Radio-Lists Home Now on R4 Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 02 JUNE 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01j2dyf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01jlkjk)
Paul French - Midnight in Peking

Episode 5

Read by Crawford Logan.

Author Paul French reveals the true-crime "cold case" that haunted the last days of old Peking.

Summer, 1937. Pamela Werner's unsolved murder is forgotten amidst the violence and chaos of the Japanese invasion of China. But Pamela's father presses on with his own, unofficial, investigation and makes some shocking discoveries.

Abridged by Robin Brooks.
Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01j2dyh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01j2dyk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01j2dym)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01j2dyp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01j6wtw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Mark Oakley of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01j6wty)
Eddie Mair speaks to Bill Lucas, an athlete who won the Distinguished Flying Cross for his service in Bomber Command during the Second World War. Bill had pinned his hopes on a medal in the 1940 Olympics, but the war intervened, and his next opportunity came in London 1948, long after he had passed his best. Your News is read by Jeremy Vine. Share What You Know: ipm@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01j2dyr)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01j2dyt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b01j6t0g)
Series 21

Dartmoor

Clare Balding is walking with dogs (and their owners) in this new series of Ramblings.

Prog 5: Dartmoor with Alex Lyons who is a search and rescue dog handler.

Alex Lyons is a dog handler with the Tavistock-Dartmoor Search and Rescue Team. He and several members of his team - and their dogs - take Clare for a wild, wet and windy walk on Dartmoor. Clare sees how the rescue dogs work, and asks why anyone would want to spend their leisure time doing a voluntary job which is exhausting and occasionally upsetting. The answer? A sense of fulfilment, the opportunity to spend time in beautiful and remote countryside, and - of course - the joy of working with highly trained and intelligent dogs (who make their presence felt, and heard, throughout the programme).

Producer Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01jg53s)
Farming Today This Week

As the price of wool reaches a 25 year high, Charlotte Smith finds out whether farmers and manufacturers are now cashing in on what was once an almost worthless product.

From high fashion to the motor industry, the hard-wearing properties of British fleeces are now being harnessed in a range of hi-tech innovative products. But many farmers, it's the first year in that when profits will cover the price of shearing their flock.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01j2dyw)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01jg55d)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:

0833
Four aid workers, among them a British woman, Helen Johnston, have been freed by coalition forces in Afghanistan after being held hostage for 11 days.Lt Col Jimmie Cummings, from the International Security Assistance Force, Isaf, told the programme that the rescue team was inserted by helicopter during the hours of darkness, and freed the four people, who are said to be well, from their captivity in a cave complex.

0838
Doctors are going to refuse non-emergency care for a day on 21 June, the first strike for more than 40 years. The British Medical Association (BMA), representing doctors, says the decision wasn't taken lightly, but was thought justified because of changes to their pension arrangements, which they say are unfair: their contributions are going up, and they will be expected to work for longer. Under the new proposals, the government says, a doctor joining the NHS today could still expect a pension of 68,000 pounds (at today's values) on retirement. Dr Hamish Meldrum, who chairs the council of the BMA, details its position.

0848
The Queen's Diamond Jubilee has been celebrated throughout the country to widespread, although not universal, acclaim. Journalist and broadcaster Matthew Parris delivers his own hyperbole-free tribute to the Queen. Also, the former Conservative MP and broadcaster, Gyles Brandreth and the Guardian's satirical cartoonist Steve Bell go head to head on whether the Jubilee is a genuine expression of love for the monarch, or a hollow exercise in public sycophancy.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01jg73m)
Tim Smit, Congo siblings, medal heroes, John McCarthy in Beirut, Face Shape Science, Bedlington, Inheritance Tracks, IVF couple

Sian Williams & Richard Coles with founder of the Eden Project Tim Smit, a brother and sister returning for the first time to the Congo where the rest of their family was massacred in 1964, a couple who spent 12 years and £35,000 trying to have a baby, a caricaturist turned amateur scientist who's trying to prove that people who look the same also sound the same, John McCarthy as a tourist in Beirut, a gathering of Victoria Cross recipients, Coronation memories and a Jubilee Crowdscape from Bedlington in Northumberland, and singing legend Sir Tom Jones's Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: JP Devlin.


SAT 10:30 Smile (b01jg73p)
Historian and author Kate Williams goes in search of the modern winning smile.
The wide and toothy smile is all around us and used in many different and persuasive ways, from the delight of meeting up with friends, beautiful people beaming down from billboards persuading us to buy their product, to politicians vying to win our votes, the broad and confident smile is very much at the centre of communication in today's society. However this hasn't always the case, with open mouthed smiling deemed a sign of madness and undignified.

We discover the impact of dentistry and films on our changing relationship with our smiles, the role gender and culture play, why most of us hate smiling in photographs and Jenni Murray explains why she would never broadcast without one.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b01jg73r)
Sport policy

The 2012 Olympic Games will be the biggest sporting event ever held in the United Kingdom, costing billions of pounds of public money. The Government says there will never be a better opportunity to transform the nation's sporting culture.

Away from the glitz and the glamour of the Games, former England cricketer and now journalist and author, Edward Smith, assesses the Government's sports policy. Increasingly sport is seen by policy makers as a vehicle for behavioural change to achieve for better public health and improved social cohesion. But how successful is it?

And how far should sports policy be designed to deliver community objectives rather than glory on the field?


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01jg73t)
Fergal Keane meets exiled Syrians in Istanbul and finds little agreement among them about the way forward for their troubled country.

Gabriel Gatehouse is in eastern Congo where politics, history and nature have conspired to create instability and danger.

David Willey talks of unrest and dismay at the Vatican as Cardinals plot and the Pope speaks of betrayal.

Anu Anand's been meeting The Love Commandos in Delhi -- they help young couples who dare to get together without parental approval.

And just ten miles from Wall Street and you're bathing in the Atlantic Ocean! Reggie Nadelson's in Brighton Beach, New York's most interesting ethnic enclave.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01jg73w)
Money Box has learned that more than one million pounds worth of fines have been levied on patients who applied for and received free dental treatment when they were not eligible. Similar penalties can also apply to people who claim more than one free eye test in a two year period. But is it made clear to patients what they are and are not entitled to? And how fair is it to fine people when there is no formal appeal against these civil penalties? Money Box hears from a jobseeker claimant and a pensioner who have been hit by these fines. Paul Lewis is also joined in the studio by benefits expert Will Hadwen from Working Families.

A major insurer refuses to refund the holiday costs of a woman who suddenly became too ill to travel. The problem - her illness was mental rather than physical. We speak to Graeme Trudgill, at the British Insurance Brokers' Association about how common it is for travel insurers to exclude cover of mental illness.

The City regulator the Financial Services Authority has decided to cut the amount which investment firms tell us our money might make when they sell us a pension or other investment.
At the moment they have to show three scenarios - annual growth before charges of 5%, 7%, and 9% a year in a pension or ISA and 4%, 6%, and 8% in investments that don't get tax relief. But the FSA has decided to make substantial cuts in these projection rates.
In future it will mean that the projected value of pensions or investments will look rather lower than they do now. And that has led to many complaints by people who run investment funds and financial advisers who sell them.
Steven Cameron, head of regulation at pension and investment firm Aegon speaks to the programme.

Do you know how much you pay for receiving messages to your mobile phone? Many phone users assume that calls to voice-mail are included in their contracts but Money Box reveals that some customers may be running up significant charges without realising. We have top tips on how to avoid paying for messages from Dominic Baliszewski, telecoms expert at Broadbandchoices.co.uk.

Car insurance costs are set to be studied by the Competition Commission after the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) said the market was "dysfunctional." The OFT says artificially high car hire and repair charges add £225m a year to drivers' premiums and it wants the commission to investigate the sector. Bob Howard reports on an issue Money Box first highlighted four years ago.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b01j6whk)
Series 77

Episode 9

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton, Rebecca Front and Susan Calman.

Produced by Sam Bryant.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01j2dyy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01j2dz0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01j6wsx)
Belfast

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Methodist College, Belfast, one of the winning schools in the BBC's nationwide Schools Questions and Answers challenge. The students will be helping Jonathan Dimbleby put the programme together and will be involved in the production from start to finish. On the panel, leader of the Ulster Unionist Party, Mike Nesbitt; deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist Party, Nigel Dodds; Sinn Finn representative and education minister at Stormont, John O'Dowd; and Provost of Magee Campus and Dean of Academic Development at the University of Ulster, Deidre Heenan.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01jg73y)
Call Jonathan Dimbleby on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The topics discussed on Any Questions? were: the Jubilee celebrations, political U-turns, EU referendums, political dissidents and the Northern Ireland education system.

Was Tesco right to remove the Jubilee badges from its Northern Ireland staff?

Do the U-turns by the government this week show a government that is listening or one that is weak and indecisive?

Should there be a referendum in the UK on the EU?

Would the panel speak to dissidents?

Northern Ireland consistently out-performs the rest of the UK at GCSE and A level. What lessons could the UK learn from the Northern Ireland education system?

Producer: Anna Bailey.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01jg740)
Hattie Naylor - The Forgotten

A young girl emerges from a forest after a nameless war, knowing nothing of where she has come from or where she has been. She finds the local doctor, Charonne, trapped in the briar. After she has freed him he takes her back to his village where she lives in secret in his house. But she has been spotted by the villagers who wish to call Charonne to account for his conduct in the war.

As the pressure on Charonne mounts he disappears into a familiar story in which the young girl takes a leading role. Questions of guilt, memory and responsibility are all raised in The Forgotten, Hattie Naylor's dark retelling of the story of The Sleeping Beauty.

The play stars Tim McMullan as Charonne, Ruth Mitchell as Sylvanne and Laura Greenwood as Ireena.

Cast:
Anton ...... John Biddle
Ireena and Rosa ...... Laura Greenwood
Young Charonne ...... Harry McEntire
Charonne ....... Tim McMullan
Sylvanne ....... Ruth Mitchell
Marie ....... Sally Orrock

Writer: Hattie Naylor

Director: Paul Dodgson
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Tales from the Stave (b01j5j2d)
Series 8

Vivaldi's Flute Concerto

In a special edition of Tales from the Stave Frances Fyfield heads to Edinburgh to tell the story of what was thought to be a lost Vivaldi Flute Concerto.

It's a rare and thrilling moment for a classical music researcher to unearth a manuscript that has been hidden for centuries. But that was the lot of Andrew Woolley when he found, nestling in the Marquesses of Lothian's family papers at the National archives in Edinburgh, a Flute concerto by Antonio Vivaldi.

In this Tales from the Stave Special, Frances follows the research, cross checking and confirmation that followed Andrew's discovery and lead, very quickly, to the first recording and first recorded performance of the concerto known as Il Gran Mogol.

The manuscript, copied out from a lost original and probably sold to Lord Robert Kerr during a continental journey, tells the story of Vivaldi's composing methods and the cross fertilization of Southern European creativity and the Scottish Enlightenment. Andrew Woolley and the Vivaldi scholar Michael Talbot help tell the concerto's story.

Producer: Tom Alban.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01jg742)
Michelle Mone; women asylum seekers; Regina Spektor

Michelle Mone on the business of lingerie, Orange prize-winning novelist Madeline Miller, Elizabeth I, education and what we expect from it, father and son relationships, women who seek asylum, and music from Regina Spektor in this week's highlights. Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Jane Thurlow
Editor: Anne Peacock.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01jg746)
Saturday PM

Patrick O'Connell presents the day's top news stories, with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01j6t47)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

As the mood on Europe swings from doom to gloom, Evan Davis asks his executive guests about the outlook for the Euro. What will it take to save the single currency? And what are the prospects for business more generally in 2012?

Joining Evan in the studio are Warren East, chief executive of FTSE 100 microchip designer ARM Holdings plc; Dr Carol Bell, energy industry executive with particular expertise in investment and financing in the oil and gas sector and a board member of three energy companies, including Salamander Energy plc; Michael Morley, chief executive of private bank Coutts.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01j2dz2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01j2dz4)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01j2dz6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01jg7j4)
Freddie Flintoff, Louis Theroux, Alistair McGowan and Brendan Walker

Clive's bowled over by cricket legend Freddie Flintoff , who since retiring from cricket in 2010 is now a broadcasting all-rounder. He's presented on BBC Radio Five Live and was team captain on 'A League Of Their Own'. Now Freddie journeys to the far flung corners of the earth for an epic series of wildlife adventures. 'Freddie Flintoff Goes Wild' is on Discovery Channel on Thursdays at 21.00.

Jon Holmes hopes stand-up comic and actor Alistair McGowan will make a Big Impression on him and talks to Alistair about his career impersonating hundreds of famous people. He's hosting ITV's topical sports entertainment show 'You Cannot Be Serious' on Saturday nights at 19.30

Clive's at home with the world's only 'thrill engineer' Professor Brendan Walker. His new Channel 4 series celebrates the science behind the inventions and innovations that transformed the way we lived and catapulted an exhausted post-war country into the modernity of 1950's Britain. 'The House the 50s Built' begins Thursday 7th June at 21.00.

Clive has a Weird Weekend with Louis Theroux, whose broadcasting career has seen him interview anti-zoinists and white supremacists. In 1998, Louis went to San Fernando Valley, the hub of America's adult entertainment industry to find out if being a male porn star was one of the best jobs a man can have. Now Louis returns to talk to some of the performers he interviewed 15 years ago to see how they have fared. 'Twilight of the Porn Stars' is on BBC Two on Sunday 10th June at 22.00.

With music from Manchester-based alternative folk rockers The Slow Show who perform 'God Only Knows' from their EP 'Brother'.

And the new star of Bluegrass Sarah Jarosz performs 'Annabel Lee' from her album 'Follow Me Down'.

Producer Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b01jg7j6)
Series 12

A Greek Proposal

A Greek Proposal by Lou Ramsden

In a week which has seen bookings of Greek holidays soar despite the unstable financial situation, writer Lou Ramsden takes a humorous look at how up-tight Euan Clarke tries to turn a cheap holiday to Kos to his advantage by proposing to his unsuspecting girlfriend.

Performed by: ... Stephen Hoyle, Sarah McDonald Hughes and Jon Lolis. With music performed by Dimitri Vatikiotis and Paschal Paschalis.

Directed by ... Charlotte Riches.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01jg7j8)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests writers Malorie Blackman and Giles Fraser and musician Pat Kane review the week's cultural highlights including Ridley Scott's film Prometheus and Christopher Eccleston's performance as Creon in Antigone at the National Theatre.

It is over thiry years since Ridley Scott all but invented the science fiction film genre, first with Alien and then with Blade Runner. Prometheus is described as a prequel to Alien, the film which itself has spawned so many sequels. Starring Girl With The Dragon Tatoo star Noomi Rapace along with Michael Fassbender and British actor Idris Elba - does the film live up to the hype? And does the vastly superior digital technology three decades on aid or detract from the creation of monster aliens and forbidding planets?

Christopher Eccleston is Creon and Jodi Whittaker is Antigone in a new production of Sophocles's Antigone at the National's Olivier Theatre translated into modern idiom by Don Taylor. Directed by up and coming director Polly Findlay and set in an Eastern European type bunker, how does a play which explores the conflict between the individual and the state resonate in 21st century Britain?

Pulitzer Prize winning author Richard Ford's new novel Canada explores the adolescent trauma of 15 year old Del Parsons whose parents rob a bank. This extraordinary event is recounted in great detail 50 odd years later by Del himself. The novel explores the themes of memory and survival, issues that lie at the heart of American identity.

Turner Prize winning artist Grayson Perry brings us a new three-part series All In The Best Possible Taste on Channel 4 in which he goes on safari through the taste tribes of Britain, not just to observe our taste, but to tell us in an artwork what it means. The work he'll be creating is a series of six imposing tapestries called 'The Vanity of Small Differences' - his personal but panoramic take on the taste of 21st century Britain, from Sunderland to Tunbridge Wells to the Cotswolds.

And the Heatherwick Studio: Designing the Extraordinary at the V&A is the first solo exhibition of this polymath designer / architect / sculptor whose creations range from the new London Routemaster Bus to the Zip Up Bag to the controversial B for a Bang star burst sculpture in Manchester

Producer: Hilary Dunn.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01jhpfq)
Bards of the Back Straight

4 Extra Debut. Poet Paul Farley explores how the language of poetry and sports commentary compare. With Sir Peter O'Sullevan. From June 2012.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01j2ff2)
Virginia Woolf - Mrs Dalloway

From Afternoon to Nightfall

Dramatised by Michelene Wandor

Virginia Woolf's classic novel set on a single day in June. As Clarissa Dalloway makes her final preparations for an important party, Septimus visits another doctor and becomes increasingly troubled.

2 of 2: From afternoon to nightfall

Mrs Dalloway ..... Fenella Woolgar
Richard ..... Sam Dale
Septimus ..... Paul Ready
Rezia ..... Susie Riddell
Peter ..... Scott Handy
Sally ..... Liza Sadovy
Elizabeth ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Lucy ..... Amaka Okafor
Sir William ..... Patrick Brennan,
Miss Kilman ..... Christine Absalom
Dr Holmes ..... Peter Hamilton Dyer,

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01j2dz8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Decision Time (b01j5nwx)
The BBC's Political Editor Nick Robinson shines a light on the process by which controversial decisions are reached behind closed doors in Whitehall.

Producer: Rob Shepherd.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b01j5fwl)
Series 26

Episode 6

(6/13)
Would you be able to name the two earlier composers whose names provided the title of an 1898 opera by Rimsky Korsakov?

And which colourful character did the singer and bandleader Cab Calloway describe as 'a red hot hoochie-coocher'?

These are among the musical teasers Paul Gambaccini will be putting to the contestants in this week's heat of Counterpoint. They'll have to prove the breadth of their knowledge across a range of musical styles if they're to stand a chance of winning through to the semi-finals of this year's competition.

