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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01c7xgw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01cpy0w)
Michele Hanson - What the Grown-Ups Were Doing

Episode 5

Written by Michele Hanson.
Read by Rebecca Front.

Fleeing suburbia for Art School brings liberation in many guises.

The genteel suburbia of Northwest London in the 1950s is the setting for this memoir of an only child whose Jewish mother had loudly held opinions on everything from the stinginess of her neighbours to the bowel movements of her entire family. Negotiating adolescence was never going to be easy.

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01c7xgy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01c7xh0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01c7xh2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01c7xh4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01c7xqk)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4.
From Wales, with the Rev.Mary Stallard.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01c7xqm)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01c7xh6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01c7xh8)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b01c7sn5)
Inspirational Walks

Storytelling in Cornwall

In the third in a series of inspirational walks for Ramblings, Clare Balding is in Cornwall where she is joined by writer and storyteller, Anna Maria Murphy. Inspired by the story of Mary Kelynack, an 84 year old Cornish fishwife who walked from Newlyn to London in 1851, Anna decided to walk all over Cornwall meeting people along the way and gathering stories to inspire her writing. Using ancient routes and seldom used footpaths, Anna set off with a notebook and pen and describes her journey as possibly the single most inspirational thing she has ever done in her life.
Today, Clare joins Anna to walk from the small coastal fishing town of Looe to Polperro, the village where Anna was born. Although this route usually forms part of the popular South West Coast Path, Clare and Anna choose to head inland following woodland footpaths and the 'roads less travelled' of Cornwall before heading to Talland Bay where they pick up the coast path for the last section of the walk. Who will they meet along the way?

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01cj1lk)
Farming Today This Week

This week the Environment Agency announced south east England would join most of East Anglia in drought. Charlotte Smith visits Northamptonshire, where the last 16 months have been the driest on record. A big hole which farmer Duncan Farrington digs for her, in one of his oilseed rape fields, shows exactly why he is concerned about where his crops will get their water from later in the spring. The UK's Global Food Champion explains why he thinks farmers need to adopt more radical ideas to save water. And, if water scarcity intensifies, could water footprinting become as familiar an idea as carbon footprinting?

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01c7xhd)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01cj1lm)
Presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01cj1lp)
Lucie Green, Salena Godden, Martyn Ware, Chrissie Wellington, Diane Blood, height theorist, John Bercow Inheritance Tracks

Richard Coles with astronomer Dr Lucie Green, poet Salena Godden, Diane Blood who made legal history 15 years ago by fighting for the right to bear her dead husband's children, and super athlete Chrissy Wellington who's 4 times winner of the female Iron Man triathlon, a Daytrip to Sheffield with The Human League/Heaven 17's Martyn Ware, a man who has a theory about height and school uniform and the Inheritance Tracks of Speaker of The House of Commons John Bercow.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b01cj1lr)
Ashoka's India; Undesirable Places

Sandi Toksvig hears about a lost Emperor of India: Ashoka ruled the subcontinent about 2,200 years ago and left many pillars and rocks carved with his edicts. Historian Charles Allen went in search of the legacy of this once great Emperor a journey which took him to some of the remoter parts of the country. Writer Tim Moore and webmistress Cathy Shaw both have an interest in visiting some of the least attractive sounding places in Britain and have made many trips to find out if the reputations of towns like Middlesbrough and Scunthorpe for being undesirable destinations are justified.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 The Art of Monarchy (b01cj1lt)
Faith

The Royal Collection is one of the most wide-ranging collections of art and artefacts in the world and provides an intriguing insight into the minds of the monarchs who assembled it.

In this series, BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz encounters dozens of these unique objects - some priceless, others no more than souvenirs - each shedding light on our relationship with the monarchy and giving a glimpse into the essential ingredients of a successful sovereign.

A thousand years of monarchical history tell us that one crucial relationship for a monarch is with the church. In today's programme, Will sees how hard successive rulers have worked to make sure religion stayed on their side. It has not always been easy. The relationship with the church has through the centuries been so fraught as to threaten the survival of a sovereign.

Will begins with an object used - only for a brief but crucial moment - in the coronation of the present Queen, then encounters an object that dates from the time of William the Conqueror and that has anointed some of England's most famous Kings and Queens in the eyes of God. He reads Henry VIII's robust defence of the Catholic faith, written just a few years before political expediency drove him to break with the Papacy; and sees a landscape painting that provides a possible insight into the private faith of Queen Victoria.

Along the way, Will enlists the help of curators from the Royal Collection, Lord Indarjit Singh, historians Sir Diarmaid MacCulloch, Anna Whitelock and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b01cj1rs)
A look behind the scenes at Westminster.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01cj1rv)
Andrew Harding's in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia -- how impressed have they been there with the international gathering in London this week aimed at restoring stability to their country? Gerry Northam's in Japan where, a year after the devastating earthquake and tsunami, they're wondering whether to dump nuclear power altogether. David Willis is looking at a ninety-year-old murder mystery in the Hollywood hills. An extraordinary tableau's revealed in a Cairo bar: Sara Hashash meets a soldier who, on his days off, joins demonstrators throwing stones at the military! And Aleem Maqbool examines Pakistan's system of government from Mirpur, a town they call: Little Britain.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01cj1rx)
Paul Lewis presents the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b01c7x4w)
Series 36

Episode 2

Steve Punt is joined by Jon Culshaw, Mitch Benn, Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin and Paul Sinha for a topical tour of the week's news.

Producer Katie Tyrrell.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01c7xhg)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01c7xhj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b01c7xfg)
Long Eaton, Nottingham

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Trent College, Long Eaton, Derbyshire, with Education minister, Sarah Teather; Shadow minister, Michael Dugher; businesswoman, Nickki King; and writer and broadcaster, Kenan Malik.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01cj1rz)
Listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01cj1s1)
Noughts and Crosses

by Malorie Blackman, dramatised for radio by Janice Okoh

Callum and Sephy have known each other since they were babies, when his Mum worked for hers. But Callum is a Nought - a second class citizen - and Sephy a Cross, one of the elite. Her father is also one of the country's leading policiticians. No matter how much they may want to be together, the world is telling them they can't. And soon bigger things will prevail. Like the bombing..........

Sephy ..... Zawe Ashton
Callum ..... Rikki Lawton
Meggie/Jasmine ..... Adjoa Andoh
Ryan/Andrew Dorn ..... Carl Prekopp
Jude ..... Alex Lanipekun
Lynette/Sarah ..... Tracy Wiles
Kamal ..... Jude Akuwudike
Kelani Adams ..... Nikki Amuka Bird
Mr Pingule ..... Israel Oyelumade
Mr Stoll ..... Richard Pepple
Soanes ..... Gerard McDermott
Shania ..... Victoria Inez Hardy

Director/Producer Marion Nancarrow

Malorie Blackman, OBE, is the BAFTA winning author of more than 50 books. "Noughts and Crosses" won the Children's Book of the Year Award in 2002, as well as the Fantastic Fiction Award and was in the BBC's Big Read Top 100.
The dramatist of Noughts & Crosses, Janice Okoh, won the prestigious Bruntwood prize 2011 for Playwriting, in conjunction with the Royal Exchange Theatre, for her original play Three Birds.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01cj2bk)
Weekend Woman's Hour: London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week - does the industry protect its models and the business of fashion forecasting.The fall of the Alpha Male and the rise of the Beta Age. Can three minutes of vigorous exercise a week really keep you healthy? The charity tackling unsporting behaviour on the sidelines by parents and music from the legendary Joan Baez and the rapper Speech Debelle.
Presented by Jane Garvey.
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01cj2hd)
Saturday PM

A fresh perspective on the day's news with sports headlines. Presented by Carolyn Quinn.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b01c7srg)
Selling expertise

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan and three top executives discuss the curiosities of selling their expertise, knowledge the customer doesn't have. If consumers are in a state of relative ignorance, how can they shop around? What stops them getting ripped off? They also swap thoughts on religion in the workplace.

Joining Evan are Heather McGregor, managing director of headhunters Taylor Bennett; Rupert Soames, chief executive of mobile energy company Aggreko; Gavin Oldham, chief executive of retail stockbroker The Share Centre.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01c7xhl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01c7xhn)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01c7xhq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01cj2hg)
Clive will be scratching an itch with broadcaster Simon Mayo, whose new children's book is inspired by his son's love of reading and science. Itchingham Lofte is a fourteen year old science nut who discovers a rock that, in the wrong hands, could cause untold havoc across the world.

Journalist and presenter Michael Mosley will be sprinting in to talk to Clive about his current fitness regime, consisting of just three minutes of high intensity training per week! Forget about spending hours in the gym or jogging, Michael's BBC Two programme explains how in 'Horizon: The Truth About Exercise' on Tuesday 28th February at 21.00.

Arthur Smith tickles the ivories with comedian and pianist Rainer Hersch. His new London show is a tribute to one of the world's greatest comedy entertainers Victor Borge, whose life is retold and his hilarious act re-imagined by his natural successor. 'Rainer Hersch's Victor Borge' is at Jermyn Street Theatre, London from 6th to 31st March.

Clive's on a Big Night Out with comedian Simon Day, whose 'Fast Show' comedy creations include blazer wearing, deadpan entertainer 'Tommy Cockles' and the 'Competitive Dad'. Simon's autobiography 'Comedy and Error' tells the story of his past addictions, homelessness and his successful career as a comedian.

With music from the Mercury nominated Portico Quartet featuring Swedish singer Cornelia who perform 'Steepless' from their self-titled album.

And our prayers are answered when singer-songwriter Ed Laurie performs 'East Wind' from his album 'Cathedral'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b01cj2hj)
Series 11

Episode 7

John Godber's topical drama is inspired by this week's news. Two gravediggers (Mark Addy and Dicken Ashworth) contemplate the ideal Sunday newspaper.

Mark Addy is currently starring in Collaborators at The National Theatre and Dicken Ashworth stars in Three Days in May at Trafalgar Studios. John Godber is one of the most performed playwrights in English and has won many awards for his work on stage, film and television.

To complement Radio Four's News and Current Affairs output, our weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. The form and content are entirely lead by the news topic - an instant reaction to the mood of the moment.

This is the 12th series and the sheer breadth of approach is reflected in the range of writers who have participated so far. They include: Lionel Shriver, David Baddiel, David Edgar, Amelia Bulmore, Mark Lawson, Bonnie Greer, Laura Solon, Will Self, Alistair Beaton, Lemn Sissay, April de Angelis, Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Adrian Mitchell, Stewart Lee, John Sergeant, Jo Shapcott, Ian McMillan, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Kate Mosse, Marina Warner, Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti, A.L.Kennedy and Lyn Coghlan.

From Fact to Fiction presents writers with the creative opportunity to work in a bold and instinctive way as they respond to events in the news, beginning on a Monday when an idea is selected through to Friday when the programme is recorded and edited.

The high-profile series also attracts big names from the acting profession. Philip Glenister, Tracy-Ann Oberman, Samuel West, David Soul, Henry Goodman, Anne-Marie Duff, Alistair McGowan, Robert Bathurst, Stephen Mangan, Ken Cranham, Brendan Coyle, Haydn Gwynne and Sally Hawkins are just some of the names who have featured so far.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01cj2hl)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests Deborah Moggach, Paul Morley and Kevin Jackson review the week's cultural highlights including Capital by John Lanchester.

The Bomb: A Partial History at the Tricycle Theatre in London is a series of ten specially commissioned short plays on the subject of nuclear proliferation. It includes work by Zinnie Harris, David Greig and John Donnelly.

The action in John Lanchester's novel centres around the people living and working in a well-to-do London street - Pepys Road - in the months leading up to the banking crash of 2008. The characters include a banker, a Polish builder, a Premiership footballer and a Zimbabwean asylum seeker working as a traffic warden.

Woody Harrelson stars as a corrupt LA cop - Dave Brown - in Oren Moverman's film Rampart. Brown is under investigation after savagely beating a motorist who crashed into his patrol car, but he is unrepentant and both his personal and professional life are out of control.

Paula Milne's BBC2 drama series White Heat traces the lives of a group of seven friends who first meet as students sharing a flat in London in 1965. It stars Claire Foy, Sam Claflin and Juliet Stevenson.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01cj2lf)
The Politics of Art

To mark the death earlier this month of the broadcaster and author, John Berger, "Archive on 4" rebroadcasts Tim Marlow's 2012 programme assessing Berger's ground-breaking 1972 BBC-2 series on art and society called "Ways of Seeing".

In the programme, Tim shows how Berger's "Ways of Seeing" challenged, in a revolutionary way, popular ideas about paintings. He reveals how the series contributed significantly to broader social change by offering a compelling new approach to understanding the relationship between painting and wider society. And Tim also considers what the legacy of the series has been for public perceptions of art.

John Berger's decision to wear brightly coloured, open-necked shirts to present the series was arresting enough. But it was his opening-frame vandalism of Botticelli's celebrated canvas "Venus and Mars" from the National Gallery which broke new ground. Berger argued that paintings had been stripped of their context and meaning to raise money for institutions through sales of reproductions. The pictures needed to be seen afresh.

In the febrile political and social atmosphere of the early Seventies in Britain, "Ways of Seeing" argued powerfully, as we hear in extracts from programmes across the series, for understanding art in a far more political way. Tim shows how "Ways of Seeing" was engaged, passionate and up-to-date, explicitly seeking out the opinions of those - notably women and children - whose views had until then been largely ignored. But how well does it stand the test of time?

Producer: Simon Coates.


SAT 21:00 Jonathan Swift - Gulliver's Travels (b01c6trt)
3 The Voyage to Laputa

The last voyages of Jonathan Swift's story are the lesser told. Gulliver finds himself on the floating Island of Laputa, where he encounters mad scientists and the terrifying ghosts of the great and the good. He flees from these intellectual and spiritual horrors, only to finally find a kind of Eden with the Houyhnhnms, a race of intelligent and gentle horses.

However, in this land, humans - or as they are called, the 'Yahoos' - are considered vermin. The dark and traumatizing experiences Gulliver has in this land change his life (and his wife and family's lives) forever.

With the satire here focused on crazy scientific experimentation, superstition, and finally spiritual desolation - Gulliver's Travels is as modern and potent now as it has ever been.

Jonathan Swift's classic satire starring Arthur Darvill as Gulliver.

Gulliver …. Arthur Darvill
Richard Sympson …. Matthew Gravelle
Mary …. Bethan Walker
The Governor of Glubdrubdrib …. Ewan Bailey
The Master Horse …. Sam Dale
Lady Munodi …. Phoebe Waller-Bridge

Adapted by Matthew Broughton.

A BBC Cymru/Wales production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2012.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01c7xhs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b01c7rql)
University admissions

When The Office for Fair Access (OFFA), the public body that promotes fair access to higher education, was created it was immediately dubbed by cynics as "Off-Toff". Those critics would say their fears have been justified with the appointment of its new chief "university access tsar" Professor Les Ebden who has threatened to use OFFA's power to impose huge financial penalties on universities that fail to do enough to open their doors to undergraduates from disadvantaged homes. Depending on your educational background that's either an ad hominem argument, or playing the man rather than the ball. The moral battle that universities find themselves in the centre of is meritocracy verses social engineering. OFFA supporters say our universities, especially Oxbridge and the so called Russell Group are becoming dominated by those from wealthy and privileged backgrounds. They want more use of "contextual data" about applicant's backgrounds and even lower grades for some state pupils to promote social mobility and justice - especially when a steep rise in tuition fees and cuts in places is making it harder to get a place at all. The "Off-Toff" camp says this kind of interference will undermine the academic excellence of one of our last truly world class sectors at a time when as a nation we need to be investing in our intellectual capital to compete with countries like India, China and Brazil and to produce graduates who see their education as a career-changing improvement rather than a lifestyle choice. Or is this treating the symptom and not the cause - a state education system that's lost sight of the quest for academic excellence and is not producing what top universities are looking for and a society that likes to think its meritocratic, but is still beset with class envy and division? And while both sides fight over the position of the educational goalposts parents are left wondering how to do the best for their children.

Witnesses: Professor Dennis Hayes - Founder of the campaign group Academics For Academic Freedom. Head of the Centre for Educational Research, University of Derby; Geoff Parks - Head of Admissions, University of Cambridge; Professor Roger Brown - Co-Director of the Centre of Higher Education Research & Development at Liverpool Hope University; Wes Streeting - Chief Executive of the Helena Kennedy Foundation and former President of the National Union of Students.

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Matthew Taylor, Claire Fox and Clifford Longley.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b01c7ncn)
(15/17)
The third semi-final of the grand-daddy of general knowledge quizzes features competitors from Windsor, Glasgow, Tottenham and Farnsfield in Nottinghamshire. Each of them has come unscathed through the heats stage, and now plays for a place in the grand 2012 Final the week after next.

Russell Davies puts questions from every conceivable field of knowledge. Which war was formally ended by the Treaty of Paris of 1856? In the Beatles' first film 'A Hard Day's Night', which Irish-born actor played the grandfather?

As always, there's also a chance for a listener to win a prize with his or her suggestions for fiendish questions to defeat the contestants' combined brainpower.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01c6try)
Roger McGough presents a selection of poetry asked for by listeners, including this week poems by Brian Patten and Thomas Hardy. There is also a special focus on the work of the late Christopher Logue, a friend and inspiration to both Brian Patten and Roger himself.

Producer Christine Hall.



SUNDAY 26 FEBRUARY 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01chz9v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Under the Skin (b01cj384)
Another Life, by Resma Ruia

Under the Skin is a celebration of the second ever South Asian Literature Festival, which is staged in London and across the United Kingdom. The relationship between the English language, its literary tradition and writers from South Asia has become an exciting and enduring part of British literary life. The Festival celebrates writers from South Asia and British Asian writing, equally, reflecting the diversity of themes, subjects and literary forms that constitute South Asian writing in 2012.

