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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 14 JANUARY 2012

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0196vj7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b019lzsy)
Stop What You're Doing and Read This

The Right Words in the Right Order

Passionate, funny, revelatory and inspiring, this series is a mission statement about the transformative power of reading; about the way it inspires us, the tangible impact it can have on our well-being and the importance it holds for us now and will continue to hold in the future.

Stop What You're Doing And Read This! features five of our finest authors and advocates from the world of publishing. Michael Rosen, Jeanette Winterson, Tim Parks, Carmen Callil and Mark Haddon, are all united here in a passionate belief in the distinctive and irreplaceable pleasures and powers of reading. Their essays argue that reading literature is, and must continue to be, a fundamental part of our daily life, as it directly improves our mental health and well-being, enriches our experience and broadens our imaginations.

As the ways people read, what they read, where they buy their books and in what format are all changing rapidly, this series argues unapologetically for the paramount importance of books and reading in a fast-moving, dislocated, technology-obsessed world.

From the moment he won six Penguin Classics in a school competition Mark Haddon has been an avid reader. But it's not the plots of books he focuses on but the words themselves, the images they conjure up, the world's they introduce him to. In 'The Right Words In the Right Order' he explains how reading, and reading the right books at the right time is a life-enhancing experience.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0196vj9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0196vjc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0196vjf)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0196vjh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0196vl5)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4.
From Wales, with the Rev. Dr. Stephen Wigley.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b0196vl7)
A listener who has owned shotguns for 30 years explains why he no longer trusts himself to keep them. A reverend re-lives being attacked by a giant sea eagle. And Radio 2's Chris Evans reads Your News.

Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0196vjk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b0196vjm)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b0196td6)
Olympics

This is the year of the London 2012 Olympic Games. In just 6 months time, 60,000 people are expected to flood into Weymouth and Portland every day for 2 weeks to watch the sailing events. GB has topped the Sailing medals table at the last three Olympic Games. British sailors will be hoping to repeat the feat at London 2012, battling their rivals in Weymouth Bay. Weymouth and Portland have been preparing for this moment since the location of the sailing events was announced over five years ago. The area has seen major developments in terms of the roads, the marina and the esplanade. For this week's Open Country, Helen Mark visits the area to find out how it has prepared to host such a major event and what impact these changes are having on local residents.

Presenter : Helen Mark
Producer : Anna Varle.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b019h151)
Farming Today This Week

As of January 2013 European pig farmers will have to stop routinely tethering their sows and reduce the amount of time the pigs are confined in stalls. Charlotte Smith reports from Mark Bailey, a Worcestershire pig farmer who rears his animals outdoors. Mark thinks that the new welfare standards won't go far enough.

The new pig welfare standards have already been in place on UK farms since 1999. Melvin Rickarby visits Richard Blant who keeps 100 sows at his farm near Nottingham to find out what the conditions are currently for UK pigs.

The Prime Minister, David Cameron says that the UK was wrong to be ahead of other EU countries. There are warnings that many farmers on the continent will not make the deadline in time to be compliant to the new sow stall regulations by January 2013. John Howard from the Danish Agriculture and Food Council assures that Denmark will be ready in time.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0196vjp)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b019h153)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

Featuring Ed Balls on the public pay cap (0810), a cruise liner is grounded off Tuscany (0841) and press ethics (0750).


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b019h155)
Jon Ronson, Kate Fox, Crows Sound Sculpture, Alien Implants, Antarctic addict, Turkish teacher, Jenny Agutter Inheritance Tracks

Richard Coles with journalist Jon Ronson, poet Kate Fox, a man who extracts alien implants, the teacher who went to Turkey and found herself driving the school bus, a woman who is addicted to the South Pole and a Sound Sculpture of crows. Plus the Inheritance Tracks of actress Jenny Agutter.

Producer: JP Devlin.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b019h157)
Swimming - Land Art - Sicily

John McCarthy discusses Art and Travel with leading art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon explaining his abiding passion for the raw art of Sicily which has been drawing him back to the island for over twenty years. He talks about his latest BBC 2 series on Sicily called 'Sicily Unpacked' which, in the company of chef Giorgio Locatelli, reveals the many stunning works of art round every corner as well as the fresh ingredients which make for a delicious and unique cuisine. Part of the appeal, he says, is that the Art is so accessible, not locked up in museums and galleries but available to all at virtually every street corner. The art, he feels, has not become homogenised as in so many other places. Art academic Dr. Amy Dempsey discusses her love of Outdoor Art which led to her book called 'Destination Art' cataloguing two hundred of the most modern and contemporary art sites around the world, mostly in Europe and the USA. Many of the works are unshowy and quite difficult to find, all part of the experience for the traveller. She makes particular mention of works in the Netherlands (the 'positive' and 'negative' Green Cathedrals) and the work of Anthony Gormley and Anish Kapoor. She believes these works have been overlooked in the past and have not received the attention they deserve by the critic and the traveller. Susie Parr explains her ten year quest to chart the history of outdoor bathing in the UK. To that end, she has swum in chilly harbour waters, at glorious beaches and in once stylish lidos. She also explores how immersion in cold water seems to have inspired art and creativity and was enjoyed especially by some of the key Romantic figures including, Wordsworth, Shelley and Byron.

Producer: Margaret Collins.


SAT 10:30 Reasons to be Cheerful (b019h159)
Series 3

Jackie Kay

Scottish poet and writer Jackie Kay does her best to cheer up Muriel Gray with her Reasons To Be Cheerful in the third series of the popular programme. The concept behind Reasons To Be Cheerful is simple. Each week a guest presenter looks at some of the things about modern life that they believe are worth celebrating.

Jackie returns to her Scottish homeland to celebrate a few of the things that she believes make modern life better. The revival of home-baking is one of Jackie's big reasons. She visits her mum's Glasgow home to sample the baked goods of her neighbours. Jackie is joined by Catharine Brown, one of Scotland's best known cookery writers.

Jackie is delighted by the current boom in the publication of poetry pamphlets. Despite living in the age of e-publishing, poetry lovers are turning to this decidedly old fashioned form of communication. Jackie visits the Edinburgh Poetry Library to see their pamphlet collection and to meet Liz Lochhead, acclaimed poet and the current Scottish Makar, the national poet.

She celebrates what she sees as a revival in activism of young people. She is particularly delighted by imaginative campaigns like Football Beyond Borders, which uses soccer to break down barriers between people. It was set up and run by young people, including her son Matthew.

Jackie interviews Carol Craig, chief executive of the Centre for Confidence and Well-being in Glasgow. The innovative centre is dedicated to looking at ways of tackling pessimism in modern society.

Among Jackie's guests are Andy Furlong, Robyn Marsack and Jasper Kain. Along the way Jackie has to convince the broadcaster and writer Muriel Gray that there are things to cheer about.

Produced by Martin McNamara and Kim Normanton.
A Loftus Audio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b019dtlp)
Steve Richards of The Independent looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

With Ed Miliband under fire for his performance as Labour leader, one of his predecessors, Neil Kinnock, gives a fascinating insight into the pressures endured by a Leader of the Opposition. Among the adversaries? Cowards in the ranks.

After the financial crash, a new debate is opening up on how capitalism can be made more moral. Do the party leaders have a role here? The Conservative, John Redwood and Labour's Tristram Hunt think they have - but they don't agree on how far.

He's taking on the Westminster Parliament in his quest for independence for Scotland. But what's First Minister Alex Salmond really like? Iain Macwhirter who writes for the Sunday Herald has watched him for years. A conviction politician, he says, but no ideologue.

After the portrayal of Mrs Thatcher in the film 'The Iron Lady', why aren't more British political dramas committed to film and fiction? The author and peer Michael Dobbs and the academic Steven Fielding swop notes.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b019dtlr)
The Afghan women still suffering in silence - ten years after the fall of the Taliban. Caroline Wyatt, who's just back from Kabul, examines how their lives might change once the international community withdraws its troops from their country. Nick Thorpe's been to meet the president of Hungary - a man at the centre of a political and constitutional storm. Laura Trevelyan's in Haiti where, two years ago, a 35-second earthquake killed more than three hundred thousand people. She finds the process of reconstruction is still going on -- some say it's taking too long. Sara Hashash is in Cairo where they're trying to salvage what they can from thirty truckloads of ancient books, manuscripts and other documents damaged and destroyed during fighting in the capital last year and our Europe correspondent Chris Morris takes a break from talking about bail-outs and over-the-counter derivatives and heads off to Copenhagen for a heart-to-heart with the Queen of Denmark.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b019dtlt)
Four of the big six power companies have now announced small and limited cuts in energy prices. Two of the seven smaller ones had already made cuts. The others are likely to follow. But why are the cuts so limited - 5 percent or less typically on just gas or electricity - when last year's rises were so large - up to 19 percent in the autumn alone? And why not all utility customers stand to benefit from the headline price cuts anyway? Joe Malinowski of the comparison site, The Energyshop.com, joins the programme.

A well-known payday loan company changes its procedures after taking continuing amounts from the debit card of a borrower's mother who had simply tried to pay off just one of her son's debts but found she was liable for his future debts as well. We look at payday loans and how parents can safely help with debt. Bob Howard reports. The programme also hears from freelance debt expert, Nick Lord.

The AA charges one customer 243.14 pounds for her breakdown cover if she pays by cheque but says she can have the same cover for 106.36 pounds if she gives them a direct debit authority. This premium of more than 136 pounds to pay by cheque could be a record! The AA says it's a special one-off deal for certain customers. James Daley from Which? Money joins the programme.

Last week we looked at absolute return investment funds most of which gave investors absolutely nothing or less. This week we look at tracker funds which don't track the movements of the FTSE index as closely as investors hope. Tom Stevenson investment director at Fidelity speaks to the programme.

If you are one of the nine million people in the self-assessment system and you have not yet filed your online return you have until January 31st to do so or face a series of new penalties which will reach at least 1,600 pounds in fines if you delay filing for a year. John Whiting of the Chartered Institute of Taxation explains the new rules.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b0196vgp)
Series 76

Episode 4

Scotland, Speed, and Office Stupor: Sandi Toksvig presents Radio 4's perenially popular topical quiz in the week that Alex Salmond named a date for a referendum on Scotland leaving the union, plans for the controversial HS2 train link were unveiled, and 1 in 4 office workers were said to be endangering their lives through boredom. Jeremy Hardy and Sue Perkins take on Fred Macaulay and Bob Mills, and Corrie Corfield reads the news. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0196vjr)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0196vjt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b0196vgw)
Musselburgh, East Lothian

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from Loretto School in Musselburgh, East Lothian with Secretary of State for Scotland, Michael Moore; Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland, Margaret Curran; journalist and broadcaster, Lesley Riddoch; and Scottish Finance Secretary, SNP MSP John Swinney.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b019dtlw)
Call Jonathan Dimbleby on 03700 100 444, email us at any.answers@bbc.co.uk or tweet #bbcaq.
Scottish independence - whose choice? Should it be decided by the whole of the UK or just the Scots? Britishness? Devo max? the economic cost of breaking up The Union?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00g3ycd)
Michael Hastings - Tom and Viv

Benedict Cumberbatch stars in the heart-breaking story of TS Eliot's marriage to Viv Haigh-Wood.

Michael Hastings' best known play charts the turbulent, doomed marriage of the young TS Eliot and the charismatic Vivienne Haigh-Wood. This moving, highly-charged study has been described as 'one of the most important plays of the 20th century'.

Stars Benedict Cumberbatch as Tom, Lia Williams as Viv, David Haig as Maurice and Judy Parfitt as Rose.

Adapted and directed by Peter Kavanagh.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.