There'll be plenty of musical extracts to identify, both familiar and surprising - and as always, the contestants will have to answer specialist questions on a musical topic for which they're completely unprepared.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01j2ld1)
Roger McGough presents two classic works and readings. First, the opening section of Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas recorded in 1954. It's hard to resist Richard Burton inviting us to hush and 'come closer'.
Then, Paul Scofield reads Gerard Manley Hopkins' tormented cry The Wreck of the Deutschland. Composed after the foundering of a German boat in the Thames, it was also Hopkins first poem written since his conversion to Catholicism and becoming a Jesuit priest. As Hopkins said himself, it's a poem to be read by the ears, and there is no finer rendition than this 1975 gem from the archives.
Producer: Sarah Langan.



SUNDAY 03 JUNE 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01jg7mf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Platform 3 (b01jll1h)
The Homecoming

Written by Olga Grushin. You can find all of human life at railway stations and Platform 3 is a set of stories inspired by hanging around them. Sweet Talk commissioned three writers to explore the theme: all the places, destinations, thoughts, hopes and fears. The people - or lack of them.

Gregory is a successful New York businessman who has returned to Russia for the first time in many years to visit his mother. He takes a trip out to his mother's dacha in the country and then heads for the local station. He has an urgent plane to catch. Moscow is only two hours away - but only if the train comes. And while he waits, he has a strange encounter...

Olga Grushin was born in Moscow in 1971 and spent her childhood in Moscow and Prague. In 1989 she became the first Soviet citizen to enrol for a full-time degree in the United States while retaining Soviet citizenship. In 2006 she was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for New Writers and named one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists in 2007. She has published two novels: The Dream Life of Sukhanov (2006) and The Concert Ticket (published in the US as The Line) in April 2010. 'The Homecoming' is her first story for radio. Olga lives in Washington D.C.

Reader: Alan Cox

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7mk)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01jg7mm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7mp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01jg7mr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01jg8qp)
The bells of St Mary le Ghyll in Barnoldswick, Lancashire.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b01j5nwz)
Series 3

Paddy Docherty: Poverty and Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneur Paddy Docherty says business is best placed to bring prosperity to impoverished and post conflict nations, arguing that only the commercial sector can supply the scale and dynamism needed to make a lasting impact on development.

Four Thought is a series of talks with a personal viewpoint recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01jg7mt)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01jg8qr)
Fruits of Labour

After giving birth recently for the first time, the writer and broadcaster Melissa Viney reflects on how motherhood can affect a woman's creative life.

Does it open up new ways of viewing the world or can it occasionally push them 'to the side of their own lives' as Philip Larkin suggested? Including readings from the work of Esther Morgan, Ellen Bell and Chana Bloch, music from Nina Simone and Clara Schumann and new interviews with the artists Charlotte Verity and Jo Dennis.

Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01jg8qt)
For this week's On Your Farm, Naturalist Nick Baker visits 42 acres of woods and fields, where a small community is pioneering a system which aims to produce its own food while living in harmony with nature. The landmatters project near Totnes in Devon has been given five years planning permission by the Government to practice permaculture on the land. Permaculture has been operating in the UK for the last 30 years and it's popularity is growing. With the threat of climate change and global warming, Nick Baker investigates whether this way of living could could be a solution for the future?


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01jg7mw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01jg7my)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01jg8qw)
As fears of civil war in Syria escalate Samira asks Fergal Keane have we seen this before and can comparisons be drawn with Bosnia and Rwanda?

BBC School Reporters from St Paul's Cathedral School have been talking to 96-year-old Maurice Sills who helps out at their school and in the Cathedral library. He gave his reflections on the Queen, the Jubilee and St Pauls.

More details have emerged this week in the Vati-leaks scandal; the pope's butler was arrested amidst allegations that he didn't act alone and that a shadowy group of Cardinals were behind the leaks. Robert Mickens reports from Rome.

Amid all the pomp & ceremony of the Diamond Jubilee it's easy to forget the religious significance of the monarch and the Queen's personal Christian faith. Charles Carroll has been looking at 'what the Queen believes'

Richard Hoskins, author of The Boy in the River, tells Samira how his work on a ritual sacrifice case has lead to him becoming one of the lead experts in African tribal religion.

Sunday explore the historic and changing relationship between Queen and Church with a special report by Trevor Barnes.

Scotland's first woman bishop is consecrated on June 7th. Exclusive interview with Bishop Elect Helen Hamilton, of the Open Episcopal Church about her upcoming position.

As the dust settles after two amendments to women bishops legislation left many 'angry and disappointed' we hear from both sides of the debate and assess the chances of the legislation passing as was originally hoped at the July General Synod. Discussion with Bishop Pete Broadbent and Judith Maltby, Chaplain of Corpus Christie College Oxford.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01jg8qy)
Body & Soul

Trevor Eve presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Body & Soul.
Donate:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Body & Soul.
Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal
Reg Charity: 1060062.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01jg7n0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01jg7n2)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01jgb8m)
Matins from Westminster Abbey

A service of Matins from Westminster Abbey on Trinity Sunday in celebration of Her Majesty the Queen's Diamond Jubilee with music by Stanford and Byrd sung by the Abbey Choir directed by James O'Donnell and accompanied by Robert Quinney. Preacher: The Very Revd Dr John Hall, Dean of Westminster. Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01j6wsz)
On Bees and Being

"The other day" Adam Gopnik writes, "my son was working his way through the text of Shakespeare's 'Henry V' with an eye to a student production". He read Canterbury's famous speech on how the well regulated kingdom is like a bee hive. "How could Shakespeare know that much about the division of bee-labour" he ponders "and not know that the big bee in the centre was -- a girl bee?"

Gopnik takes us - via a bunch of bee experts - on a journey of "long and buzzing thoughts". He discovers a transgendered bee in Virgil's Georgics, dressed up as a king bee. He finds himself deep in the world of the Dutch biologist, Swammerdam. "Swammerdam!" he writes. "One of those great Northern European names, like Erasmus of Rotterdam that carries its credibility within its consonants".

He draws lessons about the theory of knowledge and the working of the human mind. He rejects the notion "that thought proceeds in fortresses as ordered and locked as a beehive seems to be." In truth, he argues, "no age thinks monolithically, and no mind begins with absolute clarity ... The sticky honey of uncertainty, the buzz around the beehive's entrance - these are signs of minds at work".

Producer:
Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01jgb8p)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell. Reviewing the papers; the Spectator's 'Miss Manners' and agony aunt Mary Killen, associate editor of The Mirror Kevin Maguire and historian and royal biographer Sarah Bradford.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01jgb8r)
For detailed descriptions see daily programmes

EDITOR..... JOHN YORKE
WRITER..... NAWAL GADALLA
DIRECTOR..... JOHN YORKE

KENTON ARCHER..... RICHARD ATTLEE
DAVID ARCHER..... TIMOTHY BENTINCK
RUTH ARCHER..... FELICITY FINCH
PIP ARCHER..... HELEN MONKS
JOSH ARCHER..... CIAN CHEESBROUGH
PAT ARCHER..... PATRICIA GALLIMORE
TOM ARCHER..... TOM GRAHAM
ADAM MACY..... ANDREW WINCOTT
IAN CRAIG..... STEPHEN KENNEDY
LILIAN BELLAMY..... SUNNY ORMONDE
CHRISTINE BARFORD..... LESLEY SAWEARD
PEGGY WOOLLEY..... JUNE SPENCER
JOLENE PERKS..... BUFFY DAVIS
JOE GRUNDY.....EDWARD KELSEY
CLARRIE GRUNDY..... ROSALIND ADAMS
SUSAN CARTER..... CHARLOTTE MARTIN
CHRISTOPHER CARTER..... WILLIAM SANDERSON-THWAITE
ALICE CARTER..... HOLLIE CHAPMAN
MIKE TUCKER..... TERRY MOLLOY
VICKY TUCKER..... RACHEL ATKINS
LYNDA SNELL..... CAROLE BOYD
ALAN FRANKS..... JOHN TELFER
USHA FRANKS..... SOUAD FARESS
AMY FRANKS..... JENNIFER DALEY
JIM LLOYD..... JOHN ROWE
HARRY MASON..... MICHAEL SHELFORD
ELONA MAKEPIECE..... ERI SHUKA
SPENCER WILKES..... JOHNNY VENKMAN.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01jgb8t)
Margaret Rhodes

Kirsty Young's castaway is Margaret Rhodes.

As the first cousin to the Queen, she has a unique insight into the life of the royal family. She used to spend her summer holidays at Balmoral with the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret while, during the war, she worked for MI6 and lodged at Buckingham Palace. She attended the Queen's wedding and coronation and, in later life, worked as an assistant to the Queen Mother.

Remembering the Queen's coronation, she says: "We had only just recovered from six or seven years of deprivation and blackouts and rationing - it was like the sun suddenly coming out behind a lot of very dark clouds and I think everybody felt that with a new young Queen, a whole new era was opening up. It was somehow exciting."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01j5fwv)
Series 63

Episode 3

Paul Merton, Sue Perkins, Julian Clary & Greg Proops join Nicholas Parsons for the game in which panellists have to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Today Sue Perkins talks on the subject of The Worst Night of my Life, Julian Clary teaches us all about The Vikings, Paul Merton explains How he would Describe his Personality and Greg Proops enlightens us on the subject of Why the Dinosaurs Died Out.

Producer: Claire Jones.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01jgb8w)
Wine Trends

Simon Parkes reports from the London International Wine fair to discover the latest trends in the wine industry.

Simon meets wine producers from emerging wine producing countries such as India and Brazil to taste the wines that could soon be hitting the supermarket shelves in the UK. He also samples wines with a lower alcohol strength to discover if it is possible to produce wines that taste good without the high levels of alcohol.

The Food Programme also reports on two smaller festivals focussing on 'natural wine': wines made with a minimum of chemical input to find out whether natural wines are now becoming more established in the UK wine market.

Presenter: Simon Parkes
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01jg7n4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01jgb8y)
Global news and analysis. As the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant prepares to set sail, we hear live from the river bank and speak to the Marquess of Salisbury who has organised the event. Lady Antonia Fraser discusses the relevance of the monarchy with fellow historian Philippa Gregory. And as President Assad makes a belligerent speech at the Syrian parliament, we bring together Sir Malcolm Rifkind and Lord Malloch-Brown to debate what should happen next.
Presented by James Robbins.


SUN 13:30 Reading between the Lines (b01j5j2v)
Beyond the Reading Wars

Michael Morpurgo - former Children's Laureate, writer, father, grandfather and ardent advocate for children's reading - explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years. It is a subject close to his heart and one which he approaches with his customary curiosity and passionate engagement.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new 'Phonics Screening Check'.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

In the first programme, Michael tried to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading.

2.Beyond the Reading Wars

In this second programme, Michael Morpurgo explores how the contemporary debate has been informed by teaching methods of the recent past- and is, in some ways, a reaction to them.

He hears from the influential teacher and author, Margaret Meek, now in her eighties, about her belief in letting children learn to read from "real books", and he challenges Julia Eccleshare, Children's Books Editor of The Guardian newspaper, on whether this method really worked for her own children.

He explores why learning to read has traditionally been a weather vane for wider classroom philosophies with the help of fellow children's author Michael Rosen.

Finally, he hears from the distinguished Cambridge neuroscientist, Usha Goswami, about how her research on dyslexia might help us understand what goes on in children's minds when they learn to read - and might even bring an end to the so-called 'Reading Wars'.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01j6wh5)
South Oxhey, Herts

Peter Gibbs and the panel are guests of the Dig Deep Community Project in South Oxhey. The team also report from the brand new Chelsea Fringe show.

Questions addressed in the programme:
Which edibles would grow in 15x30cm containers (on a narrow boat)?
Plant suggested: Mushrooms, dwarf courgettes, dwarf beans, dwarf aubergines and dwarf peppers.

Which wild flowers attract moths?
Plant suggested: grasses, honeysuckle and campion

How can I grow sweetcorn from seed?

Which pond plants will not be eaten by Koi fish?
Plants suggested: rushes and marsh marigolds

My previously healthy Wisteria is very sickly - has it got a disease that may affect other plants in the garden and does it need to be replaced? The panel recommended replacing with Akebia Quinata

What is the Chelsea chop?

Will seed potatoes blighted by frost, come back?

Which vegetables would crop by July (for a school workshop)?
Plants suggested: dwarf beans. chard and peas

Produced by Robert Abel
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b01jgb90)
Sunday Edition

Fi Glover presents the Sunday edition of Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: today's programme covers the vital support offered by friendship, and also family life in all its rich variety.

Betty, a retired cook from Hull, chats with her daughter, Elaine - a cleaner - about bringing up ten children with lots of love, but not much money. Catherine tells her friend, Liz, about the impact the fact that her parents met when they were a priest and nun had on her childhood, and on her current relationship with the Catholic church. And friends Anne and Steve talk about how each has supported the other through the serious dramas of life: bereavement and the suicidal despair caused by childhood abuse.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01jgb92)
Publish and Be Damn'd: The Memoirs of Harriette Wilson

Episode 1

Adapted by Ellen Dryden.

Nancy Carroll stars as Harriette Wilson, one of the most infamous and talked-about women of the early 19th century. Her lovers included aristocrats, adventurers and even the Duke of Wellington himself. And when they all ceased to support her after her retirement, she had a simple bargain for them - 'pay up, and I'll keep you out of my memoirs'.

A scandalous bestseller of their time, her memoirs reveal a sharp-witted, good-hearted, infinitely adaptable, madcap woman who took on the patriarchy of the time and did something close to beating them at their own game.

Harriette's exciting, secretive, unpredictable world is brought vividly to life in Ellen Dryden's radio dramatization of the book which set the whole country gossiping about the behaviour of the men who ran it, and the women they loved.

In the first episode, Harriette escapes from the stultifyingly boring household of her first aristocratic protector in favour of a more exciting, younger lover. But will he be able to keep her in the style to which she has become accustomed?

We also meet Harriette's friends and rivals such as the mysterious Julia, her saintly sister Fanny, and her satanic sister Amy. Featuring Blake Ritson as the Duke of Argyle, Charles Edwards as Lord Ponsonby, and Barnaby Kay as the Duke of Wellington.

Producer: Ellen Dryden
A First Writes Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b01jgb94)
Philippa Gregory: The Other Boleyn Girl

Philippa Gregory, queen of historical fiction, talks about her best-selling tale of lust, jealousy and betrayal, The Other Boleyn Girl. James Naughtie presents and a group of readers ask the questions.

The novel charts the lives of Anne Boleyn, and her sister Mary, thought to be the mistress of Henry VIII before Anne.

Each in their turn are "the other Boleyn Girl", pawns of their fiercely ambitious, conniving family who in the novel use the girls to advance their own positions at the court of Henry VIII.

Philippa Gregory will be talking about her fascination with Anne Boleyn's lesser known sister and about the lines between working with fact and fiction; and how she drew on her research to create the claustrophobic detail of palace life in Tudor England.

Philippa Gregory depicts Mary, aged just 13, as little more than a child when she is presented to Henry and ordered by her family to serve her King and country by becoming his mistress.

Inevitably though, the King's eyes soon begin to wander and Mary is overlooked, helpless to do anything but aid her family's plot to advance their fortunes, replace her with Anne and give Henry the greatest gift of all: a son and heir.

July's Bookclub choice : Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont by Elizabeth Taylor

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01jgccz)
Roger McGough presents listeners' poetry requests read by Seán Gleeson and Barbara Barnes. This week's mixture includes an anti-war poem by James Joyce. We also hear the jaunty song recorded in 1902 that inspired Joyce's poem. Its refrain of "Mr Dooley-ooley-ooley-ooh" is pleasingly difficult to shake.
Roger dons a hybrid scouse-west country accent to indulge in a little Smuggling, courtesy of Rudyard Kipling and introduces work by one of his favourite poets, Norman MacCaig.
There's a clever and moving 'mirror' poem by Julia Copus, recalling a memory of a father, which is also the subject for a poem by Ken Smith. And Anna Crowe joins the programme to read her poem 'Alice and the Birds.'
Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 Summit Fever (b01j5myh)
Jonathan Powell, Tony Blair's former Chief of Staff, discusses what happens at intergovernmental summits. There are now more summits than ever before, and world leaders often see more of each other than they do of their cabinet colleagues back home. How have they emerged as the decision making forum of our era and could they ever be replaced by skype or teleconferencing? Powell's interviewees include Tony Blair, Lord Carrington, Lord Hurd, David Milliband, and Lord Robertson.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b01jg7j6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7n6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01jg7n8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01jg7nb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01jgcd1)
Felicity Finch makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

In this week's Pick of the Week prepare to celebrate anniversaries and age.we'll be looking back at the history of Radio Luxembourg, meeting a 70 year old reggae DJ and Harry Belafonte. We'll also hear the disturbing story from Canada of quintuplets born in the 1930's as well as a tribute to a woman of ninety with 10 children and we take an intriguing journey through our cites....

Radio Luxembourg - Radio 2
DJ Derek - Radio 4
Today - Radio 4
Outlook - World Service
Witness - World Service
Invisible City - World Service
Afternoon Play: Cry For Me - Radio 4
One to One - Radio 4
Listening Project - Radio 4
Off The Page - Radio 4
World Routes - Radio 3
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Bernadette McConnell.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01jgcd3)
The atmosphere at Brookfield is tense, and David's keen to get the family focussed on something positive. He was hoping to do a 'team talk' for Open Farm Sunday. Ruth suggests tomorrow might be a good time, and sets off for the Jubilee celebrations with Ben. She's delighted when David joins them later. They're both glad they came, and agree that they can't let one person spoil it for them.
Things aren't quite going according to plan in the Village Hall kitchen, as the sponges for the Jubilee cake are not all as expected. Practical Nic eases Clarrie's mind and gets the cake into shape, and icing commences. Jill joins in and a production line is established. To Lynda's surprise it's finished in the nick of time and looks lovely.
Joe reminisces about the Queen's coronation day. He is disappointed to find his pint of Shires isn't on the house today, as it had been back then. To his disgust, Mr Pullen arrives safely to cut the Jubilee cake. But Joe's dismay turns to delight when he's asked to lead the rousing cheers to her majesty.