Under the Skin features three stories by British Asian writers. Resma Ruia's Another Life focuses on the restlessness of an Asian businessman who visited Manchester as a young man on his way to America - but never left.

Lyndam Gregory, Deni Francis and Najma Khan are the readers.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01chz9x)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01chz9z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01chzb1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01chzb3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01cj388)
The bells from St Michael's in Mottram in Longdendale, Greater Manchester.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b01c7rqn)
Series 2

Robin Gorna: Are We Losing the Fight Against AIDS?

Robin Gorna has spent 26 years working globally to combat AIDS. She fears that at a time when we know how to deal with the problem, we are losing the political will to tackle it.

She sees finances drying up, and stigma, prejudice and an unwillingness to engage with social and sexual aspects of the illness preventing millions from getting access to the treatment and care they need.

Robin believes there is a real opportunity to end the epidemic, and she blames short attention spans and the wrong actions for the fact that it is still on the increase.

Four Thought is a series of talks in which speakers give a personal viewpoint recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01chzb5)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01cj38b)
I'm a Number, Not a Man

In a society based on managerial principles, is it possible that our numbers count more than our names?
Jo Fidgen explores challenges to our sense of self.

She talks to an American man known as Benjaman who was found suffering from amnesia with no personal identification on him and, without a social security number, no means of re-engaging with society. And she also references the writings of, among others, WH Auden, George Orwell and Jose Saramago, with music by Erik Satie, the Kinks and Shostakovich.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b01cj38d)
Winter Flies

Where do flies go in the winter? It's a question often asked and Miranda Krestovnikoff goes is in search of the answers. Her guide is Erica McAlister, the Collections Manager of Diptera (two-winged flies) at London's Natural History Museum. The location is an icy pool and woodland near Kidderminster where the conditions look anything but favourable. When they arrive nothing is flying, but Erica's backpack suction sampler (what she calls her "ghostbuster gear") reveals a host of metallic greenish flies hiding under the leaves of a tussock sedge. These are known as "dollies" to fly experts ... easier to say than dolichopodids!

These dollies are expert dancers and can be seen on most garden ponds in summer when the males pose on the surface film and wave their wings to flirt with females and threaten other males.

Flies are excellent indicators of good habitat, claims Erica. With over 7,500 species in the UK they outnumber butterflies, moths and beetles and get into every niche, so if you want to study the health of a habitat look for its diversity of flies. Producer: Brett Westwood


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01chzb7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01chzb9)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01cj438)
Edward Stourton with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories familiar and unfamiliar.

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01cj43b)
The Rainforest Foundation

Trudie Styler presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of The Rainforest Foundation.

Reg Charity: 7391285
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope The Rainforest Foundation.

Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01chzbc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01chzbf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01cj43d)
What is Freedom?

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, is the preacher in the first of this year's Lent services taking the theme of the Way to Freedom. Live from the King's School Canterbury and led by the Senior Chaplain, the Revd Fredrik Arvidsson, with the Chapel Choir directed by Howard Ionascu. Organist: David Newsholme. Producer:Stephen Shipley. Download web resources specially written for the series from the Churches Together in Britain and Ireland website.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01c7xfj)
A History of Monetary Unions

David Cannadine reflects on the history of monetary unions and what causes them to succeed or fail. Ancient Greece turns out to be a pioneer, whereas modern Greece has posed a threat to any monetary union it has joined.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01cj43g)
Paddy O'Connell presents news and conversation about the big stories of the week.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01cj43j)
For detailed synopsis, see daily episodes

Writer ..... Nawal Gadalla
Director ..... Kim Greengrass
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Jolene Perks ..... Buffy Davis
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Mike Tucker ..... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Alan Franks ..... John Telfer
Usha Franks ..... Souad Faress
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Tracy Horrobin ..... Susie Riddell
Bert Horrobin ..... Martyn Read
Kylie Richards ..... Leah Brotherhead.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01cj4ky)
Brian Moore

Kirsty Young's castaway is the former rugby player and commentator Brian Moore.

As a player he was ferociously competitive, he says his approach to the game was almost pathological and it earned him the nickname 'the pitbull'.

By the time he retired, he'd earned dozens of England caps and played in three grand slams. But he discovered the obsessive determination he'd shown as a player was not so useful off the pitch.

"In sport, the 'I won't give up', 'carry on training' and 'going again and again and again', that's rewarded because people say isn't that fantastic - but when it comes to normal life, you can't solve everything like that."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b01c7ncx)
Series 62

Episode 3

Chairman Nicholas Parsons endeavours to find out who has the greatest gift of the gab.

Panellists Paul Merton, Sue Perkins, Julian Clary and Charles Collingwood have to speak on a variety of subjects given to them by Nicholas. They must speak for 60 seconds on that subject without hesitation, repetition or deviation - a task much more difficult than it sounds.

This week Sue Perkins reveals what she's got in her attic, Paul Merton talks about his Olympic Dreams, Julian Clary explains why he likes singing in the shower and Charles Collingwood lets us in on his fear of spiders and rats when he's asked to talk on the subject of Sydney.

The game Just A Minute was devised by the late Ian Messiter atop a London bus on his way to work as a BBC Radio producer more than 45 years ago. It was inspired by his memory of a teacher making him and his classmates speak on a subject for 60 seconds as a punishment for bad behaviour.

Producer: Claire Jones.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01cj83h)
Britain's Food Safety Net

Who makes sure our food is safe and how? A report on Britain's food safety net.

The Food Standards Agency is reviewing who makes sure our food is safe and how that work is carried out.

Currently the UK's 434 local authorities employ 2800 people to police our food. With with austerity measures underway there's now less money to spend on those services and budgets for Environmental Health, Trading Standards and public analysis are coming under pressure.

It's resulted in food sampling rates and the number of inspections on businesses coming down. Professor Erik Millstone, an expert on the UK's food safety system, believes this could result in an increase in risk from food borne illness.

Already rates of Campylobacter, a bacterial form of food poisoning, are on the rise and so any future safety regime will have that as one of its main priorities.

Sheila Dillon interviews Tim Smith, Chief Executive of the Food Standards Agency, about the cuts, the FSA's review and if economic pressures could lead to an increase in risk to our health.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01chzbk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01cj83k)
As Syrians vote on their constitution, we hear from supporters of President Assad on the streets of Damascus. Lord Hutton and Lord Crisp discuss the limits of competition in the NHS. Lord Crisp describes the government's Health Bill as a confused mess.
We look at China's increasing use of soft power to win influence in the world.
And Mike Wooldridge reports from Johannesburg as Nelson Mandela recovers from an operation.


SUN 13:30 The Battle for Egypt (b01cj83m)
A year after President Mubarak of Egypt was brought down by 18 days of street protest, the army, then hailed as heroes for defending the revolution, are now seen by many as villains. Despite almost daily street protests calling on them to step down, the generals are still running the country. They say they'll handover power once a new president has been elected in the summer.

When they do hand over it will be to a government that's likely to be dominated by Islamists, who won around 70 per cent of the seats in parliament in recent elections. The young activists who drove the revolution find themselves on the political fringes, with only a handful of seats in parliament and lacking a unified organisation.

Magdi Abdelhadi, who reported from Cairo during the final tumultuous days of President Mubarak's 30-year rule, returns to assess who's winning the struggle in a three-way battle for power in Egypt between the army, the Islamists and the revolutionaries.

Interviewees include: Shady El Ghazaly Harb, one of the revolutionaries; Mohamed Ghozlan, spokesman for the Moslem Brotherhood; former military intelligence officer General Sameh Seif Al-Yazal; historian Khamal Famy; Julie Hughes of the National Democratic Institute.

The producer is Tim Mansel.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01d167g)
Saltash, Cornwall

Matthew Wilson, Bunny Guinness and Anne Swithinbank are on the panel. Eric Robson chairs.

Matt James explores how the slag heaps around Cornwall's polluted and now defunct tin mines are being cleaned up and replanted as a massive new park.

Producer: Howard Shannon
A Somethin Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Key Matters (b00tt5jf)
Series 2

E Minor

In this second series of Key Matters, presenter Ivan Hewett explores the question of why certain musical keys have become associated with particular moods. For example, why is A major almost always employed by composers to write optimistic, even ecstatic music? And how has E minor become the key of choice for portraying menace and tragedy?

Cellist and composer Philip Sheppard defines the qualities of E minor on Wednesday with music ranging from Brahms, Elgar and Shotakovich to The Clash.

Produced in Birmingham by Rosie Boulton.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01cj83p)
The Cruel Sea

Episode 1

Dramatised by John Fletcher.
1 of 2.
The first part of Nicholas Monsarrat's searing classic novel about the men and ships who fought who fought in the North Atlantic during the 2nd World War.

Lockhart ..... Gwilym Lee
Ericson ..... Jonathan Coy
Ferraby ..... Carl Prekopp
Wainwright ..... David Seddon
Phillips ..... Peter Hamilton-Dyer
Gregg ..... Harry Livingstone
Mavis ..... Tracy Wiles
Coxswain ..... James Lailey
Donnelly ..... Adam Billington

Sound by Caleb Knightley
Directed by Marc Beeby

The Cruel Sea is the story of the crew of a newly commissioned corvette, Compass Rose, a ship that forms part of the escort to merchant convoys during World War II. The crew are mostly inexperienced men from non-naval backgrounds and the story focuses on their differing reactions to the horrifying experiences they have as German U-boats attack their convoys with increasing success. Some will survive the war, and some won't - but all of them will be changed by their experiences.
But this isn't just a war story. In a surprisingly subtle way, The Cruel Sea also chronicles the often abrasive process by which classes, previously unknown to each other, were thrown together onboard ship and had to learn to rub along - and how the earned respect, in the long term, led to the future Welfare State and the social equity and cooperation of the 50's and 60's.
The novel, published in 1951, was an immediate success and it has never been out of print since. It brings home the realities of the longest battle in the second world war, the Battle for the Atlantic, but it does so not through harrowing depiction of the horrors involved, but through its detailed depiction the people involved, people we come to care about, to admire, and to mourn.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b01cj83r)
John Lanchester discusses his latest book Capital

Mariella Frostrup talks to John Lanchester about his new novel Capital, which looks at the state of the nation through the lives and stories of the residents of one street.

Recently there have been a number of authors who've hit back publically after a review they haven't agreed with, including the great American linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky, who published a retort to a review of his book "Making the Future." So it is ever a good idea for writers to respond to their critics? Author Terence Blacker explores.

Paris has famously been the inspiration and muse for many artists and writers, from Sartre, Toulouse-Lautrec and Renoir to Balzac, Colette and their literary counterparts from around the world, people like F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce, and Ernest Hemingway. Another ex-pat drawn to the city today is the Australian born writer and journalist, John Baxter, whose book "The Most Beautiful walk in the world" explores his own experiences of the French capital, a journey that has led to him becoming a walking guide to literary Paris.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01cj83t)
More of listeners' poetry requests as Roger McGough, Martin Jarvis and Susan Jameson present a mix of material including an 18th century comic romp, some pieces of nostalgia and a poem asked for by more listeners than any other.

Producer Christine Hall.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b01c7pr5)
Diabetes

New NHS research has revealed the shocking toll of preventable deaths caused by just one medical condition. Diabetes - in which the body fails to control blood sugar levels safely - is causing 24,000 needless deaths a year in England alone.

It's not just the old and middle-aged who are at risk. Young women with diabetes are 6 to 9 times more likely to die than their age group overall. And many more young people who don't die will develop life threatening diseases later due to failure to manage their blood sugar.

Badly controlled diabetes can lead to kidney disease, heart conditions, or blindness. It's also the cause of 5,000 amputations a year, mainly of legs or feet. With around 3 million diagnosed sufferers known to the health service, diabetes is said to be costing the NHS £9 billion a year, about a tenth of the total health budget.

Julian O'Halloran reveals why, despite Government pledges, it's so difficult to get to grips with the disease. And, with the incidence of diabetes rocketing, he asks whether the NHS can cope.

Producer - Gail Champion.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b01cj2hj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01chzbm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01chzbp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01chzbr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01cj83w)
Sarah Montague makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

This week, Sarah Montague escapes the newsroom to go on a hunt for the biggest trees in the world; to be inspired by birds; and take a tour of the grandest streets of London. After that we're bathing with a ferret, before lying back on a few scatter cushions to listen to Van the Man and mull over the choice of God or George Clooney?

World at One Radio 4
Nature Radio 4
Inspired by birds Radio 3
Julia George Water Radio Kent
PM Radio 4
Afternoon Drama: Number 10 Radio 4
It's Not What You Know radio 4
Wordaholics Radio 4
My London World Service
Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme Radio 4
Book of the Week: What the Grown Ups are Doing Radio 4
One to One Radio 4
Witness: Silent Films World Service
Oscar Sings Radio 4
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw

Producer: Jessica Treen.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01cj83y)
Jennifer thinks Debbie returned to Hungary feeling positive about the dairy. But at the public meeting Jennifer was surrounded by Pat and Ruth, so she felt under siege. She just wishes Debbie could have had a proper talk with Adam. Brian's just grateful Adam didn't come to the meeting.

Ruth can't believe their latest electricity bill is so high. David gently suggests it's time to make a decision. Ruth won't face up to the thought of giving up the cows; she might as well give up farming. Jennifer heads their way, looking for Adam. Ruth can't face her while she feels like this.

Chris senses Alice is upset that they can't afford to join her old school friends on an Easter skiing holiday, and tries to perk her up. Alice tells Brian she's feeling guilty for taking things out on Chris. Chris turns up with some catkins for her. Alice hugs him and assures him she really doesn't want to go to Austria but loves his idea of going for an indoor snowboarding session. Jennifer wishes she had their problems. She tells Brian how Ruth cut her dead. This dairy scheme is tearing apart the whole family. Pat and Tony are already at war with them, and now Ruth!


SUN 19:15 Meet David Sedaris (b0129bpk)
Series 2

Us and Them and selected diary extracts

The multi-award winning American essayist brings his wit and charm to BBC Radio 4 for a series of audience readings. This week, we learn no two families are ever alike in "Us and Them" and we get a peep into the caustic mind of the author when he reads selections from his extensive diaries.

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Boomerang production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Sussex Scandals (b01cjb66)
Up and Down the Fire Escape

Written by John Peacock.

In his teens, Gerard O' Shea, lived innocently, through the tempestuous affair of his mother, Katie O' Shea and Parnell 'the uncrowned King of Ireland'. 50 years later Myrna Loy and Clark Gable, unwittingly, help him to reach an understanding of those days.

These are three short stories narrated by characters involved in notorious scandals that originated in Sussex: Uppark (Lady Hamilton), Crawley (John George Haigh's girl friend) and Brighton (Katie O' Shea's son, Gerard), ranging from 1815 to 1953. The fall of a woman who revelled in her scandals; another who was forced to face the truth that her lover was a murderer; and the son of Katie O' Shea, defending his father during his mother's notorious affair with Charles Stewart Parnell.

Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b01c7x4r)
Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations.

Presented by Roger Bolton, this is the place to air your views on the things you hear on BBC Radio.

This programme's content is entirely directed by you.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01c7x4p)
Matthew Bannister on

the war correspondent Marie Colvin who was killed covering the bombardment of Homs in Syria. We hear about her dangerous career - and her love of sailing.

the adventurer John Fairfax - he was the first man to row solo across the Atlantic and then rowed across the Pacific with Sylvia Cook. She tells me how they braved huge storms and a shark attack.

the military historian MRD Foot, who drew on his own experiences in the SAS to become the official historian of the Special Operations Executive

And the comedian Frank Carson, who unified Northern Ireland through laughter.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01cj1rx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01cj43b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b01c7nd5)
Profits Before Pay

It may come as no great surprise that many of us have experienced a wage squeeze, while the cost of living has gone the other way, since the financial crisis of 2008. However, as Duncan Weldon, a senior economist at the Trades Union Congress, points out, wages for most people in the UK began stagnating years before the crisis.

We tend to think of the early 2000s as a time of relative wealth: house prices were rising, credit flowed easily, the government introduced a generous tax credit scheme and people generally felt better off. But Duncan Weldon argues these masked the reality of what was going on.

Work done by the think tank The Resolution Foundation, which focuses on those on low and modest incomes, shows that there was almost no wage growth in the middle and below during the five years leading up to 2008 and yet the economy grew by 11% in that period. Others also point out that the share of the national income which goes into wages, as opposed to profits, has been decreasing since the mid-1970s. The argument is that less of the economic pie is going into the pockets of ordinary workers.

What is also clear is that a disproportionate amount of the economic wealth has been going to those at the top. The earnings of the richest few per cent have increased rapidly in the UK since the 1980s and that pattern accelerated in the last ten years. In the United States that process began earlier and has been more extreme.

Some economists argue that this is not a problem in itself as taxation, for example, helps to re-distribute the money to the less well off or those with disadvantages.

In Analysis Duncan Weldon asks why wages stopped rising in the years before the crash and what was the driving force for the squeeze?


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01cjb68)
Carolyn Quinn talks to the Chief Political Correspondent of the Guardian Nick Watt about the big political stories. They discuss the prospect of further changes to the Health and Social Care bill, the arguments over the Government's work experience scheme and plans to elect the House of Lords.

The Liberal Democrat MP John Thurso defends his party's policy to elect the Lords.

Conservative MP George Hollingbery and Labour MP Rushanara Ali debate Lords reform and the Government's work experience scheme.

The first woman ever to be Sergeant at Arms of the House of Commons, Jill Pay, discusses the highs and lows of her four years in the post.

