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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 MARCH 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01chzlf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01cqx0f)
Wilkie Collins

Episode 5

Written by Peter Ackroyd.
Read by Michael Pennington.

His first child with Martha Rudd is born, Caroline Graves returns to Gloucester Place and Wilkie Collins' great friend and collaborator, Charles Dickens, dies.

Short and oddly built, with a head too big for his body, extremely short-sighted, unable to stay still, dressed in colourful clothes, 'as if playing a certain part in the great general drama of life' Wilkie Collins looked distinctly strange. But he was none the less a charmer, befriended by the great, loved by children, irresistibly attractive to women - and avidly read by generations of readers.

Peter Ackroyd follows his hero, 'the sweetest-tempered of all the Victorian novelists', from his childhood as the son of a well-known artist to his struggling beginnings as writer, his years of fame and his life-long friendship with the other great London chronicler, Charles Dickens. A true Londoner, Collins, like Dickens, was fascinated by the secrets and crimes -- the fraud, blackmail and poisonings - that lay hidden behind the city's respectable facade. He was a fighter, never afraid to point out injustices and shams, or to tackle the establishment head on.
As well as his enduring masterpieces, "The Moonstone" - often called the first true detective novel - and the sensational "Women in White," he produced an intriguing array of lesser known works. But Collins had his own secrets: he never married, but lived for thirty years with the widowed Caroline Graves, and also had a second liaison, as 'Mr and Mrs Dawson', with a younger mistress, Martha Rudd, with whom he had three children. Both women remained devoted as illness and opium-taking took their toll: he died in 1889, in the middle of writing his last novel - Blind Love.

Told with Peter Ackroyd's inimitable verve this is a ravishingly entertaining life of a great story-teller, full of surprises, rich in humour and sympathetic understanding.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01chzlh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01chzlk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01chzlm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01chzlp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cks6f)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Bishop Martin Shaw.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01cks6h)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01chzlr)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01chzlt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b01ckpjk)
Inspirational Walks

Kinder Scout

Almost 80 years since the Mass Trespass on Kinder Scout, Clare Balding joins ramblers from Manchester and Sheffield to mark this inspirational moment in walking history.

On April 24th 1932, around 400 ramblers from Lancashire set off from Bowden Bridge quarry near Hayfield to walk up onto the plateau of Kinder Scout, the highest point in the Derbyshire Peak District, in protest at the lack of the right to roam on open land. As they scrambled upwards towards the moorland plateau of Kinder, the trespassers were met and confronted by the Duke of Devonshire's gamekeepers. A group of ramblers from Sheffield, who had also set off that morning from Edale, did eventually reach the plateau and the two groups met up before turning and retracing their steps. The following day six of the Manchester ramblers were arrested and imprisoned, a move which was to outrage many people and serve only to highlight and sympathise with the ramblers cause, resulting finally in the Countryside and Rights of Way Act in 2000

Today Clare joins members of the Sheffield Ramblers, as well as Manchester-born broadcaster and avid walker, Mike Harding. They represent the two groups of ramblers that set off from Edale and Hayfield respectively, to take part in the Mass Trespass back in 1932. Leaving from Bowden Bridge, just as the original trespassers did, the group walk towards Kinder Reservoir and on to William Clough, where the Duke of Devonshire's gamekeepers were waiting. As they walk, the old cross-Pennines rivalry is still in evidence as the Sheffield walkers remind Clare that it was their group that had actually reached the top all those years ago. But everyone on that day 80 years ago shared a common passion for the hills and the moors around which, as folk singer Ewan Maccoll wrote, no one man should have the right to own.

The Mass Trespass of Kinder Scout was one of the most inspirational moments in the history of the rambling movement, inspiring walkers and campaigners of access to open land for years to come. It wasn't the
only trespass to take place - there were others before it and many more inspired by it. But it lives on in the memory of all those who believe that all should have the right to roam.

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01cv8n9)
Farming Today This Week

Food production is now the UK's biggest manufacturing industry, employing more than 400,000 people and accounting for around 7% of GDP. The Government is calling on farmers, growers and producers to think big and think global to help boost the UK's economic recovery. In this edition of Farming Today This Week, Caz Graham asks whether growing food could be the key to the UK's financial growth. She takes a tour of Mike Heler's farm and cheese processing plant in Cheshire. His father started the dairy business in 1952 with 40 cows. It now has a turnover of £60million producing 17,000 tonnes of cheese each year. But in tough economic times serious concerns are raised about some sectors of the agricultural industry that could be doing better. Leading food policy expert Tim Lang says the fruit and veg desperately needs a makeover to encourage the next generation of growers to work the land. Farming Minister, Jim Paice also questions what more can be done for UK producers to tap into a £1billion trade deficit for butter, yoghurt and cheese.

This programme was presented by Caz Graham and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01chzly)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01cv8nc)
Presented by John Humphrys and Justin Webb. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01cv91m)
Andi Osho, Murray Lachlan Young, Dolly the Sheep scientist, Jubilee boat man, British Summer Time campaigner

Richard Coles with comedienne Andi Osho, poet Murray Lachlan Young, Dr Bill Ritchie who helped create Dolly the Sheep, Philip Morrell, the Barnado's boy turned millionaire who's lending his boat to the Queen for the Jubilee, Patrick Newman who's trying to change the date of British Summer Time, a Soundscape of a guitar, and the Inheritance Tracks of arts guru Sir Christopher Frayling.

Producer: JP Devlin.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b01cv91p)
Medics abroad; The Oscars

Sandi Toksvig hears about medical work abroad from Dr Marie Charles who runs an organisation which places volunteer doctors and nurses in developing countries to impart their skills to local medical workers. She tells of her experiences travelling the world in the course of her work. And dentist Ian Wilson relates how he used his skills to start an oral health programme in Tanzania. Sandi also meets writer and comedian Liz Carr who explains how she went to join the red carpet crowds in Hollywood for the Oscars.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 The Art of Monarchy (b01cv91r)
Magnificence

The Royal Collection is one of the most wide-ranging collections of art and artefacts in the world and provides an intriguing insight into the minds of the monarchs who assembled it.

In this series, BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz encounters dozens of these unique objects - some priceless, others no more than souvenirs - each shedding light on our relationship with the monarchy and giving a glimpse into the essential ingredients of a successful sovereign.

In this programme, Will uses five objects to investigate a pivotal aspect of the art of monarchy - the projection of magnificence. An idea as old as monarchy itself, magnificence is the expression of power through the display of wealth and status. Will's first object unites our current Queen with George III; the Gold State Coach, which has been used for coronations since 1821. Built for George III in 1762, it reflects Britain's new found glory in its richly gilded carvings and painted panels...but the glory was to be short lived.

Will goes on to explore Henry VIII's taste for interior design at Hampton Court Palace, with the enormous Abraham Tapestries - a symbol of Henry's personal self-belief but also a post-Reformation statement to his rival the Pope. Charles II's preoccupations are given unlikely form in a silver table now held at Windsor Castle, whilst Sir Christopher Wren's designs for Hampton Court have an unusually egalitarian purpose.

The idea of magnificence might seem one-dimensional - but encoded into the jewels, the gilding, the silver and the marble are stories of political intrigue and personal paranoia.

Prod: Neil George.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01cvcqm)
Andrew Pierce of The Daily Mail looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

A comprise was finally reached over the government's welfare to work scheme this week. Was it a U turn on the government's part and was the Labour party running shy of the issue? Teresa Pearce Labour and Brandon Lewis Conservative both members of the Commons Work and Pensions Select Committee, debate the need for work experience and the issue of cutting benefits.

Ed Miliband claims the Health and Social Care Bill will be David Cameron's poll tax. Lord Fowler a cabinet minister during the poll tax debacle, and Alan Johnson the minister who saw through the original tuition fees legislation for the Labour government, discuss the difficulties in getting unpopular policies through parliament.

How far does House of Lords reform threaten to de-stabilise the coalition? Lord Rennard former Liberal Democrat Campaigns Manager and Lord Maples once deputy chairman of the Conservative party consider their respective bargaining positions.

Finally Mr Speaker has been calling the house up on how they turn a phrase. Amber Rudd Conservative and Kevin Brennan Labour consider why they can say distort but not misrepresent and how best to say liar without using the actual word.

The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01cvcqp)
'A revolution with almost no co-ordination or planning.' That was Ian Pannell's assessment as he toured northern Syria trying to work out the extent of the rebellion against President Assad.

Meanwhile, James Harkin's in the capital Damascus where international sanctions are starting to leave their mark on everyday life.

Rachel Harvey's been meeting a group of Burmese opposition figures recently released from long jail sentences. Do they believe the new government is genuinely committed to a process of reform?

There's a story of connectivity, turtles and love from Huw Cordey in the central American state of Costa Rica.

And how would you like to get the tea for 49 young children? Catherine Fellowes has been talking to a mum in Kenya who does it every day!


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01cvcqr)
Paul Lewis presents the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b01cks52)
Series 36

With Andy Parsons and Lynne Truss

Topical comedy with Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis. This week Lynne Truss, Andy Parsons, Laura Shavin and Mitch Benn join Steve and Hugh for a look at the week's biggest (and smallest) stories.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01chzm0)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01chzm2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01cks58)
Beccles, Suffolk

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Beccles in Suffolk.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01cvcqt)
Listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01b8w6h)
An American Rose

by Charlotte Jones

The Kennedys were the most famous family in
England when Joseph became American Ambassador
in London. But daughter Rosemary's behaviour began to
cause the family increasing concern.

Produced by Claire Grove
Directed by Sally Avens

Award winning writer Charlotte Jones' play is inspired by the lives of two of JFK's sisters, 'Rosemary' Kennedy, who died in 2005, but underwent a prefrontal lobotomy aged 23 and Kathleen 'Kick' Kennedy who married the heir to the Duke of Devonshire.
Charlotte's work includes 'Airswimming' and 'Humble Boy' for the National Theatre. She has written several plays for Radio.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b01cjwtn)
Series 13

The Hallelujah Chorus

Stirring, emotional and unmistakable: The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's Messiah is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

The Alzheimer's Society runs a group called 'Singing for the Brain'. It's for people with dementia or Alzheimers and their carers who come together to sing in a group. As music is tied so closely to emotional memories, often lyrics and music remain firmly fixed in the brain, even though other memories have died away.

Julia Burton of the Alzheimer's Society recalls the power of the Hallelujah Chorus, as performed at a special event by Singing for the Brain groups in Wiltshire and Dorset.

Mrs Vera Fiton, whose late husband - Ted - had dementia talks about how important the weekly singing group was for both of them. Taking Ted from his care home to 'do the Hallelujah' was a weekly highlight, he enjoyed it so much, Vera recalls, that he'd still be singing in the taxi on the way home.

Carol Pemberton, of the Birmingham-based a capella quintet 'Black Voices', took part in the reopening concert of Birmingham Town Hall in 2007. The programme director suggested they sing The Messiah, but not as Handel intended, rather a daring interpretation arranged by Quincy Jones, called the 'Soulful Messiah'. It's a soul/gospel version which has to be heard to be believed! Carol describes performing it as one of the biggest highs of her career to date.

Jennifer Blakeley runs Alphabet Photography, a photo company based in Niagara Falls in Canada. She came up with the idea of staging a Flash Mob to promote her company. The Hallelujah Chorus had long been a favourite piece, and she - along with her local choir - set up a flash-mob in a local shopping mall. The result was emotional, extraordinary... and achieved so much more than the intended aim to boost her business. Passers by , not linked with the choir, joined in... others cried, emotions ran high. And the resulting You Tube video has now attracted over 37 million hits.

Paul Spicer, composer, conductor and organist, describes the historical backdrop to Handel's exhilarating composition.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01cvcqw)
Kathy Lette; How to make the perfect cup of tea

How to distinguish Darjeeling from Green - the key to the perfect cuppa. Kathy Lette on her new novel which draws on her own experience of having a son with Aspergers Syndrome. Orla Guerin on her experience of reporting from a war zone. The rising cost of childcare. Girls, gangs and sexual abuse. Learning how to fail. And music to "move the soul and stir the spirit" created on the lirone a stringed instrument that's disappeared from modern orchestras
Presented by Jenni Murray.
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01cvcqy)
Saturday PM

Presented by Carolyn Quinn. A fresh perspective on the day's news with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01ckr4d)
Reinvention

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan's three executive guests all run companies that to a large extent have had to reinvent themselves. He asks them what's driven change in each of their businesses, and how they've fared. They also swap ideas on what they think our children should be taught at school.

Joining Evan are Rooney Anand, chief executive of pub retailer and brewer Greene King; Ian Livingston, chief executive of multinational telecoms provider BT Group; Rupert Gavin, chief executive of Odeon and UCI Cinemas Group.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01chzm4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01chzm6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01chzm8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01cvcr0)
This week Clive chats to Nicholas Owen, the news anchor, reporter and correspondent who has taken the chance to report on his own life in his autobiography 'Days Like This'.

Marine biologist Monty Halls tells Clive about taking the plunge to live the life of a Cornish fisherman for his new BBC 2 series, "The Fisherman's Apprentice".

Nikki Bedi gets cosy with actor Stephen Mangan who will be returning to our screens in the guise of Dirk Gently, Douglas Adams' self-styled 'holistic detective'.

Actor, comedian, occasional singer songwriter Keith Allen tells us about his Channel 4 documentary Keith Allen Meets Nick Griffin. And what happened when he serenaded the the leader of the BNP on his ukulele.

Music comes from Jeb Loy Nichols, an American-born singer, songwriter and musician. His music combines elements of soul, country, folk, reggae and blues. Jeb plays Countrymusicdisco45 from his ninth solo album 'The Jeb Loy Nichols Special'.

Katy Carr is a London based performer whose distinctive cabaret-folk style has likened her somewhere between Lady Gaga and Vera Lynn. She's joined by The Aviators to perform 'Kommander's Car' from her album 'Coquette'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b01cvcr2)
Series 11

I Hold My Breath

The return of the award-winning series in which writers create a fictional response to the week's news. A 15 minute stand-alone drama created from scratch during the week.

To complement Radio Four's News and Current Affairs output, our weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. The form and content are entirely lead by the news topic - so drama can come in many guises, as well as poetry and prose.

It's uniquely radio - an instant reaction to the mood of the moment - a concept impossible to imagine in any other medium.

This is the 12th series and the sheer breadth of approach is reflected in the range of writers who have participated so far. They include: Lionel Shriver, David Baddiel, David Edgar, Amelia Bulmore, Mark Lawson, Bonnie Greer, Laura Solon, Will Self, Alistair Beaton, Lemn Sissay, April de Angelis, Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Adrian Mitchell, Stewart Lee, John Sergeant, Jo Shapcott, Ian McMillan, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Kate Mosse, Marina Warner, Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti, A.L.Kennedy and Lyn Coghlan.

From Fact to Fiction presents writers with the creative opportunity to work in a bold and instinctive way as they respond to events in the news, beginning on a Monday when an idea is selected through to Friday when the programme is recorded and edited.

The high-profile series also attracts big names from the acting profession. Philip Glenister, Tracy-Ann Oberman, Samuel West, David Soul, Henry Goodman, Anne-Marie Duff, Alistair McGowan, Robert Bathurst, Stephen Mangan, Ken Cranham, Brendan Coyle, Haydn Gwynne and Sally Hawkins are just some of the names who have featured so far.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01cvcr4)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests writers Linda Grant and Miranda Sawyer and academic John Mullan review the week's cultural highlights including The Leisure Society

The Leisure Society at Trafalgar Studios in London is a play by Canadian playwright Francois Archambault. It's an account of an awkward evening in the lives of a well-to-do New York couple (played by Ed Stoppard and Melanie Gray) who have recently had their first child. When they invite a friend around for dinner to tell him they don't want to see him any more, the cracks in their perfect life begin to show.

Lost Memory of Skin is Russell Banks' novel about a young man known only as the Kid. The Kid is a homeless sex offender living in a squatter camp under a causeway on the Florida coast whose life faces even more disruption, first when the camp is raided by the police and then when a professor of sociology co-opts him into helping with his research.

Argentinian director Pablo Trapero's film Carancho stars Ricardo Darin as a lawyer who has lost his licence and is reduced to making a living by chasing ambulances. He works for a shady company that offers legal help to traffic accident victims but ultimately creams off most of their compensation payments.

