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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 21 APRIL 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01g6479)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01g65gn)
Besieged: Life Under Fire in a Sarajevo Street

Episode 5

To mark the twentieth anniversary of the start of the siege of Sarajevo the award winning journalist Barbara Demick revisits her evocative eyewitness account of how the residents of one street in the city endured three and half years of living in a warzone. Today, hostilities end, and twenty years on we find out how life has changed on Logavina Street.

Read by Laurel Lefkow
Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01g647f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01g647k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01g647p)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01g647r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01g669t)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Dr Jeremy Morris, Dean of King's College Cambridge.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01g669y)
'Minster for sport and we won the World Cup. Minister for drought... and it rained.' A listener prompts us to look back at the man put in charge of the water crisis in 1976. Also a worried listener put his concerns over directly-elected mayors to a current government minister. Kate Adie reads the news sent in by listeners. With Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01g647t)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01g647w)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01g63tv)
Herefordshire Churches

Where might you find the spot where Saint George killed the dragon and the oldest complete set of medieval bells? The answer lies in the Herefordshire countryside and in the history and legend attached to just some of the beautiful churches that can be found there. The Bishop of Hereford once said that 'The Diocese of Hereford is blessed with so many beautiful church buildings. Most of them stand at the centre of communities they have served for a thousand years or more."

Helen Mark travels around the Herefordshire countryside to meet some of the people involved with the churches that are still at the heart of of the rural communities that they serve. She finds out about their history and heritage, the legend and folklore, their past, their present and what the future holds for them.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Anne Marie Bullock.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01gd4l9)
Farming Today This Week

New season asparagus is already on supermarkets shelves, UK grown tomatoes are three weeks earlier than usual and oil seed rape is bursting into flower in the fields. The milder weather has helped push forward the harvest for many home grown crops.

On this edition of Farming Today This Week, Charlotte Smith asks if farmers can cash in on consumers' taste for all things seasonal by capitalising on technology, the warmer weather and piloting new varieties. She gets her hands dirty with a lesson in the traditional method of cutting asparagus and visits a brand new apricot grove in the Vale of Evesham.

This programme is presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01g6480)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01gd4lc)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, featuring:

0738
A paper in Nature this week suggests that cosmic rays are not at all like what we thought they were like. At the same time, another paper in the Journal of Astrophysics shows that dark matter is not where it should be - and so probably is not anything like we thought it was either. In the pioneering field of astrophysics, are there any certainties or will our theories constantly be challenged? Professor John Butterworth, professor of Physics at UCL and has worked on the Large Hadron Collider at Cern, explains.

0818
It is Record Store Day today. An annual event where independent record stores team up with musicians and record labels to bring out exclusive, one day only releases in the hope of luring music fans away from the internet and into real life record shops. This year sees special CD and vinyl releases by the likes of Abba, Bruce Springsteen and The Sex Pistols. But as Mark Coles reports the 78rpm record is making a surprise comeback too.

0833
"IMF bailout bull" - that was the response of one Conservative backbencher to the news that the Chancellor George Osborne has committed Britain to giving the International Monetary Fund another £10bn in loans. Labour said it was "a sticking plaster response". The money is part of a £250bn global effort to boost the IMF's capacity to lend to troubled economies, including the Eurozone. Last night Sarah Montague spoke to the Chancellor who is in Washington and asked what he would say to those, not least in his own party, who do not think we should be committing this extra money.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01gd4lf)
Billy Bragg, Murray Lachlan Young, Kinder Scout leader's son, blind marathon runner, homeless cat man, Sue Townsend

Richard Coles with musician and activist Billy Bragg, poet Murray Lachlan Young, Prof Harry Rothman, son of Benny Rothman, the leader of the Mass Trespass on Kinder Scout to mark the 80th anniversary of the climb that won our generations' right to roam, Simon Wheatcroft an blind ultra-marathon runner, a feature about a homeless man from London, James Bowen, who was adopted by a cat and now they're constant companions, and Adrian Mole author Sue Townsend's Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Rachel Simpson.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b01gd4lh)
Africa - Rwanda, Uganda and South Sudan

John McCarthy discusses travel to the African countries of Rwanda, Uganda and to the world's newest country, South Sudan. With his guests, doctor Rob Summerhayes, paramedic Franz Opitz and forensic accountant Benedict Jenks - John finds out what attracts people to visiting a country with troubles past or present. All the guests are sensitive to the highly political issues that are involved in visiting such countries and have wide experience of travel to some of the world's hotspots. All have also spent considerable time in Central Africa developing considerable insight into those countries.
Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 The Playlist Series (b01gd4lk)
William Shakespeare's Playlist

David Owen Norris and guests compile a playlist for the bard. Choosing Shakespeare's favourite songs are the renowned Shakespeare scholar Stanley Wells, RSC director Greg Doran and musician Lucie Skeaping.

The music ranges from a lullaby Shakespeare's mother Mary Arden might have sung him, through bawdy ballads from the local tavern, to haunting songs written by Shakespeare himself. What do they tell us about our most enigmatic genius?

The programme is recorded at the Swan Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon, a wooden recreation of a Shakespearean playhouse.

With singers Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, and a trumpeter from Shakespeare's old school to test the theatre acoustics with some rousing fanfares.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke.
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01gd4lm)
Peter Oborne of The Daily Telegraph looks behind the scenes at Westminster this week.

How widespread is unease on the Conservative backbenches after the Budget?

Has the Abu Qatada affair really tripped up Theresa May ?

And are the smaller parties ready to rise?

George Galloway, Caroline Lucas, Nigel Farage, Peter Kellner, Douglas Carswell, Nicholas Boles, and the cartoonist Martin Rowson reflect on a turbulent political week.

Editor: Peter Mulligan

The editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01gd4lp)
Bahrain: Rupert Wingfield Hayes examines why all sides in the bitter conflict there feel the controversy surrounding this weekend's Grand Prix can work in their favour.

France: It's an election which lacks a feel-good factor. Perhaps, Chris Morris feels, that's why all the campaigners are looking back, at a vision of a romantic, glorious French past.

Kenya: Mary Harper's in a huge refugee camp, run on international money, and contrasts life there with that in an impoverished village not far away.

India: His mother warned him against walking on ice, but Paul Howard finds it's the only way to visit a remote community high in the Himalayas.

Germany: Great excitement at the start of the white asparagus season. Steve Evans finds the vegetable dominating menus and conversation. But surely it's not an aphrodisiac?


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01gd4lr)
On Money Box with Paul Lewis: One of the UK's biggest part-time recruitment agencies, Adecco, is accused of short-changing workers by wrongly calculating the holiday pay they are owed. The firm denies it. We hear from one former worker who complained and got the full amount paid.

On the trail of the dodgy wine investment companies - we talk to the Insolvency Service and ask why they're not doing more to close down firms found be to trading against the public interest.

If you have power of attorney so you can deal with a relative's financial affairs on their behalf, how easy have you found it to deal with banks and building societies? New research suggests banks are inconsistent about what they require, often leaving relatives bewildered and confused by the whole process, at a time when they are already distressed.

And companies that offer to get you compensation for mis-sold Payment Protection Insurance: should they be banned from cold-calling or demanding upfront fees? And why are so many still operating when you can make the claim yourself? We hear from the Ministry of Justice on their efforts to clamp down on a growing industry.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b01g65l0)
Series 77

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. Featuring Jeremy Hardy, Rebecca Front and Andy Hamilton.

Produced by Sam Bryant.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01g6486)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01g6488)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01g65tg)
Coventry

The BBC's political editor, Nick Robinson, chairs a panel discussion of news and politics from Ash Green School and Arts College, Coventry, with International Development Minister, Alan Duncan; Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Caroline Flint; barrister, professor and international law expert, Philippe Sands; and editor of The Spectator, Fraser Nelson.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01gd4lt)
Call Nick Robinson on 03700 100 444, email any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq. The questions on Any Questions? were: Even though we are in April, is May already over? Isn't it time that national interest and security outweighed the European Court's rulings? Is Formula One racing more important than the human rights of the Bahraini people, and should the Grand Prix go ahead? As an active Rotarian, I would like to know the panel's opinion of charity funding. Is Time magazine right that Adele is more influential than David Cameron?

Producer: Joe Kent.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00s7yrb)
JB Priestley - An Inspector Calls

By J. B. Priestley

The Birlings are celebrating the engagement of their daughter Sheila when a police Inspector calls. Each member of the family is questioned about their relationship with a young woman, Eva Smith. And they each have to face up to their role in her tragic story.

Inspector Goole ... Toby Jones
Arthur Birling....David Calder
Sibyl Birling...Frances Barber
Sheila Birling ... Morvern Christie
Eric Birling ... Sam Alexander
Gerald Croft ...Geoffrey Streatfeild
Edna... Vineeta Rishi

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01gd4lw)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Olivia Newton-John

What's the appeal of an open relationship and how can they be successful? What are the rules and who makes them? Olivia Newton-John talks about being a cancer survivor and her new book Livwise. A look at the behind the scenes criticism over human rights abuses in Azerbaijan as it prepares to host the Eurovision. Catch up with the flyweight boxer Nicola Adams as she prepares for the Olympics. Celebrate the contribution women made in the steel industry during World War II. And hear from British Vogue Editor Alexandra Shulman about her debut novel. Plus music from the Brodsky Quartet's Jacqueline Thomas who are celebrating their 40th Anniversary and Ren Harvieu hailed as the next "big thing"

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer Emma Wallace
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01gd4ly)
Saturday PM

Patrick O'Connell presents the day's top news stories, with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b01g669y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01g648j)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01g648l)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01g648n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01gd4m0)
Rufus Wainwright, Jack Davenport, Brenda Blethyn and Amy Lamé

Clive has a smashing time with The Talented Mr Jack Davenport. Launching his acting career by playing law graduate Miles Stewart in 'This Life', Jack's starred in 'Coupling' and the first two 'Pirates Of The Caribbean' films. He now plays the womanising director of a Broadway show in the new musical drama 'SMASH', on Sky Atlantic HD from Saturday 21st April at 22.00.

Clive will be having a Dalliance and talking Secrets & Lies with award-winning actress Brenda Blethyn. She returns to Northumberland and to our screens to star as the unlikely cop DCI Vera Stanhope in ITV's detective drama 'Vera'. Series two starts on Sunday 22nd April at 20.00.

Allegra McEvedy plays pass the parcel with self-confessed chubby glamourpuss, writer and comedian Amy Lamé. Commiserations to Amy, who's new show 'Unhappy Birthday' is actually an exuberant culture clash of party, performance and DJ set. The party starts at Camden People's Theatre from 2nd May and then on a UK tour.

Clive will Release A Star, in the form of folk-pop royalty, Rufus Wainwright, who will be talking about his glittering career, sumptuous, theatrical stage shows, Prima Donna's and becoming a dad. He'll be treating us to a performance of 'Out Of The Game' from his album of the same name.

And bringing beats and bass lines into the Loose Ends studio, The Vocal Orchestra will be beatboxing 'Everybody Daydream', taken from their current E4 Udderbelly show created by Shlomo at London's Southbank Centre. They perform there nightly until Sunday 27 May.

Producer Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b01gd4m2)
Ralf Hutter

Chris Bowlby profiles Ralf Hutter, the only founding member left of the German electronic band Kraftwerk. Coming from an obscure industrial background, Kraftwerk first formed in 1970, and are now credited with being hugely influential on a host of musicians and on music of diverse types, including electronic, hip hop, house and drum and base.
Notoriously uncommunicative with the outside world, Kraftwerk used to only have a fax machine as a point of contact at their studio though Ralf Hutter says even that has now gone.
Krafwerk have just completed a major series of concerts in New York and are promising that they will be releasing a new album "very soon" - the first in nearly a decade.

Producer:
John Murphy.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01gd4m4)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests writer Susan Jeffreys, literary critic John Carey and actor Kerry Shale review the cultural highlights of the week.

Lasse Halstrom's film Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is based on Paul Torday's bestselling novel. Ewan McGregor stars as an introverted government scientist who is approached by a Yemeni sheikh's representative (Emily Blunt) to fulfil her client's desire to introduce salmon fishing to his homeland.

Skios by Michael Frayn is a farce which revolves around mistaken identity. Dr Norman Wilfred is an expert in scientometrics who is flying to a Greek island to give a keynote speech to a private foundation based there. Also heading to the island is Oliver Fox, a feckless young man who has a strong tendency to act on impulse, regardless of the consequences. Both are in for some surprises.

Enda Walsh's play Misterman at the National Theatre in London stars Cillian Murphy as Thomas Magill. Although other characters appear on tape, Magill is the only one who appears on stage - an unhinged outsider, holed up in a vast, unused industrial building, replaying the events of a fateful day in the small town of Inishfree.

In The King and the Playwright: A Jacobean History on BBC4, American scholar James Shapiro examines the later period in Shakepeare's career, following the accession of James VI and I to the English throne. Shapiro argues that the political negotiations and theological debates that the playwright witnessed as a member of James's court fed directly into his later plays.

Ron Mueck's work is instantly recognisable - meticulously realistic figures made out of silicone, sometimes much larger and sometimes smaller than life. His latest exhibition - at Hauser & Wirth in London - showcases four new sculptures, including a human sized dead chicken hanging upside down from the ceiling. At the same gallery there is also an exhibition by Andy Hope - Medley Tour London. Hope revisits his earlier works in paintings he calls X Medleys, featuring characters including Batman and Beavis and Butthead.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00yztnk)
Walls of Sound

When Nelson Mandela was tried 1964 he famously said, "I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunity. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and achieve, but, if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die." Without the British Library's sound conservation work we would never have heard this. The trial was recorded using a Dictabelt system. The recordings soon became unplayable. The Dictabelts were brought to the British Library where digital transfers were made, allowing us to hear what Mandela said, and how.

In 1924, in Paris, James Joyce was recorded reading from 'Ulysses' and the British Library's disc is as highly prized as its Blake, Hardy and Lawrence manuscripts. Alas, we'll never hear how they read their work.

These are just two of recordings of immense importance that without the work of the Sound Conservation Centre would be lost. And what a loss that would be. The British Library has invested millions in the Centre and appointed its first ever Curator of Radio. Audio is being accorded the conservation effort usually devoted manuscripts and old masters. All this, the radio historian Sean Street argues in this programme, reflects a fundamental change in attitude to sound itself.

In a massive undertaking our sound archives are being saved, restored, digitised, catalogued and opened to all. Street observes all this and talks to curators, technicians and users. Throughout we hear amazing recordings from the libraries walls of sound that, until this change in thinking about sound, few knew about, and fewer could listen to. We listen as these recordings find their rightful place in the documentary heritage of the nation.

Producer : Julian May.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01dmdnz)
Plantagenet: Series 3

Richard III - The Three Brothers

by Mike Walker, inspired by Holinshed's Chronicles. Despite his rebellious brother Clarence, and the formidable dowager Queen Margaret, Edward IV manages to bring a modicum of stability to the kingdom of England. But discontent at the power of his wife and her family erupt into civil war after his death, and his brother Richard is forced to take increasingly drastic steps to uphold Plantagenet power.The final episode of the series.

Queen Elizabeth...Nancy Carroll
Edward 4th...Simon Bubb
Richard 3rd...Carl Prekopp
Clarence...Christopher Webster
Margaret...Aimee Ffion Edwards
Warwick...Gerard McDermott
Stafford...Adam Billington
Lewis...James Lailey
Bishop...Paul Moriarty
Directed by Jeremy Mortimer and Sasha Yevtushenko.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01g648s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b01g63w4)
Television Cameras in Court

Clive Anderson and top judges and lawyers discuss controversial Government plans to relax the rules banning television cameras from our courts. While some legal experts are calling for justice to be seen to be done, others warn that the presence of cameras could 'pollute and corrupt' the process of justice.

Justice Minister Ken Clarke has announced his intention to initially allow judgments in the Court of Appeal to be broadcast, expanding this to the Crown Courts at a later stage. Despite pressure from broadcasters including the BBC, ITN and Sky, the Government has no immediate plans to allow filming of jurors, victims and witnesses.

Clive's guests include judges and lawyers with a wide range of views on the impact cameras would have on the trial process. Among them a Scottish Sheriff who has already allowed filming in his own court.

They discuss the arguments for and against allowing broadcasters unrestricted access to the courts 'from gavel to gavel'. What lessons can be learned from experience in other countries, such as in the OJ Simpson and Michael Jackson trials and the more recent Amanda Knox trial?

Would the presence of cameras dissuade people coming forward as witness, lower the esteem of the court or impede justice in any other way? Or is it time for justice to truly be seen to be done?

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b01dp52g)
Series 2

University of Northampton

Coming this week from the University of Northampton, "The 3rd Degree" is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners whilst delighting the current ones. It's recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

Together with host Steve Punt, the show tours the (sometimes posh, sometimes murky, but always welcoming!) Union buildings, cafés and lecture halls of six universities across the UK.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and Lady Gaga... In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, were particularly lively, and offered plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides...

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list...

