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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 30 JUNE 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01k2fcb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01k2f7l)
Damn His Blood

Episode 5

'Damn him!' he swore. 'There is no more harm in shooting him than a mad dog!'

The brutal murder of the Reverend George Parker in the rural village of Oddingley on Midsummer's Day in 1806 gripped the nation. It was a strange case in an isolated Worcester village still bound by superstition and folklore, involving an investigation that lasted nearly a quarter of a century. It turned out to be a gripping true story of brutality, greed and ruthlessness in a rural community gone wildly astray.

In today's final episode, nearly a quarter of a century has passed, and the case has still not been solved. But a gruesome discovery leads to a new inquest, and Oddingley village finally learns the truth.

Peter Moore is a young literary historian and journalist, who is currently teaching Creative Writing at City University in London.

Abridger: Viv Beeby
Producer: Justine Willett
The Reader is Alex Jennings, who is currently appearing in The Collaborators as Mikhail Bulgakov at the National Theatre and is currently starring in Silk on BBC One.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01k2fcd)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01k2fcg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01k2fcj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01k2fcl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01k2ffq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch, a student of Tibetan Buddhism.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01k2ffs)
'I escaped drink-sodden, maudlin, macho nationalism.' A Scots listener explains why she backs the Union and how she became a proud 'Londoner'. Dot "Wimbledot" Davis reads Your News. With Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01k2fcn)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01k2fcq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b01k2bw1)
Series 21

Whitley Bay with Barry Stone

Clare Balding is walking with dogs (and their owners) throughout this series of Ramblings.

Prog 6 - Whitley Bay with Barry Stone

In this week's programme Clare Balding meets author Barry Stone, his partner Paul and their dog, Bonzo the black Lab.

Barry's childhood was coloured by the secret of his father's homosexuality and alcoholism; both parents had been traumatised by their experiences during the second world war and Barry had a deep personal struggle in coming to terms with his own sexuality.

Over the years he attempted to write his story - eventually burning one manuscript of 300,000 words - and it was only at his mother's funeral that he was struck by the need to write through the 'voice' of Brucie (his childhood pet dog). The resulting book, a semi-autobiographical novel called 'Barking at Winston' was initially self-published with local distribution but was quickly picked up commercially and is now selling successfully around the country.

Barry and Paul take Clare on a favourite local walk through Whitley Bay to the village of Holywell. Starting at Barry's childhood home, the place where Brucie first came into his life, they head down to the beach and then the promenade of Whitley Bay sea-front. From there they turn inland and walk through Holywell Dene - a beautiful and peaceful area of ancient woodland - before heading home.

Producer Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01k9lbw)
Farming Today This Week

Charlotte Smith visits a farmers' market in Birmingham to find out how important direct selling is for agriculture. She hears from a farmer who is struggling to find somewhere to sell his sausages because all the farmers' markets around him are full. And Charlotte visits a market in Birmingham which is run by a private company to ask whether the farmers' market name is being diluted.

Clare Freeman visits Moseley Farmers' Market which is considering moving from monthly to bi-weekly. Could it replace the local supermarket for the weekly shop? And Gareth Jones from FARMA,the national market association, tells Charlotte that farmers' markets are increasingly available to people from all incomes.

The presenter is Charlotte Smith and the producer is Emma Weatherill.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01k2fcs)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01k9lby)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by John Humphrys and Evan Davis, featuring calls for a banking inquiry, prisoner rehabilitation, plus examining email etiquette.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01k9lc0)
Sir Christopher Frayling; Giles Coren Daytrip; Tippi Hedren's Inheritance Tracks

Sian Williams & Richard Coles with author and arts champion Sir Christopher Frayling, Steve Marsling and Sean Hosey tell the story of their lives as undercover ANC recruits; listener Rupert Horrox describes how he chanced on a film set and ended up on the red carpet; listener Gail Simmons delivers a Soundsculpture about an iron; John McCarthy reveals more of Gran Canaria; JP Devlin goes on a Daytrip with broadcaster and food critic Giles Coren; and actress, model and lion-keeper Tippi Hedren shares her Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 10:30 Britain in a Box (b01k9lc2)
Series 5

Pop Idol

Paul Jackson returns with a new series of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

Over the next three days he'll be exploring the innovation of 'Vision On' and assessing the legacy of 'Grandstand', but he kicks off with a programme that re-wrote the rules for talent shows, saved a network and conquered the world.

1. Pop Idol - began life as an idea captured on a scrap of paper... went on to make global superstars of some of its participants... and now generates over one and a half billion dollars a season in advertising income in the US alone. With the help of those who sold and who bought the original UK shows, those who fronted it and those who appeared on it, Paul Jackson traces its step-by-step development.

Those appearing include producers Alan Boyd and Richard Holloway, commissioners Claudia Rosencrantz and David Liddiment, presenters Ant and Dec, winner Michelle McManus and commentators Mike Smith and Nina Myskow.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01k9lc4)
Fraser Nelson of The Spectator looks at the latest sudden U-turn by George Osborne; at the growing row over Lords' reform; and at a painful television interview. He also hears a Conservative protest at the prospect of regional pay.

His guests are Nigel Lawson, Alistair Darling, John Reid, Duncan Hames, Andrew Turner, Guy Opperman and Jacob Rees Mogg.

The Editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01k9lc6)
Churches and mosques are being targeted by the Boko Haram militant group in Nigeria. Will Ross has been to the northern city of Jos, a city he says feels like it's under seige.

The Europe-wide debt crisis is increasingly being felt in Italy, where both prices and unemployment are soaring. Alan Johnston's in a suburb of Rome, hearing that people have begun to feel the pinch.

It's fifty years now since Algerians won their battle for independence from France. Chloe Arnold in Algiers has been meeting a woman who feels she did her bit to liberate the country.

Jim Carey's in Jordan, a kingdom which prefers hospitality to headlines and has a policy of being nice to everybody.

And is conformism really a feature of the French psyche? It's a question which has been troubling Hugh Schofield on his morning runs around the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01k9lc8)
The Financial Services Authority has announced it's found "serious failings" in the way banks sold complex interest rate products to some small and medium-sized businesses. They were supposed to protect them in case interest rates went up. But in reality, some increased their borrowing costs.

Money Box hears from Anne who runs a small business. She took out a mortgage with one of the banks, but it was conditional on a complicated "interest rate swap", which she really didn't understand but felt obliged to sign up to. She's struggling to cover the monthly payments.

Paul Lewis also talks to Martin Berkeley, Senior Consultant, from Vedanta Hedging, an independent hedging company that advises business on hedging.

Compensation for RBS customers?

11 days after Natwest, RBS and Ulster bank first experienced a technical fault that left thousands of customers unable to see or access their money, we ask what the bank is doing to compensate all those who have been affected.

We also explore how the bank can guarantee customers credit ratings will not be affected by missed payments caused by the glitch.

Meanwhile up to 1.9 million customers of Ulster Bank are still unable to access their accounts. We hear from one customer who had to fly out to Portugal after his 18 year old brother and his friends got stuck out there with no money.

Paul speaks to Antoinette McKeown, Chief Executive of the Consumer Council for Northern Ireland.
Paul also puts your credit reference concerns to Tom Ilube, from the credit reference agency Callcredit.

Closed Accounts

The chairman of a key consumer body has called for major changes in the way banks deal with customers where there is an allegation of fraudulent activity on an account.

Adam Phillips, who chairs the FSA's Consumer Panel says current practices are "Kafkaesque."

Money Box first highlighted this issue in November, when we reported how NatWest had closed an account of six month old girl. Bob Howard reports.

Problems with prepaid currency cards?

Prepaid currency cards are becoming an increasingly popular way to take cash abroad. But some Money Box listeners have fallen foul of the small print.

Money Box hears from one Cash Passport customer who found the money she'd loaded on to the card had been eaten up by fees, because she hadn't used the card often enough. Another, with an STA cashcard found she couldn't access her money until she'd upgraded her card.

Paul Lewis talks to Amit Sharma, CEO of prepaid365.com, a comparison website for prepaid cards.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b01k2f8m)
Series 37

Episode 4

The 2015 Election Starts Here: in the week that David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg all seemed to set out their stalls for future policies, Jon Holmes, Marcus Brigstocke, Mitch Benn and Pippa Evans join Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis to review the news. With special guest appearance from John Humphrys. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01k2fcv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01k2fcx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01k2f8t)
Curdridge, Hampshire

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a panel discussion of news and politics from a Young Carers' Festival organised by YMCA and the Children's Society at YMCA Fairthorne Manor near Southampton. On the panel: Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Chuka Umunna; chief executive of Barnardo's Anne Marie Carrie; Liberal Democrat MP and Minister for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Jeremy Browne and author and journalist Harry Mount.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01k9lcb)
Call Anita Anand on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The topics discussed on Any Questions? were: banking regulation, welfare reform, House of Lords reform and carers. Questions included:

Can regulation ever successfully cure the bank problems?

Does the panel think there is any merit in the suggestion that housing benefit could be made available to the over-25s only?

If the House of Commons is supposed to represent the public's opinions, why is it forcing reform in the House of Lords when it is not considered important by most people.

If you imagine you're doing your studies and are already failing to cope, now bring your parents into the equation and they're ill or unable, how would you deal with this?

Does the team think that many more of the million-plus unsold seats for the Olympic football game would have been sold if David Beckham had been selected?

Producer: Anna Bailey.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01k9lcd)
Menna Gallie - Strike for a Kingdom

By Menna Gallie
Dramatised by Diana Griffiths

It's 1926 and in the small Welsh valleys village of Cilhendre, the miners are on strike. When the local mine's manager is found dead, the murder investigation begins to expose the tensions and secrets of this close knit community.

Paul Rhys stars in a new adaptation of Menna Gallie's classic novel. First published in 1959, Strike for a Kingdom was Menna Gallie's first book. Menna grew up in a small village in the Swansea valley which serves as a template for the fictional Cilhendre. She was six at the time of the miner's strike, though deeply affected by its impact on her community.

Strike for a Kingdom is two things: It's a darkly engrossing murder mystery that keeps you guessing until the end. But it's also a beautifully poetic evocation of a close knit community struggling to survive in a world of extreme poverty.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales production.


SAT 15:30 John Barry - The Lost Tapes (b01k1my3)
One of Britain's premier film composers, John Barry was renowned for his scores for the early James Bond films as well as Midnight Cowboy, Out of Africa and Dances With Wolves. The winner of five Oscars, Barry, who passed away in 2011, was a private man - but 'John Barry - The Lost Tapes' offers a revealing insight into his working life

Author and broadcaster Eddi Fiegel, during the course of many extensive interviews with John for her biography, also recorded a conversation for BBC radio, which was never broadcast and considered lost.

Barry was a vivid raconteur and recounted the first decade of his career, from fledgling pop musician and producer to Oscar winning-composer. He also gave me some rare insights into his song writing craft.

He talked fondly about his early days with his instrumental group The John Barry Seven, his recordings with Adam Faith, the first venture into film and his remarkable recordings on the James Bond movies. With the success of Goldfinger in 1964, barely a week seemed to go by without John receiving a new film commission. It was a prolific time for him and, over the next two years, his scores included Thunderball, Richard Lester's The Knack and The Ipcress File starring a young Michael Caine. The pair became firm friends.

John's Oscar winning score for Born Free made him an international figure and the royal screening of the film saw a leading British actor 'throw a fit' when upstaged in front of the Royal family.

Producer: John Sugar
A Sugar production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01k9lvg)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Thomasina Miers, Masterchef

Has the feminist label got any appeal for young men ? Why's the British government so intrigued by the way the Danish government manages issues of childcare and parenting. Former Masterchef winner Thomasina Miers Cooks the Perfect - Spinach and Feta Tacos. Author Kathryn Flett talks about her first novel. Could the app that claims to alert you to the bars with the best talent help you find love ? Plus jazz singer Kate Dimbleby on why she finds Dory Previn such an inspiration.
Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer Ruth Watts
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01k9lvj)
Saturday PM

The day's top news stories, with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01k2cfc)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan and his executive guests consider how well the market works at allocating investment capital to the right businesses. Do deserving companies get enough, do the undeserving get more than they should?

Joining Evan in the studio are Terry Smith, chief executive of stockbrokers Tullett Prebon; Israeli serial entrepreneur and investor Yossi Vardi; Ken Olisa, chairman of boutique technology merchant bank Restoration Partners.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01k2fcz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01k2fd1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01k2fd3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01k9lvl)
James Naughtie, Jenny Eclair, David Starkey and Simon Armitage

Clive's Thought For Today is focused on broadcaster James Naughtie, who's currently presenting BBC Radio 4's landmark series 'The New Elizabethans'. He talks to Clive about the 60 individuals whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact and given the age its character. 'The New Elizabethans' broadcasts Monday to Friday at 12.45.

Clive has a sweet tooth for comedian, actress and author, Jenny Éclair. Grumpy Old Woman Jenny was the first female solo winner of the prestigious Perrier Comedy Award and is about to publish her third novel. 'Life, Death and Vanilla Slices' which she describes as a darkly funny family drama, based upon an unfortunate traffic accident and a box of cakes.

Arthur Smith takes a stroll with Professor of Poetry Simon Armitage, whose new book 'Walking Home' is a stride-by-stride account of his 256 mile journey across the Pennine Way. Making his extraordinary, yet ordinary journey as a 'modern troubadour' and without a penny in his pocket, Simon paid his way with poetry.

Clive battles the beaches with historian David Starkey, whose new Channel 4 series 'The Two Churchills' is a double biography of Winston Churchill and first Duke of Marlborough, John Churchill. David tells Clive about the two remarkable men who he thinks shaped the destiny of Europe. 'The Two Churchills' begins at 8pm on Sunday 22nd July.

Tune in to music from Senegalese singer and human-rights campaigner Baaba Maal who performs 'Tindo' from his album 'Television'. And Natalie Duncan performs 'Lonely Child' from her album 'Devil In Me'.

Producer Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b01k9lvn)
Series 12

Thirteen Minutes in Cairo

Thirteen Minutes in Cairo

By Oliver Emanuel.

A husband returns from a celebration following President Mursi's inauguration to find his wife packing to leave the country.

In the week when the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate became Egypt's first democratically elected president, playwright Oliver Emanuel creates a real-time drama set in Cairo that explores what democracy might mean to the country.

Heba ... Meg Fraser
Omar ... Simon Tait
Rabiah ... Hannah Donaldson

Director: Kirsty Williams.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01k9lvq)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests novelist Liz Jensen, poet Paul Farley and academic and critic Maria Delgado review the week's cultural highlights including Killer Joe.

William Friedkin's film Killer Joe is set in the Texas badlands. Chris (Emile Hirsch) needs some money fast so that he can pay off some local drug dealers - the only way he can see is to have his mother killed and then collect the insurance. So he enlists the services of local policeman and freelance murderer Joe Cooper (Matthew McConaughey).

As part of its contribution to the Cultural Olympiad, the BBC are screening The Hollow Crown - new adaptations of the Shakespeare history plays Richard II, Henry IV pt 1 & 2 and Henry V. The directors involved are Rupert Goold, Richard Eyre and Thea Sharrock and the impressive cast includes Ben Wishaw, Rory Kinnear, Jeremy Irons, Simon Russell Beale and Tom Hiddlestone.

Leaving the Atocha Station is the debut novel by American poet Ben Lerner. It follows the experiences of Adam, a young American poet on a prestigious scholarship in Madrid, where he has gone to learn the language and, notionally at least, to research the Spanish civil war for a forthcoming work.

Edvard Munch: The Modern Eye at Tate Modern in London brings together many of the Norwegian artist's paintings but doesn't feature his most famous work The Scream. It does however include photographs and cine film taken by Munch and makes a case that his interest in early cinema had a direct impact on his paintings.

Dr Dee - Damon Albarn and Rufus Norris's music drama about the Elizabethan polymath and mystic John Dee - had its premiere at the Manchester Festival last year. Reworked and expanded it now comes to ENO in London. A series of tableaux from Dee's life it is possibly the only current stage production in London to feature live ravens.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Meeting Myself Coming Back (b01k9lvs)
Series 4

Paddy Ashdown

From rookie MP to Liberal Democrats leader, from the Royal Marines to high office in Bosnia, Paddy Ashdown relives his life from the archives in a frank and sometimes emotional conversation with John Wilson

From his early days in the army to his leadership of the Liberal Democrats, Paddy Ashdown - now Lord Ashdown- has been a singular political figure. He arrived in Westminster as a Liberal but soon his party voted for a merger with the SDP. He led the newly named Liberal Democrats for 11 years and then worked in Bosnia, trying to repair the damage that the war had done.

In this interview he meets his younger self at key moments from the sound archive and discusses his reactions with John Wilson. We hear his memories of serving in the Marines and also hear extracts from his first major speech at the Liberal Party Conference when he warned of the dangers of Cruise missiles.

There are highly emotional moments as well, when Paddy recounts the horrors of the scenes he saw in Bosnia in 1992.

And the programme comes up to the present with a consideration of what the Coalition and the recent local elections have meant for the Liberal Democrats.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01k2bpw)
Songs and Lamentations

Episode 2

Songs and Lamentations , a new translation of the two biblical books Lamentations and Song of Songs by Michael Symmons Roberts . A powerful story of the horrific destruction of a once great city, and the love story of a couple who find hope and solace in each other offering two very different, but complementary, perspectives on the days leading up to the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonian armies in 587 BC.

Set in the middle east, this poetry of violence, heat, passion and vengeance has clear resonance with the intractable cycle of violence - and the survival of love - in that same part of the world 2500 years on. The themes and wisdom of 'Song of Songs' and 'Lamentations' have never been more current or more apposite.