Game Plan is a major retrospective of the work of Italian artist Alighiero Boetti at Tate Modern. Boetti started as a member of the Arte Povera movement in the 1960s, but soon dissociated himself from it to make algorithmic works which derived from simple rules and repeated processes.

Touch is a new TV series from Tim Kring - the man behind Heroes. It stars Kiefer Sutherland as Martin Bohm a former journalist who has struggled to look after his autistic son since the death of his wife on 9/11. His son is obsessed with numbers, but a series of unexplainable events suggests that he is using these numbers to communicate and to predict the future.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01cvcr6)
Playing Doctors and Nurses

Since the broadcasts of the Radio Doctor encouraged the British to open their bowels during the Second World War, the bowels of broadcasting organisations have filled up with factual and fictional series featuring doctors and nurses.

Mark Lawson visits the BBC's written archives centre in Caversham and reads through programme files detailing reactions to some of the Radio Doctor scripts, worries about the accuracy of early documentary dramas and behind the scenes information about the making of well known series including Dr Finlay's Casebook, The Singing Detective and Angels.

He meets the doctor turned writer Richard Gordon, whose name adorns the jackets of the Doctor in the House books, which have been adapted as film, tv and radio series. And he talks to the former medic Jed Mercurio, who created the TV series Cardiac Arrest, which is regularly voted the most realistic medical drama in polls of medical professionals.

Actor Alan Alda explains how his role in Mash helped to save his life and we hear whether Hugh Laurie (star of House) and Helen Baxendale (star of Cardiac Arrest) believe doctors should be seen as heroic figures. Mal Young, the former head of continuing drama serials at the BBC, discusses having to answer complaints about realism, graphic footage and political bias in Casualty and Holby City. Programme makers' responsibilities are debated by Roger Graef, whose many documentaries about aspects of medicine include Inside Great Ormond Street, and who chairs the Mental Health Media Awards: honouring accurate depictions of psychiatric illness in medical fact and fiction.

Dramas which have been condemned by the medical profession for giving patients false hopes of salvation or resuscitation are now used to train would be doctors - what does Richard Gordon think of this trend?

Producer: Robyn Read.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01cj83p)
The Cruel Sea

Episode 1

Dramatised by John Fletcher.
1 of 2.
The first part of Nicholas Monsarrat's searing classic novel about the men and ships who fought who fought in the North Atlantic during the 2nd World War.

Lockhart ..... Gwilym Lee
Ericson ..... Jonathan Coy
Ferraby ..... Carl Prekopp
Wainwright ..... David Seddon
Phillips ..... Peter Hamilton-Dyer
Gregg ..... Harry Livingstone
Mavis ..... Tracy Wiles
Coxswain ..... James Lailey
Donnelly ..... Adam Billington

Sound by Caleb Knightley
Directed by Marc Beeby

The Cruel Sea is the story of the crew of a newly commissioned corvette, Compass Rose, a ship that forms part of the escort to merchant convoys during World War II. The crew are mostly inexperienced men from non-naval backgrounds and the story focuses on their differing reactions to the horrifying experiences they have as German U-boats attack their convoys with increasing success. Some will survive the war, and some won't - but all of them will be changed by their experiences.
But this isn't just a war story. In a surprisingly subtle way, The Cruel Sea also chronicles the often abrasive process by which classes, previously unknown to each other, were thrown together onboard ship and had to learn to rub along - and how the earned respect, in the long term, led to the future Welfare State and the social equity and cooperation of the 50's and 60's.
The novel, published in 1951, was an immediate success and it has never been out of print since. It brings home the realities of the longest battle in the second world war, the Battle for the Atlantic, but it does so not through harrowing depiction of the horrors involved, but through its detailed depiction the people involved, people we come to care about, to admire, and to mourn.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01chzmb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b01ckggt)
The Morality of Abortion

Department of Health officials are this week starting their inquiry in to allegations in the Daily Telegraph that abortions are being carried out on the basis of gender. Undercover reporters filmed consultations about terminations at a number of clinics around the country. One consultant in Manchester was heard telling a woman who said she wanted to abort a female foetus: "I don't ask questions. If you want a termination, you want a termination". The revelations have re-ignited the debate over reform of the act that legalised abortion in 1967. It's estimated that at least one third of British women will have had an abortion by the time they reach the age of 45. In 2010, there were 189,574 abortions carried out to residents of England and Wales and one third (34%) of those women undergoing abortions had already had one or more previous abortions. The overwhelming majority (98%) of terminations are carried out under the clause that to continue the pregnancy would risk the woman's mental health. Campaigners on one side argue that the law is being interpreted far too liberally, in a way that was never intended or anticipated 45 years ago and that in the early stages of pregnancy abortion is effectively available on demand. On the other side it's said that the allegations of "gendercide" are vastly exaggerated and this is all part of a campaign by the backdoor to make it harder for women to get an abortion. Have we turned what should one of the most profound of moral choices involving life and death into a thoughtless act amounting to little more than routine inconvenience? Or is that an attack on the fundamental liberty of women to have control over their own bodies and to turn the clock back to a time when sexual shame and individual guilt were common currency? How do we balance the moral status of the unborn foetus with rights of women and if it's morally unacceptable to have an abortion on the grounds of gender, why is it OK just because it's inconvenient?

Witnesses: Ann Furedi - Chief Executive of BPAS; Elaine Storkey - President of Tear Fund and founding member of Restored, a charity campaigning about violence against women; Kate Smurthwaite - Feminist activist, comedian and vice chair of Abortion Rights; Mark Bhagwandin - Senior Education for "Life".

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor, Claire Fox and Kenan Malik.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b01cjm4y)
(16/17)
The fourth and last semi-final of the 2012 series will determine who takes the remaining place in the grand Final. The competitors are from Reigate, Inverness, Disley in Cheshire and Neath in South Wales.

Russell Davies asks the questions, which include: What's the name of the man-eating water monster who plagues the hall of King Hrothgar in the Old English poem Beowulf? And which sea-area in the Met Office shipping forecast extends furthest west?

The answers could prove crucial in the contest to discover who'll take a step closer to the 2012 'Brain of Britain' title.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01cj83t)
More of listeners' poetry requests as Roger McGough, Martin Jarvis and Susan Jameson present a mix of material including an 18th century comic romp, some pieces of nostalgia and a poem asked for by more listeners than any other.

Producer Christine Hall.



SUNDAY 04 MARCH 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01cp83j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Under the Skin (b01cvdds)
Eyebrows, by Kavita Bhanot

Under the Skin is a celebration of the second ever South Asian Literature Festival, which is staged in London and across the United Kingdom.

The relationship between the English language, its literary tradition and writers from South Asia has become an exciting and enduring part of British literary life. The Festival celebrates writers from South Asia and British Asian writing, equally, reflecting the diversity of themes, subjects and literary forms that constitute South Asian writing in 2012.

Under the Skin features three stories by British Asian writers. Kavita Bhanot's Eyebrows introduces us to three generations of women seen through the eyes of Jaya on her weekend visits to her grandmother.

Lyndam Gregory, Deni Francis and Najma Khan are the readers.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01cp83l)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01cp83n)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01cp83q)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01cp83s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01cvg3x)
The sound of church bells.


SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (b01ckggw)
The Bishop of Bradford, the Rt Revd Nick Baines begins a new series of Lent Talks where six well known figures from journalism, science, religion and public life reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

Speakers of this year's talks include the journalist and author Martin Wroe, who will explore humanity being at its most divine when working in community; John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University, explains how his encounter with God is enhanced through science; Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, explores the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01cp83x)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01cvg3z)
Challenging Your Instincts

Mark Tully wonders what might happen if we challenge our instinctive fears and prejudices. Some instincts can protect us but others can act as barriers in our lives.

Mark looks at instincts like fear, disgust, hatred and revenge and considers how overcoming them can have positive results.

The programme features examples of people who have gone against the instinct to hate: the white judge in the Southern States of America who, in times of segregation, risked his life to defend Negroes; and the Croatian poet who writes of the need to love our enemies, despite what they have done in the past and continue to do now. In her words: 'only love such as this can save the world... make life come out of death'.

The readers are Samantha Bond and Peter Guinness.

Producer: Adam Fowler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01cvg41)
Caz Graham visits an egg farmer who borrowed £1 million for new cages. Battery cages were banned in January; On Your Farm asks whether the new cages are worth the money.

Secretary of State for the Environment Caroline Spelman has been lobbying the EU, calling for tough action on countries which have not complied with the battery cage ban. 14 countries didn't make the deadline. But Italy has now given its farmers three more years to install the new cages.

Presenter: Caz Graham Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01cp83z)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01cp841)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01cvg43)
Edward Stourton with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories familiar and unfamiliar.

As the first anniversary of Japan's devastating tsunami approaches,
reporter Gerry Northam tells us how the Shinto faith of the bereaved
and homeless has been tested.. and on how they are stoic in the face of
such terrible circumstances.

Continuing a series reflecting on the daily routines of people with
prominent or unusual roles in the religious life of the nation, this
week features Rachel, a Catholic hermit from Lincolnshire.

We examine the issue of witchcraft following the case of Eric Bikubi...how is witchcraft a legitimate part of a belief system..and what can be done by churches and other agencies in the future to prevent such tragedies?

Matt Wells reports from Ohio on the race for the Republican presidential nomination and examines the religious issues being debated ahead of " super Tuesday"

We talk to the director of a controversial dance performance which examines Islamic extremism

and David Willey reports from Rome on the opening of the Vatican archives
to the public.. and describes some of the treasures to be found within.

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01cvg45)
War on Want

Vanessa Redgrave presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity War on Want.

Reg Charity: 208724
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope War on Want.
Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01cp845)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01cp847)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01cvg47)
Freedom through Discipline

The Provost of St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh, is the preacher in the second of this year's Lent services taking the theme of the Way to Freedom, and today exploring freedom through discipline.
Led by the Revd Canon Mark Harris, with the Cathedral Choir directed by Duncan Ferguson. Organist: Nicholas Wearne. Producer: Mo McCullough.
Download web resources specially written for the series from the Churches Together in Britain and Ireland website.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01cks5b)
David Cannadine: Why Wear a Tie?

Historian David Cannadine compares the traditions of tie wearing on both sides of the Atlantic. He reflects on the social significance of this element of male dress and observes a recent phenomenon - that politicians seem to campaign in open neck shirts but govern wearing ties.
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01cvg49)
Paddy O'Connell presents news and conversation about the big stories of the week.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01cvg4c)
Writer ..... Simon Frith
Director ..... Julie Beckett
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Lily Pargetter ..... Georgie Feller
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Clarrie Grundy ..... Rosalind Adams
William Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Nic Grundy ..... Becky Wright
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Christopher Carter ..... William Sanderson-Thwaite
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Annabelle Shrivener ..... Julia Hills
Luke ..... David Perks.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01cvg4f)
Patsy Rodenburg

Kirsty Young's castaway is the renowned voice coach Patsy Rodenburg.

Her work at the National Theatre and the RSC has spanned decades and her students include Dame Judi Dench, Sir Ian McKellen, Dame Maggie Smith and Daniel Day Lewis. But her work takes her away from the stage too - she has coached politicians and helped offenders in prison. She says: "I did some work on Hamlet in a top security prison and the guy playing Claudius was a murderer and he spoke, 'Oh my offence is rank, it smells to heaven', and he just broke."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01cjm56)
Series 62

Episode 4

Panellists Paul Merton, Liza Tarbuck, Josie Lawrence and Kit Hesketh-Harvey join host Nicholas Parsons for the popular panel game where they have to speak on a given subject for sixty seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

This week Paul Merton tells us about his Perfect Lie-In, Josie Lawrence reveals details of her Perfect Date, Kit Hesketh-Harvey describes how to Throw a Successful Party and Liza Tarbuck brings the show to a standstill with her revelations about her aptitude for Belly Dancing.

Devised by Ian Messiter.

Producer: Claire Jones.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01cvg4h)
The Food We Eat

We are going through an unprecedented change in how we eat. Developing countries are moving away from traditional diets, and all over the world new types of foodstuffs are edging out foods that have been consumed for centuries. Is this a change for the better, what is driving this change, and how well do we understand what the implications are?

Two influential thinkers - Michael Pollan in the USA and Joanna Blythman in Britain - have written books that, at a time when food choices and dietary advice seem ever more complicated, offer a cry for simplicity.

The most populous nation on the planet - China - is undergoing its own rapid transition. Could the glamour of the western diet really threaten such an ancient and unique food culture?

Sheila talks to Michael, Joanna and the food writer and expert on Chinese food, Fuchsia Dunlop, about the food that we eat.

Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01cp84f)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01cvg4k)
Shaun Ley presents the latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Comp Lit (b014629w)
A children's book using the word "Paki". An angry Daily Telegraph editorial about teen fiction. A new group of writers and teachers grappling with the difficult lives of new young readers. 'Comp Lit.' may not have been a literary genre. But it had widespread repercussions

Nick Baker revisits a period in children's literature, the 1970s, when stories with gritty true life settings sent the boarding school story packing, at least until the arrival of Harry Potter. A new era of fiction set in state schools, aimed at a diverse new readership, hungry for stories about their lives, rather than the idealised lives of middle class children.

Nick traces the arrival of stories for and about 'ordinary' boys and girls of all ages, talking to writers Robert Leeson, Bernard Ashley, Gene Kemp, Farrukh Dhondy and Jan Needle about a time when the politics of class and the classroom, of race and gender, came together in fiction.

By the 1970s, books like The Trouble with Donovan Croft by Bernard Ashley, The Turbulent Term of Tyke Tiler by Gene Kemp and Come To Mecca by Farrukh Dhondy were depicting real life in Britain. Authors were often teachers, keen to capture the imaginations of reluctant readers with stories they'd relate to. The stories were instantly popular. They inspired the hit TV drama Grange Hill..

What kids should and did read became a hot topic. The new books told stories charged with the language and behaviour found in schools the readers went to. Fostering, working mums, benefits, multiracial friendships and racist bullying were all grist to the mill. Did they sacrifice fantasy for social realism? Should the politics of class race and gender be kept out of the children's books? Nick examines the legacy of Comp Lit.

Producer: Tamsin Hughes
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01cks4r)
Haynes, Bedfordshire

Peter Gibbs chairs a gardening debate in Bedfordshire. Joining him on the panel are Matthew Biggs, Pippa Greenwood and Chris Beardshaw.

Matthew Wilson reports on the progress of the Olympic park and Matthew Biggs investigates italian vegetable varieties

Produced by Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Lent Talks (b01ckggw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01cvgbp)
The Cruel Sea

Episode 2

Dramatised by John Fletcher.
2 of 2.
The second part of Nicholas Monsarrat's searing classic novel about the war in the North Atlantic.

Lockhart ..... Gwilym Lee
Ericson ..... Jonathan Coy
Hallam ..... Tracy Wiles
Wainwright ..... David Seddon
Raikes ..... Gerard McDermott
Phillips ..... Peter Hamilton-Dyer
Ferraby ..... Carl Prekopp
Gregg ..... Harry Livingstone
The Operator ..... Adam Billington
Coxswain ..... James Lailey

Sound by Caleb Knightley
Directed by Marc Beeby.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b01cvgbr)
Alan Hollinghurst - The Line of Beauty

Alan Hollinghurst talks to James Naughtie and readers about his 2004 Man Booker prize-winning novel The Line of Beauty.

Framed by the general elections of 1983 and 1987 which returned Margaret Thatcher to power, The Line of Beauty is a story of love, class, sex and money - and AIDs. It won praise for the way it crawls deep under the skin of 1980's Britain.

Protagonist Nick Guest is a young, gay Oxford graduate of modest means who is invited to stay with the wealthy Fedden family at their Notting Hill home. The father Gerald is a conservative MP consumed by by his rising status within the party; his wife Rachel is from the landed gentry - and therefore old money; daughter Catherine is a manic depressive, whilst Nick has had a crush on the son Toby since their time together at University.

However, there is far more to this book than mere social satire.

"It's about someone who loves things more than people. And who ends up with nothing, of course. I know it's bleak, but then I think it's probably a very bleak book, even though it's essentially a comedy."

This is Nick speaking about Henry James' book The Spoils of Poynton, which he has been turning into a (doomed, of course) film script. However, in a typical instance of Hollinghurst's sharp irony, both the reader and Nick himself realise just as he speaks these words that he might as well be discussing his own narrative in The Line of Beauty.