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 Adventures in Poetry (b01g4ksk)
Series 12

Dear Mr Lee

UA Fanthorpe's poem Dear Mr Lee is an engaging piece of ventriloquism, written in the voice of a school pupil who has been studying Laurie Lee's classic memoir, Cider With Rosie, in her English class. Fanthorpe has captured the enthusiasm and despair of adolescence, as the pupil confesses to 'Laurie' that she loves everything about his book, except the essays she's had to write about it. Part of the poem's success lies in the fact the Fanthorpe herself taught English for many years, and demonstrates an unusual empathy with a student struggling with the demands of the exam system and a rather tenuous grasp of literary criticism. Peggy Reynolds talks to Lee's biographer Valerie Grove, to UA Fanthorpe's partner Rosie Bailey, to poets Michael Rosen and Wendy Cope, to several of Fanthorpe's notable ex-students including MP Fiona MacTaggart, and to some current students of GCSE English and their inspiring teacher, who all bring their own enthusiasms to the poem.

Producer: Sara Davies.



SUNDAY 22 APRIL 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01gd56g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Greengrocer's Apostrophe (b01gnp5m)
Penny's from Heaven

Comic tales inspired by those hand-written signs offering "Apple's and Banana's" which can be found in every town in Britain.

James Anthony Pearson reads a quirky story about the apostrophe that ends a relationship, written by Anneliese Mackintosh.

Produced by Eilidh McCreadie.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01gd56j)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01gd56l)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01gd56n)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01gd56q)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01gf4js)
The bells of St Alphege, Solihull, West Midlands.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b01gd4m2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01gd56s)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01gf4jv)
Everything Is Music

Scholar and priest Teresa Morgan examines why music is so often used to communicate the nature of our existence - from the Big Bang to the human genome. With readings from Oliver Sacks, C.S. Lewis and Milan Kundera and music from Beethoven, Olivier Messiaen and Aaron Copland.

Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01gf4jx)
Denmark is the largest source of imported pork and bacon eaten in the UK. Its pig industry is facing a major change because a partial ban on the use of sow stalls is coming into force next year. The vast majority of Danish breeding pigs have been kept in the narrow pens which only allow sows to stand up and lie down. Sow stalls were completely banned in the UK in 1999. But, as Sarah Swadling finds out, the new EU regulation will still mean that, in practice, pigs will still be kept in sow stalls for several months a year, as well as being confined after they have had piglets. Per Bach Laursen, who breeds 36,000 pigs a year in Northern Jutland, tells Sarah that the stalls reduce stress from sows bullying each other during the early stages of pregnancy. He's concerned that, whilst Danish farmers are on course to comply with the new rules, countries like Spain and France may not meet the deadline.

Produced and Presented by Sarah Swadling.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01gd56v)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01gd56x)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01gf4jz)
Broadcaster and song writer Ricky Ross has returned to Brazil with Christian Aid to see how rural people are beginning to have access to their own land...we have a report from him.

The founder of the Corrymeela community in Northern Ireland, Ray Davey, has died. The wartime chaplain was taken prisoner in North Africa and ended up in a POW camp outside Dresden where he witnessed the destruction of the city by the allies. After the war his experiences led him to set up Corrymeela as a centre for peace and reconciliation. Edward talks to Duncan Morrow the former head of the Community Relations Council in Northern Ireland about his legacy.

The Welsh language is not given adequate support in the Church in Wales according to a paper being discussed by their governing body this week. Kevin Bocquet reports from Llandudno.

The traditionalist Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans will be meeting from Monday to decide its future. Archbishop Jensen from Sydney talks to Sunday about what they hope to achieve.

As the first round of the French elections gets underway, we discuss the role Islam is playing in the debate and the implications of the result for Muslims in France and further afield. We talk to journalist Anne-Marie Moutet, academic Matthew Goodwin and Nabila Ramdani.

As the trial of Anders Breivik reaches the end of its first week, Edward Stourton speaks to Rev Jens Johnsen Director of the Norway Lutheran Church Council about what the church is doing to support those affected by the trial.

The Vatican has ordered a crackdown on nuns in the USA it considers too radical...Jane Little brings us the latest on the story.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01gf4k1)
Toybox

Diane Louise Jordan presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Toybox.

Reg Charity: 1084243
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Toybox.
Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01gd56z)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01gd571)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01gf4k3)
The Race of Life

'The Race of Life' - 1000 years after the martyrdom of Alfege, one of the last Saxon Archbishops of Canterbury, from St Alfege's Greenwich, near the London Marathon start line. Alfege was killed by soldiers of the invading Danish army on 19th April 1012 at Greenwich. Alfege gave up his life to protect his flock from oppression at the hand of the invader, refusing to allow himself to be ransomed. After his death he was much venerated, and came to be regarded as a saint who could be honoured by both Dane and Saxon. So Alfege is commemorated both as a martyr for justice and as a symbol of reconciliation between peoples. With The Revd Chris Moody & The Venerable Christine Hardman, Archdeacon of Lewisham and Greenwich. Director of Music: Stephen Dagg. Organist: Richard Brasier. Producer: Mark O'Brien.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01g65tj)
Challenging Intellect

Will Self says we should embrace the intellectual challenge of "difficult" books and art, and value works which are more taxing than our increasingly low-brow popular culture. "The most disturbing result of this retreat from the difficult is to be found in arts and humanities education, where the traditional set texts are now chopped up into boneless nuggets of McKnowledge, and students are encouraged to do their research - such as it is - on the web."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01gf4kt)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01gf4kw)
For detailed descriptions please see daily programmes

"Writer ..... Caroline Harrington Director ..... Rosemary Watts Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde Peggy Woolley ..... June Spencer Brenda Tucker ..... Amy Shindler Robert Snell ..... Graham Blockey Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd Alan Franks ..... John Telfer Usha Franks ..... Souad Faress Amy Franks ..... Jennifer Daley Leonie Snell ..... Jasmine Hyde Elona Makepeace ..... Eri Shuka Kevin Townsend ..... Paul Greenwood John Bagshaw ..... Harry Livingstone Esther Sutton ..... Anita Wright Martin Sykes ..... David Troughton Hattie Marshall ..... Maya Barcot Carl ..... Nicholas Bailey".


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b01gf4ky)
Globe Theatre

In this edition of The Reunion, Sue MacGregor reunites five people who created a London landmark - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre. Despite three decades of setbacks they defied the critics to make the Globe a critical and commercial success.

When Shakespeare's Globe was opened by the Queen on the 12th June 1997, it was the culmination of a dream that began over fifty years earlier. The American actor Sam Wanamaker visited London in 1949 hoping to find the original Globe, where William Shakespeare had written plays. Instead, he found a plaque on a brewery wall. Outraged, he began his quest to reinstate the Globe.

He wanted to bring the Elizabethan Globe to life in look and feel. But a simple idea turned into a protracted mission that risked the livelihoods and reputations of everyone involved. There were accusations that it would be a 'Disneyland' for Shakespeare. Some Southwark residents wanted council houses, not a theatre. And just when it looked like the Globe team had the go-ahead to build, a group of road sweepers became the catalyst for a lengthy court battle that almost ended the project before building began.

But timber by timber, Shakespeare's Globe took shape. And when it finally opened, audiences queued around the block, rainmacs in hand, for open-air performances under its thatched roof. Fifteen years on, experimentation and award-winning performances have firmly established the Globe in the Shakespeare circuit.

Joining Sue MacGregor is: Patrick Spottiswoode, the first Director of Education; Diana Devlin, who saw the project through some of its most difficult years; architect Jon Greenfield; Claire van Kampen, the first Director of Music; and Zoe Wanamaker, Sam's actor daughter who is now Honorary President of Shakespeare's Globe.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b01g5zp0)
Series 9

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Marcus Brigstocke, Miles Jupp, Susan Calman and Alan Davies are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Swimming, Bread, Hotels and Foxes.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01gf4l0)
The New Beer Frontier

From barrel ageing beer to sourcing intensely bitter hops, Dan Saladino reports on the latest trends in American brewing that are starting to influence British beer styles.

The US "craft beer" scene started to take shape 30 years ago. Prohibition in the 1920s and post-war industrialisation brought an end to one of the world's most diverse brewing cultures.

In 1979 President Jimmy Carter made home brewing legal again, and soon after, a network of adventurous brewers started to emerge. Known as craft brewers, they operate on a small scale and use traditional brewing techniques but also place great emphasis on experimentation and innovation.

American brewer and editor of The Oxford Companion to Beer, Garrett Oliver puts their quest for new flavours down to the US losing its own brewing culture and so being free to explore all others. Now a young generation of brewers in the UK are looking at these new US styles and discovering techniques like barrel aging as well embarking on experiments with new, intensely flavoured, hop varieties.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01gd573)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01gf4l2)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The Invention of... (b0167zl1)
Germany

The Rise of Prussia

Germany history is often obscured by the fog of Nazism, making it easy to forget both the high culture, and its often feeble past. There is for example in Koblenz a fountain, marked in 1812 by Napoleon's army heading east, and by the Russians in 1813 heading west. In this series Germany is the turntable, the chess board, the stomping ground of Europe.

"It's very difficult to think of Germany at this time as having a future of unity and power," says Professor Norman Davies. "It was in many ways retarded."

In this second programme, Misha Glenny explores the rise of Prussia - from Frederick the Great in 1740 to humiliation by Napoleon in 1806. He discovers a state far removed from the images of Iron Crosses, spiked helmets and officious bureaucrats of popular imagination. It is Prussia that will eventually create modern Germany, but first there are several myths to dispel.

Misha Glenny is a former BBC central European correspondent and winner of a Sony gold. The producer is Miles Warde, who collaborated with Misha Glenny on previous series about the Alps, the Habsburgs and Garibaldi.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01g65h3)
Cannock Wood, Staffordshire

The panel visit a gardening group near Rugeley for some gardening trouble-shooting. In addition, Anne Swithinbank explores the power of climbers in the garden, Alan Titchmarsh explains the appeal of working as a professional gardener as part of National Gardening Week.

Questions addressed in the programme are:

Why does my compost bin become soggy and smelly?
My Cordyline has produced off-shoots at the base. What should I do?
My rhubarb crop died of at one end of the garden but not the other, why?
I need to cut back my cyclamen but don't want to damage it. Help!
Does the panel advise growing fruit trees parallel to a giant conifer hedge?Will the conifer roots threaten my trees?
Plant suggestions included: Sea Buckthorn, 'Stella' cherries or 'Morello' cherries
Would you recommend saving and sowing my sweet pea seeds?
Why are my daffodils coming up blind?
Which plant will add the 'Wow' factor to the house I'm trying to sell. Plant suggestions included: Nigella or Calendula bedding plants, Or runner beans!

Produced by Robert Abel & Amy Racs
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b01gf4ln)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover presents the Sunday Omnibus edition of Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: today Barbara talks to her best friend Becky about her compulsive disorder and how it's affected her life; Humberside transsexual Michelle discusses living as a woman with her friend Cilla; Bob talks to his son-in-law James about his life of crime and Jim and Joan from Northern Ireland share an intimate moment of conversation about growing old together and the end of life.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a sort of snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer Simon Elmes.


SUN 15:00 Electric Decade (b01gf4lq)
Uncle Fred in the Springtime

Episode 1

Dramatised by Archie Scottney

Joyous all-star spring fever, led by Alfred Molina, Patricia Hodge, Jared Harris, Martin Jarvis and Rufus Sewell. A pig-napping romantic thriller! PGW's dialogue dances across the Blandings Castle lawns. Charming Earl of Ickenham (Uncle Fred) has received a plea from affably dotty Lord Emsworth to help foil a plot to steal his prize-winning pig. And to examine the sanity of eccentric Duke of Dunstable.

Delighting in such entertainment, Uncle Fred arrives at Blandings in the guise of "brain specialist" Glossop, with nephew Pongo posing as his secretary. Lively Polly Pott is the third imposter, secretly engaged to Dunstable's nephew Ricky and hoping to charm her prospective uncle-in-law. Emsworth's devious secretary Rupert Baxter (Jared Harris) spots them but can't call their bluff for fear of blackmail. Emsworth's sister Connie suspects they are jewel thieves. Bosham, Emsworth's son, thinks all is above board. But then Polly's detective Dad is called in. Will the pig-napping happen?

Cast:
Uncle Fred ..... Alfred Molina
Lady Constance ..... Patricia Hodge
The Duke of Dunstable ..... Christopher Neame
Rupert Baxter ..... Jared Harris
Ricky Gilpin ..... Rufus Sewell
Horace Davenport ..... Lloyd Owen
Mustard Pott ..... Julian Holloway
Polly Pott ..... Sophie Winkleman
Lord Emsworth ..... Martin Jarvis
P.G. Wodehouse ..... Ian Ogilvy
Lord Bosham ..... Simon Templeman
Pongo Twistleton ..... Matthew Wolf
Beach ..... Kenneth Danziger
Valerie Twistleton ..... Moira Quirk
Webster/Footmen ..... Darren Richardson
Singing Gardener ..... Mark Holden

Director: Martin Jarvis
Producer: Rosalind Ayres

A Jarvis & Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01gf4lv)
Timothy Mo on his much-anticipated novel, Pure

Mariella Frostrup talks to award-winning writer Timothy Mo about his new book Pure, his first for over a decade, a controversially humorous exploration of the nature of Muslim fundamentalism told from the point of view of a Thai "ladyboy", unwillingly caught up with a group of jihadists in Southern Thailand. The recent devastating bombings, coupled with David Cameron's much publicised visit to Southern Asia, have made Pure a topical and prescient book.

Anna Funder and Philip Sington discuss the inspiration to be had from the secret Stasi files in the old East Germany and how writers of both fiction and non - fiction have responded to this fascinating but sometimes devastating archive. In her award winning book Stasi-land, Anna Funder talked to both victims and former Stasi agents whom she tracked down by placing an advert in local East German newspapers. Thriller writer Philip Sington in his novel "The Valley of Unknowing" features a writer compromised by his own frailty as much as by Stasi rule. So how have writers responded creatively to the stories of betrayal, treachery and heroism that the publication of thousands of Stasi files have revealed and are such books a way of healing the wounds of the past?

The 41st London Book Fair in partnership with China's General Administration for Press and Publication has attracted criticism from Chinese writers in exile. Neill Denny, editor of The Bookseller, talks about how the 25,000 industry professionals in attendance have responded to the controversy as well as revealing what actually goes on at the publishing world's equivalent of the Stock Exchange trading floor. What are the major deals, how are they transacted - and why do publishers still worry about the rise and rise of the e-book?

Producer: Hilary Dunn.


SUN 16:30 Adventures in Poetry (b01gf4n2)
Series 12

Vitai Lampada

Henry Newbolt's poem Vitai Lampada - better known to most by its rousing chorus "play up, play up and play the game!"- seems at first sight to be a product solely of its time and place: he wrote it at the end of the 19th century and it features cricket, war and a public school ethos about sport and leadership. However, as Peggy Reynolds unpacks the poem and talks to people who still know it, some surprises emerge.


SUN 17:00 My Name Is Not 'Hey Baby' (b01g61w2)
In 2011 the Slutwalks which took place around the UK made headlines when women, carrying placards and shouting slogans, protested against the blaming of victims of rape and sexual assault rather than the perpetrators.

Yasmeen Khan meets the organiser of the London Slutwalk to see what impact it made, as well as young activists who are raising awareness of street harassment and encouraging women to raise their voices against it. At a Hollerback meeting students describe the verbal assaults which can build up from quasi-compliments to threatening physical assault, and how they can or should react.

The grey area between a flirtatious comment and unwanted attention is sometimes a fine one, and makes this area of sexuality difficult to deal with. Yasmeen talks to men and women about how they perceive it, and also to women in India, Sweden and New York about how a new generation is trying to make the rules of sexual engagement clearer.

The Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister issued a statement on International Women's Day on March 8 this year stating that they 'are working towards signing the Council of Europe's Convention on Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence'. Vera Baird, QC, the chair of Labour's Commission on Women's Safety, talks about the way the judiciary have been influenced, and a spokesman for the Metropolitan Police's anti-rape Sapphire Unit describes how their specialist police officers now deal with victims of serious sexual assault.

Yasmeen Khan also asks how the sexualisation of society, in which advertising, the internet and pop music all play a part, has affected young teenagers, and what efforts are being made to counter their influence.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b01gd4m2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01gd577)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01gd579)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01gd57c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01gf4n4)
Stuart Maconie makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Cecile Wright

Stuart has cast his net far and wide for this week Pick of the Week: From Moscow to Nepal, from stables in York to studios in Jamaica, from the brutality of Sarajevo's war zone to, the sumptuous luxury of, well, Alton Towers. Add to that his catch of the occasional iceberg, and a very odd creature called a Lamprey and it's a bumper haul.

Adventures in Poetry - Radio 4
My Name is Not 'Hey Baby' - Radio 4
Wireless Nights - Radio 4
How Young is too Young to be a Popstar? - Radio 1
Nature - Radio 4
The Big Conversation - Radio York
Today - Radio 4
Alton Towers: A Journey into Puginland - Radio 4
The Ice Mountain - Radio 4
World on 3 - Radio 3
Book of the Week: Besieged ep 2 - radio 4
Afternoon Drama: My One and Only - Radio 4
Balalaika Born Again -Radio 4
Tighten Up - The Story of Trojan Records - 6 Music.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01gf4n6)
Ian's keen to meet Ifty and teases Adam over his interest in the handsome new youth cricket coach.
Adam observes that Jennifer's walking on eggshells with grumpy Brian as he awaits the mega-dairy decision.
Later Brian takes a tumble whilst dealing with a frisky lamb. Adam thinks Brian's wound needs looking at, but Brian insists it's only a scratch. Adam tells Ian that he blames himself. The accident happened when he raised the dairy issue. Ian observes that Adam and Brian are very fond of each other despite everything.
Ian and Alistair note the number of girls at cricket training - and not just on the pitch. Alistair suspects a lot are there to eye up Ifty. Alistair reports that Ifty might be able to get a grant for some equipment. Not just a pretty face then, observes Ian. Far from it, agrees Alistair, and takes Ian off to introduce him.
Alan's excited but nervous about meeting Carl tomorrow. He doesn't want to let Amy down. Usha assures him Carl's charming; it'll be fine. Alan thinks he might run the vacuum round tomorrow. Laughing Usha advises him instead to sit peacefully on the green and listen to the bell ringers. She'll do the vacuuming.