Programme Editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01cjb6b)
Episode 92

Kevin Maguire of The Mirror analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01c7sn7)
Francine Stock talks to Woody Harrelson, who plays a violent racist cop in his new film Rampart. It's been hailed by many as one of the performances of the year. So why no Oscar nod? He explains all.

Also out this week is Black Gold, a vast sweeping epic which tells the story of the discovery of oil in the Arab states at the turn of the 20th century. Staring Mark Strong and Antonio Banderas, the film is conspicuous in featuring no Arab actors in the lead roles. One of the producers behind the film Ali Jaafar, discusses the challenges of making a movie set in the Arab world.

Director Stephen Frears explains why Otto Preminger's Laura, starring Gene Tierney, is one of his favourites from the film noir genre.

And ahead of the Academy Awards this weekend Francine speaks to producer Sue Goffe and director Grant Orchard about their Oscar-nominated short, A Morning Stroll.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01cj38b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 27 FEBRUARY 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01chzcg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01c7rq6)
In 1980 there were around 300,000 students in forty-six universities, now there are some two and a quarter million students studying in 130 universities across Britain. More people than ever before are receiving a university education but despite - or even because of this - there is enormous anxiety about the role that universities should play. Should they be judged on their contribution to the economy or on the pursuit of knowledge for knowledge's sake? How can their 'impact' or success be measured? The intellectual historian Stefan Collini puts these debates in their historical context as he talks to Laurie about his new book, What Are Universities For?

And why are we so fascinated with outlaws? Could it be that they offer an alternative way of life without the hierarchies and corporate power that seem to hold us back? Martin Parker, author of Alternative Business: Outlaws Crime and Culture thinks so. He discusses his work with Laurie and criminologist Dick Hobbs.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01cj388)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01chzcj)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01chzcl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01chzcn)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01chzcq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cjm45)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4.
From Wales, with the Rev.Mary Stallard.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01cjm47)
Growing up on a farm, surrounded by muck, could be much better for you than living in a clean house. Researchers at the University of Bristol have compared piglets reared in a sanitised environment to those kept on a farm. They found that the farm animals have a better immune system - and this also correlates to humans.

Food and farming is the biggest industry in the UK - but could it expand to aid the UK economy? Farming Minister, Jim Paice MP thinks that the industry can export more food to expand. Professor Tim Lang believes that there needs to be comprehensive investment in rural housing and agriculture colleges, and that farming can't be left to market forces. Lord Donald Curry believes that although UK agriculture could expand, farming will never become a dominant industry.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01chzcs)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01cjm49)
Presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01cjm4c)
Faith and Doubt: Richard Holloway, Karen Armstrong, Jonathan Safran Foer and Helen Edmundson

On Start the Week Andrew Marr discusses faith and doubt. Richard Holloway started training for the priesthood from the age of 14, but as the former Bishop looks back on his life he reveals a restless spirit, always questioning his beliefs. Karen Armstrong has had similar crises of faith, and asks in a forthcoming talk, 'What is Religion?' For the 17th century Mexican nun, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, faith was wrapped up in her love of writing and poetry - her life is brought to the stage by the playwright Helen Edmundson. And Jonathan Safran Foer celebrates the Jewish text Haggadah which tells the story of the Exodus to the Promised Land.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01cjm4f)
Wilkie Collins

Episode 1

Written by Peter Ackroyd.
Read by Michael Pennington.

Peter Ackroyd charts the life of Wilkie Collins. From his childhood as the son of an artist, to his struggles to become a writer, and his life-long friendship with Charles Dickens.

Short and oddly built, with a head too big for his body, extremely short-sighted, unable to stay still, dressed in colourful clothes, 'as if playing a certain part in the great general drama of life' Wilkie Collins looked distinctly strange. But he was none the less a charmer, befriended by the great, loved by children, irresistibly attractive to women - and avidly read by generations of readers.

Peter Ackroyd follows his hero, 'the sweetest-tempered of all the Victorian novelists', from his childhood as the son of a well-known artist to his struggling beginnings as writer, his years of fame and his life-long friendship with the other great London chronicler, Charles Dickens. A true Londoner, Collins, like Dickens, was fascinated by the secrets and crimes -- the fraud, blackmail and poisonings - that lay hidden behind the city's respectable facade. He was a fighter, never afraid to point out injustices and shams, or to tackle the establishment head on.
As well as his enduring masterpieces, "The Moonstone" - often called the first true detective novel - and the sensational "Women in White," he produced an intriguing array of lesser known works. But Collins had his own secrets: he never married, but lived for thirty years with the widowed Caroline Graves, and also had a second liaison, as 'Mr and Mrs Dawson', with a younger mistress, Martha Rudd, with whom he had three children. Both women remained devoted as illness and opium-taking took their toll: he died in 1889, in the middle of writing his last novel - Blind Love.

Told with Peter Ackroyd's inimitable verve this is a ravishingly entertaining life of a great story-teller, full of surprises, rich in humour and sympathetic understanding.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cjm4h)
Childcare Costs, Funny Women, Active Ageing

The rising costs of childcare - we look at a new report from The Daycare Trust which shows how much parents are paying out to go to work. At the other end of the scale, we look at the growing numbers of people over 60 and hear arguments for better support for our ageing population taking priority over help with childcare costs. Despite a proliferation of professional funny women, it's men who dominate a shortlist for this year's Chortle comedy awards. Just two female comedians make it to the listing which runs to 13 separate categories. We talk to the man behind the awards and ask why women appear to have lost out. We look at the challenges that arise when same-sex couples enter into informal parenting agreements with donors in order to have a child. Are pre-conception agreements the answer to potential legal battles over the role of the parents involved?
Producer Catherine Carr.
Presenter Jane Garvey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cjm4k)
Christopher William Hill - Angarrack

Autumn

Christopher William Hill's black comedy revolves around the future of a crumbling Cornish ancestral estate in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Sir Richard Penwerris (Richard Johnson), mired in debt, wishes to bequeath it to the National Trust, much to the fury of his wife, Lady Helen (Lia Williams) who plans to drag the estate, kicking and screaming, into the 20th century. Matters are complicated further by the sudden emergence of an heir to the estate, Rafe Penwerris (Henry Hadden-Paton), whom his father believed to have died in the war. A clash of Titans ensues - with only one winner.

Cast:
Sir Richard Penwerris ..... Richard Johnson
Lady Helen ...... Lia Williams
Rafe ...... Harry Hadden-Paton
Tregunna ....... Tony Haygarth
Ralston ....... Nicholas Boulton

Incidental Music: composed by David Chilton

Producer: Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 Recycled Radio (b01cjm4m)
Failure

Old BBC programmes are chopped up and recycled into something new.

Failure is a subject we can all understand and this programme features quiz show contestants, divorcees, politicians, as well as an explanation of the death of the dodo, and the voice of the man who discovered Scott's body in his tent in the Antarctic.

Featuring the voices of Sheila Hancock, David Attenborough, Beryl Bainbridge, Matthew Parris, John Humphrys, Margaret Thatcher, Joe Queenan, Bill Clinton, Armando Iannucci, Jeremy Paxman and Gordon Brown, among many others.

These are not stories told in a conventional sense - they have been chopped up and broken down, slowed down and juxtaposed to create something new.

Producer: Miles Warde

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


MON 11:30 Wordaholics (b01cjm4p)
Series 1

Episode 2

Wordaholics is the comedy panel game all about words.

Gyles Brandreth presides as Natalie Haynes, Michael Rosen, Arthur Smith and Paul Sinha vie for supremacy in the ring.

Wordaholics is clever, intelligent, witty and unexpected. There are toponyms, abbreviations, euphemisms, old words, new words, cockney rhyming slang, Greek gobbledegook, plus the panellists' picks of the ugliest and the most beautiful words: the whole world of words.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle

Producer: Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01cv9tp)
The cost of residential care and expensive 'free' trials

Should cafes and bars let you "spend a penny" without you having to spend a penny? Or is that an unfair burden on business? Is it fair for people who fund their own residential care to be charged hundreds of pounds a month more than local authority-funded residents for exactly the same service? And have you fallen victim to the face cream "free trial offer" that could cost you a packet?

The presenter is Julian Worricker, the producer is Paul Waters.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01chzcv)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01cjm4r)
Martha Kearney presents the national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cjm4t)
War Games

Week five of the series that explores how sport made Britain and Britain made sport. In this episode Clare Balding visits The Imperial War Museum to discover the vital role sport has played, both on the battle field and on the home front, during both World Wars. She starts in the Hall of Remembrance in front of John Singer Sargent's, Gassed, an oil painting more than twenty feet long, depicting the aftermath of a mustard gas attack during the First World War, with a line of wounded soldiers walking towards a dressing station. Yet in the background there are groups of men playing football. As Prof. Tony Collins of De Montfort University explains, sport became an essential part of army life, alleviating the boredom and the terror, by 1916 there was a football ground in each brigade area of the Western Front.
During the Second World War, Prof Tony Mason explains the importance of sport to those captured and detained in German prisoner of war camps, with football, in particular being used as a way of providing entertainment for troops overseas.

The series was made in partnership with The International Centre for Sport History and Culture at De Montfort University, Leicester.

The Reader is Alun Raglan
Technical presentation: John Benton
Producer: Garth Brameld.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01cj83y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Stone (b01cjm4w)
Series 3

Sleep Tight

Episode 1

Sleep Tight by Cath Staincliffe

When two year old Brianna disappears one night from her family home, DCI Stone and his team are called upon to lead the investigation. The first of a new series of the intelligent detective series tackling morally ambiguous, complex and challenging subjects created by Danny Brocklehurst and starring Hugo Speer as DCI John Stone.

DCI STONE ... Hugo Speer
DI MIKE TANNER ... Craig Cheetham
DS SUE KELLY .. Deborah McAndrew
CARA .. Rachel Austin
JEN .. Sarah McDonald Hughes
CROW/EDOZIE .. Chris Jack

Directed by Nadia Molinari
Produced by Charlotte Riches

A Radio Drama North Production.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b01cjm4y)
(16/17)
The fourth and last semi-final of the 2012 series will determine who takes the remaining place in the grand Final. The competitors are from Reigate, Inverness, Disley in Cheshire and Neath in South Wales.

Russell Davies asks the questions, which include: What's the name of the man-eating water monster who plagues the hall of King Hrothgar in the Old English poem Beowulf? And which sea-area in the Met Office shipping forecast extends furthest west?

The answers could prove crucial in the contest to discover who'll take a step closer to the 2012 'Brain of Britain' title.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01cj83h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Tarzan: Lord of the Jungle (b01cjm50)
In 1912 Edgar Rice Burroughs created the character of Tarzan who quickly became a global sensation.

When the books were first adapted for the big screen in 1918, the resulting film was one of the first ever to take over a million dollars at the box office. Way ahead of his time, Burroughs ignored the advice of business 'experts' who told him not to roll out the character across different formats. By doing so, he was one of the true pioneers of the multi-media franchises that have since become the norm.

Tarzan himself has been as troubling as he has been popular - the different characterisations that have appeared in the hundreds of books, films, radio shows, comic books, cartoons etc., make it very hard to pinpoint one single, authentic character. Some critics have derided him for his affirmation of white, colonial assumptions, while others have championed his eco-warrior credentials.

One thing is for sure - with a range of new books and films appearing, the character of Tarzan has lost little of his original appeal.

John Waite talks with, among others, James Sullos of ERB Inc., Desmond Morris to find out about the plausibility of the notion of a baby being raised by apes, and cultural historian Jeffrey Richards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2012.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01cjm52)
Korea

The death in December of Kim Jong Il, North Korea's "Dear Leader" has focused the spotlight on the affairs of one of the world's most secretive states.
Kim Jong Il - and his father before him - had assumed the status of demi-gods. To follow any other religion risked imprisonment or worse. In today's "Beyond Belief" Ernie Rea asks what the implications of Kim Jong Il's death might be for religious freedom.
By contrast, South Korea has some of the world's largest Christian congregations. And for centuries millions of Koreans, North and South, have followed Confucian, Buddhist and Shaman traditions.

Joining Ernie for the discussion are James Grayson, Emeritus Professor of Modern Korean Studies at the University of Sheffield; Professor Sebastian Kim who holds the Chair in Theology and Public Life at York St John University; and Dr Jiyoung Song Associate Fellow at Chatham House and Lecturer at the National University of Singapore.


MON 17:00 PM (b01cjm54)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01chzcx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b01cjm56)
Series 62

Episode 4

Panellists Paul Merton, Liza Tarbuck, Josie Lawrence and Kit Hesketh-Harvey join host Nicholas Parsons for the popular panel game where they have to speak on a given subject for sixty seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

This week Paul Merton tells us about his Perfect Lie-In, Josie Lawrence reveals details of her Perfect Date, Kit Hesketh-Harvey describes how to Throw a Successful Party and Liza Tarbuck brings the show to a standstill with her revelations about her aptitude for Belly Dancing.

Devised by Ian Messiter.

Producer: Claire Jones.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01cjm58)
Brian and Annabelle discuss the next steps for the proposed dairy. South Borsetshire planning department are bound to cause them a few headaches, and the Environment Agency could still scupper the whole project. Brian's confident Adam won't give them any more problems but Annabelle's not convinced and suggests Brian has a word with him.

Neil and Susan enjoy having their home to themselves but Susan feels sorry for Gary. She suggests Neil could paint his room as a random act of kindness for Lent. Neil feels he's done enough but agrees to think about it. He suggests Susan tries Alan's other proposal for Lent - giving up gossip.

Neil drops some paint off but it turns out Gary doesn't want his room touched. He's happy with his Star Trek wallpaper. Susan thanks Neil for trying. She starts to tell Neil that she saw Brian and Annabelle leaving The Feathers together but Neil challenges her not to gossip. Susan takes up the challenge and says no more.

Brian thanks Adam for not going to the public meeting last week. Adam points out that his reason for not going doesn't warrant Brian's thanks. Brian tries to appease the situation but Adam insists it's too late to just agree to differ.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01cjm5b)
Jennifer Aniston in Wanderlust and comedian Sarah Millican

With Mark Lawson,

John Adams' controversial opera The Death of Klinghoffer, based on the true story of a hijacked cruise liner in 1985, has just had its first performance at English National Opera in a new production directed by Tom Morris, co-creator of the National Theatre's adaptation of War Horse. Sarah Crompton gives her response to the first night.

Award-winning comedian Sarah Millican discusses moving her comedy from the stage to the TV screen, and also reflects on her row with a fan who recorded one of her shows on a mobile phone.

In the new comedy film Wanderlust, Jennifer Aniston and Paul Rudd play an over-stressed couple who leave the pressures of Manhattan to join a freewheeling community where the only rule is 'to be yourself'. Antonia Quirke reviews.

Radio 4 is inviting you to nominate New Elizabethans - people who have made an impact on the UK from 1952 to today. This week Front Row is asking writers and artists for their suggestions, and tonight playwright Mark Ravenhill nominates a pioneering theatre director.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cjm4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Doctor - Tell Me the Truth (b01cjm5d)
Episode 2

In the second part of Doctor Tell Me The Truth Prof Reason asks whether the University of Michigan programme could work in the NHS. Peter Walsh from Action Against Medical Accidents tells him of cases where doctors have been prevented from admitting their mistakes at the insistence of their managers. He introduces us to 'Robbie's Law', named after a boy who died as a result of medical malpractice, a piece of proposed legislation now being examined in the House of Lords which would require all NHS hospitals to adopt an open disclosure policy. Academics David Studdert and Alan Kalachian ask whether such a policy is legally enforceable or even desirable. Sir Liam Donaldson, a former Chief Medical Officer, tells us of his attempts to promote openness in the NHS and we hear from Robbie Powell's father who tells us that his twenty year legal battle could have been avoided if the doctors had only admitted their mistakes and apologised.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b01cjm5g)
America: The Right Way

Justin Webb explores what the primaries reveal about the state of the right in the US. Is the Republican party really split? We explore how the party has shifted to the right, and the reasons for it. The role of the Tea party within the conservative movement, and the effect it's having on the primary race. We look at what ideas the American right offers in the post financial crisis world -that might enthuse Americans and perhaps the rest of us too. And ask is the party ready to lead again.

Contributors:
Henry Olsen, Vice President, American Enterprise Institute
Professor Francis Fukuyama, Stanford University
Michael Lind, New America Foundation and Author of "Land of Promise:an Economic History of the United States"
Michael Kibbe, President Freedom Works
Thomas Frank, Author, "Pity the Billionaire"
Jay Cost, Columnist, Weekly Standard.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01c7sn9)
Quentin Cooper hears that men may not be heading for extinction after all! The male Y-chromosome is degenerate but, according to a new study, has been stable since we diverged from monkeys 25 million years ago. But the fundamental unit of mass, the kilogram, may not be stable. Attempts to redefine it in terms of fundamental constants are fraught with difficulty. But there is hope on the horizon for mimicking one of nature's greatest secrets, photosynthesis, the ability to turn sunshine into fuel.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01cjm4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01chzcz)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cjmjy)
As the Leveson inquiry resumes, how deep were the connections between senior met police and senior news international editors?

Should the international community start arming the Syrian rebels?

And does attending meetings lower your IQ?

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01cjmk0)
Deborah Levy - Swimming Home

Episode 1

'Life is only worth living because we hope it will get better and we'll all get home safely"

When beautiful Kitty Finch lands in the middle of what seems a conventional holiday set up - two couples, one teenage daughter and a villa in the south of France - no-one quite knows the effect she will have, though at once the ground shifts.

In the fierce heat of July, fissures yawn open, prised apart by Kitty's unsettling presence. Is she benign? What does she want? Is she an admiring fan or a darker foe? And who is keeping secrets, most of all from themselves?