April's Bookclub choice : Anne Enright's The Gathering
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Workshop (b01cvgbt)
Series 1

Episode 4

Ruth Padel's landmark series exploring the pleasures of writing and reading poems comes this time from The Dylan Thomas Centre in Swansea, where Ruth leads a workshop with the Junkbox poetry group.

To warm up their poetry muscles, the group try out some writing exercises. These will be available on the website for anyone who wants to give them a go. Then they work on developing and refining poems from two members of the group; acting (as Heaney describes it) as "the reader over my shoulder." The poems are Milking Time by Becky Lowe and Still Life with Wine Glasses by Alan Kellerman. Both have a sense of loss or longing. The group discuss line endings, alliteration and adjectives, and the effectiveness of their use in the two poems. They also enjoy and respond to a poem by Gwyneth Lewis that evokes that peculiarly Welsh phenomenon 'hiraeth'.

Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01cjwvh)
Credit Rating Agencies

Their judgments send markets into freefall. It is alleged that their mistakes led to the Enron collapse and the 2008 financial crisis. They are the credit rating agencies. Who exactly are they and what exactly do they do?

Is this exploration of the complex world of the "Big Three" rating agencies, BBC Chief Economics Correspondent Hugh Pym takes listeners behind the scenes of the world economy. Through revealing interviews with insiders and former analysts at Standard and Poor's (S&P), Moody's and Fitch, along with leading investors and bankers, Hugh tells the story of the world's ongoing financial woes from a new perspective and ask if anything has really changed. S&P managing director John Chambers explains why governments listen to what his company says.

In Italy the agencies - rarely heard about until recently - have suddenly been subject to police raids and front page headlines. Italy, like many European nations, is unhappy about its recent downgrade and campaigner Elio Lannutti is on a mission to break the power of the rating agencies. But is there any truth in the idea that they're acting politically in their judgements on the Eurozone?

Real concern about the "Big Three" began following the collapse, in 2001-2003, of several major multinationals, including Parmalat, dubbed Europe's Enron. Ordinary people who lost money know only too well what it means when the rating agencies get it wrong. When mortgage-backed securities began going bad in 2007, alarm bells rang again. Why had financial products riddled with bad debt been given Triple A ratings?

So is there any way of breaking the "Big Three's" grip on power - or are they an inevitable fact of life in a global financial landscape?
Producer: Lucy Proctor.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b01cvcr2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01cp84h)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01cp84k)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01cp84m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01cvgbw)
Eric Robson makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

Now, where would you find the henhouse that sparked the Euro crisis, a Czech spy who did a bunk in 1974, Neil Kinnock shedding a furtive tear, the father of humanism, owls, potcheen and a glass of Chateau Fleet Street?
It's all in Pick of the Week with Eric Robson on Sunday.

The Great Squanderland - Roof Radio 4
Essential Classics - Radio 3
The Essay: Wild Things, The Owl. - Radio 3
The Strand - World Service
Japan: Hope Amid the Chaos - World Service
The History Plays: Stonehouse in Alice - Radio 4
Tarzan: Lord of the Jungle - Radio 4
Ramblings: Kinder Scout - Radio 4
Twenty Minutes: Ascent of Mount Ventroux - Radio 3
PM - Radio 4
Rumpole and the Man of God - Radio 4
Kitchen Cabinet - Radio 4
Angarrack - Radio 4

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Jessica Treen
Addition(s):.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01cvgby)
Brian's told Jennifer there's been a big reconciliation, and she wants them to play happy families over lunch. Adam can't do it. He knows Brian only wants to be chums again so he can go ahead with the dairy scheme with a clear conscience. Ian points out there's still a lot of opposition to the scheme but Adam can't see what can stop it now.

Peggy visits Tony. She advises him not to rush things but Tony's feeling better each day and tells Peggy he hopes to be up and about for the launch do in Felpersham on Friday. This is news to Pat.

Tom's tidied up the yard and is taking photographs for the café launch. He's got so much to do in the next few days . Pat's sure everything will be fine. Tony joins them and offers to help. Pat insists Tom has it all under control. Pat asks Tony about the launch and Tony affirms his plan to be there. Tom's convinced he won't be up to it but Pat can see he's determined and can't see how they're going to stop him.


SUN 19:15 Meet David Sedaris (b012f9s3)
Series 2

Memento Mori and The Motherless Bear

The multi-award winning American essayist brings his wit and charm to BBC Radio 4 for a second series of audience readings. This week: The consequences of buying your partner an antique skeleton in "Memento Mori" and a dark fable about mourning: "The Motherless Bear".

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Boomerang production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Dressing Natalie (b01d24cl)
By Hannah McGill. A woman puts pen to paper and writes to her bank manager after an unforeseen spending spree. Read by Barbara Rafferty.

Writer and critic Hannah McGill is a former Artistic Director of the Edinburgh International Film Festival.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01cks4y)
The fate of BBC local radio is once more under the microscope this week, as independent media consultant John Myers publishes his report on the best way to cut costs and keep quality. He recommends scrapping the plan to share afternoon programmes across regions, and suggests that cutting back on management could save two million pounds. Roger meets David Holdsworth, the controller of English Regions, to find out what this will mean for listeners.

As the BBC World Service turns 80, it has thrown open the doors to its news conference. For the first time the daily meeting where editors discuss the news agenda was broadcast around the world. Feedback went along to find out how much the great and the good consider what the audience wants to hear.

And do you know your Angry Birds from your Grand Theft Auto? On BBC Radio 4 a recent edition of Front Row focused on computer games. About time too said many listeners. So will there be more discussion of the topic in the future? Roger meets editor John Goudie to find out.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producers: Karen Pirie and Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01cks4w)
John Wilson on

Davy Jones - the child actor from Manchester who became a Monkee in California. Last Word hears from his bandmate Peter Tork.

Jean Pateman who led the campaign to save Highgate Cemetery from closure in the 70s, remained the guardian of the place for 30 years and became the basis of a character in a bestselling novel by Audrey Niffenegger
.
Steve Kordek, the man who, in the 1940s, revolutionised the game of pinball by adding the electric flippers.

And childbirth guru Betty Parsons whose clients included the Queen and Princess Diana.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01cvcqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01cvg45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01cjm5g)
America: The Right Way

Justin Webb explores what the primaries reveal about the state of the right in the US. Is the Republican party really split? We explore how the party has shifted to the right, and the reasons for it. The role of the Tea party within the conservative movement, and the effect it's having on the primary race. We look at what ideas the American right offers in the post financial crisis world -that might enthuse Americans and perhaps the rest of us too. And ask is the party ready to lead again.

Contributors:
Henry Olsen, Vice President, American Enterprise Institute
Professor Francis Fukuyama, Stanford University
Michael Lind, New America Foundation and Author of "Land of Promise:an Economic History of the United States"
Michael Kibbe, President Freedom Works
Thomas Frank, Author, "Pity the Billionaire"
Jay Cost, Columnist, Weekly Standard.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01cvgc2)
Carolyn Quinn talks to the political editor of The Independent, Andrew Grice, about the big political stories in the week ahead.

Two MPs take part in a live debate - the Conservative Amber Rudd and Labour's Helen Goodman. The discuss public attitudes to the welfare state and the decision to remove Child Benefit from people paying higher rates of tax. They also preview a debate in the House of Commons on International Women's Day.

Adrian Trett, who chairs the Liberal Democrat gay and lesbian group, explains why he supports the forthcoming government consultation on same-sex marriage.

John Beesley reports on the role played by ministers for sport in UK governments over the last three decades.

Programme editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01cvgc4)
Episode 93

David Aaronovitch of The Times analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01ckr42)
Francine Stock meets with Minnie Driver and director Marc Evans to discuss their high school musical Hunky Dory, a love letter to 1970's Wales.

Austrian Markus Schleinzer discusses his debut Michael, where a paedophile imprisons a young boy in his cellar.

Pasquale Iannone explains why The Conformist from 1970 is director Bernardo Bertolucci's masterpiece and a blue print for the American New Wave.

And as the Oscar stardust settles, box office analyst Charles Gant reveals what we've actually been watching on the big screen.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01cvg3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 05 MARCH 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01cp858)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01ckggc)
Ambient religion - Poverty and social work

"poor mentality", "placidly bovine", "volubly unreachable", "feeble minded" - just some of the terms used by social workers as they tried to describe the poor in the 1920s and 30s. Much of their case work was given over to discussing whether the poor were deserving or whether they were making fraudulent claims on the charities and government organisations these new professionals were representing. Laurie is joined by Mark Peel, the author of a new study of social work and poverty in the United States, Australia and Britain, and they discuss which attitudes have changed and which remain the same with the historian Selina Todd.
Also, how evangelic Christians have turned their backs on fire and brimstone and are seeking to put the Bible into the background of everyday life. Matthew Engelke talks about his study of the Bible Society of England and Wales.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01cvg3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01cp85b)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01cp85d)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01cp85g)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01cp85j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cvk7w)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Bishop Martin Shaw.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01cvk7y)
In a bid to understand more about the newly identified livestock disease, Schmallenberg Virus, scientists are infecting midges by injection. Professor Peter Mertens, from the Institute for Animal Health, explains why knowing more about the midge's role will help control the disease, which causes fatalities and deformities in lambs and calves. Out on the farm, we hear from a cattle vet about what it's like to discover Schmallenberg in a herd, and why she thinks the disease may be under reported. And, why the battery cage ban is sending costs rocketing for food manufacturers.

Presenter: Anna Hill
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01cp85n)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01cvk80)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Evan Davis and John Humphrys, including: 07:30 Cardinal Keith O'Brien explains why his is opposed to gay marriage. 07:50 Justice Secretary Ken Clarke on the Legal Aid Bill. 08:10 Were the Russian elections fair? 08:30 James Naughtie on the US campaign trail.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01cvk82)
Middle Age: David Bainbridge, Deborah Moggach, Simon Armitage and Claudia Hammond

Andrew Marr celebrates middle age with the scientist David Bainbridge, who dismisses any suggestion of mid-life crisis, to argue that there's much more to middle age than just a period between youth and being old. The poet Simon Armitage asks in 'Knowing what we Know Now', whether we'd choose to live our life backwards once we got to the mid point, but the writer Deborah Moggach suggests there's a gender divide to reaching 50. And the psychologist Claudia Hammond discusses perceptions of time, and explores why we're so obsessed with its passing.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01cvk84)
Then They Came for Me

Episode 1

Maziar Bahari left London in June 2009 to cover Iran's presidential election, believing he would return to his pregnant fiancée, Paola, in just a few days. In fact, he would spend the next three months in Iran's most notorious prison, enduring brutal interrogation sessions.

During his time in prison, Bahari drew strength from the similar experiences of his family in the past: his father had been imprisoned by the shah in the 1950s and his sister by Ayatollah Khomeini in the 1980s.

Bahari's memoir is also a troubling portrait of life in modern Iran.

Read by Philip Arditti and Peter Hamilton Dyer.

'Then They Came for Me' is by Maziar Bahari, with Aimee Molloy. The book is published by Oneworld
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Emma Harding.

Music tracks from CD Iranian Chronicles (2008), by David Bergeaud
Label: CD Baby.Com/Indys
ASIN: B001MIFY46


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cvk86)
Hear how Jane and six radio colleagues got on when they completed an assault course to raise money for Sport Relief. Would you consider going part time to save your job? There's anecdotal evidence that people in the public and part time sectors are being asked to cut their hours but how willing should you be to accept a part-time post as an alternative to no job at all? As Abigail's Party reaches its thirty-fifth birthday, we talk to Alison Steadman about the enduring appeal of cheesy-pineapple nibbles and chiffon dresses. With a bill to limit the costs of legal aid back in parliament today, we hear from one Labour peer who argues that too many women who suffer domestic violence will be unable to qualify for financial aid.
Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer Lucinda Montefiore.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cvk88)
I Love You, Goodbye

Episode 1

written and adapted by Cynthia Rogerson

Rose's marriage to Harry is falling apart. Their 15 year old son, Sam, hates them for moving to the Highlands. Polish philosopher and pizza maker, Maciek, is missing home and Ania, the marriage guidance counsellor, finds that not everything can be orderly. All are soon to discover the beauty and heartache of love.

Rose ... Wendy Seager
Harry ... Steven McNicholl
Sam ... Finn den Hertog
Ania ... Meg Fraser
Maciek ... Grant O'Rourke

Original music by Fraser Fifield

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 11:00 Boot Camp on a Boat: Still Sailing? (b01cvk8b)
In 2010, Jolyon Jenkins went to Hull to report on 'Cat Zero', an innovative new charity that set itself ambitious targets to change the lives of the city's 'NEETs' - young people not in employment, education or training. Powerful, moving and funny, the documentary he made charted the early days of a controversial approach to re-engaging these disaffected and disenchanted young people.

Unlike other projects targeted at this hard-to-reach group, Cat Zero did not offer trendy 'teen' prizes for those taking part. They promised instead a gruelling SAS-type test where participants would have no sleep, no cigarettes, lots of exercise and a series of chores and challenges to complete, including cooking their own food. If they survived this introductory event, they could join the six-week training course which would lead to several qualifications and the possibility of a voyage in the North Sea for two weeks. Hull's NHS Primary Care Trust spent nearly half a million pounds on a 72 foot yacht as its contribution to the scheme, causing controversy both locally and nationally.

Early results were encouraging but the long-term impact of this unusual project were yet to be determined, and its initial funding ran out in September 2011. Now that the government and the economic climate have radically changed, Jolyon asks how things have turned out for 'graduates' of the scheme and how it will raise funds to keep going in the future.

He discovers what co-founder Jim Dick sees as a perfect example of 'Big Society'. The charity has adapted its programmes to suit the needs of sixth-formers and older jobseekers as well as the 16-18 year old NEETs. It has partners in a range of businesses across Hull with private and public sector funding and now sells berths on events like the North Atlantic Challenge to raise money for the project in the winter months.

As for the people it was set up to help:seventy per cent of its participants have come off the NEET register and their testimony is moving. Vinny left school at thirteen, became a father at sixteen and had resigned himself to a life on benefits at seventeen. But he was persuaded onto the course and says it has transformed his life. He now has a full time job and is looking forward to 'living as an adult and starting my life'. His mother Angie says 'Cat Zero hasn't just changed his life, it's changed our lives and his son's life. He left here a boy and he came back a man. He totally changed and he's stayed that way.'

Producer Mary Ward-Lowery

There are two tracks included in the programme:Professor Green 'Today I cried' and Orson 'Bright Idea'.


MON 11:30 Wordaholics (b01cvk8d)
Series 1

Episode 3

Wordaholics is the comedy panel game all about words.

Gyles Brandreth presides as Susie Dent, Natalie Haynes, Jack Whitehall and Milton Jones vie for supremacy in the ring.

Wordaholics is clever, intelligent, witty and unexpected. There are toponyms, abbreviations, euphemisms, old words, new words, cockney rhyming slang, Greek gobbledegook, plus the panellists' picks of the ugliest and the most beautiful words: the whole world of words.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01cvk8g)
Radio 4's Consumer Affairs Programme.

New research shows how customers can pay over £300 more a year for the same amount of energy depending on where they live and the tariff they choose.

The diet advice on the diabetes website has been criticised by a doctor who says it could well make the condition worse.

Later this year restrictions on non lawyers owning and running law firms will be abolished. The aim is that legal firms will become more entrepreneurial and efficient. Supporters say it will lead to less costly services and products that will be easier to understand; critics claim it could do the opposite.

British supermarkets are rejecting more fruit and vegetables from foreign suppliers because they are 'ugly'. They say Britain is becoming obsessed with looks over taste;meanwhile A Tory MP agrees and she's setting up a business to sell 'ugly food'.

A firm that supplied expert witnesses to courts ruling on disputes relating to the cost of car hire has been closed down and its employees face jail in what has been described as one of the largest legal scams ever.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01cp869)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01cvk8j)
Martha Kearney presents the national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cvk8l)
Sport for All

Clare Balding asks why and when did the British government get involved in sport. How did sport become part of politics, in a country which had always prided itself on keeping them apart?
The Nazis threw immense resources behind the German team for the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, while the British Foreign Office still thought sport should be, ' a private affair between private individuals' free of government interference. However by the 1950's post war politicians began to think that physical recreation and games might be a cure for the general apathy and discontent of British youth as exemplified by the teddy boys, mods and rockers of the era.
Professor Tony Mason of The International Centre for Sport Culture and History at De Montfort University explains the importance of the 1957 Wolfenden Committee's report in broadening access to sporting facilities for all sectors of society.
Technical presentation: John Benton
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01cvgby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Stone (b01cvk8n)
Series 3

Demons

Demons written by Martin Jameson.