SUN 19:15 My Teenage Diary (b00x3ywb)
Series 2

Julian Clary

Rufus Hound invites Julian Clary to read embarrassing extracts from his teenage diary and read it out in public for the very first time.

Producer: Victoria Payne
A TalkbackThames production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Jennifer Egan - Emerald City and Other Stories (b01gf4n8)
Spanish Winter

The next in our series of stories from 'Emerald City', the new collection by young American author Jennifer Egan, whose 'A Visit from the Goon Squad' went on to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and made her name as one of the best new writers to emerge in the past decade.

Today's story, 'Spanish Winter', is set in the shadows of the Alhambra, where a divorced woman tries to break free from the painful ties that bind, until a figure from her past forces her to rethink...

The Abridger is Miranda Davies
The Producer is Justine Willett
Reader: Madeleine Potter.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b01g65h9)
How many species are going extinct?

First of a new series.

It's been claimed that we are experiencing the greatest wave of extinction since the disappearance of the dinosaurs. "Every hour," says the Convention on Biological Diversity, "three species disappear. Every day up to 150 species are lost." We explain why it's impossible to know whether those numbers are even remotely accurate.

A listener asks whether it's true that more British tourists die in Thailand than in any other tourist destination. We get the answer (which - for those who're short of time - is "no").

North Korea is in the news thanks to its recent failure to launch a long-range rocket - an embarrassment for its new leader, Kim Jong-un. What was supposed to be a symbol of power has become a symbol of impotence. But a claim has been doing the rounds which is as resonant as any misfiring missile: that North Koreans are much shorter than their South Korean neighbours. It turns out it's true - and for tragic reasons.

Is it really the case that, as one newspaper headline put it, "Blobby Bobbies of Scotland Lard - Three Quarters of male Met Staff are overweight"?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Richard Knight.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01g65h7)
Bert Weedon, Mike Wallace, Judy Egerton, Jack Tramiel and Ahmed Ben Bella

Matthew Bannister on

The man who taught the world to play guitar - Bert Weedon

The American TV correspondent Mike Wallace who founded 60 Minutes and interviewed the famous and influential.

The art historian Judy Egerton who wrote the definitive work on George Stubbs and enjoyed a gossip with her friend Alan Bennett. He pays tribute.

The Algerian freedom fighter and then President Ahmed Ben Bella.

And the businessman Jack Tramiel, a holocaust survivor who developed the pioneering Commodore computer.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01gd4lr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01gf4k1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b01g64tv)
Dragon's Den

After 30 years of tearaway economic growth, there are fears that China may be rapidly slowing down, putting great strains on their economic system. Peter Day reports on the bursting of the great Chinese housing bubble and the pressures on private businesses and wonders if the Year of the Dragon is going be about hard times not traditional good fortune.
Producer: Julie Ball.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01gf4nb)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01gf4nd)
Episode 100

Iain Martin of The Sunday Telegraph analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01g63y4)
Francine Stock meets with Emily Blunt to talk about her new film, an adaptation of Paul Torday's best-seller, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen.

Director Kevin MacDonald makes the case for Bob Marley as one of the most important cultural icons of the 20th century.

Juliette Binoche talks about her new film, Elles, an exploration of modern day prostitution in Paris.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01gf4jv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 23 APRIL 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01gd58c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01g63vw)
The High-life and the Row-life

What is the reality of life for a crack cocaine user in South London? Daniel Briggs new ethnography is a day to day observation of the people who use the drug, and their struggles to get the drug and also to get off it. He takes Laurie Taylor on an unsettling journey through violence and intimidation.
Also in the programme, eight men in a boat - but how to stop them from pulling in different directions? Anthony King tells Laurie about his research into how a Cambridge crew prepared for and won the Boat Race. He explains the factors which helped and hindered their attempt to establish a rowing rhythm, and discusses what this says about co-ordinating action in society at large.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01gf4js)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01gd58k)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01gd58p)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01gd58r)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01gd58t)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01gf4pm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Dr Jeremy Morris, Dean of King's College Cambridge.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01gf4pp)
Charlotte Smith hears the English pilot badger culls will be challenged in court. Jack Reedy explains why the Badger Trust have been granted a judicial review of the pilots in West Gloucestershire and West Somerset.

The long await for the supermarket adjudicator may be over. The Groceries Code Adjudicator Bill, which could tighten up rules between supermarkets and their suppliers, is likely to be in the Queen's Speech on the 9th May. MP Tim Farron says it's a positive step forwards.

And Europe's silent crisis, costing billions of pounds a year: biodiversity loss. Dutch Liberal MEP Gerban-Jan Gerbrandy tells Farming Today food prices should go up to reflect the cost to the environment.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Clare Freeman in Birmingham.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01gd58w)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01gf4pr)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and John Humphrys. Including:

0810
John Humphrys interviews Prime Minister David Cameron ahead of the upcoming local elections.

0844
Scientists are developing a satellite navigation system especially for nervous elderly drivers as part of a government-funded project at Newcastle University. Professor Phil Blythe, who is leading the research, describes how it would work.

0849
Disabled rights campaigner Lord Ashley of Stoke died on Friday night aged 89. Louise Medus-Mansell, chair of the Thalidomide Society, reflects on his success getting compensation for the victims of Thalidomide and completely changing the legal basis for disability rights.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01gf4pt)
Iain Banks and David Hare

On St George's Day Andrew Marr discusses national identity and belonging. The playwright David Hare has written a companion piece to a Terrence Rattigan play, set in an English public school. George Benjamin is celebrated as one of England's leading composers, but how far is his work shaped by the French musical tradition? The Scottish writer Iain Banks discusses his novel, Stonemouth, set in a town north of Aberdeen and vividly evoking a sense of place and identity. And Rachel Seiffert examines what happens when an Ulster girl marries a Glaswegian boy, in her latest short story, Hands Across the Water.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01gf5sk)
Sightlines

Aurora

Read by: Maureen Beattie
Abridged by: Pete Nichols

"The outer world flew open like a door, and I wondered - what is it that we're just not seeing?"

In the opening essay from her new book SIGHTLINES, the Scottish poet and travel writer Jamie takes us to a world of ice and aurora and silence.

Five years after FINDINGS broke the mould of nature writing, award-winning Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie subtly shifts our focus on landscape and the living world, daring us to look again at the 'natural', the remote and the human-made.

"Kathleen Jamie, the Scottish poet, has written a book that transcends the definition of nature study ... SIGHTLINES is a work of intense purity and quiet genius and we're lucky to have it."
Philip Hoare
The Sunday Telegraph

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01gf5sm)
IVF, Circus Art, Gang Psychology

Is egg-sharing the answer to rising IVF costs and what are the ethical concerns? Johnny Ball discusses the role of the grandfather, the psychologist who says her work shows that staying in a gang is sometimes the better option, and the art of the circus as vintage entertainment.
Presented by Jane Garvey.
Produced by Ruth Watts.


MON 10:45 A Small Town Murder (b01gk4n5)
Episode 1

By Scott Cherry

In the first episode of 'A Small Town Murder' by Scott Cherry: it looks like Family Liaison Officer, Jackie Hartwell, might be offered some paid leave after the tragic events of a recent case.

Jackie Hartwell (played by Meera Syal) is a West Midlands Family Liaison Officer who solves cases by winning the trust of those caught up in the nightmare of serious crime and murder.

Police guidelines: The primary function of an FLO is that of an investigator. In performing this role, the officer will support the family, but will also gather relevant information and intelligence.

Jackie is a serving copper, not a social worker, functioning as part of an active team of investigating CID officers. But working in liaison enables her to get closer to the people involved in the crime, closer to the raw emotions, than the rest of her colleagues - allowing her to investigate in a way they can't, as she combines empathy and intuition with the keen observation of a clever detective.

In Series 4 of 'A Small Town Murder', Jackie is asked to be FLO to the parents of a young man whose murdered body is found floating in the local canal. But as she tries to support the family and solve the murder, Jackie finds herself becoming more and more distracted by the tragic consequences of a previous case.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:00 Mind Changers (b01gf5sr)
Julian Rotter and Locus of Control

When, as a Psychology student, Claudia Hammond read about Locus of Control in Julian Rotter's Social Learning Theory she assumed its author, like most great Mind Changers, was no longer alive. Twenty years later she met him in his home near the University of Connecticut. He was happy to reflect on his career.
In 1966 Rotter published his famous IE scale. This measured whether the subject had an Internal Locus of Control - believing that they could affect the course of their life, that their choices would have an impact on what happened to them - or an External Locus of Control, in which case their life was guided by luck or fate and they themselves had little power to change things. The test has been developed in many ways since then, but it is still widely used today and the notion of Locus of Control has been particularly influential in healthcare. Claudia visits Guy's Hospital in London to hear from health psychologists Dr Nicky Thomas and Professor John Weinman about how it affects their work with patients.
Julian Rotter himself was one of the first clinical psychologists ever to be trained in the US and was to be extremely influential in training those who followed. He was proponent of the scientist-practitioner model and he worked hard to ensure that clinical psychology became a research-based discipline. He was largely responsible for bringing personality theory into the clinical arena.
Claudia also meets his wife, Doffie - a former graduate student of Rotter's, his friends and former colleagues at UCONN: Professors Charles Lowe, Marianne Barton and Jerome Smith. And hears from Margie Lachman of the Lifespan Developmental Psychology Laboratory at Brandeis University, how Locus of Control can change with age.


MON 11:30 Mr Blue Sky (b01gf5st)
Series 2

Happy 18th

Written by Andrew Collins

Harvey Easter (played by Mark Benton), 46, is the eternal optimist. He is able to see the good in every situation, the silver lining within every cloud, the bright side to every bit of bad news.

This, however, is his downfall. Someone for whom the glass is always half-full can be difficult to live with, as his wife of 19 years, Jacqui (played by Claire Skinner), knows all too well. Even as life deals Harvey and the Easter family a series of sadistic blows, Harvey looks on the positive side. It's pathological with him. The way Jax sees it, instead of dealing with the problems of their marriage and their teenage kids, Harvey's optimism is actually his way of avoiding engagement with the big issues.

Mr Blue Sky is about one man battling to remain positive in moments of crisis, and one woman battling to live with someone who has his head in the clouds.

This week, Harvey and Jax stand firm and inform Charlie that they can't afford to throw her an 18th birthday party, much to her displeasure, while Robbie's latest flirtation with drugs does not quite go as planned.

Cast
Harvey Easter ..... Mark Benton
Jacqui Easter ..... Claire Skinner
Charlie Easter ..... Rosamund Hanson
Robbie Easter ..... Tyger Drew Honey
Kill-R ..... Javone Prince
Rakesh Rathi ..... Navin Chowdhry
Dr Ray Marsh ..... Justin Edwards
Sean Calhoun ..... Michael Legge
Shop Assistant ..... Susy Kane

Producer: Anna Madley
An Avalon Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01gf5sw)
Do flu jab campaigns work?

People who have been mis-sold payment protection insurance are being told to claim the money back themselves, rather than go through claims management companies which often take a big cut of the compensation. Should banks be doing more to tell people how they can claim?

Thousands of young people will soon be volunteering overseas as part of the government's International Citizen Service. What are the hopes for the £55 million scheme which has been described by some critics as a "government sponsored gap year"? We hear from International Development minister Alan Duncan.

The former chief medical officer Sir Liam Donaldson has claimed that an increase in deaths from flu was down to a drop off in government public health campaigns. So how effective are flu jab adverts?

It's a year since Additional Paternity Leave was introduced, which entitles men to take six months off if their partner has had a baby. How many men have taken up the government's offer and what does it mean for small businesses?

The company that's setting itself up as a Royal Mail rival by delivering post in London, package delivery company Yodel's plans to charge retailers more and would you buy a TV with your flat-pack shelving unit? We find out why furniture giant Ikea is moving into the electronics markets.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Olivia Skinner.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01gd58y)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01gf5sy)
An opinion poll for this programme finds strong public support for a referendum on reform of the House of Lords. But the Minister responsible tells us the case hasn't been made.
Plus the latest on the French elections.
The Lithuanian rock star who is playing Hamlet at the Globe in London.
And how can children be protected from online porn?


MON 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01gf5t0)
Europe: Triumphs of the Past

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, continues his new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 6. EUROPE: TRIUMPHS OF THE PAST - As a tourist attraction in Westminster Abbey, Henry V's instruments of battle reflect the view of English history as depicted on the Elizabeth stage.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01gf4n6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b01gf5t2)
Odour

Odour
A celebrated cardiologist is driven to distraction by a persistent odour. Where is it coming from? It pervades the whole of his life and he becomes obsessed by it. When he finally discovers the cause, he is devastated. A black comedy by James O'Neill.
Phillip............Tim McInnerny
Alex...............Kathryn Hunt
Susan............Fiona Clark
Roger/Consultant.....Conrad Nelson
Mary..............Yusra Warsama

Producer Gary Brown

Phillip Fallow may be a little sharp with his colleagues but to the outside world he is a celebrated humanitarian who helps overseas students come over to study. But his life starts to unravel when he is dogged by a persistent smell and has to finally face some uncomfortable truths.

Together with Eamonn O'Neill and Martin Shea, James O'Neill has written extensively for stage, radio and TV comedy. They have written for shows as diverse as Big Train and Lenny Henry. For Radio 4, they have written a number of afternoon plays, including Happily Never After which was nominated for the Peter Tinniswood award, and In The Garden starring Anthony Sher.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b01gf5t6)
Series 26

Episode 1

(1/13)
The evergreen general knowledge music quiz returns, with Paul Gambaccini welcoming music enthusiasts from around the UK aiming to prove the depth and breadth of their musical knowledge. One of them is destined to become the 26th annual Counterpoint champion in July.

The first programme features competitors from London, Wiltshire and Bedfordshire. As always on Counterpoint, they'll be faced with an unpredictable mix of questions covering many genres of music, from the classical repertoire through film music, jazz, show tunes, and the pop charts from the 1950s to the present day. There are plenty of musical extracts to identify, some familiar, others surprising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01gf4l0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 One in a Million (b01gf5w5)
Last year on World Book Night, one million books were given away for free. Mariella Frostrup explores the experience through the words of givers and receivers. Chris Queree, who, by various vicarious means, obtained numerous books to give to the inmates of HMP Bristol. C J Sansom's Dissolution was given away by Margaret McMullin outside her local chip shop. Keith Walters gave away Case Histories by Kate Atkinson on his local high street and Katie Fryd received One Day by David Nicholls whilst returning home from a night out in London.

All four participants gained different experiences - from the simplicity of sharing in the joy of those to whom they gave books, to being encouraged to write and illustrate their own book.

Tonight sees the second World Book Night give away, it might be worth hitting your local high street for the chance of a free book. You never know, it might change your life.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01gf5w7)
Physics

When asked to defend their belief in a Creator God, people of faith often turn to the argument that there must be a First Cause - you can't create something out of nothing they say, therefore right at the beginning, someone must have been responsible for the first element from which sprang life.

A new book, "A Universe from Nothing", by the American theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, turns this argument on its head. Not only can something arise out of nothing, but something will always arise out of nothing because physics tells us that nothingness is inherently unstable.

The book has made an enormous impact in the States, making the New York Times' best sellers list, and it prompted Richards Dawkins to observe that it was "Potentially the most important scientific book with implications for atheism since Darwin".

So does it knock the argument for God on the head? Are physics and God irreconcilable?

Joining Ernie to discuss whether modern physics leaves any room for God are Dr John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford, Dr Usama Hasan, Senior Lecturer at Middlesex University and a part time Imam, and Dr Mark Vernon, Honorary Research Fellow at Birkbeck College, London who has degrees in physics, theology and philosophy.


MON 17:00 PM (b01gf5wh)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01gd590)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b01gf5wk)
Series 9

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Lucy Porter and Graeme Garden are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Restaurants, Barbie dolls, Feet and Garlic.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01gf5wm)
Alan and Jill are enjoying the church bells. Jill talks about Elizabeth's French-themed birthday tea courtesy of Lily. Jill was a bit down this morning; it would have been Phil's birthday today. But Lily ringing at St Stephen's seems very appropriate. They chat about the promises auction and chuckle over Sabrina Thwaite's bid for Harry. Jill says if she'd been younger she'd have bid for him herself.
Tom's pleased with himself. The supplier has promised to fast track the delayed polytunnel delivery, Underwoods have increased their sausage order, and he's got a discount on the farm's feed supply. On top of that, his quad bike's been found. He's not making much headway with the ready meals, but Brenda suggests putting them on hold until he's got time to do them properly
Alan arrives home late to find Amy, Carl and Usha making polite conversation. Amy's less than impressed with her dad, but Carl's understanding. He says his grandmother's really impressed he's going out with a pastor's daughter. When Amy and Carl have gone, Alan comments that Mabel will be pleased Amy's going out with someone of Jamaican heritage. When Usha suggests Mabel will be buying a hat, Alan laughs that they shouldn't get ahead of themselves.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01gf5ww)
World Book Night; Mark Ravenhill; Winning Words at Olympic Park

With John Wilson.

