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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 07 JULY 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01kblsb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01kbltc)
The Old Ways

Episode 5

"Humans are like animals and like all animals we leave tracks as we walk. Pilgrim paths, green roads, drove roads, corpse roads, trods, leys, dykes, drongs, sarns, snickets, holloways, bostles, shutes, driftways, lichways, ridings, halterpaths, cartways, carneys, causeways, herepaths."

Author Robert Macfarlane follows some ancient routes in the UK and overseas. As well as having adventures on the way - as you do on foot - he ponders the creation of old paths, the people who trod them, and how they resonate in today's landscapes.

After various journeys, it's back to the chalk paths for Robert Macfarlane and a ghostly encounter is in store..

Reader Dan Stevens.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01kblsd)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01kblsg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01kblsj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01kblsl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01kbm3p)
With the Rev. Peter Baker.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01kbm3r)
'The idea of fighting the class war seems remote'. One listener, a Welfare Rights Adviser and self-described 'poor person's accountant' explains why he thinks the benefits debate is all wrong, and why he supports Jimmy Carr's tax arrangements. Stephanie Flanders, the BBC's Economics Editor, takes a break from explaining quantitative easing to read our bulletin of listeners' news. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01kblsn)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01kblsq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01kblcs)
Eels

Helen Mark is in Gloucestershire to find out more about one of our most fascinating creatures, the eel, and hear why efforts are being made to save this endangered species.
When eels arrive in the UK as tiny babies, called elvers, they do so at the end of an exhausting 4,000-mile marathon swim from the Sargasso Sea where they have spawned. For generations, their arrival was greeted with much anticipation by fishermen on the Rivers Severn and Wye where they were caught at night and often used in dishes and delicacies.
But the eel is in trouble and has been placed on the Red List of Fish to Avoid by the Marine Conservation Society who class it as critically endangered. However, others believe that the decline in the number of eels is not just a result of over-fishing but is also due to the way in which rivers are managed and flood defences are erected, so blocking the eels migratory route, and that by leaving them to their own defences the eels' fate will be sealed.
Helen Mark meets some of the people involved with trying to save this precious and mysterious creature including fisherman Richard Cook who has a life-long passion for eels and who is now taking tanks of eels into schools to teach the children who look after them for a few weeks about the importance of the fish, our rivers and the environment . Eventually, the children will release the eels back into the river as part of a restocking project.
Helen also hears from Bernadette Clarke of the Marine Conservation Society about the reasons why they felt it was important that eels should be classed as critically endangered and placed on the Red List. And Helen meets Andrew Kerr of the Sustainable Eel Group which is working to devise a recovery plan to protect and preserve the eel.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01kjgnq)
Farming Today This Week

Charlotte Smith asks if landowners are cashing in on Britain's forests and woodlands.
Whilst 18% of England's forests are publicly owned, they make up 60% of total timber production. And as only half of privately owned woodlands are managed, could landowners be missing out on a multimillion pound investment?
Charlotte meets one farmer in Staffordshire who's bucked the trend by leaving dairy farming for a career in managing woodlands.

Following the recommendations by the Independent Panel of Forestry and huge public outcry, the government has confirmed its u-turn on the decision to sell off public owned forests. But how difficult is it to manage public access, using woodlands for leisure and commercial activities? And is the government planning to invest and offer more financial support to potential foresters?

Farming Today speak to Caroline Spelman, Environment Secretary and Bishop of Liverpool, the Right Reverend James Jones on their recommendations for the future of forestry.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Clare Freeman in Birmingham.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01kblss)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01kjgns)
0735
Torrential rain has been causing disruption as a month's rain fell in parts of the UK within one day yesterday. The number of flood warnings - meaning flooding is expected - reached more than 60 in England, and 145 flood alerts were in place across the UK last night. Pete Fox from the Environment Agency surveys the extent of the flooding.

0753
The government is expected to outline plans to cap the cost of social care in England. Simon Gillespie, chairman of the Care and Support Alliance, comments on the news.

0810
The response to the false terror alert on a bus on the M6 has been seen as an over-reaction on the part of police and security services. Was it a heavy handed response from police getting too twitchy in the run up to the Olympics? Or given that there were other arrests this week when weapons were found in a car - was it entirely proportional? Dr Tim Brain is a former chief constable of Gloucestershire. Jodie Blackstock is from the civil rights group Justice.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01kjgnv)
Sian Williams & Richard Coles with commentator and classicist Mary Beard; Namira Salim who's set to be one of the world's first space tourists; Phillippa Yaa De Villiers who was born mixed-race but brought up as white in apartheid South Africa; listener Owen Ephraim who worked with Alan Turing at Bletchley Park; John McCarthy goes biking with travel writer Ted Simon; JP Devlin meets cave collector Jim Gardner; listener Sally Townsend explains why a red fox fur coat is the thing about her; and actress and singer Olivia Newton John shares her Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 10:30 Britain in a Box (b01kjgnx)
Series 5

Grandstand

Paul Jackson presents a further edition of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

Programme 2. Grandstand - in a programme recorded before the London Olympics, Paul traces the origins of the show that for nearly 50 years changed our relationship to sport, brought constant innovation to live TV coverage, and gave us not only David Coleman and Frank Bough but also Des Lynam.

And with the help of the said Lynam, as well as former BBC 1 controllers Sir Paul Fox and Alan Hart, former and current Heads of Sport Jonathan Martin and Barbara Slater, Paul Jackson not only traces the development of Grandstand but also assesses it's legacy and asks whether the BBC is in danger of taking its eye off the sporting ball.

Producers: Oliver Julian & Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01kjgnz)
George Parker of The Financial Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
David Cameron made his views on Europe plain this week but was accused of pandering to Eurosceptic backbenchers, like Andrea Leadsom a leading light in the Conservative Fresh Start group who want to re-negotiate parts of the EU treaty. She talks to Hannes Swoboda leader of the Socialist group in the European parliament opposed to the idea.
Liberal Democrat MP David Laws an ex banker, and Lord Levene a former Mayor of the City of London, consider the implications of the Barclays Libor scandal.
And what parliamentary tactics will be used by opponents of the House of Lords Reform Bill? Bernard Jenkin a former Maastricht rebel, Lord Foulkes, and champion filibusterer Andrew Dismore give examples.

The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01kjgp3)
Natasha Breed on how the population of Kenya's expanding fast, urban areas are eating up the countryside. And it's proving disastrous and sometimes fatal for the country's wildlife.

A weird fungus which grows out of the heads of caterpillars is being harvested in parts of the Himalayas. Craig Jeffrey, who's been investigating, says it's proving a valuable cash crop for some of the mountain villagers.

Latvia has the fastest-growing economy in Europe. Damien McGuinness has been to the capital Riga to see how they've made austerity cool.

The Nigerian president's been speaking of the importance of family planning. The BBC's Jane Dreaper's been to a part of his country where having seven children is far from unusual.

And Anna Horsbrugh Porter is one of the BBC World Service staff who're leaving their headquarters in London, Bush House in the Strand. She's been talking to colleagues about a much-loved broadcasting institution.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01kjgp5)
On Money Box with Paul Lewis:

If you are thinking of buying an annuity do not expect very much. Even if you have £100,000 the current top rate for a fixed annuity at 65 is barely £6000 for a man and £5750 pounds for a woman - and that will not rise with inflation. To index link your retirement income you can take 40 per cent off. Annuity rates have fallen by more than a quarter in four years. Is Quantitative Easing - aka printing money - to blame? If so magicking another 50 billion quid out of thin air can only make things worse. Dean Mirfin of Key Retirement Solutions speaks to the programme.

Your car springs a fuel leak on the motorway. The emergency services clean it up. A Highways Agency 4x4 arrives and sprinkles some absorbent powder on the wet patch. Then sends you a bill for more than three hundred pounds which your insurer will not pay. Find out why those helpful Highways Agency traffic officers, who are in fact contractors hired by the Agency, may charge you for their time - there and back. Paul Watters from the AA joins the programme and explains his concerns.

Timeshares - they may have seemed like a great idea 10 or 20 years ago but turn the clock forward and many elderly owners are finding themselves stuck paying hundreds, even thousands in maintenance payments for properties they don't want and can't get rid of. Mary and her husband are both in their 80s and have two timeshares in Scotland. Despite not being well enough to use the properties for more than a decade they are still stuck paying more than 2500 a year in fees. So just what have you signed up for and is it for life? Paul Gardner Bougaard from the timeshare industry, the Resort Development Organisation, and solicitor David Greene from Edwin&Co join Paul Lewis to explain all.

The rights of couples who live together without being married were clarified this week in the Supreme Court. The judgment applies only in Scotland where a six year old Act gives individuals the right to claim for any economic disadvantage they suffered during the relationship. Mrs Gow moved in with Mr Grant in 2003. He owned the house they lived in and she sold her Edinburgh flat, spending the proceeds on their joint activities. After five years they parted and she moved into rented accommodation. If she had kept her flat it would have gained more than £30,000 in value. She wanted that disadvantage paid by Mr Grant but the appeal court rejected her claim. On Tuesday the Supreme Court overturned that judgement awarding her £39,500.

John Fotheringham from Edinbugh based solicitors Lindsays and Joanne Edwards, partner at Manches and vice-chair of the family law body Resolution outline the issues and differences in law on cohabiting.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b01kbm11)
Series 37

Episode 5

A Week of Splits: in the week that David Cameron suggested he might have a referendum on whether the UK should break from Europe, Katie Holmes announced her split from Tom Cruise, and scientists at CERN announced the discovery of a Higgs-like Boson, Jon Holmes, Holly Walsh, Mitch Benn and Pippa Evans join Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis for a sideways glance at this week's big stories. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01kblsv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01kblsx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01kbm17)
Darton, South Yorkshire

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Darton College, Barnsley, South Yorkshire.
On the panel this week: Conservative MEP for the South East of England DANIEL HANNAN; Shadow Health Minister, DIANE ABBOTT; Director of Policy Exchange, NEIL O'BRIEN and Priest-in-charge at St Mary's Newington, south London and former canon chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral, GILES FRASER.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01kjgp7)
Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The topics discussed on Any Questions? were: Bob Diamond's pay, cuts to the army, women bishops, children going hungry and Andy Murray.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01kjgp9)
The Hound of the Baskervilles

When Sherlock Holmes hears the strange tale of the Hound of the Baskervilles, he despatches Watson to Dartmoor to begin solving the mystery. Hostile yokels, alarming acquaintances, an escaped murderer and the deadly Grimpen Mire conspire to make Watson more baffled than ever, until Holmes turns up in disguise to take over the investigation.

Peepolykus Theatre Company play fast and loose with Conan Doyle, including a Spanish Holmes, in a comic take on this classic yarn, recorded in front of a live audience in Bristol earlier this year.

Adapted from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's original story by Steven Canny & John Nicholson
Directed by Alison Hindell

Recorded at Queen Elizabeth's Hospital School Theatre, Bristol, for Radio 4's More Than Words Festival.
Peepolykus Theatre Company's previous stage productions include The Hound of the Baskervilles, Spyski and, for Radio 4, Marley Was Dead.


SAT 15:30 Changing My Voice (b01k9vh0)
Christopher Gabbitas asks why singers sometimes have to change the pitch of their voice. How do they learn to perform in another register and what effect does the change have?

Christopher Gabbitas is a member of the vocal group the King's Singers. He originally began his career as a bass, able to sing the lowest notes with ease. But when he auditioned for the group,the vacancy was for the higher baritone voice and he had to learn to sing in that new range.

Some classical singers have to change their voice because of the effects of ageing. If they've been a high soprano perhaps they now have problems hitting the top notes and may decide to pursue a career in the lower mezzo range. Men, as in the recent case of the celebrated tenor Plácido Domingo, may decide to move from being a tenor to singing baritone.

Other singers discover that, although they may have begun in one register, they are more suited to another. The opera singer Grace Bumbry began her career as a low soprano but discovered that she was able to sing higher and changed - to huge critical acclaim.

And there are cases of injury to the vocal chords, which can also cause a singer to have to change register.

But it's not easy to change your voice. Although it can prolong a singer's performing life, changing pitch can be an unnerving process. There are new techniques to learn. The ear has literally to be retuned and the brain rewired to adapt to a new vocal range. And the way performers often think of themselves in stereotypes- a romantic tenor for example, or a coloratura soprano- has to be revised.

In this feature, Christopher goes on a personal exploration of the art of voice changing. He examines his own experiences and talks to other singers who have switched ranges, to see how fundamental such shifts can be. Interviewees include the singers Grace Bumbry and Rosalind Plowright.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01kjgpc)
Julie Walters. Mitch Winehouse. Fifty Shades of Grey

Julie Walters back on stage at the National Theatre. The publishing phenomena Fifty Shades of Grey. Mitch Winehouse on Amy his daughter. Where are all the lesbians? asks the cover of this month's Tatler magazine.
Would a woman at the helm of Barclays make it less risk averse? Your stories of what you did on the day your ex husband married someone else. Plus music from Mary Chapin Carpenter
Highlights from the Woman's Hour week. Presented by Jane Garvey.
Editor Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01kjgpf)
Saturday PM

The day's top news stories, with sports headlines with Paddy O'Connell.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01kbld9)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan and his executive guests discuss the evolution and hierarchy of brands. Who has the upper hand in the many battles being fought between big consumer brands and shops' own-labels? They also consider consumer tastes - do their own customers have good taste, or do they just buy what they're given?

Joining Evan in the studio are Justin King, chief executive of supermarket chain Sainsbury's; Cecile Bonnefond, chief executive of French champagne house Piper-Heidsieck; Geoff Cooper, chief executive of builders merchant Travis Perkins.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01kblsz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01kblt1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01kblt3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01kjgpl)
Neil Sedaka, Helena Kennedy QC, Sharon Horgan and Luke Goss

Clive finds his way to Amarillo with Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter Neil Sedaka. For over 50 years, he has written, performed and produced countless songs, both for himself and other artists. Clive talks to Neil about what inspired him to pen such hits as 'Breaking Up Is Hard To Do'and his plans for a UK tour in October.

Clive cross examines one of Britain's most distinguished lawyers, Helena Kennedy QC, about her career championing civil liberties and promoting human rights. Helena's Radio 4 series 'Capital Justice' examines the profound and powerful relationship between our financial and legal systems; capital and the law; freedom and justice. 'Capital Justice' starts Monday 9th July at 09.30.

Bonafide 'Brosette' Emma Freud talks to actor Luke Goss about finding fame with twin brother Matt in 80's pop trio Bros. Luke swapped pop hits for movie hits, starring in action-packed blockbusters such as 'Hellboy 2'. In his latest film he stars as ruthless Romanian assassin Victor who, betrayed by gangsters, escapes to London where he's embroiled in a gangland power struggle. 'Interview With A Hitman' opens in cinemas on Friday 17th August.

Clive's Pulling comic, actress, screenwriter and Free Agent Sharon Horgan, writer and star of BBC 3's 'Dead Boss'. Sharon plays Helen Stephens, a woman falsely imprisoned for murdering her boss. Whilst Helen's sure it's only a matter of time before the mistake is rectified, it appears others are conspiring to keep her behind bars. The final part of 'Dead Boss' is on Thursday 12 July at 22.30.

Music from Cardiff-based singer-songwriter Cate Le Bon, who performs 'Fold The Cloth' from her album 'CYRK'. And rising star Lianne La Havas performs 'Gone' from her album 'Is Your Love Big Enough?'

Producer Jane Thurlow.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b01kjgx7)
Series 12

A Delicate Lie

A Delicate Lie
by Lemn Sissay

One of the Official Poets at the London Olympics and Associate Artist at the South Bank centre, Lemn Sissay writes this week's short drama. Set during a tennis match at Wimbledon two Bankers want to enjoy a day out at Centre Court and forget the recent troubles. One banker is determined not to talk shop, but underneath the seething tension of their predicament boils.

Cast

Jonathan Keeble
Conrad Nelson
Charlie De'Ath

PRODUCER Pauline Harris.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01kjgx9)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests writers Susan Jeffreys and Alex Preston and historian Kathryn Hughes review the week's cultural highlights.

Samantha Spiro stars as Katherina and Simon Paisley Day is Petruchio in Toby Frow's exuberant production of The Taming of the Shrew at the Globe Theatre in London.

If This Is Home is Stuart Evers' first novel and centres around Mark - a young man desperate to get out of the small Cheshire town he grew up in. He moves to the US and adopts a completely new identity, but feels impelled to return 12 years later to try to make sense of what happened just before he left.

Daniel Nettheim's film The Hunter stars Willem Dafoe as a mercenary who is hired by a bio-tech company to hunt down a Tasmanian tiger - a marsupial presumed to be extinct - in the mountains of the Australian island state.

West Wing writer Aaron Sorkin returns to television after the success of his film The Social Network with a new series - The Newsroom. Jeff Daniels plays Will McAvoy - a celebrity news anchor in trouble after an intemperate outburst. Mackenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer) is hired to produce his new show and has a strong streak of idealism - but the two have some history.

