just a numbers man. Ruth Alexander talks to those who know Brailsford, and finds out what motivates the quiet cycling supremo.

Presenter Ruth Alexander
Producer Ben Crighton.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01lsqks)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests Billy Kay, Hannah McGill and Kathryn Hughes review the cultural highlights of the week from the Edinburgh Festival including Pixar's new animated story, Brave, an American story with a very Scottish flavour. Pixar's first film to be set entirely in the British Isles it is also the first to boast a female lead. Kelly McDonald plays fiery red head Scottish Princess Merida. She is joined by other Scottish stars, Billy Connolly as King Fergus, Robbie Coltraine as Lord Dingwall and Kevin McKidd as Lord MacGuffin - aswell as Emma Thompson and Julie Walters.

The British premiere of Morning by award winning British playwright Simon Stephens opens at the Traverse. Developed with young actors from the Junges Theater in Basel and the Lyric Young Company in London Stephens play begins as Cat prepares to go off to university, a prospect that is depressing her best friend Stephanie. Described as moving from brutality to banality, the play charts disillusion and alienation amongst urban youth.

The panel also discuss the National Theatre of Scotland's Appointment with the Wicker Man at the newly refurbished Assembly Rooms, a spoof of the 1973 cult film The Wicker Man, The Best of Edinburgh Showcase Show at the Pleasance Courtyard and Dirty Great Love Story also at the Pleasance.

NVA Speed of Light invites the audience to take part in a walking version of son et lumiere on Arthur's Seat - their advertisement for runners asked "Ever dreamed of running in a light suit as part of a choreographed mass movement on Arthur's Seat. Well this is your chance." Saturday Review joined the audience participants during the dress rehearsal, donning light sabres and suitable walking shoes to brave the rocky crags.

And a series of public art commissions including Andrew Miller's artist's pavilion in St Andrews Square, The Waiting Place, Callum Innes's Regent Bridge, Kevin Harmon's 24/7, Martin Creed's Work 1059 the Scotsman Steps, the Rose Street Film Programme and The House of Fairytales.

And Indian writer Manu Joseph's second novel "The Illicit Happiness of Other People" is set in a Madras tenement and explores the fall out of a family tragedy. It explores the pressures arising from living cheek by jowl with neighbours, as well as probing the quixotic nature of what we understand by the truth.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01lsr14)
Inner Voices - The Burton Diaries

The archive of Richard Burton is a rich treasure. The performances are by common consent amongst the most compelling of any age, given in a voice that many have felt to be an aural equivalent of heaven. Hamlet, Under Milk Wood, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf and Equus stand out, and then there are the blockbusters: Wild Geese, Where Eagles Dare, Anthony and Cleopatra, Night of the Iguana and The Robe. Add to that the poetry readings - Dylan Thomas of course but also Shakespeare and the English Classics. It is a feast for the ears.

Yet it is a remarkable testament to the man and to his life that, just as magnetic as the body of work, is another collection. Through several periods of his life, most notably from the mid-1960s to the early '70s (his 'superstar years') he kept a diary, sometimes handwritten, mostly typed out and assembled in thick notebooks. The diaries provide a unique view of the world in which he moved, among actors and directors, writers and poets, millionaires and royalty. They also give an insight into his approach to acting, his insecurities, his drinking and his volatile relationship with Elizabeth Taylor at a time when they were the most famous couple in the world.

Twenty-five years ago, shortly after Burton's death, Melvyn Bragg was given access to the diaries to write his definitive biography of Burton, Rich. Now, to mark the publication of the complete diaries, Bragg presents an Archive on 4 which examines Burton's life through broadcast interviews and the previously inaccessible lens of his diaries. Bragg returns to Burton to reassesses the man in the light of his own experience and in the light of the private and confessional thoughts that Burton wrote, alone, throughout his life.

Burton was the gifted son of a Welsh miner. He met a remarkable teacher and made the journey to Oxford and on to superstardom - but he was seldom really happy. He was a hellraiser who often behaved appallingly and was accused of squandering an extraordinary talent on drinking and bad movies. If that was all he was then he'd be just a footnote in 20th century culture. But Burton was also a man of wonderful erudition, passion, insight and self- knowledge. He fought his way through life through force of will, love, and voracious reading. It is this side of the man that makes him such a remarkable presence. It is also a side of him captured in a rich vein of BBC archive and interviews.

The diaries show him on top of the world, in love, in despair, and fighting the alcoholism that had killed his father and he knew was killing him. This programme puts the flesh and the voice back into our collective understanding of one of the great cultural figures of the 20th century.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01lh971)
John Wyndham - The Chrysalids

Episode 2

John Wyndham's post-apocalyptic science fiction classic dramatised by Jane Rogers.

Genetic mutation has devastated the world. Any deviation is seen as the work of the devil, ruthlessly hunted out and destroyed. David Strorm is one of a group of young people who can communicate by transferring thought-shapes. In God fearing, law abiding Waknuk, David and his friends would be classed as Mutants. Will David be forced to flee to the Fringes, the lawless territory inhabited by mutants or risk discovery?

Directed by Nadia Molinari

Written in 1955 Wyndham's novel explores the dangers inherent in discrimination and the threats posed by religious fundamentalism. The 'Old People' who caused the apocalypse are depressingly like us: ' They were shut off by different languages and different beliefs. They created vast problems then buried their heads in the sands of idle faith.' The children of the future (the Chrysalids) are able to 'think-together' and so can rise above the selfish violence and conflicting religions of the past. Wyndham's story of a group of persecuted teenagers is more timely than ever in our post-Fukushima, war-riven, genetically engineered and religiously divided world. Jane Rogers is a playwright and novelist, her latest novel The Testament of Jessie Lamb won the Arthur C Clarke Award this year.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01ljrqk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The EU Debate (b01ljk52)
With the crisis continuing in the eurozone, recent polls suggest that the vast majority of the British electorate would be in favour of a referendum on Britain's membership of the European Union.

In the current climate the voices of those in favour of the European project have been noticeable by their absence.

Evan Davis chairs a debate at the London School of Economics on the motion "Britain should stay in the European Union."

Sir Stephen Wall, the former diplomat and EU adviser to Tony Blair, speaks in favour of the motion, arguing his position against a panel who want Britain out.

The Panel:
Roger Helmer - UKIP MEP for the East Midlands
Dr Helen Szamuely - Head of research for the Bruges Group and blogger on Your Freedom and Ours
Mark Reckless - Conservative MP for Rochester and Strood
George Eustice - Conservative MP for Camborne and Redruth

Producer: Hannah Barnes.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b01lhbgn)
Another edition of the 48th series of Quote... Unquote, the popular quotations programme presented and devised by Nigel Rees. The guests this week are author Louise Doughty, writer and broadcaster Natalie Haynes, newsreader Nicholas Owen and columnist Hugo Rifkind. The reader is Peter Jefferson.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


SAT 23:30 My Heart Is in the East (b01lh975)
Medieval historian Miri Rubin explores the rich history of the most famous of Hebrew poems.

My Heart is in the East is probably the best-known poem in the Hebrew language. It was written in the twelfth-century by Rabbi Yehuda Halevi, the finest Hebrew poet of the Middle Ages. Though he had lived his entire life in Spain, it describes his deep yearning for his spiritual home, Jerusalem.

This longing could have remained a poetic preoccupation but, in his sixties, this successful doctor, renowned philosopher and poet, took the extraordinary decision to try and make his way to the Holy Land, crossing the Mediterranean by ship to Alexandria in 1140. The journey was a perilous one and he must have known he would not be welcome in Jerusalem. Since the Christian conquest during the First Crusade in 1099, Muslims and Jews were banned from living in the city.

What happened next to Halevi remained unknown for centuries and became the stuff of legend. But thanks to the discovery of the Cairo Genizah in 1896, remarkable documentary evidence of Halevi's epic journey has emerged. Letters preserved in the Genizah enable historians to trace much of Halevi's route and also reveal the fame and stature he had acquired as a poet and philosopher around the Mediterranean region.

Long after Halevi's death, My Heart is in the East still resonates with new audiences. His poetry was revived by romantic and early Zionist poets in nineteenth century Europe, and has continued to influence Israeli poets and singers to this day.

Contributors: Dr Tamar Drukker, Professor Nicholas de Lange and Dr Ben Outhwaite.

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise Production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 12 AUGUST 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01ln9gy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lyf67)
We Are Stardust, We Are Golden...

Arnold in a Purple Haze

Read by Conleth Hill

These three short stories were commissioned by Radio 4 to mark the 40th anniversary of the famous Woodstock Music Festival. With different themes, which reflect that momentous time, We Are Stardust We Are Golden continues with Arnold in a Purple Haze by Nick Walker.

Still damaged by his Vietnam experiences, Arnold is trying to arrange transport for a band due to perform at the Woodstock Festival. But the sounds of the city and the noise of the helicopters begin to unbalance him and blur things in his mind.

Producer: Cherry Cookson
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9h0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ln9h2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9h4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01ln9h6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01lstrj)
The bells of St Mary's Church, Lamberhurst, Kent.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01lsqkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01ln9h8)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01lstrl)
Most of us like a practical joke, but can it do us good while it's making us laugh? In the week of the Festival of Janasthami, celebrating the birth of Krishna, the Hindu Deity known amongst other things for his practical jokes, Mark Tully discusses the spirituality of the Prankster.

Like it or not, practical jokes and pranks play an intrinsic and important part of life. And our reactions to them can be revealing. A joke played and taken in good part can be an affirmation of friendship. Many initiation rites have pranks at their core. Some religious teachers have used them to make a memorable point.

Yet a delicate balance has to be struck. There must be countless examples of pranks tipping over into cruelty, or friendships being ruined by a misplaced trick. At the same time we can delight in being the butt of an inventive prank and we certainly love to see them played on others.

With the help of Professor Dacher Keltner a psychologist from University College, Berkeley and with music from Dudley Moore, Haydn and the musical "Matilda", Mark Tully investigates the cultural importance of joke playing.

The readers are Helen Ryan and Kenneth Cranham.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b01lstrn)
Ouzels of the Moor

Ring ouzels are birds of wild upland country, migrant thrushes rather like blackbirds with a bold white bib .In fact, ouzel, is an old word for blackbird or thrush.

Unlike blackbirds, these are shy creatures which winter in North Africa and breed in remote craggy places in Wales, the north of England and Scotland, but are nowhere common. In southern England their decline has been sharp, with just a handful of pairs remaining on Dartmoor.

For The Living World, Miranda Krestovnikoff tracks down these elusive birds with the help of naturalist Nick Baker who's been studying the Dartmoor ouzels for the RSPB in an attempt to find out why the birds are in decline.

By late June, some birds have already fledged, but near other nests, the male birds are still singing and both parents are visiting the young. Although singing birds are easy to locate, proving that birds have bred at any particular site is a different matter as Nick admits, and this season has already provided him with some surprises.

Miranda learns that while the birds are declining across the whole of the UK, ornithologists are still uncertain about the reasons. Climate change may be drying up their mountain grasslands, or disturbance and nest predation may be the reasons, but the mysteries surrounding this stunning bird remain to challenge the dedicated teams striving to save it.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01ln9hb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01ln9hd)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01lstrq)
On this week's programme Brother Colm O'Connell talks to Jane Little about how he went to Kenya as a missionary and ended up training many of the Olympic Kenyan athletes including 800m gold medal winner David Rudisha.

This week the Church of England announced it was disinvesting from News Corp, Andrew Brown, Secretary to the Church Commissioners explains why.

Today David Cameron and other world leaders will gather for what has been called the 'Hunger Summit' at which they will focus their attention on drought, poverty and malnutrition. Laura Taylor, Head of Policy for Tearfund, talks to Jane Little about what she thinks this summit may or may not achieve.

Dylan Winter visits Bhaktivedanta Manor to join in the Hindu Janmashtami Festival this week and hear the concerns from devotees about the pollution of the sacred Yamuna river which flows past the Taj Mahal and other sacred sites.

As the Olympic Games reaches its final day Trevor Barnes reports on whether it's legacy will have a real impact on the local residents.

The Law Society has announced the sale of ancient manuscripts from the Mendham Collection. A collection of religious and polemical writings which date back to the 13th centuries. Jane Little talks to Dr Alixe Bovey who explains why the decision has upset the University of Kent and Canterbury Cathedral who do not want to see the collection broken up.

As the month of Ramadan continues, Dorian Jones reports from Turkey on the row over the amount of money being spent on Iftar, the evening meal that ends each day of fasting which in some 5 star hotels is costing $100 a person.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01lstrs)
The Salvation Army

Rhidian Brook presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity The Salvation Army
Reg Charity: 214779
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope The Salvation Army.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01ln9hg)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01ln9hj)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01lstrv)
Kindled with the Flame of God's Love

Kindled with the flame of God's love.
As the Olympic flame begins its journey from this country to Brazil, this morning's service reflects on fire and flame as a symbol of God's love handed on to others.
The College of St Hild and St Bede at Durham University hosts singers from the Eton Choral Course directed by Ralph Allwood.
Led by the Rev'd Fr Jonathan Lawson, chaplain for the College
Preacher: the Rev'd Dr Calvin Samuel, Director of the Wesley Study Centre in Durham
Organist: Alex Hodgkinson
Producer: Clair Jaquiss.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01ljwsn)
Climate for Culture

John Gray reflects on the climate needed for culture to thrive, recalling Orson Welles' quote from the film "The Third Man" that despotism in Italy produced the Renaissance whereas democracy in Switzerland produced the cuckoo clock."We know that art can flourish under despots but we're reluctant to admit it: if creativity and tyranny can co-exist, the value of freedom seems diminished."
Producer:
Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01lstrx)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01lstrz)
See daily episodes for detailed synopsis

Writer ..... Tim Stimpson
Director ..... Jenny Stephens
Editor ..... John Yorke

Alistair Lloyd ..... Michael Lumsden
Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Kate Madikane ..... Kellie Bright
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Rosalind Adams
Mike Tucker ..... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Hayley Tucker ..... Lorraine Coady
Phoebe Aldridge ..... Lucy Morris
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Elona Makepeace ..... Eri Shuka
Pawel Jasinski ..... Max Krupski
Darrell Makepeace ..... Dan Hagley.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01lsts1)
Craig Brown

Kirsty Young's castaway is the critic and satirist Craig Brown.

A prolific writer, he's lampooned everyone from DH Lawrence to Victoria Beckham and, earlier this year, he became the first journalist to win three separate prizes at the British Press Awards. He showed early promise - when he was 14 he started writing spoofs of Harold Pinter plays, and his characters have their own entries in Who's Who.

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01lhbgx)
Series 64

Episode 1

Join Nicholas Parsons and friends for the first of another series of the grandaddy of all panel games.

Panellists Paul Merton, Sue Perkins, Liza Tarbuck and Graham Norton join Nicholas for the verbal equivalent of the Olympics. It's an energetic game this week - but who will win gold medal for the greatest gift of the gab?

Paul talks about The Biggest Fib he Ever Told, Sue Perkins divulges a lot of information about her Famous Friends, Liza Tarbuck speaks knowledgeably on the subject of Fake Tan and Graham Norton gives his tips on How To Annoy The Audience.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2016.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01lsts3)
The Science of Taste

Can changing our dining utensils change the flavour of food? Simon Parkes investigates.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01ln9hl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01lsts5)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The Songs of Milne (b01jwk3f)
'Christopher Robin is saying his prayers....', 'They're changing guard at Buckingham Palace....': familiar verses by A.A. Milne from the 1920s, but who wrote the original music?
In their day the songs were as much a part of the Milne success as the famous E.H. Shepard illustrations. Time, Disney and changing fashions have seen to it that the majority of these pieces have been all but forgotten, along with the man who set them to music. There are sixty-seven songs in all, from the verses in When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six, and The Hums of Pooh are from the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Their composer was Harold Fraser-Simson, whose reputation was made by a hit West End musical in 1917 called The Maid of the Mountains, though he was partly chosen by Milne because he lived across the street in Chelsea and belonged to the Garrick Club.
When pianist John Kember first found the music on a friend's piano, he was so struck with it that he scoured the world for the scores to gather in all of the songs, which haven't yet been compiled into a full collection. With baritone Richard Burkhard John performs his favourites, follows the fortunes of some of the songs and hopes that the time might be ripe for another revival.
Presenter: John Kember
Producer: Kate Howells.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01ljwmp)
Thetford

Eric Robson, Bunny Guinness, Chris Beardshaw and Bob Flowerdew and the team are guests of Thetford Garden and Allotment Club.