Second in a new series of the intelligent detective drama created by Danny Brocklehurst and starring Hugo Speer as DCI John Stone.

When a young man, Emir, is fatally stabbed in a Manchester street in front of his twin brother Jamal, DCI Stone and his team investigate whether it could be a case of mistaken identity. Emir's father believes it to be a racist attack and has serious concerns about Stone's investigation. As tension mounts, racial unrest begins to spread through the city and Stone's investigation comes under intense scrutiny. Then Jamal goes missing.

DCI STONE.....Hugo Speer
DI MIKE TANNER.....Craig Cheetham
DS SUE KELLY.....Deborah McAndrew
JAMAL.....Darren Kuppan
SYED.....Shiv Grewal
MUMTAZ.....Harvey Virdi
DALE/CONNOR.....Matthew McNulty
MCCAFFREY.....Jonathan Keeble

Produced by Nadia Molinari

Audio Drama North.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b01cvk8q)
(17/17)
Russell Davies is in the chair, as the 2012 season of the longest-lived general knowledge contest of them all reaches the Final. The four competitors who have come unscathed through heats and semi-finals line up for the last hurdle, which will determine who is named the 59th 'Brain of Britain'. This year the Finalists are from London, South Wales and Nottinghamshire.

They can expect the questions to be especially challenging in the Final contest. They'll be asked, among many other questions, to name Dickens's mistress who was the subject of an acclaimed biography by Claire Tomalin in the 1990s; and the Pope who instigated the First Crusade with an uncompromising sermon in the year 1095.

As always, the champion takes home the handsome silver 'Brain of Britain' trophy.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01cvg4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Fever Pitched: Twenty Years On (b01cvkc1)
So acceptable has it become for the middle classes to 'talk' football, it's hard to remember what an anomaly you were in 1992 if you had a degree and followed league games. The public perception of football for most of the eighties was summed up by a broadsheet article which called it 'a slum sport for slum people'.

Nick Hornby's 'Fever Pitch' may not have single-handedly changed all of that in the twenty years since it was published, but the quality of the autobiographical writing had a huge impact on the admissibility of the sport into high and middle brow circles, and influenced a generation of British male writers. In this programme Nick Hornby talks to presenter John Wilson to uncover the origins of this remarkable account of a self-aware and obsessive Arsenal fan. They also venture into Arsenal's old ground at Highbury (now converted into flats) to reflect on how much the world of football has changed since Nick first conceived the book. John also happens to have a personal stake in the fate of the stadium, and in the story of Nick's seminal memoir - he's the son of legendary Arsenal goalkeeper Bob Wilson who features in 'Fever Pitch'.

Produced by Faith Lawrence in Salford.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01cvkc3)
Atheism

For the last few years a group dubbed the New Atheists have been waging a verbal war against religion. The language they employ is unrestrained. The late Christopher Hitchens was fairly typical when he wrote in his book "God is not Great," "Religion comes from the bawling and fearful infancy of our species and is a babyish attempt to meet our insatiable demand for knowledge." Richard Dawkins has declared that his aim is " To convert religious believers to atheism by helping them to overcome their childhood indoctrination in order to break free of the vice of religion altogether." Where has this new militancy come from? How does it differ from the Atheism that went before? Is New Atheism a movement and where is it heading?

Joining Ernie to discuss Atheism today are Professor Simon Blackburn, Vice President of the British Humanist Association; Mark Embleton, a psychologist and President of Atheism UK; and Lois Lee, founder of the Non-Religion and secularity research network.


MON 17:00 PM (b01cvkc5)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01cp86h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b01cvkc7)
Series 62

Episode 5

Nicholas Parsons challenges Paul Merton, Sue Perkins, Julian Clary and Charles Collingwood to talk without hesitation, repetition or deviation for 60 seconds. From March 2012.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01cvkdb)
David asks Ruth if she's come up with a plan to keep the cows. Ruth changes the subject and asks David to book the go-karting for Ben's birthday for Friday afternoon. He pushes her and she insists she's working on it. She's researching another system but asks David to back off and give her some time.

It's Clarrie's first day back in the dairy and she's feeling nervous. Susan tells her it'll be just like old times and Pat welcomes her back with a hug. Susan tells Pat they've both given up gossiping for Lent. Clarrie's being over-cautions with her hygiene. Susan's just grateful to have her help. She tells Clarrie that Tracy has managed to get Brad and Chelsea into Loxley Barratt school after Easter but worries that this might be gossip. Clarrie reckons it's just family news.

Tom's had some positive feedback from the ready meal tastings but he's got so much work to do that he's feeling over-loaded. Brenda realises it's not just work he's worrying about. Tom admits he's worried about Tony. Brenda insists the prognosis is really good, thanks to Tom's speedy reaction. So he needs to focus on the launch and go easy on himself.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01cvkdd)
Andrew Stanton; William Byrd; sports documentaries

With Mark Lawson.

Andrew Stanton is an Oscar-winning film-maker whose credits include Toy Story and Finding Nemo. His latest film is John Carter, a sci-fi time travel fantasy set on Mars. He reflects on working with Steve Jobs at Pixar and how directing live action differs from animation.

Alyson Rudd reviews two new TV documentaries which both focus on a sporting challenge - Racing With The Hamiltons, looking at the motorsport aspirations of Lewis' brother Nic, and David Walliams' Big Swim.

Andrew Carwood and his early music choir The Cardinall's Musick are touring the UK this year performing music by the Elizabethan composer William Byrd, for which they recently won the Gramophone Recording of the Year Award. Carwood reflects on how difficult it must have been for the devoutly Catholic Byrd in Reformation England and how this double-life produced such majestic music.

Producer Ellie Bury.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cvk88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Document (b01cvkg4)
Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series, examining documents which shed new light on past events.

In the first programme of the new series, Mike investigates the role played by the French Government and defence industry during the Falklands War.

30 years on, it's well documented that French President Francois Mitterrand was supportive of the British war effort - not least in the memoirs of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Yet Mike discovers papers which suggest there was a deep split within the French government.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01cvkg6)
Neue Labour

Why Labour thinkers believe German society should be the model for Britain's centre left. Matthew Taylor, a former policy adviser to Tony Blair, presents.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01crd80)
Quentin Cooper hears the outcome of the House of Lords review into the role of the government's departmental Chief Scientific Advisers from the chair of the committee, Lord Krebs. There is news of progress towards refining, reducing and replacing the use of animals in scientific experiments. And we take a walk in the forest - the oldest forest ever discovered, home to strange plant ancestors nearly 400 million years ago.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01cvk82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01cp86r)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cvln4)
Ritula Shah presents national and international news and analysis.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01cvln6)
Capital

Episode 1

Capital - the new novel by John Lanchester is the story of one south London street, which has seen a hundred years of fortunes made and lost, of hearts broken, of first steps and last breaths. And then, one day a card with a simple message drops through each letterbox: 'We Want What You Have'...

At forty, Roger Yount is blessed with an expensive life, a stalled marriage and a job in the City. His hoped-for Christmas bonus of a million pounds might seem lavish, but with second homes and nannies to maintain it's starting to look more like a necessity. At eighty-two, Petunia Howe just sits in her window, perplexed by how Pepys Road has changed in her lifetime, wondering why anyone wants what she's got. Elsewhere in Pepys Road, Zbigniew has come from Warsaw to indulge the affluent in their interior decoration whims and traffic warden Quentina has exchanged political activism in Zimbabwe for encounters with enraged motorists. At the end of the road, Ahmed Kamal runs the cornershop. For them all, this non-stop city offers the chance of a different kind of life.

Capital interweaves the lives and stories of the residents of Pepys Road in an utterly compelling, post-crash, state-of-the-nation novel told with compassion, humour and truth; epic in scope, yet intimate and contemplative.

Capital is read by Rafe Spall and begins in December 2007 with the residents of Pepys Road preparing for Christmas, but the cards they receive aren't what they expect.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack (b00w20zg)
Series 1

Episode 1

Meet a masseuse who likes to ensure her clients are relaxed and a cleaning lady who knows her place

Tim Vincent's Mum checks into a hotel - and all the way from Las Vegas, Candi Karmel the 80-year-old diva who can't stop performing.

Characters galore courtesy of Lucy Montgomery.

With Philip Pope, Sally Grace, Waen Shepherd and Natalie Walter

Written by Lucy Montgomery, Barunka O'Shaughnessy, Steven Burge, Jon Hunter and Holly Walsh

Script Editor: Dan Tetsell

Music by Philip Pope

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2010.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cvm3l)
Alicia McCarthy with the day's top news stories from Westminster, where the Government's plans to shake up legal aid in England and Wales have run into trouble in the House of Lords.

Ministers were defeated as peers voted to guarantee legal aid protection for victims of domestic violence.

In the Commons, the Prime Minister told MPs that Britain was a key player at last week's summit in Brussels, despite Britain's refusal to sign a new treaty designed to tighten up budgetary rules in the Eurozone.

And Ministers defend the Government's work experience programme after it dropped plans to stop the benefits of young people who drop out of the scheme.



TUESDAY 06 MARCH 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01cp884)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01cvk84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01cp886)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01cp888)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01cp88b)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01cp88g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cz1m7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Bishop Martin Shaw.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01cvpys)
The world's most expensive Limosin bull has been bought for £126,000 in Carlisle. Caz Graham goes to the Penrith farm which bought him to discover why a bull can be a good investment.

The price of lamb could increase if significantly more livestock is affected with Schmallenberg disease. There has been a sharp increase in the number of farms with this new virus which causes birth defects in lambs and calves. Peter Hardwick from Eblex tells Anna Hill how lamb prices can be affected by deficits in the global sheep flock.

And an animal welfare group is accused of prohibiting improvements in animal welfare. The National Pig Association believes farmers could be put off trying to erect new buildings for their animals, after a pig farmer received a letter from the charity Compassion In World Farming, asking for details about the plans. But CIWF explains how it is trying to protect the welfare of farm animals.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01cvpyv)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including: 07:30 James Naughtie reports on the Republican race for the presidential nomination, as Super Tuesday dawns. 07:40 The history of slang. 08:10 Is Britain's industrial policy working? 08:20 When is it acceptable to boo?


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01cvpyx)
Martin Rees

Jim enters the multiverse with Astronomer Royal Martin Rees. He's worked on the big bang, black holes and the formation of galaxies but what he would really like to know is if there is life elsewhere in the universe.

As an ex president of the Royal Society and a member of the House of Lords he is at the heart of science policy and worked with the G8 to put science on the international agenda. An atheist, he has attracted criticism from other scientists for his religious views.

He says we can now be fairly certain of what happened in the universe from a nanosecond after the big bang until today and is a supporter of the idea that there may have been many big bangs leading to many universes.

Producer: Geraldine Fitzgerald.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01cvpyz)
Yasmin Alibhai-Brown with Megan

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of divorce on families for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up

So far Yasmin has spoken to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and to the author, Louis de Bernieres, who is patron of Families Need Fathers.

This week she speaks to 18 year old Megan, who describes the experience of living through her parents' divorce.

The charity Young Minds put us in touch with Megan. Their website is www.youngminds.org.uk and Megan is part of the Young Minds VIK (Very Important Kids) project.

Young Minds has a Parents' Helpline which is for any adult who is concerned about the mental health or wellbeing of any child or young adult. It's free to call and the number is 0808 802 5544 (Monday to Friday 9.30am-4pm)

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01d2fsn)
Then They Came for Me

Episode 2

Maziar Bahari left London in June 2009 to cover Iran's presidential election, believing he would return to his pregnant fiancée, Paola, in just a few days. In fact, he would spend the next three months in Iran's most notorious prison, enduring brutal interrogation sessions.

In today's episode, Bahari films some of the demonstrations and violence that follow the disputed presidential elections, but his activities soon bring him to the attention of the Iranian authorities and he finds himself under arrest.

Read by Philip Arditti and Peter Hamilton Dyer.

'Then They Came for Me' is by Maziar Bahari, with Aimee Molloy. The book is published by Oneworld
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Emma Harding.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cvpz1)
Goldie Hawn on teaching mindfulness to children. Women and Catholicism, If money is no object is it better to stay at home and look after children or work? Are the cuts affecting women's safety? Presented by Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cvpz3)
I Love You, Goodbye

Episode 2

written and adapted by Cynthia Rogerson

Rose's and Harry continue to attempt to save their failing marriage. Their 15 year old son, Sam, hates them for moving to the Highlands but finds an unexpected friend in Polish philosopher and pizza maker, Maciek. Recovering from a broken heart, Maciek is about to experience a bolt from the blue.

Rose ..... Wendy Seager
Harry ..... Steven McNicholl
Sam ..... Finn den Hertog
Ania ..... Meg Fraser
Maciek ..... Grant O'Rourke

Original music by Fraser Fifield

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


TUE 11:00 Return of the South China Tiger (b01cvpz5)
Back to China

Ten Years ago, Li Quan - a petite former fashion executive --and her American multi-millionaire banker husband, turned their backs on the corporate world and, decided to use their personal wealth to try to save the South China tiger from extinction.

With no formal qualifications or conservation background, Li persuaded the Chinese authorities to lend her two precious zoo-bred tigers, to be shipped to a reserve in South Africa. There the tigers could learn to hunt and breed in the wild again. Their offspring would then be sent back to specially created wildlife reserves in China.

It was a daring plan, and widely criticised for being too risky and too costly. But ten years on, there are now 14 tigers in South Africa, six of them born in the last year, and all have proved proficient hunters.

The next stage of the project is to establish a wildlife reserve in China where the second generation cubs can be returned. Several possible sites have been selected, and prey animals would also have to be introduced for the tigers to hunt. It is a challenging task.

Depending on the site chosen by the Chinese government, thousands of people may have to be moved in order to make way for the tigers, and there is still the unresolved problem of poaching in a country where tiger blood and body parts are highly prized for Chinese medicine, despite being illegal since 1993.

Sue Armstrong asks whether this pioneering project has any prospect of saving one of the world's most endangered species?

Producer: Ruth Evans
A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:30 Bach's Choir (b01cvpz7)
Stephen Evans traces the 800 year history of the the boys choir of St Thomas' Church Leipzig, from the days of J S Bach through Mendelssohn, the war years and communism.

St Thomas' is a remarkable choir. One of the oldest in Europe it was traditionally formed from the less privileged children of the area and developed a unique sound and technical excellence that J S Bach exploited to the full in his 20 years as its music master. Since then the choir has treasured the musical traditions of its early years and defended the elite musical education of the boys and the performance of Bach's works as he would have heard them, surviving the Nazi years and atheist communism too.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01cvpz9)
Call You and Yours: Do we get the press we deserve?

It started with revelations about phone-hacking but now the Leveson inquiry has been hearing about the rather seedy relationship between the police and the tabloid press. But how much are we - the readers - responsible for the press we get? Do we encourage this culture of salacious stories from the tabloid press? There has been a lot of shock and horror about the conduct of some journalists, however there is still an appetite for the Red Tops. Indeed we have just seen the launch of the Sun on Sunday. So do we get the press we deserve? That's the issue that we will be exploring on Call You and Yours. Have you ever accepted payment from a journalist? Did you feel it was justified? Have you ever found yourself at the centre of a news story - how do you feel you were treated? Or should we just lighten up - isn't gossip just harmless fun? Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk, text 84844 and we may call you back or call 03700 100 444. Lines open at 10am, Tuesday.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01cp88p)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01cvr3q)
Martha Kearney presents the latest national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cvr3s)
Golden Girls

In the final week of her series exploring how sport made Britain and Britain made sport, Clare Balding looks at the female British athletes of the 1960's who finally took centre stage on the podium and in the press.
She visits the home of the Birchfield Harriers in Birmingham, one of the country's leading athletics clubs. There she meets Norma Blaine who'd been coaching young women athletes since 1951. Norma remembers when women were unable to compete in any distance race over two hundred metres. Her friend, Diane Leather ran a five minute mile, (breaking the women's world record), the same week as Bannister broke the male world record but Diane's achievement was never acknowledged.
Clare explores the legacy of Anita Lonsborough,Dorothy Hyman, Anne Packer, Mary Rand and Lillian Board and asks if this golden age of female athletes can ever be repeated.
The series has been made with The International Centre for Sport History and Culture at De Montfort University in Leicester.
Technical presentation: John Benton
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01cvkdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00p8hk4)
The Tobacco Merchant's Lawyer

Glasgow 1780. Lawyer Enoch Dalmellington represents the ambiguities of Scottish society since the Union. He detests the corruption of Glasgow's merchants, but can't resist being bought off by them; he dreams of Scottish independence, but is too canny to mention it. And there's a wake-up call to a city whose history has always been more rich, varied and morally ambiguous than the dominant narrative of victimhood allows.