Designing 007: 50 Years of Bond Style at the Barbican Gallery in London celebrates the behind-the-scenes talent that has made the Bond films such a popular and good-looking franchise for half a century.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01kjgxc)
The Night of the Long Knives

Fifty years ago, Harold Macmillan instigated a purge that shocked British politics to its core. It was the most dramatic government reshuffle in modern history. In one evening he sacked seven members of his Cabinet including his Chancellor of the Exchequer, Selwyn Lloyd. It was meant to be a show of strength but to everyone else, it was a catastrophic admission of weakness signalling the beginning of the end of his premiership and Tory party leadership.

In the late 50s, Macmillan had earned the nickname Supermac for rescuing the country from the wake of Suez and ushering in a period of unrivalled affluence. But Local Elections had gone badly and the by-elections worse. The government's tight economic policies, thanks to Chancellor Selwyn Lloyd, were unpopular with the voters. Selwyn Lloyd's attempts to keep both inflation and wages under control had led to public sector wages being frozen. Nurses and teacher were getting poorer while the rich were getting richer. The public was furious, and Macmillan was feeling the pressure. The Cabinet was fractious and there were complaints of a lack of leadership. He had to make an example of his Chancellor. The Night of the Long Knives had begun.

In modern politics these events have become shorthand for a botched reshuffle. The scale of the event has never been repeated since, but the tension between a PM and the Chancellor remains.

Through a combination of archive material and original interviews with historians and eyewitnesses such as Jonathan Aitken who, as private secretary to Selwyn Lloyd, captured the drama of that night in his hitherto unknown diary.

Producer: Kati Whitaker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01k9npd)
G&W Grossmith - The Diary of a Nobody

Episode 1

Johnny Vegas and Katherine Parkinson play Mr and Mrs Pooter in Andrew Lynch's adaptation of the Grossmith brothers' comic novel of 1892.

The story is a social vignette of Charles, the self-important but highly likeable clerk, his loving wife Carrie and their son William (played by Andrew Gower).

Much of the action takes place in the house that the Pooters share with their maid Sarah...and the noisy sound of passing trains. The Laurels in Brickfield Terrace is frequently visited by colourful and amusing characters, not least Gowing and Cummings, Pooter's 'trusty' fairweather friends.

This full dramatisation has a Victorian sit-com feel and stays true to the book - with a couple of twists of Lynch's own - capturing a kind of lower-middle-class aspiration that still has a tangible familiarity in 2012.

In Episode One, the Pooters move in to The Laurels. Charles and Carrie attend The Mansion House Ball and Willie arrives home from the bank in Oldham.

Cast:
Charles Pooter ...... Johnny Vegas
Carrie Pooter ...... Katherine Parkinson
William / Lupin ...... Andrew Gower
Sarah ....... Sinead Matthews
Cummings (and Horwin) ...... Adrian Scarborough
Gowing (and Borset) ....... Stephen Critchlow
Farmerson ...... Joe Ransom
Trillip ...... Adam Gillen
Daisy Mutlar ...... Sarah Sweeney

Other parts were played by members of the cast.

Adapted by Andrew Lynch, from the original by George and Weedon Grossmith.

Produced by Sally Harrison
Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Woolyback production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01kblt5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b01jmxrx)
Niall Ferguson: The Rule of Law and Its Enemies: 2012

The Landscape of the Law

The historian Niall Ferguson delivers a lecture at Gresham College in the heart of legal London, addressing the relationship between the nature of law and economic success. He examines the rule of law in comparative terms, asking how far the common law's claims to superiority over other systems are credible. Are we living through a time of creeping legal degeneration in the English-speaking world?

Producer: Jane Beresford.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b01k9q73)
Series 26

Episode 11

(11/13)
Can you remember at whose court Rigoletto is a jester, in the Verdi opera? Or which American trade journal published the first ever music chart based on record sales?

Paul Gambaccini has the answers in this week's edition of Counterpoint, the general knowledge music quiz - which has reached the second semi-final of the current series. This week's competitors, who've all won their respective heats, are from Chelmsford, Tunbridge Wells and Nottingham. One of them will take another of the places in the Final, and compete for the title of 26th Counterpoint champion.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01k9n89)
It sounds like Hollywood - the poet who wakes up to learn that his newly published verse has made his name and his fortune. But that's precisely what happened to the young Lord Byron 200 years ago when his epic 'Childe Harold' was published. Roger McGough introduces requests for the poem that features the first 'Byronic hero'.

Producer: Mark Smalley.



SUNDAY 08 JULY 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01kjfbx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Midsummer Tales (b01kjjng)
The Longest Day

By Alison Miller. Returning home to Orkney after decades in Glasgow, lonely Jan seeks diversion in a blind date. Read by Tracy Wiles.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfbz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01kjfc1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfc5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01kjfc7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01kjjnj)
The bells of Westminster Abbey.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b01kbj39)
Series 3

Alice Bell: Improving Public Understanding of Science

Scientist Alice Bell argues that better engagement by scientists, rather than lessons in 'scientific literacy', is the solution to the lack of public understanding of science.

She is frustrated how often this apparent panacea is rolled out as the solution to the problem. But on some controversial subjects the scientific evidence does not point in a single direction, she says.

More than that, the specific bit of science needed to understand the subject at hand varies from issue to issue.

Instead, scientists should work to provide structures where non-experts can learn about science as and when they become important to them.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01kjfc9)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01kjjnl)
Being Good

Some recent studies have shown that modern obituaries are unlikely to comment on a person's goodness. The phrase, "she or he was a good man or a good woman" is found less often than it used to be. In an edition of Something Understood called 'Being Good', Mark Tully considers why this should be so. Does it mean that we are no longer concerned about personal goodness and, if so, what are we concerned about when we judge a person's achievements in life? Do we undervalue the idea of being good? And is goodness enough on its own? Nelson Mandela has said, "A good head and good heart are always a formidable combination. But when you add to that a literate tongue or pen, then you have something very special." This programme explores the values of a moral approach to life and the importance of valuing the good in others.

Mark draws on the expertise of Professor Simon Blackburn, Bertrand Russell Professor of Philosophy at Cambridge, and author of the ethical study "Being Good". The programme is also illustrated by readings from the works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, E.V. Lucas and Yi Fu Tuan with music ranging from Edward Elgar and Wladislaw Szpilman to the Canadian band Emerson Drive.

The Readers are Philip Franks and Grainne Keenan.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01kjjnn)
Wool

Deborah Meaden investigates one of her passions and business interests, wool.
The British wool industry is the strongest it's been in years. Farmers are seeing prices rise for the 4th year in a row and production is increasing. In 2009, Deborah Meaden saved a Somerset mill which has been weaving wool for the last 200 years. In this programme, Deborah explores the current state of the industry and the top end of the market. As well as visiting the mill she owns which uses the finest cloth to make suits for Saville Row, she also meets a farmer who produces merino wool from the only pure bred fully traceable Bowmont flock in the country.

With Deborah's passion in wool - we take a look at the current state of the industry. We visit a mill which has been weaving wool for the last 200 years. Fox Brothers was struggling before Deborah and Douglas Cordeaux took it on and now it's breaking even. The cloth maker uses only the finest British wool to make cloth for the likes of Saville Row.

We then visit a farmer who produces such merino wool from the only pure bred fully traceable Bowmont flock in the country to find out her story.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01kjfcc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01kjfcf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01kjjnq)
On the eve of the Church of England's historic vote on women Bishops, Edward Stourton presents a special programme from the Church's General Synod in York.

From the debating chambers to the tea rooms, Trevor Barnes reports on the final hurdles faced by the women Bishop's legislation before it reaches Monday's historic vote.

"Being an Anglican can feel like being driven at 55 miles an hour down the middle lane of the M4. Traffic zooms past, both sides". Quentin Letts offers a view from the pews.

Is Synod democratic? Or in its quest to be inclusive does it end up satisfying no one? Kevin Bocquet reports.

A private members motion being debated at Synod calls for the church to support the Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel. If passed the Chief Rabbi says it would do serious damage to Jewish-Christian relations. Edward debates the issues with Dr John Dinnen and Jonathan Arkush.

24 hours before the start of the final debate Edward asks is the Church still too riven with division for the women Bishops legislation to pass? Joining the debate are: Bishop Pete Broadbent, Rev Miranda Threlfall-Holmes and Alison Ruoff.

Also in the news...

Where do British Muslims fit in the Army of 2020? One senior officer says they are planning to recruit more ethnic minority soldiers in the future. We ask how much of a challenge that is going to be in practice.

And one year on from the birth of South Sudan, Christian Aid's Rocco Blume describes the on-going challenges facing the world's newest country.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01kjjns)
Sound Seekers

Annette Crosbie appeals on behalf of Sound Seekers
Reg Charity: 1013870.
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Sound Seekers.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01kjfch)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01kjfck)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01kjjnv)
Holy Islands

Holy Islands: Bishop Stephen Oliver visits Iona in the first of three summer services exploring the spirituality of islands on Britain's coastline. The founder of the Iona Community, George MacLeod, described Iona as a 'thin' place where only a tissue paper separates heaven and earth. Producer: Mo McCullough.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01kbm19)
The curse of a ridiculous name

"I have a funny name. I know it," Adam Gopnik starts out. "Don't say it isn't or try to make me feel better about it...If I ever google myself, I find myself as often as not as Adam Gropnik."

He explains its unglamorous origins and it's contemporary Russian connotations of meaning "a drunken hooligan".

But the trouble is, he says "like every writer, I would like my writing to last". Little chance of that with a name like Gopnik, he believes. He bemoans why he hasn't a name like Jane Austen or Anthony Trollope.

Writers are, he believes, condemned to greatness or otherwise, by their names. The great exception is William Shakespeare, whose ridiculous surname - much mocked in his day - is now part of everyday speech.

Via a detour through name history, he reaches the conclusion that his fate is fixed. "I shall remain and say goodbye -- and then vanish as a, and A., Gopnik".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01kjjnx)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01kjjnz)
Writer ..... Carolyn Sally Jones
Director ..... Rosemary Watts
Editor ..... John Yorke

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Hayley Tucker ..... Lorraine Coady
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Keith Horrobin ..... Sean Connolly
Tracy Horrobin ..... Susie Riddell
Judge ..... Sara Perrin
Pawel Jasinski..... Max Krupski.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01kjjp1)
Martina Navratilova

Kirsty Young's castaway is the legendary tennis player, Martina Navratilova.

In an extraordinary career she's won 59 Grand Slam titles - her last just a few weeks short of her fiftieth birthday. Her life off the court has been equally eventful - she grew up in communist Czechoslovakia and, as a teenager, threw rocks as Soviet tanks rolled in; tennis offered a way to see the world and she defected to the US when she was 18 years old. After thirty years at the top of her profession she retired - and says she finally found time for the rest of her life: "Tennis really was a total commitment, you didn't have much time for anything else. So, when I quit, I was going through something emotionally that most people go through when they're 18, 20 years old. Really having the time for personal relationships, developing friendships and taking the time with everybody. I think I've caught up by now."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b01k9qc1)
Series 57

Episode 2

The 57th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the Warwick Arts Centre. Regulars Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel by Tony Hawks and Jeremy Hardy, with Jack Dee in the chair. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano. Producer - Jon Naismith.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01kjjtc)
Can Food Save the High Street?

Sheila Dillon asks if food is the key to reviving the Britain' declining high streets. Food expert, Henrietta Green visits Croydon town centre which has just been awarded a grant by retail guru,Mary Portas to see if a radical food future is possible and asks what are the barriers to bringing quality food back to our high streets.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01kjfcm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01kjjtf)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Crouching Low, Hidden Camera - Life as a P.I. (b01k9wpt)
As controversy flows over the role of private investigators in the phone hacking scandal and breaches of privacy, and the debate continues over whether the industry should be tightly regulated, Jake Wallis Simons examines the murky world of private detectives.

He explores the nature of the work of those who operate in this shadowy field, from investigating marital infidelities and company theft to countering money laundering and recovering stolen art. He talks to a range of investigators, from retired police detectives with a background of 30 years in the force to a twenty-year-old new recruit two weeks into the job.

And he finds out the best way to conceal a hidden camera in a cardboard takeaway coffee cup or a pizza box.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01kbm0q)
Eric Robson and the panel invite GQT listeners to pose their gardening questions at RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show.

Chris Beardshaw, Bunny Guinness and Bob Flowerdew form the panel.
In addition, rising star, Jack Dunckley gives his personal take on designing for large flower shows.

Questions answered in the programme:
Why do ants farm aphids and does it harm the plant? Do ants eat strawberries?
Are 'Spanish slugs' invading or are they indigenous to the Isle of White? How do I get rid of them?
Planting suggestions for a pink and white colour schemes, with evergreens at a variety of hights, to be planted in a garden that is half in sun, half in shade? Suggestions included: Pittosporum Tobira, Deschampsia, Angelica 'Ebony', evergreen box balls, Erigeron karvinskianus, Knautia macedonica, Thistle Cirsium, Allium, Buddleia ('Pink Delight', 'Flowering Redcurrent').
Suggestions for fast growing, low maintenance, and cheap plants to cover a 6 ft orange fence? Suggestions included: rambling roses ('Seagull', 'Rambling Rector'), Ficus, Jerusalem artichoke.
Does over wintering give better results in challenging and uncertain weather conditions?
Suggestions for a climber or tallish shrub to provide all year interest for a shaded and dry porch in keeping with a country cottage look? Suggestions included: Clematis, Pileostegia Viburnoides, roses - 'Darcey Bussell', Abutilon 'Nabob'.
When lifting and storing Tree Lily bulbs should the tiers of bulbs be separated (if so, when?) or replanted as lifted?
Suggestions for plants that bankers should grow in their garden?

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b01kjlhc)
In prison with Nelson Mandela

Ahmed Kathrada was one of the ANC activists accused of conspiring to overthrow Apartheid at the Rivonia Trial in South Africa in 1964. He was jailed on Robben Island alongside Nelson Mandela and spent almost as long in prison. In this edition of Witness he talks to Alan Johnston about his time in prison: the petty distinctions that Apartheid imposed on the prisoners according to their race, how they filled their time, and what they missed most.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01kjlhf)
G&W Grossmith - The Diary of a Nobody

Episode 2

Johnny Vegas and Katherine Parkinson play Mr and Mrs Pooter in Andrew Lynch's adaptation of the Grossmith brothers' comic novel of 1892.

The story is a social vignette of Charles, the self-important but highly likeable clerk, his loving wife Carrie and their son William (played by Andrew Gower).

Much of the action takes place in the house that the Pooters share with their maid Sarah...and the noisy sound of passing trains. The Laurels in Brickfield Terrace is frequently visited by colourful and amusing characters, not least Gowing and Cummings, Pooter's 'trusty' fair-weather friends.

This full dramatisation has a Victorian sit-com feel and stays true to the book - with a couple of twists of Lynch's own - capturing a kind of lower-middle-class aspiration that still has a tangible familiarity in 2012.

In Episode Two, Lupin's lifestyle upsets the measured balance of everyday life, Carrie hosts a seance with Mrs James, while Mr and Mrs Pooter dine with Franching in Peckham and meet a Mr Hardfur Huttle.

Cast:
Charles Pooter ....... Johnny Vegas
Carrie Pooter ....... Katherine Parkinson
William / Lupin ...... Andrew Gower
Sarah ....... Sinead Matthews
Cummings (and Horwin) ....... Adrian Scarborough
Gowing (and Borset) ....... Stephen Critchlow
Mrs James ....... Jo Neary
Hardfur Huttle ....... John Guerrasio
Murray Posh ........ Joe Ransom
Frank Mutlar ....... Adam Gillen
Lillie Girl / Daisy Mutlar ...... Sarah Sweeney

Other parts were played by members of the cast.

Adapted by Andrew Lynch, from the original by George and Weedon Grossmith.

Produced by Sally Harrison
Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Woolyback Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01kjlhh)
Michael Palin on his novel The Truth

Michael Palin discusses his second novel in seventeen years, The Truth, the story of a failed journalist and would be novelist Keith Mabbut, who's suddenly been offered big bucks to write the biography of a heroic but maverick environmental campaigner.

Kitty Aldridge, whose latest novel is A Trick I Learned from Dead Men, and Professor John Mullan discuss the wit and pathos in the depiction of funerals in literature and the rich tradition of novelists who've used funerals and death to explore the lives and exploits of the living.

As fans gather in Oxford to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Alice Day, when The Reverend Charles Dodgson, better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll first told the story of a young girl's escapades down the magical rabbit hole to his muse Alice Liddell on a boat ride on the Thames, we'll be assessing the enduring appeal of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the on-going debates surrounding Carroll's relationship with the young girl.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01kjlhk)
Roger McGough introduces an intriguing range of poems requested by listeners that juxtapose man's machine world with the natural one, and the ocean in particular. We'll hear works by JRR Tolkien, Michael Donaghy, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and others.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01kbg86)
Asset Returns

The Arab world's newest governments are desperate to retrieve billions banked in Britain by despots including Libya's Muammar Gaddafi and Hosni Mubarak of Egypt.