Jeremiah Peter Hamilton-Dyer
Rachel Gillian Kearney
Pashur Russell Dixon
Nathan Tom Ferguson
Zedekiah David Seddon
Thomas Henry Devas
Samuel Patrick Lally
Ana Deborah McAndrew

Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts

2. Although left to starve by the King, the jailed Jeremiah is kept alive by the young servant girl from the palace, who brings him food, ostensibly because she wants to help him. But she has another motive.

She is meeting a man nearby, one of the King's own ministers. Love between a minister and a servant is impossible. Nonetheless they flirt and entice each other, in the poetry of the Song of Songs.

Day by day, pressure mounts on the King. The people want revolution against the Babylonians, but Jeremiah the prophet's warnings are unsettling him.

The impossible love of the couple in Song of Songs becomes an elegy for the city

And its people.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01k2fd7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b01jmxqp)
Niall Ferguson: The Rule of Law and Its Enemies: 2012

The Darwinian Economy

The eminent economic historian Niall Ferguson travels to the world's financial centre to deliver a lecture at the New-York Historical Society. He reflects on the causes of the global financial crisis, and argues that many people have drawn erroneous conclusions from it about the role of regulation. Is regulation, he asks, in fact "the disease of which it purports to be the cure"?
Producer: Jane Beresford.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b01k2dbf)
Series 26

Episode 10

(10/13)
Which great composer's only oratorio was called 'Christ on the Mountain of Olives'?

And what was particularly strange about the B-side of the 1960s novelty hit 'They're Coming to Take Me Away, Ha-ha!'?

Paul Gambaccini puts these and many other questions about music in all its variety, to the first batch of semi-finalists for 2012. The pace really hots up in the competition, as those who've already won their heats go all-out for a coveted place in the Final. Today's winner clears another hurdle on the way to possibly becoming the 26th Counterpoint champion.

As always, the questions cover the classics, show tunes, jazz, film music, rock and pop.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01k2br8)
Roger McGough presents a selection of listeners' poetry requests, including specially recorded readings by the Irish poet Paul Durcan - one of which is his acerbic and amusing commentary on the recession in Ireland. Also, Lucy Black reads poems by William Blake, Milton, John Clare, Christina Rossetti, Shakespeare and Rabindranath Tagore.

Producer Beth O'Dea.



SUNDAY 01 JULY 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01k9h8c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Midsummer Tales (b01k9m2s)
Casting

By Hannah McGill. A London film crew causes a commotion when they descend upon a tiny island community in 1930s Shetland. Read by Claire Knight.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01k9h8f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01k9h8h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01k9h8k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01k9h8m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01k9m2v)
The bells of St.Peter's Cathedral, Adelaide, South Australia.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b01k2b12)
Series 3

Colin Crooks: The Let-Down Generation

Serial social entrepreneur Colin Crooks argues that politicians and the media are wrong to focus on youth unemployment.

Instead, he says, we should all be worried about the very high levels of persistent unemployment amongst the 'let-down generation' who were failed by poor education between the 1970s and 1990s.

Teaching them the lessons of being in work, he argues, would not only benefit them, but their children, too.

And he believes that to make a meaningful impact in these unemployed people's lives, we should stop developing skills for jobs which often do not exist, and instead focus on creating real jobs where they live.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01k9h8p)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01k9m9z)
Prayer Before a Five Pound Note

Money occupies a central position in the lives of people around the world - no matter the culture or currency. And yet few of us ever pause in our earning and spending to consider what is it's real role within our society? What is its weight in our lives? In this edition of Something Understood, Mark Tully explores our human relationship with money and asks, given its immense power, what should be our Prayer Before a Five Pound Note?

We hear readings from a broad range of writers, with all sorts of view points on money, from Christian activist Monica Furlong to publishing magnate and poet Felix Dennis. Music includes Michael Head's exaltation of poverty, "Money O!" and JJ Cale's "Money Talks".

Mark speaks to Professor Jacob Needleman, who believes most people ignore the spiritual implication of money in their day to day lives, and do so at their peril. This is a strange attitude to take towards something which has such a singular power over us, as shown by Jacob's own experiments, in which he attempts to hand a five dollar bill to strangers in the streets. Their reactions, and his own feelings on giving away money in this way, reveal great deal about our often fraught interactions with it.

It seems that humanity teeters between the obsessive pursuit of money and often futile attempts to rid themselves of it. Perhaps the most productive way to engage with it is to abandon those two extremes and instead use it as a mirror to show us ourselves - the way we spend reveals our priorities in often surprising ways. Should our prayer before a five pound note be "please, help me to understand myself"?

Producer: Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01k9n7n)
Commoning

For this week's On Your Farm, Chris Packham is in a place very close to his heart, The New Forest.

Commoners have been allowed to graze their livestock in the New Forest since medieval times but now this could be under threat. According to Natural England fewer and fewer young people are becoming commoners. One factor is the high price of land, which is necessary to provide a base for livestock.

Without commoners grazing the land, many argue that a much loved landscape will change. Chris Packham investigates what the obstacles are in becoming a young commoner and the impact having fewer commoners could have on the New Forest.

Presented by Chris Packham.
Produced by Anna Varle.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01k9h8r)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01k9h8t)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01k9n7q)
The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem has been granted World Heritage Status by UNESCO despite objections from Israel and the United States. Edward speaks to Harriet Sherman in Jerusalem.

The Dean of St Paul's Cathedral has been keeping an audio diary of his first few weeks in office. This week his thoughts on the Occupy protests and the role of the Cathedral.

History is apparently written by the victors, and in this case, according to Eamon Duffy they created a myth around the English Protestant Reformation that has lasted until the last few decades. He tells Edward about the efforts to create a truer picture of England's uncertain early path towards protestantism.

Trevor Barnes visits the ancient church of St. Mary at Finchley as it launches 'Listening to Finchley' - Eyewitness accounts of 90 years of change in church and people, as told by residents past and present.

This week in Oxford leading academic's and theologian's have been discussing Human Dignity. Charles Wookey talks to Edward about their conclusions.

The Methodist conference debates the ethics of unmanned aerial vehicles in war zones, Edward talks to their policy adviser Steve Hucklesby and Michael Codner from military think tank Royal United Services Institute.

Why are women priests urging General Synod not to pass legislation which would introduce Women Bishops to the Church of England at General Synod next week? Rev Lucy Winkett outlines the thinking behind this surprise move.

Today the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces of Egypt are due to hand over power to the Muslim Brotherhood President Mohammad Mursi. Oliver McTernan from Forward Thinking has been meeting with the Brotherhood since 2005 and tells Edward what kind of Presidency we can expect.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01k9n7s)
Music as Therapy International

Imelda Staunton appeals on behalf of Music as Therapy International
Reg Charity: 1070760
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Music as Therapy International.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01k9h8w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01k9h8y)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01k9n7v)
Archbishop Patrick Kelly leads a traditional service of Morning Prayer to welcome the light from Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. The cathedral choir sings music by Tallis and Victoria with traditional hymns and psalms and canticles set for the day.
Director of Music: Christopher McElroy; Organist: Richard Ley; Producer: Clair Jaquiss.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01k2f8w)
Nazis - Gopnik's Amendment

Adam Gopnik reflects on our continuing obsession with the Nazis and ponders the place of the Second World War in our history.

He writes: "A German friend once complained to me that educated Westerners often know far more about the German government in those five years of war than they do about all German governments in the sixty years of subsequent peace".

Adam quotes a principle frequently used during internet discussions called "Godwin's Law". It states that "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler gets greater". Godwin's conclusion - broadly speaking - is that we should not mention the war.

But Adam proposes what he calls "Gopnik's Amendment". "When we see the three serpents of militarism, nationalism and hatred of difference we should never be afraid to call them out, loudly, by name and remind ourselves and other people, even more loudly still, of exactly what they have made happen in the past".

We should, he says, "never be afraid to mention the war".

Producer:
Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01k9n7x)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell, with the forensic scientist Sohom Das, comedian & actress Wendy Wason and former BBC correspondent Nick Jones reviewing the papers.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01k9n7z)
Writer ..... Carole Simpson Solazzo
Director ..... John Yorke
Editor ..... John Yorke

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Josh Archer ..... Cian Cheesbrough
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Hayley Tucker ..... Lorraine Coady
Phoebe Aldridge ..... Lucy Morris
Brenda Tucker ..... Amy Shindler
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Natalie Hollins ..... Maddie Glasbey
Keith Horrobin ..... Sean Connolly
Gerry Moreton ..... Mark Perry.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01k9n81)
Charles Jencks

Kirsty Young's castaway is the architectural critic and writer Charles Jencks.

Born in America, for the past four decades he has lived and worked in Britain - where his designs are as likely to be found in sculptural landscapes as buildings. Perhaps his most significant legacy, though, is the work he did with his late wife, Maggie Keswick. They worked together to design Maggie's Centres - a series of practical and beautifully-designed buildings to give information and support to people with cancer.

He says: "When you have cancer, there's many things which you have to do aside from the struggle - it's not just a medical problem, it's a social problem - of how you tell the children, how you tell your boss - and above all, as Maggie said, it's not to lose the joy of living."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b01k1ngt)
Series 57

Episode 1

The 57th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the Warwick Arts Centre as part of the Stratford-upon-Avon Literary Festival. Regulars Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Tony Hawks and Jeremy Hardy, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano. Producer - Jon Naismith.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01k9n83)
The Future of the Cookbook

With digital publishing evolving at a blistering pace, Sheila Dillon investigates the future of the printed cookery book.

Andrew Webb is a food journalist whose work spans the online and printed worlds. He is the author of 'Food Britannia', which just scooped the Guild of Food Writers award for Food Book of the Year, and also edits a food website. To find out where things are moving in the world of the food book, The Food Programme sent him to meet five key players in the world of food, books and publishing.

Antony Topping is a literary agent, whose clients include Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Thomasina Miers. Mary-Clare Jerram is a Publishing Director at Dorling Kindersley, looking after both digital and print editions. Ian Malone runs a company specialising in food apps for phones and tablets.

Andrew also meets Dr Peter Ross, Principal Librarian at the Guildhall Library, home to the largest collection of food books in any UK public library - and lastly, Hardeep Singh Kohli is a broadcaster, author and is passionate about food.

Sheila is joined in the studio by Neill Denny, Editor-in-Chief of the book industry magazine 'The Bookseller', Kerstin Rodgers - aka MsMarmitelover - food blogger and pop-up restaurant pioneer, and Ben Ebbrell, who cooks and presents on the Sorted food site.

Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01k9h90)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01k9n85)
Global news and analysis, presented by Shaun Ley. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The Frock and the Church (b01k9n87)
When it meets in July 2012, the General Synod of the Church of England will be voting on legislation that paves the way for the ordination of women bishops. If it is approved, the first female bishops could start to practice in 2014, twenty years after the first women were ordained in Bristol as Church of England priests. But it may be rejected or deferred. Whatever the outcome, the move threatens chaos for a church that is struggling with other modern day issues such as same sex marriage.

Several bishops have already resigned over the prospect of their counterparts becoming female. Meanwhile, the Bishop of Gloucester said in May, "the worst possible outcome would be for the legislation to go down at final approval in July. There would be a haemorrhaging of women from the Church."

This is one of the biggest challenges facing this long standing institution, so how will it cope?

To find out, Charlotte Smith walks the Pilgrim's Way from Winchester Cathedral to Canterbury, visiting churches, vicars and congregations, and asking key players in the Church whether it can accept women into its upper echelons and how it will resolve its differences - if at all.

Among those she talks to are Rev Martyn Neale, vicar of Holy Trinity, in Blackwater; April Alexander, member of the House of Laity in the General Synod; Andrea Trevenna, Bible Teacher for Women at St Nicholas Church in Sevenoaks; the Bishop of Buckingham, Rt Rev Alan Wilson; and Rev Claire Edwards, Canon at Canterbury Cathedral. From them she gains an understanding of how wide the divide is between those who can and those who cannot accept female bishops, yet is struck by how they all wish to remain in a church that has long accommodated a broad range of beliefs, but may not be able to this time.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01k2f87)
Garden for the Games, Olympic Park, Stratford

Eric Robson and the panel meet a London audience at the Olympic Aquatic Centre, Stratford.
We revisit the Olympic Park one final time before the doors are thrown open to the public.

Questions answered in the programme:
How can we encourage people to grow plants in their front gardens instead of concreting them over?
What manure should I use for the best homegrown tomatoes?
What tree will establish quickly and resist the harsh conditions on the west coast of Ireland?
Suggestions included: Fir, Native Hawthorn, Birch, Rowan, Poplar

I've got a dwarf spruce, dying from the inside out, what can I do?
How can I maximise the crop yield of vegetables from a 6 meter square plot?
Suggestions included: French beans, courgettes, cut and come again lettuce, parsley, fruit trees, rhubarb, sweetcorn.

Planting suggestions for large tubs, brick planters, and baskets to along a seaside town high street. Suggestions included: Perennial seed mixes, grasses, Steeper Arundinacio, Wolvalarian, Sentranthus, Eupatorium Chocolate, Calendula,

Suggestions for plants that can be planted now to flower in the Olympic colours in a month's time.
Suggestions included: Annual poppies - 'Ladybird', Nigella, Pelargonium (cuttings)
In the Olympic year, what could I plant in 9.85 seconds?

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b01k9npb)
Greensboro Lunch Counter Sit-In

Franklin McCain was one of four young black men who asked to be served at a 'whites-only' lunch counter in a branch of Woolworths in Greensboro North Carolina in 1960. What happened next would change America. In this edition of Witness, Franklin McCain speaks to Alan Johnston.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01k9npd)
G&W Grossmith - The Diary of a Nobody

Episode 1

Johnny Vegas and Katherine Parkinson play Mr and Mrs Pooter in Andrew Lynch's adaptation of the Grossmith brothers' comic novel of 1892.

The story is a social vignette of Charles, the self-important but highly likeable clerk, his loving wife Carrie and their son William (played by Andrew Gower).

Much of the action takes place in the house that the Pooters share with their maid Sarah...and the noisy sound of passing trains. The Laurels in Brickfield Terrace is frequently visited by colourful and amusing characters, not least Gowing and Cummings, Pooter's 'trusty' fairweather friends.

This full dramatisation has a Victorian sit-com feel and stays true to the book - with a couple of twists of Lynch's own - capturing a kind of lower-middle-class aspiration that still has a tangible familiarity in 2012.

In Episode One, the Pooters move in to The Laurels. Charles and Carrie attend The Mansion House Ball and Willie arrives home from the bank in Oldham.

Cast:
Charles Pooter ...... Johnny Vegas
Carrie Pooter ...... Katherine Parkinson
William / Lupin ...... Andrew Gower
Sarah ....... Sinead Matthews
Cummings (and Horwin) ...... Adrian Scarborough
Gowing (and Borset) ....... Stephen Critchlow
Farmerson ...... Joe Ransom
Trillip ...... Adam Gillen
Daisy Mutlar ...... Sarah Sweeney

Other parts were played by members of the cast.

Adapted by Andrew Lynch, from the original by George and Weedon Grossmith.

Produced by Sally Harrison
Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Woolyback production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b01k9npg)
David Baddiel talks about Elizabeth Taylor's Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont

To celebrate the centenary of novelist Elizabeth Taylor, David Baddiel is our guide to her best known book, Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont.

Like many writers, David Baddiel thinks that Elizabeth Taylor has been overlooked and is one of the finest writers of the middle of the twentieth century. He has called her 'the missing link between Jane Austen and John Updike'.

Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont was the last book to be published in her life time, and was shortlisted for the Booker prize in 1971. It tells the story of Laura Palfrey, a widow who can no longer look after herself and moves into a private hotel in West London, where she will probably end her days. She strikes up an unlikely friendship with an impoverished young writer, Ludo, who uses her life for his novel.

Radio 4 listeners, some new to Elizabeth Taylor, and others who've been reading her books for forty years, join in the discussion with David Baddiel, and the programme is presented by James Naughtie.

Producer : Dymphna Flynn

August's Bookclub choice : The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01k9n89)
It sounds like Hollywood - the poet who wakes up to learn that his newly published verse has made his name and his fortune. But that's precisely what happened to the young Lord Byron 200 years ago when his epic 'Childe Harold' was published. Roger McGough introduces requests for the poem that features the first 'Byronic hero'.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01k1nk6)
School Inspections

Ofsted has a new, hard-line chief inspector and a new, tougher inspection regime - and in the past few months that has led to a spike in the number of schools deemed inadequate.
Predictably, there has been a corresponding wave of anger in schools - with a growing number taking to the courts to challenge the inspectors' views?
So are the inspectors really up to the job? And who inspects the inspectors?
Fran Abrams investigates.
Producer: Rob Cave.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b01k9lvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01k9h92)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01k9h94)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01k9h96)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01k9npj)
Simon Parkes makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

This week's Pick of the Week hasn't been very straight-forward: things haven't been quite what they seem. There have been plots, subversions and things masquerading as other things. Who would've guessed it?

Gordon Corera exposes a Czech spy ring meant to implicate former prime minister Edward Heath, only to learn it probably was an attempt to discredit him by members of his own party. A.S. Byatt feels strange inexplicable forces in her own home and then there's the man exploring a cave system in Iceland - caves shaped by nature but making some very other-worldly noises. What can all these contradictions mean?

Hopefully, Simon Parkes will be providing some answers to these strange phenomenon in this week's Pick of the Week.

The Cave - Radio 4
Olympic Torch - BBC Radio Leeds
Sporting Lexicon - Radio 4
My Teenage Diary - Radio 4
Outlook - World service
John Barry: The Lost tapes - Radio 4
The Heath Caper - Radio 4
Witness: Ann Frank - World service
The Food Programme - Radio 4
Nightwaves - Radio 3
Britain in a Box - Radio 4
Is it Worth It? - Radio 2
The Uncanny - Radio 4
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Bernadette McConnell.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01k9npl)
Nervous Emma's not keen on Ed going on the badger vaccination course, leaving her alone at Rickyard Cottage. Ed says they really can't afford for him not to do it, and it will be another string to his bow. He wouldn't go if he thought Emma was in real danger. But Emma arranges to stay at her mum's for the duration, and a slightly piqued Ed agrees to take them over there.