Last year on Front Row poetry publisher William Sieghart announced that a line from Alfred Tennyson's Ulysses would be displayed prominently on a wall in the London Olympic Village. Now the wall, which is part of the Winning Words poetry project, has been finished. John visits the Olympic Park with William Sieghart and artistic commissioner Sarah Weir as they see the completed wall for the first time.

On Shakespeare's birthday, Front Row focuses on his sonnets.

Now in its second year, tonight's World Book Night sees 2.5 million books given away as part of an international initiative to encourage people to make reading a part of their lives, including prisons, hospitals and homeless shelters. Each of the books in the UK will include a Shakespeare sonnet, selected by poet Don Paterson. He and writer Meg Rosoff discuss how the sonnets fit with the chosen titles.

Playwright Mark Ravenhill reads his new sonnet, commissioned by the RSC, to celebrate Shakespeare's birthday and the official opening of the World Shakespeare festival. He also discusses the challenges of writing it.

Naomi Alderman reviews the week's big multiplex release, Marvel Avengers Assemble, starring Robert Downey Jr, Scarlett Johansson and Mark Ruffalo.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


MON 19:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01gf5t0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:45 today]


MON 20:00 It's My Story (b01gf5x8)
Mr Fan, from Boatperson to Horseman

Mr Fan fled Vietnam on a boat and landed in Greenwich. He grows vegetables like a Chinese peasant, and rides horses like an English gentleman. In his barber shop, he tells his tale.When radio producer Julian May or his sons need a haircut they pop round to Mr Fan. Over the years, the blond baby and the grey curls falling, his story of escape, exile, settlement and identity, has emerged.Mr Fan is from Vietnam but is Chinese. In 1979, when the Chinese crossed the border and fought a short war with her neighbour, he had to leave. His family left everything and clambered aboard an over-laden sailing boat. No one knew how to sail or navigate. Months later they reached Hong Kong and were interned. Eventually, while his father languished dying in prison, he landed in England, and settled in Greenwich.That's the past. What is interesting is the life Mr Fan leads now: very Chinese; very English. His tiny garden full of pak choi; dawn exercises in the park; table tennis. As he snips he sips green tea.But the pictures on the walls are of horses. Three times a week at a suburban riding school, among the pigtailed 'gels', this Chinese man in his sixties, trots, canters - and now gallops and jumps - in his black velvet riding hat.This is what he loves, what England has given him, and he'll never go back. He did go to Mongolia - on a riding holiday.While he cuts hair, exercises early in Greenwich Park (where he enjoyed watching the Olympic equestrian events last summer), tends his peasant patch and rides the horses he loves, Mr Fan tells his story to Julian May who, sparingly, presents a tale that reveals important aspects of identity and belonging.Producer: Julian May.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b01g62zk)
The Pink Certificate

There's a Turkish saying that every man is born a soldier; and in Turkey every man is conscripted for military service of up to 15 months. There is no alternative to this; Turkey does not recognise the concept of conscientious objection. But one group of people are exempt - homosexuals. Their presence in the army is deemed damaging to morale and operational effectiveness. But the process by which homosexual men are asked to prove their sexual orientation is arbitrary and humiliating. Some are asked to provide pornographic photographs of themselves with their partners; others, photographs of themselves dressed as women. This is also a problem for the military psychiatrists who have to compromise their professionalism by "diagnosing" someone as homosexual, despite the fact that homosexuality is no longer regarded internationally as a medical disorder, although it once was. In "The Pink Certificate" Emre Azizlerli lifts the lid on the only country within the NATO military alliance to discriminate against homosexuals in this way. Among his interviewees are gay men who have been humiliated in various ways during the application process for exemption, as well as another man, who wanted to join the military despite his homosexuality and enjoyed a varied sex life during his period of service. Emre also meets a psychiatrist who discusses the ethical dilemma he faced while in the army and being asked to "diagnose" gay men, and a well-known conscientious objector who went to prison for his principles.
Producer: Tim Mansel.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01g6444)
This week, new research number crunching millions of bits of data on breast cancer has allowed scientists to reclassify the disease into 10 different subtypes. They say this is a huge break though which will lead to new treatments and improve outcomes for women with the disease. The lead author of the Cancer Research UK study Carlos Caldas explains its impact.

The maths of politics. Stand up Mathematician Matt Parker and professor of theoretical physics Andrea Rapisarda look at the role mathematics plays in elections and the way politicians behave. Andrea argues political decisions would be improved if politicians were selected at random rather than elected, but Matt sees the mathematical flaw in electoral systems, which he likens to rolling a dice – one where the voters hardly ever get the outcome they wish for.

Its 40 years since British scientist Godfrey Hounsfield invented the CT scan. This multilayered use of x ray imagery has revolutionised the diagnosis of internal health problems and is used worldwide. We speak to Liz Beckmann, one of Godfrey Hounsfield’s former colleagues and the co author of a new book on his life and work, out this week; 'Godfrey Hounsfield: Intuitive Genius of CT'

And we continue our experiments for 'So You Want To Be A Scientist'...


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01gf4pt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01gd592)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01gf5xg)
European markets tumble and the Dutch Government falls - is the euro crisis back?

Tory MP, Nadine Dorries, calls David cameron and George Osborne "arrogant posh boys" - do her fellow Tory MPs share that view?

A leading female Arab writer says the Arab world hates women - is she right?

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01gf5xj)
The House on Paradise Street

Episode 6

Sofka Zinovieff's novel about an Englishwoman's quest to find out the origins of the bitter feud that has split her dead husband's family is set in contemporary Athens, but takes us back to the tragic events of the Greek Civil War in the 1940s. When Nikitas is killed in a mysterious car crash, his English widow Maud meets for the first time his mother Antigone, who has returned from Russia after sixty years' of exile from Athens. Antigone is slowly beginning to reveal to Maud the events which broke her family apart.
Abridged by Sarah LeFanu

Readers: Lucy Briers and Ann Beach
Producer: Sara Davies.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b01g61vp)
As the 100-day countdown to the Olympics begins, Chris Ledgard examines how trademark law can control the language of the games, and asks if word use can ever be effectively contained and controlled. He meets historians charting usage of the term "olympic" over centuries; talks to comedy producer Jon Plowman about the BBC mockumentary "Twenty Twelve", and discovers that one American university wants some words banned altogether.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01gf5xn)
The Chancellor defends his decision to lend a further £10 billion to the International Monetary Fund.
George Osborne tells MPs it is in Britain's national interest to provide the extra funding. But Labour and Conservative MPs criticise the move.
In the House of Lords, peers defeat the Government again over its plans for legal aid in England and Wales.
And MPs pay tribute to former Labour MP Jack Ashley - Lord Ashley of Stoke - who died last week.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 24 APRIL 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01gd59x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01gf5sk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01gd59z)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01gd5b1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01gd5b3)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01gd5b5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ghtqb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Dr Jeremy Morris, Dean of King's College Cambridge.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01gg7cd)
Anna Hill hears about a dairy farmer who is sending cow embryos by plane to China to set up herds with British bloodlines. The farmer from Somerset already has orders to help set up farms with 10,000 animals. Around 80% of countries across South East Asia are dependent on importing milk and dairy products and demand is growing.

In five years time plastics, medicines and cosmetics could be made, in part, from old egg shells or banana skins. Each year the UK generates more than 17 million tonnes of food waste and now scientists at the University of Leicester are investigating how it could be re-used.

And conservationist Mark Avery and the National Farmers Union spokesperson on wildlife, Guy Smith respond to claims of a biodiversity crisis across Europe.

This programme is presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01gg7cg)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis, including: 07:45 The Mass Trespass of Kinder Scout mountain 08:10 A local authority in East London says it has been forced to ask a housing association in Stoke-on-Trent to accommodate families on housing benefit. 08:20 Are political changes making the European economy nervous?


TUE 09:00 Children of the Olympic Bid (b01gg7cj)
Series 7

Episode 1

Peter has followed them from their dramatic appearance alongside Sebastian Coe in Singapore, through their sporting triumphs and failures, GCSE's, A-levels and University courses, successful and unsuccessful love affairs, emigration, rows with parents, and in one case a brush with the police. As the games approach he finds out what has happened to them and those who live and train alongside them - from Ellie, the poster girl of the bid, who has now been selected for the British swim team, to Danielle, the dancer, who has been chosen to take part in the opening ceremony.

When Sebastian Coe presented London's bid for the Games to the IOC in 2005 he was flanked on the stage by 30 East End youngsters who represented the rich cultural diversity of their community. Faces of young sporting hopefuls appeared on billboards and the hopes and dreams they embodied became those of the nation. Radio 4's commitment to following their lives has resulted in tremendous access to youngsters from very different backgrounds as they emerge into adulthood and deal with issues ranging from romance to the direction they should take.

As 2012 draws near we hear from Ellie, pictured all those years ago as she dived from the Thames Barrier with the Olympic rings behind her. She moved to Australia, where better access to high quality training facilities, coupled with sheer dedication and talent, have helped her secure a place in the GB team: "Its such a relief, I've been planning this for the last four years and it's amazing to be able to say I'm going to the Olympics. I've been building up to it, I've been training to it and I'm so excited to have made the team."

According to her Mum, Toni, the combined prayers or relatives, family and friends across two continents, coupled with years of hard work, helped realise a dream first captured with her place helping the bid, seven years ago: "She's a London girl and she's made the London Olympics. Who would of thought when she was 12 and helped with the bid, that first of all London would get the Olympics and then that Ellie would make the team - it's like a fairy tale. For the little kids out there thinking I want to go to the Olympics, the message is that if you set your heart on something you can achieve it no matter how impossible it might seem."

Danielle will be dancing in the opening ceremony, her life having taken unexpected twists and turns - including the recent reconciliation of her parents, who originally divorced when she was just seven. Ashley has also experienced unforeseen developments - he lost his place on the third year of his economic degree course and Peter is alongside him as he copes with life on benefits. He has not, however, lost his commitment to the Olympics - once a promising 2012 prospect, injury put pay to his hopes of competing. He is now overseeing the Youth Ambassador scheme and encouraging youngsters to build on the 2012 opportunities, including funding and facilities: "Its amazing to see the completion of this fantastic Olympic project. "

Producer: Sue Mitchell.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b016wxtz)
Evan Davis talks to Rob George

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth . From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.
In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01gk4rq)
Sightlines

Pathologies

Read by: Maureen Beattie
Abridged by: Pete Nichols

"The outer world flew open like a door, and I wondered - what is it that we're just not seeing?"

In the second essay from her new book SIGHTLINES, Jamie recalls how the loss of her mother affected her and took her on an unlikely journey

Five years after FINDINGS broke the mould of nature writing, award-winning Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie subtly shifts our focus on landscape and the living world, daring us to look again at the natural, the remote and the human-made.

"Kathleen Jamie, the Scottish poet, has written a book that transcends the definition of nature study ... SIGHTLINES is a work of intense purity and quiet genius and we're lucky to have it."
Philip Hoare
The Sunday Telegraph

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01gg7cl)
Tips on revision for exams.

With exam season looming, is there a way of constructive way to help the kids with their revision without causing more stress and aggravation? Will women who've been raped be put off coming forward following news that a victim has been named on a social media site? What role do Chinese women play in politics? More on whether pregnant women are getting the right information about vitamin D. Plus Shakespeare in Kabul.
Presenter Jane Garvey.
Producer Lucinda Montefiore.


TUE 10:45 A Small Town Murder (b01gk4rs)
Episode 2

By Scott Cherry

In the second episode of 'A Small Town Murder' by Scott Cherry: Family Liaison Officer, Jackie Hartwell, gets closer to identifying the malnourished body of the young man found floating in the canal.

Jackie Hartwell (played by Meera Syal) is a West Midlands Family Liaison Officer who solves cases by winning the trust of those caught up in the nightmare of serious crime and murder.

Police guidelines: The primary function of an FLO is that of an investigator. In performing this role, the officer will support the family, but will also gather relevant information and intelligence.

Jackie is a serving copper, not a social worker, functioning as part of an active team of investigating CID officers. But working in liaison enables her to get closer to the people involved in the crime, closer to the raw emotions, than the rest of her colleagues - allowing her to investigate in a way they can't, as she combines empathy and intuition with the keen observation of a clever detective.

In Series 4 of 'A Small Town Murder', Jackie is asked to be FLO to the parents of a young man whose murdered body is found floating in the local canal. But as she tries to support the family and solve the murder, Jackie finds herself becoming more and more distracted by the tragic consequences of a previous case.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:00 Nature (b01gg7cn)
Series 6

Hedgehogs

Hedgehogs are in decline in the UK. We know this from a number of studies and from the fewer corpses we see on our roads: ironically the more flattened hedgehogs, the greater the likelihood of a strong population. But teasing the facts from the image we have created of a vulnerable creature that has to be rescued and nurtured, is a challenge.

For Nature, Paul Evans meets the scientists who are grappling with surveys and techniques for assessing hedgehog numbers and status, scientists like Tom Moorhouse from Oxford University's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit who's beginning a study to radio-track hedgehogs on arable farmland. The study is funded by the British Hedgehog Preservation Society and the People's Trust for Endangered Species, a sure sign that the need to stem the decline of our hedgehogs has become urgent.

Producer: Brett Westwood
Editor: Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Folk Song, Art Song (b01gg7dm)
Christopher Maltman is an award-winning opera singer and recitalist. Alongside the lieders, chansons and art songs of his recital repertoire, he loves nothing more than performing folk song settings.

Audiences often respond well, but not all among the folk-singing fraternity are enthusiastic about this genre borrowing. Some contend that folk songs lose much of their impact when refined and beautified for the recital stage.

Christopher talks to folk singer Eliza Carthy and scholars Georgina Boyes and Tim Healey about the uneasy relationship between the two musical worlds.

Is the antagonism musical or to do with very English attitudes to class and accent? And why is it that so many of his opera-singing colleagues from Scotland, Ireland, Wales and further afield, have no such animosity from their respective folk cultures?

Christopher also talks to his regular recital accompanist Julius Drake and senior colleague Sir Thomas Allen about the best way of approaching this music, searching for a performance that is genuine to singer and song alike.

Producer: Tom Alban

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2012.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01gg7dp)
Call You and Yours: Is the Dangerous Dogs Act fit for purpose?

Call You and Yours: Is the Dangerous Dogs Act fit for purpose?

There have been five fatal dog attacks in homes since 2007 - four of them on children - and hospital admissions for serious dog bites have more than doubled over the past decade, according to figures from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Now DEFRA has announced changes to the 1991 act in an attempt to clamp down on people who fail to control their dogs and reduce attacks.

It will now be an offence for pet owners to 'fail to control their animals within their house or garden' - previously only public land was covered. There'll also more comprehensive micro-chipping of dogs, as called for by major animal charities and many members of the public.

Defra have also promised more support for the police, councils and charities who deal with what they call 'irresponsible or dangerous owners and their dogs".

But do these measures go far enough to prevent dog attacks?

We want to hear what you think ............especially if you're a dog breeder or if you've owned dogs classed as dangerous - like Pit Bulls or Japanese Tosas. Also if you know first hand what it is like to be attacked by a dog, do get in touch to share your experience.

03700 100 444 is the phone number - a call will cost you the same as dialling an 01 or an 02 number - you can e-mail via bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours, or you can text to 84844, and if you do that it will cost you your standard operator message rate and we may call you back on that number.

Presented by Julian Worricker
Produced by Karen Dalziel.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01gd5b7)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01gg7dr)
As James Murdoch gives evidence to the Leveson Inquiry into media standards, we have reaction from the Labour MP Tom Watson and the BBC's Business Editor, Robert Peston.
Also how real are concerns that the introduction of full passport checks are causing lengthy delays at major airports?
And we report from Holland in wake of the government collapse there.


TUE 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01gg7dt)
Ireland: Failures in the Present

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, continues his new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 7. IRELAND: FAILURES IN THE PRESENT - A rare woodcut offers a equally rare visual impression of the troubles and tragedies of Elizabethan Ireland.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01gf5wm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01gg7fr)
The Biggest Issues

Sally Stone, a shock jock who hosts a show entitled 'The Biggest Issues', has made her name by stirring up local grievances; everything from mistreated dogs to the issue of free gastric bands. Sally is well aware that her listeners have a healthy appetite for Health matters, and a love hate relationship with the NHS.

When Sally gets a call from a listener complaining that her elderly mother has died of neglect at the local hospital she immediately begins a campaign of attrition against the accused doctor and the hospital she works at. But in their eagerness to follow the story, Sally's researcher has failed to reveal that her elderly woman was 17 stone, had had a lung removed twenty years earlier due to heavy smoking.and had continued to smoke after the operation. This was a patient who had virtually zero chance of surviving an operation.

But untroubled by the facts, Stone's radio show 'The Biggest Issues' pursues the story with vigour. Newspapers pick up the trail and the consultant's name is leaked. Her family is door - stepped by reporters and her teenage son is driven to the verge of suicide.

Annie McCartney has written a number of plays for Radio 4, series, including Two Doors Down and several short stories. She has also written three successful novels and is currently working on her fourth book.