The money, they say, was stolen from their people and is needed to rebuild shattered economies.

In 'File on 4' Jenny Cuffe reports on the Arab nations' mounting impatience at the lengthy and costly process of investigation demanded to prove that assets were illicitly obtained by the now deposed leaders, their families and associates.

Already Egypt has gone to court to demand more information from the British Treasury about where their lost billions are stashed.

And campaigners in Tunisia - the first of the Arab Spring nations - complain Britain is dragging its feet. They contrast slow progress in London with a more helpful response from the country once renowned as the most impenetrable of banking fortresses: Switzerland.
Producer: Andy Denwood
Presenter: Jenny Cuffe.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b01kjgx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfcp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01kjfcr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01kjfct)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01kjlhm)
Liz Barclay makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

It's a real trip down memory lane this week with stories of past Olympic glories and injustices, a glimpse behind the scenes of the dark and dingy home of Ulster Punk, an amble through the dusty collections of Chinese Museums and a flick through the pages of the diary of a 13 year old - about-to-be-published novelist with a crush on Sarah Ferguson! . oh, and Private Godfrey as you've never heard him before.

Excusing Private Godfrey - Radio 4
Ballads of the Games - Radio 2
The Sad Story of Jim Thorpe - Radio 4
Dad's Last Tape - Radio 4
Changing My Voice - Radio 4
Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities - Radio 4
Elizabeth Taylor Short Stories - Radio 4
Food of Love - Radio 4
My Teenage Diary - Radio 4
World at One - Radio 4
The Godfather of Ulster Punk -Radio 4
The New Elizabethans: Paul Foot - Radio 4
World Routes - Radio 3
News Hour - Radio 4

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Bernadette McConnell.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01kjlhp)
Roy and Hayley are finishing Phoebe's room and are confident that their efforts will please their daughter. Kate then calls with some news that unsettles Roy and Hayley. Phoebe will not be joining the Tucker family as planned, but will stay and enjoy her summer holidays in South Africa. Roy and Hayley raise their concerns with Kate and are adamant Phoebe should return to Ambridge immediately. However once Roy hears how excited Phoebe is to stay for the summer, he can't deny her request. When Josh hears the news he is really disappointed and thinks he won't have a fun summer without Phoebe.
David and Ruth are enjoying working side by side once again. However David's relationship with his sister is still frosty. Elizabeth has dropped Josh and Ben back at Brookfield and made her feelings perfectly clear about David's involvement in the trial. She thinks it is another wrong decision from a man who can't be trusted to make them.
Being the protective mother, Hayley suggests to Roy that Kate may have brainwashed Phoebe into not wanting to return to Ambridge. However Roy is the voice of reason and knows how excited Phoebe is to be with her friends.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b01by9l4)
Series 15

Jackie Collins

Author of the Week this episode is million-selling author and steadfast purveyor of "bonkbusters", Jackie Collins.

Team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh are joined by journalist, Jane Thynne, and creator of the DI Thorne novels, Mark Billingham as they attempt to answer questions based on her life and work.

For the finale of the show, the teams are asked to imagine Jackie Collins' version of a literary classic, such as Wuthering Heights or Jane Eyre.


SUN 19:45 The Food of Love (b01kjlhr)
The Lovely Miss What's-Her-Face

In this series of monologues exploring the link between food and memory, poignant domestic dramas gradually unfold through the preparation of a special recipe.

In this story, 'The Lovely Miss What's-Her-Face' by Kevin Barry, winner of the 2012 Sunday Times short story award, an insurance clerk of a certain age recreates the exotic spaghetti bolognese he cooked for the lass in the typing pool, on his last romantic date - some 30 years before...

Kevin Barry's first novel, 'City of Bohane', was shortlisted for the Costa first novel award, and a previous short story collection, 'There Are Little Kingdoms', won the Rooney prize for Irish Literature.

Read by: David Schofield
Producer: Justine Willett.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01kbm0x)
Are sensational storylines ruining The Archers? Some listeners think familiar characters are acting out of character, simply to crank up the tension. Roger Bolton meets Acting Editor John Yorke and longstanding Archers' writer Keri Davies, to ask at what point does the dramatic veer into the unbelievable?

With only three weeks to go until the Olympic and Paralympic Games, Roger talks to 5 Live's Controller Adrian Van Klaveren about the network's preparations for covering the world's biggest sporting event. He also puts other listener questions to 5 Live's boss. Is the network over-infatuated with Richard Bacon? And is the station alienating its older listeners?

Finally, what is it with the Today programme presenters and telling the time? Why so many slip ups? Feedback visits Justin Webb at the Today studios to investigate and ensure the correct time-telling instruments are present and correct.

This is the last in the current series of Feedback, but the team are still keen to hear from you over the break, so do get in touch.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01kbm0v)
Eric Sykes, Sir Michael Palliser, Gillian Hush and Yitzhak Shamir

John Wilson explores Eric Sykes' comic talents on screen, stage and golf course and Eric is remembered by friends and fellow entertainers Bruce Forsyth, Jimmy Tarbuck and Ken Dodd along with TV producer Beryl Vertue. John also examines the life of Yitzhak Shamir, long-serving Israeli prime minister who took a hardline stance against Palestinian nationhood. Diplomat Sir Michael Palliser who, as permanent under-secretary at the Foreign Office, helped negotiate Britain's entry to the EEC and radio producer Gillian Hush, who was awarded an MBE for over 30 years work bringing documentaries and stories to the airwaves.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01kjgp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01kjjns)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01k9qd8)
The Gold Standard

As banks collapse and governments run out of money, the popular solution is to print more and more and expand bank balance sheets. But is there another way of fixing our economy? Would the financial system be more stable if each pound in our pocket was backed by gold? The Today programme's business presenter Simon Jack meets the so-called 'gold bugs' who predict the collapse of the paper system as well as those who argue that a return to the gold standard would be a huge mistake. Which makes more sense - placing your faith in a yellow metal or in money created at the push of a button?

Interviewees include ...
Detlev Schichter: fellow at the free market think tank the Cobden Centre and author of the book Paper Money Collapse: The Folly of Elastic Money and the Coming Monetary Breakdown

John Butler: Chief investment officer at Amphora (an independent investment and advisory firm in London) and author of The Golden Revolution: How to prepare for the coming global gold standard

Lord Skidelsky: Cross-bench peer, Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick and biographer of the economist John Maynard Keynes

Dani Rodrik: Professor of International Political Economy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and author of The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the future of the World Economy

Barry Eichengreen: Professor of Economics and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley and author of Exorbitant Privilege - The Rise and Fall of the Dollar and the Future of the International Monetary System

Dr DeAnne Julius: chairman of Chatham House and former member of the Bank of England's monetary committee

Lord Lawson: Conservative former Chancellor of the Exchequer

Producer: Helen Grady.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01kjlht)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01kjlhw)
Episode 111

Kevin Maguire of The Mirror analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01kblcv)
Francine Stock meets with Welsh actor Rhys Ifans, who explains why he's adopted an English accent for his role as the villain in The Amazing Spiderman.

As the Wellcome Trust and the BFI launch a scheme to encourage more scripts set in the world of biology and medicine, critic Tim Robey and script editor Katy Leys discuss the scientist in film.

Director Bobcat Goldthwait on what's eating America in his new film, God Bless America.

Actor Willem Dafoe discusses his role in The Hunter, as a mercenary searching for the Tasmanian Tiger.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01kjjnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 09 JULY 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01kjfdt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01kbhk6)
Urban Protest

From the Paris Commune to the 'Right to the City', cities have long been the centre of utopian dreams and protests. They have generated riches, destitution, celebration and organised and often violent protest. Professor David Harvey, the acclaimed social geographer, talks to Laurie Taylor about the urban roots of the contemporary capitalist crisis and the vision of a city for all. They're joined by the sociologist, Sophie Watson.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01kjjnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfdw)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01kjfdy)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01kjff0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01kjff2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01kjp44)
With the Rev. Peter Baker.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01kjp46)
The WI throws its weight behind the consumer campaign against milk price cuts. UK scientists are starting to map the midge genome, a key to fighting diseases like Schmallenberg and Bluetongue. There are 1500 species of midge , so the project leader, Dr Mark Fife, tells Charlotte mapping the genome is a tall order. And we visit the European Young Shepherd of the Year competition in Worcestershire.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01kjff4)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01kjp48)
Morning news and current affairs presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis.

0719
A DNA database is using the "markers" that are part of our genetic make-up to reveal the patterns of our heritage, where everybody in this country came from. Writer and historian Alistair Moffat, who is running the project in the Scottish Borders, explains how he has been turning up fascinating stories that go back to the world of the Old Testament.

0810
Following Andy Murray's defeat in the Wimbledon final yesterday, can British tennis take advantage of his heroic performance? Tony Hawks, who co-founded charity Tennis for Free, and Roger Draper, CEO of the Lawn Tennis Association, discuss why there is still only one British player in the top 100 ATP rankings.

0821
The coalition is facing its sternest test of unity as MPs start debating controversial changes to the House of Lords. Penny Mordaunt MP, one of the Conservative rebels, and Mark Harper MP, minister for constitutional change, debate the reform proposals.


MON 09:00 The Long View (b01kjqzl)
The Great powers are at loggerheads over what to do about Syria. The opinion of the western powers lead by the United states and Britain is that, on the strength of the reports coming in of atrocities committed against innocent civilians, something has to be done. Opposing that is the Russian view that to encourage or even condone regime change is to destabilise the region without any real idea of what might happen in the aftermath.

Back in 1876 the debate was similarly uncomfortable when vivid news reports came in of the terrible violence meted out by the Ottoman authorities after an uprising in the land that now constitutes modern Bulgaria. Thousands of people were killed, women and children among them. And all this, recorded in detail, was available to readers of the London Evening News. Back then it was the Russians who demanded that 'something must be done' while the British Prime Minster Benjamin Disraeli first played down the atrocities and then tried to caution against intervention. His old opponent William Gladstone, inspired by a national reaction to the atrocities, added his voice to those who demanded action in the form of a famous pamphlet 'Bulgarian Horrors and the question of the East' .
When the Russians attacked the Turks Disraeli threatened to join on the Ottoman side. The result was the treaty of San Stefano and subsequently the congress of Berlin with Bulgaria gaining a degree of autonomy while the other great powers took the opportunity of dismantling part of the Ottoman empire for their own gains, Britain took control of Cyprus.

But did this re-shaping of the Balkans deliver long term 'peace with honour' as Disraeli had claimed, or was it yet another example of Liberal intervention assuaging national consciences but creating dangerous instability in the process.
Lord Ashdown, John Baron MP and Professor Robert Service are on hand to take the Long View of Liberal Intervention.


MON 09:30 Capital Justice (b01hf135)
Episode 1

Helena Kennedy QC presents a new series uncovering the profound and powerful relationship between our financial and legal systems, between capitalism and the law, between freedom and justice.

The great British system of common law - judge made, ever evolving and adaptable - flourished in the 19th century under the growing dynamism of markets and new ideas of individual freedom. And market capitalism was given legal security and freedom to flourish in turn.

For centuries our financial and legal systems have been profoundly intertwined, a close arrangement of 'spontaneous order' that travelled to America and then around the world. So how has this dynamic really shaped the course of our history, and what have been its deepest moral and political consequences? The economist Adam Smith championed both free commerce and the rule of law, but feared a moral vacuum growing up between the two in society. Now, after years of deregulation, what happens when we turn to the law to set limits, both legal and moral, on what can be done in the name of market freedoms and the pursuit of profit? Can justice have any meaning in these terms?

This reflective series mixes the historical and contemporary with Helena Kennedy's sharp legal insight, exploring the connectedness between capitalism and the law that, beneath the surface, has so profoundly shaped our modern life.

Contributors include Naomi Klein, John Lanchester, John Grey, Julian Assange, Gillian Tett, Matt Ridley, Peter Oborne and Lord Neuberger, Master of the Rolls (and second most senior judge in England and Wales).

Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01l348t)
The Ecstasy of Influence

Going Under in Wendover

In the opening essay from his book The Ecstasy Of Influence, the American writer Jonathan Lethem recalls an unnerving journey hitch-hiking in the USA.

Jonathan Lethem is one of the most idiosyncratic voices in US literature. Before he became a published writer the New Yorker spent 15 years working in secondhand bookshops. His first published works were science fiction stories; before moving on to novels. His interests are eclectic: ranging from Bob Dylan to Marvel comics; Philip K. Dick to cyber culture.

The Ecstasy Of Influence is a collection of previously published pieces and new essays and is a provocative array of the writer's talent.

"One of the most emotionally engaging and intellectually nimble of contemporary novelists"
The Guardian

Reader: Kerry Shale
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kjqzq)
Women Bishops, Housework, Living with HIV

Housework and why it still divides the genders. As the Church of England's Synod prepares to vote on plans to allow women to become bishops, we look at the implications of what would be the biggest development since the ordination of women was approved 18 years ago. HIV and why it's no longer a barrier to becoming a mother. We hear from the artist behind a public art project involving more than 400 women and talk about its installation at Tate Modern.
Producer: Emma Wallace
Presenter: Jane Garvey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjqzs)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 6

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

When 15 year old Bee wins perfect grades, she calls in her parents' promise of a graduation present of 'anything she wants'. This turns out to be a family trip to Antarctica - a prospect that will challenge her mother Bernadette's deep dislike of travel and of dealing with other people. But first Bernadette needs to take on some of the other mothers at Bee's school, or as she calls them - 'the Galer Street gnats'.

In today's episode, Elgin confronts Bernadette about the mudslide incident.

Adapted by Miranda Davies
Produced/ directed by Emma Harding

About the author: Maria Semple has written for television shows including Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen. She lives with her family on an island off Seattle. This is her first novel.


MON 11:00 In His Element (b01kjr7t)
Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson says every country is facing the same economic challenge - "how do we educate people to find work and create wealth in a world that is changing faster than ever?" Sir Ken suggests that by enabling young people - and indeed older people - to discover their true talents you are preparing them for a better working life.

Sir Ken has plenty of experience in this area. In 1998 he led a government advisory committee, looking at creativity in education - this concluded with the All Our Futures report. He went on to work on another report in Northern Ireland entitled Unlocking Creativity.

A Liverpudlian, Sir Ken Robinson now lives in Los Angeles. He is much in demand. His expertise is sought by organisations throughout the world. He spends a lot of the year travelling to deliver lectures and talks. His entertaining TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talks have become an internet phenomenon and his book The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything has been translated into sixteen languages.

In this documentary Ruth McDonald meets Sir Ken Robinson on a return visit to Northern Ireland, where he's supporting Derry~Londonderry's plans as the first UK City of Culture in 2013.

Plagued over years by violence, unemployment and mass emigration, Derry is a complex city. The organisers of the City of Culture see the year-long event as an opportunity to 'tell a new story' but already there have been bomb attacks by dissident terrorists.

Sir Ken Robinson sees 2013 as a golden opportunity for Derry to become a 'creative city'. Ruth discovers how his ideas are being received.

Presenter: Ruth McDonald
Producer: Claire Burgoyne.


MON 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b018xs8f)
Series 3

Bungay

In this third series comedian Mark Steel visits 6 more UK towns to discover what makes them and their inhabitants distinctive.

He creates a bespoke stand-up show for that town and performs the show in front of a local audience.

As well as shedding light on the less visited areas of Britain, Mark uncovers stories and experiences that resonate with us all as we recognise the quirkiness of the British way of life and the rich tapestry of remarkable events and people who have shaped where we live.

During the series 'Mark Steel's In Town' Mark will visit Berwick-Upon Tweed, Holyhead, Basingstoke, Douglas (Isle of Man), Bungay and Wigan.

Episode 5 - In this episode Mark performs a show for the residents of Bungay in Suffolk, where he talks about non-existent castles, haunted pubs and chicken roundabouts. From January 2012.

Written and performed by Mark Steel with additional material by Pete Sinclair.
Produced by Sam Bryant.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01kjr7w)
Nick Hewer on working at 75, Lesley Joseph on carers and the UK's first hand transplant

We ask Nick Hewer from The Apprentice and Countdown whether older people can still cut it in the world of work? In his programme 'The town that wouldn't retire' - part of the BBC One Ageing season - Nick follows fifteen retired pensioners back to work. With today's newborns having to work until they're 77, how do bosses, fellow workers and the public react to a more mature workforce?

Also - Lesley Joseph is famous for playing Dorien in Birds of a Feather. She'll be talking about pressures on carers. She's been spending time with a couple where caring for her husband is putting the wife's health at risk.

The Citizen Advice Bureau will reveal a massive rise in people having problems with the new Employment and Support Allowance. And we'll also be finding out about the UK's first hand transplant.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Paul Waters.