Susan feels sorry for David and Ruth; what they're going through doesn't bear thinking about. She comforts a wobbly Emma while Ed looks on feeling inadequate. They say their goodbyes. As Emma looks happier, Ed feels even more of a failure.

Ruth's back from taking Josh and Ben to Prudhoe. While they feel very far away and it's unnaturally quiet, she's glad they're off the farm. When she discovers Emma's gone too, she feels it smacks of rats leaving the sinking ship. The atmosphere is tense as David tries to maintain a semblance of normality. Ruth would rather none of this was happening at all. David replies ruefully that it is, and he can't do anything to change it. Distraught Ruth unhappily acknowledges this.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b01bmq2l)
Series 15

Terence Rattigan

The teams examine the life and work of "Author of the Week", playwright and creator of "Flare Path", Sir Terence Rattigan.

Regular captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh are joined by Sir Andrew Motion and children's author, Sue Limb as they answer questions based around Rattigan's life and work, as well as more general literary brainteasers, set by host James Walton.

For the finale of the show, the teams are asked to imagine Rattigan discarding his stiff-upper-lip-style and writing a gritty, kitchen sink-style drama.


SUN 19:45 The Food of Love (b01k9npn)
Cake

In this series of monologues exploring the link between food and memory, poignant domestic dramas gradually unfold through the preparation of a special recipe.

In the first story by Helen Simpson, powerful memories are evoked when a mother bakes a birthday cake for her daughter, now no longer a child.

Helen Simpson is a novelist and hugely acclaimed short story writer. Her first collection, 'Four Bare Legs in a Bed and Other Stories', won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, while her book 'Hey Yeah Right Get a Life', a series of interlinked stories, won the Hawthornden Prize. She was one of Granta's twenty Best of Young British Novelists campaign in 1993, and is currently a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

The next story in the series comes from Kevin Barry, who won this year's Sunday Times short story award. Barry's first novel, 'City of Bohane', was shortlisted for the Costa first novel award, and a previous short story collection, 'There Are Little Kingdoms', won the Rooney prize for Irish Literature. In Barry's story, an insurance clerk of a certain age recreates the romantic spaghetti bolognese he cooked for the lass in the typing pool on his last date - some thirty years before...

The final story in the series is by Aminatta Forna, the award-winning author of two novels: 'The Memory of Love and Ancestor Stones'. In her story, a man struggles to cook for a young child after a terrible loss.

Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Stella Gonet.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01k2f8f)
The History of an Epic Struggle: last week marked the end of Richard Holloway's 20-part Honest Doubt series, which explored 3,000 years of faith jostling with doubt. It had a profound effect on many Radio 4 listeners. A one-sided attack on Christianity, or an insightful exploration of an often controversial subject? Roger talks to Richard Holloway, and the editor behind the commission, Radio 4's Jane Ellison.

From the spiritual to the virtual, big changes to all 55 of the BBC Radio websites are scheduled for the Autumn, but web users are getting a sneak peak by using a Beta version of the sites - a test version which runs alongside the old sites. Roger uploads a friendly, virtual companion to help him navigate the new websites and discovers what changes will be made in conversation with Mark Friend, controller of BBC Audio and Music Interactive.

And, we follow up on Drop Out Watch. Keen-eared listeners have been in touch with more examples of content cut short by technical glitches. And Roger receives a listener comment about....himself. No one, not even Mr Bolton, can escape the forensic attention of Feedback.

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01k2f8c)
Nora Ephron, Gunnar Sonsteby, Ron Onions, Dr John Horder and Doc Watson

Matthew Bannister on

The screenwriter, director and essayist Nora Ephron - best known for her romantic comedies When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle.

Gunnar Sonsteby - the Norwegian resistance fighter who was a master of disguise and forgery

Ron Onions - who pioneered new styles of news reporting on the UK's first commercial radio stations, LBC and Capital

Dr John Horder - who raised the status of GPs in Britain and was a talented musician and painter

And Doc Watson - the veteran American folk/blues guitarist.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01k9lc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01k9n7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01k1nh0)
Eurogeddon II

As the crisis in the Eurozone continues, Chris Bowlby examines what might eventually emerge and what that could mean for us.

When Analysis looked at the possibility of a Greek exit from the Euro back in February, the topic was regarded as "thinking the unthinkable". Not so now.

In this programme Chris Bowlby looks forward and asks if the Eurozone is headed for disintegration or, conversely, even closer political and economic union. What do either of those scenarios mean in practice and can the Eurozone survive? What are the implications for borders, cash movements and who controls the levers of power?

Interviewees include: Lord Peter Mandelson, David Marsh, Ulrike Guerot, Dani Rodrik, Paul Donovan, Brian Lucey and Aristotle Kallis.

Producer: John Murphy.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01k9pfw)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01k9pfy)
Episode 110

Iain Dale of Total Politics analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01k2bw3)
Francine Stock talks to veteran director William Friedkin about his new film, Killer Joe, starring Matthew McConaughey as a Texan cop and assassin for hire.

Critics Robbie Collin and Jamie Dunn report from Britain's oldest film festival in Edinburgh.

Journalist Anthony Baxter explains why he remortgaged his house to make a documentary about Donald Trump's golf course on the east coast of Scotland.

The independent director behind such films as Welcome to the Dollhouse, Happiness, and Palindromes, Todd Solondz, discusses his latest, Dark Horse.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01k9m9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 02 JULY 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01k9hb8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01k290g)
Evil; the morality of cycling

'Evil' is a concept more readily associated with theology and psychology than the social sciences. Tabloid headlines denounce 'evil' crimes but offer little in the way of explanation. Indeed, the very term implies that no explanation is possible. But Michel Wieviorka, the leading French sociologist, tells Laurie Taylor why he thinks that 'evil' can and should be subjected to sociological scrutiny. They're joined by Peter Young, Head of Criminology at the University of Kent.

Also, the sociologist, Judith Green, talks about her study into the morality of cycling - do cyclists feel they are 'better' than drivers and have drivers conceded the ethical high ground?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01k9m2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hbb)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01k9hbd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hbg)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01k9hbj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01k9py8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch, a student of Tibetan Buddhism.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01k9pyb)
After price cuts announced by Britain's biggest fresh milk processor, Robert Wiseman, how can dairy farmers pick themselves up and move on? We hear from the Agriculture Minister Jim Paice who says the milk market isn't working. The panel to look into the future for England's woodlands, following the Forestry Commission sell off debacle, publishes its final report this week. The Campaign to Protect Rural England says more trees need to be planted, and suggests a second National Forest.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01k9hbl)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01k9pyd)
0751
The NHS is not spending enough on new drugs, according to the drugs industry. Stephen Whitehead, chief executive of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, and Roy Lilley, an independent health policy analyst, debate the issue.

0810
Marcus Agius is expected to resign as the chairman of Barclays. Business editor Robert Peston, and Terry Smith, chief executive of city firms Tullett Prebon and Fundsmith, give their views and analysis on the future of the bank.

0816
An study of the lives of people in Britain called Mass Observation was started 75 years ago. One of questions posed was "what is on your mantelpiece?" BBC correspondent Allan Little has been looking through the archives.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01k9q6g)
National Identity with Maajid Nawaz and Sir Christopher Meyer.

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to Maajid Nawaz about his journey from Islamist extremist to a champion of democracy. Growing up in Britain in the 1980s Nawaz found his sense of identity in political Islam. National identity and the state of the nation is at the heart of Robert Chesshyre's book in which he argues that the roots of many of today's problems, especially the increase in inequality, were planted under Margaret Thatcher's leadership. But one of the new intake of Conservative MPs, dubbed the 'New Radicals', Elizabeth Truss, looks to an alternative future where "decline is not inevitable." And the former ambassador, Sir Christopher Meyer, turns his attention to the rich and powerful across the world, to see how different power networks operate.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01k9q6j)
The Old Ways

Episode 1

"Humans are like animals and like all animals we leave tracks as we walk. Pilgrim paths, green roads, drove roads, corpse roads, trods, leys, dykes, drongs, sarns, snickets, holloways, bostles, shutes, driftways, lichways, ridings, halterpaths, cartways, carneys, causeways, herepaths."

Author Robert Macfarlane follows some ancient routes in the UK and overseas. As well as having adventures on the way - as you do on foot - he ponders the creation of old paths, the people who trod them, and how they resonate in today's landscapes.

Setting off, Robert Macfarlane hits England's chalk paths and soon finds out there's a price to pay for this..

Abridger Penny Leicester
Read by Dan Stevens

Producer Duncan Minshull.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01k9q6l)
Risk-taking, looksism, women breadwinners

Grammy award winning Mary Chapin Carpenter plays live, men and and risk-taking in the world of high finance, investing in your looks - does it pay off and can it change your life? Being a female breadwinner, DIY manicures.
Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Catherine Carr.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01k9q6n)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 1

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

When 15 year old Bee wins perfect grades, she calls in her parents' promise of a graduation present of 'anything she wants'. This turns out to be a family trip to Antarctica - a prospect that will challenge her mother Bernadette's agoraphobia and social reclusiveness.

CAST:

Bernadette ..... Miranda Richardson
Bee .... Lydia Wilson
Elgin .... Richard Laing
Audrey .... Madeleine Potter
Soo Lin .... Laurel Lefkow
Marcus Strang .... Don Gilet
Ollie-O/ Jacob .... Sam Alexander
Paul Jellinek .... Patrick Brennan
Helen/ Gwen Goodyear .... Susie Riddell
Dr Kurtz .... Christine Absalom

Other parts played by members of the company.

Adapted by Miranda Davies
Produced/ directed by Emma Harding

About the author: Maria Semple has written for television shows including Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen. She lives with her family on an island off Seattle. This is her first novel.


MON 11:00 Dad's Last Tape (b01k9q6q)
Clare Jenkins explores why people record their life stories and what impact those stories have on other people when the interviewee is no longer themselves, or no longer alive.

Twenty-five years ago, Clare recorded her father talking about his life: growing up in a Scottish tenement, being 'sold' as a farmer's boy at a hiring fair, a wartime stint in the RAF, working as a gardener to the wealthy, amateur poet. Jack Jenkins died 18 years ago, and Clare never listened back to the tapes - until making this programme.

Broadcaster Rony Robinson never listened back to recordings he had done with his mother until Clare asked him to. Nor had singer-songwriter Sally Goldsmith listened to her mother, who died two years ago, singing May Day songs recalled from childhood.

This programme explores the different circumstances in which people's life stories are recorded, and the memories and emotions that come flooding back when the tapes are eventually heard.

We hear from the wife of a man suffering from dementia about her bitter-sweet feelings when listening to tapes of his voice. "They really calmed him and made him smile. And it was amazing for me, because I'd forgotten how funny he was."

Another woman, terminally ill with cancer, has made a series of recordings for her newborn granddaughter as part of a hospice project in Sheffield. "I want her to hear about my life - and to know that I don't have a Yorkshire accent!" she says.

We also hear from Mary Stewart of the British Library, who has been studying the way recorded interviews are used by and for those most intimately involved. Along the way, we discover the power of the beloved voice.

Producer: Clare Jenkins
A Pennine Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b018gpdn)
Series 3

Douglas (Isle of Man)

In this third series comedian Mark Steel visits 6 more UK towns to discover what makes them and their inhabitants distinctive.

He creates a bespoke stand-up show for that town and performs the show in front of a local audience.

As well as shedding light on the less visited areas of Britain, Mark uncovers stories and experiences that resonate with us all as we recognise the quirkiness of the British way of life and the rich tapestry of remarkable events and people who have shaped where we live.

During the series 'Mark Steel's In Town' Mark will visit Berwick-Upon Tweed, Holyhead, Basingstoke, Douglas (Isle of Man), Bungay and Wigan.

Episode 4 - In this episode Mark performs a show for the residents of Douglas on the Isle of Man, to discuss space travel, fairy bridges and the mystery - or otherwise - of Gef the Talking Mongoose. From December 2011.

Written by Mark Steel with additional material by Pete Sinclair.
Produced by Sam Bryant.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01k9q6s)
When I'm 65 - Positive Ageing. Japanese knotweed, Independent Shops

If Japanese knotweed is threatening the structure of your home or has wrecked your mortgage application - there could be good news for you. We'll bring you the latest from the UK's biological war against this invasive foreign species.

Also - we hear a lot about some of the downsides of ageing. But we'll be finding out why life for older people can be a lot more positive than you might expect.

And what are independent shops doing to win your custom in these tough economic times?

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Paul Waters.


MON 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01k9q6v)
Philip Larkin

The New Elizabethans: Philip Larkin. To mark the Diamond Jubilee, James Naughtie examines the lives and impact of the men and women who have given the second Elizabethan age its character.

Philip Larkin is one of the great English poets, famous also for his day job as Librarian at the University of Hull. In 2003 he was chosen as the nation's best-loved poet of the last 50 years, according to a survey by the Poetry Book Society.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Sukey Firth.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01k9hbn)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01k9q6x)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities (b01k9q6z)
Series 1

Episode 1

In the first in the series, Roger Law travels to China to find out what has brought about museum fever. With new museums opening every month, he wants to know what the Chinese are displaying and why. He begins in Shanghai with a visit to an opera museum, a rather unusual shoe museum in a private house, and a security museum where all the guns of the city's gangsters are on display. It's certainly a whole new world of curiosities.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01k9npl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00txj8j)
A Nice Little Holiday

By Sarah Wooley

1961. The South of France. On holiday with his mistress, Jocelyn Rickards, John Osborne has embarked on a passionate affair with his future third wife while, in London, Osborne's current wife gives birth to a son.

From the idyllic French farmhouse, Osborne penned his infamous 'Damn you, England' letter which caused such a furore back home that they found themselves under siege and their nice little holiday turned into a nightmare - with Osborne only just escaping alive.

Jocelyn Rickards ... Tracy Wiles
John Osborne ... Robin Laing
Tony Richardson ... Tobias Menzies
Christopher Isherwood .. Richard Greenwood
Don Bachardy ... James Anthony Pearson
Major ... Matthew Zajac

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b01k9q73)
Series 26

Episode 11

(11/13)
Can you remember at whose court Rigoletto is a jester, in the Verdi opera? Or which American trade journal published the first ever music chart based on record sales?

Paul Gambaccini has the answers in this week's edition of Counterpoint, the general knowledge music quiz - which has reached the second semi-final of the current series. This week's competitors, who've all won their respective heats, are from Chelmsford, Tunbridge Wells and Nottingham. One of them will take another of the places in the Final, and compete for the title of 26th Counterpoint champion.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01k9n83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Voice of God (b01k9qbv)
The Rev. Richard Coles Richard explores the various ways that the way God speaks is depicted in literature, the theatre and film and what this reveals about our ideas of the deity. Coles is a priest, a broadcaster and was a pop star. Who better, then, to explore the different ways that the way God speaks is depicted within literature, theatre and film, and within sacred texts?

In the 'Book of Kings' the prophet Elijah is wrung by earthquake, wind, fire and thunder, but God is in not in any of these. It is in the silence following that Elijah hears God in a 'still, small voice'. In Britain Quakers have been listening for God in silence since the 1650s. This hasn't been how artists usually imagine the Almighty communicating. In the theatre and cinema God tends more to the Brian Blessed - or Brian Glover, pronouncing from on high, in the earthy demotic of Yorkshire, atop a fork-lift truck in a famous production of 'The Mysteries' at the National Theatre. With the cinema historian Matthew Sweet Richard explores the variety of divine utterance as depicted in popular culture.

Muslims believe Allah spoke to Mohammed in Arabic via the angel Gabriel. One of his earliest followers was convinced of the truth of Islam by the language - it was so beautiful it had to be true. At Pentecost the Holy Spirit spoke through the Christian disciples, yet every listener heard their own language. Jahweh spoke to certain Jews, but they could never utter his name.

Richard Coles talks to Rowan Williams, who was the Archbishop of Canterbury when this programme was made, the Chief Rabbi, Jonathan Sacks and the Muslim commentator, Mohammed Ansar, exploring their their faiths', and their personal experiences of the voice of the creator.

Producer: Julian May

(Repeat).


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b01k9qbx)
Series 6

Does Size Matter?

Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined on stage by comedian Andy Hamilton to discuss whether size matters? Material scientist Mark Miodownik and bioengineer Eleanor Stride also join the panel to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of being really huge, or extremely small, and why if you wanted to be a truly effective super hero, then being really really tiny is probably the greatest superpower you could have.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 17:00 PM (b01k9qbz)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01k9hbq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b01k9qc1)
Series 57

Episode 2

The 57th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the Warwick Arts Centre. Regulars Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel by Tony Hawks and Jeremy Hardy, with Jack Dee in the chair. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano. Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01k9qc3)
Elizabeth offers Jill some plants for Britain in Bloom. Jill's relieved to be there for tea, temporarily escaping Lynda and the final preparations for judging. Elizabeth's delighted that UK Vintners have been complimentary about Lower Loxley's entry for the awards. Jill's pleased, but his turns to annoyance when Elizabeth criticises David's handling of the situation at Brookfield.
The icy atmosphere is broken by unwitting Hayley asking if she can leave work early to shop for Phoebe's room makeover.
Jennifer makes useful suggestions to ease Adam's 'to do' list burden, and offers to speak to Brian about a replacement tractor driver. Buoyant Brian informs Jennifer that the purchase of Valley Farm's looking good, and the driver situation's sorted.
Ian helps Adam with the cherry harvest, though Adam's distracted keeping his eye on Pawel, a wayward picker. As they share a companionable lunch, Adam admits to Ian that it feels good to be back at work. He's lucky they're a good bunch of pickers this year. Ian asserts that it's Adam's skill as an employer rather than luck that's responsible. Ian thinks David should stand firm and give evidence against the attackers. Adam wonders how on earth he's going to tell Ruth that.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01k9qc5)
Christopher Eccleston in Blackout; on the Chariots of Fire track; ping pong

With Mark Lawson.