Dalmellington ..... Ian McDiarmid
Directed by Jeremy Mortimer

Iain Heggie was born in Glasgow in 1953. 'A Wholly Healthy Glasgow' , and his John Whiting award-winning play, American Bagpipes, both premiered at the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester, and were later seen at The Royal Court in London. Recent plays include' Love Freaks' (a new take of Double Inconstancy) and 'Sauciehall Street'.


TUE 15:00 The Global Reach (b01cw5n8)
Episode 1

The Global Reach is a new weekly programme , presented by Katie Derham ,which aims to shine a light on international affairs through the personal stories of those directly involved in the making of history.

This week, a year on from the Japanese earthquake, we hear the story of sixty one year old Hiromitsu Shinkawa, who was rescued 10 miles out to sea, sitting on the roof of his house 2 days after a massive Tsunami hit his home

We go ringside with Yamar, a big fan of La Lutte or Senegalese wrestling, which is fast becoming the West African country's biggest sporting obsession.

Narcorridos are the most popular musical genre in northern Mexico but their jaunty polka-style rhythms often hide something far more sinister and insidious. The drug cartels use them to recruit gunmen to their cause and to frighten their rivals. We find out who sings them, who listens to them and why.

As Azerbaijan gears up to host this year's Eurovision, Azeri activist and "donkey" blogger Emin Milli takes a wry look at his country's record on human rights.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b01cw5nb)
Rebel Without a Car

The car was once the symbol of youthful cool. From James Dean through Steve McQueen to Ayrton Senna the car was a symbol of freedom, daring and sexual allure. Today the young of the western world have turned their back on the car. Half of American 17-year-olds have a driver's licence today compared with three-quarters in 1998 and in Europe car sales are down whilst public transport use is up.

Is it simply that insurance costs have rocketed for young drivers? Is it because the young remain in education for longer? Are our youth becoming more environmentally aware or is it because cars have become safe, reliable and downright dull?

In 'Costing the Earth' Tom Heap takes to the road from the Streets of San Francisco to the inner ring roads of the West Midlands to find out if the age of the car is coming to an end. He meets the marketing men, the manufacturers and the innovators struggling to retain a place in our affections for the motor car.

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b01cw5nd)
Sport and the Law

The law is increasingly impacting on sport, with landmark cases being heard in the High Court and European Court of Justice in areas like drugs and employment law. The involvement of lawyers has increased as the professionalism and importantly the money has increased. But when sport ends up in the ordinary courts the cases can be slow and in some cases financially crippling. Governing bodies are often keen to stay out of court, and sport has instituted its own courts, such as the Court for Arbitration for Sport. Many sporting governing bodies write into their constitutions that the CAS be the first port of call in dispute resolution.

The CAS will play a key role at the Olympics, but dispute resolution starts long before the games themselves. Britain's rhythm gymnastics team recently appealed against a decision not to select them for the Olympics and sprinter Dwain Chambers is awaiting a decision by CAS on whether the British Olympic Association rules that currently bar him from competing in an Olympic Games break the international rules on drug bans.

But the move away from the normal courts is not driven by cost alone. There is a debate about how far the law courts should be involved in decisions which impact on sport. The European Union has recognised the special nature of sport, and this has been welcomed by sporting governing bodies. But are we seeing the build up of a body of sports law, which might conflict with law in other areas? How far should sport be special in the eyes of the law? And where should the boundary lie between areas which are decided by traditional courts, sports courts or left up to the sport governing bodies themselves? Joshua Rozenberg talks to those involved with sport and the law.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01cw5ng)
Deborah Meaden and Eliza Carthy

Harriett Gilbert invites Deborah Meaden from Dragons' Den, and folk-singer and songwriter Eliza Carthy to pick their favourite books.

Eliza chooses Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer - a story of a young man who goes to the Ukraine in search of the woman who saved his Grandfather from the Nazis, aided by a blind old man, a randy dog and a very, very bad translator.

Deborah's choice is the historical detective story The Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears, the tale of a young woman, Sarah Blundy, accused of murder set against the backdrop of religious, political and intellectual ferment that surrounded England in the 1600s.

Harriett's choice is the idiosyncratic The Emperor's Babe by Bernardine Evaristo. It's a book written entirely in verse and set in Roman Britain, which tells the story of Zuleika, the feisty and precocious daughter of Sudanese immigrants whose head is turned by the arriving Emperor, Septimus Severus.

Producer: Toby Field

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01cw5nj)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01cp88w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b01cw5nl)
Series 7

Arthurish

Arthur sets off to run an ill friend's bar in Spain. To make life easier, for him and everyone else, he attempts to invent his own language. Now, if only he can navigate the airport and get to Spain.

Count Arthur Strong - one time Variety Star, now sole proprietor and owner of Doncaster's Academy of Performance - is a show business legend, raconteur, and lecturer extraordinaire. He stars in a Sitcom with regular sidekick Wilfred Taylor, Master Butcher, and a host of other characters.

All false starts and nervous fumbling badly covered up by a delicate sheen of bravado and self-assurance, and an expert in everything from the world of entertainment to the origin of the species, everyday life with Arthur is an enlightening experience.

Cast:
Steve Delaney
Mel Giedroyc
Alastair Kerr
David Mounfield

Producer: John Leonard
A Komedia Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01cw5nn)
Jennifer and Lilian visit Tony. They agree he's looking better. Tony admits he's looking after himself - he'll do anything to avoid it happening again. It gets Jennifer and Lilian thinking about their own lifestyles. Jennifer acknowledges they've had their own fair share of stress over the dairy scheme and admits it was tearing the family apart. She's just relieved that they've finally shaken hands and agreed to differ.

Brian learns that there's a demonstration against the dairy, at the market. The protestors are trying to persuade farmers to support them and boycott the market because of the Borchester Land connection.

Brian turns up to find the numbers increasing. He notices Kirsty is amongst them. Cliff Alladay advises Brian that the police can't do anything unless it gets out of hand. Brian goes out and tries to reason with the crowd. He finds himself being caught on camera before he's able to ask them to call it a day. Kirsty insists it's nothing personal but there are a lot of people who really hate his scheme and this is their way of showing it. It won't be the last time he seems them, so Brian had better get used to it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01cw5nq)
Lloyd Newson; Michael Winterbottom; cinematic soccer team

With John Wilson, who meets Lloyd Newson, director of DV8 physical theatre, whose new work focuses on questions of freedom of speech in a multicultural society.

Michael Winterbottom explains why he transposed Thomas Hardy's Tess Of The D'Urbervilles from 19th century Dorset to 21st century India.

Love Life is a new ITV drama written by Bill Gallagher, whose previous credits include Lark Rise to Candleford. The three part series explores the complications inherent in romantic relationships. Writer and critic Natalie Haynes gives her verdict.

Jim White lines up his fantasy team of footballers who have transferred their talents to the silver screen.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cvpz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01cw5ns)
Family Annihilation

In the last two months, three fathers have killed their partners, children and themselves. File on 4 investigates what drives these men to take such drastic action.

The programme talks to relatives, expert forensic psychiatrists and academics to try to find out why they became so-called 'family annihilators'.

It looks at new research into such cases which points to a link to unemployment rates and the levels of gun ownership. It will also ask whether authorities like the health service and police could do more to watch for signs that men are a risk to their families and asks whether new gun licence measures are working.
Presenter: Jane Deith
Producer: Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01cw5nv)
A tribute to David Rathband and RNIB concerns about PIPS - 06/03/2012

Peter White pays tribute to PC David Rathband whose death was announced this week.
The Welfare Reform bill is now law so the days of Disability Living Allowance are numbered. It will be replaced by something called Personal Independence Payments (or PIPs) but Andy Barrick from the RNIB is concerned that these may exclude some of the needs of blind and partially-sighted people.
And Lee Kumutat goes shopping with Susannah Hancock and Pardeep Gill to road test a new personal shopping service where the staff have had visual impairment awareness training.

Presented by Peter White
Produced by Cheryl Gabriel.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01cw5nx)
Vitiligo, diabetes care, knee implants, masks, social media

In Inside Health tonight, Dr Mark Porter tackles the confusion and prejudice that surrounds the skin condition Vitiligo - famously said to have been the reason why Michael Jackson skin looked so light.

Max Pemberton discovers why surgeons may be wearing masks for their benefit rather than their patients.

And Margaret McCartney reminds doctors who tweet to proceed with caution - posting photographs of the first patient you've anaesthetised is likely to get you into trouble!


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01cvpyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01cp892)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cw5nz)
Britain needs a Business Investment bank, say Vince Cable and Ed Miliband. Have the Big Four let business down ?

Iran agrees to let nuclear inspectors in.

Scotland's big drop in pre term babies thanks to the Smoking ban.

with Robin Lustig.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01d5nhh)
Capital

Episode 2

Christmas is upon Pepys Road, Petunia Howe is feeling poorly and Arabella Yount is plotting a surprise for Roger.

Capital - the new novel by John Lanchester is the story of one south London street, which has seen a hundred years of fortunes made and lost, of hearts broken, of first steps and last breaths. And then, one day a card with a simple message drops through each letterbox: 'We Want What You Have'...

At forty, Roger Yount is blessed with an expensive life, a stalled marriage and a job in the City. His hoped-for Christmas bonus of a million pounds might seem lavish, but with second homes and nannies to maintain it's starting to look more like a necessity. At eighty-two, Petunia Howe just sits in her window, perplexed by how Pepys Road has changed in her lifetime, wondering why anyone wants what she's got. Elsewhere in Pepys Road, Zbigniew has come from Warsaw to indulge the affluent in their interior decoration whims and traffic warden Quentina has exchanged political activism in Zimbabwe for encounters with enraged motorists. At the end of the road, Ahmed Kamal runs the cornershop. For them all, this non-stop city offers the chance of a different kind of life.

Capital interweaves the lives and stories of the residents of Pepys Road in an utterly compelling, post-crash, state-of-the-nation novel told with compassion, humour and truth; epic in scope, yet intimate and contemplative.

Capital is read by Rafe Spall and begins in December 2007 with the residents of Pepys Road preparing for Christmas, but the cards they receive aren't what they expect.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The History Plays (b01cw5p1)
Maggie Heart Galtieri

The History Play: Maggie Heart Galtieri

Maggie Watkins (Josie Lawrence) finds a young Argentinean soldier, Christian Galtieri (Javier Marzan), in her kitchen, wounded and in need of shelter. As she slowly learns why he is in hiding the pair fall in love, but as their relationship grows the Task Force lands and it becomes harder and harder to ignore the larger forces at play around them.

This is the third of Nigel Smith's series The History Plays, five two hander plays set at turning points in the history of the last five decades.

Written and directed by Nigel Smith
Produced by Gareth Edwards.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cw5p3)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster .

At Treasury Questions, the Chancellor, George Osborne comes under fresh pressure to cut fuel duty in next month's budget as petrol prices reach record levels.
Also on the programme: the Prime Minister, David Cameron, appears before a committee of senior Mps - and sets out his views on Iran and Syria.
And The Justice Secretary, Ken Clarke, warns that Britain's allies might not be prepared to share intelligence with us in future if sensitive evidence about the security services is disclosed during court cases.



WEDNESDAY 07 MARCH 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01cp8b4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01d2fsn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01cp8b6)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01cp8b8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01cp8bb)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01cp8bd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cz1sn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Bishop Martin Shaw.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01cw65w)
As the number of cases of Schmallenberg disease climbs to 3000 in Europe, scientists warn we need to start planning now for when the midge clouds carrying the disease return to UK shores.

Sarah Swadling visits the Met Office in Exeter to see how weather modelling might predict how the disease could spread. And Anna Hill hears from the World Organisation for Animal Health which is developing new tests for this new virus.

And as drought continues in parts of England, the Environment Agency explains how it is easing restrictions to help farmers out.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


WED 06:00 Today (b01cw65y)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including: 07:30 James Naughtie reports on Super Tuesday results. 07:50 Should the world focus more on dementia? 08:10 Was Vince Cable right, in his leaked letter, to propose a British business bank? 08:20 The NME turns 60.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01cw660)
Libby Purves is joined by singer David Essex; fashion designer Ozwald Boateng; conservationist Dame Daphne Sheldrick and actor and artist James Burke-Dunsmore.

Ozwald Boateng is a British menswear designer who received his first suit at the age of five. A new documentary, 'A Man's Story', charts his career from the opening of his own store on London's Savile Row, to becoming creative director of French fashion house Givenchy. Away from the catwalk, the film reveals the toll the business has taken on his personal life. A Man's Story is out in UK cinemas.

David Essex is a musician and actor. Initially unsuccessful as a drummer and singer, his lucky break was in 'Godspell' in 1971. Within a year he was starring in the film 'That'll Be the Day' and had his first No. 1 single, Rock On. In a career spanning forty years, he went on to star in the West End musicals 'Evita' and 'Mutiny', which he wrote. He also recently appeared in Eastenders as Eddie Moon. 'Over the Moon: My Autobiography' is published by Virgin Books.

Dame Daphne Sheldrick worked alongside her husband David, the legendary warden of Kenya's Tsavo East National Park, rearing and rehabilitating orphaned wild animals. Since David's death in 1977, Daphne has become internationally known for her work with orphaned elephants and rhinos, establishing the 'David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust' in his memory. Her book Love, Life and Elephants: An African Life Story is published by Penguin/Viking.

James Burke-Dunsmore is an actor and director who specialises in playing Jesus Christ in passion plays around the country. He plays Jesus Christ in The Passion of Jesus in London's Trafalgar Square on Good Friday. He is also an artist whose work is inspired by wildlife.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01d2ftk)
Then They Came for Me

Episode 3

Maziar Bahari left London in June 2009 to cover Iran's presidential election, believing he would return to his pregnant fiancée, Paola, in just a few days. In fact, he would spend the next three months in Iran's most notorious prison, enduring brutal interrogation sessions.

During his time in prison, Bahari drew strength from the similar experiences of his family in the past: his father had been imprisoned by the shah in the 1950s and his sister by Ayatollah Khomeini in the 1980s.

In today's episode, his captors offer to make him a deal.

Read by Philip Arditti and Peter Hamilton Dyer.

'Then They Came for Me' is by Maziar Bahari, with Aimee Molloy. The book is published by Oneworld
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Emma Harding.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cw662)
Agyness Deyn Supermodel

Supermodel, Agyness Deyn, talks about making her debut on the London stage. Has feminism left men behind? Does child benefit actually get spent on the children - and will any changes be bad for mothers. Are the US Republican Presidential candidates waging a war on women' as they try to limit access to abortion and birth control. And as NME turns sixty - a celebration of the women who write about rock.

Producer; Ruth Watts
Presenter Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cw664)
I Love You, Goodbye

Episode 3

written and adapted by Cynthia Rogerson.

The vagaries and complexities of love and sex continue to puzzle the inhabitants of the Highland village of Evanton. Could splitting up be the best solution for Harry and Rose? And, for Maciek, a miracle occurs outside the Co-op.

Rose ..... Wendy Seager
Harry ..... Steven McNicholl
Sam ..... Finn den Hertog
Ania ..... Meg Fraser
Maciek ..... Grant O'Rourke

Original music by Fraser Fifield

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


WED 11:00 Building the Big Society (b01cw7kl)
Organising

Giles Edwards has been following three community organisers, who the government hopes will build the Big Society in some of England's more deprived areas. But can they do it?


WED 11:30 HR (b01cw7kn)
Series 3

Gambled

The two friends, having discovered that their pensions are worthless, take every measure thinkable to survive.

Now they're hoping for a lottery win.

Nigel William's retirement comedy series, starring Jonathan Pryce and Nicholas le Prevost.

Peter ..... Jonathan Pryce
Sam ..... Nicholas Le Prevost
Dustman ..... Gerard McDermott

Producer: Peter Kavanagh

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01cw7kq)
Are we breeding the wrong sorts of dogs?

A law firm has just launched a special divorce package for the over 60s - the 'silver separation suite' in response to a marked rise in divorce cases for clients in that age group over the last two years.