Peter Gibbs delves into the RHS Wisley weather records to learn a lesson from previous bad summers. Bob Flowerdew reveals some of the ingenious tricks used in his Norfolk garden.

Q. Why won't my five-year-old potted gooseberry bear any fruit?
Try repotting to a larger container in spring and top dress with blood, fish and bonemeal. Apply woodash sporadically and thin the fruit. A very sweet variety is 'Rokula'

Q. What is on the underside of my fern leaf?
These are sporangia or sori which contain the spores.

Q. Since I removed my Laurel tree, the roots continue to sprout. How can I kill these off?
These should be physically cut out with a stump-grinder

Q. Last year my 'Giant Prague' celeriac grew well, though some of them had purple veining. When we tried to cook them they turned black. What is causing this?
Violet root rot. Try changing variety. Next time round, spray with seaweed solution which contains all the essential elements.

Q. My Clematis produces flowers with anything between 4 and 10 petals per flower? What is causing this variation?
This is symptomatic of a stressed or frail plant. Treat with care.

Q. How can I ensure my crop of cauliflower is successful this year? Last year they bolted.
Shade the white curd with a few leaves to stop it budding.

Q. How did my white Hyacinths gradually turn into bluebells?

Q. Which garden tasks do the panel consider a marathon.

Produced by Robert Abel.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b01lsts7)
The battle for Mount Longdon

It is 30 years since the end of the Falklands War. Hear two very different views of the conflict from an Argentine veteran and a British veteran. Miguel Savage was a 19 year-old student conscript. He had never wanted to join the army but ended up a reluctant member of Argentina's Falklands invasion force nonetheless. Quintin Wright was a well-trained member of the 3rd Battalion of the Parachute Regiment. He had joined-up voluntarily, and was excited at the thought of action. They both fought in one of the decisive encounters at the end of the war - the battle for Mount Longdon.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01lsts9)
Thomas Mann - Buddenbrooks

Episode 1

Dramatised by Judith Adams with original music by Nico Muhly.

Michael Maloney and Barbara Flynn star in this story of an old Hanseatic merchant family fighting to keep their commercial supremacy in the changing world of 1840s Europe.

Four generations of Buddenbrooks try to sustain their inheritance - a once highly successful trading company in the port of Lubeck on the Baltic Sea - in a world where the old ways no longer work.

Harmonium and Flute by Rick Juckes.
Technical Presentation by David Fleming Williams.

Produced by Chris Wallis
A Watershed production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01lstsc)
Comedian and author Russell Kane presents Open Book

Comedian and author Russell Kane talks to Enid Shomer about her novel The Twelve Rooms of the Nile in which she fictionalises a meeting between the sex obsessed young French writer Gustave Flaubert and the naive 29 year old Florence Nightingale. Both historically in Egypt at the same time, Flaubert was despondent from the bad reception an unpublished novel received, while Nightingale was trying to find a role for herself, away from the constraints of her class and her parents who didn't believe nursing was a suitable occupation for their daughter. Seven years later they would both be famous - she as the lady with the lamp at the Crimea and he for his controversial modern novel Madame Bovary

Does it really matter how we get our literary fix? Is reading a book definitively better than listening to it being read to you? Despite the continued popularity of talking books over the past 75 years since they were first sent out by the Royal National Institute of the Blind, as well as the current prevalence of portable devices and downloads, Russell feels that there is still a stigma to this form of 'reading.' To discuss the place of the audio book Russell is joined by the audiobook critic Christina Hardyment, the literary agent Carole Blake and Professor Sophie Scott from the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.

It's been fifty years since Ursula Andress sexily emerged from the Caribbean Sea and 007 foiled the evil plans of Dr No. To mark this milestone in cinema history, Vintage Classics are releasing new editions of all fourteen of the Ian Fleming novels. Tom Rob Smith discusses the continuing appeal of these original books and how they depict a different side to Britain's most successful and best loved spy.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 An Outcast of the Islands: Lady Grange (b01lstsf)
While making 'A Requiem for St Kilda' for Radio 4 (which won the Sony Feature Award), writer Kenneth Steven and producer Julian May came across the extraordinary story of Rachel, Lady Grange. The wife of James Erskine, Lord Justice Clerk of Scotland, she enjoyed a fashionable life in C18th Edinburgh. Their relationship soured - Grange kept a mistress in London - and they separated. Rachel, desperate to see her children, began accost her husband in the street. She had incriminating information, that Erskine had held meetings with Jacobite sympathisers at their house. Times were dangerous, so Erskine had his wife abducted.

She was dragged through the Highlands, and shipped to St Kilda. She spoke no Gaelic, the St Kildans no English. After seven years she smuggled messages to her solicitor in Edinburgh. They arrived two years after she wrote them and provoked a scandal. Her lawyer sent a ship, the Arabella, to rescue her - an early example of sending a gunboat. But Erskine (who had already held her funeral) had Rachel spirited away again. She was taken from island to island, and at last to Skye, where she died in 1745 - the very year when Prince Charlie landed.

Kenneth Steven visits the Special Collections Department of Edinburgh University Library, where, amazingly, one of Lady Grange's letters from St Kilda survives, describing in great detail the brutality of her abduction, and naming names.

He meets Margaret Macaulay, author of 'The Prisoner of St Kilda', who spent 7 years researching the story. He retraces her journey from Edinburgh to her final resting place in the far north of the Isle of Skye.

Siobhan Redmond reads from Lady Grange's letters, and Kenneth responds to her story with a series of new short lyric poems.

Producer: Julian May.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01lhgyn)
World health chiefs have branded diesel exhaust emissions a major cause of cancer. Despite the efforts of car-makers to filter out the most noxious substances, these fumes still play a big part in causing air pollution.
Britain has the second worst respiratory death rates in Europe and has long been under notice from Brussels to clean up its act. So why are most UK areas in breach of legal limits?
And do ministers have any clear plan to reduce the huge annual total of resulting deaths?
Julian O'Halloran investigates.
Producer : Rob Cave.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01lsqkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9hn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01ln9hq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ln9hs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01lstsh)
Stewart Henderson makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

He was a brooding, beaten Hamlet, a besotted Marc Anthony and a supreme verse speaker. But who was Richard Burton, the man? His soon to be published private diaries are heard for the first time.
The story of Irish soldiers who joined the British army during the Second World War, and were subsequently denied employment and benefits in their homeland, is told.
There's also a tale of tango addiction, that's the dance not the drink, smouldering across an Argentinian dance floor. And poet Daljit Nagra recalls his 1970's childhood in the suspicious suburbs of West London.

The 'Arse' That Jack Built - Radio 4
What's the Point of Lord Lieutenants? - Radio 4
Amanda Vickery on Men - Radio 4
Leap of Faith - Radio 2
Face the Facts - Radio 4
Twenty Minutes: Telling Me of Elsewhere - Radio 3
Indian Britain - Radio 2
The Bricklayer's Lament - Radio 4
Archive on 4: Inner Voices The Burton Diaries - Radio 4
Afternoon Drama: Like A daughter - Radio 4
Gotta Dance: Just a Tango -Radio 4
Front Row -Radio 4

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Bernadette McConnell.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01lstsk)
Vicky gets Mike to join her for an on-line shopping spree for baby things. Mike wants to hear that Jazzer and Harry are back from Scotland, so that he can get their shifts sorted, but Fallon drops off a note from Harry. He's not coming back. He's met up with his old boyfriend, Grant, and they've rekindled their relationship. Mike's main concern is finding another milkman.
Jennifer is caught in the middle as Adam furiously disagrees with Brian's decision to advertise his position. He's talked it through with Ian, and feels his future is at Home Farm. Jennifer is delighted but Brian points out that there might be other people interested.
Jennifer implores Brian to remove the advert and make up with Adam. Brian's keen for a reconciliation but wants to push home his advantage to secure more commitment from Adam. Debbie agrees with him. Brian promises Jennifer he'll talk to Adam later, to tell him they'll have him back.
Adam has his job to go to in the morning but he's still not sure he can offer Brian his commitment to the dairy. Ian feels it's a step in the right direction. In celebratory mood, he suggests they invite Pawel over tomorrow for a 'Polish night'.


SUN 19:15 Wondermentalist Cabaret (b01lstsm)
Edinburgh Special

Comedy, bonhomie, poetry, music and audience creativity in the company of Matt Harvey and guests.

Another chance to hear last summer's special Edinburgh Festival edition of Wondermentalist - the slightly interactive, comedy-infused poetry cabaret.

Showcasing Matt Harvey's peerless poetry, meet his nemesis, side-kick and one man house band Jerri Hart, and peerless guest poets, Kate Fox and Elvis McGonagall.

Kate Fox is the poet with Northern vowels and a love of puns, buns and rhymes, while Elvis McGonagall, stand-up poet and armchair revolutionary strolls in to the BBC's Festival site, on bail from The Graceland Caravan Park, near Dundee.

Like luxury muesli, Wondermentalism is a faith that contains sparkly, shiny multigrains of truth, wit, wisdom and laughter. Vitamin supplements for the soul.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SUN 19:45 Original Shorts (b00vhg8x)
Series 4

Middle Swine

Martin Jarvis reads Christopher Matthew's specially written story of old school rivalry. Why should John Small pretend he was at school with Tim Slingsby? And why are Slingsby and Tony Fobbing so keen that Small should attend the Old Melburian's Dinner? Are there old scores to settle? And who, actually, will be settling them?

Christopher Matthew's witty take on what could happen when so-called old school friends meet in later life. Can we ever leave our schooldays totally behind? There's a possible answer in the story's surprising climax.

Producer: : Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis and Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b01ljwmx)
How to lose money, fast

In this week's programme:

High frequency trading

Last week Knight Capital lost a lot of money very quickly. It was the latest chapter in the story of something called 'high frequency trading'. Investors have always valued being the first with the news. But high frequency trading is different: algorithms execute automatic trades, conducted by computers, at astonishing speeds. We ask: is the rapid growth of high frequency trading progress, or - as some think - a threat to the stability of the entire financial system?

Medalling with the Olympics

While the Olympic medal table puts all UK successes together, some people have been tempted to peer under the surface. Scotland has been pronounced superior to England per head of population, while Yorkshire has been hailed as the number one county, beating Australia in the medals table. We check the sums.

Trumptonomics

A year after Trumptonshire's Treasurer (Con. T Harford) embarked on a round of public spending cuts which included sacking Fireman Dibble, we return to Trumpton to find out what happened next to the county's economy - and to poor old Dibble.

The geeks are coming

Mark Henderson discusses his new book, The Geek Manifesto, which argues for more scientific thinking in public life.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Richard Knight.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01ljwmv)
Robert Hughes, Sir Bernard Lovell, Lakshmi Sehgal, Sir John Keegan and Franz West

Matthew Bannister on

the pugnacious Australian art critic Robert Hughes, who presented the acclaimed TV series Shock of The New.

The astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell who led the building of the enormous radio telescope at Jodrell Bank

Doctor Lakshmi Sehgal, the Indian independence campaigner who raised a regiment of women to fight against the British during the second world war

The military historian and Reith Lecturer Sir John Keegan

And the controversial Austrian artist Franz West who built giant colourful sculptures and invited the public to climb on them.


SUN 21:00 Face the Facts (b01lhj0x)
Pardon for the Disowned Army

The thousands of Irish soldiers who swapped uniforms to fight with the British against Hitler went on to suffer years of persecution on their return home John Waite's first investigation into their plight, which was broadcast earlier this year, generated huge interest from listeners and was debated in the Irish Parliament.
This was the first broadcast to highlight the injustice they suffered and to hear from them about the on-going repercussions and their continued fight for a pardon.
The programme led directly to the Irish Minister for Justice, Alan Shatter, undertaking an urgent review and, just six months after the broadcast, he announced an official pardon.
As John Waite now hears, one of those relieved by the news is 92-year-old Phil Farrington, took part in the D-Day landings and helped liberate the German death camp at Bergen-Belsen. Up until now he has had to wear his service medals in secret after having spent time in a military prison in Cork for deserting the Irish army. He returned to a British unit on his release but has had nightmares that he would be re-arrested by the authorities and punished again for his wartime service.
"They would come and get me, yes they would," he said in a frail voice at his home in the docks area of Dublin. Mr Farrington was one of about 4,500 Irish soldiers who deserted their own neutral army to join the war against fascism and who were brutally punished on their return home as a result. They were formally dismissed from the Irish army, stripped of all pay and pension rights, and prevented from finding work by being banned for seven years from any employment paid for by state or government funds.
A special "list" was drawn up containing their names and addresses, and circulated to every government department, town hall and railway station - anywhere the men might look for a job. It was referred to in the Irish parliament - the Dail - at the time as a "starvation order", and for many of their families the phrase became painfully close to the truth.
John Stout served with the Irish Guards armoured division which raced to Arnhem to capture a key bridge. He also fought in the Battle of the Bulge, ending the war as a commando. On his return home to Cork, however, he was treated as a pariah. "What they did to us was wrong. I know that in my heart. They cold-shouldered you. They didn't speak to you.
It was only 20 years since Ireland had won its independence after many years of rule from London, and the Irish list of grievances against Britain was long - as Gerald Morgan, at Trinity College, Dublin, explains. "The uprisings, the civil war, all sorts of reneged promises - I'd estimate that 60% of the population expected or indeed hoped the Germans would win. To prevent civil unrest, Eamon de Valera had to do something. Hence the starvation order and the list."
Today, thanks largely to this BBC investigation, those Irish servicemen have at last been recognised for the part they played in helping defeat fascism.


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01lstrs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b01ljl5z)
The Fizz Biz

THE FIZZ BIZ
There's a new boom in English sparkling wine. It is taking on Champagne and (sometimes) beating it. But what's behind the bubbles? Peter Day finds out from some of the top English growers ... and a select group of world wine experts on a pioneering trip into unknown territory. You can also watch a special video with Peter Day, by following the link on the In Business webpage, via the Radio 4 website.
Producer: Sandra Kanthal
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01lstsp)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01lstsr)
Episode 116

Miranda Green of The Day analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01ljl5l)
Matthew Sweet meets with Jeremy Renner to discuss his role as the lead in The Bourne Legacy.

We take a trip back in time with Austin Vince from The Adventure Travel Film Festival.

Academic Melanie Williams champions an early kitchen sink drama from 1957, Woman in a Dressing Gown.

And Mark Gatiss is back for the summer to pick 4 of his favourite biopics - first up, Lewis Gilbert's Carve Her Name With Pride, starring Virginia Mckenna.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01lstrl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 13 AUGUST 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01ln9k0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01ljk4r)
Social capital; gentrification

What happens when middle class white people move into vibrant, ethnically diverse and challenging areas in inner city London? Emma Jackson talks to Laurie about the developing attitudes of the 'gentrifiers' in Peckham and in Brixton.
Also, Irena Grugulis, author of Jobs for the Boys returns to the programme: She address points raised by listeners on her study of networking in the media and discusses the concept of 'social capital'.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01lstrj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9k2)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ln9k4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9k6)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01ln9k8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01lstvy)
Short reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01lstw0)
Charlotte Smith asks if a commercial crop of blight-resistant GM potatoes could be the answer to weather conditions like this year's. And the Potato Council say, thanks to the weather, shoppers should expect smaller home-grown potatoes this year.

The US Department of Agriculture has further reduced its expectations for this year's maize and soyabean harvest, in response to ongoing drought across the Mid-West. Now, there are warnings from the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation that food prices are rising across the world. Charlotte asks whether this could lead to the similar food shortages of 2007/8?