MON 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01kjr7y)
John Lennon/Paul McCartney

The New Elizabethans: John Lennon and Paul McCartney. To mark the Diamond Jubilee, James Naughtie examines the lives and impact of the men and women who have given the second Elizabethan age its character.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney were two young men from Liverpool whose dazzling talent created first a band, then a cultural phenomenon and finally became a short hand for vast social change.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: James Cook.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01kjff6)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01kjr80)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Siberian Stories (b01kjs0y)
Old Believers

Five sketches of life on the move in the wild Siberian borderlands. Cicely Fell follows the upper reaches of the Yenisei river to nomadic and religious communities on the southern edge of Russia.

Life is changing for two Russian Old Believer villages on a remote branch of the Yenisei in the republic of Tuva. The Old Believers fled to this hidden corner of the taiga forest to escape religious persecution. But, as Cicely discovers when she visits the community during hay-gathering season, today they are facing competition from outsiders for the land that has provided their livelihood for generations.

Producer: Cicely Fell
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01kjlhp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b01kjs10)
Caterpillars

by Laura Bridgeman and Charles Lambert.

Comedy heist drama set in Edinburgh. Disinherited by her stepmother, Amber Buchanan determines to honour the memory of her father by entering into the family trade. Crime.

Amber ..... Claire Knight
Sasha ..... Laurie Brown
Karen ..... Rosalind Sydney
Rhona ..... Gemma McElhinney
Piers Logan ..... Jimmy Chisholm
Sean ..... Simon Donaldson
Mary ..... Monica Gibb
Child ..... Sean Graham

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b01kjs12)
Series 26

Episode 12

(12/13)
Which classic British film of 1945 was made into an opera in 2009, with music by Andre Previn? And which was the first Beatles album to feature nothing but Beatles compositions?

If you can answer these questions you might be able to give the contestants in Counterpoint a run for their money. Paul Gambaccini is in the chair for the third and last of this series' semi-finals - with the one remaining place in the 2012 Final at stake. The competitors are from Worksop, Stafford and Swindon.

As ever, they'll need to display musical knowledge across a wide spectrum, from the classics to jazz, show tunes, film music, and six decades of rock and pop.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01kjjtc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Ann Widdecombe's Hell Hounds and Night Hags (b01kjs14)
1/1
Spectral hounds, mysterious graves, hairy hands. Dartmoor was a place of lore and legend long before Sherlock Holmes and the Hound of the Baskervilles. Ann Widdecombe investigates.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b01kjs16)
Series 6

The Science of Symmetry

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by mathematician Marcus Du Sautoy, science journalist Adam Rutherford and comic book legend Alan Moore to discuss why symmetry seems such a pervasive phenomenon throughout our universe, and possibly beyond. The world turns on symmetry -- from the spin of subatomic particles to the structure of the natural world, through to the molecules that make up life itself. They'll be asking why symmetry seems so ubiquitous and whether the key to Brian's large female fanbase is down to his more than usually symmetrical face.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 17:00 PM (b01kjs18)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01kjff8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b01kjs1b)
Series 57

Episode 3

The nation's favourite wireless entertainment pays a first-time visit to the Grand Theatre in Swansea. Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Rob Brydon, with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell provides piano accompaniment. Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01kjs1d)
Over breakfast Elona suggests that she had her suspicions about Matt, but thinks he has been fair to Darrell lately. They have been able to afford a keyboard for Ana with the addition of Matt's wages, and Elona is extremely excited about giving it to her this afternoon. Darrell doesn't seem very happy, but covers his true feelings with a big grin. Elona can tell Darrell is withholding something, but when Darrell suggests he has had enough of this particular job Elona assumes he is simply tired.
Brian is feeling good about this year's harvest, but Jennifer is not so optimistic. It seems that Brian has cause for celebration though as he has first option on the buildings at Valley Farm. Annabelle is already looking into the legal matters and interrupts Jennifer and Brian's conversation with some information about Gerry who is looking into Home Farm's arable contract with Borchester Land for the Estate. Annabelle thinks Brian should take Gerry's meddling attempts more seriously, but Brian is not worried.
Hayley shows Jennifer around Phoebe's room and she receives a message from Phoebe that says she is sorry to let them down. When alone, Hayley replays the text and sobs uncontrollably.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01kjs1g)
Magic Mike; Twenty Twelve writer John Morton.

With Mark Lawson.

Matthew McConaughey and Channing Tatum star in Magic Mike, the latest film from Traffic and Ocean's Eleven director Steven Soderbergh. The film explores the world of all-male dance shows with Channing Tatum as the young stripper who dreams of something more. Antonia Quirke reviews.

As John Morton's mockumentary Twenty Twelve - about the challenges facing the team charged with staging the 2012 Olympics - reaches its climax in three final episodes, he discusses the difficulty of making comedy just to the side of reality, and why he had no time to buy tickets to the real Olympic Games.

Italian writer Andrea Camilleri, winner of this year's Crime Writers' Association International Dagger Award for the best crime novel translated into English, reflects on his famous creation - the food-loving Sicilian detective, Inspector Montalbano.

Niall Leonard - the husband of E.L.James, creator of the best-selling 50 Shades of Grey series - also has a book deal. Professor John Sutherland joins Mark to discuss husband-and-wife writing careers.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjqzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Through Persian Eyes (b01kjs1j)
Episode 3

Many in the west have described Iran as a rogue state. Yet this so-called rogue state has a recorded history that tracks back more than 3000 years. It is a civilization that has given rise to philosophies and religions, to science and medicine, to architecture and the arts.

By the end of the 18th century Iran was emerging from nearly a century of political and economic turmoil. Imperial frontiers were in disarray and under threat; while its population and economy had suffered the depredations of war. The state was a shadow of its former self.

Professor Alli Ansari begins part three with the story of a very peculiar despot, Agha Mohammad Khan, the founder of the Qajar dynasty. Castrated at the age of 6 - an act of mercy we are told since the alternative was death - Agha Mohammad Khan grew into a very angry young man, determined to secure the throne at all costs. With a combination of ruthlessness and political agility he succeeded in restoring Iranian greatness.

But within a short period Iran faced the new challenge of European imperialism from both north and south as the Russian and British empires competed for dominance. The modern age had arrived and the Iranian response was typically diverse: resistance, rebellion, revolution and modernisation as despots and democrats fought for the soul of modern Iran. That is a struggle that in the 20th century brought in two great revolutions, one in 1906 was constitutional and the second with Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979 was theocratic. And that struggle between constitutional and theocratic revolutions continues today.

Professor Ansari is one of the world's leading experts on Iran and its history. Professor Ansari's books include Confronting Iran and The Politics of Nationalism in Modern Iran.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01kjs1l)
China's Battle of Ideas

As China changes leadership, Mukul Devichand probes Beijing's hidden battle of ideas. Unlike the messy democracy of elections in the US or Europe, the Communist Party's "changing of the guard" this autumn is set to be a sombre, orderly and very Chinese affair. But the dramatic sacking of a top Party boss over the alleged murder of an Englishman earlier this year was about more than just a personal power struggle. These events provide a window into a deeper, more ideological battle for the future of the world's new superpower.

This week, Mukul Devichand travels to the People's Republic of China for a unique look at the social and ideological faultlines in the country. Radio 4's Analysis programme has a 40-year history of looking at the deeper ideas and trends shaping politics -- and this week's programme takes that approach on the road to a rising superpower whose policy debates are largely misunderstood in the West, despite the profound implications of China's future direction for our own.

Recent years have seen large-scale social experiments in China and the emergence of a "New Left" school of thought to rival the pro-market "New Right" in Chinese intellectual life. Mukul Devichand looks at what these scholars and officials are reading, and the ideas that shape their vision of the world. He looks at how these schools of ideas have created their own showcase provinces and cities -- Chongqing vs Guangdong -- and looks at recent events for clues about where China will go next.

Contributors:

Mark Leonard
Director, European Council on Foreign Relations
Author, What Does China Think?

John Garnaut
China correspondent, Sydney Morning Herald and Melbourne Age

Zhang Jian
Professor of Political Science, Peking University

Daniel Bell
Professor of Political Theory, Tsinghua University and Jiaotong University

Pan Wei
Director, Center for Chinese & Global Affairs. Peking University

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01kblcx)
This week scientists at CERN in Geneva have discovered a sub-atomic particle they think might be the long-sought Higgs Boson particle. Quentin talks to leading CERN scientists Professor Jim Virdee and his colleague at Imperial College, Professor Gavin Davies, about the implications of this finding.

Also in today's programme, Quentin visits the annual Summer Science Exhibition at the Royal Society. Dr Phil Manning explains how particle physics does not just allow scientists to find Higgs, but can also tell us about the colour of dinosaurs. His group uses a particle accelerator to 'read' fossils. At another stand, Dr Gianluca Memoli and Ian Butterworth from the National Physical Laboratory tell Quentin why the sound of bubbles can have interesting medical applications. And Dr Stephen Leslie maps the genetic make-up of the different peoples in the UK. Quentin finds out he is actually more of a soft Southerner than the tough Northerner he fancied himself to be ...


MON 21:30 The Long View (b01kjqzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01kjffb)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kjs1n)
Deputy Governor of Bank of England defends his role during Barclays Libor fixing scandal.

New Egyptian President Morsi demands Parliament be allowed to sit immediately.

Lords reform debate begins - will anyone make concessions?

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kjs1q)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 6

Written by Michael Palin.

Melville rescues Mabbut from his captors and takes him to his camp. But Melville is no fool. He knows Keith isn't just a tourist who strayed off the beaten track.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b01k9wpr)
Bohemians

Bohemians - love them or loathe them, we've all met them. Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss avant-garde free spirits, or pretentious, posing pseudo-intellectuals, depending on your point of view.

Dominic is joined by an original free spirit; the writer Hanja Kochansky,writer and critic Cosmo Landesman, whose parents' eccentric behaviour caused the young Cosmo much embarrassment; and by the journalist who declares in his blog that he is 'right about everything', James Delingpole.
Has the British bohemian spirit - if there ever was one - disappeared? Now boho is mainstream, desirable even, what is there to rebel against?

Producer: Sarah Langan.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kjs1s)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster.



TUESDAY 10 JULY 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01kjfg7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01l348t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfg9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01kjfgc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfgf)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01kjfgh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01kpv16)
With the Rev. Peter Baker.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01kjsfv)
Anna Hill hears about peas rotting in the field unable to be harvested due to weeks of rain. Lincolnshire pea farmer Steve Francis tells Anna about the thousands of pounds that he is losing because he cannot bring his peas in. Somerset farmer Nick Taverner had to race to rescue his sheep before they were drowned in the floods.

And the Farming Minister, Jim Paice, warns against dairy farmers taking militant action in response to price cuts.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Weatherill.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01kjsfx)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b01jmxsk)
Niall Ferguson: The Rule of Law and Its Enemies: 2012

Civil and Uncivil Societies

The historian Niall Ferguson examines institutions outside the political, economic and legal realms, whose primary purpose is to preserve and transmit particular knowledge and values. In a lecture delivered at the Royal Society of Edinburgh, he asks if the modern state is quietly killing civil society in the Western world? And what can non-Western societies do to build a vibrant civil society?

Producer: Jane Beresford.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kjsfz)
The Spy Who Loved - Christine Granville

The exams are over and for many 16 year olds this means their first holiday away from their family. Where are they going, who are they going with and what are they telling their parents? Harrowing mobile phone footage of an Afghan women accused of adultery being publicly shot which emerged at the weekend has caused outrage around the world. What's it mean for other women currently in prison? Do you employ a cleaner? Is the role valued and if not how do we change attitudes? Plus the story of Christine Granville, one of the Second World War's most daring female special agents.
Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Laura Northedge.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjsg1)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 7

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

15 year old Bee and her parents are preparing for their imminent family trip to Antarctica, but Elgin is increasingly worried about Bernadette and her run-ins with the other Galer Street mothers.

In today's episode, Elgin is paid a visit by an agent from the FBI, who makes a shocking revelation about Bernadette's life online.

Adapted for radio by Miranda Davies

Produced/Directed by Emma Harding

About the author: Maria Semple has written for television shows including Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen. She lives with her family on an island off Seattle. This is her first novel.


TUE 11:00 Attila The Hen (b00zsdsb)
Natalie Haynes has heard some dark rumours about the true habits of the hen.

So she’s meeting some of the people and poultry involved in the fashion for keeping urban chickens.

With her own chicken knowledge limited entirely to their lives in Ancient Rome, Natalie seeks information from chicken breeders and keepers.

But perhaps the most keen insight is from ornithologist Mark Cocker, who explains how things look from the chickens' own perspective...

Producer: Christine Hall.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


TUE 11:30 Sibelius: A Symphony That Burned (b01kjt7h)
The most notorious 'lost work' in classical music: rediscovered? Peggy Reynolds tells the story of Jean Sibelius's infamous Eighth Symphony - with extracts from new musical fragments discovered last year, performed exclusively for the programme.

---

Jean Sibelius thought he'd burned his last symphony forever. For two decades, he had struggled in the forest fastness of his home in the countryside, Ainola, north of Helsinki. Born in 1865, he was Finland's greatest artistic hero: a composer whose music had once articulated an entire nation's dreams of independence. Finlandia, the Karelia Suite, The Second Symphony - all flowed from his pen...and made him an icon.

Now, in the 1930s and 40s, he was an old man of the Romantic era - an artist alive long after his time. Loved by concert audiences but pilloried and mocked by the new winds of musical modernism, now he felt ancient, irrelevant, unable to speak.

For the last 25 years of his long life, he didn't publish a single note of music. How could he? Here was an artist truly adrift between old and new. The year Sibelius was born, 1865, Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. The year he died, 1957, the Russians sent Sputnik into space.

And so, one morning in 1945, Jean Sibelius took the pages of a symphony that had taken him to the brink of despair...and burned it all: destroying it before it destroyed him.

His Eighth Symphony became the most notorious 'lost work' in classical music. Audiences dreamed of hearing just a snatch of what had played inside the old man's head; critics wondered if this 'irrelevance' had been forging secret, daringly original new musical ground.

For decades not a single note could be traced. And then, last year, three short fragments of music were revealed - the culmination of years of painstaking research through piles upon piles of manuscript sketches. The only evidence of any orchestral work by Sibelius during the infamous 'silence of Ainola'. And almost certainly the only tantalising glimpse we may ever get at his fabled Eighth Symphony.

Writer and broadcaster Peggy Reynolds visits Sibelius's home near Helsinki to fully unpick - for the first time - the riddle of Sibelius's Eighth Symphony, with contributions from the great British conductor and Sibelius expert Sir Mark Elder. She presents a performance of newly-discovered musical fragments, performed exclusively for the programme by the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra under John Storgards...after eight decades, the closest we may ever get of experiencing the most infamous lost work in 20th century music.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01kjt7k)
Call You and Yours: Working when I'm 65

As part of the BBC's Ageing Season, 'When I'm 65', Call You and Yours looks at working beyond the traditional retirement age to find out who benefits most. Is it the individual, the company or the economy?

We want to hear your experience. Do you want to work or do you feel forced to work to keep financially afloat in the current economic climate? And how easy is it to get a job - or keep a job - later in life?

If you are happy to keep working beyond 60 or 65, why? Does your job give you a sense of satisfaction and purpose? Do you enjoy the social contact and routine that employment brings?

The Office for National Statistics found there were 1.4 million people working beyond the state pension age last year compared to 753,000 in 1993. So how does this affect the labour market? Is there any truth in the accusation that so called 'job hogging' by older workers prevents young people entering the work force?

Call us on 03700-100-400 before ten, 03700 100444 after ten, or email us via our website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours ; leave us a message or a name and number where we can call you back.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Karen Dalziel.


TUE 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01kjt7m)
Margot Fonteyn

The New Elizabethans: Margot Fonteyn.

James Naughtie considers the life and legacy of Dame Margot Fonteyn, widely considered to be one of the greatest classical dancers of the 20th century. She spent her whole career with the Royal Ballet and was appointed prima ballerina absoluta by The Queen.

Her greatest artistic work was with the Russian star Rudolf Nureyev. Beginning in the 1960's when she was 42, he 24 - they formed an on and off stage partnership that lasted until her retirement in 1979. They debuted Kenneth MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet, and Frederick Ashton choreographed Margeurite and Armand for them, a role which wasn't performed by any other artists until the 21st century.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Alison Hughes.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01kjfgk)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01kjt7p)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Siberian Stories (b01kmjg6)
Autumn Migration

Five sketches of life on the move in the wild Siberian borderlands. Cicely Fell follows the upper reaches of the Yenisei river to nomadic and religious communities on the southern edge of Russia.

The Khemchik valley in western Tuva is a wild frontier land of derelict villages, where extreme poverty is driving many families to return to traditional nomadic herding as a way to survive.

Cicely joins the Mongush family as they set out on their autumn migration. The journey takes them over remote mountains along the Russian-Mongolian border, from the taiga forest to the grassland steppe. A nomadic way of life re-emerging from the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Producer: Cicely Fell
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01kjs1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01kjt7r)
Cordite for Breakfast

By Ben Ockrent.