SUN 19:15 Tonight (b01j6t4c)
Series 2

Episode 4

Rory Bremner and the team return for another series of Tonight, the topical satire show that digs that bit deeper into national and international politics.

Rory's mantra is that it's as important to make sense out of things as it is to make fun of them. With a team that includes veteran satirists Andy Zaltzman and Nick Doody and versatile impressionist and character comedian Kate O'Sullivan, Tonight promises to do both. This is half an hour of stand-up, sketches, and investigative satire. And at the core of the show are Rory's incisively funny interviews with the most informed guest commentators on the current political scene.

More global crises, more political scandal, more jokes with the word fiscal in them - and some truly brilliant impressions: a shot in the arm for satire lovers everywhere.

Producers: Simon Jacobs & Frank Stirling
A Unique Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 The Transit of Venus: Pilate's Wife (b01jgcd7)
by Patricia Duncker.

To mark this week's Transit of Venus across the sun.

Pilate's wife has had an unsettling and disturbing dream, making her run from her husband and seek refuge with her servant's family. Escaping from Jerusalem, she encounters a terrifying individual on the road.

A transit of Venus across the Sun takes place when the planet Venus passes directly between the Sun and Earth, becoming visible against the solar disk. During a transit, Venus can be seen from Earth as a small black disk moving across the face of the Sun.

Read by Francesca Dymond

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01j6whc)
Have you ever listened to the radio and felt that what you were hearing was too private for broadcast?

In the first of the new series of Feedback, Roger is joined by a group of programme makers to discuss how they tread the line between gripping radio - and exploitation. Editor Philip Sellars discusses Radio 4's recent series The Trouble with Kane, which follows the treatment of a twelve year old boy arrested for cannabis possession. Editor Louisa Compton talks about Victoria Derbyshire's 5Live broadcast from an abortion clinic. And Foreign Correspondent Mike Thomson describes a harrowing interview with a woman who had suffered greatly at the hands of rebel Rwandan soldiers.

As the BBC's Delivering Quality First plans are finally approved, Feedback listener Andy Boddington asks the managing editor of his local station, BBC Radio Shropshire, what impact the cuts will have.

And we hear a plea for restraint in the face of the Jubilee jamboree.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01j6wh9)
Matthew Bannister on

Leopold De Rothschild the banker who raised millions for musical charities and ran a railway in his garden

Donald "Duck" Dunn - the bass player behind scores of soul hits from the sixties

Elisabeth Tomalin the designer who used art therapy to help the children of Nazis come to terms with their guilt.

Colin McIntyre - the founding editor of the BBC's Ceefax service.

and the clarinettist Alan Hacker who played a key role in the performance of new music.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01jg73w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01jg8qy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01jb6vz)
Middle East: Too Soon for Democracy?

Edward Stourton explores the prospects for post-revolution government, following the Arab Spring. Elections are being held, but can voters be sure autocratic rule is in the past?

Contributors, in order of appearance:

Aref Ali Nayed, Islamic theologian and Libyan ambassador to the United Arab Emirates.

Khaled Fahmy, professor of history at the American University in Cairo.

Marina Ottaway, senior associate of the Middle East programme at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Fawaz Gerges, Professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics.

Timur Kuran, Gorter Family Professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University.

Eugene Rogan, lecturer in the modern history of the Middle East and fellow of St Antony's College, Oxford.

The Right Hon. Sir Paddy Ashdown, former UN High Representative to Bosnia.

Khalifa Shakreen, lecturer in the Economics and Political Science department at Tripoli University.

(Producer: Ruth Alexander).


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01jgcdc)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01jgcdh)
Episode 106

Patrick O'Flynn of The Express analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01j6t0l)
Francine Stock meets with Charlize Theron to discuss her role in two films out this week - Prometheus and Snow White and the Huntsman.

It's been one of the most hyped films of the year, but does Ridley Scott's Prometheus deliver? Critic Tim Robey is here with his verdict.

Neil Brand is behind the piano to study the use of music in films based on fairy tales.

Tom Lawes, owner of the Electric Cinema in Birmingham, has made a documentary called The Last Projectionist. He discusses the dying trade of the 35mm projectionist.

Producer Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01jg8qr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 04 JUNE 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01jg7pb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01j5nwl)
AIDS conspiracy theories; comics

British comics are full of iconic and transgressive characters from Dan Dare to Minnie the Minx. Laurie Taylor talks to professor James Chapman the author of a new book charting the cultural history of British comics. They are joined by the broadcaster Matthew Sweet.

Also, Professor Nicoli Nattrass explains why a disproportionate percentage of Black South Africans and African Americans subscribe to conspiracy theories about the origins of AIDS..

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01jg8qp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7pd)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01jg7pg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7pj)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01jg7pl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01jggkm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Mark Oakley of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01jggkp)
Charlotte Smith hears about the thousands of beacons lighting up the countryside for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

John Hayes, the Minister for Skills is mapping rural crafts to try and encourage more people to get into traditional skills. He believes that rural skills benefit the economy and are in demand.

And at one of the busiest times of the farming year the Health and Safety Executive is warning farmers to take care to avoid accidents when baling hay. Eleven people have been killed in baling accidents since 2007 and Charlotte speaks to a farmer that is lucky to be alive after a bale fell on him.

The presenter is Charlotte Smith and the producer is Emma Weatherill.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01jg7pn)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01jggkr)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague and Evan Davis, including:

0709
The start of a public consultation on plans to compensate people whose homes are blighted by the planned high speed rail link has been delayed. Lord Andrew Adonis, former transport secretary, outlines possible reasons for the delays.

0810
Conservative-controlled Lincolnshire County Council will this week vote on stringent new guidelines for the approval of new wind turbine developments in the county. The council's leader, Cllr Martin Hill and Tim Yeo, Conservative MP for South Suffolk, debate if the plans are appropriate.

0852
Some memories of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, starting with excerpts from her own private journal. We also hear the words of the late Conservative Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, and those of Keir Hardie, the founder of the Labour Party.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01jggkt)
Grayson Perry at the Charleston Festival

In a specially recorded edition of Start the Week Andrew Marr is at the Charleston Festival with Grayson Perry, Virginia Nicholson, Faramerz Dabhoiwala and Janice Galloway. As the home of Vanessa Bell, Virginia Nicholson's grandmother, Charleston was a by-word for sexual freedom and the Bohemian lifestyle. But Dabhoiwala insists that far from the 1920s being the time of real sexual revolution, that honour goes to the 18th century, the origin of our modern attitudes to sex. Janice Galloway brings the story up-to-date as she relives her adolescence in small town Scotland in the 1970s. And the celebrated potter Grayson Perry explores changing social attitudes in relation to taste: the choices people make in the things they buy and wear, and uses these details of modern life to create six tapestries, called 'The Vanity of Small Differences'.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01jggkw)
Strands

Episode 1

A year of discoveries on the beach. Jean Sprackland meditates on objects revealed by the shape-shifting sands, or washed up on the wild beaches between Blackpool and Liverpool.

Recorded on location on Ainsdale Sands, 'Strands' is a book about what is lost and buried, then re-discovered; about all the things you find on a beach, dead or alive, natural or man-made; about mutability and transformation - about sea-change.

In today's episode, Jean contemplates the miraculous re-appearance of the Star of Hope, wrecked on Mad Wharf in 1883, but suddenly raised up from the depths one day - an entire wreck, black and barnacled, taking the air for a while before sinking back under the sand.

Read by Jean Sprackland

Abridged by Miranda Davies

Produced by Emma Harding

About the author: Jean Sprackland is the author of three books of poetry and a collection of short stories. Her most recent poetry collection, Tilt (Cape, 2007), won the Costa Poetry Award. Hard Water (Cape, 2003) was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, and was shortlisted for both the T S Eliot Prize and the Whitbread Award for Poetry. She was chosen as one of the Next Generation Poets in 2004.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01jggky)
The Noisettes

Shingy Shoniwa of the Noisettes - best known for Don't Upset the Rhythm (Go Baby Go) - talks about the inspiration behind the band's new album and plays live in the studio with Dan Smith.

Why the Government doesn't want to impose mandatory quotas for the number of women on Boards.

Queen Victoria's life revealed through a new exhibition at Kensington Palace. We reveal the crucial role the Palace played in her life. And the joy and pain of first love.

Presented Miranda Sawyer.
Producer Laura Northedge.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jggl0)
Chronicles of Ait - The Saxon Stones

Episode 1

Written by Michael Butt

Chronicles of Ait -The Saxon Stones finds author and one-time TV historian Linus Scott returning to the remote east coast settlement of Ait to attend the funeral of his childhood mentor, Kenrick, a scholar of Old English who had rescued the young boy from a problem background. But also attending the ceremony is a stranger, Alice Pyper, who, to Scott's surprise, appears to have had some connection to the deceased man. When Alice begins snooping around Kenrick's house, Scott confronts her, and the first door is opened onto a labyrinthine mystery that leads deep into the history of the Saxon Stones and the ominous myth of Dracamuth.

Cast:
Linus Scott . . . . . Greg Wise
Alice Pyper . . . . . Amanda Drew
Darlene . . . . . Heather Craney
Thurgis . . . . . Richard Hope
Irwin . . . . . Christopher James
Aidan . . . . . Jonathan Keeble
Child Linus . . . . .James Foster

Produced & Directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 Desperately Seeking Sympathy (b01jggl2)
Why would a perfectly healthy person pretend they had cancer? Or pretend that were pregnant with a foetus that could not survive long after birth? Munchausen's disorder has been known about for years but it's spread to the internet. People are constructing elaborate false identities, faking medical misfortunes and then posting online support forums. Few forums have escaped the imposters in what has become an epidemic of fakery.

In this programme Jolyon Jenkins speaks to those who have fallen victims of this kind of deception, as well as tracking down those who have perpetrated it. He learns how people who have genuinely suffered from medical misfortunes go online to offer help to other sufferers, only to find themselves taken for a ride by fakers. For some, learning that they have been getting into a deep and personal relationship with someone who turns out to be an emotional fraudster, is traumatic. Entire online communities sometimes feel devastated to learn that they have been harbouring an imposter.

The deception is often highly elaborate. "Munchausens by Internet" sufferers often invent multiple online personalities (known as "sock puppets"): to support each other husbands, boyfriends, relatives and friends who pop up to validate the main character. In one case, the Macmillan cancer forum was hoaxed by a teenage girl who posed as the mother of a young girl, "Charly", with terminal cancer. Members of the forum were gripped for months as the Charly's fortunes rose and fell. Eventually she lost her brave fight against cancer; forum members painted their nails pink in tribute to Charly's alleged last wishes and others wrote poetry in her memory. When it turned out that Charly was completely fictional, Macmillan forum members, many of whom had cancer themselves, were stunned. Some still refused to believe they had been corresponding with a teenager.

Imposters are not always detected but when they are they usually disappear without a word. Sometimes they reappear later under different names, but tracking down the real person behind the fake is virtually impossible. Why do they do it? Not for money. In interviews with two sufferers, Jolyon Jenkins hears of their desperate need for attention, their feelings of inadequacy in real life, and of loveless childhoods.

Other questions are raised by the phenomenon: why are people prepared to offer 24 hour support to characters who they don't know, and whose very existence they take on trust? And given the psychological damage done by perpetrators, shouldn't forum owners take more care to check that they are not providing a home for this new kind of online fraud?


MON 11:30 With Nobbs On (b01jggl4)
The Fall and Reprise of Reggie Perrin

With Nobbs On sees David Nobbs, the comic genius behind Reggie Perrin, The Two Ronnies, Tommy Cooper, Frankie Howerd and Radio 4's The Maltby Collection, presenting a three-part series of entertaining, joke-laden, insider observations on his comedy career to a studio audience along with guest readings, archive material and unpredictable delights.

David Nobbs describes life after he creates one of the most memorable of British characters, Reginald Iolanthe Perrin and how Reggie keeps on rising.

Written and presented by David Nobbs
Featuring Martin Trenaman and Mia Soteriou

Produced by Andrew McGibbon
A Curtains For Radio Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01jggl6)
Is the British film industry value for money?

The British film industry receives hundreds of millions of pounds of state support in tax relief and subsidies. But does it deliver in terms of jobs and economic payback? Can we justify funding indigenous British films which struggle to attract large audiences, or should we throw all our weight behind attracting American blockbusters to film here or use our facilities? And what about the cinemas themselves? Are multiplexes with ever bigger and better screens the answer - or should we look to the network of village hall cinemas for a broader range of films beyond the mainstream? The way we watch films could be about to radically change too, as we move on from 3-D to holographic projections. And what if cinemas could measure your fear while you watch - and then alter the film so you become even more frightened? It could happen sooner than you think.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Paul Waters.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01jg7pq)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01jggl8)
National and international news and analysis with James Robbins. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle (b01jgglb)
Breaking Up

In a series of personal essays, Richard Holloway considers the tensions between faith and doubt over the last 3000 years. Author and former Bishop of Edinburgh, Richard Holloway focuses on the Judeo-Christian tradition as he takes the listener from the birth of religious thinking, through the Old and New Testaments, to the developments in subsequent centuries and their influence on thinkers and writers, up to the present day.

This week he looks at the story of doubt from the 16th Century to the Enlightenment. The journey takes in the fragmentation of Christianity during the Reformation, the early non conformists and how some of the great minds of Europe responded to the discoveries of the Scientific Revolution. He also addresses the price that doubters paid - through the Roman Inquisition, censorship and excommunication. He ends the week with an essay on Free Will.

In today's programme, Richard Holloway explores the role of doubt as a means of challenging the prevailing religious thought, and in the 16th century points to Martin Luther as the man who "lit the fuse that was to blow Christendom apart". This was the time of the Reformation when the focus in Christianity shifted from the highly organised life of the Catholic Church to a system of theological ideas derived directly from the Bible. A.N. Wilson explains that the reformers thought they were restoring the original purity of a faith that had been corrupted, and Luther, a generation later, was followed by another hugely influential reformer, John Calvin. As Richard Holloway says, "The Reformation let a multitude of genies out of the bottle".

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01jgcd3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00t28db)
Circus Train

Margarita Sharapova's tale, based on working in a Russian circus, is adapted by Louis Nowra.

While their train is waiting at a remote rural station, animal trainer Orest and his assistant Alex take the dog out to relieve herself and their long circus train leaves without them. With no papers or money and not knowing where they are, they embark on a madcap journey, hopping goods trains and hiding away in carriages. Some are full of contraband, others have stowaways and one clattering goods train is carrying mysterious chemicals. Alex and Orest encounter a host of eccentric characters who are finding new and often desperate ways to survive.

As they manically switch trains to try to rejoin the circus, they explore the hinterland of Russia. Life here has changed since communism and yet in many ways is also much the same. A farm is still very much a co-operative even though the spokeswoman talks about the new economy and there is a picture of President Obama on the wall. The drab and ugly towns Orest and Alex pass through rejoice in fictive names like Yellow Rat Town - this is a heightened picaresque tale where imagination vies with grim reality.

Drunken soldiers, village policemen and a succession of chicken farmers harass and pursue the circus couple, convinced they are criminals on the run.

Recorded by a Russian-speaking repertory cast.

Orest Anderlect ... Yasen Peyankov
Alex/Alyona ... Anne Bobby
Nastya ... Angelique Doudnikova
Berg ... Michael Levi Harris
Gorlogryzov ... Stass Klassen
Bruskov ... Moti Margolin
Hayk ... Peter Von Berg
Train Dispatcher ... Tatyana Zbirovskaya

All other parts were played by members of the cast.

Music composed by Gene Pritsker.
Sound design by Peregrine Andrews.

Producer: Judith Kampfner
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b01jggld)
Series 26

Episode 7

(7/13)
Could you remember which contemporary composer wrote the anthem 'This Is The Day' for the marriage service of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge last year?

The seventh heat in the current series of the wide-ranging music quiz features competitors from Surrey and Kent answering Paul Gambaccini's questions, not just on classical music but on jazz, film music, musical theatre and sixty years of pop and rock.

There are plenty of musical extracts for them to identify, both familiar and surprising. They will also have to be prepared to answer a set of specialist questions on a musical topic that's been sprung on them by surprise.

The winner will take another of the remaining places in the series semi-finals, which begin next month.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01jgb8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Pina Bausch - Dance for Your Life (b01jgglg)
Recorded with dancers in Pina Bausch's Tanztheater company in Wuppertal, former lead dancer for the Royal Ballet, Deborah Bull, pays tribute to this extraordinary artist.

Bausch's subject is the relationship between men and women, which is played out in all her pieces. Her dancers, who break any conventional rules about age and shape, actively share in the creation of the choreography - bringing their life experiences, memories and personalities to the dance.

Each of the performances has the capacity to provoke immense, powerful and individual responses. There's no single narrative in each piece; it's more like a sequence of captured moments, close ups and sometimes lucid, sometimes inexplicable enactments of life.

Tanztheater, literally, means Dance Theatre. It's a hybrid or a genre that slips between the definitions and breaks down the formal boundaries between different arts.

The raw, expressionistic movements, often so extreme, pose open questions about culpability, moral responsibility and humanity's dark side. For all the intensity though, she incorporates humour - her dancers will leave the stage and offer the audience jam sandwiches, cups of tea, or ask someone in the front row if they are in love.