Tom ............... Benedict Cumberbatch
Viv.................. Lia Williams
Maurice..............David Haig
Rose............... Judy Parfitt
Charles............ John Rowe
Louise..................Emily Randall
Janes............... Chris Pavlo
Dr Todd............ Gunnar Cauthery
Barrister............. Jonathan Tafler

Adapted and directed by......Peter Kavanagh.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b019dtly)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Women who've launched successful businesses on markets offer their advice to anyone thinking of setting up a stall. Why are music videos so raunchy,are they any worse than when Hot Gossip strutted their stuff?
How natural is it for a parent to have a favourite child and should you acknowledge it? We hear from a mother about the taboo subject.
As The Iron Lady hits the cinemas two former northern MPs Elizabeth Peacock and Joyce Quin to get their take on the 1980s and asks if Margaret Thatcher responsible for the north/south divide? and the female back benchers with an eye on promotion. How likely are they to get a foot on the ladder in the next government reshuffle? Plus Masterchef winner Tim Anderson explains how to Cook the Perfect steak.
Presented by Jane Garvey.


SAT 17:00 PM (b019dzpf)
Saturday PM

A listener who has owned shotguns for 30 years explains why he no longer trusts himself to keep them. A reverend re-lives being attacked by a giant sea eagle. And Radio 2's Chris Evans reads Your News.

Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b0196vl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0196vjw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0196vjy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0196vk0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b019dzph)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Culinary wizard Heston Blumenthal brings his bubbling cauldron of cooking tips to the boil and explains how to perform magic in our own kitchens. He'll disclose his carefully researched techniques, so that we too can cook like Heston. The next episode of 'How to Cook Like Heston' is on Wednesday 18th January at 20.00 on Channel 4.

Seasoned traveller and Radio 3 presenter, Lucy Duran, will be checking in to talk about visiting over fifty countries to record the local music of the world. Whether dodging bandits in Madagascar, or attending ear-splitting Greek weddings, Lucy's 'World Routes' programme has done it all in the name of preserving the world's musical cultures. New material recorded on location is now captured on the double album 'World Routes: On The Road'.

Emma Freud will be under the spell of hypnotist and bestselling author Paul McKenna, whose new book 'I Can Make You Smarter' claims to increase learning capacity and intelligence. Top marks for Emma then!

Ullo John, got a new motor? Comedian, author and rogue landlord in 'The Young Ones', Alexei Sayle will be talking to Clive about his return to stand-up, compering a special series of shows at London's Soho Theatre. Alexei is performing some brand-new material, as well as introducing his specially selected comedians from the circuit.

Music comes from 'Phantom Limb' who play 'Laugh Like You're Mad' from their new album 'The Pines'.

Former co-frontman and songwriter of experimental folkies Tunng, Sam Genders is currently drawing in a new audience with crisp, minimalist pop music with his next band 'Diagrams' who perform 'Tall Buildings' from the album 'Black Light'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b019dzpk)
Series 11

Episode 1

The return of the award-winning series in which writers create a fictional response to the week's news. Snoo Wilson begins the run with a topical drama inspired by a story making the headlines. The wife of a city financier, fed up with his cheating, decides on a tuneful revenge: a musical called 'Fat Cats'. But if his bonus goes, who's going to fund it?

Gloria...Tracy Wiles
Sneep...Stephen Critchlow
Tom...Orlando Seale
Pianist...Neil Brand

Produced by Peter Kavanagh.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b019dzpm)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests the writers Susan Jeffreys and Jim White and the writer and broadcaster John Tusa review the week's cultural highlights including the film Shame

Steve McQueen's film Shame stars Michael Fassbender as Brandon - a Manhattan businessman who appears to be in control of his life, but who has no control over his compulsive need for sex and pornography.

The Art of Fielding is Chad Harbach's first novel, set in the world of college baseball. A rising young star makes an entirely uncharacteristic error during a game, which has profound consequences for him and for many of those around him.

Michael Morpurgo's novel War Horse has already been adapted - very successfully - for the stage. Now Steven Spielberg has brought it to the big screen with a screenplay by Richard Curtis. Many horses were used - but none of them harmed - in the making of this film.

Just over twenty years ago John Keane was appointed official war artist for the first Gulf War. He has continued to deal with conflict in his paintings and his latest exhibition - Scratching the Surface, Joining the Dots - at Flowers Central in London includes images of Tony Blair's appearance at the Chilcot enquiry and protestors in Tahrir Square.

Cranford writer Heidi Thomas has adapted Jennifer Worth's best-selling novels about her experiences as a midwife in the 1950s for a new BBC drama series - Call The Midwife. It stars Jessica Raine as Jennifer, a young and inexperienced midwife who faces a steep learning curve when she arrives in the very unfamiliar world of London's East End.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b019dzpp)
Bertrand Russell: The First Media Academic?

Bertrand Russell was one of the greatest thinkers of the last century. His contributions to the field of mathematics and philosophy are still widely acknowledged as some of the most important of their kind. But, as Robin Ince discovers, he was also arguably one of the first great media academic stars, who brought his own brand of rationalism and intellect to an audience far beyond the academic and political circles he routinely mixed with. His relationship with the BBC goes back almost to the beginning of its own history, and his many broadcasts and appearances on radio, in particular, brought his ideas to a whole new audience. He delivered the very first Reith Lectures back in 1948, and was a regular panellist on the hugely popular "The Brains Trust". His thoughts on themes ranging from education, through to nuclear armament and religion, were regularly broadcast on the BBC, right up to the end of his life. Robin Ince takes a listen back to some of Russell's great contributions to broadcasting and looks at the life of arguably the first great media academic.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01946wd)
The Mumbai Chuzzlewits

Episode 2

By Ayeesha Menon

Sony award-winning writer Ayeesha Menon reworks Charles Dickens' Martin Chuzzlewit and sets it amongst the Catholic community in modern-day Mumbai, India.

Convinced his relatives are after his money, miserly old recluse Martin Chuzzlewit (Roshan Seth), adopts orphan girl, Mary (Nimrat Kaur), to be his carer. As she will inherit nothing upon his death, he believes she will do her utmost to keep him in good health. But when his grandson Mickey (Zafar Karachiwala) falls in love with her, Martin's plans are thrown into disarray. Disinheriting him, Martin triggers a complex web of deceit, betrayal and manipulation as the extended family and hangers-on close in, in pursuit of his fortune.

Told from the point of view of orphan Thomas (Karan Pandit), an observer into the world of the Chuzzlewits, this is a fast-paced drama full of intrigue, romance, suspense and murder...

Disinherited by his grandfather, Mickey Chuzzlewit escapes India and tries to make his fortune in Dubai. In his absence, the scheming Pinto and murderous Joseph join forces in an attempt to get hold of the old man's fortune. And while Thomas's feelings grow for Mickey's fiancé, Mary, a mysterious lodger with a terrible secret moves in next door ...

Ayeesha Menon is an award-winning writer who works extensively in film and radio. For BBC Radio 4 she has written several outstanding adaptations including: Q & A (Slumdog Millionaire) which won Gold for Best Drama at the Sony Radio Academy Awards; The Cairo Trilogy, starring Omar Sharif, which won a Bronze at the Sony Awards; My Nane Is Red from the novel by Orhan Pamuk; and Six Suspects from the novel by Vikas Swarup.

Cast:
Martin ..... Roshan Seth
Thomas ..... Karan Pandit
Mickey ..... Zafar Karachiwala
Pinto ..... Rajit Kapur
Mercy ..... Preetika Chawla
Charity ..... Ayeesha Menon
Anthony ..... Sohrab Ardeshir
Joseph ..... Nadir Khan
Mary ..... Nimrat Kaur
Mrs. Gomes ..... Radhika Mital
Louis ..... Rohit Malkani
Doctor ..... Shernaz Patel
Monty ..... Arghya Lahiri
Manek ..... Vivek Madan
Young Mickey ..... Zaal Madon
Young Thomas ..... Nominath Ginsburg

Sound Recordist: Ayush Ahuja
Sound Design: David Chilton
Music: Sacha Puttnam
Producer and Casting: Nadir Khan

Producer: John Dryden
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0196vk2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Decision Time (b0196rpp)
Nick Robinson returns with a new series of the programme that goes behind the closed doors of Whitehall and inside Westminster to explore how controversial decisions are reached. Each week, he asks people with senior experience of government and politics how a government, of whatever political colour, would approach a looming decision. Producer, Rob Shepherd.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b0194kky)
(9/17)
Which major battle took place at Drumossie Moor near Inverness? And if Shakespeare was known as the 'Swan of Avon', which writer was the 'Swan of Usk'?

Russell Davies puts these and many other questions to the competitors in today's ninth heat of the general knowledge quiz, each of them aiming for a place in the semi-finals and a further step towards the coveted title 'Brain of Britain 2012'. Today's contestants come from London, Stevenage and Edinburgh.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01946wj)
Winter, star-gazing and time

Roger McGough presents a selection of poetry about Winter, star-gazing and time, read by Pippa Haywood, Peter Marinker, Mark Meadows and Nadia Williams.

There are well-known works by Sheenagh Pugh and Alfred Tennyson contemplating the new year. Roger marks Stephen Hawking's 70th birthday with a poem by Robert Frost about the importance of telescopes.

Winter looms large, with poems by Longfellow, Edna St. Vincent Millay and Dana Gioia, but in contrast there are rays of sunshine from John Lyons.

Producer: Toby Field.



SUNDAY 15 JANUARY 2012

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b019dqdh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Brief Sparks (b019h1c3)
You Should Have Seen the Mess

Muriel Spark had one of the most distinctive voices in twentieth-century writing, was capable of incisive and darkly-comic observation, and won prizes for her writing across the World. Spark worked as a novelist, dramatist and children's author, but it is perhaps her short stories that best exemplify her sharp eye and beautifully-crafted work, where she coolly probes the idiosyncrasies that lurk beneath veneer of human respectability.

The three stories in this series include the darkly funny 'Ladies and Gentlemen', which contrasts well with the wry humour of social comedy 'The Snobs' and the sharp satire of class, aspiration and phobia in this vignette: 'You Should Have Seen the Mess', read by Jane Collingwood.

Here, Muriel Spark revels in the pettiness of the British psyche in an acerbic story of a girl who turns her back on life's opportunities for fear of a little dirt.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b019dqdk)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b019dqdm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b019dqdp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b019dqdr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b019f6j9)
The bells of St Thomas' Church, Oxford.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b0196rpr)
Series 2

Judith Clegg: Pay it Forward

Entrepreneur Judith Clegg argues that the special culture of technology start-ups could make the world a dramatically better place, if adopted more widely.

Even after a year of dramatic change, she believes we could do with some more - in sectors as varied as banking, government and energy companies.

The start-up culture of pay-it-forward, decent treatment of staff, enthusiasm and hard work is just what we need in every sector in these hard economic times, she says.

With a family background steeped in entrepreneurial spirit, and a career spent breathing life into start-ups, she now runs the Takeout consultancy, which helps big organisations learn lessons from the start-up community, and the Glasshouse, a meeting space for entrepreneurs, and is co-founder of a startup investment fund.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b019dqdt)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b019f6jc)
Starting Over

Ugandan born journalist and BBC World Service presenter Paul Bakibinga explores the idea of loss and how to get going again after a major life setback in Something Understood: Starting Over.

The programme includes an account of his own experience of losing a baby, and explores how others have managed to restart their lives after setbacks such as contracting HIV, and an account from an Asian family who managed to get going again after being thrown out of Uganda by Idi Amin. Paul Bakibinga explains how directly experiencing adversity has given him more empathy when covering death or disaster as a journalist.

It also features an interview with South African performance poet Malika Ndlovu who reads a moving extract from her journal, "Invisible Earthquake", which depicts her struggle to regain a sense of inner calm after her daughter was still-born.

An uplifting programme which begins in darkness with Mahler's "Songs on the Death of Children" and moves into the light - ending with the Ugandan Children's Choir singing "Siyahamba - We Are Marching In The Light of God".

The programme is presented by Paul Bakibinga.

Producer: Kim Normanton.
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b019f6jf)
It is an early start for Ian Cure, a farm vet from Lancashire. Alongside the routine appointments booked in at farms across the county, he has one ear listening out for the ring of his mobile phone for an emergency call. In this edition of 'On Your Farm' Caz Graham is shadowing him on a typical day.

As a young vet with a specialist farm practise, Ian is one of a decreasing number in the UK who only treat sheep,cows, pigs and horses. There are around 40 million large farm animals in the UK and it is part of the role of the farm vet to ensure their health and welfare.