And Sarah Swadling visits the Farming Today cow, Bradley Cora 289, for the final time to recap a year in the life of a dairy cow.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Clare Freeman in BBC Birmingham.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01ln9kb)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01lstw2)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Amanda Vickery on... Men (b01lswch)
The Gentleman

Amanda Vickery examines the history of masculinity through six different archetypes of the ideal man, archetypes which still have an echo today.

In this second programme of the series she explores the Gentleman, an ideal of refinement and culture which has its roots in Renaissance Italy. The programme begins in the Palace of Urbino, Northern Italy, where the courtier Castiglione wrote a book of advice for men which became a best-seller throughout Europe. In England its influence lasted for hundreds of years, and it spawned a whole genre of manuals for men. The advice about how to behave is comprehensive and endless: how to dress, dance, bring up children, play tennis, compose music, and even how to fish.

The cumulative message is that masculinity is something that's made not born. It involved hard work, relentless practice and rigid self-control. The programme includes a moving description of the ceremony in which a young child became a boy by being dressed in breeches for the first time at the age of six. By the 17th century it was no longer enough for a man to be a warrior knight; he had to be cultured and graceful as well. Above all, he had to cultivate charisma.

Of course the mask of the gentleman often slipped. Rigid self-control was not universal among real men, nor were the all-important charisma and confidence given to all. For every cool courtier or accomplished clergyman there was a rowdy drunk - sometimes they were the same person!

Contributing scholars include Luca Mola, Lawrence Klein and Alexandra Sheppard.

Amanda Vickery is Professor of Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:30 Head to Head (b01lswck)
Series 4

The Decline of Britain

Edward Stourton revisits broadcast debates from the archives - exploring the ideas, the great minds behind them, and echoes of the arguments today.

When Correlli Barnett, the military historian, came to BBC studios in 1974 to record this debate, Britain was in dire straits. Like many at the time, he wondered why, just a century before, Britain had been the world's most powerful nation in terms of both military and economic strength. For the most part, Barnett blamed the ruling elites for Britain's demise - for creating a political culture that was overly liberal and lacking technological know-how. Had a romantic idealism set in and industrial development been neglected? And where did the roots of the problem reside - in our education system or the empire?

His adversary was historian and journalist Paul Johnson, who agreed that Britain was sick but offered a different diagnosis. Was the collapsing empire a symptom of Britain's decline or was it the cause? Having won two world wars, was Britain's military might real or merely a delusion of grandeur? And what was wrong with our leaders and their schooling?

In the studio dissecting the debate is Will Hutton, who has worked in journalism as an editor, a broadcaster and a commentator. He is author of "The State We're In" and currently the Principal of Hertford College at Oxford University. Joining him is David Edgerton, who is Hans Rausing Professor at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine at Imperial College London. He is also author of "Britain's War Machine".

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01lswcm)
Kate Summerscale - Mrs Robinson's Disgrace

Episode 1

"The judges were presented with a singular case on Monday 14 June, a month after they had heard their first divorce suit. Henry Oliver Robinson, a civil engineer, was petitioning for the dissolution of his marriage on the grounds that his wife, Isabella, had committed adultery, and he submitted as evidence a diary in her hand."

These bare facts - the angry husband and the incriminating words - are, in the author's hands, shaped to tell a riveting story, that says much about the individuals involved and the social world they moved in...

One day Isabella Robinson makes the acquaintance of Mr Robert Lane and this inspires the writing of a diary which, when unearthed, will have astounding consequences for both parties...

Abridged in five parts by Katrin Williams and read by Emma Fielding.
Producer Duncan Minshull.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01lswcp)
Olympic legacy, going for big money, and abuse in teen relationships

What Olympic success means for women's sport; physical and emotional abuse in teenage relationships; women at work and why we undervalue what we do; Scottish poet Jen Hadfield on the inspiration of the Shetlands.
Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Ruth Watts.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01lswcr)
Oliver Emanuel - The Other One

Episode 1

By Oliver Emanuel.

A tense and moving drama, inspired by a set of exceptional true events, that explores the nature of identity and the notion of family.

A twelve-year- old girl's world turns upside down when she's told an unbelievable truth.

Director: Kirsty Williams.


MON 11:00 Asian Weddings: Something Gold, Nothing Borrowed, Everything New (b01h2c3n)
4 Extra Debut. Big fat gypsy weddings might have hit the headlines, but the traditional British Asian wedding has always been big. Often including several separate ceremonies and events spread over a week or more, the cost of the average Asian wedding in the UK is frequently well over £30,000. With the significance of marriage or 'shaadi' being huge in south Asian culture, weddings are a serious business. From the lavish designer outfits and the elaborate cakes to the grand stages where the bride and groom sit on their thrones, complete with a lighting and sound system to rival a TV talent show, this is an industry worth a reported £300 million a year in the UK alone.

Yasmeen Khan explores the glamorous world of British Asian weddings. She takes in an Asian wedding exhibition in the UK, meeting the clothes designers, wedding planners, toastmasters, food suppliers, chefs, videographers and 'yellow gold' jewellers making their fortunes as the second and third generation tie the knot, all of them keen to help the families show off their wealth. She learns about the different cultural aspects of a Muslim, Sikh and Hindu wedding. She visits a couple's big day and explore the meaning behind cultural traditions, such as the confiscating of the groom's shoes by the bride's sisters and cousins - finding out what he must do to get them back.

Yasmin also delves into the politics of the guest list at an Asian wedding, many of which are huge affairs with hundreds and sometimes thousands of guests! And she discovers just how much family relations are tested as an increasing number of couples pay for something that has traditionally been paid for by the bride's family.

Produced by: Yasmeen Khan & Neil Rosser
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Bleak Expectations (b00w7dnw)
Series 4

A Painful Life Further Re-Miserabled

Pip and Harry put to sea with Captain Beehab in a bid to thwart a sea-going Mister Benevolent and rescue Ripely.

But fate has other plans and they are shipwrecked. Pip soon finds himself on a desert island that holds many surprising secrets.

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ..... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ..... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ..... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ..... James Bachman
Grimpunch ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ..... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ..... Susy Kane

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2010.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01lswcw)
Pay for a day, free entry all year

Pay for a day: free entry all year. Who really wins from tourist attractions offering 'free' annual passes?

The neighbours who were secretly offered tens of thousands of pounds by a developer to support plans for a new supermarket next to their homes.

And we're live at Heathrow airport where a temporary terminal's been set up to cope with athletes leaving London 2012.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Jon Douglas.


MON 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01lswcy)
Margaret Thatcher

The New Elizabethans. Margaret Thatcher, politician.

James Naughtie considers the lasting influence of Margaret Thatcher, the longest serving Prime Minister of the 20th Century and the only woman to hold the post. Her uncompromising policies and leadership style earned her the enduring nickname "The Iron Lady".

Among her initiatives were the deregulation of the financial sector, the privatisation of state-owned companies, and the reduction of the power and influence of trade unions, policies that have become known as "Thatcherism".

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


MON 12:57 Weather (b01ln9kd)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01lswd0)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Generation E (b01lswtw)
Series 2

Germany's Eldorado

As the economic crisis deepens and schisms emerge, Lucy Ash travels across Europe to meet the continent's next generation, who face an uncertain future. She explores the challenges they face and the ways in which they are meeting them.
In this programme Lucy travels to the southern German town of Schwabisch Hall which, after a publicity drive, was inundated with job requests from Portugal; dozens simply pitched up, asking for a job.
When the economic crisis hit, Latvia introduced some of the strictest austerity measures to be found anywhere in Europe. Its GDP fell by 25 per cent. Now it is trumpeted by the IMF as a great success story. But Lucy Ash discovers that life for young people is still extremely tough. She speaks to those who have lost their homes but still owe the banks huge debts, while others have simply left the country.
In Italy she meets Milan's youngest city councillor, who says he is trying to change the corrupt politics of his country and argues that it is Italy's - and his - last chance.
The new Hungarian government has introduced a raft of new laws, which critics argue are increasingly authoritarian and, in some cases, break EU laws. Lucy hears how sleeping rough on the streets is punishable by a fine or prison sentence; and about how some students who receive a government grant are required to sign an agreement saying they won't leave the country for ten years.
In Poland she visits a re-opened coal mine which is attracting young workers in an area of high unemployment; and she speaks to young entrepreneurs who are resorting to illegal means because they say the country's taxes are crippling them.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01lstsk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00t7knw)
Tetherdown

The place: London.
The threat of terrorism - imported and home-grown - hangs in the air. A recession bites. Fresh crimes of violence are reported daily, with Londoners torn between fascination and fear, and the police struggling to retain the confidence of the public.
The year: 1896.
In the well-heeled suburb of Muswell Hill, Henry Smith, a retired engineer, is found tied-up and beaten to death in his own home. Scotland Yard detectives are on the scene within the hour, but their investigations are hampered by judges and politicians, who refuse to recognise the latest breakthrough in forensic science: fingerprints. "The British policeman," says a high court judge," must depend on his customary tenacity and ingenuity."
As the detectives identify suspects, and launch a nationwide manhunt, news of the crimes goes global, with reports in newspapers as far apart as the USA and New Zealand.
Tetherdown (the name of the road where the murder took place) is a fast-moving play by Scott Cherry and Gregory Evans which views these tragic events of over a century ago through the prism of the 20th century. Every character is based on a real person connected to the case.

Nicholas Woodeson (Great Expectations; Conspiracy; Red Riding) stars as Detective Constable Burrell.

Director: Marion Nancarrow.


MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b01lswv0)
Another edition of the 48th series of Quote... Unquote, the popular quotations programme presented and devised by Nigel Rees. The guests this week are the author and actor Charlie Higson, radio presenter Martin Kelner, comedian Nat Luurtsema and critic Stephanie Merritt. The reader is Peter Jefferson.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01lsts3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b01lswv2)
Dr Phil Hammond

Dr Phil Hammond's interests in comedy, journalism and the world of medicine are reflected in his choice of literature in this edition of With Great Pleasure. We hear from the man who was his mentor in the world of comedy, Miles Kington; there are extracts from the journalistic writings of Clive James and Martha Gellhorn; and from the preface of The Doctor's Dilemma by Bernard Shaw comes a salutary lesson for contemporary medicine that was written over one hundred years ago.
Producer Paul Dodgson.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01lswv4)
Syria

With escalating conflict in Syria and increasing concerns about the role of Muslim fundamentalism in the future of the country; Ernie Rea is joined by Syrian businessman Ammar Waqqaf, historian Emma Loosely and Lecturer in Islamic Studies Mustafa Baig to discuss the role of religion in Syria. Whilst the majority of the country's population are Sunni Muslims, President Bashar al-Assad's regime is Alawite, a secretive branch of Shi'a Islam. So what has it meant for Syria to be governed by an elite religious minority? How are Syria's other minorities religions such as Christians, Druze and Sufis treated? How will religion affect the current crisis in Syria and what kind of society might Syria be once it is over?

Producer: Rosie Dawson.


MON 17:00 PM (b01lswv6)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ln9kg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b01lswv8)
Series 64

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons challenges Paul Merton, Miles Jupp, Pam Ayres and Charles Collingwood to speak for 60 seconds. From 2012.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01lswvb)
Pawel turns up early to help Ian prepare the meal, so they are in high spirits by the time Adam gets home. In an unguarded aside, Adam hints to Ian he knows more than he has previously let on about Pawel's sexuality. This prompts Ian to ask Pawel directly. Subsequently Pawel makes a toast acknowledging how his naivety has led him to make mistakes. He entreats them to show him around the local gay scene. Ian agrees but Adam is not keen. A compromise is reached as they agree to go to the pickers' leaving party.
Pip has taken over at Brookfield as Ruth and David take a short holiday. Concerned Ruth calls, and is relieved to hear everything is running smoothly.
Darrell has serious misgivings about Matt's plans for Joyce and Arthur's house at Hillside. He thinks that the problems are minor and could be remedied easily. Matt turns up. He puts additional pressure on Darrell to exaggerate the work necessary and force Joyce and Arthur to move out, or face losing his job.
Rosa delightedly shows off her brand new scooter, which Elona has assured her they can afford. Darrell, seeing how happy she is, assures her she won't have to take it back.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01lswvd)
Alice Cooper, Clive Owen, and TV drama Person of Interest

With Mark Lawson.

Actor Clive Owen discusses his latest role in Shadow Dancer, the new film from director James Marsh (Man on Wire, Project Nim). Set in 1990s Belfast, a member of the IRA (played by Gillian Anderson) turns informant in order to protect her son.

Alice Cooper's School's Out went to number one in the UK pop charts 40 years ago this week. The American rock star reflects on his career, including encounters with Salvador Dali, George H W Bush, John Lennon and Johnny Depp.

Created by JJ Abrams (Lost) and Jonathan Nolan (The Dark Knight Rises), Person of Interest is a TV crime drama in which a former CIA agent - played by Jim Caviezel - is recruited by a billionaire to prevent violent crimes in New York City. Rebecca Nicholson reviews.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01lswcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Octavia (b01lswvg)
Historian Tristram Hunt MP considers the remarkable legacy of Octavia Hill, one hundred years after her death.

Octavia was a social reformer who pioneered housing schemes and open spaces for the poor and went on to co-found the National Trust. For many years she has been consigned to relative obscurity, but now there's a new appreciation of her radicalism, her localism and her insistence on the importance of beauty and space in people's lives, chiming loudly with current social pre-occupations. Octavia is newly claimed as a heroine by those on the left and right of politics.

The programme includes evidence of how the National Trust is reconnecting with its founder - through awards schemes, scholarly essays and plans to make land and properties much more accessible to the less well-off.

We hear about Octavia's vital friendship with John Ruskin whose ideas about the social purpose of art and nature she absorbed.

The programme visits Wisbech in Cambridgeshire where Octavia was born, Red Cross gardens - her model dwellings and gardens in South London, and Toys Hill in Kent - the precious area of land she and her family saved for the Trust and where she is now buried.

Contributors include Fiona Reynolds, Gillian Darley, Robert Hewison, Kathryn Hughes, Peter Clayton and Octavia's descendant, Clare Armstrong.

Produced by Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b01ljl54)
Cold Turkey in Karachi

Karachi is facing a drugs epidemic. Pakistan's sprawling port city has an estimated half a million chronic heroin addicts. The drug is cheap and easily available as it comes across the Pakistan/Afghanistan border, before being shipped to Europe and the US. Mobeen Azhar finds out how a charity is trying to help addicts and their families.

An NGO called the Edhi Foundation operates what is thought to be the world's largest drug rehabilitation centre. It's here that Mobeen meets brothers Yusaf and Husein who have checked themselves in. Patients who volunteer for treatment like this can leave whenever they feel ready. But the majority of patients, like 24-year-old Saqandar, are brought in by their desperate relatives, and according to Edhi rules, only the family can decide when they will be released.

The centre offers heroin users food and painkillers to ease the physical symptoms of withdrawal - but conventional treatment like methadone is not available. So does enforced cold turkey really work?

Mobeen follows the stories of three heroin addicts and finds out how the stress of their addiction takes its toll on them and their families.

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Ben Crighton.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01l8n7k)
While school children are enjoying a well-deserved holiday, Quentin Cooper discusses the use of phonics to teach children to read and looks at the extent to which neuroscience can help inform education policy. He is joined from Cambridge by Usha Goswami and from York by Charles Hulme.

Quentin also finds out how a mathematical approach can help elucidate the historical basis of some of our oldest classical texts. Padraig Mac Carron and Ralph Kenna, join him from Coventry University.

And Alex Kacelnik joins Quentin from Oxford to discuss the question as to whether or not animals have empathy.


MON 21:30 Amanda Vickery on... Men (b01lswch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01ln9kk)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01lswvj)
Criticism of Norwegian police following the Breivik massacre
Egyptians react to changes at the top of the military
World's first all female city to be built in Saudi Arabia.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01lswvl)
The Greatcoat

Episode 1

1/5 A new ghost story from Helen Dunmore set during and after the Second World War, about the power of the past to imprint itself on the present, and possess it. In 1952, Isabel Carey and her husband Philip, a doctor, are beginning their married life together in a small flat in a Yorkshire town.

Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths.
Reader: Jasmine Hyde
Producer: Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b01lhgwb)
Brussels - A Language Story

Chris Ledgard visits Brussels, a melting pot of European languages. He meets interpreters, language planners and voice coaches to discover how the European Commission operates "interpreting on an industrial scale." We find out why officials fear a looming shortage of interpreters, and we meet the man who teaches people how to speak and behave in a multilingual setting.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


MON 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgmxq)
Micky Flanagan: What Chance Change?

Episode 1

Cockney geezer Micky Flanagan regales us with the story of his journey from tabloid to broadsheet; from the street party to the dinner party; from apples and pears to stocks and shares... Well you've got the idea.

Each week's episode focuses on a different decade of Micky's life. Micky regales us with stories from his life told through stand up comedy. In between, the programmes goes 'behind the scenes' with short interviews that give an insight into the stand up.

In this opening episode Micky talks about growing up in the East End in the 1970's. He chats to his school friends about their shared experiences of leaving with no qualifications to work at Billingsgate Fish Market. He also interviews Sociology Professor Paul Willis about his research on working class boys in a 1970's school.

Micky's transition from the mean streets of the East End, working as a Billingsgate Fish Porter to an entertainer living in the leafy lanes of Dulwich is a fascinating story, all the better for being told through jokes. The issue of class is a crucial theme in Micky's stand up. However it is framed less as "Do we now have a classless society?" and more as "Is it ok to ask for Tomato sauce in a fancy French restaurant?"

The series is written and performed by Micky Flanagan.
The producer is Tilusha Ghelani.



TUESDAY 14 AUGUST 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01ln9lg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01lswcm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9lj)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ln9ll)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9ln)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01ln9lq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m40xt)
Short reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01lsyj2)
An expert land agent says the cost of agricultural land in England will reach an all time high of £9000 an acre by the end of the year. It's being caused by a high demand for arable land driven by rising grain prices.

UK beef exports have fallen by over 20% in the past year. It's a knock on effect of high feed prices three years ago, says Debbie Butcher, senior analyst from the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board.

Ella McSweeney gets to know a herd of noisy Irish Dexter cattle in County Cork. The breed has been around for centuries, they are small, hardy and profitable.

Farming Today is presented by Ella McSweeney and produced in Birmingham by Ruth Sanderson.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01lsyj4)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01lsyj6)
Pat Wolseley

Jim Al-Khalili talks to botanist, Pat Wolseley about her obsession with lichen and the environmental secrets it holds. This humble and ancient organism contains a wealth of information about the quality of air we breathe. Certain species thrive on road traffic pollution: others prefer acid rain. And, for the last five years, thousands of people throughout the UK have been gathering scientific data on different lichen populations in their local area and using it to monitor air pollution.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01lsyj8)
Razia Iqbal talks to Hilal Sezgin

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe. Here she talks to the German writer and journalist, Hilal Sezgin, at her small farm just outside Hamburg.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01lsyjb)
Kate Summerscale - Mrs Robinson's Disgrace

Episode 2

"The judges were presented with a singular case on Monday 14 June, a month after they had heard their first divorce suit. Henry Oliver Robinson, a civil engineer, was petitioning for the dissolution of his marriage on the grounds that his wife, Isabella, had committed adultery, and he submitted as evidence a diary in her hand."

These bare facts - the angry husband and the incriminating words - are, in the author's hands, shaped to tell a riveting story, that says much about the individuals involved and the social world they moved in...

Isabella cements her friendship with Edward Lane, but in her dairy their time together is recounted in more passionate detail. What to believe?

Read by Emma Fielding.
Producer Duncan Minshull.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01lsyjd)
Feminism and the family, Arab women and sport

Viv Groskop talks to Jenni about whether it's possible to pursue your feminist beliefs within your own family. 400 years since the Pendle Witch Trials we visit the area to find out why 10 women were hanged for witchcraft and go to the site of a cottage where the 'witches' were said to have met. Olympic footballer Kelly Smith tells Jenni about her career and her record as the UK's highest scoring woman player, and after the Olympics, what is the legacy for Arab women and sport? Presented by Jenni Murray.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2fgm)
Oliver Emanuel - The Other One

Episode 2

By Oliver Emanuel.

Following a DNA test to establish paternity, a mother and father have discovered that Laura, their twelve-year-old daughter, isn't biologically related to either of them.

Now in the knowledge that the life she's been living should have belonged to someone else, Laura visits the detective investigating how this could have happened.

A tense and moving drama, inspired by a set of exceptional true events, that explores the nature of identity and the notion of family.

Director: Kirsty Williams.


TUE 11:00 James and the Giant Eagle (b010fc06)
Like most small boys James Aldred loved climbing trees and now he has grown up, he's still climbing trees; helping scientists and film crews up into the canopy. When he was invited to help a wildlife team film one of the world's largest eagles in Southern Brazil, it was an offer he couldn't refuse. But what happened next was a nerve-wracking and painful encounter with one of the world's most powerful birds. Harpy Eagles have a body length of over 3ft, a wingspan of over 6ft and weigh 10-12 pounds. Their hind talons can grow up to the size of grizzly bear claws, and are used to strike their prey; monkeys, sloths and possums, which they then carry aloft. When James was asked to climb a tree, to assist with moving a camera on an eagle's nest, he found out exactly why these birds have such an awesome reputation.

Harpy Eagles are found in tropical lowland forests from southeast Mexico to northern Argentina and southern Brazil. Their name is derived from the Harpies in Greek Mythology, which were ferocious winged creatures with sharp claws, a woman's face and a vulture's body.

Harpy Eagles are successful predators, owing primarily to their size and strength. They are also highly manoeuvrable fliers. They have excellent eyesight and good hearing, and are acutely observant and opportunistic birds. Taken together these attributes make for a highly impressive predator. Recordings made by James Aldred on location are combined with interviews with ornithologist Ian Newton and field biologist, Marta Curti (who has spent many years working with Harpy Eagles with The Peregrine Fund) in a programme which explores the behaviour and ecology of Harpy Eagles and what happens when a female tries to protect her young.

Producer Sarah Blunt

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


TUE 11:30 A Sound British Adventure (b01lsyjg)
Comedian Stewart Lee is passionate about electronic music and he take us on a remarkable musical journey. We discover how, after the Second World War, a small group of electronic pioneers began tinkering with their army surplus kit to create new sounds and music.

Tristram Cary started the first electronic music studio in Britain but, while France, Germany, Italy and the USA had lavishly funded research centres, British electronic music remained the preserve of boffins on a budget.

As the programme reveals, this make do and mend approach prevailed long after austerity Britain had given way to the swinging 60s, with Peter Zinovieff developing EMS synthesizers from a shed at the bottom of his garden in Putney. (Paul McCartney put on his wellies and took a look). Zinovieff is interviewed about his experiments in sound.

Unsurprisingly, the electronic community in Britain was a small, intimate group and joining Cary and Zinovieff was Daphne Oram, who devoted decades to developing a 'drawn sound' electronic composition system that never really quite worked.

Brian Hodgson tells us about 1960s experimental and electronic festivals, including The Million Volt Light and Sound Rave (1967) at which The Beatles' electronic piece Carnival Of Light had its only public airing. We shall also hear how the radiophonic workshop broke new musical ground with Dr. Who.

Experts in the history of electronic music, including author and musician Mark Ayers and Goldsmiths College lecturer in computer studies Dr. Michael Grierson give the boffins' view and Portishead's Adrian Utley explains why the early forays in electronics are still relevant today.

Produced by John Sugar
A Sugar Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01lsyjj)
Call You and Yours: Sunday Opening Hours

Sunday trading laws in England and Wales have been extended for the duration of the Olympics and Paralympics. Larger shops can now trade for more than six hours a day on Sundays. There are suggestions that this could continue after the Games are over to give the economy a much needed boost.

Do you find the current Sunday trading hours inconvenient and wish that the shops were open for longer? Perhaps you attend church on a Sunday and regard it as a sacred day, or as a much needed day off to spend with friends and family.

Will longer opening hours be the final nail in the coffin for the unique character of a Sunday? Do consumer demands now trump the idea of a day of rest?

Are longer opening hours a good way to give the economy a much needed boost? Or do you think they would damage small businesses? If you're a shop owner or you work in retail, what do you think of the idea?

Call us on 03700-100-400 before ten, 03700 100444 after ten, or email us via our website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours; leave us a message or a name and number where we can call you back.
Or text us on 84844. Or tweet @BBCRadio4 during the programme, using the hashtag #youandyours.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Olivia Skinner.


TUE 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01lsyjl)
David Hockney

Born in Bradford, artist David Hockney's work has been shown around the globe. Now 75, his recent exhibition at London's Royal Academy, 'The Bigger Picture' had people queuing round the block to look at his latest collection of Yorkshire landscapes - epic in scale and ambition. Accompanying his paintings, were a collection of pictures he'd drawn on an I-pad - still experimenting in his eighth decade.

He launched on to the British Pop art scene in the sixties, left London to live in America and he enjoys a creative career which has seen him at the forefront on art and artistic technology.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gasgoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan AGar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse".

Producer Sarah Taylor.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01ln9ls)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01lsyr9)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Generation E (b01lsyrc)
Series 2

Loans for Life in Latvia

As the economic crisis deepens and schisms emerge, Lucy Ash travels across Europe to meet the continent's next generation, who face an uncertain future. She explores the challenges they face and the ways in which they are meeting them.
In this programme she travels to Latvia. When the economic crisis hit, Latvia introduced some of the strictest austerity measures to be found anywhere in Europe. Its GDP fell by 25 per cent. Now it is trumpeted by the IMF as a great success story. But Lucy Ash discovers that life for young people is still extremely tough. She speaks to those who have lost their homes but still owe the banks huge debts, while others have simply left the country.
In Italy she meets Milan's youngest city councilor, who says he is trying to change the corrupt politics of his country and argues that it is Italy's - and his - last chance.
The new Hungarian government has introduced a raft of new laws, which critics argue are increasingly authoritarian and, in some cases, break EU laws. Lucy hears how sleeping rough on the streets is punishable by a fine or prison sentence; and about how some students who receive a government grant are required to sign an agreement saying they won't leave the country for ten years.
In Poland she visits a re-opened coal mine which is attracting young workers in an area of high unemployment; and she speaks to young entrepreneurs who are resorting to illegal means because they say the country's taxes are crippling them.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01lswvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Brief Lives (b01lsyrf)
Series 5

Episode 1

Brief Lives by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly.
Return of the popular series about Frank Twist, Sarah Gold and their team of paralegal advisors. A community interpreter's girlfriend is arrested for assaulting a police officer. Sarah investigates, but all is not what it seems.

Producer/Director Gary Brown
Original Music by Carl Harms.


TUE 15:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b01lsyrh)
Series 2

What Makes a Fake a Fake?

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink.

Each week presenter Matthew Sweet takes a puzzle with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, John Stuart Mill and Wittgenstein. All recorded in a pub with an audience, who'll have their own contributions to make - but whose assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Propping up the bar this year will be philosophers such as Julian Baggini and Nigel Warburton, and academic experts on memory, the law, art and computers. We'll be meeting bald men, a woman who used to be a man, and a woman who can't remember being a girl. Plus music from The Drifters - a far more philosophical group than you'd ever imagine.

This programme is a repeat.

The producer was Estelle Doyle.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b01lsyrk)
Britain from 2060: The Land

According to the latest predictions on global warming Britain from the 2060s could begin to look rather like Madeira. In the first of a two-part investigation into the impact of climate change Tom Heap visits the island 350 miles from the coast of Morocco to find out how we might be living in the second half of the 21st century.

With a climate dominated by the Atlantic, a wet, mountainous north and a warm, dry, over-populated south Madeira already resembles Britain in miniature. The settlers who arrived from Portugal in the 15th century developed a complex farming system that found a niche for dozens of crops, from olives and oranges to wheat and sweet potatoes. Could British farmers prepare for a less predictable climate by studying the delicate agricultural arts of the Madeirans?

Irrigation systems bring water from the wet north of Madeira to the parched south where 90 percent of the population live and most of the tourists visit. Should Britain accept the inevitable and invest in the water pipes that could keep the South-East of England hydrated with Scottish and Northumbrian water?

Tom will also be studying the island's wildlife. Can Britain expect semi-tropical insects and reptiles to invade the south as our mountain hares and ptarmigan die out in the north? Or does Madeira's broad range of species offer hope of something subtly different but just as fascinating from the 2060s?

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b01lsz29)
Preaching

Chris Ledgard listens to the ways in which preachers use words and the power of language to move people, and visits churches and a mosque to find out about the modernising forces at work there.

Contributors:

The Rev'd Canon Simon Butler, St Mary's Church Battersea
Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra
Pastor Kasali Fatai, The Redeemed Christian Church of God, Bristol
Ruth Gledhill, The Times religious correspondent
Max Atkinson, author of Lend Me Your Ears

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b01lt2f3)
Series 28

Walter Scott

Tory MP author and adventurer Rory Stewart champions the life of Sir Walter Scott. Presenter Matthew Parris is joined by Scott's biographer Stuart Kelly. Scott arguably invented the idea of Scottishness and marketed it to the world. But now he is virtually unread and he stands accused of saddling Scotland with tartan tat and Highland kitsch. Rory Stewart argues that Scott's version of Scottish identity represents a valid alternative to today's Scottish nationalism.
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

From 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01lt2f5)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ln9lv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Mr Blue Sky (b01hf12z)
Series 2

On Your Wedding Day

Written by Andrew Collins.

Harvey Easter (played by Mark Benton), 46, is the eternal optimist. He is able to see the good in every situation, the silver lining within every cloud, the bright side to every bit of bad news.

This however is his downfall. Someone for whom the glass is always half-full can be difficult to live with, as his wife of 19 years, Jacqui (played by Claire Skinner), knows all too well. Even as life deals Harvey and the Easter family a series of sadistic blows, Harvey looks on the positive side. It's pathological with him. The way Jax sees it, instead of dealing with the problems of their marriage and their teenage kids, Harvey's optimism is actually his way of avoiding engagement with the big issues.

Mr Blue Sky is about one man battling to remain positive in moments of crisis, and one woman battling to live with someone who has his head in the clouds.

It's the day before Charlie and Kill-R's wedding day. While Rakesh makes Jax an unexpected offer and the bride gets cold feet, Harvey's plan to write his speech is interrupted by a distress call from the groom at Gatwick.

Cast:
Harvey Easter ..... Mark Benton
Jacqui Easter ..... Claire Skinner
Charlie Easter ..... Rosamund Hanson
Robbie Easter ..... Tyger Drew Honey
Kill-R ..... Javone Prince
Lou Easter ..... Sorcha Cusack
Rakesh Rathi ..... Navin Chowdhry
Dr Ray Marsh ..... Justin Edwards
Sean Calhoun ..... Michael Legge
Registrar ..... Simon Day
Custom's Official ..... Greg Davies

Produced by: Anna Madley
An Avalon Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01lt2f7)
Still on holiday, Ruth uses her powers of charm and persuasion to distract anxious David from fretting about how Pip is managing on the farm.
Pip's had a busy night. With Emma's help she has freed a straying lamb who got caught up in a fence. Pip is cross with herself for not checking everything earlier and is determined to mend the fence before David and Ruth get back.
On their return, David and Ruth find all is well and the fence is mended thanks to Pip and Emma's efforts. Emma's triumph is short-lived as Ed has a quiet word. Summer mastitis in the herd is going to mean further vet bills, so they may have to cut back on their spending even further.
Jamie receives a text from Natalie to say she's having a results party at her place on Thursday. Jamie doesn't want to talk about exam results but Kathy tells him she's changed her shifts so that she can take him to college to pick up his results. Jamie wants her to stop going on about his exams, and doesn't want her there on Thursday.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01lt2vg)
Alanis Morissette, Take This Waltz

With John Wilson.