The pitfalls of becoming an accidental landlord. In the past five years alone there has been a rise in the rented property market and with it a massive growth in accidental landlords. How easy is it to navigate the system?

Are the wrong dogs are being bred by the wrong people for the wrong reasons? For centuries dogs were bred to work. Recently these working breeds have been further bred and refined as show dogs. Many of us want them to be good companions rather than hard workers and we can't cope with their boundless energy. So how do you choose the right dog for your family?

A Parliamentary Inquiry has been hearing about the owners of mobile home sites who've been harassing and intimidating elderly people who live there. They tell us their story.

The hybrid Vauxhall Ampera has been voted European Car of the Year for 2012. Some car buyers are underwhelmed by the decision but what do the experts say?

We take a look at the Tenant Cashback Scheme that launched this week. It's offering wannabe decorators and carpenters the opportunity to become "an apprentice in the home" - and get paid to hone their skills. Under the scheme responsible residents will have the chance to tackle everyday DIY dilemmas like leaky taps, fitting doors and painting and decorating. .


WED 12:57 Weather (b01cp8bg)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01cw7ks)
Martha Kearney presents the national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cw7kv)
Rugby's Big Bang

Clare Balding explores why Rugby Union tried to stand firm against the encroaching tide of professionalism and in August 1995, lost.
One by one the old bastions of the sporting gentleman had fallen in the 1960s and 1970s. Cricket, tennis and athletics had all abandoned the Victorian distinction between amateurs and professionals. The word 'amateur' had almost become an insult. But of all the major sports, only one continued to uphold the banner - rugby union. It had introduced strict amateur rules into the game in 1886 and ever since had been determined to uphold them. Prof Tony Collins explains that when the Thatcher era did away with the old school tie mentality and money became an acceptable topic of conversation there was only one way rugby could go.
This series was made in partnership with The International Centre for Sport History and Culture.

Technical presentation: John Benton
Producer: Sara Conkey.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01cw5nn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01cwrt2)
Series 4

Wives

By Nick Warburton. Trevor Peacock stars as inspirational chef Warwick Hedges who runs an upmarket restaurant in the Cambridgeshire Fens with his son Jack. Warwick's granddaughter is back from college and she's curious about the family. She wants to trace her roots. In particular she's been wondering about her grandmother but her request touches a nerve.

Warwick Hedges...Trevor Peacock
Jack Hedges...Sam Dale
Marcia Hedges...Kate Buffery
Zofia...Helen Longworth
Samuel...John Rowe
Imogen...Victoria Inez Hardy

Directed by Claire Grove.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01cwrt4)
Paul Lewis and guests take calls on the financial implications of part time working.

More than a quarter of the population now works part-time - and record numbers of people have been forced into part-time work because they can't find a full-time job, according to latest figures from the ONS.

For many, part-time employment offers a good balance between work and other commitments. For others it's what they have to do until the job market picks up.

If you're one of millions working part-time, whether through choice or by necessity, Moneybox Live has a panel of experts ready to offer advice and answer any queries you might have.

What rights do you have if you work part-time?

How will it affect your pension, your benefits, your tax?

What about maternity rights, holiday entitlement and sickness provision?

Can your employer force you to cut your hours and what protections are available?

If you have children or need to care for a family member, is your employer obliged to let you work part-time?

How can you be sure you're getting the same rate of pay, pro rata, as your full-time colleagues?

Paul Lewis will be joined by:

Sarah Veale, Head of Equality and Employment Rights, TUC

Malcolm Maclean, pensions expert, Barnett Waddingham

John Whiting, Tax Policy Director, The Chartered Institute of Taxation

Will Hadwen, Rights adviser, Working Families

Phone lines open at 1pm. The number to call: - 03 700 100 444.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01cw5nx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01cwrt6)
Boxing styles UK vs US - Why nations fail

Why do some nations remain mired in poverty whilst others thrive? A new book argues that the clue to prosperity has less to do with a country's climate, culture and geography than with the inclusivity of its institutions. Authoritarian regimes may succeed in the short run, but long term wealth is only ensured by secure private property, the rule of law and democracy. James Robinson, Professor of Government at Harvard University, discusses his thesis with Laurie Taylor. They're joined by Paul Collier, Professor of Economics at Oxford University. Also 'A Straight Left against a Slogging Ruffian' - the origins of different boxing styles in the UK and US. Research by, Kasia Boddy, an English lecturer at University College, London, explores the boxing boom in the years leading up to the First World War. How did anxieties about the pre-war balance of power turn into a debate on the pros and cons of English versus American styles of boxing? And does this cultural clash about sporting technique still get played out today?
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01cwrt8)
This week Dame Elizabeth Filkin's been telling the Leveson Inquiry about claims of improper relations between police and the press, including suggestions that some senior officers exchanged information to keep their private lives out of the papers. What impact could her recent report on police/press relations have on this and, based on what we've heard from the Inquiry this week, does she see senior officers as a greater problem than the junior ones?

Lord Birt was BBC Director General from 1992 to 2000. As the search continues for a successor to the current DG, Mark Thompson, what qualities does he think the candidates need and what are the main problems that she or he will face? You can hear Greg Dyke's thoughts on this on The Media Show on 1st February.

And, following this programme's coverage of the debate about women on TV, what are the prospects for the latest campaign? Broadcast magazine's calling for women to make up at least 30% of the experts used on news programmes and, so far, Sky News and Channel 4 News have pledged their support. The BBC's head of diversity, Amanda Rice, discusses this with Broadcast's editor Lisa Campbell.


WED 17:00 PM (b01cwrtb)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01cp8bj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Life: An Idiot's Guide (b01cwrtd)
Series 1

Dishonesty

Stephen K Amos and his pick of the circuit's best stand-ups attempt to unravel the knotty problems of modern life

With the help of Sara Pascoe, Matt Forde, Carey Marx and David O'Doherty, Stephen offers his idiot's guide to dishonesty.

Producer: Colin Anderson.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01cwrtg)
Brian's helping Helen again but she's still too busy to come up with imaginative recipes to go out in the veg boxes. Brian suggests she sends all the old recipes to Jennifer, who's keen to help. Jennifer could weed through them and print out some that could be recycled.

Clarrie and Susan suddenly realise they're gossiping. Mischievous Jim overhears and tries to entice them into more gossip about yesterday's demonstration. They refuse to be drawn in.

Susan admits her Lent resolution isn't easy, and tells Alan about Jim trying to wear them down. Alan confronts Jim, who insists it was just harmless fun. Alan seizes the opportunity to offer Jim a challenge, which he agrees to. He'll pay a compliment to a different person every day.

Brian's hoping the demonstration at the market was a one-off. Adam tells him not to count on it, and suggests Brian checks out the protestors' website. When Brian discovers another demonstration is planned for tomorrow, he thanks Adam for the warning and asks to be kept informed if Adam hears any more rumours. Adam insists he has no inside information but there's a lot of opposition out there and it's spreading. With the power of social networking, what else did Brian expect?


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01cwrtj)
Andrew Lloyd Webber on Phantom sequel Love Never Dies

Mark Lawson talks to Andrew Lloyd Webber, who reflects on Love Never Dies, his follow-up to Phantom of the Opera, which is now released on DVD. In a special edition of Front Row, Lloyd Webber explains what was wrong with the original production of Love Never Dies, why he regrets taking Cats off the West End stage, what his plans are for the new ITV talent search for Jesus Christ Superstar, and why his next project is a musical based on the tragic life of osteopath Stephen Ward, one of the central figures in the 1963 Profumo affair.

Producer Timothy Prosser.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cw664)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b01cwrw8)
Iran and nuclear weapons

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu flew to Washington this week to meet US President Barack Obama and right at the top of the agenda was Iran's nuclear programme. Iran claims its programme is for peaceful purposes, but at the same time has banned inspections by the International Atomic Energy Authority to verify those claims. Despite international sanctions Iran seems determined to press ahead - analysts differ on time scales, but all agree that it now has the capability to produce a nuclear weapon if it so chooses. A nuclear armed Iran could dangerously destabilise an already volatile Middle East and pose an existential threat to Israel, putting millions of lives at stake. Also other countries, like Saudi Arabia, would almost certainly feel they'd have to follow the nuclear route. So is it our moral duty to intervene, by force if necessary, to stop that happening? Or, after a decade of disastrous western wars in the Middle East, would an attack on Iran amount to criminal irresponsibility? Can the international community claim any moral authority on this issue when it has allowed India, Pakistan, North Korea and Israel all to develop nuclear weapons? And, in a week when there have been renewed calls of the UK to abandon its 25 billion pound Trident programme, what is our moral justification for keeping our own nuclear arsenal while at the same time preaching non-proliferation to the Iranians?

Witnesses: Prof David Rodin, Director of the Oxford Institute for the Ethics & Law of Armed Conflict, DTL from Geneva; Douglas Murray Henry Jackson Society; Dr Mehrdad Khonsari, Sen Res. Consultant at Centre for Arab and Iranian Studies,London/former Iranian diplomat; Prof Mike Clark, Director of RUSI.

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Matthew Taylor, Clifford Longley and Melanie Phillips.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b01cws2d)
Prof Linda Woodhead

Linda Woodhead - Director of the Religion and Society Research Programme and Professor of Sociology of Religion at Lancaster University - draws from the findings of the Religion and Society research programme to explore the dis-embedding from traditional community relationships to new communities formed from choice rather than inheritance.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

Speakers of this year's talks include the journalist and author Martin Wroe, who will explore humanity being at its most divine when working in community; John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University, explains how his encounter with God is enhanced through science; Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies in the Faculty of Oriental Studies at Oxford University, examines the philosophy of the individual and how this is neglected in many areas of Islam; Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, explores the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01cw5nb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01cw660)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01cp8bl)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cws2g)
Plans to close factories for disabled workers are criticised by Labour and the unions. But disability rights groups are in favour.

At last the Syrian Arab Red Crescent is allowed into the Baba Amr district of Homs.

President Sarkozy targets immigrants in his election campaign

with Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01d5njl)
Capital

Episode 3

Roger Yount's Christmas goes from bad to worse and Shahid Kamal has a surprise when an old comrade turns up.

Capital - the new novel by John Lanchester is the story of one south London street, which has seen a hundred years of fortunes made and lost, of hearts broken, of first steps and last breaths. And then, one day a card with a simple message drops through each letterbox: 'We Want What You Have'...

At forty, Roger Yount is blessed with an expensive life, a stalled marriage and a job in the City. His hoped-for Christmas bonus of a million pounds might seem lavish, but with second homes and nannies to maintain it's starting to look more like a necessity. At eighty-two, Petunia Howe just sits in her window, perplexed by how Pepys Road has changed in her lifetime, wondering why anyone wants what she's got. Elsewhere in Pepys Road, Zbigniew has come from Warsaw to indulge the affluent in their interior decoration whims and traffic warden Quentina has exchanged political activism in Zimbabwe for encounters with enraged motorists. At the end of the road, Ahmed Kamal runs the cornershop. For them all, this non-stop city offers the chance of a different kind of life.

Capital interweaves the lives and stories of the residents of Pepys Road in an utterly compelling, post-crash, state-of-the-nation novel told with compassion, humour and truth; epic in scope, yet intimate and contemplative.

Capital is read by Rafe Spall and begins in December 2007 with the residents of Pepys Road preparing for Christmas, but the cards they receive aren't what they expect.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b01cws2j)
Series 1

Chance

Tim tackles the dicey issue of 'chance' via a selection of poems including: 'The Wrong Number that Led to a Marriage' and 'Probably Gay'.

Written and presented by Tim Key

Musical accompaniment is provided by Tom Basden.

Producer: James Robinson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


WED 23:15 Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing (b01cws2l)
Series 1

About Work

Despite his comedy career, Nathan's family try persuading him to take a job at Dad's office.

This is the story of young, up-and-coming comedian Nathan Caton, who becomes the first in his family to graduate from University - only to opt for a career in comedy - much to his family's annoyance who want him to get a 'proper job' using his architecture degree.

Each episode shows the criticism, interference and rollercoaster ride that Nathan endures from his family as he pursues his career against their wishes.

A mix of Nathan's stand-up intercut with scenes from his family life.

Written by: Nathan Caton. Additional material by: Ola and Maff Brown.

Nathan ..... Nathan Caton
Grandma ..... Mona Hammond
Mum ..... Adjoa Andoh
Dad ..... Curtis Walker
Mr Brimson ..... Don Gilet
Paul ..... Ola
Lingerie Customer / Boss ..... Chizzy Akudolu

Script Editor: James Kettle

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cws2n)
David Cameron and Eb Miliband lead tributes in the Commons to the six British soldiers killed in an explosion in Afghanistan.
But the Labour leader and the Prime Minister clash over a decision to make parents work longer before they can claim tax credits.
MPs mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee with a debate in the Commons.
In the Lords, peers consider government plans to cut the legal aid budget.
While on the committee corridor, executives from the leading credit rating agencies face some tough questioning.
Alicia McCarthy and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 08 MARCH 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01cp8c7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01d2ftk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01cp8c9)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01cp8cc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01cp8cf)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01cp8ch)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cz3jn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Bishop Martin Shaw.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01cws6k)
Vets are arguing that meat packaging should carry more detail about how animals were slaughtered. The British Veterinary Association thinks consumers should know whether animals were stunned before slaughter, as opposed to the practice in some Halal and all Kosher meat production. The Halal Food Authority argues animal welfare is a priority in all forms of Halal slaughter, but agrees that clear labelling is needed. As the new Schmallenberg virus spreads in southern England, we scan the horizon for the next exotic disease threat. And, with crops unplanted and straw still unbaled in the fields, farmers in south west Scotland are sick of the rain.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


THU 06:00 Today (b01cwsz9)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01cwszf)
Lyrical Ballads

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Lyrical Ballads, the collection of poems by William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge first published in 1798. The work was conceived as an attempt to cast off the stultifying conventions of formal 18th-century poetry. Wordsworth wrote that the poems it contains should be "considered as experiments. They were written chiefly with a view to ascertain how far the language of conversation in the middle and lower classes of society is adapted to the purpose of poetic pleasure."Lyrical Ballads contains some of the best-known work by Coleridge and Wordsworth, including The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Tintern Abbey - and is today seen as a point of radical departure for poetry in English.With:Judith HawleyProfessor of Eighteenth-Century Literature at Royal Holloway, University of LondonJonathan BateProvost of Worcester College, OxfordPeter SwaabReader in English Literature at University College London.Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01d2fvd)
Then They Came for Me

Episode 4

Maziar Bahari left London in June 2009 to cover Iran's presidential election, believing he would return to his pregnant fiancée, Paola, in just a few days. In fact, he would spend the next three months in Iran's most notorious prison, enduring brutal interrogation sessions.

During his time in prison, Bahari drew strength from the similar experiences of his family in the past: his father had been imprisoned by the shah in the 1950s and his sister by Ayatollah Khomeini in the 1980s.

Read by Philip Arditti and Peter Hamilton Dyer.

'Then They Came for Me' is by Maziar Bahari, with Aimee Molloy. The book is published by Oneworld
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Emma Harding.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cwszh)
Japan one year on from Fukushima

The Japan nuclear disaster - one year on, the impact it's had on families. What brings about social change? Girls, public speaking and debating. Plus the Funny Women comedy challenge.

Presenter Jenni Murray.
Producer Sarah Johnson.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cwszk)
I Love You, Goodbye

Episode 4

written and adapted by Cynthia Rogerson.

The complexities of love and sex continue to trouble the inhabitants of a Highland village. Ania is pregnant but in love with another man. Sam is falling in love. But his parents, Rose and Harry, have split up - haven't they?

Rose ... Wendy Seager
Harry ... Steven McNicholl
Sam ... Finn den Hertog
Ania ... Meg Fraser
Maciek ... Grant O'Rourke

Original music by Fraser Fifield

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b01cwszm)
The extraordinarily spry 80-year-olds of Shikoku: Peter Day's met them and tells us about the problems countries such as Japan and Britain face with their ageing populations.

'A match made in heaven.' Daniel Schweimler's impressed with the wines made in the Argentine region of Mendoza.

Matthew Price finds Greeks deeply concerned about the further demands they're facing for austerity as efforts continue to secure a further cash bailout from the EU and IMF

What happens when Chinese villagers, incensed about land grabs, stand up against the authorities. Martin Patience, in Guangdong province, says they may have won the battle but they shouldn't feel too confident about winning the war.