Deborah Levy's first novel in fifteen years has garnered much praise. Witty and acute by turn, its deceptively simple setting belies the fractured relationships and the sense of imminent chaos that threatens all the characters. In today's episode: 'There's something in the pool'.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Produced by Di Speirs
Directed by Elizabeth Allard
The Reader is Juliet Aubrey

Deborah Levy is the author of novels, including Beautiful Mutants, Swallowing Geography and Billy and Girl, and also a playwright and a poet. Born in South Africa, she now lives in London.


MON 23:00 Miracles R Us (b00sm8tq)
Lot 243

Caroline's car gives up the ghost and the business can’t afford the repairs.

When they've asked to bid for a lot at a county house auction – how can they get there?

Sylvia rides to the rescue. Once they arrive, Caroline makes a new friend, while Sylvia meets a kindred spirit...

Sitcom by Lesley Bruce.

Sylvia ..... Anna Massey
Caroline ..... Deborah Findlay
Lauren ..... Madeleine Bowyer
Lambourn ..... Trevor Peacock
Carl Bailey ..... Nigel Hastings
Auctioneer ..... Michael Shelford

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2010.

Music and strings from the music of Nick Drake. Theme: "When the Day is Done" and strings : "Time of No Reply" and "Cello Song".


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cjmk2)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster .

Peers continue their scrutiny of government plans to shake up England's NHS.
Also on the programme there's a call for sex education to be made a legal requirement in schools and on the Committee corridor, the Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, is questioned over his plans to elect the House of Lords.



TUESDAY 28 FEBRUARY 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01chzdm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01cjm4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01chzdp)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01chzdr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01chzdt)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01chzdw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cmt11)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4.
From Wales, with the Rev.Mary Stallard.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01cjwt8)
Cattle vets are predicting the number of confirmed cases of Schmallenberg in cows could be less than those seen in Europe. The British Cattle Veterinary Association says the signs of illness and reduced milk yield seen in affected cows on the continent last year, were not reported by farmers in the UK. The disease causes birth defects in lambs, calves and goat kids. The Government has confirmed 5 cases on cattle farms.

Farmers in drought stricken parts of the UK are being forced to rethink what crops and vegetables they plant, and when. The ground water level in the south and east of England is at its lowest levels since the dry summer of 1976. Many farmers are now cutting back on crops such as potatoes, carrots and onions which all need extra water.

And Secretary of State Caroline Spelman unveils the locations of a dozen of new Nature Improvement Areas. Its hoped the sites will help will create wildlife havens and encourage local people to get involved with nature. Mrs Spelman also responds to an announcement of a legal challenge to the planned badger cull in England later this year.

This programme was presented by Anna Hill and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01cjwtb)
Presented by James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Yesterday in Parliament; Weather; Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01cjwtd)
Iain Chalmers

Jim Al-Khalili talks to the pioneering health services researcher, Iain Chalmers, who was one of the founders of the Cochrane Collaboration.

Once described by one writer as 'The Maverick Master of Medical Evidence'. Iain Chalmers trained as a doctor, eventually specialising in obstetrics. But early in his career, he started to question the basis of everything he was trained to do and this set him on a very different path: to champion treatments based on the best available evidence, first in his own field and then across healthcare. It's a journey that has at times challenged the foundations of medical practice.

In 1992, he was appointed Director of the Cochrane Centre, which led to the foundation of the Cochrane Collaboration, dedicated to ensuring that patients, doctors and researchers have access to unbiased information about the effectiveness of healthcare interventions, across the world.

Iain wants to reduce uncertainty in medicine so that patients can make sensible choices about their care. There are now 30,000 Cochrane members world wide, from Brazil to Belgium, Spain to South Africa. He's been hugely influential both within medicine but across all areas of social policy and the inspiration for a generation of evidence-based, sceptical enquirers such as Ben Goldacre. A frequent irritant of the medical establishment Iain become one of them when he was knighted for services to healthcare in 2000.

Having spent his career trying to change the mindset of the medical community from the inside, he's now pushing from the outside, arguing that patients' concerns should drive the medical research agenda.

Producer: Rami Tzabar.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01cjwtg)
Yasmin Alibhai-Brown with Louis de Bernieres

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of family breakdown for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up.

Last week Yasmin spoke to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and this week she speaks to the author Louis de Bernieres. He talks from the position he holds as patron of the charity Families Need Fathers, but also from the very personal point of view of a father of two children, who has now separated from their mother.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01cqrsl)
Wilkie Collins

Episode 2

Written by Peter Ackroyd.
Read by Michael Pennington.

Following the death of his beloved father William, Wilkie embarks on a memoir to celebrate his life.

in colourful clothes, 'as if playing a certain part in the great general drama of life' Wilkie Collins looked distinctly strange. But he was none the less a charmer, befriended by the great, loved by children, irresistibly attractive to women - and avidly read by generations of readers.

Peter Ackroyd follows his hero, 'the sweetest-tempered of all the Victorian novelists', from his childhood as the son of a well-known artist to his struggling beginnings as writer, his years of fame and his life-long friendship with the other great London chronicler, Charles Dickens. A true Londoner, Collins, like Dickens, was fascinated by the secrets and crimes -- the fraud, blackmail and poisonings - that lay hidden behind the city's respectable facade. He was a fighter, never afraid to point out injustices and shams, or to tackle the establishment head on.

As well as his enduring masterpieces, "The Moonstone" - often called the first true detective novel - and the sensational "Women in White," he produced an intriguing array of lesser known works. But Collins had his own secrets: he never married, but lived for thirty years with the widowed Caroline Graves, and also had a second liaison, as 'Mr and Mrs Dawson', with a younger mistress, Martha Rudd, with whom he had three children. Both women remained devoted as illness and opium-taking took their toll: he died in 1889, in the middle of writing his last novel - Blind Love.

Told with Peter Ackroyd's inimitable verve this is a ravishingly entertaining life of a great story-teller, full of surprises, rich in humour and sympathetic understanding.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cjwtj)
Restaurateur and campaigner Prue Leith on her life in food; Ambition and failure - why children need to be taught to fail; the politics of magazines aimed at young women and the anatomy of disgust
Presented by Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqrsn)
Christopher William Hill - Angarrack

Winter

Lady Helen is dismayed at the arrival of a man from the National Trust, to whom her husband wishes to bequeath the estate. A visit from her stepson, Rafe, is more intriguing.

Christopher William Hill's black comedy revolves around the future of a crumbling Cornish ancestral estate in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War.

Sir Richard Penwerris (Richard Jonson), mired in debt, wishes to bequeath it to the National Trust, much to the fury of his wife, Lady Helen (Lia Williams) who plans to drag the estate, kicking and screaming, into the 20th century. Matters are complicated further by the sudden emergence of an heir to the estate, Rafe Penwerris (Henry Hadden-Paton), whom his father believed to have died in the war. A clash of Titans ensues - with only one winner.

Cast:
Sir Richard Penwerris ..... Richard Johnson
Lady Helen ...... Lia Williams
Rafe ....... Harry Hadden-Paton
Tregunna ....... Tony Haygarth
Ralston ....... Nicholas Boulton
Jepson ...... Peter Cadwell

Incidental Music: composed by David Chilton

Producer: Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Return of the South China Tiger (b01cjwtl)
Episode 1

Li Quan, a petite, former international fashion executive, was born in Beijing in the year of the Tiger, and seems an unlikely conservationist. With no formal conservation background, Li and her wealthy investment banker husband turned their backs on the corporate world and dug deep into their own pockets to try to save the South China Tiger from extinction.

These highly endangered tigers have not been seen in the wild for many years, and there are fewer than 60 left in Chinese zoos.

Arguing that time for the tigers was running out fast, in 2003 Li persuaded the Chinese authorities to lend her Hope and Cathay, two precious zoo-bred cubs. She flew them to South Africa to start a new life on the grasslands of the Karoo, where they could learn to hunt and breed in the wild again. Ultimately, their offspring would then be sent back to specially created wildlife reserves in China.

A year later, two more cubs called Tiger Woods and Madonna followed. Born in captivity, these cubs had never walked on grass before and were only used to ready meals. Madonna was definitely a virgin and Tiger Woods decidedly under par, but slowly they learnt to hunt for themselves.

This original Gang of Four has now increased to 14, all of whom have proved to be proficient predators in the wild.

Flying tigers half way round the world to start a new life in a new continent was a high risk and controversial plan. The project has faced opposition from conservationists who argue that the project is foolhardy and reintroduction should only be done in the animals' natural environment - in China not Africa.

Sue Armstrong investigates whether this pioneering project has any prospect of saving one of the world's most endangered species.

Producer: Ruth Evans
A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b01cjwtn)
Series 13

The Hallelujah Chorus

Stirring, emotional and unmistakable: The Hallelujah chorus from Handel's Messiah is the subject of this week's Soul Music.

The Alzheimer's Society runs a group called 'Singing for the Brain'. It's for people with dementia or Alzheimers and their carers who come together to sing in a group. As music is tied so closely to emotional memories, often lyrics and music remain firmly fixed in the brain, even though other memories have died away.

Julia Burton of the Alzheimer's Society recalls the power of the Hallelujah Chorus, as performed at a special event by Singing for the Brain groups in Wiltshire and Dorset.

Mrs Vera Fiton, whose late husband - Ted - had dementia talks about how important the weekly singing group was for both of them. Taking Ted from his care home to 'do the Hallelujah' was a weekly highlight, he enjoyed it so much, Vera recalls, that he'd still be singing in the taxi on the way home.

Carol Pemberton, of the Birmingham-based a capella quintet 'Black Voices', took part in the reopening concert of Birmingham Town Hall in 2007. The programme director suggested they sing The Messiah, but not as Handel intended, rather a daring interpretation arranged by Quincy Jones, called the 'Soulful Messiah'. It's a soul/gospel version which has to be heard to be believed! Carol describes performing it as one of the biggest highs of her career to date.

Jennifer Blakeley runs Alphabet Photography, a photo company based in Niagara Falls in Canada. She came up with the idea of staging a Flash Mob to promote her company. The Hallelujah Chorus had long been a favourite piece, and she - along with her local choir - set up a flash-mob in a local shopping mall. The result was emotional, extraordinary... and achieved so much more than the intended aim to boost her business. Passers by , not linked with the choir, joined in... others cried, emotions ran high. And the resulting You Tube video has now attracted over 37 million hits.

Paul Spicer, composer, conductor and organist, describes the historical backdrop to Handel's exhilarating composition.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01cjwtq)
Call You and Yours

On Call You & Yours we'll be talking about the value of a cultural education and who is best placed to teach our children about culture, heritage, history and the arts.

Last April the Education Secretary Michael Gove launched a major review of Cultural Education. He said 'Every child should be exposed to rich cultural opportunities. Too often, this is a privilege reserved for the wealthy few. This must change.'

On Tuesday 28th February 2012 the government will publish its findings, and outline how it plans to give every school child in England 'a well rounded education and the opportunity to experience and take part in performance and visual arts'.

If you benefitted from a broad cultural education, has it improved your quality of life or employment prospects? Or do you feel you are in a cultural wasteland and regret not learning more about music, art or theatre when you were young?

Do you think schools should take the lead role in delivering cultural and artistic education as they have the best access to ALL social and economic groups. Or are extra trips and cultural activities a luxury that most schools simply don't the have time or money for?

If you want to have your say you can email via our web page; www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours and don't forget to leave a contact number where we can reach you.

Or call us on 03700-100-400 until 10am on Tuesday 28th February or after that on 03700 100-444

Alternatively please Tweet us at BBCRadio4 #youandyours, or text us on 84844.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01chzdy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01cjwts)
The British photographer Paul Conroy has been rescued from Syria. He was injured in the same attack that killed his colleague Marie Colvin. We have the latest.

As the government says it is cracking down on two highly abusive tax loopholes, we ask whether banks are breaking the code they signed?

We hear about the cruise ship which caught fire in the Indian Ocean together with the preparations the Seychelles government are making to deal with the stranded passengers.

We go behind the scenes at Westminster with the Government Chief Whip Patrick McLoughlin.

And we return to Libya to hear how the security services are operating under the new government.

To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cjwtv)
Broadcasting to the Nation

Clare Balding discovers how the birth of broadcasting changed British sport for ever. Radio played a crucial role in the popularisation of sport, suddenly you didn't need to be at the event to know exactly what happened or to be swept up in the excitement of the match. Jean Seaton, the BBC's historian explains how the events that were chosen for outside broadcast began to provide a secular calendar for the year, with the schedule being dominated by the most commentator friendly sports; football and tennis were a fit, flying fishing and pigeon racing were not.

We hear some of the earliest and most celebrated sports broadcasters ; George ' by Jove' Allison, Raymond Baxter, Brian Johnson and John Arlott, who describes the man responsible for the first sports programming on the BBC, Seymour Joly de Lotbiniere.

The series was made in partnership with The International Centre for Sport History and Culture at De Montfort University.

Readers: Stuart McLoughlin and Jo Munro
Technical presentation: John Benton
Producer: Lucy Lunt
Executive producer: Ian Bent.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01cjm58)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01cjwtx)
The Great Squanderland Roof

In 'The Great Squanderland Roof', Julian Gough explores another puzzling area of modern economics with the help of the BBC's Stephanie Flanders. This time Gough turns his attention to the eurozone crisis and, along with the Chancellor of Frugalia and the Head of the European Bank of Common Sense and Stability, conjures an ambitious and unorthodox plan to save Europe, the Markets and the World.

Jude lives in a henhouse with no roof, in the bankrupt Republic of Squanderland. Purchased for ten million euro at the height of the credit bubble, his henhouse has been rated the asset in Europe most likely to default. To solve this small but symbolic problem and restore confidence in the markets, Europe's leaders need a plan. Sadly, putting a roof on Jude's henhouse quickly escalates out of control. Soon they are committed to building a roof over the entire country, half a mile above the startled voters... But what happens when a structure that's too big to fail finally fails? To the horror of Europe's bankers and politicians, Jude comes up with a dramatic (and rather romantic) solution to the Eurozone crisis...

'The Great Squanderland Roof' stars Rory Keenan as the hapless Jude (whose recent credits include 'The Kitchen' at the National, 'A Dublin Carol' at the Donmar and 'Birdsong' on BBC TV) in his debut BBC Radio role, Dermot Crowley as a banker turned government minister, and Stephanie Flanders, the BBC's Economics Editor.

Julian Gough is an Irish novelist, short story writer, blogger and playwright, who lives in Berlin. He won the BBC National Short Story Award in 2007 for his story 'The Orphan and the Mob' and his most recent novel 'Jude in London' was short listed for the 'Not the Booker' Award 2011. His story 'The Great Hargeisa Goat Bubble' - about boom and bust - was the first short story to appear in the Financial Times. It was dramatised for Radio 4 in 2009 and again starred Stephanie Flanders.

Cast
Jude - Rory Keenan
Finian - Dermot Crowley
Bertrand Plastique - James Lailey
Helen Dunkel - Adjoa Andoh
Heidi - Clare Corbett
Stephanie Flanders - herself.

Director Di Speirs.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b01cjwtz)
Series 1

Episode 4

Jay Rayner presents the final programme of a new BBC Radio 4 series: a food panel show, recorded in front of a live audience, aimed at anyone who cooks at home, not just the experts. Each week the programme travels round the country to visit interesting food locations, and meet local food-loving people.

The panel features: food adventurer and self-styled 'gastronaut', Stefan Gates; Mexican food expert, writer and Masterchef winner, Thomasina Miers; chef, co-founder of the Leon restaurant chain, and regular on Radio 4's Loose Ends, Allegra McEvedy; and food scientist, Peter Barham, who has advised some of the leading restaurants in the world, including Heston Blumenthal's Fat Duck and Noma in Copenhagen.

This week The Kitchen Cabinet is in Rye, as part of Rye Bay Scallop Week, so the panel will be talking about all things seafood.

The show is witty, fast-moving, and irreverent, but packed full of information that may well change the way you think about cooking.

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun.

Produced by Robert Abel & Lucy Armitage
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b01cjwv1)
Nuclear Power Without the Nasties

The Fukushima disaster in Japan brought the nuclear revival to a juddering halt. But what if there was a cheaper, safer way to create nuclear energy?

Thorium is an abundant radioactive element that offers the prospect of producing power without the danger of reactor meltdowns or the enormous amounts of long-lived waste left behind by conventional nuclear power plants. The Chinese and Indian governments have advanced plans for thorium reactors whilst French and British scientists are already developing the technology that can turn the theory into commercial reality.

In 'Costing the Earth' Julian Rush investigates the prospects for a new wave of 'safe' nuclear energy.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b01cjwv3)
Privacy and Copyright in the Internet Age

Joshua Rozenberg considers the law on privacy in the light of two recent, highly significant - and little-noticed - decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. He talks to the senior appeal court judge, Lady Justice Arden, about what the rulings mean and how they relate to the courts and the press in the United Kingdom. They are already having an effect here in Britain. Last week, the High Court in London ruled on a claim for privacy brought by the young international rugby player, Jonathan Spelman - who is also the son of the Cabinet minister, Caroline Spelman. Joshua Rozenberg talks to a leading media lawyer about how young people who are well-known in their field may be legally affected.

On an important day for the search engine giant, Google, the programme also looks at how, in the internet age, personal privacy is safeguarded and copyright could change. The BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones discusses how data on computer users is collected as Google implements today changes to its privacy policy. Simon Davies of Privacy International and Nick Stringer of the Internet Advertising Bureau then debate the issues of personal privacy and targeted advertising. The former UK Information Commissioner, Richard Thomas, considers how far proposed new EU legal rules will protect users while enabling companies to carry on their legitimate data-gathering activities.

William Patry, senior copyright counsel at Google, Inc., has recently published a book called "How to Fix Copyright". Joshua Rozenberg questions him about his proposed reforms, especially as they relate to the United States. How far these might serve the interests of the company for which he works - and how will existing copyright holders in film, music and books be affected?