His first job of the day is to carry out pregnancy tests on around 35 dairy cows using an ultra sound scanner in the farmyard. Then after he has scrubbed up, she is standing by as Ian sedates a cow for an operation to correct a potentially life threatening stomach problem.

This programme is presented by Caz Graham and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b019dqdw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b019dqdy)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b019f6jh)
The Archbishop of York Dr John Sentamu joins Edward to explain why the government is guilty of 'a moral failure' over its welfare reforms, and to talk about The Childrens Society report which claims half a million children are unhappy

The Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan stated this week that Syria is heading towards 'religious, sectarian and racial civil war'. Dr Thomas Pierrot joins Edward to discuss the relationship between state and religion in the country.

The American think-tank The Pew Forum has released a report into how Mormonism is viewed by people inside, and outside the religion. As Mitt Romney moves closer to the Republican Presidential nomination what does the survey say about his candidacy?

A church service on Sunday will celebrate the first anniversary of the founding of the Anglican Ordinariate. Gavin Drake looks back at its first year and investigates whether it has a future

Trevor Barnes has been in Israel and the West Bank with a delegation from the Catholic Church and begins his series of special reports from Nablus. He will also assess how the Arab Spring looks from the area with a special panel.

Two years ago The Revd James Gulley managed to crawl out of the rubble of the Haiti earthquake after being buried for 55 hours. He tells Edward his story and why he went back to the island to help rebuild it.

And the slowdown in vocations to religious orders has been a recurrent theme in recent years, some enclosed orders are reporting an increase in interest though. Ruth McDonald's been behind the doors of the Redemptorist convent in Dublin, to talk to some recent joiners

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b019f6jk)
Bishop Simeon Trust

Sir Michael Parkinson presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Bishop Simeon Trust.

Reg Charity: 1016122
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Bishop Simeon Trust
Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b019dqf0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b019dqf2)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b019f6jm)
from Morningside Baptist Church, Edinburgh. Led by Kay Cathcart; Preacher: Senior Pastor, Karl Martin.
Praise Band leader: Thomas Dean.
Music:
Be thou my vision
Bless the Lord O My Soul
Lord When I Remember
Amazing Grace
Counting on your name


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b0196vgy)
The Art of Gardening

The historian Lisa Jardine recalls the seventeenth century Lord Chancellor, and keen gardener, Sir Francis Bacon as she reflects on the art of gardening, as both pure human pleasure and a means of self advancement. "Perhaps the innocence and sustaining consolation of gardens is not quite such a simple matter after all. The shadow of political self-interest falls across the sweet-smelling flowerbeds and shady bowers too."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:57 Weather (b019dqf4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b019f6jp)
Paddy O'Connell presents news and conversation about the big stories of the week.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b019f6jr)
For synopsis, see daily episodes
Writer ..... Caroline Harrington
Director ..... Kim Greengrass
Editor ... Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Kathy Perks ..... Hedli Niklaus
Clarrie Grundy ..... Rosalind Adams
William Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Nic Grundy ..... Becky Wright
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Mike Tucker ..... Terry Molloy
Brenda Tucker ..... Amy Shindler
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Tracy Horrobin ..... Susie Riddell
Bert Horrobin ..... Martyn Read.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b019f6jt)
Paul Johnson

Kirsty Young's castaway is the writer and historian Paul Johnson.

He writes, he says, out of a desire to 'put things right' and more than fifty books and thousands of articles have flowed from his pen. His opinions have provoked, offended and enraged plenty of people over the years and sweeping works about modernity, morality, art and philosophy, sit alongside fiercely opinionated biographies and essays. He says: "I like to be, in general, in agreement with what most people think, but I also like to be a little bit independent and individual and, thank God, I've been allowed to do that all my writing life."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b0194kl6)
Series 8

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Tony Hawks, Alan Davies, Tom Wrigglesworth and John Finnemore are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Hamburgers, Pens, Snoring and Crocodiles.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b019f6jw)
London 2012, Coke and McDonalds

Food and the Olympics. Guest presenter John Inverdale looks ahead to London 2012 and explores the history of food and athletics from the first London Games of 1948.

Presenter: John Inverdale
Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b019dqf6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b019f6jy)
The latest national and international news with James Robbins, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 David Cameron's Big Idea (b019f6k0)
Episode 2

When David Cameron became the Conservative leader in 2005, he memorably declared "There is such a thing as society; it's just not the same as the state".

Steve Richards, of "The Independent", presents a three-part series telling the story behind that famous phrase, tracing David Cameron's vision of a reformed state and a Big Society from the early days of opposition to the reality of government.

From the early days of his leadership campaign, David Cameron and his advisers were working on bold ideas which they said would reshape the state, decentralise power and strengthen society. From 2009 onwards the phrase "The Big Society" was used to describe these ideas.

In the second episode, Steve follows the tricky journey of the Big Society idea through the 2010 election campaign, in which it played a pivotal role. He talks to critics who claim the theme contributed to the Conservative failure to secure a majority.

He explores the role the idea played in the formation of the coalition and traces the rollout of a bold reform package based on the Big Society vision. Many were surprised by the speed at which the fledgling coalition government rolled out radical reforms in education, health, local government and welfare. How was this possible? What was the role of the Liberal Democrats? And, what early signs emerged of trouble ahead?

Interviewees include the former No 10 Director of Policy, James O'Shaughnessy, and the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Danny Alexander.

Producer: Leala Padmanabhan.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0196v3s)
Birmingham

Anne Swithinbank, Bob Flowerdew and Matthew Wilson join gardeners in Birmingham for a horticultural Q&A. Eric Robson is the chair.

Guest presenter, Alys Fowler visits Garden Organic's Heritage Seed Library and Matthew Biggs sings out for his Plant of the Moment: Viburnum bodnantense 'Dawn'.

Questions addressed in the programme:
Is there a definitive difference between a plant and weed?
Can I put manure on my veg. plots at this time of year? Once the veg. are growing when can I feed them? How strict should my veg. rotation be?
Last year, I lost a willow tree to Honeyfungus. Are we safe now or do we have to wait to plant anything again?
What advice do you have for naturalising bulbs in a dark, shaded woodland.
My trumpet vine did very little the last 6yrs. Last year, however, there was lots of growth and it flowered non-stop since August. How should I best prune it?
Why do the hips on my Rugosa Roses shrivel and die before changing colour?
Sawfly have attacked our Berberis and Gooseberry shrubs. What to do?
Am I wasting my time planting a winter mix of green manure?
How can I heat my greenhouse without using electricity.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Welsh's Scottish Journey (b019f6k2)
Borders

In 1934 the Orcadian poet Edwin Muir embarked on his iconic 'Scottish Journey' a set of travels round depression-era Scotland where he tried to get to grips with Scottish identity and to consider what the future held for a country whose industries were being devastated by a recession

'. . . a silent clearance is going on in industrial Scotland, a clearance not of human beings, but of what they depend upon for life'

As a man very much of his time, of the 1930s, he wavered between socialism and nationalism as cures for Scotland's ills, but in-between reflected on the nature of work, poverty, Scottishness, tourism, the ideal way of living, the highland and the lowland character and the possible existence of a best of all possible worlds on his native Orkney.

In the summer of 2011, crime writer Louise Welsh decided to embark on a mini whistle-stop version of Muir's journey, taking to the roads in an open-top car, just as he did, and trying to get a flavour now of a country also in the grip of austerity and flirting with nationalism. How do people see things today when the big industries are gone and agriculture has to compete in a global economy? In the Scottish Borders, Louise speaks to journalist and writer Stuart Kelly and farmers Tom and Mary Douglas.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b019f6k4)
The Mumbai Chuzzlewits

Episode 3

By Ayeesha Menon

Convinced his relatives are after his money, miserly old recluse Martin Chuzzlewit (Roshan Seth), adopts orphan girl, Mary (Nimrat Kaur), to be his carer. As she will inherit nothing upon his death, he believes she will do her utmost to keep him in good health. But when his grandson Mickey (Zafar Karachiwala) falls in love with her, Martin's plans are thrown into disarray. Disinheriting him, Martin triggers a complex web of deceit, betrayal and manipulation as the extended family and hangers-on close in, in pursuit of his fortune.

Told from the point of view of orphan Thomas (Karqn Pandit), an observer into the world of the Chuzzlewits, this is a fast-paced drama full of intrigue, romance, suspense and murder...

Mickey returns to India determined to show his grandfather he is a changed man and to marry Mary, the love of his life. But, in his absence, things have changed; the old man now appears to be under the control of the scheming Pinto who will not let Mickey near him. And Thomas has fallen in love with Mary... Meanwhile the hapless Joseph loses all his money in a Ponzi scheme. With his debtors closing in, murder seems to be the only way out...

Ayeesha Menon is an award-winning writer who works extensively in film and radio. For BBC Radio 4 she has written several outstanding adaptations including: Q & A (Slumdog Millionaire) which won Gold for Best Drama at the Sony Radio Academy Awards; The Cairo Trilogy, starring Omar Sharif, which won a Bronze at the Sony Awards; My Name Is Red from the novel by Orhan Pamuk; and Six Suspects from the novel by Vikas Swarup.

Cast:
Martin ..... Roshan Seth
Thomas ..... Karan Pandit
Mickey ..... Zafar Karachiwala
Pinto ..... Rajit Kapur
Mercy ..... Preetika Chawla
Charity ..... Ayeesha Menon
Anthony ..... Sohrab Ardeshir
Joseph ..... Nadir Khan
Mary ..... Nimrat Kaur
Mrs. Gomes ..... Radhika Mital
Louis ..... Rohit Malkani
Doctor ..... Shernaz Patel
Monty ..... Arghya Lahiri
Manek ..... Vivek Madan
Young Mickey ..... Zaal Madon
Young Thomas ..... Nominath Ginsburg

Sound Recordist: Ayush Ahuja
Sound Design: David Chilton
Music: Sacha Puttnam
Producer and Casting: Nadir Khan

Producer: John Dryden
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b019lyhg)
Gillian Slovo on General Gordon and Empire

Gillian Slovo discusses her latest novel An Honourable Man, a retelling of the disastrous mission by Lord Wolseley to rescue Gordon of Khartoum in 1885. Set between the deserts of North Africa, Sudan and Victorian London, the story is told through the different viewpoints of its four main character; General Gordon, his young batman Will, the civilian surgeon John and his laudanum addicted wife Mary, and explores the impact of war and Empire.

Spartacus, immortalised in the Kubrick film starring Kurt Douglas, was a real man, sold into slavery to be a Gladiator and following his escape, leader of a huge rebel army that took on the might of Rome. Despite several impressive victories against his ancient foe, he was ultimately defeated and six thousand of the surviving fighters famously crucified along the Appian way into Rome. Ben Kane has now brought the Spartacus tale back to life in his latest historical fiction epic, Spartacus the Gladiator

Since they launched in 1995 Amazon have been at the forefront of our consumption of books via the internet. Last year in the States they made a move into the more traditional publishing arena, and as well as wooing self publishing authors, have started publishing books by more established writers across many genres, in both e-book and physical formats. It's an expansion that's set shivers of panic down the spines of many established publishing houses and agents. Philip Jones, Deputy Editor of the Bookseller discusses the impact on the UK market.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b019f6k6)
Roger McGough with poetry requests read by Catherine Cusack and Patrick Romer.The stillness of winter is set ablaze with poems by Tomas Tranströmer, W.B. Yeats and Moniza Alvi.

The hush of winter lingers for miles in Robert Frost's famous poem 'Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening'. Robin Robertson reads his poem about the rumbling power of a frozen lake, and there's another poem about the sounds of weather by Janet Frame. There are also plenty of colourful poetic interventions, with a poem of adolescent love in Gary Soto's 'Oranges', cockerels 'cleaving the darkness' in a poem by Edward Thomas, and a man wearing red shoes like volcanoes dances his way through the weekend.

Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 Dying Inside (b0194n0q)
The film-maker Rex Bloomstein has pioneered the prison television documentary from the award-winning series "Strangeways" in 1980, to the ground breaking programme "Lifer - Living with Murder" in 2003. He presents his first radio documentary on the growing phenomenon of older prisoners in our prisons and hears from those who face the prospect of dying inside.