In the new three-part TV thriller Blackout, Christopher Eccleston plays a disillusioned, heavy-drinking local politician, who is dealing with the consequences of an alcohol-fuelled fight. Author and former MP Chris Mullin reviews.

The new stage version of Chariots of Fire has just transferred to the West End, with the actors put through their paces on a running track which extends five rows out into the stalls. Mark puts on his running shoes and tries out the track for himself, alongside the set designer Miriam Buether.

A new film Ping Pong follows a group of eight pensioners from different corners of the globe as they compete in the over-80s category of the World Table Tennis Championships in Inner Mongolia. Three-time Commonwealth table tennis champion and two-time Olympian Matthew Syed reviews.

Photographer Stuart Roy Clarke has spent 20 years with his focus on football, taking over 100,000 photographs at more than 4000 matches around the world. As an exhibition of his work opens at the new National Football Museum in Manchester, Clarke discusses his work with the Rochdale manager John Coleman.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01k9q6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Through Persian Eyes (b01k9qc7)
Episode 2

Many in the west have described Iran as a rogue state. Yet this so-called rogue state has a recorded history that tracks back more than 3000 years. It is a civilization that has given rise over the millennia to philosophies and religions, to science and medicine, to architecture and the arts.

In the second part of the series Professor Ali Ansari looks at a reversal of fortune as the Iranians are in turn subsumed into Arab Muslim, Turkic and Mongol empires. And he shows how captive Persia took prisoner her conquerors.

The conquest of Iran by Muslim Arabs in the 7th Century AD marked a watershed moment in Iranian history. Absorbed into the wider Muslim Caliphate, the political reality of Iran had vanished. Yet as Professor Ansari argues the cultural reality survived and would re-emerge to flourish within the new Islamic world. What is remarkable about this achievement is not simply the survival of Iranian culture and ideas, but their domination of the new environment.

Science, maths, medicine, philosophy and above all poetry flourished in a golden age. Iranians today cherish the great poets probably more than they do their kings and statesmen, perhaps because their poetry has encapsulated and protected Iranian culture and civilisation through political turmoil for future generations. Many of these poets: Rumi, Hafez and Saadi are known in the West. But arguably the greatest of all is Ferdowsi the 10th century poet who compiled the traditional pre-Islamic history of Iran, the epic Shahnameh.

Professor Ansari is one of the world's leading experts on Iran and its history. Professor Ansari's books include Iran, Islam and Democracy: the politics of managing change, Confronting Iran and The Politics of Nationalism in Modern Iran.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01k9qd8)
The Gold Standard

As banks collapse and governments run out of money, the popular solution is to print more and more and expand bank balance sheets. But is there another way of fixing our economy? Would the financial system be more stable if each pound in our pocket was backed by gold? The Today programme's business presenter Simon Jack meets the so-called 'gold bugs' who predict the collapse of the paper system as well as those who argue that a return to the gold standard would be a huge mistake. Which makes more sense - placing your faith in a yellow metal or in money created at the push of a button?

Interviewees include ...
Detlev Schichter: fellow at the free market think tank the Cobden Centre and author of the book Paper Money Collapse: The Folly of Elastic Money and the Coming Monetary Breakdown

John Butler: Chief investment officer at Amphora (an independent investment and advisory firm in London) and author of The Golden Revolution: How to prepare for the coming global gold standard

Lord Skidelsky: Cross-bench peer, Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick and biographer of the economist John Maynard Keynes

Dani Rodrik: Professor of International Political Economy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and author of The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the future of the World Economy

Barry Eichengreen: Professor of Economics and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley and author of Exorbitant Privilege - The Rise and Fall of the Dollar and the Future of the International Monetary System

Dr DeAnne Julius: chairman of Chatham House and former member of the Bank of England's monetary committee

Lord Lawson: Conservative former Chancellor of the Exchequer

Producer: Helen Grady.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01k2bw5)
The Finch report, a government report into science publishing came out last week. Its findings were not widely covered despite feelings running high about the influence of the multi million pound science publishing industry. Many scientists are unhappy with the current science publishing system, where important research findings are published in commercial journals. They say scientific data gleaned from publicly funded research should be freely available. We speak to the report’s Author Dame Janet finch.

We also hear from scientist and journalist Ben Goldacre about a new push to use methods from medical testing to examine the effectiveness of government social policy initiatives.

We speak to the winner of The Venture prize, £25000 for scientific innovation. They are looking at ways to turn laboratory work into a commercial product. Researchers at Oxford University hope to use cheap and widely available metals to replace expensive coatings on computer screens and solar panels.

And we hear about new developments in producing sustainable packaging materials.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01k9q6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01k9hbs)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01k9qrk)
George Osborne announces inquiry into the banking rate-fixing scandal.

Why three police forces will be unable to meet the needs of their areas.

How cash-strapped Spain manages to afford world class football players.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01k9qrm)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 1

Written by Michael Palin.

Keith Mabbut has completed his book on the Sullom Voe oil terminal but feels decidedly unfulfilled. Returning home to London he is determined to embark on a novel.

Keith is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes him to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference.

But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b01k1nbq)
Tomorrow's World

Dominic Arkwright and writers Bidisha, Mark Mason and Mark C Newton boldly go where no Off the Page has been before - into Tomorrow's World.

Dominic Arkwright and writers Bidisha, Mark Mason and Mark C Newton boldly go where no Off the Page has been before: to explore our fascination with Tomorrow's World. From biblical prophecy to the predictions of Nostradamus, we have a fascination with possibility of what the future might hold, and of the wonders of time travel. In our new venture, Mark C Newton writes a science fiction piece set in the City of London 100 years from now. Sci-fi nut Bidisha takes us back a century to the same place, and there she dreams of what life might be like a hundred years hence, i.e. now. And Mark Mason offers his sage thoughts on the great predictions that didn't make the grade, such as Edison's assertion that gold would one day be as commonplace as steel. With the rate of advancement in technological progress, is science fiction now just fantasy, or does it serve a broader purpose?
Producer: Sarah Langan.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01k9qrp)
Susan Hulme with the day's top news stories from Westminster. The Prime Minister and Chancellor announce a wide-ranging parliamentary review of the banking sector. David Cameron also reports back from last week's EU summit. He ruled out the possibility of an immediate public vote on membership of the EU, but said that one could happen in the future.



TUESDAY 03 JULY 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01k9hcm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01k9q6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hcp)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01k9hcr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hct)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01k9hcw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01klv6m)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch, a student of Tibetan Buddhism.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01k9vgp)
Drought in the USA is sending wheat futures soaring. Good news for UK farmers but will it lead to higher bread prices? Scottish forestry is going through something of a boom, with last year's timber harvest the biggest on record. However, foresters predict that a lack of trees planted at the right time could mean a shortage of timber in 25 years time. No shortage of trees, though, at the project to restore the Caledonian Forest which has just planted its millionth sapling. And, a new vaccine for Schmallenberg disease has been developed.

Presenter: Anna Hill
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01k9vgr)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by John Humphrys and Justin Webb, featuring:

0750

Kay-Jay Simmons, a young singer who spent most of his life in care, and Sue Berelowitz, the deputy children's commissioner for England, discuss the government's announcement that "urgent reforms" are needed to protect children in care from sexual exploitation.

0810
The Chancellor George Osborne speaks to John Humphrys about the resignation of Barclays boss Bob Diamond and the announcement of a wide-ranging parliamentary review of the banking sector.

0832
A man known as "Mike" paid more than £90,000 to a loan shark after borrowing just £250 has been given a national award for helping to bring the illegal lender to justice. He explains how he brought the man to book and Tony Quigley, head of the England Illegal Money Lending Team at Trading Standards, gives his thoughts on the issue.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b01jmxrx)
Niall Ferguson: The Rule of Law and Its Enemies: 2012

The Landscape of the Law

The historian Niall Ferguson delivers a lecture at Gresham College in the heart of legal London, addressing the relationship between the nature of law and economic success. He examines the rule of law in comparative terms, asking how far the common law's claims to superiority over other systems are credible. Are we living through a time of creeping legal degeneration in the English-speaking world?

Producer: Jane Beresford.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01k9vgt)
The Old Ways

Episode 2

"Humans are like animals and like all animals we leave tracks as we walk. Pilgrim paths, green roads, drove roads, corpse roads, trods, leys, dykes, drongs, sarns, snickets, holloways, bostles, shutes, driftways, lichways, ridings, halterpaths, cartways, carneys, causeways, herepaths."

Author Robert Macfarlane follows some ancient routes in the UK and overseas. As well as having adventures on the way - as you do on foot - he ponders the creation of old paths, the people who trod them, and how they resonate in today's landscapes.

This time Robert Macfarlane takes an ancient route across the most dangerous sands in England. Wisely, he doesn't venture alone...

Reader Dan Stevens.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01k9vgw)
Fifty Shades of Grey

Fifty Shades of Grey dubbed "mummy porn" has become the country's fastest paperback. Is it a harmless love-story or degrading to women? As the Education Select Committee examine the issue of destitution among migrant and asylum-seeking children we look at how widespread the problem is and what can be done to combat it. Plus could the Olympics be the opportunity for women's football to finally make its mark? And author Petra Reski on her latest book about the Mafia - The Honoured Society:

Presenter by Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinder Montefiore.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjmp2)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 2

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

Bernadette and Elgin have promised their 15 year old daughter, Bee, a family trip to Antarctica, for gaining perfect grades at school. To prepare herself for such a trip - practically and emotionally - Bernadette becomes increasingly reliant on her virtual assistant in India, Manjula.

CAST:

Bernadette ..... Miranda Richardson
Bee .... Lydia Wilson
Elgin .... Richard Laing
Audrey .... Madeleine Potter
Soo Lin .... Laurel Lefkow
Marcus Strang .... Don Gilet
Ollie-O/ Jacob .... Sam Alexander
Paul Jellinek .... Patrick Brennan
Helen/ Gwen Goodyear .... Susie Riddell
Dr Kurtz .... Christine Absalom

Other parts played by members of the company.

Adapted by Miranda Davies
Produced/ directed by Emma Harding.


TUE 11:00 Amazonia - Keeping It Alive (b01k9vgy)
The Amazon rainforest is the largest rainforest on earth, covering 1.6 million square miles. It is so rich in life 1/3 of all the species on earth live here.

People have had a long and complex relationship with the Amazon for at least 11,000 years. We have bought fertile soils, new plants and farmed the land, but we have also caused extinctions and great damage. As the world faces a growing problem - providing for 9 billion people by 2050, what does the future hold?

The rainforest is the source of wood, minerals, metals, water and land. Cleared areas are snapped up by cattle farmers and plantation owners - we have already lost about 20% of the Amazon during the past 40 years, more than in all the previous 450 years since European colonization began.

This programme looks at our relationship with the rainforest and asks how can we use it for the wealth of resources it contains, but still keep it alive?


TUE 11:30 Changing My Voice (b01k9vh0)
Christopher Gabbitas asks why singers sometimes have to change the pitch of their voice. How do they learn to perform in another register and what effect does the change have?

Christopher Gabbitas is a member of the vocal group the King's Singers. He originally began his career as a bass, able to sing the lowest notes with ease. But when he auditioned for the group,the vacancy was for the higher baritone voice and he had to learn to sing in that new range.

Some classical singers have to change their voice because of the effects of ageing. If they've been a high soprano perhaps they now have problems hitting the top notes and may decide to pursue a career in the lower mezzo range. Men, as in the recent case of the celebrated tenor Plácido Domingo, may decide to move from being a tenor to singing baritone.

Other singers discover that, although they may have begun in one register, they are more suited to another. The opera singer Grace Bumbry began her career as a low soprano but discovered that she was able to sing higher and changed - to huge critical acclaim.

And there are cases of injury to the vocal chords, which can also cause a singer to have to change register.

But it's not easy to change your voice. Although it can prolong a singer's performing life, changing pitch can be an unnerving process. There are new techniques to learn. The ear has literally to be retuned and the brain rewired to adapt to a new vocal range. And the way performers often think of themselves in stereotypes- a romantic tenor for example, or a coloratura soprano- has to be revised.

In this feature, Christopher goes on a personal exploration of the art of voice changing. He examines his own experiences and talks to other singers who have switched ranges, to see how fundamental such shifts can be. Interviewees include the singers Grace Bumbry and Rosalind Plowright.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01k9vh2)
Call You and Yours: Banking

On Call You & Yours -

As Bob Diamond resigns, we're asking whether we need new forms of more ethical banking? How do you think we should bank in the future?

03700 100 444 is the phone number - a call will cost you the same as to an 01 or an 02 number - you can e-mail via the Radio 4 website, or you can text to 84844. If you do the latter it will cost you your standard operator message rate, and we may call you back on that number.
Or you can tweet @BBCRadio4 #youandyours.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Maire Devine.


TUE 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01k9vh4)
Barbara Windsor

The New Elizabethans: Barbara Windsor. To mark the Diamond Jubilee, James Naughtie examines the lives and impact of the men and women who have given the second Elizabethan age its character.

As a star of the BBC's long-running soap Eastenders as well as of the popular "Carry On..." film series, "Babs" can rightly claim to have a career which spans much of the reign of the current Queen. That's why she's the only actress to take her place in the list of New Elizabethans. Jim Naughtie examines her life, her career and the very British combination of grit and sauciness at its heart.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: James Cook.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01k9hcy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01k9wfl)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities (b01kbjx5)
Series 1

Episode 2

In the second in his series on Chinese museums, Roger Law continues his journey through Shanghai. He finds that capitalism seems to be celebrated in some ways in the bank museum, whilst a tobacco museum doesn't allow its visitors to smoke on the premises. He finally ends up in an 'ancient sex museum', filled with the most unusual curiosities.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01k9qc3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01k9wfn)
Lavinia Murray - The Beautiful Ugly

The Beautiful Ugly
by Lavinia Murray

This is an imagined day in the life of Hans Christian Andersen as a child. Combining fact with fantasy we explore the remarkable roots of Andresen's magical creativity and enter an icy, snowy, surreal landscape.
Christian finds himself on a quest to save his father's life from the chilling grip of the Ice Maiden.

Christian ..... Ellis Hollins
Merman ..... Jonathan Keeble
Mother ...... Fiona Clarke
Ice Maiden ..... Kathryn Hunt
Father ...... Seamus O'Neil
Producer/Director - Pauline Harris

Further info:- H.C.A. is an awkward, wonderful, off-kilter child, preparing to reach out into the world - unable to reconcile the poverty and dullness into which he was born. And this is the day he becomes aware of his tremendous and exquisite gift for storytelling.

Hans Christian's father has just returned, tired and debilitated, from a two year stint in the Napoleonic Army. He points to the ice patterns on the window. 'See, the Ice Maiden is coming for me!' he laughs. Hans Christian can indeed see the faint silhouette of a woman draped in ice flowers with an icicle crown with her hand held out towards them. Hans Christian's mother, becomes fearful. When her husband has dozed off she tells Hans Christian that the Ice Maiden will surely visit, freeze his father's heart and eyes, and take his soul. She sends Christian on a trip for a talisman from the wise woman. Christian is on a quest - to save his father's soul - from the chilling grip of the Ice Maiden.
The writer - Lavinia Murray - very experienced radio writer, wrote The Tyger Hunt - a drama about an imagined day in the life of William Blake as a child. Other work for Radio 4 includes The Opium Eater, Man of All Work.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b01k9wpp)
Series 2

Bristol

Jay Rayner presents the first programme in the new series of BBC Radio 4's food panel show, recorded in front of a live audience, aimed at anyone who cooks at home, not just the experts. Each week the programme travels around the country to visit interesting culinary locations and answer questions from local food-loving people.

In this programme, The Kitchen Cabinet are in Bristol ahead of the city's annual Grillstock festival, which finds barbeque enthusiasts from around the world flocking to the West Country. As well as discussing the science behind what makes the perfect barbeque, the panellists field questions on all aspects of grilling and cooking on an open flame.

The panel this week features: Rachel McCormack, a Glaswegian cook who is now successfully spreading the word on all things Spanish, not least by teaching authentic Catalan cookery; Peter Barham the food scientist who has worked with Heston Blumenthal; Allegra McEvedy the chef, food writer and regular on Loose Ends; and Tim Hayward - acclaimed food critic, writer, and broadcaster.

The show is witty, fast-moving, and irreverent, but packed full of information that may well change the way you think about cooking.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun.

Produced by Robert Abel and Darby Dorras
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Off the Page (b01k9wpr)
Bohemians

Bohemians - love them or loathe them, we've all met them. Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss avant-garde free spirits, or pretentious, posing pseudo-intellectuals, depending on your point of view.

Dominic is joined by an original free spirit; the writer Hanja Kochansky,writer and critic Cosmo Landesman, whose parents' eccentric behaviour caused the young Cosmo much embarrassment; and by the journalist who declares in his blog that he is 'right about everything', James Delingpole.
Has the British bohemian spirit - if there ever was one - disappeared? Now boho is mainstream, desirable even, what is there to rebel against?

Producer: Sarah Langan.


TUE 16:00 Crouching Low, Hidden Camera - Life as a P.I. (b01k9wpt)
As controversy flows over the role of private investigators in the phone hacking scandal and breaches of privacy, and the debate continues over whether the industry should be tightly regulated, Jake Wallis Simons examines the murky world of private detectives.

He explores the nature of the work of those who operate in this shadowy field, from investigating marital infidelities and company theft to countering money laundering and recovering stolen art. He talks to a range of investigators, from retired police detectives with a background of 30 years in the force to a twenty-year-old new recruit two weeks into the job.