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b01cjwv5)
Brian Sewell and Wendy Cope

Harriett Gilbert's guests this week are the art critic Brian Sewell and the poet Wendy Cope.

Books chosen:

"From the City, From the Plough," by Alexander Baron

"The Moving Toyshop," by Edmund Crispin

"Evening in the Palace of Reason," by James Gaines

Producer Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01cjwv7)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01chzf4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b01cjwv9)
Series 7

The Viewing

Arthur finds a cunning way of nosing around a neighbours home, as he masquerades as a potential purchaser, he also receives interesting news from an old friend in Spain.

Count Arthur Strong (Steve Delaney) - one time Variety Star, now sole proprietor and owner of Doncaster's Academy of Performance - is a show business legend, raconteur, and lecturer extraordinaire. He stars in a Sitcom with regular sidekick Wilfred Taylor, Master Butcher, and a host of other characters.

All false starts and nervous fumbling badly covered up by a delicate sheen of bravado and self-assurance, and an expert in everything from the world of entertainment to the origin of the species, everyday life with Arthur is an enlightening experience.

Cast:
Steve Delaney
Mel Giedroyc
Alastair Kerr
David Mounfield

Producer: John Leonard
A Komedia production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01cjwvc)
Tom wants to discuss his plans for growing peppers but Tony's shattered and still has work to do. Helen reminds Tom to go easy on Tony and Pat agrees now's not the best time. But Tom wants it settled and goes to talk to Tony in the milking parlour.

Tom finds Tony lying on the floor in agony. Realising it's serious, Tom calls an ambulance. The paramedic checks Tony out before taking him to hospital.

Nic's found some left-over fireworks. Will agrees they can let them off after tea. They're having a great time, until Nic gets a call from Helen.

As Helen and Tom wait anxiously for news, Tom blames himself for hassling Tony. Nic turns up to take care of Henry so that they can go to the hospital but Pat finally calls. It was a heart attack, a blocked artery. Tony's already had an operation and he's out of danger. He's going to be alright.

Tony's weak but asks if everything's ok at the farm. Pat assures him there's nothing to worry about. Tony's sorry to be such a nuisance. He tells Pat that he thought he was a goner. Pat tearfully admits she thought the same. Tony tenderly tells her that he's all right. He's okay now.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01cjwvf)
Tom Hardy in This Means War; Ian Rankin's New Elizabethan

In the new film This Means War, Tom Hardy and Chris Pine play two CIA agents waging an epic battle against each other when they find they are dating the same woman, played by Reese Witherspoon. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews.

Radio 4 is inviting you to nominate New Elizabethans - people who have made an impact on the UK from 1952 to today. This week Front Row is asking writers and artists for their suggestions, and tonight novelist Ian Rankin nominates a pioneering English singer and songwriter who had a habit of reinventing himself.

The award-winning screen-writer Paula Milne talks about her new six-part TV drama White Heat, starring Juliet Stevenson and Lindsay Duncan. The series charts the lives of seven characters who share a student flat in 1960's London and follows their interwoven lives up to the present.

Shalom Auslander's novel, Hope: A Tragedy, is a satirical exploration of what it would mean to find an elderly Anne Frank living in one's attic. The novel examines the burden of history and remembrance for the Jewish community. Shalom Auslander discusses why he wasn't afraid of portraying a revered historical figure.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqrsn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b01cjwvh)
Credit Rating Agencies

Their judgments send markets into freefall. It is alleged that their mistakes led to the Enron collapse and the 2008 financial crisis. They are the credit rating agencies. Who exactly are they and what exactly do they do?

Is this exploration of the complex world of the "Big Three" rating agencies, BBC Chief Economics Correspondent Hugh Pym takes listeners behind the scenes of the world economy. Through revealing interviews with insiders and former analysts at Standard and Poor's (S&P), Moody's and Fitch, along with leading investors and bankers, Hugh tells the story of the world's ongoing financial woes from a new perspective and ask if anything has really changed. S&P managing director John Chambers explains why governments listen to what his company says.

In Italy the agencies - rarely heard about until recently - have suddenly been subject to police raids and front page headlines. Italy, like many European nations, is unhappy about its recent downgrade and campaigner Elio Lannutti is on a mission to break the power of the rating agencies. But is there any truth in the idea that they're acting politically in their judgements on the Eurozone?

Real concern about the "Big Three" began following the collapse, in 2001-2003, of several major multinationals, including Parmalat, dubbed Europe's Enron. Ordinary people who lost money know only too well what it means when the rating agencies get it wrong. When mortgage-backed securities began going bad in 2007, alarm bells rang again. Why had financial products riddled with bad debt been given Triple A ratings?

So is there any way of breaking the "Big Three's" grip on power - or are they an inevitable fact of life in a global financial landscape?
Producer: Lucy Proctor.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01cjwvk)
Jane Copsey, a published writer is joined by Guardian audio book reviewer Sue Arnold and writer Redmond Szell to discuss their favourite comfort read and what makes such a choice.
Sue Arnold chose The Blackhouse by Peter May.
Redmond selected Margery Allingham's Death of a Ghost and Jane Copsey's choice was The One From the Other by Philip Kerr. Both Red and Jane's books were the abridged versions, and Sue Arnold's book was unabridged. The team discussed the pros and cons of abridgment.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01cjwvm)
Sleep tabs death, e-cigs, GP examples, underactive thyroid and pregnancy

10 million prescriptions for sleeping pills are written every year in England. So how alarmed should we be over new American research suggesting that people who take them are more likely to die than those who don't? Dr Mark Porter speaks to a leading British sleep expert about the findings and asks what the alternatives are.

An Inside Health listener asked us to investigate how safe "electronic" cigarettes are. So Dr Max Pemberton, who uses them himself, talked to Professor John Britton from the UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies at the University of Nottingham about these currently unregulated products. Rumours abound that a tobacco manufacturer is about to launch the world's first so-called "safe" cigarette. But smokers' reactions are mixed and some prefer other products like nicotine gum.

GP Margaret McCartney's column is about whether your doctor's dietary preferences and habits influence your well being.

Half of all pregnancies in the UK are unplanned, so women and their babies lose out on important supplements like folic acid to help prevent spina bifida. But for women with an underactive thyroid gland it's even more important that they do their best for their baby by increasing their thyroxine dose as soon as they know they're pregnant. But research from Leicester shows that women often fall through the gaps when seeking care - as GPs, midwives and consultants often think someone else is helping these women.

Producer: Paula McGrath.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01cjwtd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01chzfd)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cjwvp)
Ireland will hold a referendum on the European Fiscal Pact .Could this stymy the European bailout fund ?

Syrian activists fear imminent ground offensive in Homs.

France's Socialist Presidential challenger comes to London.We find out why French voters in Britain matter.

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01cjwvr)
Deborah Levy - Swimming Home

Episode 2

'Life is only worth living because we hope it will get better and we'll all get home safely"

When beautiful Kitty Finch lands in the middle of what seems a conventional holiday set up - two couples, one teenage daughter and a villa in the south of France - no-one quite knows the effect she will have, though at once the ground shifts.

In the fierce heat of July, fissures yawn open, prised apart by Kitty's unsettling presence. Is she benign? What does she want? Is she an admiring fan or a darker foe? And who is keeping secrets, most of all from themselves?

Deborah Levy's first novel in fifteen years has garnered much praise. Witty and acute by turn, its deceptively simple setting belies the fractured relationships and the sense of imminent chaos that threatens all the characters. In today's episode: 'A Very Special Connection'.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Produced by Di Speirs
Directed by Elizabeth Allard
The Reader is Juliet Aubrey.


TUE 23:00 The History Plays (b01cdvb7)
Stonehouse in Alice

Written and directed by Nigel Smith and starring Tim McInnerny as John Stonehouse and Daniel Rigby as Ed Jennings. Stonehouse in Alice is the second of The History Plays, imaginary conversations set against the backdrop of real events.

It's 1974 and Ed Jennings, a cub reporter from a local paper has stumbled upon the scoop of a lifetime while on holiday in Australia. Because Leonard has found missing maverick MP, John Stonehouse.

Stonehouse recently faked his death to escape from a sea of debt, the fraud squad, his wife, and a series of misadventures back home in the UK. A charmer, a snob, an aesthete, a writer and a con man, the Walsall North MP, once one of the greatest loose cannons of his political generation, is now in hiding, shacked up with his mistress in one of the loneliest places on earth. What will be kept secret for decades, however, is that he's also a communist spy.

Ed is bright enough to know this story will make his name. It has all the ingredients; celebrity, notoriety, sex, politics and sleaze. But what it's fundamentally about is greed. And that is still seen as shocking in an MP. Chisholm knows no post-war English politician will have had such a fall from grace. Profumo only erred for lust. This is something new... and thrilling. And it turns out Stonehouse has an offer for the young reporter. One that will change both their lives.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cjwvt)
The Health Secretary, Andrew Lansley, faces his critics in the Commons; MPs hear from the wife of a businessman extradited to the United States; and why the less well-off could pay less for their stamps.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 29 FEBRUARY 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01chzgc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01cqrsl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01chzgh)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01chzgm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01chzgp)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01chzgr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cmt1y)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4.
From Wales, with the Rev.Mary Stallard.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01ckgfn)
Anna Hill hears warnings not to transport animals around the UK in case they spread the new disease Schmallenberg. There is no evidence that the virus can be transferred between livestock, and there are no movement restrictions on livestock. But Nigel Miller, the President of the National Farmers Union Scotland, is urging Scottish farmers not to bring in sheep from affected areas.

Cheddar cheese in China and Devon yoghurts in Dubai. The UK dairy industry is being encouraged to think globally by the Farming Minister, Jim Paice MP. Currently around 25% of milk products consumed in the UK are imported and Mr Paice tells Anna that this needs to change. Caz Graham visits one company that has already achieved this: a company in the Lake District which exports its cheese to South Africa.

And farmers in drought-struck areas want to be able to extract more water from rivers and aquifers so that they can feed their crops. But, as Anna hears when she visits the River Glaven, there also needs to be enough water for the wildlife.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


WED 06:00 Today (b01ckgfq)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b01ckgfs)
Libby Purves meets actor Pauline Quirke who is probably best known for the BBC comedy series 'Birds of a Feather' playing loveable loud-mouth Sharon Theodopolopodous. Her first acting role was in Dixon of Dock Green and most recently she appeared in 'Emmerdale'. She has also set up the Pauline Quirke Academy, teaching acting to young people. Her book, 'Where Have I Gone?' is published by Bantam Press.

Shelley Bridgman is a psychotherapist and stand-up comedian who recently won the first ever Silver Stand Up comedy award for the over 55s at the Leicester Comedy Festival and Palestinian director Amir Nizar Zuabi who is directing 'A Comedy of Errors' as part of the World Shakespeare Festival.

Photographer Dennis Morris started taking photographs as a young boy and at eleven had one of his photographs printed on the front page of the Daily Mirror. In his book Growing Up Black, he charts not just the history of the black British experience but Britain itself, capturing intimate moments within the black community and domestic life in 1960s and 70s Hackney, East London, where he lived. Growing Up Black is published by Autograph ABP.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01cqvcx)
Wilkie Collins

Episode 3

Written by Peter Ackroyd.
Read by Michael Pennington.

Wilkie meets Caroline Graves in unusual circumstances and, little does he know, she will become a close companion for the rest of his life.

Short and oddly built, with a head too big for his body, extremely short-sighted, unable to stay still, dressed in colourful clothes, 'as if playing a certain part in the great general drama of life' Wilkie Collins looked distinctly strange. But he was none the less a charmer, befriended by the great, loved by children, irresistibly attractive to women - and avidly read by generations of readers.

Peter Ackroyd follows his hero, 'the sweetest-tempered of all the Victorian novelists', from his childhood as the son of a well-known artist to his struggling beginnings as writer, his years of fame and his life-long friendship with the other great London chronicler, Charles Dickens. A true Londoner, Collins, like Dickens, was fascinated by the secrets and crimes -- the fraud, blackmail and poisonings - that lay hidden behind the city's respectable facade. He was a fighter, never afraid to point out injustices and shams, or to tackle the establishment head on.
As well as his enduring masterpieces, "The Moonstone" - often called the first true detective novel - and the sensational "Women in White," he produced an intriguing array of lesser known works. But Collins had his own secrets: he never married, but lived for thirty years with the widowed Caroline Graves, and also had a second liaison, as 'Mr and Mrs Dawson', with a younger mistress, Martha Rudd, with whom he had three children. Both women remained devoted as illness and opium-taking took their toll: he died in 1889, in the middle of writing his last novel - Blind Love.

Told with Peter Ackroyd's inimitable verve this is a ravishingly entertaining life of a great story-teller, full of surprises, rich in humour and sympathetic understanding.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01ckgfv)
War correspondent Orla Guerin on life on the front line; Going without to feed your children - are parents having to deny themselves in order to make sure their children eat properly? The Queen of Chick Lit, Kathy Lette, on living with a child with Asperger's Syndrome and a new support group for asexual people. Presented by Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqvcz)
Christopher William Hill - Angarrack

Spring

Lady Helen is growing increasingly attached to her stepson Rafe - a welcome distraction as she battles her husband Richard for control of Angarrack, the Penwerris ancestral home.

Christopher William Hill's black comedy revolves around the future of a crumbling Cornish ancestral estate in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Sir Richard Penwerris (Richard Jonson), mired in debt, wishes to bequeath it to the National Trust, much to the fury of his wife, Lady Helen (Lia Williams) who plans to drag the estate, kicking and screaming, into the 20th century. Matters are complicated further by the sudden emergence of an heir to the estate, Rafe Penwerris (Henry Hadden-Paton), whom his father believed to have died in the war. A clash of Titans ensues - with only one winner.

Cast:
Sir Richard Penwerris ...... Richard Johnson
Lady Helen ....... Lia Williams
Rafe ....... Harry Hadden-Paton
Tregunna ....... Tony Haygarth
Ralston ....... Nicholas Boulton
Jepson ....... Peter Cadwell

Incidental Music: composed by David Chilton

Producer: Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 The Lobotomists (b016wx0w)
2011 marks a 75th anniversary that many would prefer to forget: of the first lobotomy in the US. It was performed by an ambitious young American neurologist called Walter Freeman. Over his career, Freeman went on to perform perhaps 3,000 lobotomies, on both adults and later on children. He often performed 10 procedures or more a day. Perhaps 40,000 patients in the US were lobotomised during the heyday of the operation - and an estimated 17,000 more in the UK.

This programme tells the story of three key figures in the strange history of lobotomy - and for the first time explores the popularity of lobotomy in the UK in detail.

The story starts in 1935 with a Portuguese doctor called Egas Moniz, who pioneered a radical surgical procedure on the brain. Moniz was a remarkably distinguished figure, a diplomat as well as a doctor, who had invented the technique of cerebral angiography which is still used today. With very little evidence, he speculated that cutting the links between the frontal lobes and the rest of the brain would relieve symptoms of mental disorder. His results were seized on with enthusiasm the following year by Freeman, the grandson of one of the US's most famous surgeons. Freeman was a relentless self-publicist and managed to convince many of the efficacy of his procedure. Freeman's promotion of lobotomy as a cure for mental illness was instrumental in Moniz receiving the Nobel Prize for medicine. The operation was also taken up by the most celebrated British neurosurgeon of the time, Sir Wylie McKissock. Like Freeman, he travelled the country, performing numerous lobotomies in single sessions. For this programme, Hugh Levinson interviews McKissock's former colleagues and hears in detail about how he performed several thousand lobotomies, or leucotomies as they were known in the UK.

The operations were successful in subduing disturbed patients, usually with immediate positive results, which sometimes persisted. Freeman argued that this was better than letting mentally ill patients rot away for decades in squalid institutions, untreated and unattended. However, further monitoring showed very mixed results. While a significant number of patients with affective disorders seemed to become better, a large proportion were unaffected or got worse. Many patients reverted to a child-like state. A significant proportion died as a direct result of the procedure.

In the 1940s, Freeman pushed on, devising a faster and cheaper procedure. He hammered an icepick (originally taken from his home fridge) through the top of each eye socket, directly into the skull. He then swept the icepick from side to side, destroying the connections to the frontal lobes. Other surgeons were horrified by the random nature of the operation. He recorded with satisfaction in his diary when attending doctors ended up vomiting or fainting. His closest aide refused to participate. By the late 1950s the lobotomy craze was over, and only a very few continued to be performed in special cases. In the late 1960s, Freeman was banned from operating.

The stories of Moniz, Freeman and McKissock - all commanding and dynamic figures - raise profound questions about our ideas both of mental health and science. Is a patient "cured" just because he becomes subdued? And how come the lobotomy became so popular despite the lack of evidence of its efficacy - and the rapid dissemination of evidence of its potential for harm? To what extent is science independent of powerful personalities, economic considerations and media pressure?


WED 11:30 HR (b01ckgfz)
Series 3

Robbed

The two friends, having discovered that their pensions are worthless, take every measure thinkable to survive.

Now Sam tries to remortgage their home...

Nigel William's retirement comedy series, starring Jonathan Pryce and Nicholas le Prevost.

Peter ..... Jonathan Pryce
Sam ..... Nicholas Le Prevost
Mr Loomis ..... Philip Jackson.

Producer: Peter Kavanagh

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01ckgg1)
Who benefits from the Work Programme?

Patisserie Valerie says it's the home of fine cakes and gateaux. Last year they increased the number of cafes across the country to 50. What's the reason for their sudden expansion and what's driving our demand for high end cakes?

The Work Programme is the Department of Work & Pension's scheme to get the poor and long term unemployed back in to work. It offers tailored support and training through a combination of different providers who are paid by their results. But now one of the biggest providers is being investigated for fraud throwing the issue of private companies profiting from unemployment into the spotlight.