'The Biggest Issues' by Annie McCartney

Sally Stone ..... Eleanor Methven
Jill McEwan ...... Maureen Beattie
Jerry Cartwright ..... Conleth Hill
Dorothy Megarry ...... Stella McCusker
Clive Watson ...... Ian McElhinney
Bill Campbell ..... Patrick FitzSymons
Tim Webb ...... Ryan McParland
Jane Douglas ..... Katy Gleadhill
Sharon Harvey ..... Aine McCartney

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan in Belfast.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b01gg7ft)
Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today - refugee camps in seventeenth century London; the introductions of Scots Pine to England; help needed on the lives of Black American servicemen in wartime Dorset; and back to the future on the French Aerotrain.

Join in by contacting the programme:
Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk
Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL
Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b01gg7fw)
Cruise Ships and Creeks

It is the third-largest natural harbour in the world but even so, it isn't deep enough for modern ships. Falmouth in Cornwall wants to invest £100 million to modernise its ship-repairing docks and facilities for cruise liners.

The project would create hundreds of jobs, protect existing businesses and bring cash-laden tourists into the surrounding area. It depends on being able to dredge the channel into the harbour and that's where the problem lies - to do so would mean digging up rare calcified seaweed called maerl which is protected by law and lies in a special conservation area.

It's a classic stand-off between economic development and protecting the natural environment- now specialist marine scientists have been called in to see whether both sides can be satisfied. Tom Heap gets to grips with rare seaweed and big bucks in Cornwall for 'Costing The Earth'.

Producer: Steve Peacock.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b01gg7fy)
Losing Your Parents' Language

What's it like to lose the language spoken by your parents? Michael Rosen goes to meet families in which parents and children have different mother tongues. He meets those who have made the decision to bring their children up in English, and asks their children what it's like when your parents speak a language you can't understand. He also talks to parents who want to ensure that their language continues down the generations, and fear "losing" their children to English.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b01gg7g0)
Series 27

George Lyward

The musician and broadcaster Tom Robinson nominates educationalist George Lyward in this episode of Great Lives.

Aged 15 and struggling with his sexuality, Tom Robinson attempted to take his own life and had a nervous breakdown. Following a series of assessments and tests, he was interviewed for Finchden Manor, a therapeutic community founded by George Lyward.

Tom shares his own experience, explaining to Matthew Parris how he believes Lyward saved his life. Former Finchden teacher Dr Norman Alm is also on hand to provide expert assistance.

Lyward's work is also assessed in the context of the 2011 summer riots, as Matthew asks his guests what should society do with its troubled teens.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01gg7g2)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01gd5b9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b01gg7g4)
Series 8

Making a Difference

Ed Reardon leads us through the ups and down of his week, complete with his trusty companion, Elgar, and his never-ending capacity for scrimping and scraping at whatever scraps his agent, Ping, can offer him to keep body, mind and cat together.

Ed decides to 'Make a Difference' to impress Fiona and as a consequence finds himself becoming 'a voice for the people' when he joins a group trying to change the railways. As a consequence he finds himself on local radio representing the group and 'channelling grumpy', and astonishingly finds that people agree with his views and find his conversation 'totes legde'. Thus it is that 'Captain Grumblebum' is created.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas.
Produced by Dawn Ellis.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01gg7g6)
Tom's buzzing from yesterday's business success. He'd like to continue with the ready meals while he's got the momentum. But he has a rethink when he discovers his dad's still using the old methods on the computer. He tells David that having to re-do Tony's work is frustrating.
Peggy doesn't want Tony to take on too much, but she doesn't want to see Tom bogged down with routine tasks. She thinks it would be a much better use of his time if he took over more of the strategic planning for the farm. Ideas like the ready meals are vital to Bridge Farm's future. She's concerned that whilst Pat understands this, Tony sees them as some kind of add-on.
David's had a call about a suspicious car parked near Home Farm, and wants to take a look. He calls Tom, who gives him the news his quad bike's been found. With no sign of anything suspicious at Home Farm, David heads back to Brookfield. Ruth's sceptical about all this extra caution, but David thinks it might well be what's put the thieves off. Ruth concedes prevention's better than cure, while David admits they do need to keep it in proportion.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01gg7g8)
Glenn Close as Albert Nobbs; Harry Shearer on Nixon

With Mark Lawson.

Glenn Close takes the title role in the film Albert Nobbs, the tale of a woman pretending to be man in order to work as a butler in 19th century Dublin. Booker Prize-winning novelist John Banville wrote the screenplay. Antonia Quirke reviews.

Actor Harry Shearer is known for providing the voices for a number of characters in The Simpsons, including Mr Burns, as well as starring in the 1984 spoof rockumentary This is Spinal Tap. This week he steps into the shoes of Richard Nixon in a new TV comedy-drama Nixon's the One, which reveals what went on behind the scenes, based on an archive of more than 198 hours of recordings made between February 1971 and 1973.

Dramatist Robert Holman's triptych of plays Making Noise Quietly has just received a new London production. The Yorkshire-born playwright looks back at a career which goes back to the 1970s, and includes work at the RSC, the National Theatre and in the West End.

The BAFTA Television Awards nominations are announced today. Last year's drama series winner Sherlock has received three acting nominations, but is not in contention for a drama award. Gabriel Tate, TV editor of Time Out, discusses the categorisation and selections for the drama prizes.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


TUE 19:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01gg7dt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Nigerian Crossroads (b01gg7gb)
Mark Doyle investigates the Nigerian paradox. He reports from a Lagos international fashion show - and overflies a network of illegal oil refineries. He visits a polo club where relatively wealthy players favour Argentine ponies - and finds himself in a camp for displaced people which looks like it could be in war-torn Somalia.

Nigeria, the giant of West Africa, has the largest population of any African country. It's among the top dozen producers of oil in the world, and has a vibrant, growing economy. It's a country that could - perhaps should - be a significant player on the world stage. But Nigeria's communities are also torn apart by communal and religious violence. And in recent years a new, radical Islamist group has emerged to challenge the power of the state across the north of the country. Thousands have been killed as the police and the followers of the sect battle it out in places of worship, police stations and on the streets.

BBC Correspondent Mark Doyle has been visiting Nigeria for over twenty years. He finds the country to be sometimes inspiring and sometimes intensely frustrating. He asks whether Nigeria will grow into a confident democracy or whether it will collapse into a state of semi-permanent violence.
Producer: Sam Farmar.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01gg7gd)
Peter White asks the Macular Disease Society for their reaction to Novartis's decision to seek a judicial review into the use by 4 PCTs of the drug Avastin, which is being used off-label to treat people with Age-related Macular Degeneration.
As the regulator NICE has not issued any guidance to PCTs, as the drug is not licensed for use in the eye, the decision to use it currently rests with clinicians.
The programme asks what the significance is of the judicial review and the possible consequences for people with AMD seeking treatment in the future.
Lee Kumutat joins a ballet workshop designed to give blind people an enhanced experience of the performance.
Lee finds herself doing a pirouette when she least expected it and talks to other VIPs about their experience of the hands-on workshop.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01gg7gq)
Teenage depression, Choir, Heart failure, Protein shakes

In Inside Health, Mark Porter clarifies recent headlines claiming that researchers have found a "Blood test that identifies depression". It certainly isn't that simple.

GP Margaret McCartney reports from Paisley Abbey in Glasgow on the health benefits of joining a choir.

And do special muscle building drinks live up to the marketing hype? Max Pemberton looks at the science behind the recent explosion in sales of high protein sports drinks.

Plus a new treatment for helping people with fluid retention due to heart failure, that can transform a puffy face to a chiselled jaw bone overnight.

Producer: Erika Wright.


TUE 21:30 Children of the Olympic Bid (b01gg7cj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01gd5bc)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01gg7gs)
Dramatic revelations at the Leveson inquiry as James Murdoch gives evidence - how much pressure is Culture Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, now under?

The UN hears that latest on the violence in Syria.

A female Arab writer claims that the Arab world 'hates women' - is she right?

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01gg7gv)
The House on Paradise Street

Episode 7

Sofka Zinovieff's novel about an Englishwoman's quest to find out the origins of the bitter feud that has split her dead husband's family is set in contemporary Athens, but takes us back to the tragic events of the Greek Civil War in the 1940s. It's been three weeks since Maud's husband Nikitas died in a mysterious car crash, and Maud has started to hear from his mother Antigone the story of what happened in the civil war that tore the country apart in the 1940s. Meanwhile, Maud's children are involved in the most recent political protests in Athens.
Abridged by Sarah LeFanu

Readers: Lucy Briers and Ann Beach
Producer: Sara Davies.


TUE 23:00 Great Unanswered Questions (b013fj1w)
Edinburgh Special

Comedy talk show recorded at last year's Edinburgh Festival. Northern Irish comedian Colin Murphy and team are joined by special guest Andrew Maxwell. Resident font of knowledge Dr David Booth attempts to answer the questions presented by the audience and as the others debate and discuss, computer buff Matthew Collins trawls the internet to find content which will enhance the humour and knowledge.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01gg7gx)
Sean Curran reports on a day at Westminster marked by clashes over the economy; an appearance at a select committee by the comedian Russell Brand; and fears from cyclists about the dangers they face one the roads.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 25 APRIL 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01gd5c6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01gk4rq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01gd5c8)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01gd5cb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01gd5cd)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01gd5cg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01ghvv0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Dr Jeremy Morris, Dean of King's College Cambridge.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01gg8gr)
As attacks on sheep by dogs are on the rise, farmers make a fresh appeal to walkers to control their animals. Anna Hill hears how one attack devastated a farmers' pedigree flock. The National Sheep Association tells Farming Today over 100 incidents have now been reported on its helpline.

And a farmer explains why proposed changes to the Common Agricultural Policy is resulting in him digging up 100 acres of his permanent pasture. David Thompson believes many more farmers will follow his lead as they pre-empt the future policy protecting grassland.

Producer: Clare Freeman.


WED 06:00 Today (b01gg8gt)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb. Including:

0649
As part of our party leader interviews, Caroline Lucas MP, leader of the Green Party speaks to the Today programme's Justin Webb ahead of the local elections on 3 May.
0720
The traditional fairground sideshow is making a comeback, with a new performance devoted to them at London's Roundhouse.The BBC's Tom Bateman reports.
0743
In the summer, Felix Baumgartner is going to attempt to break the world sky-diving record. He's not just doing a high parachute jump, he's going up to the edge of space. Felix Baumagartner and Joe Kittinger, the current record holder, explain why.
0751
Tonight, the Oxford University Scientific Society will be debating the motion "This house wants to defeat ageing entirely". Colin Blakemore, Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Oxford Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, explains why he thinks the concept isn't feasible.
0810
Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt has rejected Labour calls for him to resign over claims that he privately supported attempts by News Corporation to take full control of BSkyB. The BBC's Peter Hunt reports on the revelations from the Leveson inquiry. Lord Fowler, former Conservative party chairman, and Damian Collins MP, Conservative member of the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee, discuss their implications Political editor Nick Robinson gives his analysis.
0833
To mark the Queen's Jubilee year, the Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy has edited a specially commissioned anthology of poems - Jubilee Lines. She reads her poem The Thames, London 2012.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01gg8gw)
James Cracknell; Susannah Corbett; Nick Freeman - Mr Loophole; Gennaro Contaldo

Libby Purves is joined by Olympian James Cracknell, actor and children's author Susannah Corbett, lawyer Nick Freeman aka Mr Loophole and chef Gennaro Contaldo.

James Cracknell is the two time Olympic gold medallist and six time World Champion rower. Now turned adventurer, he can be seen in the new series The World's Toughest Expeditions in which he takes on some of the most arduous expeditions in history. These endeavours range from tracing the steps of Colonel Fawcett's infamous 1925 expedition to the Amazonian jungle to David Livingstone's 1853 journey across Southern Africa in which James takes on the same Zambezi rapids. The World's Toughest Expeditions with James Cracknell is on Discovery Channel.

Actor and children's author Susannah Corbett is the daughter of the late actor Harry H Corbett, of Steptoe and Son fame. Susannah has written a biography of his life, 'The Front Legs of the Cow' which tells of how he rose from the slums of Manchester to become one of the best known television stars of his generation. 'The Front Legs of the Cow' is published by The History Press.

Nick Freeman is a criminal defence lawyer. Known as Mr Loophole, he uses legal technicalities to get his clients acquitted for driving offences - hence his moniker. His clients have included Sir Alex Ferguson, David Beckham, Ronnie O'Sullivan, Katie Price and Jimmy Carr. His book, 'The Art of the Loophole Making The Law Work For You' is published by Hodder and Stoughton.

Gennaro Contaldo is a chef who taught Jamie Oliver all he knows about Italian cooking. He is currently appearing in the BBC2 series Two Greedy Italians Eat Italy alongside his friend Antonio Carluccio. In the series the two men explore Italy in search of people, produce and tradition. There is a book to accompany the series published by Quadrille Publishing. Two Greedy Italians is on BBC Two.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01gk6c0)
Sightlines

The Woman in the Field

Read by: Maureen Beattie
Abridged by: Pete Nichols

"The outer world flew open like a door, and I wondered - what is it that we're just not seeing?"

In the third essay from her book, SIGHTLINES, Scottish poet and travel writer Kathleen Jamie recalls how a simple cup shaped her future.

Five years after FINDINGS broke the mould of nature writing, award-winning Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie subtly shifts our focus on landscape and the living world, daring us to look again at the natural, the remote and the human-made.

"Kathleen Jamie, the Scottish poet, has written a book that transcends the definition of nature study ... SIGHTLINES is a work of intense purity and quiet genius and we're lucky to have it."
Philip Hoare
The Sunday Telegraph

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01gg8gy)
Action against child neglect; Pianist Janina Fialkowska on returning to performance following surgery for cancer of the arm; Cook the Perfect Seafood Salad with Mitch Tonks; Doris Lessing on the 50th Anniversary of the publication of The Golden Notebook; The 7 Myths of Middle Age - what brands need to realise about marketing to women over 50. Presented by Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 A Small Town Murder (b01gk6c2)
Episode 3

By Scott Cherry

In the third episode of 'A Small Town Murder' by Scott Cherry: Family Liaison Officer, Jackie Hartwell, is finding it hard to win Sue and Carl's trust.

Jackie Hartwell (played by Meera Syal) is a West Midlands Family Liaison Officer who solves cases by winning the trust of those caught up in the nightmare of serious crime and murder.

Police guidelines: The primary function of an FLO is that of an investigator. In performing this role, the officer will support the family, but will also gather relevant information and intelligence.

Jackie is a serving copper, not a social worker, functioning as part of an active team of investigating CID officers. But working in liaison enables her to get closer to the people involved in the crime, closer to the raw emotions, than the rest of her colleagues - allowing her to investigate in a way they can't, as she combines empathy and intuition with the keen observation of a clever detective.

In Series 4 of 'A Small Town Murder', Jackie is asked to be FLO to the parents of a young man whose murdered body is found floating in the local canal. But as she tries to support the family and solve the murder, Jackie finds herself becoming more and more distracted by the tragic consequences of a previous case.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4


WED 11:00 A Kiss Is .... Never Just a Kiss (b01gg8h0)
The kiss is the most deceptive gesture.

Seemingly simple, it is in fact a highly complex action and - depending on the depth of passion used - can ignite a plethora of emotional, sensual and physical reactions including lowering blood pleasure, extending life expectancy and helping to choose a mate.

But the kiss we know and practice today, didn't always have emotional and erotic overtones. In Roman times a kiss was used as a symbol of power. The Greeks believed that breath was the life of man, and kissing an adored object represented a sort of sacrifice. And when European explorers introduced the practice of kissing in South Africa, the Tsonga people were horrified. So you see, the idea of kissing someone on the lips hasn't always thrilled people.

Today, just about every culture on the planet kisses - but some cultures are still reluctant. In Arab countries, public displays of affection can land you in prison - and if you kiss someone in Japan, you can find yourself engaged to be married!

Rowan Pelling - former Editor of the Erotic Review Rowan - tries to discover how and why our views of kissing have changed and whether it has lost some of its magic with over-use, and takes a lesson in how to do it for stage and screen when you've never met the person you're kissing before.

Producer: Angela Hind

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in April 2012.


WED 11:30 My First Planet (b01gg8h2)
Series 1

The Noticeboard of Doom

Written by Phil Whelans

Day 27 and the colonists are torn between Richard's newsletter and Archer's hot pants. And which is more dangerous - Brian's monkey wrench or Lillian's "vitamin" drink"?

A sitcom set on a shiny new planet where we ask the question - if humankind were to colonise space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Welcome to the colony. We're aware that having been in deep cryosleep for 73 years, you may be in need of some supplementary information.

Personnel
Unfortunately, Burrows the leader of the colony has died on the voyage, so his Number 2, Brian (Nicholas Lyndhurst) is now in charge. He's a nice enough chap, but no alpha male, and his desire to sort things out with a nice friendly meeting infuriates the colony's Chief Physician Lillian (Vicki Pepperdine - "Getting On"), who'd really rather everyone was walking round in tight colour-coded tunics and saluting each other. She's also in charge of Project Adam, the plan to conceive and give birth to the first colony-born baby. Unfortunately, the two people hand-picked for this purpose - Carol and Richard - were rather fibbing about being a couple, just to get on the trip.

Add in an entirely unscrupulous Chief Scientist, Mason and also Archer, an idiot maintenance man who believes he's an "empath" rather than a plumber, and you're all set to answer the question - if humankind were to colonise space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive Television Ltd Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01gg8h4)
What's it like to suffer from diabetes?

What it's like to suffer from diabetes? What is the difference from Type 1 & Type 2? Can you suffer from a milder of more severe type of diabetes?