In the world of Napoleonic-era battle re-enactments, the King's Brigade are what are known as 'hard-liners'. Every stitch is crossed just so and every button a perfect match for the original. Martin is Major General of the King's Brigade and his daughter Amy has become increasingly worried that his hobby is harming her parents' marriage. So on the most important weekend of his calendar - the Battle of Waterloo - Amy adopts the disguise of a male soldier, crosses enemy lines and stages an almighty intervention.

Cast:

Amy . . . . . Rose Leslie
Martin . . . . . Mark Heap
Tilly . . . . . Aimee-Ffion Edwards
Celine . . . . . Christine Absalom
Liam . . . . . Brian Fenton
Phil . . . . . Patrick Brennan
Soldiers . . . . . Joe Sims, Sam Alexander, Robert Blythe, Harry Livingstone.

Director: Sasha Yevtushenko
Production co-ordinator: Selina Ream
Studio Managers: Peter Ringrose, Keith Graham, Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Peter Ringrose.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b01kjt7t)
Series 2

Episode 2

Jay Rayner presents episode two in the series of BBC Radio 4's food panel show. Each week, the programme travels around the country to visit interesting culinary locations and answer questions from local food-loving people. Recorded in front of a live audience, The Kitchen Cabinet is aimed at anyone who cooks at home, not just the experts.

In this programme, The Kitchen Cabinet is in Brighton. As well as talking about ice cream beyond the seaside cone, the team takes questions on all aspects of cooking.

The panel this week features: Angela Malik, the Scottish-Indian fusion chef and entrepreneur; Henry Dimbleby - cook, writer, and co-founder of Leon restaurants; Peter Barham, the food scientist who has worked with Heston Blumenthal; and Thomasina Miers - 2005 Masterchef winner and co-founder of Mexican street-food chain Wahaca.

The show is witty, fast-moving, and irreverent, but packed full of information that may well change the way you think about cooking.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

Produced by Robert Abel and Darby Dorras
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Off the Page (b01kjt7w)
The Dark Side

Dominic Arkwright and guests wrangle with inner demons and consider the benefits of embracing The Dark Side.
The novelist and film critic Kim Newman tells how the nightmares that beset him through childhood were alleviated when he began to watch horror films. The psychologist Linda Blair considers whether people who embrace their dark side are more likely to be creative, and the writer Ian Marchant tells us how the dark forces of punk enlightened him.
Producer: Sarah Langan.


TUE 16:00 No Extremists Please - We're British! (b01kjt7y)
As austerity measures begin to bite, extremist parties across Europe have made significant electoral gains. In Greece, Golden Dawn, which advocates the forced repatriation of immigrants, won 18 seats in parliament; the anti-islamist PVV is the third largest party in the Netherlands while in France the Front National under the leadership of Marine Le Pen has established itself as a major political force. Yet here in the UK the most prominent extremist party, the BNP, had a disastrous result in May's local elections.

In No Extremists Please- We're British! Trevor Phillips, the chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, conducts a personal investigation into why extremist parties have never gained a significant electoral foothold in Britain; he asks whether there's something inherent in the mindset of the white working class voter that makes us as a nation immune to the appeal of extremist politics; or is it just a question of time before what's happening in Europe happens here?

In the course of his investigation he talks to politicians, academics and voters, here and in Europe - including a face-to-face interview with Marine Le Pen.

Producer: Will Yates
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01kjt88)
Sophi Tranchell, Alison Graham

The Henning Mankell thriller "The Man From Beijing", Jonathan Coe's family tragedy "The Rain Before It Falls" and Graham Greene's "Our Man in Havana" are the book choices of Fairtrade entrepreneur Sophi Tranchell, Radio Times television critic Alison Graham, and presenter Harriett Gilbert.

Producer: John Byrne.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01kjt9f)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01kjfgm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Sketchorama (b01kjt9h)
Series 1

Episode 3

Humphrey Ker with new sketch group talent from the circuit: The Three Englishmen, Max & Ivan and Frisky & Mannish. From July 2012.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01kjsm2)
Eddie is pleased with the new marketing idea for his stone animals. However Lynda is not as impressed and is horrified to learn that he plans to sell them from the roadside. Though the judges for the Britain in Bloom competition have already been, Lynda thinks they may be keeping tabs on the village for the whole summer. She is worried that if Eddie displays his interesting designs on a public highway it will spoil their chances of winning.
Darrell feels uncomfortable at work and questions the legitimacy of Matt's suppliers. Darrell isn't quite convinced by Matt's assurances that Bernie cannot be dealing illegal goods if he has a job with a builders firm. However Matt suggests Darrell can't quit the job as he needs money. His advice is that Darrell keeps his head down and gets on with the job.
Eddie attempts to get the insider scoop from Kenton about the community games so he can get a good team together before the good players are scouted by opposing groups. However Kenton doesn't think that's a sporting attitude. The competition between Lynda and Kenton's diverging plans for the celebration heats up at the committee meeting. Let the games begin!


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01kjtdy)
Wynton Marsalis interview; review of Seeking a Friend for the End of the World

With John Wilson.

Jazz musician Wynton Marsalis discusses his approach to the history of jazz, his feelings about hip-hop, and the rhythms of Congo Square, New Orleans, which have inspired a major composition.

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World is a new film from director Lorene Scarfaria, starring Keira Knightley and Steve Carrell. With three weeks to go before the apocalypse, a man decides to take a road trip to reunite with his high school sweetheart. Rachel Cooke reviews.

Philippe Halsman was a celebrity photographer who often used to get his subjects to jump - arguing that, in jumping, they drop their "mask" and reveal their true personality. The little-known story of his life - which included a false charge of murder - has been turned into novel, by Austin Ratner. He and Joanna Pitman, photography critic for The Times discuss Philippe Halsman's life, influence and legacy.

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation's Minimum Income Standards report says that a family with two children needs an income of nearly £37,000 to have a 'socially acceptable' standard of living. But how much of this should be spent on experiencing arts and culture? Abigail Davis who helped write the report explains how the report defines cultural activities and how their perceived importance has withstood the recession.

Producer Erin Riley.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjsg1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01kjtf0)
Abuse in Sport

It was the Paul Hickson scandal in the mid 90s which first brought the issue of sexual abuse in sport to the public eye. The Olympic swimming coach was jailed for 17 years for raping and sexually abusing young girls he trained. The case led to the setting up of the Child Protection in Sport Unit and the introduction of safeguarding measures in most sports.

But, more than a decade on, the problem hasn't gone away and this edition of File on 4 reveals new figures which show how many allegations of sexual and physical abuse were made across most major sports last year.

The programme also examines concerns about the way information about coaches who have disciplined or banned, is shared with parents and other sports bodies, primarily because of data protection laws. It reveals how some coaches accused of sexual misconduct are able to move between sporting organisations and carry on coaching
.
Reporter Chris Buckler also hears calls from families and child welfare charities for a change in the law to make it illegal for coaches to have a sex with athletes aged 16 or 17 which would bring them in line with teachers and others who have close contact with young people

Presenter: Chris Buckler
Producer: Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01kjtfg)
Paralympic selection and indoor rock climbing

The final team to be announced for the 2012 Paralympics is the athletics team. Mani Djazmi talks us through the visually impaired people who have made Team GB. We meet runner Libby Clegg and talk to her about her hopes for the Games. And reporter Tony Shearman accompanies visually impaired rock climber Red Szell up a 40 foot indoor climbing wall.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01kjtkq)
Coughs, vocal cord dysfunction and athletes, taste and smell, waiting room toys

Dr Mark Porter debates whether the recent lung cancer awareness campaign on TV, radio and the internet, hits the spot or is scaremongering. He discovers new research suggesting some people with exercise induced asthma are being given the wrong diagnosis and treatment. And GP Margaret McCartney investigates rumours this week that children's toys are to be thrown out of the doctors surgery in the on going battle against infection.

Producer: Erika Wright.


TUE 21:30 In Living Memory (b01c7rgs)
Series 15

Kung Fu

In 1973, the martial arts classic movie Enter the Dragon premiered in New York and around the world. In the UK, the films release marked the beginning of an explosion in demand for martial arts classes. Jolyon Jenkins meets those caught up in the kung fu craze of the mid-1970's and discovers that not everyone was looking for Shaolin self-control and spiritual enlightenment.


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01kjfgp)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kjtgp)
The latest on reform of the House of Lords.
Will Bob Diamond be recalled to Parliament?
Spanish miners march to Madrid.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kjtgr)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 7

Written by Michael Palin.

Mabbut feels he's getting to know Melville and understand the elusive anthropologist's principles. And Kumar takes him on a trip to see the destruction caused by the Astramex Corporation.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b01kjs16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kjtks)
Plans for reform of the House of Lords suffer a severe blow as the Government drops the timetable for the legislation in the face of a significant Tory revolt.
But the leader of the Commons, Sir George Young, insists ministers remain "committed" to the proposals.
The chairman of Barclays, Marcus Agius, tells MPs that former chief executive Bob Diamond has given up bonuses worth a reported £20 million.
The Government confirms the closure of 27 Remploy factories which provide employment for disabled people.
And there are calls in the House of Lords for a tax on sugar to curb obesity and avoid a "public health disaster".
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 11 JULY 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01kjfhj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 One to One (b01cjwtg)
Yasmin Alibhai-Brown with Louis de Bernieres

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of family breakdown for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up.

Last week Yasmin spoke to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and this week she speaks to the author Louis de Bernieres. He talks from the position he holds as patron of the charity Families Need Fathers, but also from the very personal point of view of a father of two children, who has now separated from their mother.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfhl)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01kjfhn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfhq)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01kjfhs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01kpv1s)
With the Rev. Peter Baker.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01kknt0)
Hundreds of dairy farmers frustrated by price cuts are taking their fight to Westminster. Some say they are prepared to pour litres of milk away rather than produce it below the cost of production. The group are meeting with Farming Minister, Jim Paice at a special summit.

Also in the programme, Anna Hill hears how rain, rain and more rain is impacting on livestock and potato growers across the UK - and Farming Today is given a tour around a secret tree and plant disease centre somewhere in Devon.

This programme is presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


WED 06:00 Today (b01kknt2)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01kknt4)
Jean-Claude Ellena, Linda Hope, Dave Fishwick, Ken Rijock

Libby Purves is joined by minibus millionaire Dave Fishwick who has set up his own bank, parfumeur Jean-Claude Ellena, Linda Hope, daughter of Bob and former money launderer, Ken Rijock.

Dave Fishwick is a self-made minibus millionaire from Burnley who has set up his own bank. Frustrated with the reluctance of High Street banks to lend, he set up Burnley Savings and Loans which offers help to local businesses struggling to get finance. He can be seen on Channel 4 in 'Bank of Dave' from this week. The book 'Bank of Dave,' which accompanies the series, is published by Virgin Books.

In 1980s Miami, Ken Rijock, a Vietnam veteran and successful lawyer, was one of the world's most successful money launderers, working as a middleman between the Colombian drug cartels and the Mafia. However, after a client testified against him, he went undercover for the FBI and now works with banks and governments to track the new generation of money launderers. He tells his story in 'The Laundry Man', published by Penguin/Viking.

Jean-Claude Ellena is a parfumeur and has been Hermes' first 'parfumeur exclusif' since 2004. Based in Grasse, home to the French perfume industry, he is the author of The Diary of a Nose - A Year in the Life of a Parfumeur. The book explains what day to day life is like for a parfumeur; how the creation of a new scent begins and how the five senses come into play when creating a perfume. The Diary of a Nose - A Year in the Life of a Parfumeur is published by Particular Books.

Linda Hope is the daughter of comedian and entertainer Bob Hope. Linda is launching an exhibition about her father called 'World of Laughter' at the Greenwich Heritage Centre. Bob was born in Eltham, south London before emigrating to the US with his family when he was four years old. The exhibition will tell the story of Hope's early years; his rise to be star of stage and screen; his devotion to the men and women of the military and his love of golf. The 'World of Laughter' is at the Greenwich Heritage Centre.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01l39px)
The Ecstasy of Influence

Dancing about Architecture or Fifth Beatle

In the second essay from his book The Ecstasy Of Influence, the American writer Jonathan Lethem on dancing, writing and rock stars.

Jonathan Lethem is one of the most idiosyncratic voices in US literature. Before he became a published writer the New Yorker spent 15 years working in secondhand bookshops. His first published works were science fiction stories; before moving on to novels. His interests are eclectic: ranging from Bob Dylan to Marvel comics; Philip K. Dick to cyber culture.

The Ecstasy Of Influence is a collection of previously published pieces and new essays and is a provocative array of the writer's talent.

"One of the most emotionally engaging and intellectually nimble of contemporary novelists"
The Guardian

Reader: Kerry Shale
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kknt6)
Melinda Gates on family planning and the work of the Gates Foundation; Author Joanna Kavenna on female eccentrics; Young boys and equality.

As the next generation of boys grow to become men, what are they learning about the balance of power between the sexes? Would they call themselves feminists, do they accept that men and women are equal and how does their parents' attitudes to work, family and the division of domestic chores in the home affect how they themselves might choose to live their lives in the future? Reporter Geoff Bird hears the views of a group of young men. Jane is joined by Joe Hayman, who mentors a boy of 18 and by novelist and journalist Emma Burstall, who's tried to bring her sons up as feminists. Presented by Jane Garvey. Producer: Emma Wallace.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kknt8)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 8

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

15 year old Bee and her parents have been preparing for a family trip to Antarctica, but the day before they are due to travel, her mother Bernadette vanishes.

In today's episode, a frantic Elgin travels to Argentina in an attempt to find his wife.

Adapted and directed by Emma Harding

About the author: Maria Semple has written for television shows including Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen. She lives with her family on an island off Seattle. This is her first novel.


WED 11:00 Old Photographs Fever - The Search for China's Pictured Past (b01kkntb)
'Old Photos Fever' is sweeping China, where people are encountering their photographic history for the first time, piecing together a past destroyed in Mao's Cultural Revolution.

A new and intense appetite for images of the country's past has resulted in a publishing phenomenon: sales of books and magazines filled with historical photographs have rocketed. China's turbulent history in the twentieth century meant that archives of all kinds were destroyed: in warfare and revolutions. During the Cultural Revolution of 1966-9, the process was continued by the Red Guard. People also destroyed their own - now dangerously bourgeois - family albums. Nearly a century of photographic history was erased.

The photographs that do survive were mostly taken by foreigners, living in or visiting China, who took them out of the country to safety. Professor Robert Bickers at the University of Bristol is leading the search to collect and digitise these photographs in order to restore a historical vision of China which is unfamiliar and fascinating to its citizens now. The online collection is extraordinary in its range and reflects all aspects of life in China. There are studio portraits, gruesome police photos, industrial and rural landscapes, tourist snaps and family albums.

One of the jewels in the collection is the work of Fu Bingchang, a senior Chinese diplomat, whose access to the elite of Chinese society in the first half of the twentieth century and whose talent as a photographer make for a unique and beautiful set of images. The photos were given by Fu's son Foo Chung Hung (Johnny) and his granddaughter Yee Wah, who recall finding them in twelve leather trunks of possessions which were smuggled out of China.

The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 prompted Chinese politicians to pursure an ambitious policy of historical education, to counteract a perceived lack of knowledge in young people about China's past. New museums are now huge tourist attractions in China and the desire for photographs has arisen from this resurgence of interest in the nation's history.

This fascinating documentary brings a new and surprising insight into China's past and present.

Producer: Mary Ward-Lowery.


WED 11:30 The Castle (b01hxzx3)
Series 4

The Only Way Is Ethics

Hie ye to The Castle, a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley"), Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley"), Martha Howe-Douglas ("Horrible Histories") & Ingrid Oliver ("Watson & Oliver")

Someone - or something - is hacking into peoples' private conversations and Master Henry could end up in jail. Meanwhile, Lady Anne has taken to nuzzling De Warenne's trusty War Horse.

Written by Kim Fuller & Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson
Produced and directed by David Tyler.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01kknvz)
Social care, Spanish properties and age-friendly cities

As the long-awaited Social Care White Paper is published by the Government we look ahead at what it means for those who are receiving care and the carers themselves.

A possible landmark court judgement in Spain for the thousands of British people who are thought to have lost their deposits buying apartments that were never built.

Plus, Royal Mail have completed a trial of leaving parcels with your neighbours.

Presented by Shari Vahl.
Produced by John Neal.


WED 12:30 Face the Facts (b01kmjj6)
Open for Tourist Business?

The tourist industry says it is losing millions of pounds in revenue because of the lengthy and laborious visa system. The demand from new markets in China, India and the Far East is growing rapidly and tourists from these countries are among the highest spending visitors to the UK. However many are put off by a visa system which requires them to fill out lengthy forms, submit biometric data including finger prints and a retina scan and once granted only gives entry to the UK and Ireland. Alternatively visitors to Europe can apply for a three page Schengen visa which is not only cheaper but gives access to 27 countries in the Schengen zone. Could this explain why France welcomes eight times more Chinese visitors than the UK? The Prime Minister has urged the tourist industry to do better but what can be done to turn around the image of 'Fortress UK'?