Canadian singer-songwriter Alanis Morissette reflects on her career so far, and her latest album, Havoc And Bright Lights.

Michelle Williams, Seth Rogen and Sarah Silverman star in the film Take This Waltz, a story of eroticism and infidelity that plays out through a sweltering Toronto summer. The film is directed by Sarah Polley. Antonia Quirke reviews.

The author of the music business satire Kill Your Friends, novelist John J Niven, reveals why he's written his first crime thriller, Cold Hands

American composer John Cage is celebrated for the way he challenges assumptions about what constitutes music. His work Branches uses cactuses as instruments. Ahead of a performance at the BBC Proms, cactus-player Robyn Schulkowsky brings cactuses to the studio, to demonstrate what Cage had in mind - and why.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2fgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Game Changer: 20 Years of the Premier League (b01lt2vj)
Big business or community concern, club or corporation? Journalist Jim White reports on the first 20 years of England's Premier League when it has established itself as the most marketable and valuable domestic football competition in the world. But with new overseas players, managers and owners, has the sport become divorced from the communities it came from? Or is it accurately reflecting modern Britain?


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01lt2vl)
Ian Macrae is joined by sports journalist Paul Carter, who tries to simplify and explain the complexities of the Paralympic classifications. David Poyner is Chair if British Blind Sport Archery and tells Tom Deilen from the International Archery Federation that the current classifications mean that blind and partially-sighted archers are put off entering. Tom says that he'd welcome more blind competitors and invites David to submit a proposal.
Nicola Naylor is a blind dressage rider and feels that the rule requiring B1 blind riders to wear a blindfold is discriminatory, as other disabled competitors are not asked to limit the use of their residual ability.
British Dressage respond.
Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, a gold-winning Paralympian also comments on the current classifications.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01lt2vn)
Over-diagnosis: Chronic Kidney Disease

Dr Mark Porter finds out that some medical conditions are over-diagnosed and therefore over-treated, because of the results of certain tests.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01lsyj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01ln9lx)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01lt2vq)
The French and German economies defy the Euro gloom, but can their resilience hold?

The defected Syrian Prime Minister says the government of President Assad is falling apart - but how much can we trust his account?

And can Ireland hold onto its status as a technology Mecca in the face of the recession?

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01lt2vs)
The Greatcoat

Episode 2

2/5 A new ghost story from Helen Dunmore set during and after the Second World War, about the power of the past to imprint itself on the present, and possess it. In 1952, newly-married Isabel Carey and her husband Philip come to live in a small town close to a wartime bomber station. One night, when Philip is out on call, Isabel finds an RAF officer's greatcoat in a cupboard, and spreads it on the bed to keep her warm. In the middle of her dreams, she hears a knocking on the window. When she gets out of bed and goes to look outside, there is an RAF officer wearing the greatcoat, mouthing her name. Isabel's quiet life is about to change in strange ways.

Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths.
Reader: Jasmine Hyde
Producer: Beth O'Dea.


TUE 23:00 Kevin Eldon Will See You Now (b01lt2vv)
Series 1

Guest Week - With Guests

Comedy's best kept secret ingredient gets his own sketch show. Sketches, characters, sound effects, bit of music, some messin' about, you know...

It's guest week and, to celebrate, Kevin Eldon will be talking to his guests who include a stupid man, Apollo 11 mission commander Neil Armstrong and sadly, a hypnotist.

Kevin Eldon is a comedy phenomenon. He's been in virtually every major comedy show in the last fifteen years, but not content with working with the likes of Chris Morris, Steve Coogan, Armando Iannucci, Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, Stewart Lee, Julia Davis and Graham Linehan, he's finally decided to put together his own comedy series for BBC Radio 4.

After all the waiting - Kevin Eldon Will See You Now.

Appearing in this episode are Amelia Bullmore (I'm Alan Partridge, Scott and Bailey), Julia Davis (Nighty Night), Rosie Cavaliero (Peep Show), Paul Putner (Little Britain), Justin Edwards (The Consultants) and David Reed (The Penny Dreadfuls) with special guest Phil Cornwell.

Written by Kevin Eldon.
With additional material by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris (Flight Of The Conchords, That Mitchell & Webb Sound) and Toby Davies.

Original music by Martin Bird.

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgmy9)
Ross Noble Goes Global

Episode 1

Teeming with spittoons and parks packed with people, the comedian visits the bustling city of Shanghai. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in April 2002.



WEDNESDAY 15 AUGUST 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01ln9mv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01lsyjb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9mx)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ln9n1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9n3)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01ln9n5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m40y6)
Short reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01lt45f)
Growers predict the 2012 UK apple crop will be down almost a fifth on last year because of the wet summer. Orchards growing Braeburn and Cox apples in the Midlands have been hardest hit. Ella McSweeney meets a grower who thinks his income will drop by 90% compared with what he earned in 2011.

Meanwhile in the Western Isles of Scotland crofters are coping with a drought. And will the Olympic Food Vision have any lasting legacy in the way caterers and restaurants source their ingredients?

Presented by Ella McSweeney, Produced by Sarah Swadling.


WED 06:00 Today (b01lt45h)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 What's the Point of...? (b01lt45k)
Series 4

University

"The noblest task of a university is to encourage its students in the disinterested and relentless search for truth" - so said the Archbishop of York in 1953. But the search for truth doesn't necessarily lead to a job and could land today's students in debt until their fifties, so what is the point of university in double-dip Britain?
As students in England anticipate their A' level results tomorrow, Quentin Letts canvasses the views of people within and beyond the ivory towers about the value of a university education. Is it becoming purely a means to an economic goal, a route to a better job, or is it an end in itself, learning for learning's sake, the true benefits of which cannot be appreciated in advance?


WED 09:30 The Listening Project (b01gnjgt)
Omnibus

Fi Glover presents an omnibus edition of Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: in today's programme, we meet Ciaron and Brendan, Irish brothers whose fraternal bond was tested to the limit when Brendan fell ill; from Radio Berkshire, the story of Jim and John who touchingly remember the biscuity pleasures of working at the Huntley and Palmers factory in Reading which closed in the 1970s, while from Stoke on Trent, the agonising tale of Stevie, the brother to Chris and son to Norman, who vanished while on holiday in Crete. And there's a chance too to hear just how the magic of these Listening Project encounters actually works from one of the team gathering the interviews across Britain.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a sort of snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer Simon Elmes

(Repeat).


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01lt45m)
Kate Summerscale - Mrs Robinson's Disgrace

Episode 3

"The judges were presented with a singular case on Monday 14 June, a month after they had heard their first divorce suit. Henry Oliver Robinson, a civil engineer, was petitioning for the dissolution of his marriage on the grounds that his wife, Isabella, had committed adultery, and he submitted as evidence a diary in her hand."

These bare facts - the angry husband and the incriminating words - are, in the author's hands, shaped to tell a riveting story, that says much about the individuals involved and the social world they moved in...

Isabella continues to see Edward Lane, but her feelings are not returned by him. Still, there is
also Eugene Le Petit to enjoy the company of...

Reader Emma Fielding
Producer Duncan Minshull.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01lt45p)
Cosmetic surgery review

The Masters Games photographic exhibition that hopes to show that idea that athletics isn't only for the young.
Sir Bruce Keogh on his Review into the cosmetic surgery after the PIP scandal. Children and interfaith marriages. Summer reads, forget chick flicks - why not catch up with some feminist classics. Plus a celebration of the pioneering Queens of Comedy.
Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Sharmini Selvarajah.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2fmk)
Oliver Emanuel - The Other One

Episode 3

By Oliver Emanuel.

Following a DNA test to establish paternity, a mother and father have discovered that Laura, their twelve-year-old daughter, isn't biologically related to either of them.

Now in the knowledge that the life she's been living should have belonged to someone else, Laura turns detective and tracks down the medic in charge on the day she was born and swapped.

A tense and moving drama, inspired by a set of exceptional true events, that explores the nature of identity and the notion of family.

Director: Kirsty Williams.


WED 11:00 In Living Memory (b01lt4b6)
Series 16

Co-education

Chris Ledgard visits schools in North Tyneside and Somerset to re-trace their journeys from single sex to mixed education. The stories take us back to September 1969 and the height of the co-education movement. In the South West of England, Wells Cathedral School has a charismatic head teacher with three daughters to educate and a convent closing down the road. Against the advice of some veteran school masters, he decides to admit girls in order to safeguard his school's future. Meanwhile, in the North East, the local education authority issues a blanket edict as part of the switch to comprehensive education. So the wall between the boys and girls at Marden High School has to come down.


WED 11:30 Brian Gulliver's Travels (b01lz1cj)
Series 2

Chamanoa

Brian Gulliver, a seasoned presenter of travel documentaries, finds himself in a hospital's secure unit after claiming to have experienced a succession of bizarre adventures.

More memories as Brian relives his experiences in Chamanoa, a land where naturites battle nurturites, where genetics is pitted against education.

Neil Pearson stars in series two of Bill Dare's satirical adventure story about a man lost in a fictional world.

Brian Gulliver/ Thake ..... Neil Pearson
Rachel Gulliver..... Mariah Gale
Kath & Hendl ..... Lisa Dillon
Bordle ..... Toby Longworth
Violinist ..... Amy Butterworth

Producer: Steven Canny

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in June 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01lt4b8)
Automatic car insurance renewal, and recovering from locked-in syndrome

First Group has been chosen by the government to take over running trains on the West Coast mainline. We look at why their plans are being welcomed in four towns in the west Midlands and the north-west.

Also - the government hasn't made up its mind yet about new runways in the south of England, but one of the ideas being mooted is the so-called "Boris Island" airport in the Thames Estuary. But it's an idea that's been floated before. So what happened last time this was suggested and what lessons can be learned for today?

How relying on automatic car insurance renewal from your credit card, could land you in court.

And - we'll hear from a victim of locked-in syndrome. That's when every muscle in the body is paralysed except your eyelids. It's unusual to survive and very rare indeed to make a full recovery from the condition. We'll be hearing from a man who did.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Paul Waters.


WED 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01lt4bb)
Billy Connolly

The New Elizabethans. Billy Connolly

James Naughtie considers the Scottish comedian Billy Connolly, who went from from the Clyde shipyards to being one of the UK's most popular and enduring stand up comedians.

Connolly began as a folk singer in The Humblebums but realising his gift for humour, he changed direction to concentrate on comedy. He came to wide public attention with his first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 with the "bike joke", and never looked back. He's cited as one of the most influential stand up comedians of the era, has had much success in television as well as making his mark in Hollywood, and is often considered a Scottish national treasure.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Alison Hughes.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01ln9n9)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01lt4bl)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Generation E (b01lv26g)
Series 2

Italy's Five Star Idealist

As the economic crisis deepens and schisms emerge, Lucy Ash travels across Europe to meet the continent's next generation, who face an uncertain future. She explores the challenges they face and the ways in which they are meeting them.
In this programme Lucy is in Italy where she meets Milan's youngest city councillor, who says he is trying to change the corrupt politics of his country and argues that it is Italy's - and his - last chance.
The new Hungarian government has introduced a raft of new laws, which critics argue are increasingly authoritarian and, in some cases, break EU laws. Lucy hears how sleeping rough on the streets is punishable by a fine or prison sentence; and about how some students who receive a government grant are required to sign an agreement saying they won't leave the country for ten years.
In Poland she visits a re-opened coal mine which is attracting young workers in an area of high unemployment; and she speaks to young entrepreneurs who are resorting to illegal means because they say the country's taxes are crippling them.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01lt2f7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b012r6v6)
Georges Simenon - The Other Simenon

In Case of Emergency

Georges Simenon, best known for Maigret, published scores of other novels, often tough, gripping and psychologically-penetrating dissections of small lives confounded by fate. Ronald Frame dramatises three of these stories beginning with the obsessive affair between a lawyer and a jewel thief. When her plan to rob a jeweller's shop goes wrong, Yvette - young, beautiful and dangerously impulsive - asks middle-aged lawyer, Lucien, to defend her in court. When he wins the case they begin an affair but he discovers that Yvette has a boyfriend who has no intention of giving her up.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/director Bruce Young.


WED 15:00 Fixing Broken Banking (b01lsqkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01lt2vn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01lv26j)
Breaking rules; Wall Street women

The first generation of women to establish themselves on Wall Street began their careers in the 1960s. Laurie Taylor hears from Melissa Fisher about her in depth study of the working lives of the women at the heart of America's financial centre, and Liz Bolshaw joins the discussion to bring a comparison with women in The City of London.
Also, Beth Hardie joins Laurie to discuss her new report on youth crime in Peterborough called Breaking Rules. Does morality have a role in preventing people committing crime? Her study uncovers its importance.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01lv26l)
Local TV: Birmingham's experience

This week with Steve Hewlett:

Why does Birmingham Alabama have eight local TV stations when Birmingham in the UK - four times the size - has none? Secretary of State Jeremy Hunt MP posed that question over two years ago when he set out his vision for new local tv stations across the UK. The deadline for submissions from the would-be tv operators in 21 towns and cities closed this week and now we have a clearer picture of how Jeremy Hunt's question might be answered. Join Steve Hewlett and his guests in the West Midlands to find out more.

The producer is Simon Tillotson..


WED 17:00 PM (b01lv26n)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ln9nd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 When the Dog Dies (b012xpym)
Series 2

Knock Down Ginger

Ronnie Corbett reunites with the writers of his hit sitcom Sorry, Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent. Sorry ran for seven series on BBC 1 and was number one in the UK ratings.

In the second series of their Radio 4 sitcom, Ronnie plays Sandy Hopper, who is growing old happily along with his dog Henry. His grown up children - both married to people Sandy doesn't approve of at all - would like him to move out of the family home so they can get their hands on their money earlier. But Sandy's not having this. He's not moving until the dog dies.

Dolores, Sandy's lodger, has a moment of revelation - she really does feel guilty for always being behind with the rent and is going to leave and be a housekeeper to Mr McAhmed in Edinburgh. Sandy bows to the inevitable - and thus gets everything completely wrong. Will he have enough wit to pull the communication cord? Do they still have them?

Cast:
Ronnie Corbett ..... Sandy
Liza Tarbuck ..... Dolores
Sally Grace ..... Mrs Pompom
Tilly Vosburgh ...... Ellie
Jonathan Aris ..... Blake
Philip Bird ..... Lance
Stephen Critchlow ..... Mr De Vere Smith

Producer: Liz Anstee
A CPL Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01lv26q)
Before re-assessing the damp problem at Hillside, Darrell is treated to Joyce's baking. However he faces a grilling when Matt appears unexpectedly. Matt makes it clear that he expects Darrell to find a reason to move Joyce and Arthur out, and it's his job to make them understand it too .
Darrell tries his best to convince Joyce and Arthur that they'd be better off moving to the flat that Matt's offered them. His excuses and exaggerations are no match for Arthur's steely will. He declares that he'll only leave their house feet first in his coffin.
Lynda asks Fallon if she can put up a poster stating how much the fete and community games raised. Vicky's chirping on about Harry turning out to be gay, and Fallon tries to get away.
Vicky's mind is soon on other things when she takes a call from the midwife, who advises her that there may be an increased risk of the baby being born with Down's syndrome. With Mike at work, she confides in Lynda. Her worry is that this news could dampen Mike's newly-found enthusiasm for fatherhood. Lynda urges her to tell him.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01lv26s)
Edinburgh Festival, David Hayman, Virginia Ironside

With Mark Lawson.

The Edinburgh Fringe Festival has just reached the half-way mark, and this evening Front Row comes from the world's largest arts festival. Recorded in front of a live audience in the big blue tent, Mark Lawson will be providing at taste of this year's Fringe.

Guests include the Scottish actor David Hayman, whose show Six and a Tanner is a solo performance of one man railing against his dead father; Australian beatboxer Tom Thum demonstrates his extraordinary vocal talents; the writer of a new play based on the story of Anders Breivik who killed 77 people in Norway last summer.discusses the background to his play The Economist.