This country has the largest prison population in Europe with around 88,000 inmates costing the tax payer on average £45000 per year per Prisoner. The fastest growing group within it are older prisoners, who number over 8000. This is largely due to sentences becoming harsher and longer. At present there is no national strategy to deal with this issue. Prisons cope as best they can. Inmates are classed as older prisoners from the age of 50 when they are more likely to suffer with diabetes or coronary heart disease or have problems with their mobility.

For the first ever broadcast programme on this subject on British radio or television, Bloomstein visited three prisons: HMP Maidstone, HMP Whatton and he was given exclusive access to the Elderly Lifer Unit at HMP Norwich, the first time in its history that anyone from media has been allowed in.

He discovered that one of the most extraordinary aspects of this story is that over 40% of older prisoners are men convicted of sexual offences. An increasing number of them committed their crimes many years ago but have been caught by advances in DNA techniques. At the heart of this documentary is the testimony of the prisoners themselves, some of whom have been in jail for many years, while others have been sentenced late in life after their pasts have caught up with them.

Bloomstein also spoke to prisoners with very serious health problems and who are facing the possibility of dying in prison.

The programme is presented by Rex Bloomstein

Producers: Rex Bloomstein & Simon Jacobs
A Unique Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b019dzpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b019dqfb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b019dqfd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b019dqfg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b019f6k8)
Martin Wainwright makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

Love was in the air on the radio this week- in the back streets of Derbyshire, on the last train from Charing Cross and even underwater in a pond. A fascinating range of prison visitors was also to be heard across the BBC network - from Johnny Cash to the Bishop of Liverpool, as well as a remarkable insight into what it's like to have Tourette's syndrome. Listen to all of this and more, on Pick of the Week.

Reasons To Be Cheerful - Radio 4
Start The Week - Radio 4
Dying Inside - Radio 4
Witness - World Service
The Bishop and the Prisoner - Radio 4
Erebus - Radio 4
London Soundscape - Radio 2
Isy Sittue - Pearl and Dave - Radio 4
Short Cuts - Radio 4
Nature - Radio 4
Andrew Peach - Radio Berkshire
Among The Managers - Radio 4
Today - Radio 4
Merzman - Radio 4
Tina C's Global Depression Tour - Radio 4

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Faith Lawrence.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b019f6kb)
Pip's identified potential new outlets for Hassett Hills. David is not convinced they'd profit by turning discarded fleeces into luxury items but is otherwise impressed with her research, and thinks her tutor will be too. Pip's eager to make it work in the real world. Her plan involves creating a celebrity lamb, with its own Facebook and Twitter pages. David offers to talk to Bill Oldfield, Hassett Hills' chairman, to suggest she presents her proposals at the next meeting.

Pip asks if they've decided on a new slurry tank. To afford it they'd have to make the cows pay, so Ruth's considering another look at the New Zealand system. The lower costs might balance the lower output. But it would mean expanding the herd, which would use more grazing. Pip's dismayed that then the sheep would probably have to go. David and Ruth insist nothing's settled yet

Brenda's chosen her favourite ready meals: spicy meatballs, lasagne, stir-fry and pork cobbler. Tom agrees. He's delivered business cards to Jaxx with both websites on them, ready for Farmhouse Breakfast Week. They should help spread the word. Tom reckons

Brenda's definitely earned her snowboarding birthday treat on Saturday. It's just a taster though. Once the business is back on its feet, he'll take her somewhere wonderful.


SUN 19:15 It's Your Round (b019f6kd)
Series 2

Episode 4

Four more panellists attempt to beat each other at their own games, with host, Angus Deayton.

Featured rounds:

Will Smith's "Jersey Quiz", all about the weird and wonderful world of his Channel Island birthplace.

Australian actress and comedian, Celia Pacquola's "Now That's Charity!" in which panellists must all pitch a charity which they would use to acquire enough funds to eradicate their personal bêtes noires, like men in flip-flops, Jennifer Aniston films, or people who constantly check their phones.

Jason Solomon's "Tagline Tease" in which panellists have to guess the tagline to a particular film.

Andrew Maxwell's "Boarder, boarder, boarder or boarder"... in which panellists are given a slang term and they have to guess whether it's from the world of snowboarding, surfboarding, clapper-boarding or boarding school.

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


SUN 19:45 A Dalmatian Trilogy (b019f6kg)
The Book of Complaints

Episode 3 (of 3): The Book of Complaints by James Hopkin
An Englishman takes refuge from his past life on the island of Korcula, where he meets an extraordinary silhouette cutter and learns about mysterious murmur-maids.

James Hopkin has lived and travelled widely in Europe, including time spent on the Dalmatian islands off the coast of Croatia. These three specially-commissioned stories explore the history and landscape of the area, as well as providing a colourful journey for the senses.

Hopkin gained a First Class honours degree in English and Philosophy in Manchester, then a Distinction in his MA on modern fiction, followed by a British Academy Award for his PhD. In September 2002, he won an Arts Council short story competition with 'Even the Crows Say Krakow'.

His novel Winter Under Water (2007) was an assured and critically-acclaimed debut marking the arrival of a major new writer. He published a small collection of stories in 2008, along with the paperback of Winter Under Water.

James Hopkin's A Georgian Trilogy, also produced by Sweet Talk, was broadcast in 2010.

Reader: Tom Goodman-Hill
Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b0196v3z)
High Speed 2 and Executive Pay

Tim Harford looks at the arguments for high speed rail with railway consultant Chris Stokes and Alison Munro from HS2 Ltd. He investigates the different measures of the rise in executive pay with Steve Tatton from Income Data Services and Sarah Wilson from research group Manifest. He resolves a four year-old bet on climate change between climate scientist James Annan and astrophysicist David Whitehouse and Wesley Stephenson looks behind the figures for youth unemployment in Spain.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b0196v3x)
Sir Robert Horton, Clive Robbins, Alexis Weissenberg, Sir Roger Jowell and Harry Fowler

Matthew Bannister on

The former BP chairman and chief executive Sir Robert Horton who was ousted in a boardroom coup and went on to run Railtrack

Clive Robbins, who teamed up with Paul Nordoff to create a powerful type of music therapy

Sir Roger Jowell - the statistician who measured changing attitudes in British society

The cockney actor Harry Fowler, who appeared in The Army Game and many Ealing comedies

And the Bulgarian born pianist Alexis Weissenberg - whose musical talent saved his life in a Nazi concentration camp.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b019dtlt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b019f6jk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b0196tn9)
All Together Now

In these tough times, are there better ways of doing business: worker cooperatives, for example?
In crisis-battered Spain, Peter Day visits the world's biggest worker coop in Mondragon, to find out what makes it different. And, in the UK where the cooperative movement began, will 2012, designated the year of the cooperative see the rise of the mutual business model?
Producer : Sandra Kanthal.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b019f6kj)
Carolyn Quinn talks to Paul Waugh of PoliticsHome.com about the week's big political stories.

Conservative MP Elizabeth Truss, Labour MP Willie Bain and SNP MP Stewart Hosie join our live panel. The debate the arguments over the proposed referendum on Scottish independence, the coalition's welfare reform plans and Labour's new strategy on spending cuts.

John Beesley reports on the referendums in 11 English cities on whether the local councils should be run by elected mayors. We hear the views of politicians in Coventry and Sheffield and from a leading expert on local government at the London School of Economics.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b019f6kl)
Episode 86

Iain Martin of The Telegraph analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories, in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b0196td8)
Francine Stock weighs up the week's two big releases -- Steven Spielberg's War Horse and Steve McQueen's Shame. Spielberg is already being tipped for an Oscar and McQueen has been gathering plaudits from all over the world for his film which features Carey Mulligan and Michael Fassbender in a study of sex addiction.

Producer: Zahid Warley.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b019f6jc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 16 JANUARY 2012

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b019dqg3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b0196rp1)
Cosmetic tourism - Debt 5,000 years

In Britain the market for cosmetic surgery is now estimated to be worth about £900 million per year, and world-wide it is growing fast too, with people increasingly combining surgery with a holiday abroad. The lines between a hospital procedure and a recuperative break are being blurred and Laurie hears of new research from Ruth Holiday exploring the experiences of people who have a face-lift in Costa Rica or liposuction in Koh Samui. Jacqueline Sanchez-Taylor tells him about her study of young British women who view breast augmentation as a beauty treatment, 18 women from one group of friends have all had the op and are very relaxed about the risks.
Also on the programme - being in the red is nothing new: David Graeber tells Laurie about his anthropological study of 5,000 years of Debt which shows that dispensing credit precedes even the invention of money.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b019f6j9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b019dqg5)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b019dqg7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b019dqg9)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b019dqgc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b019f89z)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4. With the Rev. Dr. Stephen Wigley.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b019f8b1)
Thousands of eggs from hens in illegal battery cages on UK farms could be getting into the food chain. DEFRA has said that eggs found to have come from around thirty farms which have not complied with the battery cage ban will be downgraded, so they can only be used in manufacturing. Terry Jones from the Food and Drink Federation tells Charlotte Smith that he's confident the major food processors, supermarkets, and caterers which have pledged not to use illegal eggs will be able to stick to their promise. He's not so confident about what he calls 'those less well scrutinised supply chains'. Also in the programme: the story behind the numbers which can decide how public money is spent on farm conservation. And, a new name in the veterinary dictionary: Schmallenberg Disease.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:57 Weather (b019dqgf)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b019f8b3)
Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day. Presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b019f8b5)
Financial Crisis: Philip Coggan, Angela Knight, Maurice Glasman and Detlev Schlichter

Andrew Marr looks for solutions to the current global crisis. Detlev Schlichter dismisses the practice of printing more money in times of recession, arguing that in the next decade our reliance on paper money will collapse, and he proposes a return to hard commodities, like gold. The historian Philip Coggan pits creditors against debtors, tax payers against public sector workers, and believes it's time for a new monetary system to emerge. The Labour peer, Lord Glasman thinks we need to change the relationship between parliament and the market. And Angela Knight sticks up for the bankers, insisting they hold the key to the crisis, so deserve both a bonus and a bit of respect.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b019f8b7)
El Narco

Episode 1

Written by Ioan Grillo. As a teenager in Brighton the author witnessed the rise of drug use in 1980s Britain. He also knew four young men who died of heroin overdoses. Twelve years ago he arrived in Mexico with ambitions to be 'a foreign correspondent in exotic climes'. But the most compelling story that demanded attention was the extraordinary and terrifying power of the drug cartels and the violent world of 'El Narco'.

It all begins with a simple flower on a hill. Asian opium poppies (as trafficked and traded by the British from India to China ) arrived in Mexico with Chinese labourers in the 1860s.

Read by Rupert Degas

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b019f8b9)
Academy Schools, Muslim marriage, Hermione Lee

As some schools say they're not being given a choice over becoming Academies, we hear from parents with different experiences at the schools they're involved with. How hardwired are human-beings to look on the bright side? One neuroscientist will argue that our brains have developed to ignore evidence that suggests the future might not be as rosy as we imagine. We hear why Muslim women who've been married in a religious ceremony are being urged to check whether they're legally married under the UK's civil law. Writer and academic Hermione Lee talks about the lasting appeal of American author Edith Wharton whose novel Ethan Frome is this week's Woman's Hour drama. Presented by Jane Garvey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b019f8bc)
Edith Wharton - Ethan Frome

Episode 1

Why does Ethan Frome walk with a limp? And what is the tragedy that befell him over twenty years earlier? A visitor to the town attempts to find out.

Ethan Frome ..... Dominic Mafham
Mattie .....Jessica Raine
Zeena .....Laurel Lefkow
Denis Eady ..... Christopher Webster
Post Mistress ..... Adjoa Andoh
Andrew Hale ..... Paul Moriarty
Edith Wharton ..... Fenella Woolgar

written by Edith Wharton
Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Directed by Sally Avens

Ethan Frome is one of Edith Wharton's most enduring and powerful stories.
Set against the cold, grey, bleakness of a New England winter. Ethan Frome scrapes a living from his woodlot whilst trapped in an unhappy marriage with his hypochondriac wife, Zeena. A ray of light enters Ethan's life when his wife's cousin Mattie arrives to help. His life is transformed as he falls in love with Mattie but their fate is determined by their circumstances and the stifling conventions of the time.