Presenter:John Waite Producer:Steven Williams.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01kjfhv)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01kknzc)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Forty-five minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. Email wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter #wato.


WED 13:45 Siberian Stories (b01kmjp5)
The Shaman's Drum

Five sketches of life on the move in the wild Siberian borderlands. Cicely Fell follows the upper reaches of the Yenisei river to nomadic and religious communities on the southern edge of Russia.

Tuva's remote and impenetrable mountain landscape enabled the survival of shamanic clan lines despite the Soviet repressions. The region has remained one of the strongholds of Siberian shamanism and is an important centre for its revival. Today, in Tuva's capital Kyzyl, associations of shamans and walk-in clinics compete for customers seeking healing or divination.

From a shamanic ritual to a drum-maker's workshop, Cicely Fell traces shamanism in Tuva and Khakassia. Chochigar Kes-Kam, a hereditary Tuvan shaman, performs a ritual to seek a blessing from the spirits for his young apprentice. A story of repression and revival, told through the shaman's drum.

Producer: Cicely Fell
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01kjsm2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00sx8nj)
Mr Anwar's Farewell to Stornoway

By Iain Finlay MacLeod.

Mr Anwar has lived for four decades on the Isle of Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. Indian by birth, and a tailor to trade, he came to the UK to make his fortune. Heading north, away from London's cramped confines, he built a successful clothing business from scratch: selling men's trousers and ladies underwear from two suitcases balanced on the back of a bicycle.

The suitcases were soon exchanged for a busy shop in Stornoway. He brought his wife to the island and the pair raised their family in the community. And yet, across the decades, Mr Anwar clung onto a fervid dream of his youth: to make a fortune and retire in style to India.

Now, five months into retirement, things are not going quite as he had planned. Distraction appears in the form of his taciturn neighbour, Tormod, who asks Mr Anwar to tailor a jacket for him. As the pair get the measure of each other, some difficult questions are asked and hard truths confronted.

Mr Anwar ... Vincent Ebrahim
Nadia ... Shelley King
Tormod ... Matthew Zajac
Isobel ... Anne Lacey

Mr Anwar's pipe tune composed and performed by Iain MacInnes.

Directed by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01kknzf)
Credit reports

Credit reports: If you need a loan, a mortgage or even a mobile 'phone contract, your credit history will be an important factor in establishing how responsible you are as a borrower. Maybe you pay off your credit card in full every month but have missed a payment because of the recent computer problems at NatWest, RBS and Ulster Bank. How will that affect your credit rating? Or perhaps you're one of seven million adults who have never taken out any form of credit. What problems might that cause in later life, if you need financial help to buy a property or set up a business? How can you build up a credit history? What can you do if you're refused credit? How easy is it to access your credit score? If you'd like advice on any aspect of credit rating, you can contact Money Box Live. Paul Lewis and a panel of experts will answer your queries. Email moneybox@bbc.co.uk or call 03700 100 444. Lines open at 1pm, Wednesday.
Producer, Lesley McAlpine.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01kjtkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01kknzh)
Immortality; Evil

From Victorian seances to schemes which upload our minds into cyberspace, there are myriad ways in which human beings have sought to conquer mortality. The philosopher, John Gray, discusses his book "The Immortalisation Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death" with Laurie Taylor. The cultural historian Marina Warner joins the debate. Also, listeners' response to Thinking Allowed's recent discussion on the sociology of 'evil'. Professor Barry Smith, the director of the Institute of Philosophy, explores contrasting analyses of 'evil' within modern thought.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01kknzk)
Chris Moyles

In today's programme with Steve Hewlett:

Radio 1 controller Ben Cooper on plans after Chris Moyles, who's announced today he's standing down in September. How far does this help Radio 1 reach the younger audience it needs to attract?

A year after its final edition, former News of the World deputy editor Neil Wallis gives his views on the impact of the closure and the subsequent Leveson Inquiry on journalism in the UK.

And YouView's chief executive Richard Halton explains what he believes the service will offer once available in the shop. Steve asks Emma Barnett, the Telegraph's digital media editor, if YouView will really be as revolutionary as claimed.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01kknzm)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01kjfhx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b01kknzp)
Series 4

Jackie Kay

My Teenage Diary returns with six more brave celebrities ready to revisit their formative years by opening up their intimate teenage diaries, and reading them out in public for the very first time.

Comedian Rufus Hound is joined by poet Jackie Kay who revisits her politically active student years in the early eighties, when she went on every demo she possibly could. She shares some of her early poetry, and talks about what a revelation it was to finally meet and make friends with other black women when she was at university.

Producer: Harriet Jaine
A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01kkp5l)
It's evening in Ambridge as Neil, Ed, Eddie and Keith enjoy a pint. The men joke that with Sam's impending marriage, Keith is not losing a daughter but gaining a large overdraft. A tipsy Neil and Eddie argue about the unidentified animal seen around Ambridge. Neil believes it's a boar but Eddie has a more mystical beast in mind.
David is cleaning the Dutch barn ready for the harvest. Ruth comes to inspect his work. The couple are relaxed and happy as they plan a family night in.
It's an early start for Josh as he wakes at midnight to help Gina calve. Meanwhile, Ed and Emma are awoken by the sound of dogs barking and see the Brookfield barn being consumed by fire. Emma stumbles out of the cottage to see someone running away across the field, though she cannot identify them in the dark.
Frantically, Ed and Emma wake David and Ruth and the families struggle to contain the fire before it spreads to the chemical store. Panic ensues, as they cannot find George or Josh.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01kkp5n)
James Fenton, rained-off festivals, and author Nicola Barker

With Mark Lawson.

James Fenton reflects on how his years as a war reporter fed into his poetry, and why it moves him so much to hear that his poem For Andrew Wood is popular at funerals. And he reveals how the words of the Roman poet Catullus happily fit the Archers theme tune.

Author Nicola Barker is known for her distinctive dialogue and unpleasant characters. She discusses her new novel and explains why she wanted to set it in Luton.

Bank Of Dave is a Channel 4 documentary which follows the fortunes of Dave Fishwick, who sets up his own small bank. Dave is also the name of a TV channel. David Quantick - David rather than Dave - charts the Daves and Davids in popular culture.

Kylie Minogue and Jason Donovan were set to be reunited in a huge concert in Hyde Park this evening. But along with many other summer music events it has been cancelled due to the wet weather. Insurance expert Jeff Park explains how our increasingly wet summers will affect festival prices.

Producer Ellie Bury.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kknt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b01kkp5q)
The past few days have seen starkly contrasting news in the progress of the so-called Arab Spring. Last weekend Libyans voted for the first time since the fall of Gaddafi. The country is still bitterly divided, but US president Barack Obama declared the vote a triumph of democracy and said he was proud of the part his country had played in supporting the Libyan revolution. Almost at the same time Syrian president Bashar al-Assad gave his first interview in English since the uprising in his country. He defiantly blamed the violence on terrorists supported by Syria's enemies and vowed to carry on the fight. How should we respond to the increasingly bloody and brutal events there? The Assad government is well established and armed. Syria is a major power in the region with support of strong international allies like Russia and China. Intervention would be difficult and bloody with an uncertain outcome. But there is compelling reason to believe that Assad's forces are attacking and killing civilians on a massive scale. Are the Russians and Chinese correct to say this is an internal problem of the Syrian people and it should be them and them alone who should solve it? Or do we have an absolute moral obligation not to stand on the side-lines? And if so, what are the boundaries of that moral responsibility? When do the forces of pragmatism give way to principle and if it's right intervene to prevent massacres is it also right to promote democracy?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Clifford Longley, Claire Fox and Kenan Malik.

Witnesses:
Anas Nader - spokesman for the London-based pressure group Friends of Syria
Karl Sharro - writer and commentator on Middle Eastern politics
Medhi Hasan - Political editor of New Statesman
Dr Alan Mendoza - Executive Director of the Henry Jackson Society.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01kkp5s)
Series 3

Leisa Rea: The Delight of Losing

With the pressure on for victory at the Olympics, comedian Leisa Rea ponders the delights of losing.

She reveals what happened when she told a group of school children that she would only be rewarding them for appalling work, which fell way below the expected standard.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Reclaiming the Sceptic (b01kkp5v)
All scientists are sceptics, doubting both their own and others' research, and weighing the evidence carefully to produce the most robust conclusion. Scepticism runs through the culture of science like the word Blackpool through a stick of rock.

The way scientists apply this concept is usually very specific, even-handed and based on a prior understanding of the principles behind the work under consideration. But in recent years there have been increasing examples of scepticism applied in a very different way to science, often based on ideology or political viewpoint. Examples include scepticism of nanotechnology, the safety of mobile phones and genetically modified crops.

Professor Philip Stott explores how scientists use scepticism and doubt in their work and how the proper application of these tools helps produce reliable and valuable information. He talks to working scientists as well as philosophers and sociologists of science, exploring the importance of this fundamental scientific principle.

He also discovers how the scepticism of science differs from the scepticism within science - and how the principle of scepticism can be abused by those who wish to undermine an area of science, applying the principle unevenly to doubt what they don't like yet remaining uncritical of that which matches their personal prejudices. This presents a challenge to science itself, one that researchers of the future will need to understand and work alongside.

Producer: Toby Murcott
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01kknt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01kjfhz)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kkp5x)
Kofi Annan briefs the UN Security Council on plans for Syria as Russian officials meet Syrian opposition; David Miliband talks to World Tonight about global diplomacy and his own political future. Also, has the UK government kicked changes to social care policy into the long grass? Presented tonight by Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kkp5z)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 8

Written by Michael Palin.

Melville agrees to collaborate with Mabbut on his book. But despite the fact that Melville has disappeared again, Keith returns to London to begin writing.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Listen Against (b016ljj6)
Series 4

Episode 1

More mash-ups of current and archive programmes from a week's worth of broadcasting - "beautifully crafted, scalpel sharp" (Gillian Reynolds)

Alice Arnold and Jon Holmes return with the comedy that takes the back off your radio and TV, fiddles round with the shows and puts them all back, the wrong way round.

Like "the mischievous offspring of Points of View and The Day Today" (Observer) fictional letters and emails complain about half-fictional programmes.

Fictional guests and real life presenters (including in this series: Melvyn Bragg, Jeremy Vine and Vanessa Feltz) argue with each other in "a gem of a satirical swoop at radio and television." (Guardian).

Written and created by Jon Holmes.

Kevin Eldon (Brass Eye, Big Train)
Justin Edwards (The Thick of It)
Sarah Hadland (Miranda)
James Bachman (Mitchell & Webb)
Kim Wall (Big Train , IT Crowd)
David Mara (RSC & Donmar Warehouse)

Producer: Sam Bryant.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2011.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kkpn1)
So could the Coalition Government be about to disintegrate after Tuesday's splits over reforming the House of Lords? Sean Curran reports on the scene at Westminster the day after the late night rebellion by Conservative MPs. Ed Miliband and David Cameron do battle in the final round of Prime Ministers Questions before the summer recess. Once again, the Government's economic record is central to the noisy exchanges between the leaders.
Also on the programme:
* A Conservative MP argues that British Commonwealth citizens should be given priority treatment when they pass through airport terminals in the UK.
* Rachel Byrne reports on the latest plans for the funding of care in England. There's plenty of reaction to the proposal that elderly people would be offered loans so the sale of their homes could be delayed until after their deaths.
* Simon Jones reports on MPs' heated discussions over a plan to change the hours they sit in the Commons chamber.
* Bob Clifford reports on the views of the Lords to the current difficulties facing dairy farmers.



THURSDAY 12 JULY 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01kjfjw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01l39px)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfjy)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01kjfk0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01kjfk2)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01kjfk4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01kpv2h)
With the Rev. Peter Baker.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01ks61n)
Charlotte Smith hears from dairy farmers threatening to throw away their milk in protest. Thousands of farmers met in Westminster yesterday, angry about cuts in the price of milk. Farming Minster Jim Paice MP announced more money to help farmers set up producer groups. And Andrew Opie from the British Retail Consortium tells Farming Today that although consumers say they care about farmers, when it comes to shopping, price always comes first.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith. Producer: Emma Weatherill.


THU 06:00 Today (b01kkr40)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01kkr42)
Hadrian's Wall

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Hadrian's Wall, the largest Roman structure and one of the most important archaeological monuments in Britain. Stretching for eighty miles from the mouth of the River Tyne to the Solway Firth and classified today as a World Heritage Site, it has been a source of fascination ever since it came into existence. It was built in about 122 AD by the Emperor Hadrian, and a substantial part of it still survives today. Although its construction must have entailed huge cost and labour, the Romans abandoned it within twenty years, deciding to build the Antonine Wall further north instead. Even after more than a century of excavations, many mysteries still surround Hadrian's Wall, including its exact purpose. Did it have a meaningful defensive role or was it mainly a powerful emperor's vanity project?

With:

Greg Woolf
Professor of Ancient History at the University of St Andrews

David Breeze
Former Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland and Visiting Professor of Archaeology at the University of Durham

Lindsay Allason-Jones
Former Reader in Roman Material Culture at the University of Newcastle

Producer: Victoria Brignell.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01l39qc)
The Ecstasy of Influence

Zelig of Notoriety

In the third essay from his book The Ecstasy Of Influence, the American writer Jonathan Lethem ruminates on famous schoolfriends.

Jonathan Lethem is one of the most idiosyncratic voices in US literature. Before he became a published writer the New Yorker spent 15 years working in secondhand bookshops. His first published works were science fiction stories; before moving on to novels. His interests are eclectic: ranging from Bob Dylan to Marvel comics; Philip K. Dick to cyber culture.

The Ecstasy Of Influence is a collection of previously published pieces and new essays and is a provocative array of the writer's talent.

"One of the most emotionally engaging and intellectually nimble of contemporary novelists"
The Guardian

Reader: Kerry Shale
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kkr44)
Signe Johansen. Marks and Spencer. M&S

With an usually high number of women featuring at this year's Proms - are the doors finally opening up to female conductors and composers. Why does the bulk of the domestic burden still fall to women - who's to blame and does it matter? M&S has reported its worst sales in years - worst hit was clothing. So where is it going wrong and what do women want from the store? We examine the origins of the word "Queen". Plus Norwegian cook and food writer Signe Johansen Cooks the Perfect cinnamon buns.

Producer Dianne McGregor
Presenter Jane Garvey.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kkr46)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 9

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

15 year old Bee and her parents have been preparing for a family trip to Antarctica, but the day before they are due to travel, her mother Bernadette vanishes. From her credit card charges, it appears that Bernadette has travelled to Antarctica on her own, but after that, the trail gets very cold indeed.

In today's episode, Bee and her father Elgin travel to Antarctica on Bernadette's trail.

Adapted and directed by Emma Harding

About the author: Maria Semple has written for television shows including Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen. She lives with her family on an island off Seattle. This is her first novel.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01kkr48)
Some Promised Land

Writer and broadcaster Maria Margaronis follows the route taken by migrants fleeing war or poverty who are risking their lives to reach the Europe Union. It is estimated that around 75 thousand people are attempting to make the perilous journey each year in the hands of unscrupulous traffickers. They are fleeing from war-torn countries like Afghanistan and Somalia or simply in search of a better life where their economic prospects aren't so bleak. Some of them never make it, suffocating in the back of a crowded lorry or drowning in the fast flowing river that marks the border between Turkey and Greece.

The programme meets up with migrants in Istanbul, on the narrow Bosphorus Strait, which has served as the crossroads of the world for thousands of years. There are children making the journey on their own and one man who has lost his fingers and toes to frostbite on a perilous journey over the mountains from Iran. Two of his companions died. The Turkish authorities confess to being overwhelmed by the numbers which are estimated to be up to 250 people a day. Illegal migrants are detained but seldom, it seems, sent back to the countries they came from. There has been an attempt to clamp down on the people traffickers but there are huge profits to be made.

The most dangerous part of the trip is along Turkey's border with Greece. The Greeks are supposed to be building an eight mile fence but that still leaves a river which is 125 miles long. Traffickers put their charges into cheap inflatable boats and push them across, regardless of whether they are able to handle a boat or to swim. Many of them can't.

For those that do make it, there is no Promised Land but an economic crisis and yet more troubles ahead.


THU 11:30 World Service Writers (b01kkr4b)
As the BBC World Service leaves Bush House for a new home, Razia Iqbal takes a look at the writers who have worked there. From the 1940s, when George Orwell and V.S. Naipaul were radio producers, to the death of Georgi Markov and the prize winning novels of Mohammed Hanif and Mirza Waheed, the list of authors who have also made radio programmes for the BBC to broadcast to the rest of the world is long and distinguished. Amongst their number are dissidents, political exiles and presenters who are massively popular in their home countries but are completely unknown in the UK. So, what was it about Bush House that created and nurtured such talents and how was their writing influenced by their work for the BBC? Razi Iqbal talks to a a variety of Bush House writers including Annabel Dilke, the widow of Georgi Markov, Bush House writer in residence Hamid Ismailov, and Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01kkr4d)
O2 network problems, should libraries ever get rid of books, and When I'm 65: The University of the Third Age

The latest on O2's network problems and the people affected.