Virginia Ironside and Tiffany Stevenson have one subject in common for their shows - the ageing process - and they'll be reflecting on that from the perspective of different generations, and comic Paul Chowdhry from Channel 4's Stand Up for the Week discusses his new show What's Happening White People in which considers the state of modern Britain

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2fmk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 In Pursuit of Dignity (b01lv26v)
Edward Stourton chairs a debate from the "Understanding Human Dignity" conference organised by the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales and Queen's Belfast. What is the relationship between human dignity and human rights? How do you define human dignity in the context of issues surrounding assisted dying, sexuality or freedom? To discuss these issues are Fr David Hollenbach a Jesuit and Professor of Human Rights and International Justice at Boston College in the United States; Denise Reaume, Professor of Law at Toronto University; Chris McCrudden, Professor of Human Rights and Equality Law at Queen's Belfast and Jeremy Waldron who teaches legal philosophy at New York University and is also Professor of Political and Social Philosophy at Oxford.

Producer: Mark O'Brien.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01lv38j)
Series 3

Katarina Skoberne: Family History Repeating

Does history repeat itself? Entrepreneur Katarina Skoberne describes how in her family's case it did, and discusses the thought-provoking lessons it taught her.

Katarina's great-grandfather was an admiral in the Russian imperial navy. His life was often interrupted by disaster, and he twice lost everything and was forced to start again.

But Katarina recently discovered some of his writing, and more than 100 years later found interesting parallels to her own life and experiences.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01lsyrk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 What's the Point of...? (b01lt45k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01ln9ng)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01lv38l)
Unemployment falls, but who can hire when there's no economic growth?

Controversy over the West Coast rail franchise - is Virgin right that the system is 'flawed'?

And Cuba's new 'Noah's Ark'.

With Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01lv38n)
The Greatcoat

Episode 3

3/5 A new ghost story from Helen Dunmore set during and after the Second World War, about the power of the past to imprint itself on the present, and possess it. In 1952, newly-married Isabel Carey and her husband Philip come to live in a small town close to a wartime bomber station. One night, when Philip is out on call, Isabel finds an RAF officer's greatcoat in a cupboard, and spreads it on the bed to keep her warm. In the middle of her dreams, she hears a knocking on the window, and when she gets out of bed and goes to look outside, there is an RAF officer wearing the greatcoat, and mouthing her name. When he comes to her door the next day, she finds herself slipping into another world of sexual passion in which she and Alec, the RAF officer, know each other intimately, and outside the war is still going on.

Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths.
Reader: Jasmine Hyde
Producer: Beth O'Dea.


WED 23:00 Political Animals (b01lv38q)
Series 1

Wilberforce

Wilberforce, Chief Mouser to the Cabinet Office 1973-1987, reflects on his life with Margaret Thatcher.

The first in a series of four scurrilous talks given by well-known, if unreliable, Downing Street cats, who relate their trials and tribulations under four different Prime Ministers.

Starring Clive Swift.

Written by Tony Bagley.

Director: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


WED 23:15 Before They Were Famous (b01lv38v)
Series 1

Episode 1

Ian Leslie presents a new Radio 4 comedy show which brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of some of the world's best known writers. A project of literary archaeology, Leslie has found evidence in the most unlikely of places - within the archives of newspapers, periodicals, corporations and universities - showcasing the early examples of work by writers such as Jilly Cooper during her brief and unfortunately unsuccessful foray into the world of war reporting, and Hunter S Thompson in his sadly short-lived phase working in the customer relations department for a major American Airline.

These are the newspaper articles, advertising copy, company correspondence and gardening manuals that allow us a fascinating glimpse into the embryonic development of our best loved literary voices - people we know today for their novels or poems but who, at the time, were just people with a dream...and a rent bill looming at the end of the month.

Produced by Anna Silver and Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgmyt)
That Mitchell and Webb Sound

Episode 1

How to talk to an emperor and inventing Saturday night TV shows. Stars David Mitchell and Robert Webb. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast in August 2009.



THURSDAY 16 AUGUST 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01ln9pq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01lt45m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9ps)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ln9pv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9px)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01ln9pz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m40yh)
Short reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01lv4n8)
Sarah Swadling reveals how a rainy and disease hit harvest could mean less British wheat in our biscuits and breakfast cereals.
Plus how a cottage garden favourite, the lupin, could help maintain food security. A new study is underway to see whether it's possible to use home-grown field lupins in animal feed instead of imported soya.
And from strawberries, blueberries to autumn veg - the impact of the summer washout on 'pick your own' farms.

Presented by Sarah Swadling.
Produced by Clare Freeman in Birmingham.


THU 06:00 Today (b01lv4nd)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Fry's English Delight (b01lv4ng)
Series 5

Episode 1

David Hockney rightly observes to Stephen Fry that it feels odd to be making a programme about colour on the radio. In a way, that's the point. Colour is subjective and emotive. The very phrase "colourful language" is a metaphor for vividness. But, until quite recently, we've been confused about how colour language developed. A discovery by statesman William Gladstone, who was also a Homer expert, led to a staggeringly wrongheaded theory. Gladstone helped show that most ancient cultures didn't have a word for blue. As a result, it was concluded that the ancients had under-developed colour vision. The reality was that they had under-developed vocabularies.

We meet a man who sees no colour but hears it electronically and can "name" colours with audio signals. We also hear from the head of colour marketing at Dulux paints whose job it is to find new words for new colours. And a bilingual woman says she might think differently about colour depending on which language she's using. The conclusion - how we see colour and how we describe it can shed light onto how language works.

Produced by Nick Baker
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 09:30 Twin Nation (b01457pz)
Episode 1

Edi Stark asks if the bond between twins ever be rivalled by another relationship?

Helen and Morna Mulgray now in their early 70s have never spent more than a fortnight apart. Having retired from teaching they've turned their uniquely close relationship into a successful recipe for writing crime fiction. But they've never married or even had a serious relationship outside of their twin. Edi asks if their relationship is too close or have these sisters found in each other the meeting of minds that the rest of us can only dream of in our life long companions.

Producer: Peter McManus.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01lv4nk)
Kate Summerscale - Mrs Robinson's Disgrace

Episode 4

"The judges were presented with a singular case on Monday 14 June, a month after they had heard their first divorce suit. Henry Oliver Robinson, a civil engineer, was petitioning for the dissolution of his marriage on the grounds that his wife, Isabella, had committed adultery, and he submitted as evidence a diary in her hand."

These bare facts - the angry husband and the incriminating words - are, in the author's hands, shaped to tell a riveting story, that says much about the individuals involved and the social world they moved in...

High drama, as the diaries of Mrs Isabella Robinson are discovered and taken away.
By no less a person than her opportunistic husband...

Reader Emma Fielding
Producer Duncan Minshull.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01lv4nm)
Judy Murray

Judy Murray on how to handle your child's talent or enthusiasm for sport and what it's really like on the professional tennis circuit with sons Andy and Jamie. Ahead of this year's Sylvia Pankhurst lecture we ask whether those on the left are better at celebrating their feminist heroes than their sisters on the right. We catch up with PC Hayley Howells to find out about her 999 Award following her actions at the scene of an accident. And what needs to be done to make men over 75 feel less lonely and isolated.
Producer Caroline Donne.
Presented by Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2fy5)
Oliver Emanuel - The Other One

Episode 4

By Oliver Emanuel.

Following a DNA test to establish paternity, a mother and father have discovered that Laura, their twelve-year-old daughter, isn't biologically related to either of them.

In the knowledge that the life she's been living should have belonged to someone else, Laura has ran away from home to find the answer to who she is.

Today she tracks down the woman she believes is her biological mother and discovers what her life could have been like.

A tense and moving drama, inspired by a set of exceptional true events, that explores the nature of identity and the notion of family.

Director: Kirsty Williams.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01lv4np)
Korea Host Bars

South Korean women, tradition says, are hard-working, respectful to family, and know their place in Korea's Confucian hierarchies. But the country's rapid economic development has meant some startling changes below the surface of that conservative social structure. Perhaps the most controversial is the advent of Host Bars - all night drinking rooms where female customers can select and pay for male companions, sometimes at a cost of thousands of dollars a night. Originally set up to cater to off-duty 'hostesses' and female escorts, they're now proving popular with many other women too. The growth of the industry is throwing up new questions for South Korea's sociologists and politicians as they struggle to reconcile the country's traditional values with the effects of its rapid development. The BBC's Seoul correspondent Lucy Williamson reports.


THU 11:30 Steptoe and Son... and Sons (b01lv4ns)
Fifty years ago a certain 'dirty old man' and his thwarted 37 year old son first appeared on our screen.

In the company of the show's creators, Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, Paul Jackson assesses the impact and legacy of what some argue is Britain's most ground-breaking sit-com. Indeed, the creators of Red Dwarf, Birds of a Feather, Our Friends In The North, the New Statesman and George Gently join them to reveal how much they were entertained, and influenced, by Albert and 'Arold and their familial squabbles that continued over 57 episodes, 8 series and 13 years.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01lv4nv)
Unfair and inefficient - why is the university clearing system so slow to improve?

A level results are out today and the disappointed thousands who don't make the grade will be calling "clearing" to find a university place. Dubbed "unfair and inefficient" why is the university clearing system taking so long to improve?

How can you kick start new building and encourage affordable housing? The government has announced it will look again at the obligation for developers to provide social housing with this aim. So will it work?

We hear from Blackpool where the Primary Care Trust and Council are working together to ban smoking in parks and playgrounds. Is this the right way to encourage people to give up, or too "nanny state"?

Tiny print, not comparing like with like, and not applicable to special offers - MP Jo Swinson is proposing changes to the unit pricing laws that should stamp out dodgy supermarket practices and give consumers a better deal.

Why Ikea, the flat-pack furniture provider, is moving into the hotel business.

And we hear from the listeners who claim their lives are being ruined by the vibrations from a nearby railway line.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Rebecca Moore.


THU 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01lv4nz)
Ralph Robins

The New Elizabethans. Ralph Robins

James Naughtie on one of the foremost industrialists of the second Elizabethan age, Ralph Robins, who is credited with turning around the fortunes of Rolls-Royce.

In 1971 Rolls-Royce was nationalised by Edward Heath's government in order to save the ailing company. Their fortunes improved and under the leadership and long term strategies of Ralph Robins, Rolls-Royce was privatised again and is now a hugely successful power systems company again and the world's second-largest maker of aircraft engines.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse.".


THU 12:57 Weather (b01ln9q2)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01lv4p1)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Generation E (b01lv4p4)
Series 2

Hungary's Graduates - Trapped by the State

As the economic crisis deepens and schisms emerge, Lucy Ash travels across Europe to meet the continent's next generation, who face an uncertain future. She explores the challenges they face and the ways in which they are meeting them.

In this programme Lucy is in Hungary. During their last year at high school, tens of thousands of young Hungarians got a nasty surprise - they will have to pay to go to university. As for the lucky students, exempted from tuition fees, they will have to stay in their country for up to a decade after graduation. Desperate to avoid a brain drain, the Hungarian government says that is only fair but many claim the new law violates freedom of movement within the European Union.
The final programme in the series, tomorrow, comes from Poland where young people are going underground, literally down re-opened coal mines; and Lucy also speaks to young entrepreneurs who are resorting to illegal means because they say the country's taxes are crippling them.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01lv26q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b012wxy2)
Georges Simenon - The Other Simenon

The Little Man From Archangel

Georges Simenon, best known for Maigret, published scores of other novels, often tough, gripping and psychologically-penetrating stories like this tragic tale of a bookseller whose wife goes missing. When Gina fails to come home one night, Jonas Milk tells his inquisitive neighbours that she's visiting a friend. But the gossips in this small country town know Gina has been having flagrant affairs and when it becomes clear that she's disappeared the bookseller is drawn into a nightmare of police enquiries and painful discoveries. Dramatised by Ronald Frame.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/director Bruce Young.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01lv4p6)
Ireland - Peat

The peat bogs of Ireland's midlands have become a battlefield, with opinions divided on how they should best be managed in the future. Helen Mark looks beyond the present-day arguments and travels to Counties Longford, Roscommon and Offaly to find out how attitudes to the bog have evolved over centuries. From the Iron Age Corlea trackway, an oak road discovered just a few years ago, perfectly preserved in peat, to startling evidence of early Christian links with Africa and memories of childhood days spent peat cutting , Helen explores what the bog has to tell us - and what it might have in store for the future.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Moira Hickey.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01lstrs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01lstsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01lv5tz)
Matthew Sweet meets with Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger to talk action heroes, male masculinity, and 19th century poetry.

Star of The Birds and Marnie, Tippi Hedren, discusses her troubled relationship with Alfred Hitchcock.

And Mark Gatiss selects another of his favourite biopics - Stephen Frear's Prick Up Your Ears, a study of playwright Joe Orton and his doomed relationship with his lover, Kenneth Halliwell.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01lv5v1)
A suit that is controlled by the brain is close to enabling a quadriplegic child to kick a football. Neuroscientist Professor Miguel Nicolelis has pledged that he's close to perfecting an entire robotic body suit that will be operated by thought alone. Users will be able to imagine an action, and the brain will send signals to the prosthetic device to complete the action. Based at Duke University, Professor Nicolelis tells Quentin Cooper that his recent research has given him new confidence that his World Cup pledge is deliverable. By placing sensors all over the exo-skeleton, the robotic arm or body suit can now send signals back to the brain, giving the user a sense of touch.

Butterflies in Japan, around Fukushima, have been affected by exposure to radioactive material following the nuclear meltdown 18 months ago, a new study in the journal, Scientific Reports, suggests. Scientists found an increase in leg, antennae and wing shape mutations among the Pale Grass Blue butterfly. Biologist Tim Mousseau from the University of South Carolina studies the impacts of radiation on animals and plants in Chernobyl and Fukushima and says the Japanese research has important implications for life in Fukushima.

Parkinson's Disease is a neurological condition with no cure. It's also very difficult to diagnose because there is no objective test. But now, a UK mathematician could be close to providing a fast and cheap way to make early diagnosis, using voice-pattern recognition. Dr Max Little, a research fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developed an algorithm while studying at Oxford University. Changes to speech is one of the main symptoms of the disease, and by collecting 10,000 voice samples from people around the world, hopes are that the rich voice dataset will be able to identify specific symptoms and provide early diagnosis. Also in the conversation is Dr Keiran Breen, Director of Research and Innovation at Parkinson's UK, who thinks this research will be of benefit.

British scientists are preparing to set off for the Antarctic in an ambitious project to drill down into a sub glacial lake that hasn't seen the light of day for hundreds of thousands of years. Engineers from the British Antarctic Survey are using a giant drill to bore down three kilometres into Lake Ellsworth in an expedition that's been 15 years in the planning. Using high-pressure hot water, Andy Tait, lead drill engineer, describes the challenges and aims of the project.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


THU 17:00 PM (b01lv5v3)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ln9q4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b010m2f6)
Series 4

Evil Narbara

The hit Radio 4 series 'Fags, Mags & Bags' returns with a 4th series with more shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave.

Written by and starring Donald McLeary and Sanjeev Kohli 'Fags, Mags & Bags' has proved a hit with the Radio 4 audience with the show also collecting a Sony nomination and a Writers' Guild award in 2008. This brand new series sees a crop of new shop regulars, and some guest appearances along the way from the likes of Mina Anwar and Kevin Eldon.

In this episode a rowdy party shop run by an unfriendly sort causes havoc amongst the local traders association after a number of undesirables descend on the town.

So join the staff of 'Fags, Mags and Bags' in their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built it up over the course of 30 years, and is a firmly entrenched feature of the local area. Ramesh loves the art of the 'shop'.

However; he does apply the 'low return' rules of the shop to all other aspects of his life. Ramesh is ably assisted by his shop sidekick Dave, a forty-something underachiever who shares Ramesh's love of the art of shopkeeping, even if he is treated like a slave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business, and Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them whether they like it or not!