And he finds out the best way to conceal a hidden camera in a cardboard takeaway coffee cup or a pizza box.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01k9wpw)
Rob Hopkins, Helen Castor

Favourite paperbacks discussed by historian Helen Castor and sustainability activist Rob Hopkins, in a programme chaired by Harriett Gilbert. Medieval and Tudor historian Helen Castor chooses an intricately beautiful historical novel by William Golding; Rob Hopkins, who campaigns for community solutions to global problems, opts for the 1940's diary of a city man whose war work takes him into agriculture for the first time. Harriett chooses a contemporary novel set in 1970's Argentina.

Producer Christine Hall.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01kbg7f)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01k9hd0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Sketchorama (b01kbg7m)
Series 1

Episode 2

Award-winning character comedian and doyen of sketch comedy Humphrey Ker presents the pick of the best live sketch groups currently performing on the UK comedy circuit in this brand new showcase - with character, improv, broken and musical sketch comedy.

Humphrey Ker is himself an established sketch performer, writer, actor and comedian who won the Fosters Edinburgh Comedy Award for Best Newcomer at the Edinburgh festival in 2011. For five years he was part of the much-loved sketch trio The Penny Dreadfuls, with whom he wrote and performed in a string of Edinburgh festival smashes, two series on BBC7 and two plays for Radio 4.

The sketch groups featured in episode two of Sketchorama are:

The Noise Next Door: Tom Houghton, Charlie Granville, Matt Grant, Tom Livingstone and Sam Pacelli have been performing their own distinctive brand of off-the-cuff comedy for over six years. They have an uncanny knack of transforming audience suggestions into fantastically funny scenes and songs in the blink of an eye, with a perfect blend of ludicrous characters, witty one-liners and epic stories.

The Boom Jennies: A trio featuring Lizzie Bates, Anna Emerson and Catriona Knox who produce fun, fast-paced, inventive sketch comedy mixed up with some top-notch tunes.

Jigsaw: Dan Antopolski (Triple Perrier Award Nominee, BBC New Comedy Award Winner and Dave's Funniest Joke of the Fringe Award Winner 2009), Tom Craine (BBC National Student Award Winner 2006) and Nat Luurtsema (Chortle Best Newcomer Nominee 2008) have joined forces to create a hydra-headed sketch monster. They enjoyed a self-titled Fringe debut in 2011 featuring well honed, fast paced material.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01kbg7w)
At the Britain in Bloom judging, Lynda's in full frenetic flow. She nervously checks gardens, itineraries and transport. Joe and Jim observe appreciatively that Marcia the female judge is a fine looking woman. When Jim escorts Marcia triumphantly to the Riley, Joe is uncharacteristically stoical. The mystery's solved when Joe turns up with Bartleby's trap. It almost eclipses Jim's classic car.

To Lynda's chagrin the off-message yellow and orange garden at Glebelands is a hit with Marcia. As Lynda tries to steer her towards the community orchard, she's horrified to see Joe already there, taster glass of Borsetshire Beauty cider in hand. Marcia's very impressed, and Jim thinks Joe's efforts have done them a favour. Lynda asserts they'll just have to wait until September, and turns her attention swiftly to the cultural side of the community games.

Keira's wreaking gentle havoc in the shop. Things get worse for jumpy Susan as she struggles to cope with the chaos of a trial 'wedding hair' session at Ambridge View. Keith earns Susan and Emma's gratitude by offering to get Bert a takeaway in place of Tracy's dubious catering, and he escapes to the pub. He tells Joe the wedding's costing a fortune. He doesn't know how he's going to do it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01kbg82)
Richard Wilson's Italian Job re-creation; Mark Damazer on The Newsroom

With Mark Lawson

Mark reports from Bexhill on Sea, as artist Richard Wilson recreates the final scene of the film The Italian Job, balancing a full-sized replica coach on the roof of the De La Warr Pavilion. Wilson discusses his inspiration, and the practical problems it poses.

Aaron Sorkin, creator of The West Wing and Oscar-winning writer of The Social Network, returns to TV with a new drama series, The Newsroom. This behind-the-scenes look at a TV news programme stars Jeff Daniels and Emily Mortimer. Former BBC news editor Mark Damazer reviews.

The Trinidad-born author Monique Roffey was shortlisted for the Orange Prize in 2010 for her novel The White Woman on the Green Bicycle. Her new book, like her last, is set in the Caribbean and tells the story of a man devastated by the loss of his wife in a flood. In an attempt to escape, he sets off from Trinidad on a boat voyage with his six year old daughter and elderly dog for crew, aiming for the Galapagos Islands. Monique Roffey explains how she herself made just such a voyage as research for the book.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjmp2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01kbg86)
Asset Returns

The Arab world's newest governments are desperate to retrieve billions banked in Britain by despots including Libya's Muammar Gaddafi and Hosni Mubarak of Egypt.

The money, they say, was stolen from their people and is needed to rebuild shattered economies.

In 'File on 4' Jenny Cuffe reports on the Arab nations' mounting impatience at the lengthy and costly process of investigation demanded to prove that assets were illicitly obtained by the now deposed leaders, their families and associates.

Already Egypt has gone to court to demand more information from the British Treasury about where their lost billions are stashed.

And campaigners in Tunisia - the first of the Arab Spring nations - complain Britain is dragging its feet. They contrast slow progress in London with a more helpful response from the country once renowned as the most impenetrable of banking fortresses: Switzerland.
Producer: Andy Denwood
Presenter: Jenny Cuffe.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01kbg8b)
Adverse weather conditions effect everybody, but what happens when you can't see to assess the situation for yourself? We talk to three contributors about their experiences in last week's stormy weather.

Audio description charity VocalEyes has asked 40 celebrities to describe one of their favourite London landmarks or places. Judy Dixey from VocalEyes tells us about the Beyond Sight Project launched in May, and shares her favourite celebrity excerpts. Plus some of your feedback from previous programmes.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01kbg8g)
GI bleeds, pregnancy and working, frozen shoulder, patient surveys

50,000 people end up in hospital every year in the UK because of bleeding from the top end of the gut - an upper gastrointestinal bleed. Around 1 in 10 of them will die. Gastrointestinal or GI bleeds are often due to ulcers - a side effect of taking aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and diclofenac. The bleeding can occur in the gullet, stomach or the first part of the intestine, the duodenum. Other causes include cancers and liver disease. The location of the bleed can be pinpointed by using an endoscope - a camera to look inside the gut - and treatments include stopping the bleeding with clips, heat or injections of adrenalin.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence hopes to change that with new guidelines on managing GI bleeds - guidelines which, as of last month, hospitals in England, Wales and Northern Ireland will be expected to follow. Scotland has had similar guidance in place for the last few years. David Patch is a Consultant Hepatologist at the Royal Free Hospital in London and has a special interest in this type of bleeding. He says that patients whose needs cannot be met at smaller hospitals should be transferred to specialist units where they can be treated promptly.

Tariq Iqbal who's a consultant gastroenterologist at the University of Birmingham is evaluating a new kind of treatment called Hemospray. This is a powder that can sprayed over the bleeding area to stop or slow any bleeding by accelerating the natural clotting process.

New research appears to show that standing at work for long periods in pregnancy can affect the unborn child. Research in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine, followed 4,680 mothers throughout their pregnancies. Some of the women had jobs where they were on their feet a lot - such as hairdressing, sales and working with toddlers. Women who stood for a long time had babies with smaller heads. It's thought that standing for long periods of time causes blood to "pool" in the legs, limiting the blood supply to the rest of the body including the uterus and therefore the developing foetus. The study also showed that working up to 36 weeks of pregnancy had no impact on birth weight, size or prematurity. Previous studies have shown that heavy lifting increased the risk of babies being born early - but this study showed no such link.

Many people with pain and stiffness in the shoulder are told they have a frozen shoulder. But the label is often incorrect as a truly frozen shoulder means restricted movement in all directions, accompanied by pain. It's not known what causes it but it is commoner in people with diabetes. During the very painful initial phase it's best to rest the shoulder and use analgesia to help relieve the pain, especially at night time when it can be at its worst. TENS and acupuncture can help sometimes. The tissues in the shoulder "capsule" appear to be thickened and rubbery - and some relief can be gained from surgery, to let the shoulder move more freely. If left alone about half of patients still have discomfort after 7 years - so the common belief that it lasts 2 years is a myth. As the pain starts to recede physiotherapy can be helpful and if there is inflammation - eg with calcified tendonitis - then steroid injections can relieve pain.

Producer: Paula McGrath.


TUE 21:30 In Living Memory (b01by7by)
Series 15

Gentlemen and Players

The last in the long running series of Gentlemen versus Players cricket matches was played at the Scarborough Festival in September 1962. Chris Ledgard goes to Yorkshire to find out about the game and explore the end of cricket's amateur era.


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01k9hd2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kbghk)
National and international news and analysis.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kcyz3)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 2

Written by Michael Palin.

Keith Mabbut's ex-wife asks him to meet her new man, his daughter Jay falls in love with an Iranian refugee and Keith's agent Silla telephones with a mysterious offer of work.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b01k9qbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kbghm)
Sean Curran reports on the row at Westminster about Barclays; the battle against drugs; and government action against child abuse.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 04 JULY 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01k9hfc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01k9vgt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hff)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01k9hfh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hfk)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01k9hfm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01klvyg)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch, a student of Tibetan Buddhism.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01kbhjh)
Anna Hill hears how cuts in milk prices mean that there is a big difference between how much supermarkets are charging for their pint of milk. Two more milk processors are cutting the price they pay dairy farmers. Arla will drop their prices by 2 pence per litre next month, and Dairy Crest by 1.7 pence per litre. This follows cuts announced last week by Robert Wiseman Dairies.

Adam Quinney from the National Farmers' Union thinks that this will irretrievably damage the dairy industry. Market Analyst Chris Walkland tells Anna which retailers sell milk at a price which is economic for farmers.

And we hear about research at Newcastle University into lameness in pigs which uses the same technology as Hollywood blockbusters.

The presenter is Anna Hill and the producer is Emma Weatherill.


WED 06:00 Today (b01kbhjk)
Morning news and current affairs presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, featuring:

0810
MPs are preparing to question former Barclays chief executive Bob Diamond about rate-fixing by the bank and whether the Bank of England knew about it. Business editor Robert Peston and political editor Nick Robinson give their analysis, and Lord Myners, former financial services secretary, gives his thoughts on the issue.

0834
Governments have failed to value the woodlands of England, according to the final report from the panel set up after the public outcry over the proposed sale of forests. The Right Reverend James Jones, Bishop of Liverpool, who headed the panel, explains the findings.

0848
Tom Feilden reports from Westminster Hall on the latest results in the search for the Higgs boson.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01kbhjm)
Mark-Anthony Turnage, Fatima Whitbread, Dr Chris Bird, Frank Partnoy

Libby Purves is joined by Olympian Fatima Whitbread, composer Mark-Anthony Turnage, Dr Chris Bird of Medecins Sans Frontieres and former Wall Street trader turned academic, Frank Partnoy.

Composer Mark-Anthony Turnage has teamed up with the charity 'Music in Prisons' to create a piece of music with inmates from HMP Lowdham Grange. The 12 minute composition 'Beyond This' will be featured as part of the Southbank Centre's New Music 20x12 programme - a weekend dedicated to music composition in the UK.

Fatima Whitbread is a former British javelin thrower and multiple medal-winner. She won bronze in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and silver at Seoul in 1988. In her autobiography, 'Survivor', she tells how athletics became her saviour after being abandoned as a baby and a childhood spent in and out of children's homes. 'Survivor' is published by Virgin Books.

Dr Chris Bird is a journalist turned paediatrician. He has just returned to the UK from a mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo with Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders). Working as a foreign correspondent for the Guardian and Reuters, Chris reported on the fighting in Chechnya and the war in Kosovo. He then became a doctor to help alleviate the suffering he witnessed as a journalist.

Frank Partnoy is a former Wall Street trader who is currently Professor of Law and Finance at the University of San Diego. A self-confessed procrastinator, he reveals in his new book 'Wait - The Useful Art of Procrastination' the science behind our decision-making disasters and successes at work and at home, in matters of love, and in government. Wait - The Useful Art of Procrastination' is published by Profile Books.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01kbhjp)
The Old Ways

Episode 3

"Humans are like animals and like all animals we leave tracks as we walk. Pilgrim paths, green roads, drove roads, corpse roads, trods, leys, dykes, drongs, sarns, snickets, holloways, bostles, shutes, driftways, lichways, ridings, halterpaths, cartways, carneys, causeways, herepaths."

Author Robert Macfarlane follows some ancient routes in the UK and overseas. As well as having adventures on the way - as you do on foot - he ponders the creation of old paths, the people who trod them, and how they resonate in today's landscapes.

In memory of his late grandfather Robert Macfarlane treads the pinkish granite of the Cairngorms. There are tales to tell in these parts...

Reader Dan Stevens.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kbhjr)
Winehouse; Infertility and Mental Health; James Bond Style

Mitch Winehouse one year after the death of his daughter Amy; Infertility and mental health? James Bond's costumes and the changing role of women. Presented by Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjmt4)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 3

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

Bernadette and Elgin have promised their 15 year old daughter, Bee, a family trip to Antarctica, for gaining perfect grades at school. The socially reclusive Bernadette becomes increasingly confessional in her emails to Manjula, her virtual assistant in India.

CAST:

Bernadette ..... Miranda Richardson
Bee .... Lydia Wilson
Elgin .... Richard Laing
Audrey .... Madeleine Potter
Soo Lin .... Laurel Lefkow
Marcus Strang .... Don Gilet
Ollie-O/ Jacob .... Sam Alexander
Paul Jellinek .... Patrick Brennan
Helen/ Gwen Goodyear .... Susie Riddell
Dr Kurtz .... Christine Absalom

Other parts played by members of the company.

Adapted by Miranda Davies
Produced/ directed by Emma Harding.


WED 11:00 The Sad Story of Jim Thorpe (b01kbhjt)
This programme explores the sad and controversial life of Jim Thorpe - the American Indian who was the star of the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, where the Swedish King famously told him 'Sir, you are the greatest athlete in the world'.

Thorpe had grown up on the Sac and Fox Indian reservation in Oklahoma and then, as a teenager, was sent 1500 miles away to a boarding school in Pennsylvania whose purpose was to 'civilise' Indian children by eradicating their culture. Its motto was 'Kill the Indian and save the man'. The pupils were forced to wear military uniforms, have short hair, and were punished if they spoke their own languages. 'The last phase of the Indian wars was fought in the classroom', says one contributor.

Thorpe was saved by sport and became the school's great star at both athletics and American football. He's often described as the 'first international sporting superstar'. But in 1913 it came out that he had been paid a few dollars to play minor-league baseball and the elite amateurs who ran US athletics rushed to condemn him as a professional. He was summarily stripped of his medals. But the public were on his side and his status in America is that of a popular hero victimised by those in power.

He went on to become the first great professional football player, but he could never cope with fame and died in near poverty in 1953. His widow arranged for him to be buried in a small town in Pennsylvania which offered to build a memorial to him. They town even changed its name to 'Jim Thorpe', but his Indian tribe are pursuing a legal battle to have his remains returned to Oklahoma.

Producer: Mark Whitaker

A Square Dog Radio Production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in 2012.


WED 11:30 The Castle (b01hllj1)
Series 4

Tender Is the Knight

Hie ye to The Castle, a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley"), Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley"), Martha Howe-Douglas ("Horrible Histories") & Ingrid Oliver

Sir John fills his castle with wounded soldiers and De Warenne fills his trousers with ice. Plus a new valet arrives hotfoot from somewhere called Downton Abbey...

Written by Kim Fuller & Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01kbhjy)
Busting health and safety myths

The children told to wear goggles before playing conkers and the trapeze artists ordered to put on hard hats. Just two of the recent stories of "health and safety gone mad." Judith Hackitt, Chair of the Health and Safety Executive, defends health and safety's reputation.

The Scottish Land Fund, which has helped rural communities buy the islands and land they live on, has been re-launched with £6 million of government funding. We hear from the Hebridean island of Gigha, which was bought by the community living there a decade ago.

The unveiling of the much awaited YouView internet television service - will it revolutionise the way we watch TV? A panel of tech experts discusses this and some of the other latest products on the market.

And in the next part of our ageing season "When I'm 65" we look at exercise - the research, the barriers and the benefits for the older body and mind.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Olivia Skinner.


WED 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01kbhk0)
Alfred Denning

The New Elizabethans: Lord Denning. To mark the Diamond Jubilee, James Naughtie examines the lives and impact of the men and women who have given the second Elizabethan age its character.

James Naughtie looks at one of the most outstanding judges of the 20th century, whose love of liberty and passion for justice stayed with him throughout his exceptionally long, and occasionally controversial, career. His impact on the shaping of common law was unrivalled during his lifetime, principally due to his unwillingness to adhere to precedent. With this 'common-sense' approach and his unwavering belief that the law should adapt to the times, it is clear to see why Alfred Denning, is so fondly remembered as 'the people's judge'.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.
They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Poppy Goodheart.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01k9hfp)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01kbhk2)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities (b01kbk3r)
Series 1

Episode 3

In the third in the series. Roger Law travels to Chongqing in China to see what new museums are being built in this huge and overwhelming city. He visits the Three Gorges museum to find the artefacts which were rescued from the massive dam project, and after climbing up and down the many hills in Chongqing, he finds himself in need of some help from the Chinese Traditional Medicine museum. The doctor in residence is able to give him some much needed personal attention, but does the medicine have any effect?