There is a shortage of products used to treat people with bladder cancer. Sanofi-Pasteur manufactures ImmuCyst, the most widely-used treatment in the UK, and has halted production until late 2013. Advice and information is available on the website of the British Association of Urological Surgeons - www.baus.org.uk

The row that's emerged over Manchester Central Library's decision to dispose of more than a third of its books. Academics and writers have signed an open letter calling for the library to halt the process.

A You and Yours interview more than 30 years ago discussed lifelong learning for older people. It prompted more than 400 letters and later that year, the University of the Third Age was established. We'll discuss the role the U3A plays today, as part of the BBC's When I'm 65 season.

After record-breaking rainfall we visit flood-hit Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire and ask the Association of British Insurers if it's getting harder for people to find affordable cover.


THU 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01kkr4g)
Peter Hall

The New Elizabethans: To mark the Diamond Jubilee, James Naughtie examines the lives and impact of the men and women who have given the second Elizabethan age its character.

Today James Naughtie considers Peter Hall, colossus of 20th Century English theatre, who was responsible for the development, success and longevity of both the RSC and The National Theatre.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Sukey Firth.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01kjfk6)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01kkr4j)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Forty-five minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. Email wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter #wato.


THU 13:45 Siberian Stories (b01kn8k0)
Khakassian Horsemen

Five sketches of life on the move in the wild Siberian borderlands. Cicely Fell follows the upper reaches of the Yenisei river to nomadic and religious communities on the southern edge of Russia.

The horse is at the heart of Khakassia's ancient yet fragile culture. Cicely Fell camps out with a group of horsemen who have returned to a nomadic form of horse herding since the collapse of the local Soviet state farm.

The valley where their herds graze is scattered with ancient rock carvings of horses, traces of a horse culture going back four thousand years. But today, as Cicely discovers, the Khakassian horsemen are struggling to protect their herds from a rare species of red wolf.

Producer: Cicely Fell
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01kkp5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00sv6g0)
Boom Boom

A car crash. A middle aged woman falls for a younger man. What's the connection?

Emily Steel is a new Welsh radio writer, currently under commission to the Sherman Theatre, Cardiff. In her first radio play, developed through BBC writersroom, she takes an unusual approach to romance in later life and the consequences of passion.

Unhappily married Nicola whose reclusive writer husband has little time for her or her work has settled into her existence as a café cum gallery owner. David is a teenager whom she hires as a summer help. Little by little, she finds herself drawn to him, and they become friends. When he falls in love with a girl his own age, she finds to her horror that she is jealous - friendship is in fact love.

As we follow the development of their relationship, we flash back and forth to an apparently unrelated car crash, caused by teenage Adam, driving his dad's car, after an illicit night out with a girl. When Nicola finally tells Stephen about her feelings for David, there are dramatic consequences.

The play brings together Nicola and Adam's stories, two seemingly unrelated incidents, to a powerful conclusion.

Cast:
Nicola ..... Sara MacGaughey
Stephen ..... Steffan Rhodri
David ..... Gareth Aled
Jess ..... Anya Murphy
Adam ..... Scott Arthur
Paramedic ..... Gareth Pierce
Policewoman ..... Lynne Seymour.

A BBC Cymru/Wales production directed by Polly Thomas.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01kkr4l)
As the excitement mounts around London 2012 Helen Mark visits Much Wenlock, the birthplace of the modern Olympics, and explores the landscape around Wenlock Edge.
In the small market town of Much Wenlock in rural Shropshire, Dr William Penny Brookes came up with an inspirational way to promote healthy living to local people by devising an annual Games event which led to the rebirth of the Olympics at its classis home in Athens. The Wenlock Olympian Society has continued with the games which are still a unique annual attraction to this day.
Helen Mark hears from some of the people taking part in, and involved with, the Games and also explores the 'living entity' that is Wenlock Edge. This wooded, limestone escarpment stretches for around 17 miles from Craven Arms to Much Wenlock and finds out more about the history, archaeology and wildlife of this incredible landscape.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01kjjns)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01kjlhh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01kkr4n)
Francine Stock talks to Steven Soderbergh about his latest film, Magic Mike, starring Channing Tatum and Matthew McConaughey, as male strippers in Miami. He also discusses the reasons why he's quitting the film business.

Three generations of film critics - Peter Bradshaw of the Guardian, blogger Charlie Lyne, and student Hattie Soper - discuss the changing nature of their work.

The film Margaret, starring Anna Paquin, Matt Damon and Mark Ruffalo, received rave reviews upon its release last year, but only played at one cinema in central London. As it's released on DVD, the director Kenneth Lonnergan talks about the difficulties in making the film, and why it received such a limited run.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01kkr4q)
With the Olympics only weeks away, airport security has been high on the government's agenda. Recent long queues and the time taken to clear security at Heathrow in particular has been criticised by MPs.

In this week's programme Angela Saini visits the Farnborough International air show to find out how technology might speed up the airport security process. David Smith from FLIR demonstrates a mock-up of a future passenger check-in, where hidden radioactivity detectors can spot suspicious isotopes before those carrying them know they've been scanned. And with the European Union keen to allow bottles of water to be carried again onto planes next year, he demonstrates a scanner which should be able to detect liquid explosives.

Angela also speaks to Oliver Böcking and Mark Stevens, of start-up company DNA-Tracker, about how their technology could track mobile phones to check for suspicious behaviour as passengers move around the terminal.

Angela also discusses with Civil Engineer Peter Budd how good airport design can make visiting airports a positive experience.

And we hear from Designer Bill Walmsley about synthetic sandbag technology, now used to defend many of our airports from car bombs.


THU 17:00 PM (b01kkr4s)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01kjfk8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Old Harry's Game (b01kkr4v)
Olympic Special

Episode 1

The sitcom set in hell returns with a two part special. Six years ago London won the right to host the biggest sporting event in the world and with typical modesty the Brits have barely mentioned it ever since. Well now the news has reached Satan in Hell and he decides to have a little look into this sporting event.

In part one he finds out how it all began by going back to ancient Greece - a time when Greece had great philosophers, big ideas and a bit of cash.

In part two he transports historian Edith from the chaos of Hell up to London in two thousand and twelve so she can appreciate real chaos.

Written by and starring Andy Hamilton as Satan and also starring Annette Crosbie as Edith.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01kkr4x)
The fire is still raging at Brookfield. Pip quickly moves the calves from the shed in case the fire spreads. Ruth and Emma are still frantically searching for George and Josh when they hear their children's replies to their calls. George had sneaked out of the house to help Josh calve Gina. When they realised the barn was alight they lead Gina to safety. There is some trouble though, as the calf has become stuck and Josh needs Ruth's help. Mother and son work as a team and successfully birth a healthy heifer.
There is more good news as the firemen have managed to control the fire. The police have discovered a petrol can in one of the hedges. The authorities will begin their investigations at first light.
Ruth and David are dismayed the attacks are continuing, but everyone is safe so they check in on the new calf. Josh names her Georgina. George thinks this is the best night of his life.
Emma goes to speak to the police about the man she saw, but she suggests she can't be a great deal of help, as she wasn't able to see much in the dark.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01kkr4z)
Antony Gormley; the man behind Angelos Epithemiou revealed

With Mark Lawson, including an interview with the The Angel Of The North sculptor Antony Gormley as a new exhibition, Still Standing, opens in London and a project about Beckett called Godot Tree is unveiled in Enniskillen.

In an exclusive interview the creator of chat show host Angelos Epithemiou, Dan Renton Skinner, reveals for the first time the inspiration behind his comedy character.

Jason Manford is currently starring as an Italian barber in Sweeney Todd yet despite having presented The One Show briefly, the programme does not appear in his credits. Actor Michael Simkins reflects on the art of crafting an actor's CV.

Art crime investigator Dick Ellis reveals what measures can be taken against the theft of sculptures in the wake of the disappearance of a Henry Moore sundial from the grounds of a Hertfordshire museum

Producer Stephen Hughes.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kkr46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01kkr51)
NHS Trust Going Bust

Current affairs series with Wesley Stephenson, combining insights into major news stories with topical investigations. Can lessons be learnt from the first NHS Trust to go bust?


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01kkr53)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan and his executive panel discuss the business of building and running infrastructure - how good is the UK at developing and delivering it? They also swap thoughts on the pros and cons of media training.

Joining Evan in the studio are Steve Holliday, chief executive of international electricity and gas company National Grid plc; Nicola Shaw, chief executive of High Speed One, the Channel Tunnel high-speed rail line; Philip Dilley, chairman of global design, engineering and consulting company Arup Group.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


THU 21:00 Attila The Hen (b00zsdsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01kkr42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01kjfkb)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kkr55)
The government says security is not compromised, but has Olympic planning gone wrong?

The Ethiopian government and human rights.

Mining for gold in Peru.

And how to historic buildings influence those who live and work there?

All that and more with Robin Lustig on The World Tonight.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kkr57)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 9

Written by Michael Palin.

Mabbut submits the manuscript of his book on the elusive Hamish Melville but the publisher isn't happy. And daughter Jay asks Keith for money to help her boyfriend's family back home.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Alice's Wunderland (b01kkr59)
Series 1

Episode 1

A trip round Wunderland, the Poundland of magical realms. It's a kingdom much like our own, and also nothing like it in the slightest.

Stay a while and meet waifs and strays, wigshops and witches, murderous pensioners and squirrels of this delightful land as they go about their bizarre business.

A sketch show written and performed by Alice Lowe.

Also starring:

Richard Glover
Simon Greenall
Rachel Stubbings
Clare Thompson
Marcia Warren

Producer: Sam Bryant

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kkr5c)
Susan Hulme and team with the day's top stories from Westminster - including the Home Secretary Theresa May is called to the Commons to explain the Olympics security situation; and the Defence Secretary Philip Hammond is questioned by a Committee of MPs. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



FRIDAY 13 JULY 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01kjfl9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01l39qc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01kjflc)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01kjflf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01kjflk)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01kjflm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01kksqp)
With the Rev. Peter Baker.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01kksqr)
Charlotte Smith speaks to a Devonshire farmer preparing for a trial badger cull on his land this autumn.
It follows the High Court's decision to give the English cull of badgers the go-ahead after a legal challenge by the Badger Trust failed. Now, NFU Cymru say they want to see the Welsh Government follow in DEFRA's footsteps.

As some dairy farmers plan for a day of direct action over price cuts, Caz Graham discusses the old days of the Milk Marketing Board with Cumbrian farmer Russell Bowman. And Kevin Bellamy Global Dairy Analyst for Rabobank International explains to Charlotte it's not just in the UK where milk prices have fallen, but across the world.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith. Producer: Clare Freeman.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01kksqt)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01kjjp1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01l39qk)
The Ecstasy of Influence

Micropsia and What Remains of My Plan

In this essay from his book The Ecstasy Of Influence, the American writer Jonathan Lethem on the ghosts who sit at the writer's table.

Jonathan Lethem is one of the most idiosyncratic voices in US literature. Before he became a published writer the New Yorker spent 15 years working in secondhand bookshops. His first published works were science fiction stories; before moving on to novels. His interests are eclectic: ranging from Bob Dylan to Marvel comics; Philip K. Dick to cyber culture.

The Ecstasy Of Influence is a collection of previously published pieces and new essays and is a provocative array of the writer's talent.

"One of the most emotionally engaging and intellectually nimble of contemporary novelists"
The Guardian

Reader: Kerry Shale
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kksqw)
Feminist Protest, Female Prisoners, Dealing with Death, Buffalo Gals and Single Muslim Mums

The old taunt has always been that feminists have no sense of humour. But young women are increasingly using wit and satire to poke fun at patriarchy and sexist attitudes. In French members of La Barbe don false beards, there have been sex strikes in Belgium, topless protest in Kiev, slutwalks around the world and in London the Muff March. Such antics may be hilarious, but what do they actually achieve? Only half of all women on remand in prison receive visits from their family, and the figures are no better who see their children while in jail according to the Prison Reform Trust. With only thirteen female prisons in the country many women are forced to serve their sentences far from home and contact with their family often breaks down as a result. The Trust says the answer is to impose custodial sentence on fewer women, many of whom serve only a short time in jail. A Muslim woman facing the challenges of being a single mother has created a Facebook page to support women who find themselves in a similar position. Misbah Akhtar created her Single Muslim Mums Facebook site earlier this year and it's gained followers around the world who are finding emotional support and advice amongst the online sisterhood. Felicity Finch meets The Buffalo Gals, who play the front-porch music of the early American settlers. And, in the past when someone died we would have worn mourning clothes or a black armband to let others know we had suffered a bereavement. But many of the old public rituals have disappeared and grief has become almost private. What's the best way to express sympathy to someone who is bereaved - a letter, a card, an email? Or perhaps a poem? Jackie Kay and Wendy Cope talk about the healing power of poetry.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kksqy)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 10

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson and Richard Laing.

In today's episode, Bee and Elgin continue their search for the missing Bernadette on the forbidding continent of Antarctica.

CAST:

Bernadette ..... Miranda Richardson
Bee .... Lydia Wilson
Elgin .... Richard Laing
Audrey .... Madeleine Potter
Soo Lin .... Laurel Lefkow
Marcus Strang .... Don Gilet
Ollie-O/ Jacob .... Sam Alexander
Paul Jellinek .... Patrick Brennan
Helen/ Gwen Goodyear .... Susie Riddell
Dr Kurtz .... Christine Absalom

Other parts played by members of the company.

Adapted and directed by Emma Harding

About the author: Maria Semple has written for television shows including Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen. She lives with her family on an island off Seattle. This is her first novel.


FRI 11:00 Hobson-Jobson: A Very English Enterprise (b01kksr0)
Poet Daljit Nagra revels in the extraordinary word horde of Hobson-Jobson, the legendary dictionary of British India.

Hobson-Jobson has resulted in more English words of Indian origin entering the OED than of any other country - dinghy, bungalow and shampoo to name a few. Since its first publication in 1886, Hobson-Jobson has been continuously in print for 140 years and has amused, inspired and seduced generations of writers from Rudyard Kipling to Salman Rushdie.

Dr Kate Teltscher of Roehampton University is producing a new edition for publication later this year as part of the Oxford World Classics series and she is entranced. She says it breaks all the rules about dictionaries. It's madly scholarly yet hugely idiosyncratic and fun.

Hobson-Jobson was compiled by two extraordinary polymaths Henry Yule and Arthur Burnell, who corresponded with scholars, diplomats, missionaries, intelligence officers and army personnel across the globe to produce their 1000 page lexicon.

In this programme, actor Tim Pigott-Smith reads entertaining and intriguing entries from Hobson-Jobson, and playwright Tom Stoppard describes how it inspired a famous scene in his play Indian Ink.

Professor Javed Majeed highlights the ambivalent British attitudes towards India evident in Hobson-Jobson, while novelist Amitav Ghosh remarks on the prudishness of the compilers, and poet Daljit Nagra shows how Hobson-Jobson has become his 'word horde', offering exciting pathways to create new poems such as This Be The Pukka Verse.

An entertaining etymological adventure into the long and complex relationship between Britain and Asia.

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 The Gobetweenies (b01kl20n)
Series 2

Happy Father's Day

Mark Bonnar and Sarah Alexander star as the exes determined to be double- not single-parents and bring their kids up together apart.

But Lucy has noticed the difference between her affluent mum, a children's fiction writer, and her broke dad who has just started a new job with Your Pets Painted in the Afterlife.com. She figures her dad he needs a proper Father's Day present, and her tuba has served it's purpose of getting her into that good state school where she doesn't get bricks thrown at her head. So why not take a visit to the pawn shop?

Her mum Mimi's young life was blighted by a no-show actor dad but she has fibbed to her kids, telling them her missing magical dad suffered from Dramnesia. When Tom discovers his granddad is starring in a stool-softening advert he invites him to visit. Won't his mum be delighted?

Director: Marilyn Imrie
Producer: Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01kksr4)
Bribery in business, cheap theatre seats and football kit

Senior executives in the grocery trade have told a poll that nearly half of them have been offered bribes aimed at securing shelf space in retail stores.

The final report in our 'Ageing Series' looks at how ageing is portrayed in advertising and the media.

The National Theatre has stopped selling cheap 'on the day' tickets for the front rows at its Olivier Theatre ending a practice that has run since it moved to its South Bank base in 1976.

Female fans of Everton Football Club are protesting at the club's decision not to offer a ladies version of the club strip.


FRI 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01kksr6)
Terence Conran

The New Elizabethans: Terence Conran. To mark the Diamond Jubilee, James Naughtie examines the lives and impact of the men and women who have given the second Elizabethan age its character.