Disability access to five of the major price comparison websites have been found to be non-compliant with the EHRC guidelines and are deemed illegal.

A growing number of councils across the country are contracting out their clothes donation banks to the private sector. Clothing donation banks make up a significant proportion of a charities' income and many of them are worried this is the start of a wider trend as cash starved councils look for new ways to raise revenue.

As the FSA continue to close down firms offering landbanking opportunities, people who invested in similar schemes which went bust in 2009 have just found out they are not going to get any of their money back.

How many of us actually know how to choose good oil, to check the label, the colour of the oil and the harvest date? After alcohol, olive oil takes up the largest amount of shelf space of any single ingredient in British supermarkets, yet we know very little about what goes in to our oil.

We hoard them in jars for that rainy day but is the penny piece on it's way out?

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Maire Devine.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01gd5cj)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01gh8mr)
As official statistics show the UK economy tipping back into recession, we're joined live by the Shadow Chancellor, Ed Balls and the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Danny Alexander.
We have reaction to the Commons statement from the Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt following yesterday's revelations at the Leveson Inquiry and the resignation of his special adviser.
And we report on Rupert Murdoch's evidence to the Leveson Inquiry.


WED 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01gg8h6)
City Life, Urban Strife

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, continues his new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 8. CITY LIFE, URBAN STRIFE - The life of London's apprentices and Shakespeare's groundlings told through a rare woollen cap.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01gg7g6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01gg8hl)
Red and Blue

Terror

By Philip Palmer

Military consultant Bradley Shoreham has been invited to discuss possible war game scenarios involving new terror attacks on London. But just how hypothetical is this consultation?

Bradley Shoreham . . . . . Tim Woodward
Brigadier Fraser . . . . . Bill Paterson
The Waiter . . . . . James Lailey
Defence Secretary . . . . . Christine Absalom
Head of Intelligence . . . . . Peter Hamilton Dyer

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01gg8hv)
Divorce and separation

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01gg7gq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01gg8hx)
Raoul Moat - the media story; Indian sex workers

The sad story of the hunt for the lone gunman Raoul Moat had many of the ingredients of classic crime fiction: a countryside location; an outsider against the law and an extraordinary set of tragic circumstances that unfolded over time. In this edition of Thinking Allowed Laurie Taylor speaks to Michael Rowe, a criminologist at the centre of the crisis. He gave countless media interviews at the time and has now conducted a study of how 24 hour news media used the rubric of crime fiction to present events in a gripping way. He argues, however, that it was a method in which truth and understanding seem to have been amongst the victims.
Also on the programme Prabha Kotiswaran discusses her ethnographic study of the daily and nightly life of prostitutes in two of India's cities.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01gh8mt)
Rupert Murdoch at the Leveson Inquiry

Steve Hewlett canvasses reaction to today's evidence from Rupert Murdoch with Ben Fenton of the Financial Times and Sarah Ellison, formerly of the Wall Street Journal and now contributing editor of Vanity Fair. Steve traces the rise of the Murdochs - and politicians' interest in them - from Margaret Thatcher onwards, with former cabinet member Lord Fowler, former Guardian editor Peter Preston and Claire Enders of Enders Analysis. Moving on to the BSkyB takeover that dominated yesterday's coverage of James Murdoch's evidence, the panel are joined by Steward Purvis, formerly of OFCOM. Are the controls on media ownership, which the Murdochs have challenged over the decades, as relevant now as they were before the rise of the internet? Should politicians be taken out of decisions about media ownership?

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01gh8mw)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01gd5cl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Castle (b00t7f96)
Series 3

The Vuvuzela of Terror

Hie ye to The Castle, a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley", "Four Weddings & A Funeral") and Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley")

In this episode, we discover that an Englishman's home is his castle and an Englishman's moat is his tax write-off. Until Sir John is investigated and has to hire some Frenchmen and a bucket of eels. Meanwhile, the Woodstock Hospital is about to lose its no-star status...

Cast:
Sir John Woodstock ....... James Fleet
Sir William De Warenne ....... Neil Dudgeon
Lady Anne Woodstock ........ Martha Howe-Douglas
Cardinal Duncan ........ Jonathan Kydd
Lady Charlotte ....... Ingrid Oliver
Master Henry Woodstock ....... Steven Kynman
Merlin ....... Lewis Macleod

Written by Kim Fuller & Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson

Producer/Director: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01gh8my)
Ebullient Jennifer rings Alice to tell her the dairy plans have got the go-ahead, but Alice is downbeat; Chris's van's been broken into. They only took a few tools, but Chris is having to rearrange work while the van's fixed. And he's worried the insurance won't pay out. Jennifer wants to help, but Alice wishes she wouldn't fuss.
The good news is that Alice has passed her exams. Just as she and Chris are about to celebrate, Jennifer turns up with a bottle of wine. They have a drink and speculate on Alice's job prospects. At last Alice encourages her mother to leave, and she and Chris pick up where they left off.
With Alan on retreat, Usha attends a Chamber of Commerce event alone. She bumps into Carl, and after some surprise and a polite chat they go their separate ways. Admiring a beautiful, elegant woman across the room, Usha asks Annabelle about the man standing next to her. Annabelle explains that the woman is a hot shot lawyer, and the gorgeous man is her husband - Carl. Annabelle laments that some people have it all; doesn't it make you sick? Usha agrees that yes, indeed it does.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01gh8n0)
Michael Frayn, Derek Walcott, and David Hare's play South Downs

With Mark Lawson.

Michael Frayn discusses his new novel Skios, a story of mislaid identity, confusion and miscalculated consequences set on a Greek island. And in the light of an acclaimed new revival of his stage farce Noises Off, he also reflects on the hits and misses of his theatrical career.

David Hare's latest play South Downs was commissioned by Chichester Festival Theatre as a companion piece to Terence Rattigan's one act play The Browning Version. Anna Chancellor takes a leading role in the two plays, which are both set in minor public schools half a century ago. Kathryn Hughes reviews.

The Nobel Prize-winning Caribbean poet Derek Walcott is in the UK to direct a professional production of his 1978 play Pantomime. He considers his approach to the stage and to poetry, and why he chose this particular play for revival.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01gg8h6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:45 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b01gh8n2)
Transitional Justice

Clive Anderson and top legal experts discuss the best way to achieve justice in the wake of massive human rights violations in the Arab Spring countries. What role should the international community play in the process?
Libyan lawyer Elham Saudi and US ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues, Stephen Rapp, reflect on how successfully transitional justice was achieved in the past, in Sierra Leone, Rwanda, Iraq, South Africa and Yugoslavia, and argue about the best way forward in Libya as well as in Egypt and Tunisia.

Should prominent members of the former Libyan regime, such as Saif Gadaffi, be tried in Libya, where they would face the death penalty, or dealt with in the International Criminal Court in The Hague?

Other guests on the programme are Claudio Cordone of the International Centre for Transitional Justice and Geoffrey Robertson QC who served as the first President of the Special Court in Sierra Leone.

Are criminal trials the best way to address the horrors of a long and brutal regime? Or are truth and reconciliation commissions better placed to allow a society to move forward? And if there are to be trials, should members of revolutionary forces also be prosecuted for human rights violations?

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01gh8n4)
Series 3

June Andrews: A Revolution for Dementia Treatment

Professor June Andrews, Director, the Dementia Services Development Centre, University of Stirling, argues for a revolution in our approach to dealing with dementia. She outlines immediate low cost changes that would make a dramatic difference to delaying the onset of the illness and caring for people with dementia.
Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01gg7fw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01gg8gw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01gd5cn)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01gh8n6)
Robin Lustig presents national and international news and analysis.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01gh8n8)
The House on Paradise Street

Episode 8

Sofka Zinovieff's novel about an Englishwoman's quest to find out the origins of the bitter feud that has split her dead husband's family is set in contemporary Athens, but takes us back to the tragic events of the Greek Civil War in the 1940s. Maud feels that the explanation for her husband Nikitas' death in a mysterious car crash lies in his family's troubled past. Nikiats' mother Antigone has returned to Athens after sixty years' exile in Russia, and has begun to reveal to Maud the reasons for her long exile and the enmity between her and her sister Alexandria.
Abridged by Sarah LeFanu

Reader: Ann Beach.


WED 23:00 The Music Teacher (b01gh8nb)
Series 2

Episode 4

Richie Webb returns as multi-instrumentalist music teacher Nigel Penny.

Nigel's attempts to field calls from a dating agency whilst teaching don't go quite as planned. Meanwhile Belinda is attempting to track down the elusive Arts Centre Cleaner, who has taken refuge in Nigel's room.

Directed by Nick Walker
Audio production by Matt Katz

Written and produced by Richie Webb
A Top Dog Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 The Cornwell Estate (b00vy29g)
Series 2

Hank Zuttermilk

Phil Cornwell brings six edgy comic characters to life in a new series of The Cornwell Estate, starring Tony Gardner (Fresh Meat), Roger Lloyd Pack (Only Fools and Horses, Vicar of Dibley), Simon Greenall (Alan Partridge) Daisy Haggard (Psychoville) Ricky Champ (Him and Her, BBC3) Jill Halfpenny (Eastenders, Legally Blonde) and Cyril Nri.

Written by Andrew McGibbon and Phil Cornwell

Hank is a Dutch long distance container driver who lives on the estate with his London girlfriend Suzi. When her father Ray tells Hank his daughter is pregnant, Hank is faced with some troubling choices.

Cast:
Hank Zuttermilk ...... Phil Cornwell
Ray Faulkner ...... Ricky Champ
Ruud ...... Cyril Nri
Customs Officer 1 ...... Toby Longworth
Customs Officer 2 ...... Abigail Hollick

Producer/Director: Andrew McGibbon
A Curtains For Radio Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01gh8zl)
Alicia McCarthy with the day's top news stories from Westminster - including stormy scenes in the Commons as Labour attacks the Culture Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, over News Corp's bid for BSkyB, saying a "shadow of sleaze"now hangs over the government; but David Cameron pledges "full support" for Mr Hunt. In other news, the Prime Minister says he's very disappointed that Britain has fallen back into recession - while Ed Miliband says it's a catastrophe.



THURSDAY 26 APRIL 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01gd5dh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01gk6c0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01gd5dk)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01gd5dm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01gd5dp)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01gd5dr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01hn3rg)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Dr Jeremy Morris, Dean of King's College Cambridge.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01ghc3z)
England's Farm Minister, Jim Paice, admits that conservation schemes haven't been focussed enough and explains the improvements he's making. Chinese scientists have developed a genetically modified lamb which has higher levels of 'good' fats in its meat. Charlotte Smith talks to a scientist who helped create Dolly the Sheep. He believes europe is getting left behind in the development of GM livestock. And, how midge traps on farms around the country are helping UK scientists build up a picture of how the Schmallenberg Virus outbreak will develop.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


THU 06:00 Today (b01ghc41)
Presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Yesterday in Parliament; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01ghc43)
The Battle of Bosworth Field

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Battle of Bosworth Field, the celebrated encounter between Lancastrian and Yorkist forces in August 1485. The battle, the penultimate of the Wars of the Roses, resulted in the death of Richard III. The victory of Henry Tudor enabled him to succeed Richard as monarch and establish the Tudor dynasty which was to rule for over a century. These events were immortalised by Shakespeare in Richard III, and today the battle is regarded as one of the most important to have taken place on English soil. But little is known about what happened on the battlefield, and the very location of the encounter remains the subject of much debate.With:Anne CurryProfessor of Medieval History and Dean of Humanities at the University of SouthamptonSteven GunnTutor and Fellow in Modern History at Merton College, OxfordDavid GrummittLecturer in British History at the University of Kent.Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01gk6qd)
Sightlines

The Gannetry

Read by: Maureen Beattie
Abridged by: Pete Nichols

"The outer world flew open like a door, and I wondered - what is it that we're just not seeing?"

In the fourth essay from her book SIGHTLINES Scottish poet and travel writer Kathleen Jamie introduces us to the world of Gannets - and more.

Five years after FINDINGS broke the mould of nature writing, award-winning Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie subtly shifts our focus on landscape and the living world, daring us to look again at the natural, the remote and the human-made.

"Kathleen Jamie, the Scottish poet, has written a book that transcends the definition of nature study ... SIGHTLINES is a work of intense purity and quiet genius and we're lucky to have it."
Philip Hoare
The Sunday Telegraph

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01ghc45)
Children in the theatre Jo Hawes

Jo Hawes has been a children's casting director on productions like Les Miserables, Mary Poppins, and Oliver for nearly 20 years. So what's it really like working with children in the theatre? Should the contraceptive pill be available to all teenagers over the counter at pharmacies without a prescription? We pay tribute to the feminist Shireen Ritchie of Women2Win . Why the police and local government can't agree about how many kids goes missing from care. Plus what's so special about grandma's cooking?


THU 10:45 A Small Town Murder (b01gk6qg)
Episode 4

By Scott Cherry

In the fourth episode of 'A Small Town Murder' by Scott Cherry: Family Liaison Officer, Jackie Hartwell, is faced with giving Sue and Carl some frustrating news.

Jackie Hartwell (played by Meera Syal) is a West Midlands Family Liaison Officer who solves cases by winning the trust of those caught up in the nightmare of serious crime and murder.

Police guidelines: The primary function of an FLO is that of an investigator. In performing this role, the officer will support the family, but will also gather relevant information and intelligence.

Jackie is a serving copper, not a social worker, functioning as part of an active team of investigating CID officers. But working in liaison enables her to get closer to the people involved in the crime, closer to the raw emotions, than the rest of her colleagues - allowing her to investigate in a way they can't, as she combines empathy and intuition with the keen observation of a clever detective.

In Series 4 of 'A Small Town Murder', Jackie is asked to be FLO to the parents of a young man whose murdered body is found floating in the local canal. But as she tries to support the family and solve the murder, Jackie finds herself becoming more and more distracted by the tragic consequences of a previous case.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01ghc47)
The Marriage Breakers of Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, twenty percent of girls are married before their fifteenth birthday. Jemy is likely to be one of them. She is thirteen years old and due to marry a cousin in three days time.
Meanwhile, twelve-year-old Oli is touring the slums of Dhaka, telling parents not to marry off their daughters.
And in the wards of the Dhaka Medical College lies Poppy, awaiting an operation to repair a body broken by childbirth at the age of twelve.
This week's Crossing Continents looks at the issue of Child Marriage, through the eyes of these three children.
It is a practice still rife in Bangladesh despite being illegal. Some call it modern day slavery. Child brides drop out of school and are rarely able to undertake any paid work. Often they become victims of domestic violence. And many, like Poppy, suffer severe health problems as a result of giving birth at a young age.
They lose their childhood completely.
But campaigners are fighting back, trying to persuade rural villagers not to marry off their daughters so young. Reporter Angus Crawford joins them as they try to track down Jemy and halt her wedding. But can they reach her in time?
Producer: Tony Smith.


THU 11:30 Alain-Fournier's Lost Estate (b01ghc49)
Lost Love in Paris

Julian Barnes and Hermione Lee travel to France in search of the places and people which inspired Alain-Fournier's novel of adolescent love Le Grand Meaulnes

Programme 2: Lost love in Paris.

On the first of June 1905, the 18 year old Henri-Alban Fournier (pen-name 'Alain-Fournier') saw a woman with a white parasol on the steps of the Grand Palais. He took a riverboat down the Seine, following her to her lodgings and for the next week he tried to attract her attention but a week later, by the church of Saint-Germain des Près, Yvonne de Quiévrecourt dashed his hopes of a romance saying "we are children ...what's the use ?"

A month after this encounter, Fournier's parents sent him to London, where he worked at Sandersons wallpaper factory for the grand father of the DJ Annie Nightingale. The letters he sent back to his childhood friend Jacques Rivière explain why he found English women shocking and show him working out what kind of writer he wanted to become. They exchanged views about Wagner, Dickens, the pre-Raphaelites and eventually both got jobs at the Nouvelle Revue Française.

8 years later, after tracking her with a detective, he met up with the now married Yvonne, just as he was about the publish Le Grand Meaulnes. In the novel she is re-imagined as Yvonne de Galais, first seen by the adventurer Meaulnes at a fete in a house in the woods - the lost estate.

Alain-Fournier began work on another novel and a play but war broke out and on 22 September 1914, having fought for only a few weeks, he was killed in action south of Verdun. Reported missing with 20 of his comrades-in-arms, his body was found in 1991 in a mass grave where German soldiers had buried him.

Producer: Robyn Read
Readings by Philip Franks from a translation by Frank Davison.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01ghc4f)
M&S tackles clothes in landfill, plus failing NHS care

M&S tackles textiles ending up in landfill. We hear from boss Marc Bolland about the latest stage of their environmental Plan A.
As part of our continuing diabetes series, one of the NHS's most senior diabetes doctors tells us about the failure of patient care. We also find out about the latest research and treatment into the condition.
The Information Commission says 2/3 of people passing on computers leave themselves open to fraud - so how do you clear your hard drive properly?
We hear how zoos across Europe are flouting conservation rules according to an investigation by the Born Free Foundation.
Plus the business forced to remove Olympic rings from its windows - how can you make sure you don't fall foul of the strict Olympic guidelines?
Presented by Winifred Robinson.
Produced by Rebecca Moore.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01gd5dt)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01ghjmy)
We hear live form the Leveson inquiry where Rupert Murdoch has said there was a cover up over phone hacking at the News of the World.
With just a week to go before the local elections a judge tells us that the voting system is wide open to criminal abuse - and the electoral commission tells us changes do need to be made to remove the potential for fraud.
As concerns grow over the Government's new banking watchdog, we hear from the former Chancellor, Lord Lawson.
And as the former Liberian President Charles Taylor is convicted of war crimes, we hear from The Hague and also from one of his victims in Sierra Leone.