Pina Bausch alongside other German artists and performers, including her mentor Kurt Joos, also addressed the aftermath of war on a profound level, asking again and again what it is to be human.

With Fiona Shaw, Antony Gormley, Michael Morris, Wim Wenders, Judith Mackrell and principal dancers from the Company - Dominique Mercy, Julie Shanahan, Julie Anne Stanzak and Eddie Martinez

Producer: Kate Bland
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b01jgj09)
Series 1

Crowded

Aleks Krotoski looks at group think in the digital world.


MON 17:00 PM (b01jgj0c)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01jg7ps)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b01jgj0f)
Series 63

Episode 4

Just how hard can it be to talk for 60 seconds with no hesitation, repetition and deviation?

Regulars Jenny Eclair and Tony Hawks welcome relative newcomers Richard Herring and Paul Sinha to try.

As ever, Nicholas Parsons chairs this popular comedy panel show.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01jgj0h)
Mike thinks he might put up a bit of a display of his forestry work after the Jubilee celebrations have finished, to see if he can attract some part-time help. Vicky's keen; she's all for increasing their leisure time.
Vicky says as much to Brenda later, as she buys her coffee at the beacon lighting. She can't wait to stop work when Mike retires so they'll have more time for holidays. Angry Brenda confides to Pip that she thinks Vicky's selfish. And when Mike announces later that Vicky's exhausted and they're heading home, Brenda declares that's just typical of Vicky; it always has to be all about her.
Pip hasn't time for David's team talk about Open Farm Sunday, but Ruth manages to get Josh and Ben enthused. She and David are grateful that the boys are at least in the house. They decide to walk to the beacon, and enjoy a family moment around the spectacular fire. Once back home they examine the security camera footage and find nothing untoward in the contents. Ruth gets emotional about the new situation in which they find themselves. David reassures her that everything's going to be fine.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01jgj0m)
Harry Belafonte at 85

From life as the child of a single, immigrant mother in New York to international music sensation, civil rights activist and Martin Luther King's right hand man - Harry Belafonte's life would be fascinating on these grounds alone. However Belafonte was also involved with the African independence movement, and he began his professional music career as a singer for Charlie Parker's band. As his new memoir My Song: A Memoir of Art, Race and Defiance, is published, he talks to Kirsty Lang about some of the milestones in his eventful life.

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jggl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Things We Forgot to Remember (b01jgj0p)
Series 8

Morgenthau Plan and post-war Germany

Michael Portillo remembers the Morgenthau Plan which aimed to strip post war Germany of its industry and turn it into an agricultural country. It was replaced by the Marshall Plan.

Many of us remember the Marshall Plan, the US programme to rebuild post war Europe. Far less is known about the Morganthau Plan (also drawn up in Washington a few years earlier) which aimed, amongst other things, to destroy German industry after the country had surrendered. Winston Churchill also signed up to the plan which would turn Germany into an agrarian "pastoral" society, unable to manufacture the machinery of warfare in the future. Michael Portillo examines the Morganthau Plan and discovers it was in fact drafted by a Soviet agent working high up in the US Administration. He considers the implications of this, looks at how far the plan was implemented and asks why we have forgotten to remember it.

Producer Neil McCarthy.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01j5h51)
Steve Keen: Why Economics is Bunk

Newsnight Economics Editor Paul Mason interviews the controversial economist Steve Keen before an audience at the London School of Economics.

Prof Keen was one of a small number of economists who predicted there would be a major financial crisis before the 2008 crash.

He argues that if we keep the "parasitic banking sector" alive then the economy will die, and says that conventional economics provides an unwitting cover for "the greatest ponzi schemes in history".

Producer: Kavita Puri.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01j6t0n)
It's 80 years since British Physicist James Chadwick discovered the Neutron. Finding this key particle led to the development of many different branches of science from theoretical physics to modern medicine, engineering and electronics. Quentin Cooper discuss the significance of Chadwick's work and his legacy with Professor Peter Rowlands, from Liverpool University - where Chadwick worked on particle accelerators and Professor Andrew Harrison, from the Institut Laue-Langevin, one of the world's leading neutron research facilities.

We hear the first results from one of our 'So You Want to Be a Scientist' teams. What noises do we really find horrible and why?

And we examine the state of the world's helium supply. It's not just used to inflate party balloons, helium has a key role in protecting sensitive microelectronics and enabling the correct functioning of medical scanners and equipment used in the study of neutrons. It occurs in the same deposits as natural gas, but is not managed well by the industries which extract and store it according to Dr Richard Clarke from the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy.

Producer: Julian Siddle.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01jggkt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01jg7pv)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01jgj0r)
The latest from today's Jubilee celebrations, we'll be live at Buckingham Palace, and we'll debate whether women make better monarchs than men.

New difficulties for Kofi Annan's peace mission to Syria.

And the people who want to move heaven and earth to tackle environmental problems.

With Roger Hearing.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01jgj0t)
Jubilee

Episode 6

The inhabitants of Cherry Gardens appear to be working happily together to organise the perfect street party but, not far beneath the surface, tensions rage.

And 30 years later, when one of worst offenders finds herself dependant on the skill of a boy she once wronged to save the life of her child, she finds the situation too difficult to bear.

Jubilee is written by Shelley Harris, read by Sartaj Garewal and abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions

Produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b01j5j2s)
No Country for Old Men

"That is no country for old men," wrote Yeats in the opening line of his poem Sailing to Byzantium. "I am trying to write about the state of my soul," he later explained. Since when the phrase has been picked up in a novel by Cormac McCarthy, and a Coen brothers film based on the same book. But are we any closer to understanding what this phrase means, beyond realising something poignant is at work ?

Tibor Fischer, Katharine Whitehorn and Guy Browning all approach the subject with three very different columns about age, experience, and youth. For Guy Browing this is no longer a country for old men because they've decided that staying young is more to their taste. Katharine Whitehorn, agony aunt at Saga, argues for the creation of a fourth age of man, while Tibor Fischer worries about what has changed more, his world or him.

Dominic Arkwright presents.


MON 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b010mrsk)
Series 6

Voices in the Head

Writer and documentary maker Jon Ronson returns for another 5 part series of fascinating stories shedding light on the human condition.

Eleanor Longden started to hear voices in her head when she was at university and was diagnosed as a schizophrenic - a label she totally rejects. Now she is a high achieving academic. What started the voices and how did she get to a point where she not only lives happily with the voices that still exist but also works with others who have the same experience? With contributions from writer Graham Linehan and comedian Josie Long.

Producer: Laura Parfitt and Simon Jacobs
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 05 JUNE 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01jg7qr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01jggkw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7qt)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01jg7qw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7qy)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01jg7r0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01js6sp)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Mark Oakley of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01jglkz)
Building houses using the rural skills of thatching, timber framing and flint knapping. Anna Hill travels around Norfolk to visit craftsmen. Steven Letch and apprentice Boz are re-thatching a traditional cottage in Bressingham. They want thatching to be used much more frequently in new build housing.

John Lord is a flint knapper - a traditional way of chipping flint to use it to decorate the walls of building. Flint knapping is no longer popular, but flint is still being used as a building material.

And John Falvey is re-discovering the traditional architecture of timber framing. He mixes old knowledge with modern techniques to build new houses.

The presenter is Anna Hill and the producer is Emma Weatherill.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01jgll1)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb. Including:

0733
The chief medical officer of football's governing body Fifa says that international players are using so much pain killing medication in tournaments that it constitutes "abuse". Gordon Taylor of the Professional Footballers' Association, speaks about the announcement ahead of the European Championships.

0751
Tomorrow is the last chance for more than 100 years to see the Transit of Venus. The Astronomer Royal, Lord Rees and Jerry Stone, amateur astronomer from the Letchworth and District Astronomy Society, explain the importance of the transit and give tips on how to view the event.

0810
Sayeeda Warsi, co-chair of the Conservative Party, has been referred by David Cameron to Alex Allan, his adviser on ministerial interest. James Kirkup, deputy political editor for the Daily Telegraph joins Louise Mensch, Conservative MP for Corby, to discuss the implications behind the move.

0822
This weekend British expatriates across the globe will be having a cup of tea and thinking of home. Dr Alex Kumar, of the European Space Agency, thinks his is the world's remotest Jubilee tea party - he's based in Antarctica.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01jgll3)
Robert May

Jim al-Khalili talks to the former chief scientific advisor, Robert May about restoring public trust in science in the wake of the BSE crisis and at the height of the anti-GM campaigns of the mid-nineties. If he were a species of plant, Bob May says he would be the "weedy type", moving as he has into new fields of science and proliferating rapidly, rather than a more established, specialised variety. He has applied mathematics first to physics, then ecology and, most recently, to banking.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01jgll5)
Mary Ann Sieghart talks to Andrew

Killing another person is humanity's greatest taboo. Mary Ann Sieghart continues her series of conversations with those who've been responsible for taking another life. Andrew knocked down and killed a young mother in a road traffic accident in 1989. He was given eighteen months despite the victim's family asking for a non custodial sentence. These events have always haunted him and they've shaped the rest of his life. He now works with young male drivers teaching them about speed awareness and safe driving.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01jk46d)
Strands

Episode 2

A year of discoveries on the beach. Jean Sprackland meditates on objects revealed by the shape-shifting sands, or washed up on the wild beaches between Blackpool and Liverpool.

Recorded on location on Ainsdale Sands, 'Strands' is a book about what is lost and buried, then re-discovered; about all the things you find on a beach, dead or alive, natural or man-made; about mutability and transformation - about sea-change.

In today's episode, Jean contemplates the surprising effects of anti-depressants on shrimp populations.

Read by Jean Sprackland

Abridged by Miranda Davies

Produced by Emma Harding

About the author: Jean Sprackland is the author of three books of poetry and a collection of short stories. Her most recent poetry collection, Tilt (Cape, 2007), won the Costa Poetry Award. Hard Water (Cape, 2003) was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, and was shortlisted for both the T S Eliot Prize and the Whitbread Award for Poetry. She was chosen as one of the Next Generation Poets in 2004.


TUE 10:00 15 Minute Drama (b01jgll7)
Chronicles of Ait - The Saxon Stones

Episode 2

Written by Michael Butt

Chronicles of Ait -The Saxon Stones finds author and one-time TV historian Linus Scott returning to the remote east coast settlement of Ait to attend the funeral of his childhood mentor, Kenrick, a scholar of Old English who had rescued the young boy from a problem background. But also attending the ceremony is a stranger, Alice Pyper, who, to Scott's surprise, appears to have had some connection to the deceased man. When Alice begins snooping around Kenrick's house, Scott confronts her, and the first door is opened onto a labyrinthine mystery that leads deep into the history of the Saxon Stones and the ominous myth of Dracamuth.

Cast:
Linus Scott . . . . . Greg Wise
Alice Pyper . . . . . Amanda Drew
Darlene . . . . . Heather Craney
Thurgis . . . . . Richard Hope
Irwin . . . . . Christopher James
Lord Ethel/Aidan . . . . . Jonathan Keeble
Child Linus . . . . . James Foster

Produced & Directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:20 The Queen's Diamond Jubilee Service of Thanksgiving (b01jgll9)
A service live from St Paul's Cathedral to mark Her Majesty The Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

Following the many celebrations over the Bank Holiday weekend to mark 60 years of Her Majesty The Queen's reign, commentator Nicholas Witchell describes the scene in St Paul's Cathedral as Her Majesty, other members of the royal family, senior members of the Government and Opposition, and representatives from around the UK and the Commonwealth gather to celebrate and give thanks for the Diamond Jubilee.

With music from the Diamond Choir, made up of young singers from across the UK specially brought together for the service, and from the choirs of St Paul's Cathedral and of the Chapels Royal. Director of Music: Andrew Carwood. Organist: Simon Johnson. Preacher: The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams.

Producer: Simon Vivian.


TUE 11:30 Modern Day Griot (b01jhb34)
How are modern musicians re-imagining the role of the West African griot?

Traditionally griots belong to particular West African families who act as oral historians, advisors, story-tellers and musicians for their culture. Now a generation of artists living in the West, who have African roots, are learning musical techniques from the masters but creating songs and stories with contemporary relevance.

In a programme rich in musical sounds and poetic storytelling, writer Gaylene Gould explores what it means to be a griot today. When modern culture uses the term as a shorthand - what does it mean to call someone a griot?

Hereditary griot Seckou Keita, leads a music workshop at a primary school, teaching harp-like instrument the Kora. At the age of 10, Tunde Jegede travelled from England to Gambia to train with a master kora player. He now collaborates with both orchestras and the hip-hop artist HKB FiNN - who has changed the way he approaches writing lyrics and embraced the griot label. Sona Jobarteh, Tunde's sister, is a hereditary griot. She gives Gaylene a lesson in kora playing and discusses how her sex affects the role and why she is reluctant to call herself a griot.

Award winning poet and performer Inua Ellams has been performing at the National Theatre and Malian musician Fatoumata Diawara sells out gigs internationally- both are called griot by their fans but aren't entirely comfortable with the label. Fatoumata believes she couldn't address topics like female circumcision as a griot. London based spoken word artist Zena Edwards explains why she wants to honour the tradition.

Reflecting on the importance of the tradition in its purest form, Tunde Jedege says "every time a griot dies it's like a library burning down."

Producer Claire Bartleet

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2012.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01jhb36)
Call You and Yours: How do you feel about the United Kingdom?

On this week's Call You and Yours we're asking 'How do you feel about the United Kingdom?'

The bunting is out and the union flags are flying to celebrate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. The Olympic torch is touring the country reminding us that the Olympic and Paralympic games are just around the corner.

So with the eyes of the world focussed on us, how do you feel about the United Kingdom?

Have the street parties, the pomp and pageantry of golden carriages and boats on the Thames changed the way you feel about this country? Have feelings of patriotism stirred or been rejuvenated?

Or does the commercial tat and flag waving fail to disguise the problems we have in this country. The faltering economy, the disillusioned youngsters who are unable to find a job and the many communities still feeling broken after the riots of last August.

Do you feel proud of the United Kingdom or sorry for it?

Call us on 03700-100-400 before ten, 03700 100444 after ten, or email us via our website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours ; leave us a message or a name and number where we can call you back.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Karen Dalziel.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01jg7r2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01jhb38)
National and international news with James Robbins. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle (b01jhb3b)
The Agony and the Ecstasy

In a series of personal essays, Richard Holloway considers the tensions between faith and doubt over the last 3000 years. Author and former Bishop of Edinburgh, Richard Holloway focuses on the Judeo-Christian tradition as he takes the listener from the birth of religious thinking, through the Old and New Testaments, to the developments in subsequent centuries and their influence on thinkers and writers, up to the present day.

In today's programme Richard Holloway focuses on three writers, each of whom wrote about their personal spiritual struggles. He begins with the 17th century poet and preacher John Donne, best known for his early love poems, but it's in his religious work that he grappled with the themes of faith, doubt and temptation. Richard Holloway talks to the former Poet Laureate Andrew Motion about Donne's internal doubts.

A generation later, John Bunyan, known universally for his religious allegory The Pilgrim's Progress, wrote about his profound feelings of guilt, doubt and melancholy.

Richard Holloway's third writer is the 19th century poet Gerard Manley Hopkins. Holloway talks to AN Wilson about Hopkins' belief that religion could make society more effective and compassionate, yet inside, he thought of himself as a failure as a priest, a teacher and a poet.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01jgj0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01jhb3d)
Operation Black Buck

During the Falklands War 30 years ago, the RAF staged the world's longest bombing run, in an attempt to damage the runway at Port Stanley. Using ageing Vulcan bombers, crews flew a round trip of 8000 miles from Ascension Island to the South Atlantic. Such a journey required not just in-flight refuelling, but re-fuelling of the refuelling planes - a hazardous undertaking that had never before been attempted on such a scale.

In this drama, Robin Glendinning recreates the nail-biting adventure. Not only were the raids themselves difficult to pull off, but even getting the aircraft ready for the flights was a major task. Aviation museums across the world were raided for spares, and key parts retrieved from junkyards.

But there are those who question whether or not the operation was militarily useful - or whether or not the same job could have been done more effectively using planes attached to the naval task force. Was this really about war, or was it about the RAF trying to carve out a role for itself in a conflict that threatened to be entirely dominated by the Army and Royal Navy? And how successful were the raids anyway?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b01jhb3g)
Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Irish Deserters in the British Army: Making History listener Paddy Reid from County Dublin in the Irish Republic wrote to the programme with the story of his father who, aged 17, deserted from the Irish Army to fight for the British during the Second World War. Having served in India and Burma Paddy's father returned home to Ireland in 1946 and was then effectively barred from employment for the best part of 16 years because many regarded him as a traitor. As the debate about amnesty for these men goes on in Dublin, Tom Holland talks to Paddy and to Professor Brian Girvin who is the Co-Director of the Volunteers Project at University College Cork.

Chalk: Patricia Nash in Basingstoke is working on a project to ensure that every public right of way in Hampshire is marked on a definitive map. Her research has meant that she has looked at hundreds of old maps and she is amazed at the number of chalk workings that are shown. 'What were they for', she asks? Making History's Simon Evans joined archaeologist Dr Matt Pope on the South Downs to find out more.

Richard Cromwell: Den Cartlidge heard our recent programme about the English Civil War and the Long Parliament. He asks why Richard Cromwell's short tenure as Lord Protector is so often ignored? Tom Holland talks to Professor Ronald Hutton from the University of Bristol.