And Martin Plaut meets an extraordinary man close to the troubled border between Sudan and South Sudan: a doctor, determined to dodge danger and bring help to all who need it.


THU 11:30 In the Lounge with Rich Morton (b01cwszp)
For many casual listeners, the music usually defined as 'lounge' may conjure up something kitsch and outdated, bringing to mind the world of Austin Powers or the sentimental, string-sodden arrangements of their parents' record collections. As comedian, composer and lounge aficionado Rich Morton discovers, there's a large and healthy subculture of lounge lovers who view it as anything but outdated. For the past twenty years, clubs devoted to lounge music have been thriving, and several successful series of lounge compilations have brought obscure and sought-after tracks by some of the greatest 20th century pop and jazz performers to the ears of a new generation.

As a composer and collector of lounge tunes, Rich goes in search of the alchemy that produces a lounge classic: whether it's the voice of a Rat Pack regular, the tight brassy arrangement of a Neil Hefti or a Quincy Jones, the timeless simplicity of a Burt Bacharach or Tony Hatch melody - or simply a mood, something indefinable, laid-back, evocative of a time and a place that's anywhere but here.

Rich meets fellow lounge collectors, club owners and composers - with the shared passion for a music that's often overlooked or derided but, as the programme reveals, constantly being reinvented. New technology means that classic tracks are being re-discovered and shared as never before, producing fascinating advances and musical hybrids within lounge culture.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01cwszr)
A shortage of eggs, GPs switching to cheaper drugs, and a new music plan for schools

The banning of battery cages for egg production has led to a shortage of eggs, and steep price rises. Winifred Robinson finds out what impact this will have on prices, and why producers were so unprepared for the changes. The companies helping shoppers buy online from American stores - but can it really save you money?
Kids menus make it hard for parents to choose good food for their children according to a survery for the Children's Food Trust. So can restaurants do more?
Will NHS reforms mean more GPs switching patient prescriptions to cheaper drugs in a bid to save money, and does this matter? We find out more. A new plan for how to teach music in schools comes into force in the new school year. We find out what it hopes to deliver. And we report from the Altzeimer Disease International conference in London.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01cp8ck)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01cwszt)
Shaun Ley presents the national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cwszw)
Globalisation

Clare Balding explores the way global television has changed our relationship with sport forever. It's no longer seasonal and is bankrolled by TV income and it bows to TV's needs.
This series was made in partnership with The International Centre for Sport History and Culture.

Technical presentation: John Benton
Producer: Sara Conkey.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01cwrtg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b0499n6h)
Daniel Glattauer - Love Virtually

Starring David Tennant and Emilia Fox, Love Virtually by Austrian novelist Daniel Glattauer is a thoroughly modern epistolary novel with one difference - its protagonists Emmi Rothner and Leo Leike communicate exclusively by email.

The European answer to You've got Mail.

Two million copies sold in Germany to date. And bought by thirty-five publishers around the world, Love Virtually by Austrian novelist Daniel Glattauer, is well on the way to becoming a global publishing phenomenon.

They "meet" when Emmi mistakenly sends an e-mail to Leo's inbox. A romance ensues that allows them to live out a shared secret life far removed from their day-to-day existences. But to what extent does it rely on fantasy and escapism, and will it survive a real-life meeting?

The problem is...Emmi (a modern Madame Bovary) is married....

Have email, Facebook, texting and the like created a generation of isolated young people who prefer to communicate remotely - who may be in fact afraid to engage in face to face contact to find love? Is it possible to fall in love with someone you've never met? Does a virtual affair 'count' as adultery? What are the implications of the fact that we can pretend to be anyone in cyberspace?

Adapted by Eileen Horne.

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b01cwv4f)
Inspirational Walks

Brecon Beacons - Art in the Park

Clare Balding walks part of the Beacons Way in the Brecon Beacons National Park to find out how people are being inspired to create their own response to the surrounding landscape. The Park's landscape has inspired artists for generations and today Clare is joined by Robert Macdonald, one of 8 artists to create a series of images which are set into stone along sections of the footpath as part of a project called 'Art in the Park'. Groups from schools and colleges, as well as people from outside of the Park boundaries, have been encouraged to walk sections of the Beacons Way and gain inspiration themselves from the art work and from the landscape around them.

Leading the walk today are some of the people involved with the project from both National Park and the Brecon Beacons Park Society and, as they walk, Clare talks to members of a group from Drugaid Cymru to find out how the project is helping, and inspiring, them.

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01cvg45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b01cvgbr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01cwvb7)
Actor John Cusack on playing Edgar Allan Poe, and his concerns for free speech in America.

Juliet Stevenson discusses the difficulties of working with Peter Greenaway on his film from 1988, Drowning by Numbers.

Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod are better known as the co-founders of the theatre company, Cheek by Jowl. This week sees the release of their debut film, Bel Ami, starring Robert Pattison as the amoral cad from the famous novel by Guy de Maupassant.

Riz Ahmed is a British actor noted for his roles in The Road to Guantanamo and Four Lions. He's now starring in Trishna, an adaptation of Tess of the d'Urbervilles, directed by Michael Winterbottom. He discusses working with the director and why the film is set in India.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01cwvb9)
Quentin Cooper asks if tourists and scientists may be bringing aliens into Antarctica. He checks out a controversial collision 12 900 years ago in which an asteroid impact may have changed the climate. He hears how one of our amateur scientists is investigating why we hate nasty noises and he discovers how star-quakes could help us discover habitable planets.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


THU 17:00 PM (b01cwvbc)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01cp8cm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b01cwvbf)
Series 1

Episode 3

Miles Jupp hosts the show in which it's not what you know that matters, but who. And more importantly, how well you know them.

Roisin Conaty, Ed Byrne and Richard Madeley nominate one of their intimate circle to answer a series of questions and they then have to second-guess how their nominees responded.

Roisin picks her best friend, Caroline, Ed chooses his mum, Jill, and Richard Madeley opts for his daughter, Chloe - all with varying degrees of success.

The panel also have to try and predict the responses of legendary football commentator, John Motson, as he is asked "what's your favourite film?", "what would you have been if you weren't a football commentator?" and "which other famous TV coat-wearer would you be? The Fonz, Columbo, or Paddington Bear?"

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01dnj0z)
Emma's childcare dilemma is getting her down. Emma tells Ed she found Joe looking after George and Keira, because Eddie had gone off on a job. Ed decides he'll speak to Oliver about the possibility of him changing his days so he covers the milking when Emma's at Lower Loxley. That way Ed can take care of Keira. It's still only temporary, until they find some proper childcare.
Brian's pleased that the bad weather's cut today's demonstration short. But his pleasure is also cut short when he learns the Echo has published a picture of him and Kirsty at the earlier demo. He feels the accompanying article is unfairly in favour of the protestors. Jennifer thinks it will soon blow over. Although happy to help, she wishes Brian had talked to her before telling Helen she'd sort out the veg recipes.
Ruth thinks she's found a way to make the milk pay. Her plan involves giving up their year-round calving and switching to block calving in the autumn. David is unsure, but after Ruth explains how it could work he lets it sink in and then agrees it's worth a try. Ruth's been talking to a consultant, so she'll call him tomorrow. She knows they can make it work.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01cwvbk)
Gilbert and George; Nanci Griffith; John Cusack as Edgar Allan Poe

With Mark Lawson.

Artistic double-act Gilbert and George discuss their working methods, as they open a new exhibition called The London Pictures, based on words taken from newspaper billboards.

Novelist and screenwriter Frank Cottrell-Boyce re-assesses the work of writer Alun Owen, best known for A Hard Day's Night, as three of his 1969 TV dramas, with Sean Connery, Michael Caine and Paul Scofield, are released on DVD.

"I've had a hard life and I write it down", sings Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Nanci Griffith on the title track of her new album, Intersection. It examines a difficult period of her life, fraught with relationship bust-ups and turmoil. As she starts a UK tour, she also reveals why she so enjoys performing in Bristol and Milton Keynes.

Novelist and critic Kim Newman reviews John Cusack as the latest incarnation of Edgar Allan Poe in the new film The Raven, and consider Poe's long cinematic history.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cwszk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b01cw5nd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01dnpqf)
Cock-ups and Conspiracies

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan's executive panel discuss corporate cock-ups and conspiracies. They swap thoughts on why they occur, and how best to avoid them.

Joining Evan are Andy Green, chief executive of business and technology service provider Logica; Phil Smith, chief executive of technology company Cisco UK and Ireland; Luke Johnson, serial entrepreneur and chairman of private equity firm Risk Capital Partners.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon.


THU 21:00 Return of the South China Tiger (b01cvpz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01cwszf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01cp8cp)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cwvbp)
Kofi Annan prepares for his diplomatic mission to Syria - what can he achieve?

Will Greece's private bondholders accept a write-down of their debts?

The young lawyer challenging Venezuela's Hugo Chavez in the Presidential elections.

With Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01d5nkw)
Capital

Episode 4

April 2008 - and life is changing in Pepys Road. Petunia faces a bleak future, Shahid has an unwanted guest and the Police are investigating the postcards.

Capital - the new novel by John Lanchester is the story of one south London street, which has seen a hundred years of fortunes made and lost, of hearts broken, of first steps and last breaths. And then, one day a card with a simple message drops through each letterbox: 'We Want What You Have'...

At forty, Roger Yount is blessed with an expensive life, a stalled marriage and a job in the City. His hoped-for Christmas bonus of a million pounds might seem lavish, but with second homes and nannies to maintain it's starting to look more like a necessity. At eighty-two, Petunia Howe just sits in her window, perplexed by how Pepys Road has changed in her lifetime, wondering why anyone wants what she's got. Elsewhere in Pepys Road, Zbigniew has come from Warsaw to indulge the affluent in their interior decoration whims and traffic warden Quentina has exchanged political activism in Zimbabwe for encounters with enraged motorists. At the end of the road, Ahmed Kamal runs the cornershop. For them all, this non-stop city offers the chance of a different kind of life.

Capital interweaves the lives and stories of the residents of Pepys Road in an utterly compelling, post-crash, state-of-the-nation novel told with compassion, humour and truth; epic in scope, yet intimate and contemplative.

Capital is read by Rafe Spall and begins in December 2007 with the residents of Pepys Road preparing for Christmas, but the cards they receive aren't what they expect.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Paul Temple (b00t2xwp)
Paul Temple and Steve

The Suspects

The net is closing on Dr Belasco, but the sleuth and his wife are now in danger from an unexpected quarter. Stars Gerda Stevenson.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cwvbr)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster - including a cut in railway costs in England and Wales; the Foreign Secretary on the future of Syria; a debate on International Women's Day; and Labour waves farewell to David Cameron's Downing Street Guru.



FRIDAY 09 MARCH 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01cp8d8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01d2fvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01cp8db)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01cp8dd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01cp8dg)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01cp8dj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cz3x6)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rt Revd Martin Shaw.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01cwvns)
Straw wars are pushing up the cost of the arable crop in the UK. Farmers say a poor harvest last year, other countries willing to pay double the price and bio fuel companies burning it as fuel, is leaving them struggling to find or afford straw to feed and bed their animals.

Also in the programme, Charlotte Smith hears about a new voluntary system which could help record the number of lambs and calves affected by the livestock disease, Schmallenberg. The Government's Deputy Chief Vet also explains why it isn't compulsory for farmers to notify them about any cases.

And Anna Hill is out on the Norfolk Broads to see if there is money to be made in growing reeds and sedge.

This programme is presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01cwvnv)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01cvg4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01d2gt8)
Then They Came for Me

Episode 5

Maziar Bahari left London in June 2009 to cover Iran's presidential election, believing he would return to his pregnant fiancée, Paola, in just a few days. In fact, he would spend the next three months in Iran's most notorious prison, enduring brutal interrogation sessions.

During his time in prison, Bahari drew strength from the similar experiences of his family in the past: his father had been imprisoned by the shah in the 1950s and his sister by Ayatollah Khomeini in the 1980s.

Read by Philip Arditti and Peter Hamilton Dyer.

'Then They Came for Me' is by Maziar Bahari, with Aimee Molloy. The book is published by Oneworld
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Emma Harding.

Music tracks from CD Iranian Chronicles (2008), by David Bergeaud
Label: CD Baby.Com/Indys
ASIN: B001MIFY46


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cwvnx)
American aristocrats, trans-racial adoption, female cop duos, and partner or baby - which comes first?

Presented by Jenni Murray. Filming is well underway for the third series of 'Downton Abbey' in which Shirley Maclaine will be appearing in the new role of Lady Grantham's mother. But who were the real life American women who crossed The Atlantic to marry an English Lord? From Jennie Jerome to Nancy Astor, we explore the 'dollar princesses' and how the tradition of the anglo-american romance continues in high places to this day. In order to get more children out of care quicker, the government wants to make trans-racial adoption easier but is it right to do so? Is a loving adoptive family all that any child needs or should the principle of always trying to match child-parent ethnicity be safeguarded when it comes to adoption? We ask what adoptees themselves think including the poet Jackie Kay. As Scott and Bailey, Manchester's very own Cagney & Lacey, returns to screen, we explore the new appetite to watch female detectives in TV crime drama. And baby or partner - who comes first in terms of time and emotional energy?


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cwvnz)
I Love You, Goodbye

Episode 5

written and adapted by Cynthia Rogerson.

A tragic accident will alter the lives of many of the inhabitants of the Highland village of Evanton. But love - in many forms - survives.

Rose ... Wendy Seager
Harry ... Steven McNicholl
Sam ... Finn den Hertog
Ania ... Meg Fraser
Maciek ... Grant O'Rourke

Original music by Fraser Fifield

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


FRI 11:00 Night Visions (b01cwvp1)
A radiophonic journey into the extraordinary world of an aerial crime fighter, peace invader, beholder of night visions and all-seeing eye.

Poet Paul Farley takes a journey into the London night aboard the Metropolitan Police helicopter. From its base deep in Epping Forest the city lights can be seen twinkling in the distance. Once the crew is scrambled and the helicopter takes off the illuminated metropolis begins to move beneath him as the the Air Support Unit dashes through the air from task to task. Be it searching for a missing person on a railway siding or a burglar hiding in gardens, taking on car pursuits or watching a house well out of earshot whilst an armed unit lays siege, it observes London and its inhabitants through thermal image cameras which turn night into day. What the naked eye sees, however, is a vision of sublime beauty as the electric city lights up.

Farley reflects on this world of transformation and in his poem, The Asset, the helicopter takes on a life of its own.

Producer Neil McCarthy.


FRI 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b01cwvp3)
A Reconstructed Corpse

Episode 2

by Jeremy Front
Based on the novel by Simon Brett

Charles discovers bitter rivalries
amongst the police investigating the murder
of a property developer. And an unwelcome surprise awaits when he attempts
to celebrate his wedding anniversary with Frances.

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Juliet ..... Tilly Gaunt
Miles ..... Thomas Arnold
Angie ..... Alex Rivers
Rob Garston ..... Adam Billington
Chloe Earnshaw ..... Francine Chamberlain
Greg Marchmont ..... Carl Prekopp
Superintendent Sorsby ..... Gerard McDermott
Police Constable ..... Christopher Webster
Barmaid ..... Victoria Inez Hardy

Directed by Sally Avens

Bill Nighy returns as the irrepressible Charles Paris: unsuccessful actor, bad husband and dipsomaniac. Charles is once again in need of work and to make things worse he's been kicked out by Frances after inadvertently starting a riot outside her house. Any job will do so when he is offered work in a crime reconstruction programme playing a missing property developer he leaps at the chance. But a missing person case soon turns to murder when severed body parts begin to appear. Television ratings soar as the public tune in to discover every gory detail of the case. The raging egos and jealous manoeuvrings of the producers, presenters and the police soon provide a long list of suspects for Charles to investigate as he pieces together a macabre jigsaw puzzle of murder.