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01kbg7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00tg2m2)
Matthew Broughton - The Rain Maker

By Matthew Broughton

When a father takes his son on a trip to a cabin in the woods, he has no idea what terrible horror is to come. A sinister story about the demons that lurk in the dark forest of the mind. (Repeat)

Father ..... Kenneth Cranham
Son ..... Joe Dempsie

Directed by James Robinson.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01kbhk4)
Paul Lewis and guests take calls on tax and self assessment.

The do's and don'ts of tax planning have been hitting the headlines over the past few weeks, with the revelations of low rates of tax paid by a number of well-known public figures using off-shore schemes. So if you are considering more complex tax planning what things should you now bear in mind?

There are also two deadlines coming up in July. July 31st is when self-assessment taxpayers have to make the second payment on account towards their 2011 - 12 tax bill. This applies if you are self-employed, or are employed and have tax that is not paid through the pay as you earn system, such as buy-to-let income.

July 31st is also the deadline for people to contact HMRC with their tax credits applications or renewals for this financial year. If you already receive tax credits and your income has changed you may face money being clawed back from April 2012 if you miss the deadline.

Are you considering tax planning and concerned that HMRC may claw back the money later?
Are you aware that the fines for late filing have gone up?
What allowances are you entitled to?
Can you carry forward any unused reliefs?
What rate do you pay on capital gains tax?
Can you offset losses on your investments against gains?
Should you transfer some of your assets to your spouse?
If you want to appeal against late filing are you clear how to do
this?
If you are running a small business are you clear about your tax filing
obligations?

Guests:

Jane Moore, Technical Manager at the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.
John Whiting,Tax Policy Director, The Chartered Institute of Taxation and director of the Office for Tax Simplification.
Elaine Clark, chartered accountant, Cheap Accounting.co.uk.

The number to ring: 03700 100 444. Lines open at 1pm. Or e mail the programme: moneybox@bbc.co.uk.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01kbg8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01kbhk6)
Urban Protest

From the Paris Commune to the 'Right to the City', cities have long been the centre of utopian dreams and protests. They have generated riches, destitution, celebration and organised and often violent protest. Professor David Harvey, the acclaimed social geographer, talks to Laurie Taylor about the urban roots of the contemporary capitalist crisis and the vision of a city for all. They're joined by the sociologist, Sophie Watson.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01kbhk8)
Jeremy Hunt interview

In today's programme with Steve Hewlett:

Jeremy Hunt MP, Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, gives his first interview since appearing at the Leveson Inquiry; Maggie Brown of the Guardian and Mathew Horsman of analysts Mediatique discuss the prospects for new BBC DG George Entwistle; and Ben Fenton of the FT comments on a new twist in Operation Elveden, the police investigation into allegations of corrupt payments to public officials.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01kbhkb)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01k9hfr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b01kbhkd)
Series 4

Caitlin Moran

My Teenage Diary returns with six brave celebrities ready to revisit their formative years by opening up their intimate teenage diaries, and reading them out in public for the very first time.

Comedian Rufus Hound is joined by writer Caitlin Moran, who relives her teenage years when she was home-schooled in Wolverhampton, shared a small house with her seven brothers and sisters, and had a novel published at only 15.

Producer: Harriet Jaine
A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01kbhkg)
Pawel's trying to get a team together for the community games. He's enjoying the UK and the picking work. When their social has to be cancelled, he suggests Adam takes the pickers to the pub. Adam's charmed, but Ian agrees to join them only reluctantly.
Alice chats to Adam about her recent job interview, and they discuss the upcoming cricket match with Alice's old school, St Margaret's ('St Mag's').
To Ian's surprise he enjoys the evening at the pub. They share a joke as Pawel teaches him some Polish. Pawel declares it the best night since he arrived.
Ruth's less than impressed that all Adam appears to have to worry about is an event for the pickers. She thinks perhaps David should have attended the Borchester Show, but David disagrees. His caution's borne out when they receive another anonymous call, saying they know where the children are.
Distraught Ruth immediately calls her mum. She wants to go straight back to Prudhoe but Jill advises it would be safer to wait until morning. She calmly solves the problem by arranging for Kenton to drive Ruth north first thing tomorrow. Jill checks on David, who's bewildered. He's done nothing wrong, so why does he feel like this is all his fault.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01kbhkj)
Julian Barnes on Jean Dujardin's new film, Nick Hewer, new Bond exhibition

With Mark Lawson.

Julian Barnes reviews The Players (Les Infidèles), the new film by Jean Dujardin, the writer and lead actor of Oscar-winning movie The Artist. The film is a series of vignettes by different directors on the theme of infidelity, starring Jean Dujardin and Gilles Lellouche.

Designing 007: Fifty Years of Bond Style is a new exhibition which charts the design and fashions of the James Bond films, half a century after Thunderball arrived in our cinemas. The golden gun, the flick-knife shoes, costumes, vehicles and set design are all on display. Writer Anthony Horowitz reviews.

Writer and actor Ray Cooney pays tribute to Eric Sykes, whose death at the age of 89 was announced today.

Nick Hewer, who found fame alongside Lord Sugar on The Apprentice, now moves onto agriculture. In The Farm Fixer he applies 40 years of business experience to aid struggling farms, starting close to his roots in Northern Ireland. He reflects on his TV career so far.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjmt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b01kbj37)
When you look at the charge sheet against Barclays - egregious levels of pay, aggressive tax avoidance, mis-selling of interest rate swaps to business customers, deception and manipulation of interest rates and lying to regulators - it makes one of the sacred principles of the City "my word is my bond" sound like a rather sick joke. Especially when it's already known that many others, including British High Street banks, are also under investigation. The fall from the days when to be a banker was to be a model of probity and trust may be profound, but banking is only the latest sector to be accused of a systemic moral failure or catastrophic loss of moral leadership. The press, politicians - even striking doctors - have all had their time under the moral microscope. There have been the usual calls for ever tougher regulation and even the jailing of those found to have taken part in this latest episode. But in the face of grand temptation, will ever more complex rules and the threat of public shaming ever be enough? Or will this just encourage a box ticking approach to corporate compliance -- it may be within the rules or legal, but avoiding the harder question, is it moral? Can we ever reclaim the qualities of virtue and personal integrity, or in a largely post-religious, materialist society are we always going to need to be controlled by rules and regulations to behave well?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Clifford Longley and Matthew Taylor.

Witnesses:
John Reynolds - Former investment banker, co-author of "Ethics In Investment Banking"
John Milbank - Professor of Religion, Politics & Ethics, University of Nottingham
Boudewijn de Bruin - Professor of Financial Ethics, University of Groningen
Giles Fraser - Former Canon of St Paul's Cathedral, currently vicar of St Mary Newington.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01kbj39)
Series 3

Alice Bell: Improving Public Understanding of Science

Scientist Alice Bell argues that better engagement by scientists, rather than lessons in 'scientific literacy', is the solution to the lack of public understanding of science.

She is frustrated how often this apparent panacea is rolled out as the solution to the problem. But on some controversial subjects the scientific evidence does not point in a single direction, she says.

More than that, the specific bit of science needed to understand the subject at hand varies from issue to issue.

Instead, scientists should work to provide structures where non-experts can learn about science as and when they become important to them.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b01kbj3c)
Gareth Mitchell meets the engineers who will transform the way we fly around the world.

Gareth has a go at flying a personal aircraft in the flight simulator at Liverpool University. Drs Mike Jump and Mark White explain that the EU funded project MyCopter is seriously looking at the prospect of flying personal vehicles that are as easy to drive as a car.

Sophie Robinson, a Ph.D student at Liverpool University, explains how her research into the safety and stability of auto-gyros, flying machines that already exist for personal travel, could set standards for the flying cars of the future.

Gareth visits the Flight Gallery at the Science Museum in London with the curator, Dr Andrew Nahum, who shows him how the basic shape of aircraft has hardly changed in 70 years, since the days of the DC3.

David Caughey, Emeritus Professor of Aeronautical Engineering at Cornell University, points out that the blended wing shaped aircraft is more energy efficient. So Gareth asks why we don't see them in service today - the answer is that apart from the innate caution of the airline manufacturers, the passengers would have no windows and it could be hard to evacuate such a craft speedily in an emergency.

Gareth talks to Prof Jeff Jupp who worked on the wings of the largest passenger plane, the A380. He also talks about alternative fuels to kerosene and new designs for engines, that look old school as they have propellers, but will make the aircraft more energy efficient. But there may be a downside in that they could be noisier and slower than jet engines.

Professor Paul Weaver at Bristol University tells Gareth about his work on making wings that change shapes like birds'.

And Colin Sirett, Head of Research and Technology at Airbus UK, discusses some ideas for planes of the future, such as see through fuselages and pods that take passengers from the airport and attach to the aircraft.

Editor: Deborah Cohen.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01kbhjm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01k9hft)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kbj3f)
Former Barclay's Chief Executive Bob Diamond is grilled in parliament - we'll hear from two of the MPs asking the questions.

Higgs Boson exists - but how will it change our world?

And the Swiss finishing school for the 21st Century.

With Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kcztc)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 3

Written by Michael Palin.

Publisher Ron Latham has offered Mabbut a very handsome fee to write the true story of the elusive humanitarian and activist Hamish Melville. But Keith is wary. The offer just seems too good to be true.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Bird Island (b01kbjdg)
Series 1

Episode 4

On one hand, Ben is on the trip of a lifetime to Sub-Antartica. On the other, he's trapped in an icy hell with one other person, a dodgy internet connection and a dictaphone. Loneliness is something of a problem. His fellow travelling scientist Graham should alleviate this, but the tragi-comic fact is, they are nerdy blokes, so they can only stumble through yet another awkward exchange. Ben experiences all the highs and lows that this beautiful, but lonely place has to offer but fails miserably to communicate this to Graham. So, Ben shares his thoughts with us in the form of an audio 'log'.

Apart from his research studying the Albatross on the Island, Ben attempts to continue normal life with an earnestness and enthusiasm which is ultimately very endearing. We're with him as chats awkwardly with Graham, telephones his mother and as he tries to form a long distance relationship with a woman through Chemistry.com. In fact, we follow Ben as everything occurs to him. We also hear the pings and whirrs of machinery, the Squawks and screeches of the birds and the vast expanse outside. Oh, and ice. Lots of ice.

EPISDE FOUR:

Bird Island is the story of Ben, a young scientist working in Antarctica, trying to socially adapt to the loneliness by keeping a cheery audio diary on his Dictaphone. An atmospheric 15 minute non audience comedy.

In this final episode Graham gives the shock news that a new member of the team is joining them.

Written by ..... Katy Wix

Produced by ..... Tilusha Ghelani.


WED 23:15 Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard (b01kbjdj)
Series 3

The Start, the Middle, and the End of Time

Step into the magically mundane world that is the life of 21st Century Wizard Mordrin McDonald. An isolated 2000-year-old Scottish sorcerer with enough power in his small finger to destroy a town, yet hasn't enough clout to get a speed bump installed outside his cave by the local Council. Even for such a skilful sorcerer - modern life is rubbish!

In this episode Mordrin (David Kay) decides he has to do something to rescue his chances of ever getting together with Heather (Hannah Donaldson), who has just announced her engagement to slime-ball Aiden (Donald Pirie). He asks Bernard The Blue (Jack Docherty) to borrow the Timepiece of Trapathia to travel back in time and make up for all the missed opportunities with Heather.

Cast:
Mordrin ........ David Kay
Geoff ....... Gordon Kennedy
Bernard ........ Jack Docherty
Heather ........ Hannah Donaldson
Aiden ........ Donald Pirie
DJ ........ Johnny Austin

Written by David Kay & Gavin Smith.

Produced by Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kbjdl)
MPs question the former Barclays boss, Bob Diamond, who resigned over the inter-bank interest rate scandal.
David Cameron and Ed Miliband clash in the Commons over the terms of an inquiry into the events at the bank.
The Prime Minister says a single parliamentary investigation would be swift and decisive. The Labour leaders insists a wider probe is need into the culture of banking.
There are heated exchanges between the Health Secretary and Labour MPs over changes to the NHS in England.
While in the Lords, peers demand action over uninsured drivers.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 05 JULY 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01k9hgn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01kbhjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hgq)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01k9hgs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hgv)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01k9hgx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01klwp2)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch, a student of Tibetan Buddhism.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01kblbz)
The report on the future of England's forests says they have untapped economic potential, including the creation of up to 7000 new jobs. Charlotte Smith asks the Environment Secretary, Caroline Spelman if she'll spend more on forestry to kick start change. She also talks to the Bishop of Liverpool, who chaired the review, about why he thinks public funding for woodlands and timber businesses is money well spent. Also in the programme, why baby eels are being moved around the countryside.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


THU 06:00 Today (b01kblc1)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01kblc3)
Scepticism

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Scepticism, the idea that it may be impossible to know anything with complete certainty. Scepticism was first outlined by ancient Greek philosophers: Socrates is reported to have said that the only thing he knew for certain was that he knew nothing. Later, Scepticism was taught at the Academy founded by Plato, and learnt by students who included the Roman statesman Cicero. The central ideas of Scepticism were taken up by later philosophers and came to the fore during the Renaissance, when thinkers including Rene Descartes and Michel de Montaigne took up its challenge. A central plank of the philosophical system of David Hume, Scepticism had a powerful influence on the religious and scientific debates of the Enlightenment.

With:

Peter Millican
Professor of Philosophy at Hertford College, Oxford

Melissa Lane
Professor of Politics at Princeton University

Jill Kraye
Professor of the History of Renaissance Philosophy and Librarian at the Warburg Institute, University of London.

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01kblc6)
The Old Ways

Episode 4

"Humans are like animals and like all animals we leave tracks as we walk. Pilgrim paths, green roads, drove roads, corpse roads, trods, leys, dykes, drongs, sarns, snickets, holloways, bostles, shutes, driftways, lichways, ridings, halterpaths, cartways, carneys, causeways, herepaths."

Author Robert Macfarlane follows some ancient routes in the UK and overseas. As well as having adventures on the way - as you do on foot - he ponders the creation of old paths, the people who trod them, and how they resonate in today's landscapes.

In Spain, Robert Macfarlane contacts Miguel Angelo Blanco, whose library of 'walking books' can predict the future...

Reader Dan Stevens.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kblc8)
Julie Walters on her new stage role as Judy the anarchic, feisty old hippy in The Last of the Haussmans. Dr Hilary Cass, the new President of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health on reforming care for children. Tatler Magazine's editor Kate Reardon on her mission to put gay women on the social A-list. Why visitors to a an exhibition of paintings by the artist, Lizzie Riches, at Blickling Hall in Norfolk are being encouraged to join in a treasure hunt. And Paul Hollywood Cooks the Perfect pork pies.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Ruth Watts.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjmvw)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 4

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson, Richard Laing and Madeleine Potter.

In today's episode, Bernadette's relationships with the other Galer Street mothers become increasingly fractious. But her husband, Elgin, is at a loss to know how to help.

CAST:

Bernadette ..... Miranda Richardson
Bee .... Lydia Wilson
Elgin .... Richard Laing
Audrey .... Madeleine Potter
Soo Lin .... Laurel Lefkow
Marcus Strang .... Don Gilet
Ollie-O/ Jacob .... Sam Alexander
Paul Jellinek .... Patrick Brennan
Helen/ Gwen Goodyear .... Susie Riddell
Dr Kurtz .... Christine Absalom

Other parts played by members of the company.

Adapted by Miranda Davies
Produced/ directed by Emma Harding.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b01kblcb)
Pauline Davies in the desert where nothing lives: the Atacama in Chile. But once thousands of miners lived here. Today ghost towns are all that remain.

Andrew Harding on how the fears of those living in the Malian city of Timbuktu came to be realised when Islamist militants came to town and started to destroy their historic monuments.

Could France be about to issue an apology to Algeria for the brutal events which led up to Algerian independence fifty years ago? Philip Sweeney wonders who exactly owes whom the apology?

Of all the postings a correspondent might expect, one in the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo Kinshasa was never going to be dull! Thomas Hubert looks back on his three and a half years there.

And the dangers from Chernobyl have not come to an end yet. Patrick Evans says there's a real fear the summer heat could trigger radioactive wildfires with consequences which could be felt all over Europe.


THU 11:30 The Godfather of Ulster Punk (b01kblcd)
Alan Dein goes to Belfast to meet Terri Hooley, who almost singlehandedly ignited a peculiarly Northern Irish punk explosion during the darkest days of The Troubles.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01kblcg)
The nutritionally perfect airline meal

Can convenience foods be healthy? Scientists say they can and have developed a super-healthy in-flight meal.

As part of 'When I'm 65' - the ageing season we're running with BBC One - we are looking at some of the new design ideas making it easier to get older.

The government is announcing a series of "city deals" - eight English cities are being offered significant new powers and money. We find out what that means for some of the cities involved.

And it's five years since the smoking ban in England came in. After a spike in support to help people stop smoking there are concerns that this will now be withdrawn.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Maire Devine.


THU 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01kblcj)
Paul Foot

The New Elizabethans: Paul Foot.

Although he was born into a political family, Paul Foot chose not to go down the Parliamentary route, he was instead a lifelong, unapologetic campaigning journalist of the political left. A career in newspapers and at Private Eye brought many hard-found exclusives. He's best known for his work exposing corruption and for his tireless crusades against miscarriages of justice, and there's now a journalism prize named after him. James Naughtie assesses the impact of this 19th New Elizabethan.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."

Producer: Alison Hughes.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01k9hgz)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01kblcl)
National and international news presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities (b01kblcn)
Series 1

Episode 4

In the fourth in the series, Roger Law has arrived in Zhengzhou on his journey through China to see some of the many museums of the country. In this city, a major railway junction, he is amazed to discover a 'Chinese Louvre', a pyramid-shaped building housing some of the finest treasures of the country. He travels on to the Longman Grottos, where he is amazed to find more than 30,000 Buddha statues and 100,000 Buddha images in a series of caves hollowed out of the rock. He also finds himself alongside almost the same number of Chinese tourists jostling to see a part of their history.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01kbhkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01kblcq)
Alone in the Garden with You

by Louise Monaghan.