Ethan Frome was deemed shocking when first published as it appeared to condone infidelity. What many readers did not know was that many of the novella's themes mirrored real events in the life of Edith Wharton. Her own story is told in an accompanying play 'The Jinx Element' that explores her own sexless marriage and a passionate affair that begun when she was 47.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


MON 11:00 What's the Benefit? (b019f8bf)
Episode 1

Large sections of the unemployed population have been accused of feigning disability and illness, they've been labelled as greedy and lazy, preferring to live off generous state benefits rather than contribute to society. It's this 'Shameless' generation that coalition government changes to the benefits system aim to hit hard.

In a two-part documentary Tom Heap aims to get behind the tabloid headlines, meeting today's unemployed and the companies, government agencies and charities charged with getting them back to work.


MON 11:30 Party (b011vg9k)
Series 2

Prison Ain't All That Bad

The student politicians of the new political Party use prison-based TV shows as inspiration for forming their policy on crime and punishment.

Second series of Tom Basden's satirical comedy.

Simon ..... Tom Basden
Duncan ..... Tim Key
Jared ..... Jonny Sweet
Mel ..... Ann Crilly
Phoebe ..... Katy Wix

Producer: Julia McKenzie

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b019f8bh)
Nursery School Food and Dragons' Den Websites

Nutritional therapists are providing an expensive service that may not be beneficial and, in some cases, could seriously harm patients' health, according to a Which investigation. Julian Worricker hears from BANT, the body for nutritional therapists.

New government guidelines on what nurseries and child minders should be feeding toddlers and the wave of crowdsourcing websites that offer entrepreneurs an alternative to the high street banks and let you become an online investment dragon.

And is the customer NOT always right? Are we unreasonably assertive in the way we treat retail staff?

The presenter is Julian Worricker. The producer is Paul Waters.


MON 12:57 Weather (b019dqgh)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b019f8bk)
Martha Kearney presents the national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 15 by 15 (b010t3jt)
Series 1

Mattress

What's in a word? Where did it come from? Where does it lead? In a new series of five programmes Hardeep Singh Kohli chooses a word and sees where it leads him.

In 15 minutes he expects to learn 15 things he didn't know before. His journey takes him to lexicographer Susie Dent, who knows about words and can tell him where the word first appeared in the English language. From there he sets off in different directions, meeting people who in different ways are connected to that programme's word.

Each programme is devoted to one word, and over the five programmes Hardeep encounters 'mattress', 'stroke', 'heel', 'spin' and 'trifle'.

In the first programme 'Mattress', Hardeep meets Gerry, who's buying a mattress at an open air stall in a market, Lauren Child, adaptor and illustrator of 'The Princess and the Pea', David Cain who exterminates bedbugs, and opera singer Julie Unwin who falls on one from a height.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b019f6kb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b019ly12)
Mel Hudson - What to Do If Your Husband May Leave

Mel Hudson stars in her surreal comedy about a woman facing a marital breakdown.

After 22 years of marriage and three children, Mel discovers that her husband Dick is having an affair. She turns for support and solutions to all the usual sources- friends, the NHS, homeopathy, spiritual healing, wine. All are rubbish. Desperate and paranoid, Mel attempts to track down the mistress and events become increasingly more bizarre.

Cast:

Mel - Mel Hudson
Dick / Daan - Richard Laing
Katinka / Auntie Gwen - Mia Soteriou
Dr Bryant - Laura Shavin
Nicky / Big Bird - Kate O'Sullivan
Librarian - Amy Clifton
Joe - Gabriel Kelly

Director - Alison Crawford.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b019f8bp)
(10/17)

The canvas entitled 'Nude Descending A Staircase', first exhibited in 1912, was the first major success of which artist?

Russell Davies puts this and many other questions to the competitors in the tenth heat of the 2012 contest. This week's programme comes from the BBC's new Salford studios, with quiz enthusiasts from Cheshire, the West Midlands and Edinburgh bidding for a semi-final place.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b019f6jw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 I'm Rather Worried about Jim (b019f8br)
In 1948 BBC Radio's Light Programme broadcast the first episode of Mrs Dale's Diary - a radio drama serial centred around the daily diary of a doctor's wife called Mary, her husband Jim, (who provided the show with its unlikely catchphrase, "I'm rather worried about Jim") and their children, Bob and Gwen. For the following twenty one years, and over 5531 episodes - more than 6 million listeners tuned in every day between 11 and 11.15 to hear the everyday affairs of this much loved family.

Penelope Keith - was herself a huge fan. She talks to original cast members and directors of the show - to discover what made it such a phenomenon and why its legacy lives on today. She reveals the magic ingredients that made it so popular, how the story lines reflected what was really going on in society, and what happened when the original Mrs Dale played by Ellis Powell - was suddenly replaced by the international actress and film star, Jessie Matthews.

"I'm Rather Worried about Jim" is a fascinating and amusing look at a once much cherished English institution.

Presenter: Penelope Keith

Producer: Angela Hind
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b019f8bt)
Protestant Work Ethic

Today's crisis in the global financial markets has produced much soul searching about the culture of greed which seems to permeate our society. At the beginning of the last century the German sociologist, Max Weber, proposed that there was a direct link between the Protestant Reformation and the rise in capitalism. And specifically, that hard work, combined with a moral attitude towards wealth, was directly linked to salvation. So is the loss of religious faith across the West linked to the current crisis in capitalism?
Joining Ernie Rea to discuss the Protestant Work Ethic are Lord Andrew Mawson, social entrepreneur, cross bench peer & minister in the United Reformed Church; Professor Sam Whimster, Fellow in the Centre for Advanced Study at the University of Bonn, and Jonathan Wittenberg, Rabbi of New North London Synagogue.


MON 17:00 PM (b019f8bw)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b019dqgk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b019f8by)
Series 8

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Lee Mack, Jack Dee, Rufus Hound and Graeme Garden are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Nuts, Boy Scouts, The Circus and Florence Nightingale.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b019f8c0)
Brian's frustrated that his internet access is down. Jennifer tries to keep him calm but it's a real pain when he's got so much fire-fighting to do. With time on his hands, he goes to see how William's doing, and is really impressed.

The new packaging for Ambridge Organics has arrived. Tom and Helen agree it looks great. Tom loads the images onto the new website and he's delighted that an internet search no longer brings up E coli - at least not until page six of the results. Things are definitely on the up. He's even had a text out of the blue from a wholesaler in Felpersham who wants to meet him next week.

The broadband is down at Grey Gables and it's causing chaos. Caroline needs Oliver's help on the desk and Ian deals with manual food orders in the kitchen, while struggling to get hold of suppliers by phone. Caroline's horrified to learn the phones are down all through the village, and the problem is serious. Thieves have stolen a length of copper cable between the exchange and Ambridge, which could take several days to sort. It feels like weeks already to Caroline. What are they going to do?


MON 19:15 Front Row (b019f9cc)
Leonardo DiCaprio in Clint Eastwood's J. Edgar. TS Eliot Prize

With John Wilson.

Clint Eastwood's new film as a director focuses on J Edgar Hoover, the first head of the FBI. Leonardo DiCaprio takes the title role in J Edgar, which shows Hoover at various stages of his controversial career. Jonathan Freedland reviews.

Lord Smith discusses his review of the British film industry, A Future for British Film, published today. It offers 56 recommendations, including a British Film week, funding from TV companies and audience testing for new film releases. Director Roger Michell, whose films include Notting Hill and Venus, offers his perspective.

Front Row announces and talks to the winner of the 2012 T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, announced this evening. Now in its 19th year, the prize offers £15,000 for the best collection of poetry, as chosen by a judging panel who are themselves poets.

Michael Kiwanuka has won the BBC's Sound of 2012 poll, an accolade previously awarded to Jessie J and Adele. The singer-songwriter reveals how he discovered his sound and why he grew up in a house with very little music.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b019f8bc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Bishop and the Prisoner (b019h3xs)
Episode 3

In this three part series the BBC is given a rare degree of access to prisons as it accompanies The Rt Revd James Jones, the Church of England's "Bishop for prisons," into the country's jails. Conversations with prisoners and ex-offenders- voices rarely heard on radio - are the centrepieces of these programmes, but the Bishop also talks to prison staff, politicians and opinion-formers about what prison should be for, how prisoners can be helped to become useful citizens and whether community sentences can ever win the public's confidence as a viable alternative to prison.

In the final programme, James Jones meets ex-offenders taking part in a variety of probation initiatives in Merseyside designed to cut re-offending and "pay back" the community for crimes committed. Three men on the Persistent Priority Offender scheme commend the programme for providing the supervision they found lacking on earlier probation orders. In a moving interview a mentor with the service, Lynsey, says probation saved her from prison, crime and alcoholism and her children from life in care. The Bishop visits the North Liverpool Justice Centre, a kind of one-stop-Justice shop which residents say has transformed their community but which the Government considers too expensive to replicate elsewhere.

This programme was first broadcast on January 16th 2012.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b0196tcw)
What happened to the Kurdish spring?

Twenty years ago, the Kurdish region in Northern Iraq achieved effective autonomy after the first Gulf War, establishing a liberal constitution and a democratic assembly. The region is booming economically, thanks to its huge oil reserves.
But things are not that simple on the ground. In February, there were protests in the city of Sulaimaniya against corruption and the dominance of the two parties which govern the region. The demonstration was violently suppressed, resulting in the deaths of several activists. Some Kurds believe that the generation of peshmerga guerillas who fought for autonomy in the 1980s and 1990s are now blocking more openness and democracy. Yet even critics concede that the Kurds have achieved far greater stability and security than the rest of Iraq.
Gabriel Gatehouse asks if the Kurdish region should be a model for the rest of the Middle East to follow or avoid?
Producer: Natalie Morton.


MON 21:00 Material World (b0194kz4)
This week, as Education Secretary Michael Gove calls for better computer science in schools, Quentin looks at how cheap or open source software and hardware could help. Seeing the invisible: the most detailed map of dark matter in the universe has been unveiled at this weeks' meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Royal Horticultural Society reveals its list of the worst garden pests of 2011. And Adam Rutherford samples horrible sounds with So You Want To Be A Scientist finalist Izzy Thomlinson.

Producer: Martin Redfern, Victoria Kent.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b019f8b5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b019dqgm)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b019h3xv)
Pakistan's political crisis deepens - who is in charge?

Nick Clegg calls for 'John Lewis economy' - but can their model of employee ownership be copied elsewhere?

How much responsibility do captains of modern cruise liners have?

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b019fxb9)
My Dear I Wanted to Tell You

Flanders, 1914

Louisa Young's story explores the impact of unthinkable changes on five young people during the First World War. Many of the old certainties about class and women's roles are being swept away, but new and terrifying challenges are appearing. Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths and read by Olivia Colman.

Episode 1 : Flanders, 1914

It's 1914. Riley Purefoy, a North London working-class boy, arrives in Flanders and gets his first taste of the war. Having been cold-shouldered by the mother of the girl he loves - a girl from a very different social background - he feels he has nothing to lose. At the front, Riley learns some hard lessons about the war, but his ability with the men is rewarded with promotion.

Produced by Christine Hall.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b0194mw1)
Stories from other cultures

Michael Rosen listens to traditional stories from other countries, including Uganda, Pakistan, Trinidad, Poland and India, told by people from those cultures who learned them from their parents and are now passing them on by word of mouth to the next generation. He finds out about the changes that happen when stories move across countries and languages with those who remember and tell them.

And he visits a junior school to find out how a pioneering translation project is encouraging bilingual children to share the stories they've inherited from their families and translate them into English.