Simon Brett has written numerous Charles Paris novels, which have been used as the basis for the Radio 4 series by Jeremy Front.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01cwvp5)
Micropubs, holidaying at home and students selling your face for advertising

Lake District hotels say they are seeing a drop in customers because of the Olympics. They have a unique Japanese market because of Beatix Potter, but because these trips begin in London and hotel prices in the capital are going up during the games - the Japanese tourists are staying away.
Are we seeing a growth of the 'micro pub' - small premises selling a small range of real ales and not much else? We feature a former Butcher's shop which is seen as the original pub of it's kind.
A pair of Cambridge graduates have paid off over half their student debts by carrying adverts painted on their faces. Ed Moyse from Poole, and Ross Harper from London were originally charging £1 a day for adverts. Six months later and demand has seen them being able to charge £400 a day, with big corporate names wanting to get on board.
VisitScotland is partnering with Walt Disney for the biggest campaign that the country have ever launched. This global marketing push is to promote Scottish tourism around the international release of Disney's highlands-set animated film, Brave. The £7m marketing tie-up marks the first time Disney has teamed up with a country's tourism board, for launching one its movies. Released in the UK in August, Brave is set in the Scottish highlands. It has been produced by Disney's animation studio, Pixar, who also created Toy Story, Up and Finding Nemo.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01cp8dn)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01cwvp7)
Shaun Ley presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cwvp9)
The State of Play

Clare Balding with Professors Richard Holt, Tony Collins and Mike Cronin explores the cultural importance of the great triviality that is sport.
The series was made in partnership with The International Centre for Sports History and Culture at de Montfort University.
Producer: Lucy Lunt
Executive Editor: Ian Bent.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01dnj0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01czctk)
Roddy Doyle - Not Just for Christmas

It was always Danny and Jimmy, Jimmy and Danny. They were blood brothers, inseparable, them against the world - until the one big row that drove them apart. Now twenty years on Jimmy is on the phone, he wants to meet. Jimmy wants to make his peace with his estranged brother, even if it involves a little white lie or two...

Regarded as one of Ireland's most influential contemporary writers Roddy Doyle shot to fame with his novels The Commitments, The Van, (Booker shortlisted) and The Snapper. These were closely followed by his novel Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha which won the Booker. As well as his numerous best-selling novels, he has written for both television and film including When Brendan Met Trudy and the Oscar nominated short film New Boy.

Producer/Director Gemma McMullan.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01cwwlg)
Wolverhampton

Eric Robson, Chris Beardshaw, Pippa Greenwood and Bob Flowerdew are guests of Wolverhampton Horticultural Society.

In addition - Practical March: a hands-on guide to one of the busiest months of the gardening year.

The questions addressed in the programme are:
How can does green manure combine with my No Dig approach to gardening?
Why are the heads of my Roderik red cabbage distorted?
How can I make use of lime tree woodchip as bed dressings?
How can I use complimentary planting to deter pests?
How can I protect my begonias and foxgloves from being eaten?

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Leap Year Tales (b01cwwlj)
Excepting February

Three stories to mark the Leap Year.

'Excepting February' by Alan Spence.

February's extra day threatens to cause technical meltdown in Scotland's granite city, but meanwhile may give love another chance for one man.

Read by John Buick.

Produced by Patricia Hitchcock

Alan Spence is an award-winning poet and playwright, novelist and short story writer. His awards include the McVitie Prize (Scottish Writer of the Year). He is Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Aberdeen where he also founded and directed the annual WORD Festival from 1999-2011. His most recent novel, 'The Pure Land', was translated into 19 languages. His latest book is 'Morning Glory', a poetry collection with illustrations by Elizabeth Blackadder.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01cwwll)
Norman St John-Stevas, Lynn D Compton, Leonard Rosoman, Robert Sherman

John Wilson on:

Politician, academic and dandy Norman St John Stevas, remembered by Michael Heseltine and Andrew Neil.

D-Day hero Buck Compton - member of the Band Of Brothers company who later led the prosecution of Bobby Kennedy's killer Sirhan Sirhan.

Leonard Rosoman, the war artist who documented the London blitz and taught David Hockney at art school.

And Disney film songwriter Robert Sherman, who helped create the soundtrack to childhood.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01cwwln)
This week the news carried tough stories about the situation in Syria, and about the death of 15 year old Kristy Bamu, at the hands of his sister and her partner. Too much information said some listeners, especially as some reports did not include a warning about the graphic content. Several other reports did carry a warning - which other listeners found patronising.

Richard Clark, head of the BBC Radio Newsroom, tells Roger why a warning may or may not be added, and why he feels it can be the right decision to include disturbing detail. He also tackles your objections about the amount of coverage being given to the US presidential primaries.

Is it the end of the road for BBC Radio 2's traffic reports? With websites, apps and local radio providing up to the minute information that's relevant to you wherever you are, some listeners think the end is nigh for traffic on national radio. Sally Boazman, aka Sally Traffic, tells Roger in no uncertain terms why she and her ilk are still providing a vital service.

And over-emotional ranters or real people speaking truth to power? Presenters Steven Nolan and Victoria Derbyshire reveal all about the art of the phone-in.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producers: Karen Pirie and Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01cwwlq)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01cp8dq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b01cwwls)
Series 36

With Lloyd Langford

Topical comedy with Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis who are joined by Jon Holmes, Lloyd Langford, Lucy Montgomery and Mitch Benn for this week's look back at the news.

Producer; Ed Morrish.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01cwwlv)
At St Stephens, Shula and Alan talk about preparations for Britain in Bloom, and they see Jim trying to spot the peregrines. Shula comments on an unexpected compliment she received from him earlier, on her good judgement in buying Topper.

Alan later questions Jim about the sincerity of his compliment. Jim points out the difference between flattery and compliments. Jim's serious about his endeavour and plans to keep a record of his compliments - one person a day for the next three weeks. He's also going to get witnesses, in case anyone's still tempted to doubt his integrity.

Tom's at the café in Felpersham setting up Ambridge Organics' new product launch. Helen and Pat wait for Tony, but he's feeling too washed out to go. Reassured that it's nothing more, Pat agrees it's a sensible decision. At the launch, everyone seems very positive about the new products. Pat has a moment's panic when she sees she's missed a call from David, who's helping at the farm again. It turns out he just wanted to assure her that Tony was fine.
Pat and Helen return home, where all seems quiet. Tony is asleep in front of the television. Pat leaves him to rest while she gets supper ready.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01cwwlx)
New York Special: John Tiffany, Lyndsay Faye, Mike Daisey's play about Apple

British director John Tiffany, who had a huge success with the play Black Watch, is now working on a Broadway musical version of the romantic film Once. The film, set in Dublin, won an Oscar in 2007 for best original song - but wasn't a musical. John Tiffany discusses how he's brought an Irish bar to the New York stage.

Writer Lyndsay Faye's new crime thriller, Gods Of Gotham, is set in 1840s New York, when the city's police force was founded. Much of the novel is written in Flash, the criminal slang of the day, which was documented by the city's first police chief. Lyndsay Faye reflects on how she researched the era.

Kirsty visits Lincoln Hospital, in the South Bronx, where they've introduced a scheme to allow artists and performers without health insurance to trade their creative talents for treatment.

Writer and performer Mike Daisey is a self-confessed geek, whose latest show, The Agony And Ecstasy Of Steve Jobs, describes his love affair with technology. He describes how this led him to China, to seek out the workers who labour in the factories assembling Apple's computers - and he reveals what he found.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cwvnz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01cwwlz)
Farnborough, Hampshire

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Farnborough Hill school in Farnborough, Hampshire, with Communities Secretary, Eric Pickles; Shadow Attorney General, Emily Thornberry; Daily Telegraph columnist, Cristina Odone and writer, broadcaster and Guardian columnist, Jonathan Freedland.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01cwwm1)
Churchill's American Speeches

David Cannadine reflects on the enduring resonance of the important speeches which Winston Churchill delivered in colleges and universities in the United States. Westminster College, Fulton, has "become a shrine to Churchill and his 'iron curtain' speech" and Harvard was where he gave a speech on "Anglo-American Unity".
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Sport and the British: Omnibus (b01cwwm3)
Episode 6

In the omnibus edition of the final week of Sport and the British ,Clare Balding looks forward to what increased globalisation will mean to the future of sport.

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer: Garth Brameld.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01cp8ds)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cwwm5)
The Italian President says it's 'inexplicable' that the UK didn't inform his country of the Nigerian hostage raid.

As Syria's crackdown on dissidents continues, we hear from the people fleeing across the border to Turkey.

And could a British art exhibition help heal rifts with Russia?


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01d5np9)
Capital

Episode 5

Spring has sprung in Pepys Road. The police investigation is going nowhere and Roger's deputy is hatching a plan to get him straight to the top.

Capital - the new novel by John Lanchester is the story of one south London street, which has seen a hundred years of fortunes made and lost, of hearts broken, of first steps and last breaths. And then, one day a card with a simple message drops through each letterbox: 'We Want What You Have'...

At forty, Roger Yount is blessed with an expensive life, a stalled marriage and a job in the City. His hoped-for Christmas bonus of a million pounds might seem lavish, but with second homes and nannies to maintain it's starting to look more like a necessity. At eighty-two, Petunia Howe just sits in her window, perplexed by how Pepys Road has changed in her lifetime, wondering why anyone wants what she's got. Elsewhere in Pepys Road, Zbigniew has come from Warsaw to indulge the affluent in their interior decoration whims and traffic warden Quentina has exchanged political activism in Zimbabwe for encounters with enraged motorists. At the end of the road, Ahmed Kamal runs the cornershop. For them all, this non-stop city offers the chance of a different kind of life.

Capital interweaves the lives and stories of the residents of Pepys Road in an utterly compelling, post-crash, state-of-the-nation novel told with compassion, humour and truth; epic in scope, yet intimate and contemplative.

Capital is read by Rafe Spall and begins in December 2007 with the residents of Pepys Road preparing for Christmas, but the cards they receive aren't what they expect.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01cw5ng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cwwm7)
Mark D'Arcy with the day's top news stories from Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01cvk88)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01cvk88)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01cvpz3)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01cvpz3)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01cw664)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01cw664)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01cwszk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01cwszk)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01cwvnz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01cwvnz)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 FRI (b01cwvp3)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01cw5ng)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01cw5ng)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01cks5b)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01cwwm1)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01cjm5g)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01cvkg6)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01cvcqt)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01cks58)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01cwwlz)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01cvcr6)

Bach's Choir 11:30 TUE (b01cvpz7)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01cvg3x)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01cvg3x)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b01cvkc3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01cvln6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01d5nhh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01d5njl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01d5nkw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01d5np9)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01cqx0f)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01cvk84)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01cvk84)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01d2fsn)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01d2fsn)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01d2ftk)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01d2ftk)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01d2fvd)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01d2fvd)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01d2gt8)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b01cvgbr)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b01cvgbr)

Boot Camp on a Boat: Still Sailing? 11:00 MON (b01cvk8b)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b01cjm4y)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b01cvk8q)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01cvg49)

Building the Big Society 11:00 WED (b01cw7kl)

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing 23:15 WED (b01cws2l)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01cj83p)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01cvgbp)

Comp Lit 13:30 SUN (b014629w)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b01cw5nb)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01cw5nb)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 18:30 TUE (b01cw5nl)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01cvg4f)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01cvg4f)

Document 20:00 MON (b01cvkg4)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00p8hk4)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01cwrt2)

Drama 14:15 THU (b0499n6h)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01czctk)

Dressing Natalie 19:45 SUN (b01d24cl)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b01cv91p)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01cv8n9)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01cvk7y)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01cvpys)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01cw65w)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01cws6k)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01cwvns)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01cks4y)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01cwwln)

Fever Pitched: Twenty Years On 16:00 MON (b01cvkc1)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01cjwvh)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01cw5ns)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b01cvcr2)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b01cvcr2)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01cvcqp)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b01cwszm)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01cvkdd)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01cw5nq)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01cwrtj)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01cwvbk)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01cwwlx)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01cks4r)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01cwwlg)

HR 11:30 WED (b01cw7kn)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01cwszf)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01cwszf)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01cw5nv)

In the Lounge with Rich Morton 11:30 THU (b01cwszp)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01cw5nx)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01cw5nx)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 THU (b01cwvbf)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01cjm56)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b01cvkc7)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01cks4w)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01cwwll)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b01cw5nd)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b01cw5nd)

Leap Year Tales 15:45 FRI (b01cwwlj)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (b01ckggw)

Lent Talks 14:45 SUN (b01ckggw)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b01cws2d)

Life: An Idiot's Guide 18:30 WED (b01cwrtd)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01cvcr0)

Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack 23:00 MON (b00w20zg)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01crd80)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01cwvb9)

Meet David Sedaris 19:15 SUN (b012f9s3)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01chzlf)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01cp83j)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01cp858)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01cp884)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01cp8b4)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01cp8c7)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01cp8d8)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01cw660)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01cw660)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01cwrt4)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01cvcqr)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01cvcqr)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b01ckggt)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b01cwrw8)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01chzlp)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01cp83s)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01cp85j)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01cp88g)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01cp8bd)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01cp8ch)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01cp8dj)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01cp83x)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01chzlr)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01cp841)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01cp847)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01chzmb)

News 13:00 SAT (b01chzm2)

Night Visions 11:00 FRI (b01cwvp1)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b01cvg41)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b01cvpyz)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01cvcqy)

PM 17:00 MON (b01cvkc5)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01cw5nj)

PM 17:00 WED (b01cwrtb)

PM 17:00 THU (b01cwvbc)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01cwwlq)

Paul Temple 23:00 THU (b00t2xwp)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01cvgbw)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01cj83t)

Poetry Workshop 16:30 SUN (b01cvgbt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01cks6f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01cvk7w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01cz1m7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01cz1sn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01cz3jn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01cz3x6)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01cvg45)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01cvg45)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01cvg45)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b01ckpjk)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b01cwv4f)

Return of the South China Tiger 11:00 TUE (b01cvpz5)

Return of the South China Tiger 21:00 THU (b01cvpz5)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01b8w6h)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01cv91m)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01cvcr4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01chzlk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01cp83n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01cp85d)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01cp888)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01cp8b8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01cp8cc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01cp8dd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01chzlh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01chzlm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01chzm4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01cp83l)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01cp83q)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01cp84h)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01cp85b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01cp85g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01cp886)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01cp88b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01cp8b6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01cp8bb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01cp8c9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01cp8cf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01cp8db)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01cp8dg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01chzm8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01cp84m)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01cp86h)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01cp88w)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01cp8bj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01cp8cm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01cp8dq)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01cvg3z)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01cvg3z)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b01cjwtn)

Sport and the British: Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b01cwwm3)

Sport and the British 13:45 MON (b01cvk8l)

Sport and the British 13:45 TUE (b01cvr3s)

Sport and the British 13:45 WED (b01cw7kv)

Sport and the British 13:45 THU (b01cwszw)

Sport and the British 13:45 FRI (b01cwvp9)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01cvk82)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01cvk82)

Stone 14:15 MON (b01cvk8n)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01cvg47)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01cvg43)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01cvg4c)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01cvgby)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01cvgby)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01cvkdb)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01cvkdb)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01cw5nn)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01cw5nn)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01cwrtg)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01cwrtg)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01dnj0z)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01dnj0z)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01cwwlv)

The Art of Monarchy 10:30 SAT (b01cv91r)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01ckr4d)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01dnpqf)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01ckr42)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01cwvb7)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01cvg4h)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01cvg4h)

The Global Reach 15:00 TUE (b01cw5n8)

The History Plays 23:00 TUE (b01cw5p1)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b01cvpyx)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b01cvpyx)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01cwrt8)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b01cks52)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b01cwwls)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01cvcqm)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01cvg4k)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01cvln4)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01cw5nz)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01cws2g)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01cwvbp)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01cwwm5)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01ckggc)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01cwrt6)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:00 WED (b01cws2j)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01cvm3l)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01cw5p3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01cws2n)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01cwvbr)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01cwwm7)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01cv8nc)

Today 06:00 MON (b01cvk80)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01cvpyv)

Today 06:00 WED (b01cw65y)

Today 06:00 THU (b01cwsz9)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01cwvnv)

Under the Skin 00:30 SUN (b01cvdds)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01chzlt)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01chzly)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01chzm0)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01chzm6)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01cp83z)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01cp845)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01cp84f)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01cp84k)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01cp85n)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01cp869)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01cp86r)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01cp88p)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01cp892)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01cp8bg)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01cp8bl)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01cp8ck)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01cp8cp)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01cp8dn)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01cp8ds)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01cvgc2)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01cvgc4)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01cvcqw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01cvk86)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01cvpz1)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01cw662)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01cwszh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01cwvnx)

Wordaholics 11:30 MON (b01cvk8d)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01cvk8j)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01cvr3q)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01cw7ks)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01cwszt)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01cwvp7)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01cvk8g)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01cvpz9)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01cw7kq)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01cwszr)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01cwvp5)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01cks6h)