Abebe Bikali: Helen Castor talks to the author Simon Martin about the Ethiopian runner whose barefoot victory in the Olympic marathon in Rome in 1960 paved the way for the African domination of distance running that we are familiar with today.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Off the Page (b01jhb3j)
The Garden of Eden

"And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed." The story of the Garden of Eden in Genesis is perhaps the most influential tale ever told. Its chief components of God, Adam and Eve and the snake, temptation, and a paradise lost still exert a hold on western thinking. Children understand it almost immediately, but this ancient story has not always been benign in its effects.

Joining presenter Dominic Arkwright are the novelist Zina Rohan, who talks about her own investigations into what this story has meant, particularly to women in the west; Sean Thomas writes about his search for where the real garden might have been; and Brook Wilensky-Lanford, whose book Paradise Lust is published in the UK later this year, describes the events of the Scopes trial of 1925. This famous clash between Darwinists and creationists featured an American presidential candidate who declared his belief that Eve was literally made from one of Adam's rib.
The producer is Miles Warde.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b01jhb3l)
Secret Courts, Drones and International Law

In the first of a new series Joshua Rozenberg talks to Sir Daniel Bethlehem the former principal legal advisor at the Foreign Office. He asks him about the changing face of international law and its effect on the making of foreign policy, including the rise in litigation against the government on foreign matters.

He also asks about international law and the use of drones, and the government's Justice and Security bill and why Sir Daniel thinks the measures laid out there are necessary.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01jhb3n)
Maggie Aderin-Pocock and William Orbit

Harriett Gilbert and her guests - space scientist, Maggie Aderin-Pocock and music producer, William Orbit - discuss favourite books by John Wyndham, Janice Galloway and Tom Stoppard.

'Chocky' by John Wyndham
Publisher: Penguin

'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead' by Tom Stoppard
Publisher: Faber and Faber

'Trick Is To Keep Breathing' by Janice Galloway
Publisher: Vintage

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01jhb3q)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01jg7r4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Cabin Pressure (b012llrz)
Series 3

Ottery St Mary

Martin is a man with a van, Douglas flies a plane with an otter and Carolyn dates a pilot with a problem with sheep.

And two mysteries are solved - the name of Carolyn's dog and the rules of "Yellow Car"

John Finnemore's sitcom about the pilots of a tiny charter airline for whom no job is too small and many jobs are too difficult.

With special guest Anthony Head

Carolyn Knapp-Shappey ..... Stephanie Cole
1st Officer Douglas Richardson ..... Roger Allam
Capt. Martin Crieff ..... Benedict Cumberbatch
Arthur Shappey .... John Finnemore
Capt. Herc Shipwright ..... Anthony Head
Mrs. Laurel ..... Flip Webster
Mr Hardy ..... Ewan Bailey

Producer/Director: David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2011.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01jhb3s)
With babymaking on her mind, Nic's cooked a lovely meal and is keen for Will to be home early. But he returns with the news that he has to go back out to attend to a rogue fox. Nic's disappointed, but Will says he'll be as quick as he can. Nic promises she'll be waiting.
Alice is trying to find out all she can about Carl's wife in an effort to stop Amy clinging to hope. Alice calls Annabelle for information.
The air's frosty at the Vicarage. Amy snaps that she's fed up of being cast as the troublemaker. Frustrated Usha declares she hasn't time to argue and goes, leaving Amy to answer the ringing phone.
Amy's heartened when Alice tells her Carl's wife Rochelle doesn't use her married name. But she is shocked that Rochelle is a parent governor, and therefore must have a child. Amy thinks Carl would surely have told her this. He's loving and kind, and so he can't possibly be in love with his wife. Alice advises Amy to look at the facts. But Amy's convinced Carl's only staying with his wife for the sake of their child, when really he's in love with her, Amy. Poor Carl, she says. He must be really hurting.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01jhb3v)
Hilary Mantel talks to Mark Lawson

In an extended interview, Mark Lawson talks to writer Hilary Mantel, who won the Booker Prize with her novel Wolf Hall, and has now written a sequel, Bring Up The Bodies.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jgll7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:00 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01jhb3x)
Police Racism

Is institutional racism still alive in the police? Black and Asian officers claim discrimination is thwarting progress through the ranks and destroying promising careers.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01jhb3z)
American jazz pianist Marcus Roberts talks to Peter White about his music and the impact his blindness has had on his career. As a child Marcus was encouraged to play the piano by his parents, particularly his mother, who was also very musical. Marcus says one of the things that attracted him to the instrument was the fact that id didn't move and he could feel its size.
The legendary musician Wynton Marsalis took Marcus under his wing and gave him his real big break, by inviting him to play in his band. Marsalis described Marcus as a genius musician and Marcus says his own style and writing is influenced by Marsalis.
Marcus talks of the frustrations of being blind and how he wishes he could conduct an orchestra.
Along with his other band members, he demonstrates some of the tricks and techniques they use when playing together, to know both when to end, and when to begin.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b01jhb41)
Claudia Hammond talks to Jacopo Annese, director of the San Diego brain observatory about his mission to create what he calls 'a Hubble space telescope for the brain'. He is recruiting people who will be willing to donate their brains to his laboratory. By interviewing them regularly to record their detailed life histories and interests and by doing psychological tests he aims to provide a brain archive for neuroscientists in the future. But what sort of links can be established between brain anatomy and personality and what sort of people are willing to donate their brains to his lab?

Producer: Pam Rutherford.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01jgll3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01jg7r6)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01jhb43)
The Queen gives a message of thanks to the nation after four days of jubilee celebrations.

Spanish economic crisis worsens - will markets continue to lend to them?

And has the Left failed to capitalise on the economic troubles of recent years?

With Shaun Ley.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01jhb45)
Jubilee

Episode 7

After receiving threatening letters, Satish wrongly accuses Colette of blackmailing him to go to the Jubilee reunion. When he realises she isn't the culprit and not knowing who knows his secret, he decides he has no alternative but to turn up for the planned photograph.

Jubilee is written by Shelley Harris, read by Sartaj Garewal and abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions

Produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The Pickerskill Reports (b0132k5b)
Series 2

Timothy Spoontz

Written and Directed by Andrew McGibbon.

When the new progressive headmaster Mike Poulson Jabby decides to impose an austerity drive in the seventies, the quality of the school's food is compromised as part of the tedious process. But the inventive agricultural talents of young boarder, Timothy Spoontz, helped by his successful father's growing agricultural business, provide the school and Castlereagh House with it's own privately delivered supply of food - until Mike Poulson Jabby gets wind of it.

Cast:
Dr Henry Pickerskill ...... Ian McDiarmid
Timothy Spoontz ....... Harry McEntire
Mike Poulson Jabby ...... Mike Priest
Lefty Rogers ....... Tony Gardner
Stanislaw ....... Mike Sarne
Stealgroynes ...... Jack Edwards
Calman ........ Kris Saddler
Moorcroft ...... Joe Cooper
Matron ... ... Mia Soteriou

Producers: Nick Romero and Andrew McGibbon
A Curtains For Radio Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b010t6lf)
Series 6

Spying

Writer and documentary maker Jon Ronson returns for another series of fascinating stories shedding light on the human condition.

Jon Ronson talks to comedian Josie Long who found herself in a situation where she had to make a choice on whether to spy on someone's life... did morality step in? Writer Danny Wallace recalls the days when a spy was sent to his home to spy on his father, a leading expert on East German literature.

Johnny Howorth, rookie documentary maker, was also in a situation where he was asked by US Marshals to spy on the couple Ed and Elaine Brown who were convicted of tax crimes. As he naively got more deeply involved, he feared another Wako and had to make a difficult decision... John Symonds, a so-called 'romeo spy' also tells his sometimes shocking story.

Producers: Laura Parfitt and Simon Jacobs
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.



WEDNESDAY 06 JUNE 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01jg7s1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01jk46d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7s3)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01jg7s5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7s7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01jg7s9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01js6st)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Mark Oakley of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01jhdg8)
Caz Graham investigates the resurgence of interest in the rural crafts which have shaped the British uplands. A trip to the eco centre in Derbyshire reveals how dry stone walling, hedge-laying and hurdle-making can provide a surprisingly steady income, despite the economic climate.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


WED 06:00 Today (b01jhdgb)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis, including: 07:30 Did the BBC get Jubilee coverage wrong? 07:50 The next plan for the eurozone banking system. 08:10 Were unpaid Jubilee security staff badly treated? 08:30 Does coffee prevent the onset of dementia?


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01jhdgd)
Simon Jordan; Samantha Spiro; Robin Millar; Steve Benbow

Simon Jordan made his fortune in the mobile phone industry and in 2000, at the age of 32, he bought Crystal Palace Football Club. Ten years later the club was in administration and Jordan had lost everything. As well as recounting his own rise and fall in football, the book lifts the lid on how the national game works from the vast sums of money paid to footballers to the top-level activities at the heart of the sport. 'Be Careful What You Wish For' is published by Yellow Jersey Press.

Robin Millar is a record producer and musician. His 1984 production of 'Diamond Life' by Sade was named one of the best ten albums of the last 30 years at the 2011 Brit Awards. Robin has worked with a range of artists including Sting, Eric Clapton, Chrissie Hynde and Elvis Costello. He was born with retinitis pigmentosa and has been registered blind since the age of 16. In March this year Robin underwent a 12 hour operation to install a bionic retina in his right eye in a clinical trial to help research into future treatment for blindness.

Steve Benbow is an urban beekeeper who started his first bee hive on the roof of his tower block in south London ten years ago. Today he runs 30 sites across the city and his bees live on top of Tate Modern and the National Portrait Gallery. His book follows a year in his life as a beekeeper. 'The Urban Beekeeper A Year of Bees in the City' by Steve Benbow is published by Square Peg.

Samantha Spiro is a double Olivier award-winning actor. She is playing Katherine in The Taming of the Shrew at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in London. Samantha played Barbara Windsor in the play Cleo, Camping, Emmanuelle and Dick and Dolly Levi in the Open Air Theatre's production of Hello, Dolly! In Regent's Park in 2010. The Taming of the Shrew runs from June 23 - October 13 2012.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01jk47w)
Strands

Episode 3

A year of discoveries on the beach. Jean Sprackland meditates on objects revealed by the shape-shifting sands, or washed up on the wild beaches between Blackpool and Liverpool.

Recorded on location on Ainsdale Sands, 'Strands' is a book about what is lost and buried, then re-discovered; about all the things you find on a beach, dead or alive, natural or man-made; about mutability and transformation - about sea-change.

In today's episode, Jean discovers an unidentifiable, but exquisitely beautiful object at the strandline.

Read by Jean Sprackland

Abridged by Miranda Davies

Produced by Emma Harding

About the author: Jean Sprackland is the author of three books of poetry and a collection of short stories. Her most recent poetry collection, Tilt (Cape, 2007), won the Costa Poetry Award. Hard Water (Cape, 2003) was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, and was shortlisted for both the T S Eliot Prize and the Whitbread Award for Poetry. She was chosen as one of the Next Generation Poets in 2004.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01jhdgg)
Michelle Obama

Should Michelle Obama be promoting Beyonce as an aspirational role model? The psychological impact of breast cancer. Author Terri Apter on difficult mothers - the angry, the controlling, the narcissistic, the envious and the emotionally neglectful. Plus Queen Victoria's life revealed through a new exhibition at Kensington Palace and the women helping children to discover the joy of playing outside.
Presented by Jenni Murray.
Produced by Kirsty Starkey.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jhdgj)
Chronicles of Ait - The Saxon Stones

Episode 3

Written by Michael Butt

Chronicles of Ait -The Saxon Stones finds author and one-time TV historian Linus Scott returning to the remote east coast settlement of Ait to attend the funeral of his childhood mentor, Kenrick, a scholar of Old English who had rescued the young boy from a problem background. But also attending the ceremony is a stranger, Alice Pyper, who, to Scott's surprise, appears to have had some connection to the deceased man. When Alice begins snooping around Kenrick's house, Scott confronts her, and the first door is opened onto a labyrinthine mystery that leads deep into the history of the Saxon Stones and the ominous myth of Dracamuth.

Cast:
Linus Scott . . . . . Greg Wise
Alice Pyper . . . . . Amanda Drew
Darlene . . . . . Heather Craney
Thurgis . . . . . Richard Hope
Irwin . . . . . Christopher James
Lord Ethel . . . . . Jonathan Keeble

Produced & Directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 A Straight Question (b01jhdgl)
Comedian, writer and actress Jackie Clune dated women for 12 years before meeting and marrying a man. She talks to those who, like her, identified as gay and then had a heterosexual relationship. This is a subject that provokes misunderstanding and downright anger and Jackie found people even walked out of her stand-up act when she mentioned her husband. We discuss how sexuality can be fluid and romance can be unexpected. Novelist Jake Arnott, who identified predominantly as gay, then fell in love with a female fellow writer, says 'You don't choose who you fall in love with.'
Niki, who describes herself as a 'gold star dyke' until a man walked into the coffee shop where she worked. That first day she realised she would marry him and have his children. Although she still identifies herself as a 'lesbian who happened to be married to a man.' She says ' He was a freak wave who drenched the whole beach.'.


WED 11:30 A Month of June (b01jhdgn)
Spray the Grass Green

It's 1939 and fading Hollywood star Lana Garfield hears the studio wants to dump her.

Contracted to Tantamount Pictures run by the notoriously difficult and womanising studio head, Al Seltzer. Miss Garfield is writing her autobiography with the assistance of British ghost writer George Creighton but is shocked when she hears on a radio gossip programme that Al intends to end her contract.

George and his ex-pat cronies take time off from their cocktails and cricket matches to collude with Al's ambitious and glamorous assistant Betty Stevens in exacting an appropriate revenge.

Written by Andy Merriman and Peter Morfoot.

The first of four comedies written for the many voices of legendary actor June Whitfield.

Lana Garfield ..... June Whitfield
George Creighton ..... David Haig
Al Seltzer ..... Patrick Brennan
Betty Stevens ..... Tracy Wiles
Harry Harcourt-Jones ..... Robert Blythe
Edna Harper ..... Amaka Okafor
Boris Karloff ..... Peter Morfoot

Director: David Hunter

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2012


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01jhdgq)
Challenging medical records, National Citizen Service, gaming consoles

With many areas of the country still in drought, Winifred Robinson asks how commercial users of water are affected, focussing on the bottled water industry.

The government recently announced that it intends to give patients in England access to their medical records online but what happens when you discover those records are wrong? And why is it so hard to change them?

Teenagers are being invited to part in a national government run volunteer programme to help make them better citizens. We hear from two graduates of the National Citizen Service.

We speak to the founder of an innovative new way to fundraise where users are offered the chance to win a sweepstake by guessing the result of an event posted by the participant. Can it really help prevent fund-raising fatigue?

And the latest on the games industry - we go live to the US west coast to hear what's happening at the world's biggest trade show, the E3.

Presenter Winifred Robinson
Producer Vibeke Venema.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01jg7sc)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01jhdgs)
National and international news and analysis with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle (b01jhdgv)
Vacating Heaven

In a series of personal essays, Richard Holloway considers the tensions between faith and doubt over the last 3000 years. Author and former Bishop of Edinburgh, Richard Holloway focuses on the Judeo-Christian tradition as he takes the listener from the birth of religious thinking, through the Old and New Testaments, to the developments in subsequent centuries and their influence on thinkers and writers, up to the present day.

In today's programme Richard Holloway discusses how the great leaps forward in scientific thought, particularly the new understanding that the Earth was not the centre of the universe, influenced the way leading 17th century thinkers reconsidered the relationship of mankind to God. Holloway talks about such great figures as Isaac Newton, Descartes and Pascal, with contributors including author Sir Anthony Kenny, Susan James, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College and Peter Millican, Professor of Philosophy at Oxford University.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01jhb3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01jhdgx)
Take a (Virtual) Girl Like You

By Nicholas Pierpan

Alex Tilly is a radio psychiatrist who cures people of cyber addiction. But he's prepared to sacrifice his scruples to get his own TV show, and begins moonlighting for a firm that manufactures virtual girlfriends. Alex's assignment is to make their digital creations as addictive as possible but he soon realises that the virtual world has very real consequences.

Cast:

Alex . . . . . Sam Alexander
Dawn . . . . . Jemima Rooper
Julie . . . . . Susie Riddell
Dr Lark . . . . . Gerard McDermott
Beth . . . . . Tracy Wiles
Vanessa . . . . . Christine Absalom
George . . . . . Harry Livingstone
DJ . . . . . Peter Hamilton Dyer

Director: Sasha Yevtushenko

Production Co-ordinator: Jessica Brown
Studio Managers: Peter Ringrose, Jenni Burnett.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01jhdgz)
Vincent Duggleby and experts take your calls on annuities.

People planning to buy an annuity to provide an income in retirement have had more bad news as rates have fallen again. While guaranteed annuities are traditionally thought best for those with small pension pots, some retired investors with bigger funds are questioning whether it is sensible to invest all their savings in a guaranteed annuity - with locked-in low returns for the rest of their life.

Some investors have turned to pension drawdown where a proportion of the fund is still invested. But recent stock market volatility means those people are exposed to more financial risk.

So what should those people coming up to retirement do?
How do I know which is the best type of annuity to buy?
What information should I tell annuity providers when shopping around for a good deal?
How much savings do I need to consider doing income drawdown?
If I have a serious illness, what type of annuity might be suitable for me?
How will the rules coming into force in December this year change the way annuities are calculated for men and women?

Joining Vincent Duggleby to answer your questions will be:

Billy Burrows, Director, Better Retirement Group
Tom McPhail, Head of Pensions Research, Hargreaves Lansdown
Katherine Oxenham, annuities expert. LV's Business Development Direct.