Terence Conran has changed the way Britain looks and introduced the concept of good taste and design to the living room in post war Britain. Still working at 80, his career spans a revolution in the restaurant world, the founding of the Design Museum, his home retail and style makeover with the Habitat and Conran stores together with his many books on food and lifestyle.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01kjflp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01kksr8)
As the government announces a new fund to encourage banks to lend to business, we ask Treasury minister - David Gauke - if it will really work. One MP tells us that with the amount of money being given to G4S, they should be providing 'a Rolls-Royce service' for the Olympics. Britain's ambassador to the United Nations - Sir Mark Lyell Grant - explains the latest diplomatic negotiations over Syria. And Northern Ireland's Justice Minister - David Ford - gives his reaction to the rioting in North Belfast.


FRI 13:45 Siberian Stories (b01knbgg)
Reindeer People

Five sketches of life on the move in the wild Siberian borderlands. Cicely Fell follows the upper reaches of the Yenisei river to nomadic and religious communities on the southern edge of Russia.

The Tozhu reindeer people live in the remote taiga forests of eastern Tuva, on Russia's border with Mongolia. For thousands of years, these nomadic hunters have kept small herds of reindeer as pack and riding animals and for milk.

Today, with the construction of the first railway into Tuva and the arrival of Russian and Chinese mining giants in the taiga, the Tozhu's traditional lands are under threat. Fewer than twenty reindeer herding families remain active in Tuva and the number of reindeer has fallen to around 1,000.

Cicely travels to the Kyrganai family's summer encampment in the high mountain taiga, a week's ride from the nearest village. The disappearance of Soviet subsidies and transportation has split the reindeer herding families between their camps in the taiga and the villages. Today they have no income and no access to provisions or medicines. Economic hardships and the depletion of wild game stocks by commercial hunters are driving the Tozhu to sell their reindeer for meat, using nearby mines as trading posts.

Producer: Cicely Fell
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01kkr4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01kksrb)
Sensationomics

by Philip de Gouveia

At the end of a long hard day, all a steel-nosed City trader wants to do is to get home. What he hasn't banked on is the tale his eccentric cab driver is keen to tell. About a young African girl sent by her struggling mother to live in the UK, in search of a better life. But what on earth does it have to do with him?

Lacey.....Sharon D Clarke
Gloria.....Amaka Okafor
Mother.....Gbemisola Ikumelo
Murphy.....Trevor White
Passenger.....Piers Wehner
Martha.....Tracy Wiles
Ted.....Sam Alexander
Quentin.....Don Gilet

Economic Advisor Paul Mason
Producer/Director Marion Nancarrow.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01kksrd)
North Yorkshire

Eric Robson and the team meet gardeners from North Yorkshire. Bob Flowerdew, Christine Walkden and Matthew Biggs form the panel. In addition, Pippa Greenwood reports on human allergies to plants.

Questions answered in the programme:

What is a fool-proof method for growing melons?

My favourite Hosta ('Great Expectations') has started to send out plain, unvarigated leaves, is there anything I can do to stop this?

My apple tree seems to suffer from a pest that has a white cotton wool like substance with little black insects in. How can I get rid of this infestation or do I need to pull it out and replace it?

I planted a Yew hedge 3 years ago. The plants have grown 1- 1.5 ft but aren't bushing out - how can I encourage them to merge into one hedge?

What damage would a cockchafer grub do in my garden and was I right to kill it?

How can I revive my poorly Pyrcantha?

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Elizabeth Taylor Short Stories (b01kksrg)
The Blush

Acclaimed short story writer and novelist Elizabeth Taylor was known for her witty and powerful explorations of the bitter frustrations and passions which lurk beneath the civilised veneer of middle class life.

In The Blush, the peaceful but empty existence of a childless housewife implodes when she realises that the influence of her cleaning lady is far more wide-reaching than she had ever imagined.

Produced by Amanda Hargreaves.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01kktmd)
Ernest Borgnine, Elinor Ostrom, Jeff Keen, Andy Hamilton and Lol Coxhill

Matthew Bannister on

Craggy film and tv character actor Ernest Borgnine - best known for playing baddies in a host of war and western movies..

The Nobel prize winning political scientist Elinor Ostrom, whose theories influenced policy on the management of common resources

The avant garde film maker and artist Jeff Keen

And the jazz saxophonist Andy Hamilton, an immigrant from the West Indies who worked to improve community relations in the West Midlands.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b01kktmg)
Who are the Libor losers?

In this week's programme:

Libor losers

How much damage did messing with Libor really do to the financial system? After all, most financial trades are two way bets - and for every winner, there is a loser. Did the banks really pick our pockets as they manipulated Libor? Or were they just picking each others'?

A million starving children?

We investigate the claim made by a leading charity that a million British children are "starving".

Challenge Yan

Yan Wong from "Bang Goes the Theory" offers to answer any question More or Less listeners can throw at him.

Crunching the census

Late last March, you may remember filling in a form for the 2011 census. Whatever happened to that? Well, the first results for England, Wales and Northern Ireland are coming out next week. We find out what we'll be finding out.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Richard Knight.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01kktmj)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01kjflt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b01kktml)
Series 37

Episode 6

Reformation: in a week of Lord's reform, and mooted changes to benefits for pensioners, Susan Calman, Mitch Benn and Laura Shavin join Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis to examine the stories making the news this week. Susan Calman inquires into the process of inquiries; Gareth Gwynn sets out the mammoth task ahead of the new BBC Director General; and Mitch Benn plays tribute to 50 years of the Rolling Stones. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01kktmn)
Adam helps Brookfield after the fire and provides David with some supplies. Adam is extremely grateful to David for agreeing to give evidence against those who attacked him, but David should think about his family's safety and perhaps decide against testifying.
Meanwhile, Annabelle has uncovered Gerry's interest in Home Farm's arable contract. He wants Borchester Land to drop the contract to farm Estate land and wants it open for discussion at the next board meeting. Brian is still not worried. He is confident Home Farm provides the best deal for BL.
It's Sam's wedding day and Keith and Emma discuss the ceremony. Emma wonders if Keith is all right, as he was limping down the aisle. Keith states he hurt his ankle falling over Chelsea's hamster.
Later, Tracy and Keith discuss the fire at Brookfield and Keith rushes off to find Emma when he realises she was there. When he keeps saying how sorry he is, Emma becomes suspicious of his erratic actions. When she gets a moment alone with Ed she raises the possibility that the man she saw running away from the fire could have been Keith.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01kktmq)
Eoin Colfer; Catherine the Great; loneliness of a soloist

With John Wilson.

Author Eoin Colfer reveals the reason that he decided to put an end to the saga of his best-selling hero Artemis Fowl, despite his publisher's wishes.

Tonight is the start of the BBC Proms 2012 - but what's it like being a world-class classical soloist? Mezzo-soprano Alice Coote, violinist Maxim Vengerov and trumpeter Alison Balsom reveal some of the pressures they face, and Colin Lawson, director of the Royal College of Music, discusses whether students can be prepared for life on the international stage.

To mark the 250th anniversary of the coup d'état which placed Catherine the Great on the Russian throne, the National Museum of Scotland is holding an exhibition exploring how she used artworks to express her power. Dr Mikhail Piotrovsky, Director of the State Hermitage Museum, explains what the collection tells us about Catherine herself.

John revisits Afghan war veterans Rifleman Daniel Shaw and Sapper Lyndon Chatting-Walters, as they prepare to go on tour with Owen Sheers' play The Two Worlds of Charlie F. John first met them in rehearsal, and they now reflect on their stage nerves and their readiness to take to the road.

Producer Ellie Bury.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kksqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01kktms)
Uckfield, East Sussex

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a discussion of news and politics from one of the winners of the BBC's nationwide Schools' Questions and Answers challenge, Uckfield Community Technology College, East Sussex, with panellists: Jeremy Hunt, Secretary of State for Culture, Media, Sport and the Olympics; Liz Kendall, Shadow Minister for Care and Older People; Liberal Democrat peer, Matthew Oakeshott; and historian, David Starkey

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01kktmx)
Why humans are violent

John Gray reflects on the nature of violence which he sees as an inevitable part of the human condition. He analyses the impulses which drive us to fight one another and takes issue with the philosopher Hobbes' view that violence can be tamed principally by the use of reason. "The vast industrial style wars of the last century may have been left behind, but they have been followed by other forms of human conflict, in their way no less destructive".

Producer:
Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b01kktmz)
Landfall

Five misfits travel to a mysterious planet to recover ore left by a mining operation and encounter a truly extraordinary intelligence. An original Science Fiction adventure by Mike Walker.

Cally ... Nicola Miles-Wilden
Intaba ... Cyril Nri
Hudson ... Clare Perkins
JD ... Alex Tregear
Hussam ... Adeel Akhtar

Sound design by Pete Ringrose and Colin Guthrie

The director is Marc Beeby

When five lost souls, recruited by the Company travel to an abandoned planet, all they know is that they are to retrieve the only known sample of an ore left over from an old mining operation. But their task becomes considerably more complicated when one of their party has a close encounter with the indigenous plant life - plant life which seems to have some very odd, very powerful properties. Soon they are battling not only to stay alive, but to hang on to the very things that make them human.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01kjflw)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kktn1)
Mass killings in the Syrian village of Tremseh; what further diplomatic pressure can be put on President Assad? Where does John Terry's acquittal on racism charges leave the anti-racism campaign in the UK; and business secretary Vince Cable discusses his latest initiative to get growth back into dynamic sector's of the economy. Tonight with Ritula Shah.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kktn3)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 10

Written by Michael Palin.

Publisher Ron Latham tells Mabbut that he's missed the real story of Melville and directs him to a man called Trickett to hear the truth. And Jay's boyfriend Shiraj disappears with Mabbut's money.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01kjt88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kktny)
Mark D'Arcy with the day's top news stories from Westminster - with MPs voting for a crackdown on metal thieves; more criticism of the killings in Syria; and fresh Labour jibes over the Coalition's plans for House of Lords reform.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01kjqzs)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01kjqzs)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01kjsg1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01kjsg1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01kknt8)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01kknt8)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01kkr46)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01kkr46)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01kksqy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01kksqy)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01kjt88)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01kjt88)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01kbm19)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01kktmx)

Alice's Wunderland 23:00 THU (b01kkr59)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01k9qd8)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01kjs1l)

Ann Widdecombe's Hell Hounds and Night Hags 16:00 MON (b01kjs14)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01kjgp7)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01kbm17)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01kktms)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01kjgxc)

Attila The Hen 11:00 TUE (b00zsdsb)

Attila The Hen 21:00 THU (b00zsdsb)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01kjjnj)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01kjjnj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01kjs1q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01kjtgr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01kkp5z)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01kkr57)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01kktn3)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01kbltc)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01l348t)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01l348t)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01l39px)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01l39px)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01l39qc)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01l39qc)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01l39qk)

Britain in a Box 10:30 SAT (b01kjgnx)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01kjjnx)

Capital Justice 09:30 MON (b01hf135)

Changing My Voice 15:30 SAT (b01k9vh0)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01k9npd)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01kjlhf)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b01k9q73)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b01kjs12)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b01kkr48)

Crouching Low, Hidden Camera - Life as a P.I. 13:30 SUN (b01k9wpt)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01kjjp1)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01kjjp1)

Drama 14:15 MON (b01kjs10)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01kjt7r)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00sx8nj)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00sv6g0)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01kksrb)

Elizabeth Taylor Short Stories 15:45 FRI (b01kksrg)

Face the Facts 12:30 WED (b01kmjj6)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01kjgnq)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01kjp46)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01kjsfv)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01kknt0)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01ks61n)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01kksqr)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01kbm0x)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01kbg86)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01kjtf0)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b01kbj39)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01kkp5s)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b01kktmz)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b01kjgx7)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b01kjgx7)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01kjgp3)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01kjs1g)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01kjtdy)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01kkp5n)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01kkr4z)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01kktmq)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01kbm0q)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01kksrd)

Hobson-Jobson: A Very English Enterprise 11:00 FRI (b01kksr0)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:00 SUN (b01k9qc1)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b01kjs1b)

In His Element 11:00 MON (b01kjr7t)

In Living Memory 21:30 TUE (b01c7rgs)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01kkr42)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01kkr42)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01kjtfg)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01kjtkq)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01kjtkq)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01kbm0v)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01kktmd)

Listen Against 23:00 WED (b016ljj6)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01kjgpl)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 MON (b018xs8f)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01kblcx)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01kkr4q)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01kblsb)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01kjfbx)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01kjfdt)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01kjfg7)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01kjfhj)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01kjfjw)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01kjfl9)

Midsummer Tales 00:30 SUN (b01kjjng)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01kknt4)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01kknt4)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01kknzf)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01kjgp5)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01kjgp5)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b01kkp5q)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b01kktmg)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 WED (b01kknzp)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01kblsl)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01kjfc7)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01kjff2)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01kjfgh)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01kjfhs)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01kjfk4)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01kjflm)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01kjfc9)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01kblsn)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01kjfcf)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01kjfck)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01kblt5)

News 13:00 SAT (b01kblsx)

No Extremists Please - We're British! 16:00 TUE (b01kjt7y)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b01k9wpr)

Off the Page 15:30 TUE (b01kjt7w)

Old Harry's Game 18:30 THU (b01kkr4v)

Old Photographs Fever - The Search for China's Pictured Past 11:00 WED (b01kkntb)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01kjjnn)

One to One 00:30 WED (b01cjwtg)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01kjlhh)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01kjlhh)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01kblcs)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01kkr4l)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01kjgpf)

PM 17:00 MON (b01kjs18)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01kjt9f)

PM 17:00 WED (b01kknzm)

PM 17:00 THU (b01kkr4s)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01kktmj)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01kjlhm)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01k9n89)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b01kjlhk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01kbm3p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01kjp44)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01kpv16)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01kpv1s)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01kpv2h)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01kksqp)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01kjjns)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01kjjns)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01kjjns)

Reclaiming the Sceptic 21:00 WED (b01kkp5v)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01kjgp9)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01kjgnv)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01kjgx9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01kblsg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01kjfc1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01kjfdy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01kjfgc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01kjfhn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01kjfk0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01kjflf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01kblsd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01kblsj)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01kblsz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01kjfbz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01kjfc5)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01kjfcp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01kjfdw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01kjff0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01kjfg9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01kjfgf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01kjfhl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01kjfhq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01kjfjy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01kjfk2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01kjflc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01kjflk)

Sibelius: A Symphony That Burned 11:30 TUE (b01kjt7h)

Siberian Stories 13:45 MON (b01kjs0y)

Siberian Stories 13:45 TUE (b01kmjg6)

Siberian Stories 13:45 WED (b01kmjp5)

Siberian Stories 13:45 THU (b01kn8k0)

Siberian Stories 13:45 FRI (b01knbgg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01kblt3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01kjfct)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01kjff8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01kjfgm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01kjfhx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01kjfk8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01kjflt)

Sketchorama 18:30 TUE (b01kjt9h)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01kjjnl)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01kjjnl)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01kjjnv)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01kjjnq)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01kjjnz)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01kjlhp)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01kjlhp)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01kjs1d)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01kjs1d)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01kjsm2)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01kjsm2)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01kkp5l)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01kkp5l)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01kkr4x)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01kkr4x)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01kktmn)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01kbld9)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01kkr53)

The Castle 11:30 WED (b01hxzx3)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01kblcv)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01kkr4n)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01kjjtc)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01kjjtc)

The Food of Love 19:45 SUN (b01kjlhr)

The Gobetweenies 11:30 FRI (b01kl20n)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b01kjs16)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b01kjs16)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b01kjt7t)

The Long View 09:00 MON (b01kjqzl)

The Long View 21:30 MON (b01kjqzl)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01kknzk)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 MON (b01kjr7y)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 TUE (b01kjt7m)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 THU (b01kkr4g)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 FRI (b01kksr6)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b01kbm11)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b01kktml)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b01jmxrx)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b01jmxsk)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01kkr51)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01kjgnz)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01kjjtf)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01kjs1n)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01kjtgp)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01kkp5x)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01kkr55)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01kktn1)

The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b01by9l4)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01kbhk6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01kknzh)

Through Persian Eyes 20:00 MON (b01kjs1j)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01kjs1s)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01kjtks)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01kkpn1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01kkr5c)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01kktny)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01kjgns)

Today 06:00 MON (b01kjp48)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01kjsfx)

Today 06:00 WED (b01kknt2)

Today 06:00 THU (b01kkr40)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01kksqt)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01kblsq)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01kblss)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01kblsv)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01kblt1)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01kjfcc)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01kjfch)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01kjfcm)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01kjfcr)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01kjff4)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01kjff6)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01kjffb)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01kjfgk)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01kjfgp)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01kjfhv)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01kjfhz)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01kjfk6)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01kjfkb)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01kjflp)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01kjflw)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01kjlht)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01kjlhw)

Witness 14:45 SUN (b01kjlhc)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01kjgpc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01kjqzq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01kjsfz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01kknt6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01kkr44)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01kksqw)

World Service Writers 11:30 THU (b01kkr4b)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01kjr80)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01kjt7p)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01kknzc)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01kkr4j)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01kksr8)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01kjr7w)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01kjt7k)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01kknvz)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01kkr4d)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01kksr4)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01kbm3r)