THU 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01ghc4h)
New Science, Old Magic

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, continues his new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 9. NEW SCIENCE, OLD MAGIC - Dr Dee's Mirror was actually a highly polished disk of black obsidian from Mexico but it reflects the Elizabethan fascination with the new sciences of cosmology and astrology.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01gh8my)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b010t7rs)
Peter Souter - That's Mine, This Is Yours

That's Mine, This is Yours
by Peter Souter

Juliet ..... Tamsin Greig
Sam ..... Alex Jennings
Amanda ..... Eleanor Butters

Directed by Gordon House

Alex Jennings, who starred in Peter Souter's award-winning 'Goldfish Girl', plays Sam, and Tamsin Greig (star of 'Episodes', 'Love Soup' - and, of course known to R4 listeners as Debbie in 'The Archers') plays Juliet. The director is the former Head of Radio Drama, Gordon House.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01ghc4k)
Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal

As the Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal celebrates its 200th anniversary, Helen Mark takes a boat trip to find out about the canal's importance to the South Wales landscape. Helen is joined by David Morgan from British Waterways to find out more about the canal's history and Helen and David help local brewer, Buster Grant, to deliver his celebratory ales to local pubs in the way that they would have been delivered 200 years ago. Stopping off en route, Helen finds out more about the lime industry in the area from Nigel Gervis who still produces lime today which is used in maintenance work on the canal's locks and bridges. Helen also meets Ceri Cadwallader from the Blaenavon World Heritage Site to find out about the Forgotten Landscapes Project and the importance of the canal's industrial heritage and its place within the communities of Monmouthshire and Brecon today. And Helen jumps aboard a second boat with ecologist, Mark Robinson, to find out about the wildlife that now inhabits the banks of the canal.
Finally, Helen and David join forces to roll out the barrel as Buster's beer arrives at its final destination.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01gf4k1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01gf4lv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01ghc4m)
Francine Stock meets with Tom Hiddleston to discuss his role in The Avengers Assemble.

Directors Will Sharpe and Tom Kingsley discuss their much praised micro-budget film Black Pond, starring Chris Langham.

Janet McTeer reveals who she modelled herself on for the role of a man in Albert Nobbs.

Critic Scott Jordan Harris reports from Ebertfest in Illinois.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01ghc4p)
In this Week’s programme Gareth Mitchell looks at the future of road transport. According to transport researchers the car as we know it will have to become a thing of the past if traffic is to continue flowing. Drivers will need to be more like passengers and leave much of the decision making about what vehicles do on our roads to computerised transport management systems.

It’s just over a century since scientists first showed that cosmic rays can come from distant stars. Subsequent research into their effects here on earth has led to the worrying conclusion that they could destroy much of our global communications infrastructure. We hear about those early cosmic ray pioneers and the role of hot air Balloons in determining where they come from, with Professor Alan Watson from Leeds University. And speak to Dr Christopher Frost from The Rutherford Appleton laboratory’s Neutron Irradiation facility, who is trying to recreate the effects of those rays to see how they affect modern electronics.

And from our ‘So You Want to be a Scientist’ experiment, we look more widely at what makes us talk the way we do.


THU 17:00 PM (b01ghc4r)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01gd5dw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section (b01dtmb8)
Series 1

Kevin Eldon

Comedian Alex Horne is joined by his own 5 piece jazz band for music and comedy as they try interactive cookery.

With special guest: comedian Kevin Eldon.

Host .... Alex Horne
Trumpet/banjo .... Joe Auckland
Saxophone/clarinet ....Mark Brown
Double Bass/Bass .... Will Collier
Drums and Percussion .... Ben Reynolds
Piano/keyboard .... Joe Stilgoe
Guest performer ....Kevin Eldon

Producer: Julia McKenzie

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012..


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01ghc4t)
Usha probes Amy about Carl and their weekend plans. She comments that Carl spends a lot of time with his nan. Amy asserts that it's one of the things she likes about him. He's a real family man. When Amy notices Usha's not her usual cheery self, Usha just says she'll be glad to see Alan tomorrow.
Jeff's spotted a truck and low loader by the polytunnels. Adam arranges to meet David there. When David arrives, the truck nearly mows him down as it speeds past. Concerned he can't see Adam, he leaves him a message. But then he spots him unconscious on the ground. He calls an ambulance. When it arrives, the paramedic says David's done well with emergency first aid.
Brian and Jennifer are out for a celebratory meal following his vote of thanks at the board meeting. They're interrupted by a call from David, who fills them in on what he knows. Jennifer's beside herself when they reach the hospital. The doctor updates them with the news. As Adam is still unconscious he'll need a brain scan to check for serious injury. Jennifer's horrified, but Brian tries to calm her down. They'll just have to hope for the best.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01ghc4w)
Brodsky Quartet; Edward Bond; TV Impressionists

With Mark Lawson.

Very Important People is Channel 4's new sketch show which claims to reinvigorate the world of impressions. Performers Morgana Robinson and Terry Mynott discuss the physical and vocal transformations necessary to take on roles such as Adele, Bear Grylls and President Obama.

The Brodsky Quartet, the British string quartet, celebrate their 40th birthday this year. As well as concentrating on the traditional quartet repertoire, they have also worked with Bjork, Elvis Costello and Paul McCartney. As they prepare to perform the complete Shostakovich Quartets this weekend, they discuss their work over four decades.

Veteran playwright and director Edward Bond has been a controversial figure in British theatre, not least for his best-known play Saved, the violence that lies at the heart of much of his work and his outspoken views about today's theatre. As a UK premiere of a trilogy of his plays is staged in London, Bond gives a rare interview as he reflects on his theatrical career.

Producer Philippa Ritchie.


THU 19:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01ghc4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01ghc4y)
Mark Duggan Investigation

When Mark Duggan was shot by armed police in Tottenham, north London on 4th August 2011, the Independent Police Complaints Commission immediately began an investigation into the circumstances surrounding his death.

It is normal procedure for the IPCC to conduct an independent investigation into the circumstances of any fatal shooting by the police.

At the time, IPCC Commissioner, Rachel Cerfontyne, said: "I will make certain that this investigation is thorough and answers the many questions that everyone has when such an incident occurs."

Yet there is now the real possibility that a full inquest conducted openly and before a jury, will never be held into the shooting which triggered rioting in Tottenham, and which later spread across London and other English cities.

Simon Cox speaks to people close to Mark Duggan about what impact this news is having in the community.

He investigates whether the IPCC have the statutory powers they need in order to do their job properly.

And, after the IPCC stated that their hands may well be 'tied' by the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act, Simon will ask whether it is time for a change in the law which currently prevents phone intercept evidence being heard in court.

Producers: Hannah Barnes and Mike Wendling.


THU 20:30 In Business (b01ghc50)
Through the Mill

In the 19th century the Lancashire cotton industry was at the heart of the world's industrial revolution and the main engine of the British economy. In the 20th century it started a long decline. Today a few remaining textile manufacturers are finding ways of surviving huge global competition. Peter Day finds out how they are doing it.
Producer: Sandra Kanthal.


THU 21:00 Nature (b01gg7cn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01ghc43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01gd5dy)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01ghc52)
National and international news and analysis.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01ghc54)
The House on Paradise Street

Episode 9

Sofka Zinovieff's novel about an Englishwoman's quest to find out the origins of the bitter feud that has split her dead husband's family is set in contemporary Athens, but takes us back to the tragic events of the Greek Civil War in the 1940s. Maud's mother-in-law Antigone has told her about her experiences with the Greek Communist partisans after the war and the charge of treason that led to her long exile in Russia. meanwhile, Maud's children have become caught up in the violence that it sweeping Athens as protests against the government mount.
Abridged by Sarah LeFanu

Readers: Lucy Briers and Ann Beach
Producer: Sara Davies.


THU 23:00 Wireless Nights (b01ghc56)
Series 1

Night Manoeuvres

Jarvis Cocker continues his prowl through the dark in the last of his new series Wireless Nights.

This evening he invites you on a curb crawl around the seamy side of town as he explores the theme 'night manoeuvres'. Driving through London he weaves his way in and out of the lives of other night riders who are always on the move. He joins a private invstigator in Nottingham on a car chase and stake out on the trail of a man suspected to be having an affair; he finds a minicab driver lost in the Mersey fog between fares, haunted by an eerie bell; and is encircled by street skaters who spin around the neon-lit West End and dark car parks seeking thrills on wheels.

The ride might get a bit hairy at times, but he promises to drop you off safely at the end.

Produced by Neil McCarthy and Laurence Grissell


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01ghc58)
Sean Curran reports on events at Westminster

Labour keeps up the pressure on the culture secretary; plans to curb dangerous dogs get a cool response; and MPs demand a tax break for churches .

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



FRIDAY 27 APRIL 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01gd5fs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01gk6qd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01gd5fv)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01gd5fx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01gd5fz)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01gd5g1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01hn9f4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with The Revd Dr Jeremy Morris, Dean of King's College Cambridge.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01ghdnd)
Charlotte Smith investigates controversial new Government plans which could see up to 20% cut from basic farm subsidy payments. Farming Minister Jim Paice says the money is needed for rural development and conservation projects. Peter Kendall, President of the National Farmers' Union disagrees saying it will make UK farmers uncompetitive in Europe.

Hundreds of dairy farmers supplying milk to processors Dairy Crest have been told they will be paid 2p less per litre from May. The company says it's acting to secure the future of its dairies in a very challenging market.

And Moira Hickey is out in the Highlands on the lookout for the rare Scottish wildcat.

This programme is presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01ghdng)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by John Humphrys and Justin Webb, including: 06:50 How close will the Solar Orbiter get to the sun? 07:30 Should anti-abortion campaigners use shocking images? 07:50 Should minicabs be allowed in bus lanes? 08:10 Will the relationship between press and politicians change in the wake of the Leveson Inquiry?


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b01gf4ky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01gk6v3)
Sightlines

On Rona

Read by: Maureen Beattie
Abridged by: Pete Nichols

"The outer world flew open like a door, and I wondered - what is it that we're just not seeing?"

In the final essay from her book SIGHTLINES Scottish poet and travel writer Kathleen Jamie makes a few house calls and learns to dit-dit diddle-dit.

Five years after FINDINGS broke the mould of nature writing, award-winning Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie subtly shifts our focus on landscape and the living world, daring us to look again at the 'natural', the remote and the human-made.

"Kathleen Jamie, the Scottish poet, has written a book that transcends the definition of nature study ... SIGHTLINES is a work of intense purity and quiet genius and we're lucky to have it."
Philip Hoare
The Sunday Telegraph

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01ghdnj)
Women and reggae, domestic violence, embryoscope use in fertility treatment and the 80-year-old GP

Presented by Jenni Murray.

Earlier this month, Shane Jenkins admitted to gouging out the eyes of his lover Tina Nash. This wasn't the first time that Jenkins had attacked his girlfriend who, in the past, had helped to get him released from prison for previous offences of GBH. Many newspapers asked why Tina had continued to stay with such an abusive partner and it is a question that is now being addressed by the Women's Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre [WRSAC] in Cornwall. They run a pattern changing programme which helps women to break patterns of behaviour that encourage them to return to an abusive partner and this week they won a GSK Impact Award for their work with victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse. Jenni talks to Kate Painter - a facilitator on the WRSAC pattern changing programme - and to Jane who has completed the 14 week course. They are joined by Anne Haynes [co-director of the domestic violence charity Seachange] who works with the male perpetrators of domestic violence.

A documentary on the life of Bob Marley is now in cinemas nationwide and it features footage of both his private life and performances with The Wailers. His backing vocalists went under the name of the I-Threes. They were Judy Mowatt, Bob's wife, Rita Marley and Marcia Griffiths, who'd already had success with the song Young Gifted and Black. The I-Threes were a rare female presence amongst Jamaica's male dominated music industry and acted as role models for the women who followed in their footsteps. But reggae has continued to be dominated by men and the women who have succeeded have often had to battle against misogyny within their own community and a lack of commitment from the record industry at large. To discuss women in reggae, Jenni is joined by music journalist Jacqueline Springer and by Lovers Rock artist Carroll Thompson, who will sing live on the programme.

Three weeks ago, Isabella Potter from Wigan became the first baby in the UK to be born using an EmbryoScope. It's a special type of incubator containing a time lapse camera. This means that embryos do not need to be removed on a daily basis for inspection but can be much more closely monitored as a picture is taken every 20 minutes. Early results suggest that the EmbryoScope has been responsible for a 44% increase in clinical pregnancy rates compared to the use of standard incubators. And parents also get a video of their child as an embryo. To find out more about the EmbryoScope, Jenni talks to Alison Campbell, Head of Embryology at CARE Fertility Manchester where Isabella's parents received their fertility treatment.


FRI 10:45 A Small Town Murder (b01gk6v5)
Episode 5

By Scott Cherry

In the final episode of ' A Small Town Murder' by Scott Cherry: Family Liaison Officer, Jackie Hartwell, hurries back to the canal in the hope of finding Sue and Carl.

Jackie Hartwell (played by Meera Syal) is a West Midlands Family Liaison Officer who solves cases by winning the trust of those caught up in the nightmare of serious crime and murder.

Police guidelines: The primary function of an FLO is that of an investigator. In performing this role, the officer will support the family, but will also gather relevant information and intelligence.

Jackie is a serving copper, not a social worker, functioning as part of an active team of investigating CID officers. But working in liaison enables her to get closer to the people involved in the crime, closer to the raw emotions, than the rest of her colleagues - allowing her to investigate in a way they can't, as she combines empathy and intuition with the keen observation of a clever detective.

In Series 4 of 'A Small Town Murder', Jackie is asked to be FLO to the parents of a young man whose murdered body is found floating in the local canal. But as she tries to support the family and solve the murder, Jackie finds herself becoming more and more distracted by the tragic consequences of a previous case.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:00 The Pathfinder (b01ghdnl)
Tom Mangold reveals the remarkable life and legacy of Air Vice-Marshal Donald Bennett, CB, CBE, DSO, founder of Bomber Command's, Path Finder Force in WWII, and one of Britain's least celebrated civilian and wartime heroes.

Bennett, born in Australia, became one of the most experienced pilots in the world in an age when civil aviation was in its infancy, radio communication was difficult, and navigation meant flying past a railway station to read the name on the board. Working for Britain's Imperial Airlines, he set several records one of which, for a non-stop seaplane flight from Scotland to South Africa, still stands today, 74 years later.

But it was during the Second World War that Bennett came in to his own. After rescuing the Polish Government in Exile from Nazi-occupied France, operating the Atlantic Ferry Organisation to fly American-built military aircraft to Britain, and escaping on foot through Norway and Sweden after being shot down in an air raid on the German battleship, Turpitz; he set up the RAF's Path Finder Force to guide bombers to their targets with much greater accuracy.

Bennett was the youngest Air Vice Marshal by far, he didn't suffer fools, he said what he thought, he had no time for bureaucracy, and he got things done. He was also the only RAF Group Commander not to receive a knighthood after the war.

Undaunted he formed his own airline, British South American Airways, flying the most perilous post-war routes in civil aviation, across the Atlantic.

Tom Mangold interviews surviving family members and those who flew with Bennett to piece together an astonishing life, and to ask why his name and achievements are so little known.

Producer: Adam Fowler
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Another Case of Milton Jones (b00rbnmk)
Series 4

Travel Mogul

In this episode, Milton's a world-famous Travel Entrepreneur who builds the world's most Extreme Sports Hotel and crosses the Atlantic in a rather unusual way... So if you like bungee ropes, grizzly bears, bright blue aliens and mosquito nets designed to keep the mosquitoes in, then you might just want to catch yourself "Another Case Of Milton Jones"

He's joined in his endeavours by his co-stars Tom Goodman-Hill ("Camelot"), Dan Tetsell ("Mongrels") and Lucy Montgomery ("Down The Line").

Britain's funniest Milton and the king of the one-liner returns with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes for a series of daffy comedy adventures

Each week, Milton is a complete and utter expert at something - Top Gun aviator, Weatherman, Billy Elliot-style dancer, World-beating cyclist, mathematical genius and Extreme Travel Entrepreneur ...

... and each week, with absolutely no ability or competence, he plunges into a big adventure with utterly funny results.

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners" - The Guardian.
"King of the surreal one-liners" - The Times
"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary ("Think The Unthinkable", "Miranda")

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01ghdnn)
The UK boss of Viagogo, travel companies paying for positive reviews, tackling diabetes

We reveal the travel companies paying for positive reviews online.
As a court case could force the secondary ticketing website Viagogo to reveal where it gets some of its tickets Peter White speaks to its UK director Ed Parkinson.
Our series on diabetes continues examining how much responsibility the public, the government and businesses will have to take in the future.
We examine a new scheme that attempts to provide a more accurate measure of how many Miles Per Gallon (MPG) new cars can achieve.
Plus we get a early look at the new Dreamliner - the Boeing made plane which is coming to the UK later this year.
And Peter takes a 'sniffy city walk" - part of a project run by Manchester University to get us all to consider how smell effects our experience of place.
Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk
Producer: Joe Kent.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b01gnk74)
Taking the Biscuit: Jim and John

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: today memories of working at Huntley and Palmer's biscuit factory in Reading from Jim and John. More from the Listening Project at 4.55pm this afternoon.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a sort of snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer Simon Elmes.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01gd5g3)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01ghjn8)
The Business Secretary, Vince Cable, tells us he dealt with News Corporation's bid to take over BSkyB "fairly and properly" -- and he would explain his conduct at the Leveson Inquiry into press standards.
We also hear from Sir Christopher Kelly, the chairman of the Committee on Standards in Public Life, who says that the issues that have emerged in the last week should be investigated.
And we have a report on the growing tensions between the world's newest country South Sudan and its neighbour, Sudan.