Contributors include Monica Byanjeru Chalmers, Faustin Charles and Sita Brand.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b019h3xx)
Michael Gove denies suggesting taxpayers' money should be spent on a yacht for the Queen to celebrate her diamond jubilee.
The Shadow Education Secretary, Stephen Twigg, challenges the Education Secretary's call for a ship to be commissioned to mark the Queen's 60 years on the throne.
MPs debate proposals which could see individuals given responsibility for putting themselves on the electoral register.
On the committee corridor, the Justice Secretary and the Culture Secretary give evidence on the use of privacy injunctions.
While in the Lords, peers press ministers over the impact of allowing grammar schools to expand their pupil intake.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 17 JANUARY 2012

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b019dqh6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b019f8b7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b019dqh8)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b019dqhb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b019dqhd)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b019dqhg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b019p3xd)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4. With the Rev. Dr. Stephen Wigley.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b019f9h3)
British egg farmers are furious that some of their colleagues have not converted to enriched egg cages in time for new EU regulations. At least 150,000 UK hens are still being kept in battery cages despite a ban which started on the 1 January 2012. Anna Hill speaks with Chairman of the National Farmers Union's Poultry Board, Charles Bourne. He says that within two weeks all the illegal cages will be removed from the UK. Norfolk egg farmer Heath Brooks thinks that those who have not complied in time should be named and shamed.

Also, Anna counts wild birds along the River Waveney with Steve Piotrowski from the Suffolk Wildlife Trust. Guy Smith is an Essex farmer. He thinks that the RSPB's surveys of birds can be misleading. Dr Mark Eaton from the RSPB believes that their surveys give an accurate representation of which birds need to be protected.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


TUE 06:00 Today (b019f9h5)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague, discussing the Welfare Reform Bill (08:20), the psychology of people caught up in disasters (07:40) and the leader of the Unite union's criticism of Ed Miliband (08:30).


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b019f9h7)
The Stephen Lawrence Case

Jonathan Freedland takes the long view of the Stephen Lawrence case, comparing it with the racist murder of Kelso Cochrane in Notting Hill in 1959.

The fatal stabbing of Kelso Cochrane in West London in 1959 sparked outrage among the local community. Police denied that the attack was racist and their investigation failed to catch Kelso's killers - even though their identity was an open secret on the streets of Notting Hill. The case bears striking similarities to the murder of Stephen Lawrence three decades later.

Jonathan draws lessons from the Lawrence and Cochrane murders with a panel including former Home Secretary Jack Straw who set up the Macpherson Inquiry, Colin Prescod of the Institute of Race Relations, the Lawrences' former MP Sir Peter Bottomley and Superintendent Leroy Logan of the Black Police Officers' Association.

The story of the Cochrane case is told by Mark Olden, author of the book 'Murder in Notting Hill' and readings are provided by Josette Simon, the voice of Doreen Lawrence on Radio 4's 'Book of the Week'.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.
Image: London, 1959. The funeral of West Indian Kelso Cochrane became a mass demonstration against racism in Notting Hill.


TUE 09:30 Musical Migrants (b015zqv7)
Series 3

Milan

Five portraits of people who relocated to other countries, influenced by music.

Pedro Carrillo is from Venezuela. He fell in love with Italian opera when he was five years old and heard a recording of Verdi's Rigoletto playing in his father's study.

When he grew up, Pedro fulfilled his childhood ambition and began singing regularly in the main theatre of Caracas. However, not long into his career, the political regime in Venezuela encroached on the nation's cultural life and Pedro, who had not hidden his anti-government views, found himself blacklisted. For three years - "three terrible years" - he was unable to work as a singer. He grew depressed. His voice suffered. He thought about giving up.

Eventually, despite many misgivings and his love for his homeland, he decided to emigrate. He moved, with his wife Victoria, to Milan - the city of La Scala and of Verdi. There, in the birthplace of opera, he had to start again and rebuild his career from zero.

Producer: Rachel Hopkin
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01b3gjy)
El Narco

Episode 2

Written by Ioan Grillo.

Mexican Chinese traffickers cash in on America's illegal opium market and the mountain farmers of the Sierra Madre begin to find a way out of poverty.

As a teenager in Brighton the author witnessed the rise of drug use in 1980s Britain. He also knew four young men who died of heroin overdoses. Twelve years ago he arrived in Mexico with ambitions to be 'a foreign correspondent in exotic climes'. But the most compelling story that demanded attention was the extraordinary and terrifying power of the drug cartels and the violent world of 'El Narco'.

Read by Rupert Degas

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b019f9h9)
The human cost of the funding crisis within social care. Why "women and children first"? Should the Victorian notion of prioritising women and children in disaster situations be upheld? Avastin could be used to treat ovarian cancer. Anna Calvi sings live in the studio. And, how to wear pastels this Spring. Presented by Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b019f9hc)
Edith Wharton - Ethan Frome

Episode 2

Zeena goes away to visit a Doctor and Ethan and Mattie are left alone together for the first time.

Ethan Frome ..... Dominic Mafham
Mattie ..... Jessica Raine
Zeena ..... Laurel Lefkow
Andrew Hale ..... Paul Moriarty
Edith Wharton ..... Fenella Woolgar

written by Edith Wharton
Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Directed by Sally Avens

Ethan Frome is one of Edith Wharton's most enduring and powerful stories. Set against the cold, grey, bleakness of a New England winter. Ethan Frome scrapes a living from his woodlot whilst trapped in an unhappy marriage with his hypochondriac wife, Zeena. A ray of light enters Ethan's life when his wife's cousin Mattie arrives to help. His life is transformed as he falls in love with Mattie but their fate is determined by their circumstances and the stifling conventions of the time.

Ethan Frome was deemed shocking when first published as it appeared to condone infidelity. What many readers did not know was that many of the novella's themes mirrored real events in the life of Edith Wharton. Her own story is told in an accompanying play 'The Jinx Element' which explores her own sexless marriage and a passionate affair that begun when she was 47.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


TUE 11:00 Nature (b019f9hf)
Series 5

The Ghost Roost

Over ten years ago before the West Pier in Brighton was destroyed by storms and fire, wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson and sound designer Thor McIntyre Burnie were given permission to rig up microphones in what had once been the grand concert hall. During the day, the pier was a dangerous place to venture, but on a winter's night, as dusk fell, and the sea glowed red, it was transformed into a magical scene as tens of thousands of starlings gathered in the air above, performing their aerial acrobatics (murmurations) before descending onto the pier to roost for the night. The starlings roosted in what remained of the concert hall, and it was the sounds of these birds gathered in their night roost, which Chris and Thor wanted to capture - from dusk until dawn, when the birds departed once again on their feeding trips.

It was no easy task rigging up the concert hall with microphones. "When the wind blew" Chris said, "chunks literally fell off and were tossed into the sea like autumn leaves". They rigged up an array of different microphones as they wanted to capture both the sense of space; the atmosphere of the concert hall, as well as close up sounds of the birds themselves. As dusk approached the first birds arrived over the pier. In time, they descended into the concert hall, and an extraordinary performance began; the sounds of tens of thousands of performers gathered together. Today the West Pier no longer exists except for some skeletal fragments. The starlings have passed into history, but what's left are the recordings. They are the recordings of a Ghost Roost.
NATURE recreates this performance with 'programme notes' about the performers and the venue.

Producer Sarah Blunt.


TUE 11:30 The Print Master (b019fwvx)
What do Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Elisabeth Frink, Paula Rego, David Hockney and Man Ray have in common? They have all worked with legendary print maker, Stanley Jones. Susan Aldworth takes the chance to be his apprentice, to hear his tales, and learn his skills.
In the 1950's the printmaking skill-base in the UK had almost completely disappeared until W S Hayter - founder of the legendary Atelier 17 studio in Paris - persuaded a talented young artist from Wigan to study the art of lithography, a skill which had been lost in the UK since the time of Whistler.
On his return to Britain, Stanley Jones spearheaded a rapid expansion in British Printmaking - today he is revered in artistic circles as one of the greatest print makers alive. Now in his 70s Stanley Jones's clients read like a roll-call of the 20th century's great British artists.

Artist Susan Aldworth was invited to be Artist in Residence at the Curwen Studio, which Stanley was involved in setting up in the 1950's - the Tate Gallery has a special archive devoted to the studio's work. In 'The Print Master', we join them amongst the thundering and clanking machinery of the print works, now near Cambridge, as Stanley initiates Susan in the art of lithography, hearing tales of artists he has worked with over the past 50 years. And what artists!

Today lithography is under threat as increasing numbers of Art Schools have disposed of their lithography presses and there are few technicians who fully understand the process. This is a unique chance to work with the world expert in this discipline, and for the listener to discover more about this art.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b019fwvz)
Remaking the Self. The growth of cosmetic surgery

From Botox parties to breast augmentations or Brazilian bum lifts, millions of men and women now think it's the norm to reshape their bodies through cosmetic surgery. Though the risks associated with what is a booming industry have been highlighted in recent weeks by the French breast implant scandal.

The proportion of teens who would consider having cosmetic surgery has risen sharply. But the biggest increase has been in gynaecomastia or 'man boob' ops -now the second most common procedure among males.

Until the 1990s, there was a veil of secrecy around cosmetic procedures but in our 21st century world, you can fly to somewhere in the world for a cut-price breast job, have a cosmetic surgical full-body makeover on reality TV, or curl up in front of an extreme makeover series.

What happened in between? How did practices until recently seen as shameful, unethical, even taboo, become so normal?

So has cosmetic surgery now been normalised?

We'd like to hear from you if you've had aesthetic surgery in the past? Why did you decide to, and what's been the result..both physically and psychologically? If you work in the field of cosmetic surgery, what sort of advice are you offering to patients? And what's your view of the changing attitudes towards cosmetic surgery? What's driving the increase in the number of people opting for it?

Call on 03700 100 400 or you can e-mail via bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours OR TEXT US on 84844 and we might call you back. .


TUE 12:57 Weather (b019dqhj)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b019fx9j)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 15 by 15 (b010xy3q)
Series 1

Trifle

What's in a word? Where did it come from? Where does it lead? In a new series of five programmes Hardeep Singh Kohli chooses a word and sees where it leads him. In 15 minutes he expects to learn 15 things he didn't know before.

In the second programme 'Trifle', Hardeep meets head pastry chef Jocky Petrie who went on a mission to make the perfect trifle, Shakespeare scholar Luke Healy, and remembers the inimitable TV cook Fanny Cradock.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b019f8c0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b019fx9l)
Birkett

Birkett and the Red Stains on the Carpet

By Caroline and David Stafford.
3/4
Norman Birkett, the most celebrated advocate of the inter-war years, defends a doctor accused of murdering and dismembering his wife and maid.

Norman Birkett.....Neil Dudgeon
Billie.....Bonnie Engstrom
Edgar.....Alun Raglan
Jackson.....Adam Billington
Buck Ruxton.....Sagar Arya
Shaw.....Gerard McDermott
Glaister.....James Lailey
Bennett.....Rikki Lawton
Alfred.....Christopher Webster
Susan/Gracie.....Victoria Inez Hardy
Mary.....Alex Rivers.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b019fx9n)
Series 1

Divided We Stand

A selection of brief encounters, true stories and found sound find a home in this new series for BBC Radio 4. Nina Garthwaite, the founder of the public listening phenomenon 'In the Dark', presents a showcase for delightful and adventurous short documentaries.

In the second edition of this series, 'Divided we Stand', we hear stories of separation - political, personal and playful. From the story of a singing airman in World War Two, and his feelings about the class divide to a classic tale of unrequited love between an animated cat and mouse, Ignatz and Krazy Kat. We eavesdrop on a breakdown of communication between a Nigerian woman and an Irishman and listen to the lilting musicality of a litany of peace walls and separation barriers from around the world.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Questions, Questions (b013852h)
Stewart Henderson presents another sparkling series of Questions Questions - the programme which offers answers to those intriguing questions of everyday life, inspired by current events and popular culture.

Each programme is compiled directly from the well-informed and inquisitive Radio 4 audience, who bring their unrivalled collective brain to bear on these puzzlers every week.

In this week's programme Stewart looks into why the swallow sometimes flies high and sometimes low - and does its choice of altitude really predict the weather? Questions about jewellery made of hair are answered by a Swedish hair jewellery expert and a listener has their query about the strange phenomenon of 'green eye' when photographing pets answered. And, guaranteed to start you scratching, Stewart finds out about new developments to see off nits with lethal efficiency.

Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b019fx9q)
Public speaking, show & tell

Michael Rosen explores the new wave of public-speaking events including Ignite and TED, and asks if the culture of 'Show & Tell' in American classrooms produces better public speakers.

He visits the American Museum in Britain and speaks to their Head of Learning, Laura Brown about what's influenced the nation's approach to public speaking, and how a sense of optimism drives their passion to share ideas.

He also speaks to Chris Anderson about how he attracted such big names to speak at the TED events, and how it's grown into a global community of public speaking. Plus there's an interview with Amanda Timberg from TeachFirst about the way 'Show and Tell', 'Hot Seat' and TED talks all feed into their working practises.

Ignite has been described as a "gig for speakers" and event organiser Andy Kervell describes the challenges of both putting together a five minute talk backed by twenty slides, and then delivering it to a rowdy and excitable crowd. Some of the speakers including Sky at Night presenter Dr. Chris Lintott explain why they enjoy taking part in these events.

Producer: Toby Field.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b019fx9s)
Series 26

Gracie Allen

Matthew Parris is joined by the actress Emma Kennedy to explore the life of the American comedienne Gracie Allen. George Burns and Gracie Allen were a hugely successful stage act who went on to conquer the new media of radio and television. But, unusually for the time, it was Gracie who was getting all the laughs, whilst George played the straight man. For actress and comic Emma Kennedy, Gracie was a pioneering female comic who, with her energy, wit and "illogical logic", paved the way for the likes of Lucille Ball and Roseanne Barr. Professor Brian Ward provides the expert analysis.


TUE 17:00 PM (b019fx9v)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b019dqhl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Mr and Mrs Smith (b01bgp22)
Pilot Episode - The Anniversary

A weekend break to celebrate their anniversary ends in disaster for Will and Annabelle. Will's terrible anniversary present is the last straw so Annabelle signs them up for marriage counselling.

Guy mediates between Will and Annabelle, with flashbacks to the events that spawned the argument. By the end, the couple find marital equilibrium once more. Sort of.

A repeat of the pilot episode from last year, ahead of the new series which begins next week. Sitcom by Will smith.

EPISODE CAST DETAILS:

Will Smith ..... Will Smith
Annabelle Smith ..... Sarah Hadland
Guy, Darryl ..... Paterson Joseph
John, TV repairman ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Receptionist, Sally ..... Morwenna Banks

Written by ..... Will Smith
Produced by ..... Tilusha Ghelani

ABOUT THE SERIES

The writer and comedian Will Smith leads the starry cast of Mr and Mrs.Smith. Sarah Hadland (Miranda, The Mitchell and Webb Look, Moving Wallpaper) stars as Will's wife Annabelle. Paterson Joseph (Peep Show, Survivors, Green Wing) plays Counsellor Guy. The series also includes Geoffrey whitehead (Reggie Perrin, Worst Week of My Life) , Susie Blake (Coronation Street; Victoria Wood as Seen on TV) and Morwenna Banks (Absolutely; Skins; Saxondale).

Will's writing credits include Armstrong and Miller (BBC1), Harry and Paul (BBC1), Moving Wallpaper (ITV1), Time Trumpet (BBC2), the multi-award winning The Thick Of It (BBC2) in which he also appears as Phil Smith, and the upcoming Veep (HBO).


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b019fx9x)
Caroline wishes she knew what she'd done with her old manual credit card readers. Oliver agrees they would be useful but he can't find them either. He's worried that Caroline's stressing and insists she gets out of Grey Gables for a while. He suggests she goes to buy the vegetables that Ian needs.

Caroline bumps into Ruth, who tells her that Elizabeth is on a different exchange at Lower Loxley, so she's fine. And she's offering complimentary coffee in the Orangery so everyone's arriving with their laptops. She's doing a roaring trade.

Jim's working in the Community Shop and tells Ruth it's been quite distressing for some people. They've not been able to pay out pensions. Christine has just seen Mr Pullen, who's worried about not being on the phone, especially as his personal alarm isn't working either. Christine's sure there must be something they can do to help elderly people in his position.

Neil appreciates Christopher's help with the renovations at 6, The Green, especially with Gary being worse than useless. Jim talks to Neil about setting up a rota to check on anyone who might be feeling vulnerable because of the phones. Christopher suggests rounding up some spare mobiles. He and Alice will happily show people how to make a simple call.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b019fx9z)
William Boyd on David Hockney, and new film Haywire

With Mark Lawson.

Novelist William Boyd gives his response to a major new exhibition of landscape paintings by David Hockney, and also re-assesses the film A Bigger Splash, made in the early 1970s, which focuses on Hockney and his circle of friends at the time.

In Steven Soderbergh's new film Haywire a black ops soldier seeks payback after she is betrayed and set up during a mission. Gaylene Gould reviews the film, whose cast includes Gina Carano, Ewan McGregor and Michael Fassbender .

Carolina Chocolate Drops are an African-American string band, using the fiddle, banjo and jug to revive often-overlooked folk music from the Piedmont region of the American south. They discuss how they rediscover old tunes, and their approach to tradition.

And in a new comic film The Sitter, Jonah Hill plays a student who is coaxed into babysitting the kids next door. Film critic Mark Eccleston considers what movies tell us about choosing the right babysitter, from Three Men and a Baby to Halloween.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b019f9hc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Three Generations of Incarceration (b019fxb1)
Gary Younge travels to Los Angeles to hear the story of one family who has had three generations pass through America's criminal justice system. The United States is the world's leader in incarceration with 2.3 million people currently in the nation's prisons or jails, and the Gamble family is just one family in that story. Jeffrey Gamble's father spent time in jail, his brother's Ricky and Mike are set to be in prison for the rest of their lives whilst his son Khalif has spent time inside too. But why has this cyclical quality of family history stretched back three generations. What has caused it, what could have been done to stop it, and will it continue?

If it was not for one decisive moment in Jeffrey Gamble's life he believes he would either be dead or in prison for the rest of his life. In their own words the family reflect on what might have gone wrong since they moved to Los Angeles from Hope, Arkansas in the late 1960s. They all have differing versions but what becomes clear is that once you become a felon your chances of finding employment, housing and a new life are drastically diminished. What should be done to improve their chances? Is rehabilitation rather than punitive justice the answer and what will stop the same family members passing through the same prison doors?

Producer: Barney Rowntree
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b019fxb3)
The Lords debate the welfare reform bill - 17/01/2012

Around 20,000 blind and partially sighted people stand to lose benefits under government changes to Disability Living Allowance as part of the welfare reform bill.

The coalition proposes to replace DLA with a new personal independence payment, and cut spending by 20%.

A Lords amendment aims to force the government to introduce a pilot scheme before any new assessment regime is introduced. What impact would this have and what other amendments are tabled?

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Steven Williams.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b019fxb5)
Health bill, Memory, Resuscitation, Flu

The programme that uncovers the real stories behind the health headlines, providing clarity where there's confusion.

First, a subject that looks set to be in the headlines this week - growing disquiet about the Health and Social Care Bill and changes to the NHS which include the transfer of responsibility and resources to GPs.

Many health experts simply don't understand the reforms, including international public health expert Professor Martin McKee who confesses in this week's British Medical Journal that he doesn't get it either. So what chance is there for the rest of us?

It's not just bewilderment that's likely to hinder the implementation of the new Bill. There's active resistance from both hospital consultants and GPs. But what are the reforms going to mean for you? Dr Clare Gerada, the Chair of the Royal College of GPs, discusses this question with Mark.

Mark Porter puts his mental agility to the test at the Research Institute for the Care of the Elderly in Bath to find out whether there's any truth behind recent headlines suggesting that our cognitive abilities start to decline from forty five. Professor Roy Jones tells Mark the results of his memory test.

And GP Margaret McCartney explores the thinking behind Do No Resuscitate Orders, the record put in a patient's notes when staff feel that attempts to resuscitate them in the event of cardiac arrest are likely to do more harm than good.

Finally, the holy grail to combat all flu viruses - a universal vaccine. Mark Porter visits the world's only Flu Camp where new versions of the vaccine are being trialled in volunteers. Professor David Salisbury, Head of Immunisation at the Department of Health, and Dr Kamran Abbasi, Editor of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, join Mark to discuss the use of the current flu vaccine.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b019f9h7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b019dqhn)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b019fxb7)
After the European Court of Human Rights vetoes the extradition of Abu Qatada to Jordan , we ask how terror suspects can be brought to justice.

Police use of ' joint enterprise' charges in cases of gang crime is criticised as a House of Commons Committee publishes a report.

Extreme measures in Indonesia using concrete balls to prevent 'train surfing'.

with Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b019p3nn)
My Dear I Wanted to Tell You

France and London

Louisa Young's story explores the impact of unthinkable changes on five young people during the First World War. Nothing in Riley Purefoy's short life could have prepared him for Flanders in 1914. The only joy he knows is his love for Nadine, and Nadine's mother has made it clear that this cannot have a future. Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths and read by Olivia Colman.

Episode 2: France and London

Newly-promoted Riley Purefoy is in France. It's 1915 and he's about to return to the Front Line. Meanwhile in London, his girlfriend Nadine makes the decision to become a nurse. Her mother still won't countenance the idea that she and Riley could have any future together.

Produced by Christine Hall.


TUE 23:00 I, Regress (b019fxbc)
Series 1

Episode 3

A dark, David Lynch-ian comedy, ideally suited for an unsettling and surreal late night listen. 'I, Regress' sees Matt Berry (The IT Crowd, Garth Marenghi's Dark Place, Snuff Box) playing a corrupt and bizarre hypnotherapist taking unsuspecting clients on twisted, misleading journeys through their subconscious.

Each episode sees the doctor dealing with a different client who has come to him for a different problem (quitting smoking, fear of water, etc). As the patient is put under hypnosis, we 'enter' their mind, and all the various situations the hypnotherapist takes them through are played out for us to hear. The result is a dream- (or nightmare-) like trip through the patient's mind, as funny as it is disturbing.

In this episode, Ms Taffgoon (Morgana Robinson) finds her appointment with Dr Berry to cure a fear of heights takes a strange path, taking in a talking pigeon (Derek Griffiths) and an interplanetary trip. And a field.

The cast across the series include Katherine Parkinson (IT Crowd), Morgana Robinson (The Morgana Show), Simon Greenall (I'm Alan Partridge), Jack Klaff (Star Wars, For Your Eyes Only), Tara Flynn (The Impressions Show, Stewart Lee's Comedy Vehicle), Alex Lowe (Barry From Watford, The Peter Serafinowicz Show), and Derek Griffiths (Playschool, Bod, and The Royal Exchange).

A compelling late night listen: tune in and occupy someone else's head!

Produced by Sam Bryant.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


TUE 23:15 Continuity (b00tjq8m)
Episode 3

A Continuity Announcer's booth can be a lonely place - especially on the late shift, when you've barely seen your wife and children for a week. Still, this Radio 4 Continuity Announcer is nothing, if not a consummate professional and he's not going to let his own insignificant little problems get in the way of your listening pleasure. Especially when there are so many exciting programmes coming up in the next week, which he's got to tell you about. At least some of them are exciting. Some of them aren't quite his cup of tea, if he's honest, but that's not really the point, is it? They may be right up your street. It's not really his place to express an opinion. Even if it is tempting. This may be a come-down from heady days spent announcing on the Today programme, but he's got a job to do. Though sometimes it is rather difficult to concentrate .....

Alistair McGowan stars in a new subversive sitcom about a Continuity Announcer brooding on the escalating disasters of his private and professional life; at the same time as attempting to give us a preview of the programmes on offer in the coming week on Radio 4. Or what might be Radio 4 in a parallel universe. Trails for 'The Ethical Enigma', 'Britain's Favourite Sound' and 'The History of Britain One Year at a Time' are just some of the strange delights on offer in the world of this 'radio professional', who harbours a slightly inappropriate relationship with his audience.