Rebekah faces a modern dilemma. When her ex-husband's dying wish is to be buried in the family garden, how does she square it - and the corresponding drop in house value - with Clive, her new man?

Cast

Rebekah ..... Susie Riddell
Alex ..... Carl Prekopp
Clive ..... Gerard McDermott
Jack ..... Felix Lailey
Meggie ..... Lauren Mote
Sales Assistant ..... Amaka Okafor
Nurse ..... Christine Absalom

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01kblcs)
Eels

Helen Mark is in Gloucestershire to find out more about one of our most fascinating creatures, the eel, and hear why efforts are being made to save this endangered species.
When eels arrive in the UK as tiny babies, called elvers, they do so at the end of an exhausting 4,000-mile marathon swim from the Sargasso Sea where they have spawned. For generations, their arrival was greeted with much anticipation by fishermen on the Rivers Severn and Wye where they were caught at night and often used in dishes and delicacies.
But the eel is in trouble and has been placed on the Red List of Fish to Avoid by the Marine Conservation Society who class it as critically endangered. However, others believe that the decline in the number of eels is not just a result of over-fishing but is also due to the way in which rivers are managed and flood defences are erected, so blocking the eels migratory route, and that by leaving them to their own defences the eels' fate will be sealed.
Helen Mark meets some of the people involved with trying to save this precious and mysterious creature including fisherman Richard Cook who has a life-long passion for eels and who is now taking tanks of eels into schools to teach the children who look after them for a few weeks about the importance of the fish, our rivers and the environment . Eventually, the children will release the eels back into the river as part of a restocking project.
Helen also hears from Bernadette Clarke of the Marine Conservation Society about the reasons why they felt it was important that eels should be classed as critically endangered and placed on the Red List. And Helen meets Andrew Kerr of the Sustainable Eel Group which is working to devise a recovery plan to protect and preserve the eel.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01k9n7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b01k9npg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01kblcv)
Francine Stock meets with Welsh actor Rhys Ifans, who explains why he's adopted an English accent for his role as the villain in The Amazing Spiderman.

As the Wellcome Trust and the BFI launch a scheme to encourage more scripts set in the world of biology and medicine, critic Tim Robey and script editor Katy Leys discuss the scientist in film.

Director Bobcat Goldthwait on what's eating America in his new film, God Bless America.

Actor Willem Dafoe discusses his role in The Hunter, as a mercenary searching for the Tasmanian Tiger.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01kblcx)
This week scientists at CERN in Geneva have discovered a sub-atomic particle they think might be the long-sought Higgs Boson particle. Quentin talks to leading CERN scientists Professor Jim Virdee and his colleague at Imperial College, Professor Gavin Davies, about the implications of this finding.

Also in today's programme, Quentin visits the annual Summer Science Exhibition at the Royal Society. Dr Phil Manning explains how particle physics does not just allow scientists to find Higgs, but can also tell us about the colour of dinosaurs. His group uses a particle accelerator to 'read' fossils. At another stand, Dr Gianluca Memoli and Ian Butterworth from the National Physical Laboratory tell Quentin why the sound of bubbles can have interesting medical applications. And Dr Stephen Leslie maps the genetic make-up of the different peoples in the UK. Quentin finds out he is actually more of a soft Southerner than the tough Northerner he fancied himself to be ...


THU 17:00 PM (b01kblcz)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01k9hh1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 The Simon Day Show (b01kbld1)
Series 2

Brian Pern

Simon Day and his characters welcome listeners to The Mallard, a small provincial theatre somewhere in the UK. Each week one of Simon's comic characters come to perform at The Mallard while the staff struggle with rivalries, self-doubt and the new owner's vision for the theatre's future.

This week brings washed up rocker, Brian Pern to the Mallard Theatre as he's interviewed on stage by pretend 6Music journalist, Ben (Rhys Thomas).

Cast list:
Brian Pern ..... Simon Day
Emanuel Akinyemi ..... Felix Dexter
Pat Bennet ... Morwenna Banks
Ron Bone / Wozak ..... Simon Greenall
Ben ... Rhys Thomas

Written by Simon Day with additional material from Rhy Thomas and Felix Dexter
Original music arranged by Steve Burge
Produced by Colin Anderson.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01kbld3)
Kenton drives agitated Ruth to her mum's. She's thankful to Jill for staying calm. What upsets her most is that the caller seems to know just what to say to get the panic reaction he wants. Kenton's sympathetic. He has a thought provoking suggestion. The caller's words didn't prove that he really knew where Josh and Ben were. Ruth agrees he has a point.

Kenton distracts her with wacky ideas for the community games and comic references to Lynda on the warpath. Ruth's grateful, but admits she doesn't know how much longer she can stand the situation at home. Kenton relates the story of someone he knew of in a similar situation who wished she'd given evidence (he means Kathy, although he doesn't identify her). Ruth has food for thought.

David's distracted and not himself. Adam's worried. Eventually he wrestles the truth from David, and is appalled and full of sympathy for the family. He tells David that nobody would blame him if he decided not to give evidence. When Ed comes over to share a fish supper with grateful David, Ed declares he's staying put at Rickyard Cottage. David and Ruth have always been great to him, and he wants to show them his support.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01kbld5)
Bryn Terfel, scoring Hitchcock, the Shard, Sinbad

With Kirsty Lang.

Leading bass-baritone Bryn Terfel talks about the intrinsic character of Welsh music, as his four day BrynFest takes place with a 500 strong male voice choir and an open air Big Sing which anyone can join.

Arabian Nights hero Sinbad the Sailor gets a modern makeover in a new TV series, from the production company behind Primeval. Critic Bidisha discusses Sinbad's contemporary appeal.

As part of a major Hitchcock season, the BFI have restored his nine surviving silent films which will be given gala screenings with brand new scores. Composers Neil Brand, Nitin Sawhney and Mira Calix discuss the art of creating a signature Hitchcock sound for the 21st Century.

The Shard is Western Europe's tallest building and tonight celebrates its official completion with a light show. Architect Renzo Piano's 72 level tower near London Bridge has been 12 years in development. Architecture writer Hugh Pearman reflects on the role of the skyscraper and its future.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjmvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01kbld7)
The Children's Care Business

The conviction in May of nine men in Rochdale for the grooming of young girls threw into stark reality the threat to young vulnerable people living in some children's homes in England. One victim had been sexually exploited while going missing from her privately run home on 19 occasions over a period of three months.

A parliamentary report published a month later has shown this is not an isolated case. In fact, as many as 10,000 young people are going missing from children's homes each year, while the institutions in which they're based are given a clean bill of health by the authorities.

The Report investigates the changing children's home industry, exploring how the task of caring for some of society's most troubled youngsters has become largely the preserve of the private sector.

Simon Cox will ask whether at a cost of as much as £250,000 per child each year, privately run homes are providing value for money and an adequate level of care for their vulnerable residents. He'll also question whether the regulatory regime charged with holding the industry to account is up to the task.

Producer: Hannah Barnes.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01kbld9)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan and his executive guests discuss the evolution and hierarchy of brands. Who has the upper hand in the many battles being fought between big consumer brands and shops' own-labels? They also consider consumer tastes - do their own customers have good taste, or do they just buy what they're given?

Joining Evan in the studio are Justin King, chief executive of supermarket chain Sainsbury's; Cecile Bonnefond, chief executive of French champagne house Piper-Heidsieck; Geoff Cooper, chief executive of builders merchant Travis Perkins.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


THU 21:00 Amazonia - Keeping It Alive (b01k9vgy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01kblc3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01k9hh3)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kbldc)
Round-up of the day's news, with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kd08w)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 4

Written by Michael Palin.

Mabbut accepts Ron Latham's offer and uses his contacts to establish Melville's whereabouts. It transpires Melville is working on a project in India and Mabbut heads for Bhubaneswar in search of his elusive subject.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 The Guns of Adam Riches (b01kbldf)
Pilot

2011 Edinburgh Comedy Award winner Adam Riches' fast-paced, fully-loaded bandolier of character comedy.

Bringing you such man-weapons as 'Coach Coach', 'MasterMind', 'Daniel Day Lewis', 'The Drifter' and 'Cube-Voice Guy'.

Plus live music and improvisation from whoever happens to be sat on the front row!

Pilot show that sparked the following series.

Written by Adam Riches.

Producers: Simon Mayhew-Archer & Rupert Majendie.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kbldh)
Sean Curran and the BBC's parliamentary team with the top news stories from Westminster, on the day that MPs decide what kind of inquiry there will be into banking, and find out how the Army will cut 20,000 jobs. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



FRIDAY 06 JULY 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01k9hhy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01kblc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hj0)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01k9hj2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01k9hj4)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01k9hj6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01klxd9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch, a student of Tibetan Buddhism.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01kblt7)
Dairy farmers are threatening protests during the Olympics over cuts to the milk price. Iolo ap Dafydd hears from National Farmers' Union Cymru and Farmers For Action who say that unless all price reductions since April are reversed, they will begin a campaign of demonstrations and disruption to the milk supply during the time of the Olympics.

And within the next fortnight a government announcement could see more electricity being generated by burning wood. Coppice willow is one of the most widely grown crops for burning. Sarah Falkingham visited a West Yorkshire farmer who turned over most of his arable farm to willow.

Presented by Iolo ap Dafydd and produced by Emma Weatherill.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01kblt9)
Morning news and current affairs presented by John Humphrys and Justin Webb, featuring:

0719 The Church of England's ruling Synod begins a meeting in York today that could see it take the historic decision to create women bishops, breaking a tradition the Church traces back to the time of Jesus. The BBC's Robert Pigott reports.

0810: Drug company GlaxoSmithKline pleaded guilty to violations involving 10 drugs. The Today programme's Tom Feilden reports and Stephen Whitehead, chief executive of Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, shares his thoughts on how this has affected the industry.

0838 The mummy porn novel Fifty Shades of Grey has made the subject of sex, fashionable again. Author John Banville, and Rachel Johnson, whose book Shire Hell was the winner of the bad sex in fiction award in 2008, debate how to write about sex.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01k9n81)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01kbltc)
The Old Ways

Episode 5

"Humans are like animals and like all animals we leave tracks as we walk. Pilgrim paths, green roads, drove roads, corpse roads, trods, leys, dykes, drongs, sarns, snickets, holloways, bostles, shutes, driftways, lichways, ridings, halterpaths, cartways, carneys, causeways, herepaths."

Author Robert Macfarlane follows some ancient routes in the UK and overseas. As well as having adventures on the way - as you do on foot - he ponders the creation of old paths, the people who trod them, and how they resonate in today's landscapes.

After various journeys, it's back to the chalk paths for Robert Macfarlane and a ghostly encounter is in store..

Reader Dan Stevens.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01kbltf)
Presenter Jenni Murray. In a joint project with Radio 5Live's Men's Hour, Woman's Hour discusses sex after childbirth. A new exhibition in Manchester looks at the temperance movement and Jenni talks to its curator - Dr Annemarie McCallister - about the role that women and children played in trying to persuade the men to avoid 'the demon drink'. Bel Mooney talks about what to do the day your ex gets remarried and food historian Ivan Day looks at condiments.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjn1n)
Where'd You Go Bernadette?

Episode 5

Maria Semple's brilliantly comic debut novel about misplaced genius and mother-daughter love, starring Miranda Richardson, Lydia Wilson and Richard Laing.

In today's episode, as Bernadette becomes increasingly confessional in her emails to her virtual assistant, Manjula, we learn about her lost career as a revolutionary architect and her early life with Elgin.

CAST:

Bernadette ..... Miranda Richardson
Bee .... Lydia Wilson
Elgin .... Richard Laing
Audrey .... Madeleine Potter
Soo Lin .... Laurel Lefkow
Marcus Strang .... Don Gilet
Ollie-O/ Jacob .... Sam Alexander
Paul Jellinek .... Patrick Brennan
Helen/ Gwen Goodyear .... Susie Riddell
Dr Kurtz .... Christine Absalom

Other parts played by members of the company.

Adapted for radio by Miranda Davies

Produced/Directed by Emma Harding

About the author: Maria Semple has written for television shows including Arrested Development, Mad About You, and Ellen. She lives with her family on an island off Seattle. This is her first novel.


FRI 11:00 Excusing Private Godfrey (b01kblth)
Poet Paul Henry, explores the true story of how Dad's Army's Private Godfrey, whom the nation took to its heart, belied an altogether more complex character: Arnold Ridley. Nearly a century after the outbreak of the First World War, one of its most enduring heroes lives on in the living rooms of millions.

Behind the genteel, lovable, incontinent elder that was Private Charles Godfrey was the much more complex character of the actor and playwright Arnold Ridley. In Excusing Private Godfrey, passionate Dad's Army fan Paul Henry will highlight the true story behind the humour, challenging the listener's preconceptions of Godfrey and bringing the horrors of WW1 and WW2 into sharp focus. The programme explores the many sides of Ridley's character and life through interview, personal diary, clips from the films, plays, and of course clips from Dad's Army. Paul Henry will delve into Ridley the soldier, how his Somme experience and war injuries shaped the rest of his life.

In Dad's Army, Godfrey was a former conscientious objector. In reality, Arnold had been a battle-hardened lance corporal with the 6th Somerset Light Infantry, who went over the top on the morning of September 16, 1916. Paul Henry finds out about his love and family life and relationship with his son Nicholas - who is interviewed for the programme. Henry delves into Ridley the playwright through his 1941 film The Ghost Train and other plays, and find out how this successful writer was both entrepreneur and eventual bankrupt. In addition, Paul Henry will unmask Ridley the actor - how did he end up as a character in Dad's Army, and what was the impact of his time spent in Forces entertainment.

Presenter: Paul Henry
Producer: Terry Lewis
A Tinderbox Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 The Gobetweenies (b01kksr2)
Series 2

The Break-Up

Marcella Evaristi's sly take on contemporary parenting looks at a divorced North London family through the prism of two go-betweening siblings.

This week, Lucy prepares to dazzle the world with her Rihanna-influenced take on the part of Nancy in the school production of Oliver! - but her mum, armed with a new parenting manual, prepares to do battle with her daughter's impermeable belief in her own genius. Meanwhile, son Tom is appalled by his hated fictional alter ego, cutesy Georgie. Maybe if he garrottes his mother's puppet version of himself, she'll get the hint? Dad is determined to steer him away from the merchandise and takes him to see a wrestling match instead.

Director: Marilyn Imrie

Producer: Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01kbm0g)
Dementia village and carp 'cheats'

Have the Dutch made a breakthrough in dealing with dementia? An innovative village with supermarkets, squares and accommodation that apes the style of their patients' youth, is causing a stir among experts in care of the elderly. We have a report from the 'dementia village'.

As the summer deluge continues with a months rain expected to fall in a day for the second time in two weeks what simple steps can home owners in flood prone areas take to protect their property and possessions.

As supermarkets stop or slow their development of superstores the convenience store market is enjoying an unprecedented boom. It's doubled in value since the year 2000 and it is expected to grow by 30%in the next five years. It is not all good news for local shops however most of the increase is down to supermarkets opening local versions- so how can the independent trader fight back.

The world of carp fishing is in ferment as some anglers are caught use computers to manipulate photos of their prize catches -"it was how big?"

Holiday makers could face additional charges if they are flying to Spain this summer; the Spanish airport authority has raised the cost for planes landing there; could other economically embattled holiday destinations follow their lead?

We are used to pubs launching happy hours but a pub in Yorkshire has bucked the trend and are running an unhappy hour where customers can unload about what a terrible week they have had with a prize for the best, or should that be, worst tale.


FRI 12:45 The New Elizabethans (b01kbm0j)
Francis Bacon

The New Elizabethans: Francis Bacon the haunting artist of suffering, pain and death most famous for his triptychs of the crucifixion and images of the screaming Pope Innocent X.

Bacon was born in Ireland but had an turbulent relationship with his parents and spent much of his life in London, especially in Soho, where he explored his emerging homosexuality. He was untrained as an artist but when he had an idea, he would use traditional techniques to express himself, hoping to bring to the image "a greater reality".

Margaret Thatcher famously described him as "that man who paints those dreadful pictures" but his talent was recognised from an early age. By the time of his death in 1992, his paintings were changing hands for tens of millions.

The New Elizabethans have been chosen by a panel of leading historians, chaired by Lord (Tony) Hall, Chief Executive of London's Royal Opera House. The panellists were Dominic Sandbrook, Bamber Gascoigne, Sally Alexander, Jonathan Agar, Maria Misra and Sir Max Hastings.

They were asked to choose: "Men and women whose actions during the reign of Elizabeth II have had a significant impact on lives in these islands and/or given the age its character, for better or worse."
Producer: Clare Walker.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01k9hj8)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01kbm0l)
National and international news presented by Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities (b01kbm0n)
Series 1

Episode 5

In the final programme in the series, Roger Law concludes his journey through China looking for the very best of the country's museums, old and new. He ends up in Beijing, making a visit to the city's 'Tap Water' museum to find out what's on display. From there he heads off to find wonderful Chinese textiles and the extraordinary sound of bells in two more of the city's unusual museums, before ending up in one of the finest collections of art that can be found anywhere in the country.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01kbld3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01k9q71)
The Last Breath

The drama is set in 2018. Assisted suicide has been legalised in the UK.

Ben Fearnside is an abstract expressionist painter. He has had some success with London galleries but his work has now fallen out of fashion. Without an audience his life-work is unwitnessed and 'uncreated'. He decides to make one final piece of art: he will capture a dying breath in a jar and exhibit it.

Ben invites freelance radio producer Anita Sullivan to profile him and document the process of capturing The Last Breath. But as the date for breath capture approaches, the identity of the donor remains a mystery.