FRI 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01ghgk3)
Toil and Trouble

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, continues his object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 10. TOIL AND TROUBLE - The differences between Scottish and English witches are revealed by a model ship, made to be hung in a church.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01ghc4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01ghgk5)
Anita Sullivan - The Hedge

By Anita Sullivan.

Marion and Richard live a quiet life in their perfect garden, sheltered from a turbulent world by their manicured hedge. Then one day, after an explosive row with their daughter Sophie, out of the hedge emerges a mysterious hand. Slowly the outside world starts to bleed into their fragile haven.

A strange and darkly allegorical tale about a family and its fears.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01ghgk7)
Thrive, Reading

Eric Robson and the team are guests of gardening charity Thrive. Christine Walkden, Chris Beardshaw and Pippa Greenwood are on the panel.

Jeremy Scott, the 2010 Blind Gardener of the Year, meets a handful of gardeners making use of the therapeutic horticulture programs run by the charity. Pippa Greenwood investigates the current Busy Lizzie problem.

Questions answered in the programme:
Why does my Acer die back each year?
Is putting water-logged newspaper beneath plants a good drought-beater?
How can I rid my pond of blanket weed?
How can I prevent the roots of my Bay tree penetrating my soakaway?
How and when to cut back an Akebia Quinata?
How would you construct raised beds to stand on concrete? And what vegetables could you grow in them?
A section of my privet hedge has died apparently because it is 'stressed', how can I de-stress it and what plant can I fill the gap with? (The plant suggested was Thuja Plicata Atrovirens.)
When you plant daffodils along a wall, how is it that the flowers always turn to face you and not the wall?

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Hidden Agendas (b01ghgk9)
Reading the Signs

Three stories from Wales about secrets and lies, even when they're with good intentions. When Gwyn goes to investigate a fire on a Welsh farm, he suspects the owners are hiding something, but discovers they are not the only ones.

Alix Nathan's story is read by Keiron Self.

A BBC Cymru Wales Production, directed by Nigel Lewis.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01ghgkc)
Lord Ashley, Levon Helm, Wendy Grant, Charles Colson, Val May

Matthew Bannister on

Lord Ashley, who as the Labour MP Jack Ashley, overcame deafness to become a champion of disabled people's rights

Also, Levon Helm, the drummer and singer of The Band - who backed Bob Dylan and recorded acclaimed albums of their own.

Wendy Grant - the neuropathologist who came out of retirement to warn that Mad Cow Disease could affect humans

Charles Colson - special counsel to Richard Nixon - who carried out dirty tricks against the President's opponents, but later found God.

And Val May, the theatre director who established the reputation of the Bristol Old Vic.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b01ghgsy)
The formula that changed the world

The Long Rain

The numbers behind the drought, the hosepipe ban and how much difference recent rainfall (enough to shrink men's hands into the hands of wrinkled apes) has made.

The Midas Formula

The story of Black-Scholes, the equation that transformed Wall Street - and the arguments over whether it made the world a better place, or helped cause the financial mess we've all been dealing with for the past five years.

Tall Tories

Last week we discovered North Koreans really are shorter than their South Korean counterparts thanks to poor nutrition in the North. This week: are Labour MPs shorter than Conservative parliamentarians?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Richard Knight.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b01ghgt0)
Bond of Brothers: Ciaron and Brendan

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: from Radio Ulster comes the story of Brendan and Ciaron, brothers whose fraternal bond was tested when Brendan fell ill. The final visit to the Listening Project is at 11.55pm this evening.

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a sort of snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer Simon Elmes.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01ghgt2)
Eddie Mair presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01gd5g5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b01ghgt4)
Series 77

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Rory Bremner, Justin Moorhouse and Roisin Conaty.

Produced by Sam Bryant.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01ghgt6)
Usha's pleased to see Alan, but he's concerned that she seems distracted. She's just about to tell him about the night she bumped into Carl when they're interrupted by a call from Ruth, giving them the news about Adam. Ruth's worried about David; it's echoes of Nigel. Usha asks if it could really be that serious for Adam. Ruth says it's hard to tell until he wakes up - if he wakes up.
The police have interviewed David, and he tells Ruth he's identified the men who were in the van.
Ian's talking to unconscious Adam in the hope that it'll help. He and Jennifer share a moment. She's been through something similar with Brian in the past. Ian says they've told him Adam doesn't need surgery, so surely he'll wake up soon.
Brian's kicking himself for not having been at the farm yesterday. Ian consoles him. He couldn't have done anything to stop it. Ian confides to Alan that if Adam doesn't wake up he doesn't know what he's going to do. Alan volunteers to sit with Adam while Ian gets some rest. Ian poignantly tells Adam that it's time he started waking up. When Ian gets back, he wants Adam awake and being as grumpy as ever.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01ghgt8)
Enquirer - a play about UK Newspaper journalists

Enquirer is a new rapid-response, verbatim work mounted by the National Theatre of Scotland investigating the current crisis in UK newspaper journalism. Performed promenade style in a Glasgow office block, it is based on over 50 interviews with journalists. Directors John Tiffany and Vicki Featherstone explain how they came up with the idea and what they hope the project will achieve.

Toni Morrison's new novel, Home, tells the story of a self-loathing African-American veteran of the Korean war who returns home to a racist America. Suffering serious trauma, he sets out to rescue his beloved sister, who is dying as a result of medical abuse, and take her back to the small Georgia town they grew up in. Professor Diane Roberts reviews.

Picasso's Vollard Suite is on show at the British Museum - a series of 100 etchings named after the avant-garde Paris art dealer who commissioned them. They show Picasso's interest in sculptural forms in the 1930s, and include images of passionate sexual imagery and bullfighting - which became central to his later work. Andrew Graham-Dixon reviews.

Tracie Bennett won the Best Actress Olivier Award last year for her performance as Judy Garland in End Of The Rainbow. The production recently transferred to the US, with Tracie as the only British member of the cast. After a run in Judy's home state, Minnesota, the show has now opened in Broadway - and Tracie talks to Kirsty Lang about her "coals to Newcastle" experience.

Producer: Nicki Paxman.


FRI 19:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01ghgk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01ghgtb)
Canterbury

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a panel discussion of news and politics from Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent with Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Iain Duncan-Smith; Labour Peer and former Cabinet minister, Andrew Adonis; Nobel prize winner and Fellow of the Royal Society, biologist Sir John Sulston; and public policy editor of The Economist magazine, Anne McElvoy.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01ghgtd)
The rights of humans... and animals

"Could it be that human rights simply don't exist?" asks Will Self provocatively.

To illustrate his point, he writes: "One man's extraordinary rendition is another man's license to torture, which in turn is a flagrant denial of a third man's human rights". And he ponders how we can conceive of a person having any human rights, unless effective sanctions are in place to stop them being violated. He turns his attention to Syria and its "vicious dictator...actively and consistently violating the human rights of its own citizenry". But the UN Security Council is - he says - seemingly powerless to stop him.

It is all a long way, he suggests, from Article 1 of the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights which states that "All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights." That - he points out - means that "no single one of the eight-and-a-half billion-odd human lives currently transpiring can be held to be of greater value that any of the others". Without the creation of an "independent global judiciary" and "an equally incorruptible international police force," he argues, this is little more than cant.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b01ghgtg)
Julian Simpson - Bad Memories

In 2004, a successful architect and his family mysteriously disappear from their home. Six years later five bodies are found in the cellar of their house. They are identified as Jonathan and Imogen Blake and their son, Matthew; Philip Gibson, who was on the missing person's register and a woman, identity unknown. Forensics determine that not only were they murdered, but the time of death was1926. Can audio files found with the bodies solve the mystery?

Cast:
Rachel Weir ..... Nicola Walker
Jim Marquez ..... Rupert Graves
Phillip Gibson ..... Steven Mackintosh
Jonathan Blake ..... Anthony Calf
Imogen Blake ..... Jana Carpenter
Matthew Blake ..... Oscar Richardson
Mary Marston ..... Imogen MCCurdy
Boy 1 ...... Ashley Cook
Boy 2 ...... Marcus Webb

Written and directed by Julian Simpson.

Recorded by Lucinda Mason Brown and David Chilton at Stanmer House in Brighton.
Sound design by David Chilton

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01gd5g7)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01ghgtj)
In a special edition of tonight's programme, two European countries debate solutions to the economic problems of Europe. We're in Berlin and Madrid to discuss who is to blame, and how to solve the euro-zone's woes. Should Spain cut more, or should Germany pay more? Should financial institutions or individuals shoulder more of the burden? Steve Evans and Manuela Saragosa present the programme.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01ghgtl)
The House on Paradise Street

Episode 10

Sofka Zinovieff's novel about an Englishwoman's quest to find out the origins of the bitter feud that has split her dead husband's family is set in contemporary Athens, but takes us back to the tragic events of the Greek Civil War in the 1940s. Maud's mother-in-law Antigone has told Maud about the imprisonment and trial that led to her long exile in Russia, and Maud is beginning to understand just how deep the rift in her husband's family has been. Meanwhile Maud's daughter Tig has been hurt in a demonstration in Athens, and is only just out of hospital in time for Nikita's forty-day memorial. As a visitor from England joins the family to mourn, Antigone has one final secret to reveal.
Abridged by Sarah LeFanu

Readers: Lucy Briers and Ann Beach
Producer: Sara Davies.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b01gg7g0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01ghgtn)
Mark D'Arcy reports on events at Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b01ghgtq)
Missing: Norman and Chris

Fi Glover presents Radio 4's series capturing the nation in conversation: in today's last visit to the Listening Project, the story of a family tragedy from Radio Stoke. Norman talks to his son Chris about his brother Stevie, who went on holiday to Crete seven years ago, but never returned...

The Listening Project is a new initiative for Radio 4 that aims to offer a sort of snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Many of the long conversations are being archived by the British Library which they will use to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer Simon Elmes.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Kiss Is .... Never Just a Kiss 11:00 WED (b01gg8h0)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01g65tj)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01ghgtd)

A Small Town Murder 10:45 MON (b01gk4n5)

A Small Town Murder 10:45 TUE (b01gk4rs)

A Small Town Murder 10:45 WED (b01gk6c2)

A Small Town Murder 10:45 THU (b01gk6qg)

A Small Town Murder 10:45 FRI (b01gk6v5)

Adventures in Poetry 23:30 SAT (b01g4ksk)

Adventures in Poetry 16:30 SUN (b01gf4n2)

Alain-Fournier's Lost Estate 11:30 THU (b01ghc49)

Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section 18:30 THU (b01dtmb8)

Another Case of Milton Jones 11:30 FRI (b00rbnmk)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01gd4lt)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01g65tg)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01ghgtb)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00yztnk)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01gf4js)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01gf4js)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b01gf5w7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01gf5xj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01gg7gv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01gh8n8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01ghc54)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01ghgtl)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01g65gn)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01gf5sk)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01gf5sk)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01gk4rq)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01gk4rq)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01gk6c0)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01gk6c0)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01gk6qd)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01gk6qd)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01gk6v3)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01gf4kt)

Children of the Olympic Bid 09:00 TUE (b01gg7cj)

Children of the Olympic Bid 21:30 TUE (b01gg7cj)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01dmdnz)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b01gg7fw)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01gg7fw)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b01gf5t6)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b01g62zk)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b01ghc47)

Drama 14:15 MON (b01gf5t2)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01gg7fr)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01gg8hl)

Drama 14:15 THU (b010t7rs)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01ghgk5)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b01gg7g4)

Electric Decade 15:00 SUN (b01gf4lq)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b01gd4lh)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01gd4l9)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01gf4pp)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01gg7cd)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01gg8gr)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01ghc3z)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01ghdnd)

Folk Song, Art Song 11:30 TUE (b01gg7dm)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b01gh8n4)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b01ghgtg)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01gd4lp)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01gf5ww)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01gg7g8)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01gh8n0)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01ghc4w)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01ghgt8)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01g65h3)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01ghgk7)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b01gg7g0)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b01gg7g0)

Great Unanswered Questions 23:00 TUE (b013fj1w)

Hidden Agendas 15:45 FRI (b01ghgk9)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b01g64tv)

In Business 20:30 THU (b01ghc50)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01ghc43)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01ghc43)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01gg7gd)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01gg7gq)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01gg7gq)

It's My Story 20:00 MON (b01gf5x8)

Jennifer Egan - Emerald City and Other Stories 19:45 SUN (b01gf4n8)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01g65h7)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01ghgkc)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01gd4m0)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b01gg7ft)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01g6444)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01ghc4p)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01g6479)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01gd56g)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01gd58c)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01gd59x)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01gd5c6)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01gd5dh)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01gd5fs)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01gg8gw)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01gg8gw)

Mind Changers 11:00 MON (b01gf5sr)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01gg8hv)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01gd4lr)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01gd4lr)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b01g65h9)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b01ghgsy)

Mr Blue Sky 11:30 MON (b01gf5st)

My First Planet 11:30 WED (b01gg8h2)

My Name Is Not 'Hey Baby' 17:00 SUN (b01g61w2)

My Teenage Diary 19:15 SUN (b00x3ywb)

Nature 11:00 TUE (b01gg7cn)

Nature 21:00 THU (b01gg7cn)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01g647r)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01gd56q)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01gd58t)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01gd5b5)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01gd5cg)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01gd5dr)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01gd5g1)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01gd56s)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01g647t)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01gd56x)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01gd571)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01g648s)

News 13:00 SAT (b01g6488)

Nigerian Crossroads 20:00 TUE (b01gg7gb)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01gf4jx)

One in a Million 16:00 MON (b01gf5w5)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b016wxtz)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01gf4lv)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01gf4lv)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b01g63tv)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b01ghc4k)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01gd4ly)

PM 17:00 MON (b01gf5wh)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01gg7g2)

PM 17:00 WED (b01gh8mw)

PM 17:00 THU (b01ghc4r)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01ghgt2)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01gf4n4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01g669t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01gf4pm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01ghtqb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01ghvv0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01hn3rg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01hn9f4)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b01gd4m2)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b01gd4m2)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b01gd4m2)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01gf4k1)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01gf4k1)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01gf4k1)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00s7yrb)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01gd4lf)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01gd4m4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01g647k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01gd56l)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01gd58p)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01gd5b1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01gd5cb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01gd5dm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01gd5fx)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 MON (b01gf5t0)

Shakespeare's Restless World 19:45 MON (b01gf5t0)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 TUE (b01gg7dt)

Shakespeare's Restless World 19:45 TUE (b01gg7dt)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 WED (b01gg8h6)

Shakespeare's Restless World 19:45 WED (b01gg8h6)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 THU (b01ghc4h)

Shakespeare's Restless World 19:45 THU (b01ghc4h)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 FRI (b01ghgk3)

Shakespeare's Restless World 19:45 FRI (b01ghgk3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01g647f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01g647p)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01g648j)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01gd56j)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01gd56n)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01gd577)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01gd58k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01gd58r)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01gd59z)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01gd5b3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01gd5c8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01gd5cd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01gd5dk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01gd5dp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01gd5fv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01gd5fz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01g648n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01gd57c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01gd590)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01gd5b9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01gd5cl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01gd5dw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01gd5g5)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01gf4jv)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01gf4jv)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01gf4pt)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01gf4pt)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01gf4k3)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01gf4jz)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b01dp52g)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01gf4kw)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01gf4n6)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01gf4n6)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01gf5wm)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01gf5wm)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01gg7g6)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01gg7g6)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01gh8my)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01gh8my)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01ghc4t)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01ghc4t)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01ghgt6)

The Castle 18:30 WED (b00t7f96)

The Cornwell Estate 23:15 WED (b00vy29g)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01g63y4)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01ghc4m)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01gf4l0)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01gf4l0)

The Greengrocer's Apostrophe 00:30 SUN (b01gnp5m)

The Invention of... 13:30 SUN (b0167zl1)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b01gf4ln)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b01gnk74)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b01ghgt0)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b01ghgtq)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01gh8mt)

The Music Teacher 23:00 WED (b01gh8nb)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b01g65l0)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b01ghgt4)

The Pathfinder 11:00 FRI (b01ghdnl)

The Playlist Series 10:30 SAT (b01gd4lk)

The Report 20:00 THU (b01ghc4y)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b01gf4ky)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b01gf4ky)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b01g5zp0)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b01gf5wk)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01gd4lm)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01gf4l2)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01gf5xg)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01gg7gs)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01gh8n6)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01ghc52)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01ghgtj)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01g63vw)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01gg8hx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01gf5xn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01gg7gx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01gh8zl)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01ghc58)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01ghgtn)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01gd4lc)

Today 06:00 MON (b01gf4pr)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01gg7cg)

Today 06:00 WED (b01gg8gt)

Today 06:00 THU (b01ghc41)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01ghdng)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b01g63w4)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b01gh8n2)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01g647w)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01g6480)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01g6486)

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