You can call Money Box Live.on 03700 100 444. Lines open at 1pm, Wednesday. Or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk

Producer: lesley McAlpine.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b01jhb41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01jhdh1)
Working class alienation - Nottingham council estate

Laurie Taylor explores new research from this year's British Sociological Association conference. Lisa Mckenzie describes the growth in working class alienation on the St Anne's housing estate in Nottingham. Also, Dr Maria Papapolydorou, considers how class impacts on young peoples choice and experience of friendship.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01jhdh3)
BBC jubilee coverage, YouView, the next DG

At its peak the BBC attracted almost 17 million viewers for its Diamond Jubilee coverage but some have described parts of it as 'lamentable,' 'tedious' and 'inane'. Alan Yentob the BBC's Creative Director responds to those criticisms. Ian Hyland TV critic for the Mail on Sunday shares his view, and Michael Lumley an executive producer for the coverage of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer's wedding, reveals some of the challenges inherent in covering such large scale events on TV.

YouView is officially in launch phase. The internet television service - backed by the BBC, Channel 4, 5 and BT, amongst others - promised a new way of watching TV. But have a serious of delays left it trailing its competitors. BBC Media Correspondent Torin Douglas outlines the history and Theresa Wise of Accenture considers its future.

And the battle to become the next Director General of the BBC is gathering pace. One candidate in particular - Ed Richards - is attracting attention because of his links to the Labour Party. Anne McElvoy speaks to The Guardian's Dan Sabbagh.

Presenter: Anne McElvoy
Producer: Joe Kent.


WED 17:00 PM (b01jhdh5)
Eddie Mair presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01jg7sf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 So Wrong It's Right (b01jhdh7)
Series 3

Episode 4

Charlie Brooker hosts the comedy panel show devoted to the art of being wrong, with leading comics and entertainers competing to give the best in wrong answers.

So Wrong It's Right sees Charlie challenge the panel's creativity and asks them to reveal their finest embarrassing stories from their lives. This week the worst experiences at a party and terrible ideas for a series of children's books are just two of the challenges faced by the panel. Will anyone beat Isy Suttie's suggestion for a 'wrong' children's book - the paperwork-themed 'Morris The Admin Mouse'?

The host of So Wrong It's Right, Charlie Brooker, also writes for The Guardian and presents BBC4's satirical series Newswipe and Screenwipe as well as Channel 4's You Have Been Watching. He won Best Newcomer at the British Comedy Awards 2009 and Columnist of the Year at the 2009 British Press Awards for his newspaper columns.

Produced by Aled Evans
A Zeppotron Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01jhdh9)
David and Alistair discuss cricket training. New coach Iftikar's certainly given the team a wake-up call. Alistair reveals that Ifty is thinking of dropping Neil Carter.
Alistair notices in passing the new security cameras at Brookfield. He thinks they're a good idea. He observes it will certainly be a long time before he's picking Adam for the team again.
Oliver and David discuss the badger vaccination programme. David would much rather see a cull. He's had a couple of calls from guys worried about their scheme. They're scared it will undermine the DEFRA trial culls in the autumn. Oliver asserts that they can't let that blow them off course. The costs are more than Oliver had budgeted, so he's thinking of using contractors with their own equipment and training up Ed to help. David checks with Ed, who's still keen.
Ed's struggling with the temperamental old baler, and hasn't got much done when Ruth arrives with the somewhat reluctant boys for a family picnic lunch in the field. But David and Ruth's contentment is short-lived when Josh announces he's going off the farm on his bike. They realise they overreacted to this news, and can't decide whether to tell the boys what's really going on.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01jhdhc)
With Mark Lawson,

Woody Allen has allowed his life and creative process to be documented on-camera. With unprecedented access, filmmaker Robert Weide followed the notoriously private film legend over a year and a half; discussing topics including his creative choices and response to his critics, the split with Mia Farrow and reveals that when he finished Manhattan he didn't like the film and didn't want it to be shown. Antonia Quirke assesses what we learn about the prolific film maker.

American writer Richard Ford's new novel Canada opens in the vast landscape of Great Falls, Montana, in the 1950s, where a young solitary child Dell Parsons' world is turned upside-down when his parents commit a bank robbery. Richard Ford discusses the background to the book, and why readers usually have a five-year wait for his next novel.

Two comedies with women in the starring roles are coming to our television screens. Dead Boss was co-written by and stars Sharon Horgan as a woman who has been falsely imprisoned for murdering her boss. Sally Phillips takes the lead in Parents, a sit-com about returning back to the family home, with her own teenage children. Rebecca Nicholson reviews.

And, the novelist Joanne Harris and Professor Roger Luckhurst pay tribute to the author of Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, whose death has been announced.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jhdgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Decision Time (b01jhdhf)
Press regulation

The BBC's Political Editor Nick Robinson shines a light on the process by which controversial decisions are reached behind closed doors in Whitehall.

In this final programme in the current series, he and his panel examine regulating the press. Have British newspapers so abused their power that they've lost the right to be free of regulations imposed on them by Parliament? Or is the freedom of the press so valuable that politicians should resist at all costs setting rules for those whose job is, in part, to hold the powerful to account?

This series examines issues which could face any government, of any political colour, at this time and looks at how any decision might or might not make its way through the corridors of power.

Nick's guests this week are:

Sir Christopher Meyer, who was Chairman of the Press Complaints Commission when phone hacking was first revealed and, before that, was press secretary to Prime Minister John Major.

Bridget Rowe, former editor of the People and Sunday Mirror newspapers.

Sir Hayden Phillips, Permanent Secretary of the Department for National Heritage when the press were told they were drinking in the last chance saloon 20 years ago

Ben Bradshaw, Secretary of State in the last Labour government in what had become the Department of Culture, Media & Sport

And Evan Harris, the former Liberal Democrat MP who now works with the Hacked Off campaign.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01jhdhh)
Series 3

Kamin Mohammadi: Life in Authoritarian Regimes

Kamin Mohammadi uses her own and her family's history in Iran to argue that life - particularly private life - under an authoritarian regime is lived more creatively.

She describes the complicated and sometimes intricate behaviour which is required to navigate - creatively - around restrictions on private lives. And she explains how everything from the newest technology to shared taxis are called in aid of young people wishing to sit close and steal caresses.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b01jhdhk)
Engineering Flu

Two teams of virologists found themselves at the heart of bioterrorism maelstrom late last year when their studies on mutant bird flu were suppressed by US authorities. While security experts feared the reports were recipes for bioweapons of mass destruction, the researchers argued they held important lessons for the threat of natural flu pandemics developing in the wild.

Now the authorities have backed down and the reports have been released, Kevin Fong hears how tiny variations in the genes of bird flu can completely change the behaviour of the pathogens. And whether deliberate genetic manipulation in the lab can replicate the natural genetic variations occurring in farms around the world.

In 2009, the new strain of H1N1 flu emerged from a few villages in Mexico to infect the world in weeks. What experts fear is that a simple genetic change to H5N1 bird flu could allow it to spread as fast, but with far deadlier consequences. They argue that by identifying dangerous variants in the lab first, we'd be better prepared with vaccines ahead of the danger.

Producer Roland Pease.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01jhdgd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01jg7sh)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01jhdhm)
Europe debates how to respond to the Spanish debt crisis.

How will global economic changes affect the way we perceive culture?

And the Egyptians searching for truth about thirty years of a police state.

With Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01jhdhp)
Jubilee

Episode 8

Worried by her husband's behaviour, Maya tries to get Satish to tell her what's wrong but he can't bring himself to admit the trouble he is in, even to his wife. And still the memories of the Jubilee street party in Cherry Gardens, 30 years ago, haunt his thoughts.

Jubilee is written by Shelley Harris, read by Sartaj Garewal, and abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions

Produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Helen Keen's It Is Rocket Science (b01jhdhr)
Series 2

Episode 4

Last in the series of Helen Keen's quirky comic but true look at the past and future of space exploration. This week looks at what we could do if a giant asteroid was heading straight for us and looks at where else we might be able to go in the solar system if Earth was destroyed, and how we might get there. And we ask the most searching of all questions, why didn't the dinosaurs avoid extinction by developing a space programme of their own? And if they had, how could a T Rex have flown a spaceship with those tiny arms?

With Helen Keen
Peter Serafinowicz
Susy Kane

Written by Helen Keen and Miriam Underhill
Produced by Gareth Edwards.


WED 23:15 Strap In - It's Clever Peter (b01jhdht)
Pedro

Strap in for 15 minutes of rip-roaring comedy as Clever Peter bring you a death plunge, a leap across a ravine and a sexy clown.

Clever Peter - the wild and brilliantly funny award-winning sketch team - get their own Radio 4 show.

From the team that brought you Cabin Pressure and Another Case of Milton Jones comes the massively bonkers and funny Clever Peter, hot off the Edinburgh Fringe and wearers of tri-coloured jerseys.

"If they don't go very far very soon there is no such thing as British justice" - Daily Telegraph
"A masterclass in original sketch comedy" - Metro
"Pretty much top of the class"- The Scotsman

So -
Why "Clever"?
Dunno

Why "Peter"?
Not a clue mate

Should I listen to the show?
Yes, of course! Derrr.

Starring Richard Bond, Edward Eales-White, William Hartley
and special guest Catriona Knox

Written by Richard Bond, Edward Eales-White, William Hartley and Dominic Stone

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive Television Ltd production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b010y002)
Series 6

The Fine Line Between Good and Bad

Writer and documentary maker Jon Ronson returns for another series of fascinating stories shedding light on the human condition.

Recorded on location in Fremont, New Hampshire, Jon meets the sisters who were part of the girl group from the 1960s 'The Shaggs'. Created by their father, the sisters were home schooled and made to practice every day. Their album, Philosophy of the World was ridiculed and a flop, but remarkably many years later they were re-discovered and hailed as way ahead of their time and a major contribution to music. The other story in this programme is told by Simon Hollis who recalls the time he worked as a designer in Calvin Klein's New York flag ship store and made a major mistake with too many red candles.

Producers: Laura Parfitt and Simon Jacobs
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.



THURSDAY 07 JUNE 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01jg7tn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01jk47w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7tq)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01jg7ts)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7tv)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01jg7tx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01js6t4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Mark Oakley of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01jhjc3)
Caz Graham hears that despite the recent rain, the UK is in danger of water shortages in the future. The Institute of Civil Engineers is recommending meters which charge households more for using extra water and for households to collect more of their own rainwater. The Environment Agency tells Caz that they were right to warn of heavy droughts this year, even though rivers, reservoirs and groundwater supplies have now recovered.

Heritage Lottery Fund are investing millions of pounds in training up new people to do rural skills which will aid the economy. Moira Hickey collects antlers in the Highlands of Scotland, which are used in rural crafts to make useful objects like shoehorns and buttons.

The presenter is Caz Graham and the producer is Emma Weatherill.


THU 06:00 Today (b01jhjc5)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis, including: 07:09 Allegations of another massacre in Syria. 07:15 Does the UK need super-farms. 07:30 Spain and the eurozone. 07:50 What needs to be done to secure water supplies? 08:10 Chancellor George Osborne on the eurozone crisis. 08:20 Science fiction writer Brian Aldiss pays tribute to Ray Bradbury.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01jhjc7)
King Solomon

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the biblical king Solomon, celebrated for his wisdom and as the architect of the First Temple in Jerusalem. According to the Old Testament account of his life, Solomon was chosen as his father David's successor as Israelite king, and instead of praying for long life or wealth asked God for wisdom. In the words of the Authorised Version, "And there came of all people to hear the wisdom of Solomon, from all kings of the earth, which had heard of his wisdom." Solomon is an important figure in Judaism, Islam and Christianity alike, and is also credited with the authorship of several scriptural texts. His name is associated with the tradition of wisdom literature and with a large number of myths and legends. For many centuries Solomon was seen as the archetypal enlightened monarch, and his example influenced notions of kingship from the Middle Ages onwards.With:Martin PalmerDirector of the International Consultancy on Religion, Education, and CulturePhilip AlexanderEmeritus Professor of Jewish Studies at the University of ManchesterKatharine DellSenior Lecturer in Old Testament Studies at the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of St Catherine's College, CambridgeProducer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01jk49f)
Strands

Episode 4

A year of discoveries on the beach. Jean Sprackland meditates on objects revealed by the shape-shifting sands, or washed up on the wild beaches between Blackpool and Liverpool.

Recorded on location on Ainsdale Sands, 'Strands' is a book about what is lost and buried, then re-discovered; about all the things you find on a beach, dead or alive, natural or man-made; about mutability and transformation - about sea-change.

In today's episode, Jean contemplates the mysterious lives of starfish and brittle stars.

Read by Jean Sprackland

Abridged by Miranda Davies

Produced by Emma Harding

About the author: Jean Sprackland is the author of three books of poetry and a collection of short stories. Her most recent poetry collection, Tilt (Cape, 2007), won the Costa Poetry Award. Hard Water (Cape, 2003) was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, and was shortlisted for both the T S Eliot Prize and the Whitbread Award for Poetry. She was chosen as one of the Next Generation Poets in 2004.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01jhjc9)
Surrogacy in India; book club politics; Nina Conti

Does India's growing surrogacy industry need greater regulation? Kishwar Desai talks about the reality behind her book, Origins of Love. Book clubs: intellectually stimulating debate or full of gossip and booze? The ventriloquist, actress and comedian Nina Conti on the bereaved puppets of her mentor Ken Campbell and the appeal of alternative therapies. Queen Victoria and Albert. Presented by Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jhjcc)
Chronicles of Ait - The Saxon Stones

Episode 4

Written by Michael Butt

Chronicles of Ait -The Saxon Stones finds author and one-time TV historian Linus Scott returning to the remote east coast settlement of Ait to attend the funeral of his childhood mentor, Kenrick, a scholar of Old English who had rescued the young boy from a problem background. But also attending the ceremony is a stranger, Alice Pyper, who, to Scott's surprise, appears to have had some connection to the deceased man. When Alice begins snooping around Kenrick's house, Scott confronts her, and the first door is opened onto a labyrinthine mystery that leads deep into the history of the Saxon Stones and the ominous myth of Dracamuth.

Cast:
Linus Scott . . . . . Greg Wise
Alice Pyper . . . . . Amanda Drew
Darlene . . . . . Heather Craney
Irwin . . . . . Christopher James
Lord Ethel/Aidan . . . . . Jonathan Keeble
Child Linus . . . . . James Foster

Produced & Directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b01jhjcf)
Alan Johnston's been talking to Italians in the centre and north of the country as their homes and towns are shaken in a series of earthquakes.

Monsoon season's approaching in Pakistan. Aleem Maqbool's been finding out people are concerned there will be, once again, disastrous flooding.

The city of Johannesburg in South Africa is shaking off a reputation for violence and urban decay. Hamilton Wende, a longtime resident, believes it's becoming an exciting African metropolis for the 21st century.

James McConnachie is in Nepal where increasing Chinese influence is bringing new road-building projects among the world's most dramatic mountain landscapes.

And Roland Buerk is in Tokyo where pets are pampered like nowhere else on earth.


THU 11:30 Pump Up the Volume (b012wjcn)
The Foo Fighters did it for Chris Hoy in Beijing, Elton John's Rocket man helped Andy Flintoff in the 2005 Ashes and Kenny Rogers' Gambler inspired the England 2007 Rugby world cup team. John Wilson talks to athletes and coaches about the role pop music plays in their training. Technology has transformed the relationship between athletics and the role of music.

The advent of the MP3 player has enabled athletes and their coaches to build distinct playlists for specific areas of their training. When Victoria Pendleton is training for Gold, she listens to her Prodigy playlist with its 136 beats per minute a perfect tempo for her cycling.

John Wilson discovers why many people call music sport's "legal drug". In some research studies, it's been shown as increasing performance by 20 per cent while reducing an athlete's perception of effort by 10 per cent. Music blocks out fatigue-related symptoms such as the burning lungs, the beating heart and the lactic acid in the muscles enabling athletes to train harder and longer. Coaches and athletes will also talk about how even when you're training at the highest level, certain music tracks will enable you to carry on even up to the point of exhaustion. Besides the science involved with the relationship between music and performance, we will muse on what types of music deliver the best results.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01jhjch)
Water for the Future

Last month, forty flood warnings were issued across England while hosepipe bans remained in place due to water shortages. Drought restrictions imposed by seven water companies may soon be lifted but in a special programme, You & Yours asks why we run short of water and what we should do to ensure that we have enough in future.

Winifred Robinson examines the role of the water companies, looking at who supplies our water in different parts of the UK. She asks if the water shortage is just down to the drought or whether water companies could do more to conserve water by for example fixing leaks.

It has been suggested that Wales, which has an abundance of water, could trade with drought hit parts of England. Welsh Water explain how water trading might work in practice and whether this is a realistic option.

How can the buildings we live and work in prevent drought and flood? Fran Bradshaw from Anne Thorne Architects and Cath Hassell from Ech2o Consultants explain how we can conserve water by designing for drought.

People with water meters use ten to fifteen per cent less water and, in some parts of the UK, water meters are becoming compulsory. Dr Tim Leunig outlines how a system in place in Western Australia, where you pay a penalty for excessive water use, could be the fairest way to charge.

Lincolnshire is still in drought but farmers and businesses have found innovative solutions to the shortage by recycling water from industry and building mini reservoirs. We also hear from a couple in Kent who will never pay another water bill after they drilled their own borehole to supply their property with water.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Olivia Skinner.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01jg7tz)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01jhjck)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle (b01jhjcm)
Paying the Price

In a series of personal essays, Richard Holloway considers the tensions between faith and doubt over the last 3000 years. Author and former Bishop of Edinburgh, Richard Holloway focuses on the Judeo-Christian tradition as he takes the listener from the birth of religious thinking, through the Old and New Testaments, to the developments in subsequent centuries and their influence on thinkers and writers, up to the present day.