The Campaign for Community Banking Services are calling for the Government to put pressure on the UK's big banks to share local branches as a solution. They say the closure of rural banks is ruining local economies, endangering growth and speeding the decline of market towns.

We revisit the The Choir with No Name which is made up of homeless and vulnerable people. Now rehearsals have stepped up a gear and the soloists have been picked.

The jewellery designer Tatty Devine, says several of its designs have been copied by high street chain Claire's Accessories. They seem to have a point - the designs are strikingly similar.

Phone Operator 3 says cuts to roaming charges don't go far enough. The biggest risk surrounds the pricing levels that will be set for consumers using data on their phones when they are on holiday or away on business.

And, the jam manufacturer in a sticky situation which could lose her thousands of pounds of new business because EU regulations prevent her from finding a legal name for her products.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01chzgw)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01ckgg3)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Sport and the British (b01ckgg5)
Driving Innovation

Clare Balding continues to explore how Britain shaped sport and sport shaped Britain. Horse racing may be the sport of kings but the princes, playboys and plutocrats of the modern era have preferred motor racing and the British have been at the wheel throughout. Stirling Moss, Graham Hill, Jackie Stewart, James Hunt, Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button have all led the way but in the early days women were central to this story too, with Mrs EM Thomas being the awarded the first 120 mph badge at Brooklands in 1928.

The series was made in partnership with The International Centre for Sport History and Culture at De Montfort University.

Technical presentation: John Benton
Producer: Sara Conkey.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01cjwvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01ckgg7)
Series 4

If You Build It

By Nick Warburton. Trevor Peacock is back as inspirational chef Warwick Hedges who runs an idiosyncratic restaurant in the Cambridgeshire Fens with his permanently anxious son Jack. In the first of a new series Warwick hits on an idea for putting the restaurant on the map; a music festival. Jack is dead against it but Warwick has plans.

Warwick Hedges...Trevor Peacock
Jack Hedges...Sam Dale
Marcia Hedges...Kate Buffery
Zofia...Helen Longworth
Samuel...John Rowe
Sebastian...Adam Billington

Directed by Claire Grove

Trevor Peacock stars as inspirational chef Warwick Hedges - Mr Toad meets King Lear - who runs an up market restaurant in the Cambridgeshire Fens. His son Jack , played by Sam Dale, works alongside his father, which makes him permanently anxious. They are assisted by Samuel, an earthy odd-job man "who crawled out of the slime with the eels" and Zofia a Polish waitress. The mixture of food , family relationships and Fenland legend is handled with Nick Warburton's characteristic deft comic touch.

Trevor Peacock is a brilliant character actor best known as the bumbling Jim Trott in The Vicar of Dibley. At 80 he is still at the top of his game. He has just made a new film with Dustin Hoffman. He appeared in Much Ado About Nothing at the National Theatre, as Stephen Fry's father in the TV series Kingdom and in three series of On Mardle Fen. He also plays Anton Lesser's father in R4's Falco.

Nick Warburton won the Peter Tinniswood Award for the Best New Play on Radio. His series Witness dramatising St Luke's Gospel went out to great acclaim in Dec 2007 on R4. His afternoon play Friday When It Rains (TX October) was Radio Times Choice. Nick dramatised 'Father and Son' for R4's Classic Serial. His original radio plays include Our Late Supper with Marcia Warren. Other work includes 6 episodes Thrush Green and Moonfleet for Radio 4. Plays for stage and radio include Conversation from the Engine Room, which won the 1985 BBC/Radio Times Award, The Messenger for Radio 3, an adaptation of Tolstoy's Resurrection, A Grove of Straight Trees (short-listed for the BBC/Radio Times Drama Award), and A Soldiers' Debt (entered for the Prix Italia).


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01ckgg9)
Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01cjwvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01ckggc)
Ambient religion - Poverty and social work

"poor mentality", "placidly bovine", "volubly unreachable", "feeble minded" - just some of the terms used by social workers as they tried to describe the poor in the 1920s and 30s. Much of their case work was given over to discussing whether the poor were deserving or whether they were making fraudulent claims on the charities and government organisations these new professionals were representing. Laurie is joined by Mark Peel, the author of a new study of social work and poverty in the United States, Australia and Britain, and they discuss which attitudes have changed and which remain the same with the historian Selina Todd.
Also, how evangelic Christians have turned their backs on fire and brimstone and are seeking to put the Bible into the background of everyday life. Matthew Engelke talks about his study of the Bible Society of England and Wales.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01ckggf)
As James Murdoch steps down from News International to expand the international TV side of the business and as the police claim there was a "culture of illegal payments" at the Sun, what next for the Sun and the newborn Sun on Sunday? Ben Fenton, media correspondent of the Financial Times and Sarah Ellison of Vanity Fair discuss the latest news and what this means for News Corp. They are joined by Nick Davies who has just won the Paul Foot Award for campaigning journalism for his breaking stories on phone hacking.

Last autumn the BBC invited radio executive John Myers to review the planned changes to local radio which, broadly, would cut output rather than management. He tells Steve why it should be the other way round.

Media analyst Theresa Wise looks at ITV's figures, out today. The broadcaster wants to move away from its reliance on advertising to pay for programmes. What signs are there that this is happening?

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01ckggh)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01chzh0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Mark Thomas: The Manifesto (b01ckggk)
Series 4

Episode 4

Comedian-activist Mark Thomas and his studio audience at The Stand Comedy Club in Glasgow consider policy proposals for a People's Manifesto.

This week's agenda:
1) A kick-starter to kick Scotland out of the Union.
2) Bankers to be given bonuses in the form of NHS donation cards.
and
3) An end to bank fees for those on a family income of less than £30,000.

Plus there are plenty of "any other business" policy suggestions from the audience.

Written and presented by Mark Thomas
Produced by Colin Anderson.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01djw82)
Pat's shattered but pleased that Tony's doing really well. It was lucky that Tom found him when he did. Getting treated so quickly made all the difference. And now he's fitted with a stent it shouldn't happen again. Pat's concerned about everything that needs doing but Tom and Helen assure her they'll manage.

David and Brian turn up at Bridge Farm to offer their help. Tom and Helen are really grateful.

Tom's feeling bad for being so hard on Tony. Pat insists he's not to blame himself. He must put it out of his mind and get on with running the farm. Tom realises he won't have time to visit Tony. Pat assures him Tony will understand.

Tony's pleased his tests have revealed no lasting damage, so he'll be able to get back to work as normal. Pat tells him all in good time. She also tells him Jennifer wants to visit but she can easily put her off. Tony tells her it's ok.

Jennifer's relieved that Tony's going to be ok. She tells him this has made her realise how mean and awful she's been. Everything seems so trivial now. Tony understands and assures her they can leave it all behind them.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01ckggp)
Christina Ricci; Nick Park; writer Errol John reassessed

With Mark Lawson.

Christina Ricci discusses her role in Bel Ami, a film based on Maupassant's novel about a young man's scheming rise to power in Paris, through his relationships with influential women. Ricci reflects on how she first read the book as a teenager, her transition from child to adult star and how she combines films with TV roles such as Maggie in Pam Am.

Make Bradford British is a two-part documentary series which aims to see if people of different racial, religious and cultural backgrounds can live happily together. Eight people from Bradford, who all failed a citizenship test, are asked share a house in a microcosm of a multicultural society. Gabriel Tate reviews.

The Trinidad-born actor and playwright Errol John died in 1988, and is largely overlooked, but next week his play Moon on a Rainbow Shawl receives a new National Theatre production. Written in 1953, the play focuses on soldiers returning to Trinidad after the second world war. Writer Kwame Kwei-Armah, director Michael Buffong and actress Jacqueline Chan, who worked with Errol John, re-assess John's life and career.

Radio 4 is inviting you to nominate New Elizabethans - people who have made an impact on the UK from 1952 to today. This week Front Row is asking writers and artists for their suggestions, and tonight Wallace & Gromit creator Nick Park suggests not only a man in an ill-fitting suit who's big in Albania, but also a mischievous boy with a naughty dog.

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqvcz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b01ckggt)
The Morality of Abortion

Department of Health officials are this week starting their inquiry in to allegations in the Daily Telegraph that abortions are being carried out on the basis of gender. Undercover reporters filmed consultations about terminations at a number of clinics around the country. One consultant in Manchester was heard telling a woman who said she wanted to abort a female foetus: "I don't ask questions. If you want a termination, you want a termination". The revelations have re-ignited the debate over reform of the act that legalised abortion in 1967. It's estimated that at least one third of British women will have had an abortion by the time they reach the age of 45. In 2010, there were 189,574 abortions carried out to residents of England and Wales and one third (34%) of those women undergoing abortions had already had one or more previous abortions. The overwhelming majority (98%) of terminations are carried out under the clause that to continue the pregnancy would risk the woman's mental health. Campaigners on one side argue that the law is being interpreted far too liberally, in a way that was never intended or anticipated 45 years ago and that in the early stages of pregnancy abortion is effectively available on demand. On the other side it's said that the allegations of "gendercide" are vastly exaggerated and this is all part of a campaign by the backdoor to make it harder for women to get an abortion. Have we turned what should one of the most profound of moral choices involving life and death into a thoughtless act amounting to little more than routine inconvenience? Or is that an attack on the fundamental liberty of women to have control over their own bodies and to turn the clock back to a time when sexual shame and individual guilt were common currency? How do we balance the moral status of the unborn foetus with rights of women and if it's morally unacceptable to have an abortion on the grounds of gender, why is it OK just because it's inconvenient?

Witnesses: Ann Furedi - Chief Executive of BPAS; Elaine Storkey - President of Tear Fund and founding member of Restored, a charity campaigning about violence against women; Kate Smurthwaite - Feminist activist, comedian and vice chair of Abortion Rights; Mark Bhagwandin - Senior Education for "Life".

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor, Claire Fox and Kenan Malik.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b01ckggw)
The Bishop of Bradford, the Rt Revd Nick Baines begins a new series of Lent Talks where six well known figures from journalism, science, religion and public life reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

Speakers of this year's talks include the journalist and author Martin Wroe, who will explore humanity being at its most divine when working in community; John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University, explains how his encounter with God is enhanced through science; Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, explores the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b01cjwv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b01ckgfs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01chzh2)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01ckggy)
There are reports a ground offensive on Homs is under way. Can Syria's military overwhelm the insurgents?

The ECB pumps 530bn into Europe's banks - but is it time to stop the flow of cash?

And the final report in our series on rebuilding Sierra Leone.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01ckgh0)
Deborah Levy - Swimming Home

Episode 3

'Life is only worth living because we hope it will get better and we'll all get home safely"

When beautiful Kitty Finch lands in the middle of what seems a conventional holiday set up - two couples, one teenage daughter and a villa in the south of France - no-one quite knows the effect she will have, though at once the ground shifts.

In the fierce heat of July, fissures yawn open, prised apart by Kitty's unsettling presence. Is she benign? What does she want? Is she an admiring fan or a darker foe? And who is keeping secrets, most of all from themselves?

Deborah Levy's first novel in fifteen years has garnered much praise. Witty and acute by turn, its deceptively simple setting belies the fractured relationships and the sense of imminent chaos that threatens all the characters. In today's episode: 'My poem is a conversation with you and no-one else'.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Produced by Elizabeth Allard
The Reader is Juliet Aubrey.


WED 23:00 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b01ckgh2)
Series 1

Death

Tim Key takes on the biggest imponderable of them all - death - via his narrative poem: The Boy Who Faked His Own Death.

Musical accompaniment is provided by Tom Basden.

Written and presented by Tim Key

Producer: James Robinson.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


WED 23:15 Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing (b01ckgh4)
Series 1

About Moving Out

Nathan decides it's time to leave home. But, can he find somewhere to live and will his mother allow him to leave?

This is the story of young, up-and-coming comedian Nathan Caton, who becomes the first in his family to graduate from University - only to opt for a career in comedy - much to his family's annoyance who want him to get a 'proper job' using his architecture degree.

Each episode shows the criticism, interference and rollercoaster ride that Nathan endures from his family as he pursues his career against their wishes.

A mix of Nathan's stand-up intercut with scenes from his family life.

Written by: Nathan Caton Additional material by: Ola and Maff Brown.

Nathan ..... Nathan Caton
Grandma ..... Mona Hammond
Mum ..... Adjoa Andoh
Dad ..... Curtis Walker
Reverend Williams ..... Don Gilet
James ..... Ola

Script Editor: James Kettle
Producer: Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2012.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01ckgh6)
Sean Curran with the day's top news stories from Westminster .
At Prime Minister's Questions, David Cameron plays down the level of opposition to his government's plans to shake up England's NHS.
But the Labour leader, Ed Miliband, tells the Conservatives the bill is "digging their own burial at the next general election".



THURSDAY 01 MARCH 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01chzhs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01cqvcx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01chzhv)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01chzhz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01chzj1)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01chzj3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cmt2q)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4.
From Wales, with the Rev.Mary Stallard.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01ckmg4)
Only 5% of Welsh Lamb is actually eaten in Wales, it's a major export product to Europe and beyond. But, the Government wants more UK food producers to follow that example, to close a multi billion pound food trade gap. Motorists on islands including the Hebrides, Northern Isles, and the Isles of Scilly should see prices at the petrol pumps drop by five pence a litre. The UK Government's rural fuel duty rebate is coming into force today. However, people in Shetland are complaining the saving has already been wiped out by recent price increases. And, how Schmallenberg virus is making it harder for visitor attractions to find lambs for their springtime displays.

Presenter: Anna Hill
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


THU 06:00 Today (b01ckmg6)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01ckmg8)
Benjamin Franklin

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the life and work of Benjamin Franklin. A printer, statesman, diplomat, writer and scientist, Franklin was one of the most remarkable individuals of the eighteenth century. His discoveries relating to the nature of electricity, and in particular a celebrated experiment which involved flying a kite in a thunderstorm, made him famous in Europe and America. His inventions include bifocal spectacles, and a new type of stove. In the second half of his life he became prominent as a politician and a successful diplomat. As the only Founding Father to have signed all three of the fundamental documents of the United States of America, including its Declaration of Independence and Constitution, Benjamin Franklin occupies a unique position in the history of the nation. With:Simon MiddletonSenior Lecturer in American History at the University of SheffieldSimon NewmanSir Denis Brogan Professor of American History at the University of GlasgowPatricia FaraSenior Tutor at Clare College, University of Cambridge.Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01cqwsv)
Wilkie Collins

Episode 4

Written by Peter Ackroyd.
Read by Michael Pennington.

By 1863, Wilkie Collins has found great literary success with works including The Woman in White. And soon another woman enters his life.

Short and oddly built, with a head too big for his body, extremely short-sighted, unable to stay still, dressed in colourful clothes, 'as if playing a certain part in the great general drama of life' Wilkie Collins looked distinctly strange. But he was none the less a charmer, befriended by the great, loved by children, irresistibly attractive to women - and avidly read by generations of readers.

Peter Ackroyd follows his hero, 'the sweetest-tempered of all the Victorian novelists', from his childhood as the son of a well-known artist to his struggling beginnings as writer, his years of fame and his life-long friendship with the other great London chronicler, Charles Dickens. A true Londoner, Collins, like Dickens, was fascinated by the secrets and crimes -- the fraud, blackmail and poisonings - that lay hidden behind the city's respectable facade. He was a fighter, never afraid to point out injustices and shams, or to tackle the establishment head on.
As well as his enduring masterpieces, "The Moonstone" - often called the first true detective novel - and the sensational "Women in White," he produced an intriguing array of lesser known works. But Collins had his own secrets: he never married, but lived for thirty years with the widowed Caroline Graves, and also had a second liaison, as 'Mr and Mrs Dawson', with a younger mistress, Martha Rudd, with whom he had three children. Both women remained devoted as illness and opium-taking took their toll: he died in 1889, in the middle of writing his last novel - Blind Love.

Told with Peter Ackroyd's inimitable verve this is a ravishingly entertaining life of a great story-teller, full of surprises, rich in humour and sympathetic understanding.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01ckmgb)
Rachel Cusk and Lynn McCafferty

Lynn McCafferty is one of the sports women hoping for success this summer. Captain of the Great Britain Women's Handball team, she's now in full time training for London 2012. The growing levels of sexual violence against young women caught up in gangs. Award winning author Rachel Cusk on redefining herself as a single woman after her marriage breakup . And music to "move the soul and stir the spirit" from Erin Headley.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqwsx)
Christopher William Hill - Angarrack

Summer

Lady Helen's relationship with her stepson Rafe is growing dangerously out of control - a fact viewed with considerable suspicion by Angarrack's long-serving butler Tregunna.

Christopher William Hill's black comedy revolves around the future of a crumbling Cornish ancestral estate in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Sir Richard Penwerris (Richard Jonson), mired in debt, wishes to bequeath it to the National Trust, much to the fury of his wife, Lady Helen (Lia Williams) who plans to drag the estate, kicking and screaming, into the 20th century. Matters are complicated further by the sudden emergence of an heir to the estate, Rafe Penwerris (Henry Hadden-Paton), whom his father believed to have died in the war. A clash of Titans ensues - with only one winner.

Cast:
Sir Richard Penwerris ..... Richard Johnson
Lady Helen ...... Lia Williams
Rafe ...... Harry Hadden-Paton
Tregunna ...... Tony Haygarth
Ralston ...... Nicholas Boulton
Jepson ....... Peter Cadwell
Prideaux ...... Geoffrey Whitehead

Incidental Music: composed by David Chilton

Producer: Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b01ckmgd)
Did you ever see bin Laden? Aleem Maqbool is in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where they've been bulldozing the compound where the al-Qaeda leader was killed by US special forces. Aleem tells us many there are reluctant to believe bin Laden was ever a resident of their town.