Cast:
Ramesh: Sanjeev Kolhi
Dave: Donald McLeary
Sanjay: Omar Raza
Alok: Susheel Kumar
Peggy: Kate Donnelly
Mrs Begg: Marj Hogarth
Hilly: Kate Brailsford
Lovely Sue: Julie Wilson Nimmo
Mutton Jeff: Sean Scanlan
Bra Jeff: Steven McNicol

Producer/Director: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01lv5v5)
Adam is starting to break under Brian's concerted pressure. He agrees to be fully committed to running the arable business, and that includes supplying the new dairy. Brian appreciates this. He knows it can't have been easy for Adam.
Rosa has got to grips with her new scooter. When Kathy lets slip the details for Natalie's results party it seems there is no keeping her away, invite or not.
Natalie, already intoxicated by her exam success, is tipsily lauding her A grades over the less successful Jamie. When Rosa comes upon him he is sulking in the kitchen, but she doesn't think his claimed two As, a B and a C are anything to be ashamed of. Jamie seeks solace by test driving Rosa's scooter on the driveway. But Natalie finds the pair closely entwined in an intimate discussion. Enraged, Natalie declares that she and Jamie are finished for good.
Jamie skulks home to find Kathy waiting up for him, keen to hear of his success. He spits out his results: two Cs, a D and an E. He knows he's messed up and insists these exams will be his last. He's not going back to college in September and he's not going to university.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01lv5v7)
Jeanette Winterson; Birger Larsen, director of The Killing

With Mark Lawson.

Writer Jeanette Winterson discusses her new novella, The Daylight Gate, which is based on real characters from the notorious Pendle witch trials from 1612. The story shows how politics, religion, magic and superstition were gruesomely intertwined following the Gunpowder Plot against James I - especially in Jeanette Winterson's home county of Lancashire.

Danish TV drama The Killing was an international hit - as was the jumper worn by its main character. Its director Birger Larsen is now making his UK debut with Murder, a crime drama set in Nottingham starring Stephen Dillane. Larsen and the co-creator of Murder, Robert Jones, talk about the series - and there's a revelation about that famous knitwear.

As the US presidential election grows nearer, musicians are entering the campaign. Both Ry Cooder's latest album Election Special, and new wave band Devo's new song Don't Roof Rack Me, Bro! (inspired by Mitt Romney's road trip with the family dog in a kennel strapped to the car roof) seem timed for maximum political impact. Music writer David Hepworth joins Mark to discuss what does and doesn't work in political songs, and whether they ever do more than preach to the converted.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2fy5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01lv5v9)
Childhood Obesity

This week's Report investigates the cases of children who are so overweight that their health is at risk.

As childhood obesity becomes more common, some experts are asking whether severely overweight children should be removed from their parents. Social workers, family lawyers and health workers tell reporter Helen Grady about cases where obesity has been a significant factor prompting local authorities to step in and take children into care.

Producer: Emma Rippon.


THU 20:30 In Business (b01lv5vc)
Coal Comfort

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel, and the dirtiest, despite talk of "clean coal". It is the single biggest emitter of the greenhouse gas CO2. But with reserves of over 100 years, much more than for oil and gas, it's here to stay. In the US, almost half of all electricity comes from coal, about double the rate of the UK. With China and India fuelling their economic growth with coal, demand will stay high. So will we have to live with the environmental consequences or can coal become green? Peter Day travels to the US to find out.
In North Dakota coal is mined in a modern, open pit operation using electric draglines. One of the biggest hopes for minimising the impact of coal burning on climate change is to capture and store the resulting carbon dioxide. Peter visits the Great Plains Synfuels plant in North Dakota which burns coal to turn it into synthetic natural gas and captures about half of the resulting CO2 to pipe it to Canada for underground storage in a depleted oil field. Adjacent to the Synfuels plant is a coal-fuelled electricity power station, Antelope Valley. Unlike their neighbours, Antelope Valley decided against carbon capture and storage because adapting the plant would cost hundreds of millions of dollars. But if even a place like Antelope Valley, that could benefit from their neighbour's pipeline and other infrastructure can't do CCS in an economically viable way, what chance is there for other coal-burning power plants? While coal remains king, its status is being challenged not just by those concerned about climate change, but also by other fossil fuels such as shale gas and new oil fields. How will coal fight back? Or does it not need to, as the world cannot do without it anyway?
Producer Arlene Gregorius
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


THU 21:00 James and the Giant Eagle (b010fc06)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 Fry's English Delight (b01lv4ng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01ln9q6)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01lv5vf)
National and international news and analysis, presented by Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01lv5vh)
The Greatcoat

Episode 4

4/5 A new ghost story from Helen Dunmore set during and after the Second World War, about the power of the past to imprint itself on the present, and possess it. In 1952, newly-married Isabel Carey and her husband Philip come to live in a small town close to a wartime bomber station. One night, when Philip is out on call, Isabel finds an RAF officer's greatcoat in a cupboard, and spreads it on the bed to keep her warm. In the middle of her dreams, she hears a knocking on the window, and outside is an RAF officer wearing the greatcoat, mouthing her name. When he comes to her door next day she finds herself slipping into another world, in which she and Alec, the RAF officer, know each other intimately, and the war is still going on outside. Alec takes her to the local airfield from which he flies a bomber in dangerous nightly raids over Germany, and it becomes clear that Isabel's hostile landlady knows more about what is going on, and what went on in the past, than she is willing to admit.

Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths.
Reader: Jasmine Hyde
Producer: Beth O'Dea.


THU 23:00 Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack (b012wjd5)
Series 2

Episode 2

The human chameleon's host of comic characters with a nonagenarian musical.

Multi-paced, one woman Fast Show showcasing the exceptional talent of Lucy Montgomery.

With:

Philip Pope
Sally Grace
Waen Shepherd
Natalie Walter

Written by Lucy Montgomery with additional material by Steven Burge, Jon Hunter, Fay Rusling and Barunka O'Shaughnessy.

Script Editor: Dan Tetsell

Music by Philip Pope

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2011.


THU 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgn07)
Cowards

Episode 1

Sketch show with a comic slant on human frailties. With Tom Basden, Stefan Golaszewski and Tim Key. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in November 2008.



FRIDAY 17 AUGUST 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01ln9r1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01lv4nk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9r3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01ln9r5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01ln9r7)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01ln9r9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01m40ys)
Short reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01lv7xr)
As the worst drought in 80 years grips the American Mid-West, Anna Hill is at the Missouri State Fair to talk to farmers who are struggling to cope with soaring temperatures and parched crops.

This programme is presented by Anna Hill and produced on location in USA by Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01lv7xt)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01lsts1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01lv7xw)
Kate Summerscale - Mrs Robinson's Disgrace

Episode 5

"The judges were presented with a singular case on Monday 14 June, a month after they had heard their first divorce suit. Henry Oliver Robinson, a civil engineer, was petitioning for the dissolution of his marriage on the grounds that his wife, Isabella, had committed adultery, and he submitted as evidence a diary in her hand."

These bare facts - the angry husband and the incriminating words - are, in the author's hands, shaped to tell a riveting story, that says much about the individuals involved and the social world they moved in...

The revealing of Isabella's diaries has caused much ado, and forced what will be an unforgettable trial
in a sweltering summer in London.

Reader Emma Fielding
Producer Duncan Minshull.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01lv7xy)
Camille Paglia on women in Hitchcock, Parveen Ahmed on Eid, and being blind on a bike.

Presented by Jenni Murray.

Controversial feminist Camille Paglia once said "if civilisation had been left to women, we'd all still be living in grass huts". This weekend, she brings her views to bear on the role of women in Hitchcock's films in a lecture at the BFI. She joins Jenni in advance to talk about some of her controversial views and to discuss Hitchcock's female characters.

In February, Russian punk feminist band - Pussy Riot - were arrested for singing an anti-Putin song in church. At 2pm today, a judge will sentence them for hooliganism. Many people outside Russia view Pussy Riot's protest as a non-crime in a secular country. Jenni takes a look at the growing worldwide campaign for justice for Pussy Riot.

This weekend Muslims around the world will be celebrating Eid - the festival that marks the end of Ramadan. Parveen Ahmed has five children between the ages of 24 and 6 and a large extended family. She also runs her own cookery school. She will be making the Eid-ul-Fitr meal for a very large number of people. She chats to Jenni about what the weekend holds in store her family.

Is there such a thing as "fun for all the family"? Not according to author and father-of-two Tim Lott who believes that each member of the family subtracts from the pleasure of the others. Rosie Millard on the other hand - a journalist and mother-of-four - has travelled the world with her children and lived to tell a happy tale. They discuss their differing views of 'family fun'.

Cathy Birchall is the first blind person ever to circle the world on a motorbike. She joins Jenni to talk about her trip which included desolate and dangerous mountain roads, difficult border crossings and an [inadvertent] overnight stay in a Kosovan brothel.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2g5v)
Oliver Emanuel - The Other One

Episode 5

By Oliver Emanuel.

Following a DNA test to establish paternity, a mother and father have discovered that Laura, their twelve-year-old daughter, isn't biologically related to either of them.

In the knowledge that the life she's been living should have belonged to someone else, Laura has spent the last few days tracking down her other family.

Now she and her parents prepare to meet the girl who was accidentally swapped with Laura at birth and the parents Laura should have had.

A tense and moving drama, inspired by a set of exceptional true events, that explores the nature of identity and the notion of family.

Director: Kirsty Williams.


FRI 11:00 I'm Suzy and I'm a Phobic (b01lv7y0)
Suzy Klein is highly phobic and she wants it to stop. She won't go in lifts, no matter how many steps she has to climb, and she hasn't been on the underground for twenty years. Suzy has been phobic of spiders (now recovered) and didn't go on a plane for three years (but now flies). Yet every time she beats a phobia, another one takes hold.

At the moment she has claustrophobia and, in this programme, Suzy attempts to conquer her fear, culminating in a trip on the London Underground. Along the way she'll meet fellow phobics and discover the impact the fear has on their everyday lives and behaviour.

As a fly on the wall in her therapy sessions, we hear Professor Paul Salkovskis attempt to help Suzy overcome her claustrophobia through Cognitive Behavioural Therapy - or CBT.

Other contributors include Dr James Lefanu of the Daily Telegraph, who warns Suzy that CBT is only successful in around 30% of cases and she will have to be "desensitised" by confronting her fear. Suzy also meets up with arachnophobic Phill Jupitus to discuss where fears come from.

Produced by David Morley
A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Beauty of Britain (b01lv7y2)
Series 3

Come Stay with Me

EPISODE ONE 'COME STAY WITH ME'

The outspoken care worker takes on her toughest job since coming to Britain when her mum comes to stay. Mrs Olonga is impressed by the UK's charity shops and her first ever butternut squash risotto but embarrasses her daughter with a headline-grabbing attack on elder care in the NHS. Can Beauty cope with being overshadowed, overworked and overdrawn?

CAST:
Jocelyn Esien ..... Beauty
Cecilia Noble ..... Mrs. Olonga
Felicity Montagu ..... Sally
Nicola Sanderson ..... Karen, Rt Hon. Susie
Catherine Shepherd ..... DOCTOR Wansborough-Jones
Margaret Cabourn-Smith ..... Various
Christopher Douglas ..... Security, News Anchor

Written by ..... Christopher Douglas and Nicola Sanderson
Produced by ... Tilusha Ghelani

ABOUT THE SERIES:

Beauty of Britain is about one woman's progress through a foreign country as she searches for personal fulfilment, a sense of belonging and a pair of Jimmy Choos she can walk to church in. Beauty works as a carer for the Featherdown Agency, which is based in Stoke. She sees herself as an inspiration to other African girls hoping to live the dream in Britain.

Jocelyn Jee Esien stars as Beauty. Guest stars include Maureen Lipman, Robert Bathurst, Anne Reid, Felicity Montagu and Paterson Joseph. It is written by Christopher Douglas (Ed Reardon's Week, Dave Podmore's World of Cricket) and Nicola Sanderson.

The series breaks the embarrassed silence about what happens to us when we get old and start to lose our faculties. It shows the process in all its chaotic, tragi-comedy but from the point of view of an economic migrant, Beauty, whose Southern African Shona background has taught her to respects age. Beauty sees Britain at its best, its worst and sometimes without its clothes on running the wrong way down the M6 with a toy dog shouting 'Come on!'.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01lv7y4)
Tickets for the Paralympics, sport for older people and housing regeneration

The London Paralympics are expected to sell out for the first time in their history. The organising committee is making contingency tickets available. We look at what's on offer for anyone who's left it late and still wants to experience something of the games.

Hundreds of homes in the shadow of Liverpool's Anfield Stadium have been earmarked for demolition for more than a decade. Some people have left, some homeowners refused to sell and others have given up waiting for improvements. We'll hear a special report on their future.

Experts have gathered in Glasgow to discuss the latest research on ageing and physical activity. They hope the Olympics will inspire the over-70s to take up competitive sport. Is it a realistic idea? Organisers say elderly people are frailer than they need to be and should be competing, not just exercising.

Presenter: Nick Ravenscroft
Producer: Joel Moors.


FRI 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01lv7y6)
Amartya Sen

The New Elizabethans: Amartya Sen the Nobel-winning laureate known as the Mother Theresa of economics for his work understanding and fighting the causes of poverty.

Best known for his work on the causes of famine, his book Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation, argued that famine occurs not only from a lack of food, but from inequalities built into mechanisms for distributing food. Sen also helped to create the United Nations Human Development Index which is used to rank countries by standard of living or quality of life.

Now working as Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University, he began at the tender age of twenty-three by setting up a new economics department at Jadavpur University in Calcutta, but he has also held professorships at Delhi University, the London School of Economics and the University of Oxford.

When in 1998 he was appointed Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, he became the first Asian academic to head an Oxbridge college. In the same year he received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his work in welfare economics.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Clare Walker.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01ln9rc)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01lv7y8)
National and international news presented by Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Generation E (b01lv7yb)
Series 2

Poland's Underground Economy

As the economic crisis deepens and schisms emerge, Lucy Ash travels across Europe to meet the continent's next generation, who face an uncertain future. She explores the challenges they face and the ways in which they are meeting them.

In the final programme of the series, Lucy Ash visits Katowice, in south east Poland, where young people are going underground, literally down re-opened coal mines because there are few other jobs available, and legally, as Lucy discovers when she speaks to young entrepreneurs who are resorting to illicit means because they say the country's taxes are crippling them.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01lv5v5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b0132l72)
Georges Simenon - The Other Simenon

The Cat

Georges Simenon, best known for Maigret, published scores of other novels, often tough, gripping and psychologically-penetrating stories like this black comedy about a couple whose marriage has foundered. Conversation between Emile and Marguerite has given way to a mute exchange of vicious notes, a shared life to separate beds and separate larders. Meanwhile the sudden deaths of two cherished family pets - a poisoned cat and a murdered parrot - block all attempts at reconciliation. Emile, at the end of his tether, packs his bags and chooses freedom - but he quickly makes a discovery that, even when affection has gone, a powerful bond still unites a man and his wife. Dramatised by Ronald Frame.

Producer/director Bruce Young.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01lv7yg)
Hazlemere

Eric Robson visits Nicholas Parsons in his Buckinghamshire garden while Anne Swithinbank visits the Jodrell Laboratory at Kew Gardens to investigate the use of biological controls in the greenhouse.

Questions in the programme:
Q. I am quite successful growing courgettes from seed. However, some of my smaller fruit are turning yellow at the tip. Why is this?
Wet weather will cause the courgette flowers to rot. Next time you experience a really wet summer, try twisting off the flowers before they start to rot.

Q. I'm looking to reduce an area of scrub, mainly bramble, nettle etc and replace it with shrubs to attract bees. Which shrubs would the panel recommend?
First, be sure to clear the bramble roots well.

Planting suggestions: Dog roses, Ivy (for off-season flowering) and hawthorne.

Q. What is the secret of getting Crocosmia and Agapanthus to flower?
Agapanthus would need over-wintering indoors, ideally. Failing that, pot them up in the winter and insulate with fleece and bubblewrap. In spring, make sure they are exposed to adequate levels of sunlight.