In today's programme, Richard Holloway discusses how religion dealt with those who paraded their doubts. Following the new ideas that sprang up during the Reformation, those who rethought their relationship to the Bible and to God were vulnerable to the inquisition and excommunication. One such thinker was Spinoza, the 17th century Dutch-Jewish philosopher whose radical views caused him to be expelled by Jewish religious leaders and his books placed on the Papal Index of Forbidden Books. Insight into the workings of the process comes from an eyewitness account of Spinoza's excommunication.

With contributions from Susan James, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, and Nina Power, lecturer in Philosophy at Roehampton University.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01jhdh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01jhjcp)
Belarus

Philip Meade, 35, (Jonathan Firth) is a parish priest at a Roman Catholic church in suburban London. Unlike some fellow priests in the metropolis, Philip is a traditionalist - he approves of the conservative policies of Pope Benedict XVI. In the eyes of his oldest friend Claire, (Jane Slavin) a GP, this makes him a reactionary. In his own eyes he is simply being true to the faith he preaches.

Philip is being quietly groomed for higher things by Monsignor Gardiner, (Paul Freeman) , a senior administrator of the diocese. A secondment to Rome, where theological skills would be honed and connections made, is in the pipeline. But Philip is not some Machiavellian careerist. He likes the immediacy and intimacy of parish work and has doubts about giving it up.

Philip is approached by one of his parishioners, Maria, (Lia Williams) from Belarus. She tells him about her father, Max, (David Calder) who has been imprisoned in Minsk. Max took part in demonstrations in late 2010 against the rigged elections that returned Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko to power. Like hundreds of others, he has been detained without charge or trial. The family have heard nothing of him for months.

Shocked both by Max's plight and by his own ignorance of these events going on within Europe, Philip resolves to inform his superiors. If the church can be persuaded to speak out it might shame Lukashenko into releasing some of those held. But Philip's good intentions are about to lead him into a world of smoke and mirrors...

In Belarus by Hugh Costello

Fr. Philip Meade was played by Jonathan Firth
And Maria by Lia Williams
Max Blin was David Calder
Claire ..... Jane Slavin
Tom ..... Jonathan Tafler
Monsignor Gardiner ..... Paul Freeman
And Peter Meade..... Jon Glover

'Belarus' was produced in Belfast
The Director was Eoin O'Callaghan.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b01jhjrv)
Series 21

Alnmouth, Northumberland

Clare Balding is walking with dogs (and their owners) in this series of Ramblings.

Programme 3: Alnmouth, Northumberland

If you go walking with a dog, something extraordinary happens: complete strangers will talk to you. Sometimes this doesn't go any further than a regular 'good morning' but occasionally strong friendships are formed.

On this week's Ramblings Clare Balding goes walking in rural Northumberland with Kelly Smith and her friend Carolyn Ryan. They met while dog-walking and struck up a close friendship which is mirrored by the incredibly strong connection between their dogs: Mel the Border Terrier and Kizzy the Lurcher.

The walk begins in Kelly's kitchen, where her partner (the author Val McDermid) explains why a Border Terrier was such an obvious choice of dog for this neck of the woods. Then (leaving Val behind to make bacon sandwiches for their return), Clare, Kelly and Carolyn head down to the beach for a bracing, uplifting walk. Kelly and Carolyn explain how their friendship works, and how - despite an initially difficult start their dogs are now inseparable.

Producer Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01jg8qy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b01jgb94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01jhjrx)
Simon Pegg talks to Matthew Sweet about his latest comedy, A Fantastic Fear of Everything. Producer Stephen Woolley and Catherine Bray of FilmFour join them to celebrate British humour in film - how much does what makes us laugh define who we are as a nation? And why do American audiences still look to British performers to provide them with some element they can't quite manage to grow at home?

From Chaplin to Carry On, from Monty Phython to Sacha Baron Cohen - we look at the fine comic tradition that Simon Pegg embodies.

Producer: David Braithwaite.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01jhjrz)
Quentin Cooper looks at the outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in Scotland. He speaks to leading bacteriologist Professor Hugh Pennington about the causes of the disease, its history and why Legionnaires', one of the world's most dangerous bacterial pathogens, is so hard to detect.

We look at the transit of Venus. Venus passed between the earth and the sun earlier this week - and won't do so again for over 100 years. Observed in past centuries this phenomenon is credited with helping devise methods to navigate the earth's oceans, but it is also helping us now to detect distant planets that we cannot see.

And we catch up with 'So You Want to Be a Scientist' finalist Val Watham. After a lot of hard work analysing the results, Val can finally shed some light on whether horizontal or vertical stripes are more flattering.

Producer: Julian Siddle.


THU 17:00 PM (b01jhjs1)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01jg7v1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 The Simon Day Show (b01jhjs3)
Series 2

Billy Bleach

Simon Day and his characters welcome listeners to The Mallard, a small provincial theatre somewhere in the UK. Each week one of Simon's comic characters come to perform at The Mallard while the staff struggle with rivalries, self-doubt and the new owner's vision for the theatre's future.
This week popular, Fast Show favourite Billy Bleach returns to The Mallard, the theatre that last series gave him his first big break.

Cast list:
Billy Bleach ..... Simon Day
Emanuel Akinyemi ..... Felix Dexter
Pat Bennet ... Morwenna Banks
Ron Bone ..... Simon Greenall

Written by Simon Day
Produced by Colin Anderson.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01jhjs5)
At the farmers' market Jennifer spots Hattie Marshall from BAFF giving out leaflets. She challenges Hattie, who defends her position. Jennifer accuses Hattie of damaging Home Farm's business.
Adam steps in to defuse the situation. He asserts that his and Hattie's positions are similar. He too is all for natural production. If she continues to try to harm the fruit and venison sales, they'll be forced into more of just the sort of large-scale farming she's against. Hattie agrees to take his points back to the group. Meanwhile Jennifer pursues the market manager to complain, but there's nothing he can do.
Alan confronts Amy about an important message from Jolene she's forgotten to give him. He accuses Amy of caring only about herself. Amy's shocked at his strong reaction.
Amy accuses Usha of turning her dad against her. Amy's hurtful tirade culminates in a declaration that Usha's sitting pretty. She'll never have children of her own to consider. Alan walks in on the end of the row, but Usha drives off without another word. Alan pushes Amy to confess her venomous words. He tells her quietly that he hardly recognises her. Spite doesn't suit her, no matter how much she's hurting.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01jhjs7)
Rapper Professor Green interviewed; Dürrenmatt re-examined

With Mark Lawson.

Swiss writer Friedrich Dürrenmatt is probably best known for his play The Visit. Now director Josie Rourke has included his lesser known work The Physicists in her first season at the Donmar Warehouse. Mark considers Dürrenmatt's life and legacy with writer Jack Thorne, Josie Rourke, performer and director Simon McBurney, and Jerzy and Mary Olson Kromolowski who wrote the screenplay for The Pledge, a film based on the novella Requiem for the Detective Novel.

Professor Green is a Hackney-born rapper who gained a reputation as a formidable performer after winning successive freestyle competitions. He went on to win MOBO and NME awards and has worked with artists including Lily Allen and Emeli Sande. He reflects on how his life has changed since entering the limelight.

Mario Vargas Llosa won the Nobel Prize for literature in 2010, and today his latest novel, The Dream of the Celt, is published in English. Front Row examines the effect of winning the Nobel Prize on authors including Doris Lessing, Seamus Heaney, Toni Morrison and Harold Pinter.

Producer: Philippa Ritchie.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jhjcc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b01jhb3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01jhjs9)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan Davis and his executive panel discuss different types of employment contracts and how far should employers go in checking on their employees' behaviour?

Joining Evan in the studio are Eric Born, Swiss CEO of logistics and transport company, Wincanton, Nick Buckles, CEO of security giant G4S and Jason Iftakhar, co-founder of Salford based company, Swifty Scooters.

Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


THU 21:00 Stories in Sound (b01jmtxt)
Father of the Big Bang

William Crawley tells the story of Georges Lemaitre, the Catholic priest who originated the Big Bang theory.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01jhjc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01jg7v5)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01jhjsc)
UN monitors in Syria say they have been fired on as they try to investigate claims of another massacre.

Why is Poland so resistant to cutting its CO2 emissions?

Is the Government right to legislate to criminalise forced marriages?

With Ritula Shah.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01jhjsf)
Jubilee

Episode 9

Haunted by his memories, Satish has upped his dose but it is dangerously affecting his work in the operating theatre.

And finally he confronts the events of the day of the street party thirty years ago.

Jubilee is written by Shelley Harris, read by Sartaj Garewal and abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions

Produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Stop/Start (b01jhjsh)
by Jack Docherty

A new sitcom about love, marriage and putting up with each other. Stop/Start follows three couples as they do their best to get on with their lives. When things get tricky, the characters are able to stop the action, explain themselves to the audience and start it all up again.

Barney ..... Jack Docherty
Cathy ..... Kerry Godliman
Fiona ..... Fiona Allen
David ..... Charlie Higson
Evan ..... Steve Edge
Alice ..... Katherine Parkinson

Producer ..... Steven Canny

Jack Docherty
Jack has a fantastic record of making stand-out comedy. He first performed at the 1980 Edinburgh Festival Fringe with the comedy sketch group The Bodgers and went on to write for radio and television including: Spitting Image, Alas Smith and Jones, Vic Reeves Big Night Out, Absolutely, The Lenny Henry Show, Max Headroom, Weekending, The News Huddlines and a ton of other things.

He has also made guest appearances in The Comic Strip Presents, Sardines, Atletico Partick, The Morwenna Banks Show, Monarch of the Glen, Welcome to Strathmuir, Red Dwarf V and The Old Guys. He has also featured in the Radio 4 comedies Baggage and Mordrin MacDonald - 21st Century Wizard and has appeared on various comedy panel shows including Have I Got News For You and It's Only TV But I Like It.


THU 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b0112g4w)
Series 6

Witch Hunts

Jon Ronson considers the moment when we follow the herd and make accusations. Jon talks to Meredith Maran who at one time believed she was abused by her father. Her beliefs wrecked her family's relationships. Years later she was to question her memory, and ask whether she had been caught up in a wave of accusations that swept America at the same time which was based on false memory syndrome. But what were the consequences of her doubts on her family and her father?

Music writer David Quantick brings a lighter note to the programme with his stories of his time as entertainment officer at the student union where he took part in an evening of humiliation towards the rock society. He is still left with feelings of guilt around his actions.

Producers: Laura Parfitt and Simon Jacobs
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 08 JUNE 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01jg7w4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01jk49f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7w6)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01jg7w8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01jg7wb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01jg7wd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01js6tg)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Mark Oakley of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01jhnxz)
Caz Graham visits the last rake maker in the country and asks whether we should mourn our dying rural skills. Plus, how intensive farming could help wildlife flourish in the developing world.

Presenter: Caz Graham Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01jhny1)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague and James Naughtie, including: 07:35 Forced marriage to be made a criminal offence. 07:45 Singer-songwriter Neil Young 07:50 Is cyber crime escalating? 08:10 Is the UK government right to boycott the Euro 2012 group stages? 08:15 Is former rail regulator Tom Winsor the right choice for the Chief Inspector of Constabulary?


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01jgb8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01jk4dd)
Strands

Episode 5

A year of discoveries on the beach. Jean Sprackland meditates on objects revealed by the shape-shifting sands, or washed up on the wild beaches between Blackpool and Liverpool.

Recorded on location on Ainsdale Sands, 'Strands' is a book about what is lost and buried, then re-discovered; about all the things you find on a beach, dead or alive, natural or man-made; about mutability and transformation - about sea-change.

In today's episode, Jean experiences a very physical brush with the past, when she places her feet in the prehistoric footprints of humans from the Late Mesolithic to mid-Neolithic period, which are revealed briefly by the tide.

Read by Jean Sprackland

Abridged by Miranda Davies

Produced by Emma Harding

About the author: Jean Sprackland is the author of three books of poetry and a collection of short stories. Her most recent poetry collection, Tilt (Cape, 2007), won the Costa Poetry Award. Hard Water (Cape, 2003) was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, and was shortlisted for both the T S Eliot Prize and the Whitbread Award for Poetry. She was chosen as one of the Next Generation Poets in 2004.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01jhny9)
Presented by Jenni Murray.

Fruit salad is perfect for summer dining and can be a quick, easy and healthy dish. Chef Paul Heathcote has come up with a tropical fruit salad. He assembles it in studio for Jenni and gives some tips on how to use fresh fruit in a variety of puds. Joining them is the food journalist Oliver Thring to discuss the newest fruit to hit supermarket shelves - the papple.

Because of its colour, rarity and value, gold has been made into the most beautiful jewellery but today it is also found in dentistry, electronics, medicine and food as well as being used as a standard for international currency. A new exhibition this summer at Goldsmith's Hall in London tells the story of Britain's relationship with gold. Polly Gasston has been commissioned to make a piece of gold couture for this exhibition. She joins Jenni to talk about her work as a goldsmith. Also in studio is Joanna Hardy from The Antiques Roadshow.

How do you tell children that they have a serious or terminal illness? Caroline Cheetham has been talking to a couple whose four year old son Jack will not see his 30th Birthday as he has been diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Jenni talks to Linda Thompson - a Family Support Officer with the Rainbow Trust - and to Maria whose daughter may only have 6 months to live.

There are 4000 women in prison in this country and two thirds of them have literacy problems. Shannon Trust is a charity which was set up to tackle this problem and they have introduced a reading plan into almost all the prisons in the UK. They train prisoners who can read to teach those who can't. Judy Merry has been to Drake Hall Prison in Staffordshire to see how the Shannon Trust reading plan works there.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jhnyc)
Chronicles of Ait - The Saxon Stones

Episode 5

Written by Michael Butt

Chronicles of Ait -The Saxon Stones finds author and one-time TV historian Linus Scott returning to the remote east coast settlement of Ait to attend the funeral of his childhood mentor, Kenrick, a scholar of Old English who had rescued the young boy from a problem background. But also attending the ceremony is a stranger, Alice Pyper, who, to Scott's surprise, appears to have had some connection to the deceased man. When Alice begins snooping around Kenrick's house, Scott confronts her, and the first door is opened onto a labyrinthine mystery that leads deep into the history of the Saxon Stones and the ominous myth of Dracamuth.

Cast:
Linus Scott . . . . . Greg Wise
Alice Pyper . . . . . Amanda Drew
Darlene . . . . . Heather Craney
Thurgis . . . . . Richard Hope
Irwin . . . . . Christopher James
Lord Ethel . . . . . Jonathan Keeble
Child Linus . . . . . James Foster

Produced & Directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 The Man Who Saves Life Stories (b01jhnyf)
Irving Finkel collects ordinary people's lives. He hoards their life stories in diary form and has amassed a collection of hundreds of handwritten volumes. But Irving has a problem. What should he do with them? The diaries are crammed onto shelves and piled up in corners of his small office. Irving's day job is Assistant Keeper in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum.

With a couple of trusty recruits, Polly North and Laura Barnicoat, Irving sets out to find a home for his collection and turn it into a 'proper' archive. The plan is to create a repository for unwanted private diaries written by ordinary people.

As the project takes shape, the diarist's life stories take over. There's Godfrey, a retired JP who kept chickens and made an entry in his diary every day for 76 years. There's an unnamed catastrophist, who notes only deaths, diseases and disasters. Whilst Laura's grandmother, at 18, shows a flair for bagging boyfriends and wonderful prose.

And finally, there's a mystery. Why did a war time school girl write in code?

Producer: Tamsin Hughes
A Testbed Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Births, Deaths and Marriages (b01jhnyh)
Series 1

Episode 3

A new sitcom set in a Local Authority Register Office where staff deal with the three greatest events in anybody's life.

Written by David Schneider (The Day Today, I'm Alan Partridge), he also stars as chief registrar Malcolm Fox who is a stickler for rules and would be willing to interrupt any wedding service if the width of the bride infringes health and safety. He's not married - but why does he need to be? He's married thousands of women.

Alongside him are rival and divorcee Lorna who has been parachuted in from Car Parks to drag the office (and Malcolm) into the 21st century. To her, marriage isn't just about love and romance, it's got to be about making a profit in our new age of austerity.

There's also the ever spiky Mary, geeky Luke who's worried he'll end up like Malcolm one day, while ditzy Anita may get her words and names mixed up occasionally but as the only parent in the office, she's a mother to them all.

In this episode, Malcolm is distracted by a breast feeding mother during a birth registration, causing Lorna to suspect he might have made his first ever mistake.

Cast:
Malcolm........................................David Schneider
Lorna............................................Sarah Hadland
Anita.............................................Sandy McDade
Luke..............................................Russell Tovey
Mary..............................................Sally Bretton
Mr Carrick......................................Andrew Brooke
Mrs Carrick.....................................Kerry Godliman
Mrs Ferguson/
Mrs Goldring/ Mrs Smith..................Jane Whittenshaw

Producer: Simon Jacobs
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01jhnyk)
Kristyna Myles on busking for charity, restaurants teaching customers to cook & 50 years of BEUC

Peter White talks to singer songwriter Kristyna Myles who is busking ten thousand miles for charity and hears how some restaurants are teaching customers to cook. And we'll hear from the organisation celebrating fifty years of campaigning for consumer rights in Europe and ask whether the UK has really benefitted from EU law.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b01jhnz0)
Anne and Georgina: motherhood or not?

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: today, Anne and her daughter Georgina from Wales discuss the desire to be a mother - or not - and the joy of grandchildren.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01jg7wg)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01jhnz2)
We're with the United Nations' monitors as they investigate a massacre in Syria.

The government aims to get a former railway regulator to be the next Inspector of Constabulary, we ask if it matters if the person who polices the police isn't a policeman.

We hear from Spain, as the country's credit rating has just been downgraded, we'll look at the nation's fondness for the black economy.