The German public appears to be tiring of rescue packages for beleaguered Greece and Steve Evans in Berlin has been hearing it's not easy at the moment being a Greek in today's Germany.

David Loyn is in the Indian state of Bihar hearing the arguments for and against Britain's continuing programme of aid for India.

Hugely increased university fees in this country mean that more British students than ever before are enrolling in foreign places of learning. Sanchia Berg's been to meet some of them at Harvard in the US.

and Tom Burridge is in Barcelona where the regional politicians feel they're getting a raw deal from central government in the Spanish capital, Madrid.


THU 11:30 The 12 Inch Single (b01ckmgg)
From the mid-1970s the humble 7 inch vinyl single was joined by a much grander relative - the 12 inch single. It reached its peak in 1983 with Blue Monday by New Order, probably the biggest selling 12 inch single of all time.

Music Journalist and co-founder of ZTT Records, Paul Morley visits the Factory Club in Manchester to talk to Peter Hook of New Order about how Blue Monday was written and to designer Peter Saville about the famous sleeve.

Paul explores the origins of the 12 inch single as a potentially higher quality format than the 7 inch single and visits Abbey Road studios to watch an engineer cutting a 12 inch single; does it really sound better?

And he meets music producer Trevor Horn at Sarm Studios, home of ZTT records, to discuss the Frankie Goes to Hollywood 12 inch singles. ZTT released so many different versions of Two Tribes on 12 inch that the chart rules were changed - so was the record buyer getting value for money? And what does the 12 inch single tell us about 1980s excesses?


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01ckmgj)
Back to work schemes, the jam that isn't, and apps on the NHS

The government consultation period on disability policy closes soon. We join one of the group consultations taking place around the country, and speak to Maria Miller, Minister for Disabled People. A back to work scheme in Essex offering tailor-made advice and placements to jobseekers - could it have a wider application? When is a jam not a jam - when it's an apple jam that officials say can't be called a jam, a conserve, or even a spread. Apps on the NHS - we look at one of the many new technologies helping patients, and doctors, manage their conditions and save money. And a new tv series looks at the trials and tribulations of British consular staff in Spain - Winifred Robinson hears about the crime, injury, and insurance all in a day's work for "Our Man In".

Producer: Rebecca Moore.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01chzj7)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01ckmgl)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Sport and the British (b01ckmgn)
The Gentleman Amateur

Clare Balding's at Lords Cricket ground in London to explore the demise of the amateur gentleman and the rise of the professional player, as the 1960's saw the beginning of a new, more egalitarian era, in British sport.

In all walks of life, Britain's 'Establishment' was being scrutinized, criticised and satirised so it was hardly surprising that sport and particularly cricket should come under fire.

Dr Dilwyn Porter of The International Centre for Sport History and Culture at De Montfort University explains how the MCC had to finally abandon its long-standing distinction between gentlemen and players or amateurs and professionals. The distinction epitomised by David Sheppard (later Bishop of Liverpool) and Yorkshireman, Fred Trueman.

Readers: Sean Baker and Nyasha Hatendi.
Technical Presentation: John Benton
Producer: Garth Brameld.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01djw82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01ckpjh)
Rumpole and the Man of God

By John Mortimer
Adapted by Richard Stoneman

The text for this episode of Rumpole is 'we shouldn't drop bombs of information which might cause ruin and havoc.'

It's 1959, and Rumpole is faced with defending a clergyman accused of shoplifting who although he clearly did not commit the crime, is curiously reluctant to be cross examined under oath, where he would have to tell the truth, but save himself from being defrocked.

Meanwhile Rumpole's fellow barrister and friend Frobisher, a confirmed bachelor, announces his engagement to a very merry widow, whom Rumpole seems to remember he has met somewhere before...

And finally, Hilda, she who must be obeyed, drops a bomb of information which will have a profound effect on their marriage.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b01ckpjk)
Inspirational Walks

Kinder Scout

Almost 80 years since the Mass Trespass on Kinder Scout, Clare Balding joins ramblers from Manchester and Sheffield to mark this inspirational moment in walking history.

On April 24th 1932, around 400 ramblers from Lancashire set off from Bowden Bridge quarry near Hayfield to walk up onto the plateau of Kinder Scout, the highest point in the Derbyshire Peak District, in protest at the lack of the right to roam on open land. As they scrambled upwards towards the moorland plateau of Kinder, the trespassers were met and confronted by the Duke of Devonshire's gamekeepers. A group of ramblers from Sheffield, who had also set off that morning from Edale, did eventually reach the plateau and the two groups met up before turning and retracing their steps. The following day six of the Manchester ramblers were arrested and imprisoned, a move which was to outrage many people and serve only to highlight and sympathise with the ramblers cause, resulting finally in the Countryside and Rights of Way Act in 2000

Today Clare joins members of the Sheffield Ramblers, as well as Manchester-born broadcaster and avid walker, Mike Harding. They represent the two groups of ramblers that set off from Edale and Hayfield respectively, to take part in the Mass Trespass back in 1932. Leaving from Bowden Bridge, just as the original trespassers did, the group walk towards Kinder Reservoir and on to William Clough, where the Duke of Devonshire's gamekeepers were waiting. As they walk, the old cross-Pennines rivalry is still in evidence as the Sheffield walkers remind Clare that it was their group that had actually reached the top all those years ago. But everyone on that day 80 years ago shared a common passion for the hills and the moors around which, as folk singer Ewan Maccoll wrote, no one man should have the right to own.

The Mass Trespass of Kinder Scout was one of the most inspirational moments in the history of the rambling movement, inspiring walkers and campaigners of access to open land for years to come. It wasn't the
only trespass to take place - there were others before it and many more inspired by it. But it lives on in the memory of all those who believe that all should have the right to roam.

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01cj43b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b01cj83r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01ckr42)
Francine Stock meets with Minnie Driver and director Marc Evans to discuss their high school musical Hunky Dory, a love letter to 1970's Wales.

Austrian Markus Schleinzer discusses his debut Michael, where a paedophile imprisons a young boy in his cellar.

Pasquale Iannone explains why The Conformist from 1970 is director Bernardo Bertolucci's masterpiece and a blue print for the American New Wave.

And as the Oscar stardust settles, box office analyst Charles Gant reveals what we've actually been watching on the big screen.

Producer: Craig Smith.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01crd80)
Quentin Cooper hears the outcome of the House of Lords review into the role of the government's departmental Chief Scientific Advisers from the chair of the committee, Lord Krebs. There is news of progress towards refining, reducing and replacing the use of animals in scientific experiments. And we take a walk in the forest - the oldest forest ever discovered, home to strange plant ancestors nearly 400 million years ago.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


THU 17:00 PM (b01ckr44)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01chzj9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b01ckr46)
Series 1

Episode 2

"The Thick Of It" star, Rebecca Front, Fast Show actor and comedian, Simon Day, and award-winning Geordie comic, Jason Cook nominate one of their intimate circle to answer questions about their relationship, to try and prove how well they know them.

With Miles Jupp chairing – if the panel can predict the responses their nominees gave, they get points.

Rebecca thinks she knows her father, Charles Front, a retired illustrator and calligrapher, pretty well. Simon examines his relationship with best friend, Conrad Butlin, a stylist from Notting Hill in London. And Jason plumps for his mother, Pat, a recruitment consultant from Hebburn in Newcastle - and, it turns out, something of a Loose Women fan...

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01ckr48)
Helen takes Henry to visit Tony. Tony's doing well, and is pleased to have made up with Jennifer. He knows that Tom's up to his neck on the farm but would like to see him, if he can manage it.

Tom's grateful for Neil's help with the pigs. Helen offers to do the shop run for Tom so that he can visit Tony.

Tony thanks Tom for his quick thinking, which saved Tony's life. Tom wants to talk about the things he said beforehand but Tony insists they forget it. It's ancient history and it doesn't matter now. He changes the subject. They laugh at the thought of Susan giving up gossip, and Clarrie joining her.

Elizabeth bumps into Neil on her way to visit Tony. They confirm arrangements for Lily to have a go at bell-ringing later.

Lily starts with the back stroke, and Neil does the hand stroke. The clapper's tied so they don't hear it ring but Lily enjoys herself, and wishes she could hear it. Lily's done so well that Neil allows her to do a few rings on an un-tied bell. As the treble bell begins to chime, Lily thinks it's awesome to be a real bell-ringer!


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01ckr4b)
Titian saved; Bruce Springsteen's new album

With John Wilson.

Antonia Fraser and Caitlin Moran have both recorded audio versions of their memoirs. They discuss the challenges of reading their intimate thoughts aloud.

Bruce Springsteen's new album Wrecking Ball mixes his muscular rock with folk influences and a strong sense of anger. Kate Mossman, Reviews Editor of Word Magazine, gives her response to it.

Today the National Gallery and the National Galleries of Scotland announced that they have found the funds needed to buy Titian's painting Diana and Callisto, saving it for the nation. John asks John Leighton of the National Gallery of Scotland whether the £45m price-tag represents good value at this time.

Radio 4 is inviting you to nominate New Elizabethans - people who have made an impact on the UK from 1952 to today. This week Front Row is asking writers and artists for their suggestions, and tonight architect Amanda Levete suggests a man who's made a significant contribution to the urban environment around the world.

Producer Philippa Ritchie.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqwsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b01cjwv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01ckr4d)
Reinvention

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies. The programme is broadcast first on BBC Radio 4 and later on BBC World Service Radio, BBC World News TV and BBC News Channel TV.

Evan's three executive guests all run companies that to a large extent have had to reinvent themselves. He asks them what's driven change in each of their businesses, and how they've fared. They also swap ideas on what they think our children should be taught at school.

Joining Evan are Rooney Anand, chief executive of pub retailer and brewer Greene King; Ian Livingston, chief executive of multinational telecoms provider BT Group; Rupert Gavin, chief executive of Odeon and UCI Cinemas Group.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Stephen Chilcott.


THU 21:00 Return of the South China Tiger (b01cjwtl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01ckmg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01chzjc)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01ckr4g)
Syrian rebels say they are making a tactical withdrawal from Baba Amr in Homs. We report the latest.

More extraordinary revelations from the Leveson Inquiry.

And the new British Eurovision Song Contest entry is revealed.

With David Eades.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01ckr4j)
Deborah Levy - Swimming Home

Episode 4

'Life is only worth living because we hope it will get better and we'll all get home safely"

When beautiful Kitty Finch lands in the middle of what seems a conventional holiday set up - two couples, one teenage daughter and a villa in the south of France - no-one quite knows the effect she will have, though at once the ground shifts.

In the fierce heat of July, fissures yawn open, prised apart by Kitty's unsettling presence. Is she benign? What does she want? Is she an admiring fan or a darker foe? And who is keeping secrets, most of all from themselves?

Deborah Levy's first novel in fifteen years has garnered much praise. Witty and acute by turn, its deceptively simple setting belies the fractured relationships and the sense of imminent chaos that threatens all the characters. In today's episode: 'She knew a secret no-one else knew'.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Produced by Di Speirs
Directed by Elizabeth Allard
The Reader is Juliet Aubrey.


THU 23:00 Paul Temple (b00t0jcn)
Paul Temple and Steve

Steve's Intuition

A new production of the 1947 detective serial 'Paul Temple and Steve.' One of the great radio detectives returns refreshed and reinvigorated to the airwaves to investigate the activities of a shadowy and ruthless criminal mastermind in post-war London.

The hunt for the elusive Dr. Belasco leads Paul and Sir Graham Forbes of Scotland Yard to a surprising discovery in a remote cottage. But it doesn't seem to take them any nearer finding Dr. Belasco - perhaps the two men should listen more attentively to Paul's wife Steve.

Paul Temple ..... Crawford Logan
Steve ..... Gerda Stevenson
Sir Graham Forbes ..... Gareth Thomas
Kaufman ..... Nick Underwood
Worth/Charlie ..... Greg Powrie
Nelson ..... Jimmy Chisholm
Joseph ..... Richard Greenwood
Mrs Forester ..... Candida Benson
Ed Bellamy ..... Robin Laing
Insp. Perry ..... Michael Mackenzie

Produced by Patrick Rayner.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01ckr4l)
Susan Hulme hears MPs welcome a ban on wild animals in circuses. And the lobbyist who played golf with a top civil servant.

editor: Peter Mulligan.



FRIDAY 02 MARCH 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01chzjy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01cqwsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01chzk2)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01chzk4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01chzk6)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01chzk8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01cmt33)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4.
From Wales, with the Rev.Mary Stallard.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01cks45)
The UK needs more fruit and veg growers but there aren't enough green-fingered young farmers. No UK agricultural colleges offer a degree in commercial horticulture, and many farmers would prefer to grow arable crops. Professor David Pink from Harper Adams thinks part of the problem is that students don't find horticulture trendy enough. Sarah Falkingham visits a carrot grower who has managed to make money by extending his season to produce vegetables throughout the year.

Sheep near areas which have been affected by Schmallenberg are most at risk. Professor Peter Mertens thinks that the rate of farms who are reporting the new disease Schmallenberg is decreasing, but we need to be prepared for next year. Farmer Andrew Foulds discovered Schmallenberg on his farm in January. He thinks that other farmers aren't reporting the virus because they do not want to be stigmatized.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01cks47)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01cj4ky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01cqx0f)
Wilkie Collins

Episode 5

Written by Peter Ackroyd.
Read by Michael Pennington.

His first child with Martha Rudd is born, Caroline Graves returns to Gloucester Place and Wilkie Collins' great friend and collaborator, Charles Dickens, dies.

Short and oddly built, with a head too big for his body, extremely short-sighted, unable to stay still, dressed in colourful clothes, 'as if playing a certain part in the great general drama of life' Wilkie Collins looked distinctly strange. But he was none the less a charmer, befriended by the great, loved by children, irresistibly attractive to women - and avidly read by generations of readers.

Peter Ackroyd follows his hero, 'the sweetest-tempered of all the Victorian novelists', from his childhood as the son of a well-known artist to his struggling beginnings as writer, his years of fame and his life-long friendship with the other great London chronicler, Charles Dickens. A true Londoner, Collins, like Dickens, was fascinated by the secrets and crimes -- the fraud, blackmail and poisonings - that lay hidden behind the city's respectable facade. He was a fighter, never afraid to point out injustices and shams, or to tackle the establishment head on.
As well as his enduring masterpieces, "The Moonstone" - often called the first true detective novel - and the sensational "Women in White," he produced an intriguing array of lesser known works. But Collins had his own secrets: he never married, but lived for thirty years with the widowed Caroline Graves, and also had a second liaison, as 'Mr and Mrs Dawson', with a younger mistress, Martha Rudd, with whom he had three children. Both women remained devoted as illness and opium-taking took their toll: he died in 1889, in the middle of writing his last novel - Blind Love.

Told with Peter Ackroyd's inimitable verve this is a ravishingly entertaining life of a great story-teller, full of surprises, rich in humour and sympathetic understanding.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01cks49)
The teapot - a British tradition under threat? Kathleen Ferrier, IVF Breakthrough and the Russian presidential election

Presented by Jenni Murray. In the past five years sales of that icon of British social life - the teapot - have fallen by nearly forty percent. Now a leading British store has started a campaign to bring back the civilised art of tea drinking. But can we stop the tradition of making a pot of tea from going down the spout? A breakthrough in fertility treatment which could increase the chances of a successful pregnancy by a quarter. Kathleen Ferrier was a British contralto singer who died in 1953 from breast cancer. Her professional career had lasted just 14 years but in that time she had had become an international star, singing at Covent Garden, Glyndebourne and Carnegie Hall; not bad for someone who had no formal training as a singer and who left school to work in the Blackburn telephone exchange. Kathryn Rudge, former winner of the Kathleen Ferrier Young Singer's Bursary Award and Ferrier's biographer, Dr Christopher Fifield, join Jenni to discuss what made Kathleen Ferrier such a loved and celebrated singer. Russian Presidential elections are being held on Sunday 4 March. But while much of Europe has seen a steady increase in female representation at the highest level, is Russia lagging behind? Richard Sakwa, Professor in Russian Politics at the University of Kent examines women's political participation in Russia.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqx0h)
Christopher William Hill - Angarrack

Autumn

Sir Richard is dead, and a fire has destroyed Angarrack's library. But are the two events connected - and will Lady Helen be able to use them to her advantage?

Christopher William Hill's black comedy revolves around the future of a crumbling Cornish ancestral estate in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Sir Richard Penwerris (Richard Jonson), mired in debt, wishes to bequeath it to the National Trust, much to the fury of his wife, Lady Helen (Lia Williams) who plans to drag the estate, kicking and screaming, into the 20th century. Matters are complicated further by the sudden emergence of an heir to the estate, Rafe Penwerris (Henry Hadden-Paton), whom his father believed to have died in the war. A clash of Titans ensues - with only one winner.

Cast:
Sir Richard Penwerris ...... Richard Johnson
Lady Helen ...... Lia Williams
Rafe ....... Harry Hadden-Paton
Tregunna ...... Tony Haygarth
Ralston ....... Nicholas Boulton
Jepson ...... Peter Cadwell
Prideaux ...... Geoffrey Whitehead

Incidental Music: composed by David Chilton

Producer: Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 The Stationery Cupboard (b01cks4c)
Lucy Mangan loves pens...and paper...and folders. In fact, from her first fountain pen to the latest leather notebook, Lucy has been thrilled by the smell and feel of fresh stationery. Of course, she's not alone - one of the most popular luxuries for Desert Island Discs castaways is pen and paper. In The Stationery Cupboard, we meet fellow devotees of the paraphernalia of school and office life. Lucy goes back to her South London junior school to talk to children about pencil cases. She meets writers to discuss the merits of the 1920s typewriter, a sleek laptop, and a pile of lined A5 notebooks. The psychologist Linda Blair explores our attachment to particular designs, and members of the Writing Equipment Society explain why happiness is a collection of two thousand fountain pens.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


FRI 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b01cks4f)
A Reconstructed Corpse

Episode 1

by Jeremy Front
Based on the novel by Simon Brett

Charles takes on the role of a lookalike in a crime
reconstruction programme. But a missing person
case soon turns to murder.