Q. Is there a selective weedkiller which would kill the moss and weeds in my lawn but spare my violets?
Most lawn weedkillers target all broad-leaved plants, including violets. You would be better off manually digging up the weeds.

Q. How should Nicolas Parsons prune his Clematis 'Nelly Moser'?
In early spring, cut back to top-most large buds. This will give you the earliest bloom.

Q. What can I plant in my 6-inch bed - clay soil, shady and windy - located between my house wall and five-foot fence?
Try bedding plants in troughs.
Tolmiea menziesii or 'Piggyback plant'
New Guinea Impatiens
Heuchera

Produced by Amy Racs & Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Gotta Dance! (b01lv7yj)
The Wheeled Platform

The legendary Gene Kelly was born a hundred years ago this year.
To mark this anniversary, these stories celebrate the world of dance and its power to inspire and attract.

'The Wheeled Platform' by Hannah McGill.
In this tale, the lure of dance proves impossible to ignore for one woman who seems to have it all.

Read by Gabriel Quigley.

Produced by Patricia Hitchcock.

Hannah McGill has worked as a music, film and television critic, and
from 2006 to 2012 she was the Artistic Director of the Edinburgh
International Film Festival. She still lives in Edinburgh where she
does freelance writing, editing and teaching.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01lv7yl)
Sid Waddell, Helen Gurley Brown, Lord Morris of Manchester, Dr Aubrey Leatham and Carlo Rambaldi

Matthew Bannister on

The Geordie darts commentator Sid Waddell who drew on his classical education when describing the pub sport

Helen Gurley Brown the editor of Cosmopolitan magazine who encouraged women to enjoy sex and celebrate their achievements in the workplace

Lord Morris of Manchester, who as the Labour MP Alf Morris campaigned tirelessly for the rights of disabled people.

Carlo Rambaldi the movie special effects artist who gave life to ET and the monster in Alien.

And Dr Aubrey Leatham, the eccentric cardiologist who introduced heart pacemakers to the UK and once did his ward round on roller skates.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b01lv7yn)
The great playing field sell off?

Playing the fields

The Olympics were supposed to inspire a generation to take up sport. No wonder, then, that people are depressed about the government's record of selling off playing fields. But what do the numbers really tell us?

RIP RPI?

We explain why a weird flaw in the way the retail price index (a key inflation measure) is calculated is dry and technical - but far more important than you might think.

David's line

Our final listener question for TV's Yan Wong: If Solomon - son of King David - had about a thousand wives and concubines, as the Bible says, wouldn't it be the case that by the time of Jesus - many generations later - pretty much everyone in Israel could claim to be a descendant of King David?

20mph roads

It was reported recently that the number of people killed or injured on 20mph roads has risen by nearly a quarter. Does that mean 20mph roads are less safe than we thought? Or is there another explanation?

Thinking in Numbers

On More or Less we think numbers help us to understand the world. But for Daniel Tammet, they're a lot more important than that. For him, numbers don't just help him to understand the real world. They're his ticket to being a part of it. We've been talking to Daniel - a mathematical savant - about his new book, "Thinking in Numbers".

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Richard Knight.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01lv7yq)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01ln9rf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Chain Reaction (b01lv7ys)
Series 8

Derren Brown interviews Tim Minchin

Last week's interviewee, Illusionist Derren Brown, dispenses with the trickery and gets inside the mind of Tim Minchin by cleverly asking him some questions then listening to the answers. They talk beliefs, magic, music and Minchin.

Producer ..... Carl Cooper

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01lv7yv)
The pickers' party is in full flow. Adam and Ian help to save Jennifer's blushes by trying to block the view of Ruairi's ornate dog sculpture from the scathing glances of some of the more judgemental guests.
Adam isn't really in party mood. He can't conceal his unease at having Pawel so close at hand. Sensing this, Pawel grabs a moment to talk to him. He assures Adam he won't cause any trouble, while hinting he would like Adam to consider revisiting their affair.
Vicky is struggling to come to terms with the high probability of the baby having Down's syndrome, and fears the impact it will have on Mike. She can't seem to find the right time to talk about it, especially as Mike is so busy with the extra work on the milk round.
When she finally summons up the resolve to tell him, her fears prove to be well-founded. She tries to assure Mike that there's still one further test. It doesn't mean anything is for certain. But Mike's unsure of how he will cope with the added stress. It was going to be hard enough being a dad at his age. But now..


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01lv7yx)
Philippa Gregory, The Last Weekend, Dirty Dancing at 25

With Kirsty Lang.

Philippa Gregory discusses her latest novel on the Plantagenets. The Kingmaker's Daughter focuses on Anne Neville, daughter of 15th century power magnate the Earl Of Warwick. As a girl, Anne is used as a pawn in her father's political battles. After his death she chooses to marry the handsome and ambitious Duke of Gloucester, the future King Richard III.

Rupert Penry-Jones and Shaun Evans star in The Last Weekend, a TV adaptation of Blake Morrison's novel about male jealousy. Two couples spend the weekend in a remote holiday cottage, and the tension mounts as the men return to a 20 year old bet, with horrifying consequences. Rachel Cooke reviews.

Jorge Amado, one of Brazil's most successful and prolific novelists, was born in August 1912, and enjoyed a writing career spanning more than 60 years. Kirsty explores Amado's work with Louis de Bernieres, whose Latin American trilogy predated the success of Captain Corelli's Mandolin, JP Cuenca, who recently featured on Granta's list of the best young Brazilian novelists, and writer Benjamin Moser.

The film Dirty Dancing premiered in New York 25 years ago today. This coming-of-age drama, set in 1963 and starring Jennifer Grey as Baby and Patrick Swayze as Johnny, became an international hit, spawning a successful soundtrack album, sequel and stage musical. Writer Zoe Williams and broadcaster Paul Gambaccini consider the film's continuing appeal.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01m2g5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01lv7yz)
Bourne End, Buckinghamshire

Shaun Ley chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Bourne End, Buckinghamshire with panellists Simon Heffer of the Daily Mail; Professor Susan Greenfield CBE of Oxford University; Debbie Bannigan of the drug and alcohol recovery charity Swanswell; and Sir David Bell, vice chancellor of Reading University and former Chief Inspector of Schools.

Producer: Miles Warde.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01lv7z1)
Sherlock Holmes and the Romance of Reason

John Gray reflects on the enduring appeal of Sherlock Holmes at a time when we've lost confidence in the power of reason alone to solve problems. "Seeming to find order in the chaos of events by using purely rational methods, he actually demonstrates the enduring power of magic."
Producer:
Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b013r8fd)
Winston Graham - Marnie

It's 1961 and blonde and stunning Marnie Elmer poses as a secretary in order to steal from her employers and fund her mother's existence in Torquay. But she's yet to meet handsome company director, Mark Rutland, whose pursuit of her will ultimately lead to her downfall.

Winston Graham is probably best known for his "Poldark" series, but also wrote a number of taut thrillers, of which "Marnie" (written in 1961) may be the best remembered - having been filmed by Alfred Hitchcock in the early 1960s. This new adaptation for radio returns to the heart of the book itself.

Dramatised for radio by Shaun McKenna

Director: Marion Nancarrow

The dramatist, Shaun McKenna's, many radio credits include "The Complete Smiley", "The Postman Always Rings Twice", "The Cry of the Owl" and "East of Eden".


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01ln9rh)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01lv87j)
The Pussy Riot band members are sentenced to two years in prison, we discuss the issues raised.

Gabriel Gatehouse reports from the Turkey/Syria border

Delivering the post when you're not at home

All that and more with Ritula Shah at 10pm.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01lv87l)
The Greatcoat

Episode 5

5/5 A new ghost story from Helen Dunmore set during and after the Second World War, about the power of the past to imprint itself on the present, and possess it. In 1952, newly-married Isabel Carey and her husband Philip come to live in a small town close to a wartime bomber station. One night, when Philip is out on call, Isabel finds an RAF officer's greatcoat in a cupboard, and spreads it on the bed to keep her warm. In the middle of her dreams, she hears a knocking on the window. Outside is an RAF officer wearing the greatcoat, and mouthing her name. When he comes to her door next day she finds herself slipping into another world, in which she and Alec, the RAF officer, know each other intimately, and the war is still going on outside. Alec takes her to the local airfield from which he flies a bomber in dangerous nightly raids over Germany. It becomes clear that Isabel's hostile landlady knows more about what is going on, and what went on in the past, than she is willing to admit. Secrets are revealed in a shattering conclusion as past and present collide.

Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths.
Reader: Jasmine Hyde
Producer: Beth O'Dea.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b01lt2f3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 4 Extra Comedy Club (b01mgmtw)
On the Hour

Episode 1

The Tube system goes berserk, an earthquake in Corinth and the anniversary of space. Chris Morris fronts the news satire. Part of Radio 4 Extra's Comedy Club, originally broadcast on Radio 4 in May 1992.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01lswcr)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01lswcr)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01m2fgm)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01m2fgm)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01m2fmk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01m2fmk)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01m2fy5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01m2fy5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01m2g5v)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01m2g5v)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 MON (b01mgmxq)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 TUE (b01mgmy9)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 WED (b01mgmyt)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 THU (b01mgn07)

4 Extra Comedy Club 23:30 FRI (b01mgmtw)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01ljwsn)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01lv7z1)

A Sound British Adventure 11:30 TUE (b01lsyjg)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b00lyf67)

Amanda Vickery on... Men 09:00 MON (b01lswch)

Amanda Vickery on... Men 21:30 MON (b01lswch)

An Outcast of the Islands: Lady Grange 16:30 SUN (b01lstsf)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01lsqkg)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01ljwsl)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01lv7yz)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01lsr14)

Asian Weddings: Something Gold, Nothing Borrowed, Everything New 11:00 MON (b01h2c3n)

Beauty of Britain 11:30 FRI (b01lv7y2)

Before They Were Famous 23:15 WED (b01lv38v)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01lstrj)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01lstrj)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b01lswv4)

Bleak Expectations 11:30 MON (b00w7dnw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01lswvl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01lt2vs)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01lv38n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01lv5vh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01lv87l)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01ljwlx)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01lswcm)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01lswcm)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01lsyjb)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01lsyjb)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01lt45m)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01lt45m)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01lv4nk)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01lv4nk)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01lv7xw)

Brian Gulliver's Travels 11:30 WED (b01lz1cj)

Brief Lives 14:15 TUE (b01lsyrf)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01lstrx)

Chain Reaction 12:30 SAT (b01ljwn3)

Chain Reaction 18:30 FRI (b01lv7ys)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01lh971)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01lsts9)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b01lsyrk)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01lsyrk)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b01ljl54)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b01lv4np)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01lsts1)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01lsts1)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00t7knw)

Drama 14:15 WED (b012r6v6)

Drama 14:15 THU (b012wxy2)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b0132l72)

Face the Facts 21:00 SUN (b01lhj0x)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 THU (b010m2f6)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01lsqk0)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01lstw0)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01lsyj2)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01lt45f)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01lv4n8)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01lv7xr)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01lhgyn)

Fixing Broken Banking 12:00 SAT (b01lsqkd)

Fixing Broken Banking 15:00 WED (b01lsqkd)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01lv38j)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01lsqkb)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01lswvd)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01lt2vg)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01lv26s)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01lv5v7)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01lv7yx)

Fry's English Delight 09:00 THU (b01lv4ng)

Fry's English Delight 21:30 THU (b01lv4ng)

Game Changer: 20 Years of the Premier League 20:00 TUE (b01lt2vj)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01ljwmp)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01lv7yg)

Generation E 13:45 MON (b01lswtw)

Generation E 13:45 TUE (b01lsyrc)

Generation E 13:45 WED (b01lv26g)

Generation E 13:45 THU (b01lv4p4)

Generation E 13:45 FRI (b01lv7yb)

Gotta Dance! 15:45 FRI (b01lv7yj)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b01lt2f3)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b01lt2f3)

Head to Head 09:30 MON (b01lswck)

I'm Suzy and I'm a Phobic 11:00 FRI (b01lv7y0)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b01ljl5z)

In Business 20:30 THU (b01lv5vc)

In Living Memory 11:00 WED (b01lt4b6)

In Pursuit of Dignity 20:00 WED (b01lv26v)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01lt2vl)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01lt2vn)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01lt2vn)

James and the Giant Eagle 11:00 TUE (b010fc06)

James and the Giant Eagle 21:00 THU (b010fc06)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01lhbgx)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b01lswv8)

Kevin Eldon Will See You Now 23:00 TUE (b01lt2vv)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01ljwmv)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01lv7yl)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b01lstrn)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01lsqkn)

Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack 23:00 THU (b012wjd5)

Making Tracks 15:30 SAT (b01lhgw0)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01l8n7k)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01lv5v1)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01ljrjl)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01ln9gy)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01ln9k0)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01ln9lg)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01ln9mv)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01ln9pq)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01ln9r1)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b01ljwmx)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b01lv7yn)

Mr Blue Sky 18:30 TUE (b01hf12z)

My Heart Is in the East 23:30 SAT (b01lh975)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01ljrl2)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01ln9h6)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01ln9k8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01ln9lq)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01ln9n5)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01ln9pz)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01ln9r9)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01ln9h8)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01ljrmg)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01ln9hd)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01ln9hj)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01ljrqk)

News 13:00 SAT (b01ljrpj)

Octavia 20:00 MON (b01lswvg)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b01lsyj8)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01lstsc)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01lstsc)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01ljl5j)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01lv4p6)

Original Shorts 19:45 SUN (b00vhg8x)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01lsqkl)

PM 17:00 MON (b01lswv6)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01lt2f5)

PM 17:00 WED (b01lv26n)

PM 17:00 THU (b01lv5v3)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01lv7yq)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01lstsh)

Political Animals 23:00 WED (b01lv38q)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01ljwty)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01lstvy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01m40xt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01m40y6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01m40yh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01m40ys)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b01lsqkq)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01lsqkq)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01lsqkq)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b01lhbgn)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b01lswv0)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01lstrs)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01lstrs)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01lstrs)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00t0wf5)

Saturday Drama 21:00 FRI (b013r8fd)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01lsqk4)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01lsqks)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01ljrjq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01ln9h2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01ln9k4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01ln9ll)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01ln9n1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01ln9pv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01ln9r5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01ljrjn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01ljrk2)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01ljrpl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01ln9h0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01ln9h4)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01ln9hn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01ln9k2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01ln9k6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01ln9lj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01ln9ln)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01ln9mx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01ln9n3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01ln9ps)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01ln9px)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01ln9r3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01ln9r7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01ljrpq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01ln9hs)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01ln9kg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01ln9lv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01ln9nd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01ln9q4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01ln9rf)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01lstrl)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01lstrl)

Steptoe and Son... and Sons 11:30 THU (b01lv4ns)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01lstrv)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01lstrq)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01lstrz)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01lstsk)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01lstsk)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01lswvb)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01lswvb)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01lt2f7)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01lt2f7)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01lv26q)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01lv26q)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01lv5v5)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01lv5v5)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01lv7yv)

The Bricklayer's Lament 10:30 SAT (b01lsqk6)

The EU Debate 22:15 SAT (b01ljk52)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01ljl5l)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01lv5tz)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01lsts3)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01lsts3)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b01lsqk8)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b01lsyj6)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b01lsyj6)

The Listening Project 09:30 WED (b01gnjgt)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01lv26l)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 MON (b01lswcy)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 TUE (b01lsyjl)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 WED (b01lt4bb)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 THU (b01lv4nz)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 FRI (b01lv7y6)

The Philosopher's Arms 15:00 TUE (b01lsyrh)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01lv5v9)

The Songs of Milne 13:30 SUN (b01jwk3f)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01lsts5)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01lswvj)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01lt2vq)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01lv38l)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01lv5vf)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01lv87j)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01ljk4r)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01lv26j)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01lsqk2)

Today 06:00 MON (b01lstw2)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01lsyj4)

Today 06:00 WED (b01lt45h)

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