'The Last Breath' is a high-concept piece of drama about a high-concept piece of art. It plays with narrative form by blending documentary and drama, using real people and real names with a fictional story. The play asks some big questions: what is art, what should be sacrificed in the name of art... and what is the price of a soul?

The Last Breath was created by Ben Fearnside with Anita Sullivan

Nicky is played by Nicola Walker
The interviewees are;
Derek and Mo Fearnside, Ben Fletcher, Professor Emma Jones, Anthony Chopper White, Linda Keenan and Dr Mark Gretason.
The Static State artists are;
Kenny Watson, Alex Allan, Joseph Watts and Robert Perry.

Music was written and performed by Nick Tettersell.

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01kbm0q)
Eric Robson and the panel invite GQT listeners to pose their gardening questions at RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show.

Chris Beardshaw, Bunny Guinness and Bob Flowerdew form the panel.
In addition, rising star, Jack Dunckley gives his personal take on designing for large flower shows.

Questions answered in the programme:
Why do ants farm aphids and does it harm the plant? Do ants eat strawberries?
Are 'Spanish slugs' invading or are they indigenous to the Isle of White? How do I get rid of them?
Planting suggestions for a pink and white colour schemes, with evergreens at a variety of hights, to be planted in a garden that is half in sun, half in shade? Suggestions included: Pittosporum Tobira, Deschampsia, Angelica 'Ebony', evergreen box balls, Erigeron karvinskianus, Knautia macedonica, Thistle Cirsium, Allium, Buddleia ('Pink Delight', 'Flowering Redcurrent').
Suggestions for fast growing, low maintenance, and cheap plants to cover a 6 ft orange fence? Suggestions included: rambling roses ('Seagull', 'Rambling Rector'), Ficus, Jerusalem artichoke.
Does over wintering give better results in challenging and uncertain weather conditions?
Suggestions for a climber or tallish shrub to provide all year interest for a shaded and dry porch in keeping with a country cottage look? Suggestions included: Clematis, Pileostegia Viburnoides, roses - 'Darcey Bussell', Abutilon 'Nabob'.
When lifting and storing Tree Lily bulbs should the tiers of bulbs be separated (if so, when?) or replanted as lifted?
Suggestions for plants that bankers should grow in their garden?

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Elizabeth Taylor Short Stories (b01kbm0s)
Plenty Good Fiesta

Joanna Tope reads this charming and moving tale about Fernando, a child refugee from the Spanish Civil War who comes to stay with an English family. The language barrier and the strangeness of his new surroundings are all things he takes in his stride, until the day he sees a village fair.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01kbm0v)
Eric Sykes, Sir Michael Palliser, Gillian Hush and Yitzhak Shamir

John Wilson explores Eric Sykes' comic talents on screen, stage and golf course and Eric is remembered by friends and fellow entertainers Bruce Forsyth, Jimmy Tarbuck and Ken Dodd along with TV producer Beryl Vertue. John also examines the life of Yitzhak Shamir, long-serving Israeli prime minister who took a hardline stance against Palestinian nationhood. Diplomat Sir Michael Palliser who, as permanent under-secretary at the Foreign Office, helped negotiate Britain's entry to the EEC and radio producer Gillian Hush, who was awarded an MBE for over 30 years work bringing documentaries and stories to the airwaves.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01kbm0x)
Are sensational storylines ruining The Archers? Some listeners think familiar characters are acting out of character, simply to crank up the tension. Roger Bolton meets Acting Editor John Yorke and longstanding Archers' writer Keri Davies, to ask at what point does the dramatic veer into the unbelievable?

With only three weeks to go until the Olympic and Paralympic Games, Roger talks to 5 Live's Controller Adrian Van Klaveren about the network's preparations for covering the world's biggest sporting event. He also puts other listener questions to 5 Live's boss. Is the network over-infatuated with Richard Bacon? And is the station alienating its older listeners?

Finally, what is it with the Today programme presenters and telling the time? Why so many slip ups? Feedback visits Justin Webb at the Today studios to investigate and ensure the correct time-telling instruments are present and correct.

This is the last in the current series of Feedback, but the team are still keen to hear from you over the break, so do get in touch.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01kbm0z)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01k9hjb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b01kbm11)
Series 37

Episode 5

A Week of Splits: in the week that David Cameron suggested he might have a referendum on whether the UK should break from Europe, Katie Holmes announced her split from Tom Cruise, and scientists at CERN announced the discovery of a Higgs-like Boson, Jon Holmes, Holly Walsh, Mitch Benn and Pippa Evans join Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis for a sideways glance at this week's big stories. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01kbm13)
Brian tells Jennifer that Debbie's putting feelers out for a herd manager. Jennifer's mind is on the youngsters' homecoming. She's keen to hold a summer party for Ruairi and Phoebe, and to celebrate Adam's recovery. She observes that Brian's getting on well with Adam now. Better, perhaps, corrects Brian.

Susan enthuses about Lynda's cultural events to perplexed Kenton. He needs to come up with ideas to compete. Jamie refuses to be tempted by Kenton's offer of chocolate. He's dubious about the cricket match with St Mag's, and is trying to get fit in readiness. Kenton advises him simply to give it his best shot.

Jamie's disparaging about Kenton's community games list, and offers to look at it for him. Kenton's rattled when Jamie comes up with much better suggestions.

Feeling the strain of living with fussy Susan, Emma flees back to Rickyard. She pledges her support for David and Ruth. Ruth's delighted. David is puzzled but pleased to notice a change in Ruth since she returned home. He tells her he's decided not to testify. But to his surprise Ruth counters that she's had a change of heart and wants to see it through. They acknowledge that finally they're back on the same side.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01kbm15)
Amy Winehouse and Katy Perry films; William Fiennes on Joseph Mitchell

With Kirsty Lang.

Singers Amy Winehouse and Katy Perry are the focus of two new documentaries. Katy Perry: Part of Me follows the American performer on tour, as her marriage to Russell Brand was ending. Amy Winehouse - the Day She Came to Dingle includes footage of the late singer performing in a small Irish church in 2006. Mark Frith reviews.

Singer Sam Lee gave up being a visual artist, a teacher of wilderness survival skills and a burlesque dancer, to learn folk songs. He talks about collecting material from gypsy and traveller communities for his CD, Ground of its Own, and the sounds - including birdsong and drones - that he has added to his interpretations.

As Damien Hirst announces plans to erect a 20-metre statue of a pregnant woman in Ilfracombe, and London City Airport unveils what is claimed to be the UK's tallest bronze sculpture, art critic Rachel Campbell-Johnston considers the continuing appeal of large-scale art.

Salman Rushdie has described the American writer Joseph Mitchell as a 'buried treasure'. Working on the New Yorker from 1938 until his death in 1996, he specialized in portraits of eccentrics, workers, bohemians and their haunts. As a new edition of Mitchell's writings is published, writer William Fiennes and Janet Groth, receptionist at the New Yorker and a long-standing friend, reflect on why his work deserves a wider audience.

Producer Philippa Ritchie.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01kjn1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01kbm17)
Darton, South Yorkshire

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Darton College, Barnsley, South Yorkshire.
On the panel this week: Conservative MEP for the South East of England DANIEL HANNAN; Shadow Health Minister, DIANE ABBOTT; Director of Policy Exchange, NEIL O'BRIEN and Priest-in-charge at St Mary's Newington, south London and former canon chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral, GILES FRASER.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01kbm19)
The curse of a ridiculous name

"I have a funny name. I know it," Adam Gopnik starts out. "Don't say it isn't or try to make me feel better about it...If I ever google myself, I find myself as often as not as Adam Gropnik."

He explains its unglamorous origins and it's contemporary Russian connotations of meaning "a drunken hooligan".

But the trouble is, he says "like every writer, I would like my writing to last". Little chance of that with a name like Gopnik, he believes. He bemoans why he hasn't a name like Jane Austen or Anthony Trollope.

Writers are, he believes, condemned to greatness or otherwise, by their names. The great exception is William Shakespeare, whose ridiculous surname - much mocked in his day - is now part of everyday speech.

Via a detour through name history, he reaches the conclusion that his fate is fixed. "I shall remain and say goodbye -- and then vanish as a, and A., Gopnik".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b00zd70g)
The Gun

Mike Walker adapts C S Forester's gripping guerrilla warfare story set in Napoleonic Spain. Made famous by Hollywood as The Pride and the Passion.

Partisan groups under charismatic leaders wage a desperate war in which no quarter is given by either side. The hero of The Gun is the gun itself, a massive 18 pounder that is dragged across the mountains and plains of Spain - an epic task. Throughout the story, the gun changes the lives of those who fight each other to the death in order to gain control of it.

The Gun is a companion piece to The Gun Goes to Hollywood, which tells the story behind the Hollywood version, which was directed by Stanley Kramer and starred Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren.

The writer
C S Forester was famous for his tales of adventure and military crusades, most notably the Hornblower series.
Mike Walker has written innumerable radio plays, and won a clutch of awards, including a Sony, BAFTA and Writers Guild Award. His recent radio includes Our Mutual Friend for BBC Radio 4.

Producer.....................Polly Thomas

A BBC Radio Drama Cymru/Wales production.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01k9hjd)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01kbm2b)
A Syrian general, close to President Assad, has left the country. How significant is this?

We look ahead to the social care bill with our social affairs editor, Mark Easton.

Flood warnings across the UK

And the state of British tennis

All that and more with Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01kd0wq)
Michael Palin - The Truth

Episode 5

Written by Michael Palin.

Mabbut has been commissioned to write a book about the elusive activist Hamish Melville. He heads to India in search of his subject but, as he begins to unravel the full story, Mabbut finds himself in deep trouble.

Keith Mabbut is at a crossroads in his life. When he is offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to write the biography of the elusive Hamish Melville, a highly influential activist and humanitarian - he seizes the chance to write something meaningful.

His search to find out the real story behind the legend takes Mabbut to the lush landscapes and environmental hotspots of India. The more he discovers about Melville, the more he admires him - and the more he connects with an idealist who wanted to make a difference. But is his quarry genuinely who he claims to be? Is he really a Gandhi-like leader of the people, a political mover and shaker, an enigma? These are the question Keith must ask himself. But as he soon discovers, the truth can be whatever we make it.

Read by Alex Jennings
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01k9wpw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01kbm2d)
Mark D'Arcy with the day's top stories from Westminster - including a row over how to appoint the next Bank of England Governor; fresh controversy over the new parliamentary inquiry into the banking scandal; and anger among Welsh MPs over which regiments will bear the brunt of military cutbacks.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01k9q6n)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01k9q6n)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01kjmp2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01kjmp2)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01kjmt4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01kjmt4)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01kjmvw)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01kjmvw)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01kjn1n)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01kjn1n)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01k9wpw)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01k9wpw)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01k2f8w)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01kbm19)

Amazonia - Keeping It Alive 11:00 TUE (b01k9vgy)

Amazonia - Keeping It Alive 21:00 THU (b01k9vgy)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01k1nh0)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01k9qd8)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01k9lcb)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01k2f8t)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01kbm17)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01k9m2v)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01k9m2v)

Bird Island 23:00 WED (b01kbjdg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01k9qrm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01kcyz3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01kcztc)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01kd08w)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01kd0wq)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01k2f7l)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01k9q6j)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01k9q6j)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01k9vgt)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01k9vgt)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01kbhjp)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01kbhjp)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01kblc6)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01kblc6)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01kbltc)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b01k9npg)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b01k9npg)

Britain in a Box 10:30 SAT (b01k9lc2)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01k9n7x)

Changing My Voice 11:30 TUE (b01k9vh0)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01k2bpw)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01k9npd)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b01k2dbf)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b01k9q73)

Crouching Low, Hidden Camera - Life as a P.I. 16:00 TUE (b01k9wpt)

Dad's Last Tape 11:00 MON (b01k9q6q)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01k9n81)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01k9n81)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00txj8j)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01k9wfn)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00tg2m2)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01kblcq)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01k9q71)

Elizabeth Taylor Short Stories 15:45 FRI (b01kbm0s)

Excusing Private Godfrey 11:00 FRI (b01kblth)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01k9lbw)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01k9pyb)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01k9vgp)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01kbhjh)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01kblbz)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01kblt7)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01k2f8f)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01kbm0x)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01k1nk6)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01kbg86)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b01k2b12)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01kbj39)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b01k9lvn)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b01k9lvn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01k9lc6)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b01kblcb)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01k9qc5)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01kbg82)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01kbhkj)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01kbld5)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01kbm15)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b01kbj3c)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01k2f87)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01kbm0q)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:00 SUN (b01k1ngt)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b01k9qc1)

In Living Memory 21:30 TUE (b01by7by)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01kblc3)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01kblc3)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01kbg8b)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01kbg8g)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01kbg8g)

John Barry - The Lost Tapes 15:30 SAT (b01k1my3)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01k2f8c)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01kbm0v)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01k9lvl)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 MON (b018gpdn)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01k2bw5)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01kblcx)

Meeting Myself Coming Back 20:00 SAT (b01k9lvs)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01k2fcb)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01k9h8c)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01k9hb8)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01k9hcm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01k9hfc)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01k9hgn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01k9hhy)

Midsummer Tales 00:30 SUN (b01k9m2s)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01kbhjm)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01kbhjm)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01kbhk4)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01k9lc8)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01k9lc8)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b01kbj37)

Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard 23:15 WED (b01kbjdj)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 WED (b01kbhkd)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01k2fcl)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01k9h8m)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01k9hbj)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01k9hcw)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01k9hfm)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01k9hgx)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01k9hj6)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01k9h8p)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01k2fcn)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01k9h8t)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01k9h8y)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01k2fd7)

News 13:00 SAT (b01k2fcx)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b01k1nbq)

Off the Page 15:30 TUE (b01k9wpr)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01k9n7n)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01kblcs)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01k9lvj)

PM 17:00 MON (b01k9qbz)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01kbg7f)

PM 17:00 WED (b01kbhkb)

PM 17:00 THU (b01kblcz)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01kbm0z)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01k9npj)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01k2br8)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b01k9n89)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01k2ffq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01k9py8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01klv6m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01klvyg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01klwp2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01klxd9)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01k9n7s)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01k9n7s)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01k9n7s)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b01k2bw1)

Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities 13:45 MON (b01k9q6z)

Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities 13:45 TUE (b01kbjx5)

Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities 13:45 WED (b01kbk3r)

Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities 13:45 THU (b01kblcn)

Roger Law and the Chinese Curiosities 13:45 FRI (b01kbm0n)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01k9lcd)

Saturday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00zd70g)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01k9lc0)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01k9lvq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01k2fcg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01k9h8h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01k9hbd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01k9hcr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01k9hfh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01k9hgs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01k9hj2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01k2fcd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01k2fcj)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01k2fcz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01k9h8f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01k9h8k)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01k9h92)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01k9hbb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01k9hbg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01k9hcp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01k9hct)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01k9hff)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01k9hfk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01k9hgq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01k9hgv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01k9hj0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01k9hj4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01k2fd3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01k9h96)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01k9hbq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01k9hd0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01k9hfr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01k9hh1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01k9hjb)

Sketchorama 18:30 TUE (b01kbg7m)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01k9m9z)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01k9m9z)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01k9q6g)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01k9q6g)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01k9n7v)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01k9n7q)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01k9n7z)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01k9npl)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01k9npl)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01k9qc3)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01k9qc3)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01kbg7w)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01kbg7w)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01kbhkg)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01kbhkg)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01kbld3)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01kbld3)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01kbm13)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01k2cfc)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01kbld9)

The Castle 11:30 WED (b01hllj1)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01k2bw3)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01kblcv)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01k9n83)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01k9n83)

The Food of Love 19:45 SUN (b01k9npn)

The Frock and the Church 13:30 SUN (b01k9n87)

The Gobetweenies 11:30 FRI (b01kksr2)

The Godfather of Ulster Punk 11:30 THU (b01kblcd)

The Guns of Adam Riches 23:00 THU (b01kbldf)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b01k9qbx)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b01k9qbx)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b01k9wpp)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01kbhk8)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 MON (b01k9q6v)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 TUE (b01k9vh4)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 WED (b01kbhk0)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 THU (b01kblcj)

The New Elizabethans 12:45 FRI (b01kbm0j)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b01k2f8m)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b01kbm11)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b01jmxqp)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b01jmxrx)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01kbld7)

The Sad Story of Jim Thorpe 11:00 WED (b01kbhjt)

The Simon Day Show 18:30 THU (b01kbld1)

The Voice of God 16:00 MON (b01k9qbv)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01k9lc4)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01k9n85)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01k9qrk)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01kbghk)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01kbj3f)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01kbldc)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01kbm2b)

The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b01bmq2l)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01k290g)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01kbhk6)

Through Persian Eyes 20:00 MON (b01k9qc7)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01k9qrp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01kbghm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01kbjdl)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01kbldh)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01kbm2d)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01k9lby)

Today 06:00 MON (b01k9pyd)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01k9vgr)

Today 06:00 WED (b01kbhjk)

Today 06:00 THU (b01kblc1)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01kblt9)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01k2fcq)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01k2fcs)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01k2fcv)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01k2fd1)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01k9h8r)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01k9h8w)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01k9h90)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01k9h94)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01k9hbl)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01k9hbn)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01k9hbs)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01k9hcy)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01k9hd2)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01k9hfp)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01k9hft)

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Weather 21:58 THU (b01k9hh3)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01k9hj8)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01k9hjd)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01k9pfw)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01k9pfy)

Witness 14:45 SUN (b01k9npb)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01k9lvg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01k9q6l)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01k9vgw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01kbhjr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01kblc8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01kbltf)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01k9q6x)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01k9wfl)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01kbhk2)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01kblcl)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01kbm0l)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01k9q6s)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01k9vh2)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01kbhjy)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01kblcg)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01kbm0g)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01k2ffs)