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Angie ..... Alex Rivers
Rob Garston ..... Adam Billington
Chloe Earnshaw ..... Francine Chamberlain
Greg Marchmont ..... Carl Prekopp
Superintendent Sorsby ..... Gerard McDermott
Zoe/Receptionist ..... Jane Whittenshaw
Actor/PC/Steward ..... Rikki Lawton

Directed by Sally Avens

Bill Nighy returns as the irrepressible Charles Paris: unsuccessful actor, bad husband and dipsomaniac. Charles is once again in need of work and to make things worse he's been kicked out by Frances after inadvertently starting a riot outside her house. Any job will do so when he is offered work in a crime reconstruction programme playing a missing property developer he leaps at the chance. But a missing person case soon turns to murder when severed body parts begin to appear. Television ratings soar as the public tune in to discover every gory detail of the case. The raging egos and jealous manoeuvrings of the producers, presenters and the police soon provide a long list of suspects for Charles to investigate as he pieces together a macabre jigsaw puzzle of murder.

Simon Brett has written numerous Charles Paris novels, which have been used as the basis for the Radio 4 series by Jeremy Front.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01cks4h)
Dodgy timber, French breathalyser law & the airline letting you 'meet' fellow passengers

How some big DIY chains may have inadvertently sold 'illegally' sourced wood.

The airline offering to let you 'meet' the person you'll be sitting next to before you board their planes.

And the extra bit of kit you'll need to carry by law this summer if you're driving in France.

If The Work Programme, Job Centre or a job club couldn't find you work, how easy is it to become self employed and start a business? We'll look at one new business in Rochdale and talk to the Prince's Trust about what to consider and where to look for help. A list of the websites mentioned in the programme are on the Prince's Trust website - see link below.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01chzkb)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01cks4k)
Shaun Ley presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Sport and the British (b01cks4m)
Beating Us at Our Own Game

Clare Balding takes a look at Britain's most successful export ever - football. Yet in giving it to others, the British lost control of the game they had created and crafted. Clare, with the help of Prof Tony Mason of The International Centre for Sport History and Culture at De Montfort University, looks at our troubled relationship with the sport's governing body FIFA and asks if a British team will ever again come close to winning the World Cup.

Readers: Sean Baker and Nyasha Hatendi
Technical Presentation: John Benton
Producer: Garth Brameld.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01ckr48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01cks4p)
Rumpole and the Explosive Evidence

By John Mortimer
Adapted by Richard Stoneman

Starring Timothy West as Rumpole and Benedict Cumberbatch as the younger Rumpole.

Rumpole is in bed with flu, but more than happy to be called into work to escape the twenty four hour baby minding duties.

The case is the defence of a well known safe blower with lots of previous and Rumpole finds himself alone and without a leader, exposing the underhand behaviour employed by one Dirty Dickerson, a senior police officer who is quite prepared to tamper with evidence in order to frame well known criminals. In so doing however, he breaches one of the codes of procedure in court, and finds himself in danger of losing his right to work in court. However, help arrives from the intervention of a gentleman of the press.

Meanwhile, at Froxbury mansions, Rumpole forms a strong bond with his infant son in the watches of the night, when he talks over the intricacies of the case with him, and discovers that Hilda really does care about his career, and their future together.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01cks4r)
Haynes, Bedfordshire

Peter Gibbs chairs a gardening debate in Bedfordshire. Joining him on the panel are Matthew Biggs, Pippa Greenwood and Chris Beardshaw.

Matthew Wilson reports on the progress of the Olympic park and Matthew Biggs investigates italian vegetable varieties

Produced by Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Leap Year Tales (b01cks4t)
February Alone

Three stories to mark the Leap Year.

'February Alone' by Ruth Thomas.

An intended romantic lunch goes strangely awry. Will a gift of lingerie help save the hour?

Read by Melody Grove.

Produced by Patricia Hitchcock.

Ruth Thomas is the author of three short story collections and a novel. Her first collection, 'Sea Monster Tattoo', was shortlisted for the John Llewellyn Rhys Award and her novel, 'Things to Make and Mend' was winner of Good Housekeeping's 'Most Entertaining Read' Award. She has also received a Scottish Arts Council Book Award and has had work shortlisted for the VS Pritchett Prize. Her second novel is due out next year and she is also at work on a new short story collection.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01cks4w)
John Wilson on

Davy Jones - the child actor from Manchester who became a Monkee in California. Last Word hears from his bandmate Peter Tork.

Jean Pateman who led the campaign to save Highgate Cemetery from closure in the 70s, remained the guardian of the place for 30 years and became the basis of a character in a bestselling novel by Audrey Niffenegger
.
Steve Kordek, the man who, in the 1940s, revolutionised the game of pinball by adding the electric flippers.

And childbirth guru Betty Parsons whose clients included the Queen and Princess Diana.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01cks4y)
The fate of BBC local radio is once more under the microscope this week, as independent media consultant John Myers publishes his report on the best way to cut costs and keep quality. He recommends scrapping the plan to share afternoon programmes across regions, and suggests that cutting back on management could save two million pounds. Roger meets David Holdsworth, the controller of English Regions, to find out what this will mean for listeners.

As the BBC World Service turns 80, it has thrown open the doors to its news conference. For the first time the daily meeting where editors discuss the news agenda was broadcast around the world. Feedback went along to find out how much the great and the good consider what the audience wants to hear.

And do you know your Angry Birds from your Grand Theft Auto? On BBC Radio 4 a recent edition of Front Row focused on computer games. About time too said many listeners. So will there be more discussion of the topic in the future? Roger meets editor John Goudie to find out.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producers: Karen Pirie and Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01cks50)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01chzkd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b01cks52)
Series 36

With Andy Parsons and Lynne Truss

Topical comedy with Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis. This week Lynne Truss, Andy Parsons, Laura Shavin and Mitch Benn join Steve and Hugh for a look at the week's biggest (and smallest) stories.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01cks54)
Ruth tells Clarrie that Pip's had to put the brakes on her 'celebrity lamb' project; it's inappropriate whilst there's so much uncertainty over the Schmallenberg virus. David tells Ruth that if she can't live without the cows, she needs to come up with a plan and tell him how they can afford to live with them. He needs an answer soon.

Adam visits Tony, and tells Brian that it's going to be a while before Tony's back to milking. Brian thinks there's a lesson for them all. He wants Adam to bury the hatchet and make up. It's not that simple for Adam but when Brian asks him to shake hands and declare a truce, for the sake of the family, Adam reluctantly agrees.

Tony needs to take it easy. Pat's happy for him to sit there and be waited on. It's good to have him home.

Helen tells Pat that they're managing by the skin of their teeth, and it's such a crucial time. Pat's going to be busy looking after Tony, so they need to bring in extra help. Someone who knows what they're doing. Pat realises she means Clarrie.

Clarrie thanks Helen for coming round to tell her about Tony, and tentatively asks if she can visit him. Helen interrupts Clarrie, and tells her why she's there. Clarrie can hardly believe it. Of course she'll come back.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01cks56)
Therapy in fiction, film and TV drama

With Naomi Alderman.

Therapists and their patients now play a key part in drama and fiction, whether it's Watson meeting his analyst in the BBC series Sherlock or the recent return of Freud and Jung to our cinema screens in the film A Dangerous Method.

Naomi Alderman reports on current portrayals of therapy, talking to Sophie Hannah, who recalls her own experiences of hypnotherapy as research for her new novel, and to Yael Hedaya, one of the writers on the original version of the TV drama In Treatment, an Israeli production now available in the UK.

Matthew Sweet and Deborah Levy reflect on depictions of psychoanalysis from the days of silent cinema to the acclaimed series The Sopranos and beyond.

Psychotherapist Brett Kahr offers an insider's assessment of his fictional counterparts, and also considers why some writers fear that any kind of therapy might undermine their creativity.

French psychiatrist and writer Francois Lelord, whose novels feature a questing psychiatrist called Hector, discusses whether books can inform our self-understanding.

Producer Erin Riley.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01cqx0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01cks58)
Beccles, Suffolk

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Beccles in Suffolk.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01cks5b)
David Cannadine: Why Wear a Tie?

Historian David Cannadine compares the traditions of tie wearing on both sides of the Atlantic. He reflects on the social significance of this element of male dress and observes a recent phenomenon - that politicians seem to campaign in open neck shirts but govern wearing ties.
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Sport and the British: Omnibus (b01cks5d)
Episode 5

The omnibus edition of this weeks Sport and the British with Clare Balding.
Sport was reaching out through the airwaves to a whole new audience. It was increasing in popularity, growing up and leaving home. In some cases, this meant progress - innovation in motor sport or egalitarianism in cricket but in others, like football, it meant a painful loss of control to FIFA.
Technical Presentation: John Benton
Producer: Lucy Lunt
Executive Producer: Ian Bent.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01chzkg)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01cks5g)
Red Cross relief workers are stopped from entering Homs.Is the uprising nearly over ?

David Cameron's guru , Steve Hilton is taking a year's sabbatical.Why has he walked out of No 10?

The Dutch get a taste of their own austere medicine

with David Eades.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01cks5j)
Deborah Levy - Swimming Home

Episode 5

'Life is only worth living because we hope it will get better and we'll all get home safely"

When beautiful Kitty Finch lands in the middle of what seems a conventional holiday set up - two couples, one teenage daughter and a villa in the south of France - no-one quite knows the effect she will have, though at once the ground shifts.

In the fierce heat of July, fissures yawn open, prised apart by Kitty's unsettling presence. Is she benign? What does she want? Is she an admiring fan or a darker foe? And who is keeping secrets, most of all from themselves?

Deborah Levy's first novel in fifteen years has garnered much praise. Witty and acute by turn, its deceptively simple setting belies the fractured relationships and the sense of imminent chaos that threatens all the characters. In today's episode: 'Especially when it rains'.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Produced by Di Speirs
Directed by Elizabeth Allard
The Reader is Juliet Aubrey.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b01cjwv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01cks5l)
Mark D'Arcy with the day's top news stories from Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b01cjm4k)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b01cjm4k)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01cqrsn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01cqrsn)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01cqvcz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01cqvcz)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01cqwsx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01cqwsx)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01cqx0h)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01cqx0h)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 FRI (b01cks4f)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b01cjwv5)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b01cjwv5)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b01c7xfj)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01cks5b)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b01c7nd5)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b01cjm5g)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01cj1rz)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b01c7xfg)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b01cks58)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b01cj2lf)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b01cj388)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b01cj388)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b01cjm52)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b01cjmk0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b01cjwvr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b01ckgh0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01ckr4j)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b01cks5j)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b01cpy0w)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b01cjm4f)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b01cjm4f)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01cqrsl)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01cqrsl)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01cqvcx)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01cqvcx)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01cqwsv)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01cqwsv)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01cqx0f)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b01c7ncn)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b01cjm4y)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b01cj43g)

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing 23:15 WED (b01ckgh4)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b01cj83p)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b01cjwv1)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b01cjwv1)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 18:30 TUE (b01cjwv9)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b01cj4ky)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b01cj4ky)

Doctor - Tell Me the Truth 20:00 MON (b01cjm5d)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01cjwtx)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01ckgg7)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01ckpjh)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01cks4p)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b01cj1lr)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01cj1lk)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b01cjm47)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b01cjwt8)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b01ckgfn)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b01ckmg4)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b01cks45)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b01c7x4r)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b01cks4y)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b01c7pr5)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b01cjwvh)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b01c7rqn)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b01cj2hj)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b01cj2hj)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01cj1rv)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b01ckmgd)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b01cjm5b)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b01cjwvf)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b01ckggp)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b01ckr4b)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b01cks56)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b01d167g)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b01cks4r)

HR 11:30 WED (b01ckgfz)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b01ckmg8)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b01ckmg8)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b01cjwvk)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b01cjwvm)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b01cjwvm)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 THU (b01ckr46)

Jonathan Swift - Gulliver's Travels 21:00 SAT (b01c6trt)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b01c7ncx)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b01cjm56)

Key Matters 14:45 SUN (b00tt5jf)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b01c7x4p)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b01cks4w)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b01cjwv3)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b01cjwv3)

Leap Year Tales 15:45 FRI (b01cks4t)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b01ckggw)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b01cj38d)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b01cj2hg)

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto 18:30 WED (b01ckggk)

Material World 21:00 MON (b01c7sn9)

Material World 16:30 THU (b01crd80)

Meet David Sedaris 19:15 SUN (b0129bpk)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b01c7xgw)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01chz9v)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01chzcg)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01chzdm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01chzgc)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01chzhs)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01chzjy)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b01ckgfs)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b01ckgfs)

Miracles R Us 23:00 MON (b00sm8tq)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b01ckgg9)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01cj1rx)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01cj1rx)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b01c7rql)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b01ckggt)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b01c7xh4)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01chzb3)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01chzcq)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01chzdw)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01chzgr)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01chzj3)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01chzk8)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01chzb5)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b01c7xh6)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01chzb9)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01chzbf)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b01c7xhs)

News 13:00 SAT (b01c7xhj)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b01cjwtg)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b01cj83r)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b01cj83r)

PM 17:00 SAT (b01cj2hd)

PM 17:00 MON (b01cjm54)

PM 17:00 TUE (b01cjwv7)

PM 17:00 WED (b01ckggh)

PM 17:00 THU (b01ckr44)

PM 17:00 FRI (b01cks50)

Paul Temple 23:00 THU (b00t0jcn)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b01cj83w)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01c6try)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b01cj83t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b01c7xqk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b01cjm45)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01cmt11)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01cmt1y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01cmt2q)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01cmt33)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b01cj43b)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b01cj43b)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b01cj43b)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b01c7sn5)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b01ckpjk)

Recycled Radio 11:00 MON (b01cjm4m)

Return of the South China Tiger 11:00 TUE (b01cjwtl)

Return of the South China Tiger 21:00 THU (b01cjwtl)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01cj1s1)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01cj1lp)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b01cj2hl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b01c7xh0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01chz9z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01chzcl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01chzdr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01chzgm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01chzhz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01chzk4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b01c7xgy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b01c7xh2)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b01c7xhl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01chz9x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01chzb1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01chzbm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01chzcj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01chzcn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01chzdp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01chzdt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01chzgh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01chzgp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01chzhv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01chzj1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01chzk2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01chzk6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b01c7xhq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01chzbr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01chzcx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01chzf4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01chzh0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01chzj9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01chzkd)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01cj38b)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01cj38b)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b01cjwtn)

Sport and the British: Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b01cks5d)

Sport and the British 13:45 MON (b01cjm4t)

Sport and the British 13:45 TUE (b01cjwtv)

Sport and the British 13:45 WED (b01ckgg5)

Sport and the British 13:45 THU (b01ckmgn)

Sport and the British 13:45 FRI (b01cks4m)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b01cjm4c)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b01cjm4c)

Stone 14:15 MON (b01cjm4w)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b01cj43d)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b01cj438)

Sussex Scandals 19:45 SUN (b01cjb66)

Tarzan: Lord of the Jungle 16:00 MON (b01cjm50)

The 12 Inch Single 11:30 THU (b01ckmgg)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b01cj43j)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b01cj83y)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b01cj83y)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b01cjm58)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b01cjm58)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b01cjwvc)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b01cjwvc)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b01djw82)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b01djw82)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b01ckr48)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b01ckr48)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b01cks54)

The Art of Monarchy 10:30 SAT (b01cj1lt)

The Battle for Egypt 13:30 SUN (b01cj83m)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b01c7srg)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01ckr4d)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b01c7sn7)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b01ckr42)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b01cj83h)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b01cj83h)

The History Plays 23:00 TUE (b01cdvb7)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b01cjwtz)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b01cjwtd)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b01cjwtd)

The Lobotomists 11:00 WED (b016wx0w)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b01ckggf)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b01c7x4w)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b01cks52)

The Stationery Cupboard 11:00 FRI (b01cks4c)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01cj1rs)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b01cj83k)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b01cjmjy)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b01cjwvp)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b01ckggy)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01ckr4g)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b01cks5g)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b01c7rq6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01ckggc)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:00 WED (b01ckgh2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b01cjmk2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b01cjwvt)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b01ckgh6)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b01ckr4l)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b01cks5l)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01cj1lm)

Today 06:00 MON (b01cjm49)

Today 06:00 TUE (b01cjwtb)

Today 06:00 WED (b01ckgfq)

Today 06:00 THU (b01ckmg6)

Today 06:00 FRI (b01cks47)

Under the Skin 00:30 SUN (b01cj384)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b01c7xh8)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b01c7xhd)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b01c7xhg)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b01c7xhn)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01chzb7)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01chzbc)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01chzbk)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01chzbp)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01chzcs)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01chzcv)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01chzcz)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01chzdy)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01chzfd)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01chzgw)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01chzh2)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01chzj7)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01chzjc)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01chzkb)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01chzkg)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b01cjb68)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b01cjb6b)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b01cj2bk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b01cjm4h)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b01cjwtj)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b01ckgfv)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b01ckmgb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b01cks49)

Wordaholics 11:30 MON (b01cjm4p)

World at One 13:00 MON (b01cjm4r)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b01cjwts)

World at One 13:00 WED (b01ckgg3)

World at One 13:00 THU (b01ckmgl)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b01cks4k)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b01cv9tp)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b01cjwtq)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b01ckgg1)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b01ckmgj)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b01cks4h)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b01c7xqm)