And author Andrei Kurkov on the meaning of football in Ukraine.

Discuss the programme on Twitter #WATO.


FRI 13:45 Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle (b01jhnz4)
Caught in the Middle

In a series of personal essays, Richard Holloway considers the tensions between faith and doubt over the last 3000 years. Author and former Bishop of Edinburgh, Richard Holloway focuses on the Judeo-Christian tradition as he takes the listener from the birth of religious thinking, through the Old and New Testaments, to the developments in subsequent centuries and their influence on thinkers and writers, up to the present day.

In today's programme, Richard Holloway discusses what is meant by free will and takes Ridley Scott's film of the science-fiction novel 'Blade Runner' as an analogy - in particular the character of Rachel, a manufactured 'replicant' who believes she is human. From that starting-point he engages with the ideas of Spinoza, Schopenhauer and Freud and how they grappled with the concept.

Taking part in today's programme are Nina Power, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Roehampton University, and Chris Janaway, Professor of Philosophy at Southampton University.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01jhjs5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01jhnzl)
Ruth Rendell - People Don't Do Such Things

It is 1979 and hapless accountant Arthur (a winning Reece Shearsmith) and his wife Gwen (Laura Pyper) have made a new friend.

Flashy novelist Reeve (Michael Maloney) is everything they're not - carefree, charismatic and seemingly irresistible. At first, his friendship seems to offer an enticing window into a world beyond their cloistered suburban existence, but it doesn't take long for the relationship to slip into rather more sinister territory. With unfussy performances and a rumbling documentary-style soundscape, the grimness of late-70s suburbia is palpable throughout.

From the moment colossal egotist Reeve arrives on the scene, it's clear that Arthur and Gwen don't stand a chance, and it's this festering inevitability, lurking in awkward pauses and fidgety middle-class tics, that gives this play its most haunting moments.

Dramatised by Mike Walker from a short story by Ruth Rendell.

Sound Design: Steve Bond

Directed by John Dryden
A Goldhawk Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01jhnzn)
Scampston, North Yorkshire

Matthew Biggs, Christine Walkden and local gardener Alison Pringle answer horticultural questions at Scampston Gardens.

Pippa Greenwood gives the lowdown on using nematodes as biological controls, and Alison Pringle explains how to create an American Prairie garden.

Questions answered in the programme:
I layer used tea-bags banana skins, paper and gravel at the base of my pots and baskets. Will this benefit them at all?

My Katsura trees are too tall to fleece. How can protect them from frost?

Why do my primulas always wither and die?

My 3ft topiary box spirals are totally potbound. How do I pot them on? When do I prune them?

Should I spray my rusty garlic leaves?

How do I establish my water lilies in my pond which has part shade, part sun?

Can I clip my beech hedge now?

Do woodlice damage plant roots?

My lavender hedge has not been pruned for a long time. It's woody with little green growth. How can I revitalize it?

I use my great grandfather's tools. Do you have a sentimental attachment to tools or plants?

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Are You Inexperienced? (b01jhnzq)
Episode 1

Novelist and stand-up performer AL Kennedy relates some of the hapless events that befell her whilst trying to complete her latest book in the USA. Secreted away in a wooden cabin in deepest Connecticut, she finds that she has to contend with noisy woodpeckers that mistake her temporary home for a tasty tree. Later, upon returning to the States from Canada by train, she encounters suspicious US immigration officials who struggle to grasp the fact that she doesn't fly, and arrived in the States by boat.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01jhnzv)
Ray Bradbury, Bob Edwards, Astrid Aghajanian and Herb Reed

Matthew Bannister on

Ray Bradbury - the author of Fahrenheit 451 and countless short stories - who said libraries were his university.

Fleet Street Editor Bob Edwards, who tangled with Lord Beaverbrook at the Express and Robert Maxwell at the Mirror

Astrid Aghajanian - who survived the massacre of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire only to be sold into slavery by a bedouin

And Herb Reed - the bass singer who co-founded the 1950s vocal group The Platters.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01jhnzx)
A right Royal let down? In this week's Feedback, listeners get the chance to express their views on the BBC coverage of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. We hear from many of you who got in touch with the Feedback team to comment on the BBC's handling of the event across the main radio networks. Roger Bolton looks for answers from Alan Yentob, Creative Director of the BBC, and speaks to Kevin Marsh, a former Editor of Today, about how coverage of major events like this are planned.

Is Albert Square really coming to Ambridge? John Yorke, controller of BBC drama production, is acting editor of the Archers and his comments about darker storylines have sent ripples through the programme's loyal fan base.

And Roger talks to Tony Phillips, the Commissioning Editor behind BBC Radio 4's landmark series The Listening Project. The idea of capturing the nation in conversation has entranced many - but raised questions about scheduling and presentation.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b01jhp09)
Sarah Jane and Philip: family tensions

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: this time Sarah Jane and her brother Philip discuss the turmoil and distress that were caused to their family - in particular to their mother, stricken with cancer - and to herself when Philip ended up behind bars.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01jhp0c)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01jg7wj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b01jhp0f)
Series 37

Episode 1

Jon Holmes, John Finnemore, Mitch Benn and Pippa Evans join Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis to dissect the week's news in their own indomitable style.

It's the 37th series of The Now Show. And this, in many ways their Jubilee year, sees them joined by a range of guests from the world of comedy - from stalwarts Marcus Brigstocke and Jon Holmes, to newcomers Susan Calman and Nathan Caton. Join them for the pageant of the year.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01jhp0y)
Susan assures Iftikar that Neil's taken his advice seriously. He doesn't want to be dropped from the cricket team. Ifty's pleased to hear it. Tracy calls in to the shop. She flirts outrageously with Ifty, even getting him to help her search for a lost earring. Tracy begs Susan for an invitation to Ambridge View for lunch. She wants to quiz Neil on the rules (actually the laws) of cricket.
Lynda and Susan check the night camera DVD for any signs of the 'monster'. To their shock and surprise there are no animals to be seen, but there is footage of Will and Nic in a compromising position.
Ben's been out for a good while. David suggests Ruth gives him a call. When she does she finds Ben tearful and distressed, having made a grisly discovery. She goes to collect him and sees for herself a viciously savaged ram. She tries to assure Ben that the culprit was Lynda's monster, but really she fears it's another terror attack.
When Pip finds David calling the police she demands an explanation. She's furious that Ruth and David didn't tell her the truth, and is scared for her family. David tells Pip all they can do is stand together, and look out for each other.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01jhp10)
Neil Young interviewed

With John Wilson.

In a rare extended interview, the Canadian singer-songwriter Neil Young discusses his latest disc, a selection of traditional songs, recorded with the uninhibited rock band Crazy Horse.

The album includes a version of God Save The Queen, the anthem Young recalls singing as a schoolboy in Canada.

Young, who topped the album charts on both sides of the Atlantic 40 years ago with his LP Harvest, also reflects on the role of the protest song in the age of the TV talent show, and considers his own instinctive approach to music-making, and his reluctance to become a crowd-pleaser.

Producer John Goudie.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01jhnyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01jhp1q)
Aldborough, North Yorkshire

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Aldborough Northern Festival, North Yorkshire, with former Labour cabinet minister, Alan Johnson; Conservative MP and former minister, David Davis; writer Douglas Murray; and Leader of the Respect Party, Salma Yaqoob.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01jhp1s)
Adam Gopnik: Embarrassing Parents: The Thirteen-Year-Old Truth

"One thing that is written into the human genome" says Adam Gopnik, "is that exactly at the age of thirteen, your child - in a minute, and no matter how close or sympathetic the two of you have been before - will discover that you are now the most ridiculous, embarrassing and annoying person on the planet".

Ridiculous "because of your pretensions to be cool...in spite of the obvious truth that you are barely sentient, with one foot rooted in the dim, ancient past while with the other your toes are already tickling eternity"; embarrassing because, "in spite of being ridiculous, you are not content to keep your absurdity decently to yourself" and annoying because "in the face of the wild obvious public embarrassment you cause, you still actually think that you can give advice and counsel".

He takes us on a generational analysis of the plight of the parent - and offers some light-hearted consolation!

Producer:
Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle - Omnibus (b01jhp1v)
Episode 2

In a series of personal essays, Richard Holloway considers the tensions between faith and doubt over the last 3000 years. Author and former Bishop of Edinburgh, Richard Holloway focuses on the Judeo-Christian tradition as he takes the listener from the birth of religious thinking, through the Old and New Testaments, to the developments in subsequent centuries and their influence on thinkers and writers, up to the present day.

In today's omnibus edition, Richard Holloway shows how doubt challenged prevailing religious thought, particularly in the person of the 16th century German monk and priest Martin Luther. Luther's radical ideas launched the Reformation and, as Holloway argues "lit the fuse that blew Christendom apart". As a result, the late 16th and early 17th century saw a proliferation of sects and non conformists in Europe, many of whom were seeking a more personal and less mediated relationship with God. Holloway looks at the internal struggles of two such believers - English poet John Donne and writer John Bunyan.

Meanwhile, early Enlightenment thinkers were grappling with the philosophical nature of God as Holloway's journey takes him to 17th century France in the figures of Descartes and Pascal. Holloway discusses the ideas of Spinoza whose radical idea that God and Nature were essentially the same thing threatened the religious establishment. He was excommunicated at just 23 years old, though his view of free will would go on to influence a wide variety of thinkers including the 20th century pioneer of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01jg7wl)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01jhp1x)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01jhp1z)
Jubilee

Episode 10

The day of the reunion arrives and Satish returns to Cherry Gardens. The bunting and the celebratory table look just the same and, although the children have all grown up, he sees that many of their preoccupations are just the same. Nevertheless he lays the ghost of the day that has haunted him for half a lifetime.

Jubilee is written by Shelley Harris, read by Sartaj Garewal, and abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions.

Produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01jhb3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 Jon Ronson On (b011c0wc)
Series 6

Aiming Low

Jon Ronson talks to Stewart Lee about why we are all so caught up in competitive lives. They discuss how choosing to aim low in a conscious way is the way forward.

Producer: Laura Parfitt and Simon Jacobs
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b01jhp27)
Margaret and Barry: remembering Jimmy

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: tonight, Margaret and Barry remember their murdered son Jimmy. The death of Jimmy Mizen in his mother's arms after being wounded in a fight at a baker's shop in east London made national headlines. Tonight, Jimmy's mother and father meet in conversation about the loss of their beloved son.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01jggl0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01jggl0)

15 Minute Drama 10:00 TUE (b01jgll7)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01jgll7)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01jhdgj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01jhdgj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01jhjcc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01jhjcc)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01jhnyc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01jhnyc)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01jhb3n)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01jhb3n)

A Month of June 11:30 WED (b01jhdgn)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01j6wsz)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01jhp1s)

A Straight Question 11:00 WED (b01jhdgl)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b01jhb41)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b01jhb41)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01jb6vz)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01j5h51)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01jg73y)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01j6wsx)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01jhp1q)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01jhpfq)

Are You Inexperienced? 15:45 FRI (b01jhnzq)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01jg8qp)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01jg8qp)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01jg73r)

Births, Deaths and Marriages 11:30 FRI (b01jhnyh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01jgj0t)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01jhb45)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01jhdhp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01jhjsf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01jhp1z)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01jlkjk)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01jggkw)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01jggkw)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01jk46d)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01jk46d)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01jk47w)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01jk47w)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01jk49f)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01jk49f)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01jk4dd)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b01jgb94)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b01jgb94)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01jgb8p)

Cabin Pressure 18:30 TUE (b012llrz)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01j2ff2)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01jgb92)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b01j5fwl)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b01jggld)

Decision Time 22:15 SAT (b01j5nwx)

Decision Time 20:00 WED (b01jhdhf)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01jgb8t)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01jgb8t)

Desperately Seeking Sympathy 11:00 MON (b01jggl2)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00t28db)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01jhb3d)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01jhdgx)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01jhjcp)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01jhnzl)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01jg53s)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01jggkp)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01jglkz)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01jhdg8)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01jhjc3)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01jhnxz)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01j6whc)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01jhnzx)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01jhb3x)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b01j5nwz)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01jhdhh)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b01jg7j6)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b01jg7j6)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01jg73t)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b01jhjcf)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01jgj0m)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01jhb3v)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01jhdhc)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01jhjs7)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01jhp10)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b01jhdhk)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01j6wh5)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01jhnzn)

Helen Keen's It Is Rocket Science 23:00 WED (b01jhdhr)

Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b01jhp1v)

Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle 13:45 MON (b01jgglb)

Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle 13:45 TUE (b01jhb3b)

Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle 13:45 WED (b01jhdgv)

Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle 13:45 THU (b01jhjcm)

Honest Doubt: The History of an Epic Struggle 13:45 FRI (b01jhnz4)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01jhjc7)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01jhjc7)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01jhb3z)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 MON (b010mrsk)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 TUE (b010t6lf)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 WED (b010y002)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 THU (b0112g4w)

Jon Ronson On 23:27 FRI (b011c0wc)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01j5fwv)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b01jgj0f)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01j6wh9)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01jhnzv)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b01jhb3l)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b01jhb3l)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01jg7j4)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b01jhb3g)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01j6t0n)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01jhjrz)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01j2dyf)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01jg7mf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01jg7pb)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01jg7qr)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01jg7s1)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01jg7tn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01jg7w4)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01jhdgd)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01jhdgd)

Modern Day Griot 11:30 TUE (b01jhb34)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01jhdgz)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01jg73w)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01jg73w)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01j2dyp)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01jg7mr)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01jg7pl)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01jg7r0)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01jg7s9)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01jg7tx)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01jg7wd)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01jg7mt)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01j2dyr)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01jg7my)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01jg7n2)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01j2dz8)

News 13:00 SAT (b01j2dz0)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b01j5j2s)

Off the Page 15:30 TUE (b01jhb3j)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01jg8qt)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b01jgll5)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01jg746)

PM 17:00 MON (b01jgj0c)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01jhb3q)

PM 17:00 WED (b01jhdh5)

PM 17:00 THU (b01jhjs1)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01jhp0c)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01jgcd1)

Pina Bausch - Dance for Your Life 16:00 MON (b01jgglg)

Platform 3 00:30 SUN (b01jll1h)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01j2ld1)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b01jgccz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01j6wtw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01jggkm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01js6sp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01js6st)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01js6t4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01js6tg)

Pump Up the Volume 11:30 THU (b012wjcn)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01jg8qy)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01jg8qy)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01jg8qy)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b01j6t0g)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b01jhjrv)

Reading between the Lines 13:30 SUN (b01j5j2v)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01jg740)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01jg73m)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01jg7j8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01j2dyk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01jg7mm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01jg7pg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01jg7qw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01jg7s5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01jg7ts)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01jg7w8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01j2dyh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01j2dym)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01j2dz2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01jg7mk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01jg7mp)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01jg7n6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01jg7pd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01jg7pj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01jg7qt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01jg7qy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01jg7s3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01jg7s7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01jg7tq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01jg7tv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01jg7w6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01jg7wb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01j2dz6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01jg7nb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01jg7ps)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01jg7r4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01jg7sf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01jg7v1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01jg7wj)

Smile 10:30 SAT (b01jg73p)

So Wrong It's Right 18:30 WED (b01jhdh7)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01jg8qr)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01jg8qr)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01jggkt)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01jggkt)

Stop/Start 23:00 THU (b01jhjsh)

Stories in Sound 21:00 THU (b01jmtxt)

Strap In - It's Clever Peter 23:15 WED (b01jhdht)

Summit Fever 17:00 SUN (b01j5myh)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01jgb8m)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01jg8qw)

Tales from the Stave 15:30 SAT (b01j5j2d)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01jgb8r)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01jgcd3)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01jgcd3)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01jgj0h)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01jgj0h)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01jhb3s)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01jhb3s)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01jhdh9)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01jhdh9)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01jhjs5)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01jhjs5)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01jhp0y)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01j6t47)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01jhjs9)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b01jgj09)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01j6t0l)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01jhjrx)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01jgb8w)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01jgb8w)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b01jgll3)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b01jgll3)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b01jgb90)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b01jhnz0)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b01jhp09)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b01jhp27)

The Man Who Saves Life Stories 11:00 FRI (b01jhnyf)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01jhdh3)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b01j6whk)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b01jhp0f)

The Pickerskill Reports 23:00 TUE (b0132k5b)

The Queen's Diamond Jubilee Service of Thanksgiving 10:20 TUE (b01jgll9)

The Simon Day Show 18:30 THU (b01jhjs3)

The Transit of Venus: Pilate's Wife 19:45 SUN (b01jgcd7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01jgb8y)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01jgj0r)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01jhb43)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01jhdhm)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01jhjsc)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01jhp1x)

Things We Forgot to Remember 20:00 MON (b01jgj0p)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01j5nwl)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01jhdh1)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01jg55d)

Today 06:00 MON (b01jggkr)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01jgll1)

Today 06:00 WED (b01jhdgb)

Today 06:00 THU (b01jhjc5)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01jhny1)

Tonight 19:15 SUN (b01j6t4c)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01j2dyt)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01j2dyw)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01j2dyy)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01j2dz4)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01jg7mw)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01jg7n0)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01jg7n4)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01jg7n8)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01jg7pn)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01jg7pq)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01jg7pv)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01jg7r2)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01jg7r6)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01jg7sc)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01jg7sh)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01jg7tz)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01jg7v5)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01jg7wg)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01jg7wl)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01jgcdc)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01jgcdh)

With Nobbs On 11:30 MON (b01jggl4)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01jg742)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01jggky)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01jhdgg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01jhjc9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01jhny9)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01jggl8)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01jhb38)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01jhdgs)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01jhjck)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01jhnz2)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01jggl6)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01jhb36)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01jhdgq)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01jhjch)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01jhnyk)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01j6wty)