Written by Hugh Rycroft a stalwart of 'The News Quiz' and co-creator of 'Parliamentary Questions' and 'Life, Death and Sex with Mike and Sue', the series also features the voices of Lewis Macleod, Sally Grace, Charlotte Page and David Holt.

Produced by David Spicer and Frank Stirling
A Unique Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b019fxbf)
Susan Hulme with the day's top news stories from Westminster. Peers discuss the Welfare Reform Bill, which proposes changes to benefits for disabled people. In the Commons, MPs debate how to revitalise the High Street. And members of the Treasury Committee are told by a Bank of England official there's no reason banks can't increase their capital and lend to businesses.



WEDNESDAY 18 JANUARY 2012

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b019dqj9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01b3gjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b019dqjc)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b019dqjf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b019dqjh)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b019dqjk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b019p2yv)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4. With the Rev. Dr. Stephen Wigley.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b019fxj3)
Agriculture Minister Jim Paice MP says UK egg farmers will be prosecuted if they do not stop producing battery eggs in the next two weeks. New EU regulations banned battery cages by 1 January 2012. The UK did not meet the deadline in time, despite Jim Paice MP being confident that all UK eggs would be battery cage free.

Clare Freeman counts hares in the Welsh countryside to try and determine whether the £531 million paid out each year on agri-enviromnent schemes is money well spent. And Professor Stephen Harris from the University of Bristol discusses the accuracy of badger counting.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


WED 06:00 Today (b019fxj5)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis. Debating the 'joint enterprise' law (0821) prospects for a new London airport (0810) and Dickens at 200 (0851).


WED 09:00 Midweek (b019fxj7)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Antony Woodward, Sandy Gall, Nick Coleman and Rosie Wilby.

Antony Woodward is a writer and amateur microlight pilot. Fifteen years ago he took part in the Round Britain Rally, a three day competition flying in flimsy machines around the UK. He crashed and almost killed himself. Having stopped flying for years, Antony attempts to enter the rally again - and face his fears for a BBC Two documentary, Wonderland: The Real Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines.

Sandy Gall is a journalist, broadcaster and former ITN news presenter. Sandy has been visiting Afghanistan for the last thirty years and has made three documentaries about the country during the Soviet invasion. With his wife he set up the Sandy Gall Afghanistan Appeal charity which provides support to people who have lost limbs in combat. He is the author of War Against The Taliban Why It All Went Wrong In Afghanistan.

Nick Coleman is a writer and music journalist. Music had been an integral part of his life for as long as he could remember, but Sudden Neurosensory Hearing Loss changed that irrevocably. Unable to enjoy his greatest passion in life he tries to restore his ability not only to hear but to think about and feel music again. He tells his story in his book 'The Train in the Night: A Story of Music and Loss'.

Rosie Wilby is a musician turned comedian who looks back at the emotional rollercoaster of chasing stardom at the height of Britpop in 'How (not) to make it in Britpop' - as part of National Storytelling Week.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01b3h20)
El Narco

Episode 3

Written by Ioan Grillo.

American drug policy shapes the future of 'El Narco'. Kingpins and cartels emerge.

As a teenager in Brighton the author witnessed the rise of drug use in 1980s Britain. He also knew four young men who died of heroin overdoses. Twelve years ago he arrived in Mexico with ambitions to be 'a foreign correspondent in exotic climes'. But the most compelling story that demanded attention was the extraordinary and terrifying power of the drug cartels and the violent world of 'El Narco'.

Read by Rupert Degas

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b019fxj9)
As women's boxing makes its Olympic debut, is the Amateur International Boxing Association (AIBA) wrong to suggest women boxers wear a skirt? An online petition opposing the move has collected nearly 50,000 signatures. The AIBA say it will allow spectators to distinguish female competitors from their male counterparts. As the Committee prepares to meet in Bangkok this week to finalise the changes, we examine whether wearing a skirt undermines the status of women boxers?
Not since Nancy Astor matter-of-factly called herself a feminist have Conservative women MPs felt so comfortable doing so in public. But when Feminism has been become so enmeshed with the causes of the Left, what does it mean to be a right wing feminist and how does a belief in the free market affect the pursuit of women's interests? Louise Mensch MP and Stella Creasy MP discuss how feminism changes when it crosses party lines.
Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif talks about her experience of the Arab Spring and uprising in Tahrir Square and her latest book Cairo: My City, Our Revolution.
And parents who kill their kids. What drives a parent, who is so often described as being devoted to their family, to carry out such a brutal crime? And can anything be done to prevent it?
Presenter Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b019fxjc)
Edith Wharton - Ethan Frome

Episode 3

Ethan and Mattie's idyll is shattered by the return of Zeena.

Ethan Frome ..... Dominic Mafham
Mattie ..... Jessica Raine
Zeena ..... Laurel Lefkow
Jotham Powell ..... Adam Billington
Denis Eady ..... Christopher Webster
Widow Homan ...... Victoria Inez Hardy
Edith Wharton ..... Fenella Woolgar

Written by Edith Wharton
Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Directed by Sally Avens

Ethan Frome is one of Edith Wharton's most enduring and powerful stories.
Set against the cold, grey, bleakness of a New England winter. Ethan Frome scrapes a living from his woodlot whilst trapped in an unhappy marriage with his hypochondriac wife, Zeena. A ray of light enters Ethan's life when his wife's cousin Mattie arrives to help. His life is transformed as he falls in love with Mattie but their fate is determined by their circumstances and the stifling conventions of the time.

Ethan Frome was deemed shocking when first published as it appeared to condone infidelity. What many readers did not know was that many of the novella's themes mirrored real events in the life of Edith Wharton. Her own story is told in the play 'The Jinx Element' which explores her own sexless marriage and a passionate affair that begun when she was 47.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


WED 11:00 Songs for Tahrir (b019fxjf)
Palestinian singer Reem Kelani has a unique perspective on the tumultuous events in Egypt in early 2011 - while in Cairo to research the music of Sayyid Darwish (1892-1923), she found herself watching history unfold. Caught up in the revolution, she saw Darwish's music taking on a new and urgent topicality, alongside the creations of contemporary songwriters.

Reem recorded protestors raising their voices against Mubarak, by singing Darwish's songs - not only those dealing with nationalism and social justice: even love songs by Darwish moved protestors during the days of mass protest. Protestors also sang songs by Egyptian greats such as Sheikh Imam, delighting in a body of artistic work which had long been denied them because it was deemed subversive. Many adapted folk songs, and at the same time, contemporary musicians created new compositions, some of them capturing brilliantly the spirit of the moment. But in Tahrir Square, the overwhelming reality was of a host of unknown and unsung singing heroes who led those around them into a musical formulation of pent-up political frustration.

In a return visit to Cairo for Radio 4 Reem met up with the activists, poets and musicians with whom she spent time on Tahrir Square in the early months of 2011, to explore the role of music in the Revolution and Darwish's importance to Egyptians now. She spoke to them about the creative spirit of the popular uprising, and the underground music that accompanied the protests. Reem arrived a week before elections in November, and found anger but also optimism and determination that Egypt will set itself on the track to democracy after years of dictatorship and decline.


WED 11:30 A Short Gentleman (b019fxjh)
Episode 3

When dealing with his wife's lover, Robert employs his deadliest weapon: being a gentleman.

Hugh Bonneville stars as Robert Purcell, QC, a perfect specimen of the British Establishment, who applies faultless legal logic to his disastrous personal life.

Jon Canter's comic novel 'A Short Gentleman' adapted by Robin Brooks.

Robert Purcell ..... Hugh Bonneville
Elizabeth ..... Lyndsey Marshal
Max ..... Ted Allpress
Isobel ..... Lauren Mote
Mona/Ticky ..... Katherine Jakeways
Geoffrey ..... Paul Moriarty
Anthony ..... Carl Prekopp
Penelope ..... Tracy Wiles

With Adjoa Andoh, Ewan Bailey, Adam Billington and James Hayes.

Director: Jonquil Painting

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b019fxjk)
Shari Vahl presents Radio 4's Consumer Affairs Programme. We explore the complexities of diagnosing whiplash and why Ryanair will add 25p to all bookings from next week.


WED 12:30 Face the Facts (b019fxjm)
Wide Berth to Justice

John Waite investigates the policing of crimes that take place on board cruise ships and the case of Rebecca Coriam, who disappeared from a Disney cruise ship earlier this year. With many ships flagging away from the UK, to countries like the Bahamas, Bermuda and Panama, does international law needs to be changed to ensure the safety of passengers and to protect victims of crime?


WED 12:57 Weather (b019dqjm)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b019fxjp)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 15 by 15 (b0112d58)
Series 1

Heels

What's in a word? Where did it come from? Where does it lead? In a new series of five programmes Hardeep Singh Kohli chooses a word and sees where it leads him. In 15 minutes he expects to learn 15 things he didn't know before.

In the third programme - Heels, Hardeep meets Meg Matthews, who owns 400 pairs of high heels, takes lessons from Chyna Whyne, visits Northampton's shoe museum, and asks ballroom dancer Lilia Kopylova what she thinks about the saying that Ginger Rogers did everything that Fred Astaire did, but backwards, and in high heels.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b019fx9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00qx43c)
Robin Glendinning - Edith's Story

The true story of 16-year-old Edith Scholem, forced to flee Berlin in 1934 as her family was arrested. Stars Emerald O'Hanrahan.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b019fyq5)
Rules which came in last year mean that fathers can take up to six months off to care for new babies, as long as the mother goes back to work. Dads taking advantage of additional paternity leave will be eligible for pay of up to £128.73 per week.
Other changes have not been so kind to families, however. Government cutbacks mean that child benefit was frozen from three years from last April, and lower income limits mean that some parents may receive reduced Child Tax Credits.
The birth rate has been climbing for a decade, and even though there are signs it has recently levelled off, the increase in births mean more employers and employees find themselves faced with maternity and paternity rights questions. The expert panel will answer your queries.
Paul Lewis will be joined by:
- Will Hadwen, welfare rights advisor, Working Families
- Sian Keall, head of employment, Travers Smith
- Sarah Veale, head of equality and employment rights, TUC
Producer: Mike Wendling
Presenter: Paul Lewis.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b019fxb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b019fyq7)
Stag tourism - Men and childbirth

Vomiting, urinating openly, dressing up as women and public nudity - some of the features of the Stag Tour which show a new kind of masculinity, claims new research from Thomas Thurnell-Read. He tells Laurie that far from the controlled, contained and emotionally repressed image of traditional men, these young men are letting it all hang out - at least for one weekend. Also on the programme how men experience the process of childbirth. Are they sidelined by the medical process? Alan Dolan talks about his latest research.
The social commentator Owen Jones also joins the discussion of modern young men and how masculinity is changing.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b019fyqc)
Steve Hewlett talks to James Harding, editor of The Times and Alan Rusbridger, editor of The Guardian. Harding reflects on his evidence to the Leveson inquiry this week, Rusbridger on the falling sales which have forced The Guardian to reduce "pagination." Supplements have been folded into the paper and the sport has returned to the back page instead of being in a separate mini-paper. We also hear why Associated Press has opened up a bureau in North Korea and we discuss the growing controversy over intellectual property on the internet.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b019fyqf)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b019dqjp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Everyone Quite Likes Justin (b0124nql)
Series 1

Pilot

In one version of his life, Justin is a well-known local Manchester radio DJ who is successful, funny, and stopped in the street by adoring fans. He's the man who has everything.

In another version he's a DJ in a slightly shabby local radio station who gets hassled by the occasional oddball on the street. And he's the man who hopes for everything. The truth lies somewhere in between.

And at home? Well, naturally, his private life is chaotic. His wife has left him, taking custody of his 8-year-old son Justin jnr, and is in the process of taking him to the cleaners. So he's back on the market. As is his house - so he's currently living in his father-in-law's spare room in Bury. The only person who understands him is his Gran, living in luxury in an old folk's home in Warrington. Oh, and his producer Bryn but this might not be a good thing.

Despite all this mess, Justin always remains positive. Every new day is a new opportunity, "When life throws you lemons, make lemonade".

Sitcom written by Justin Moorhouse and Jim Poyser.

Recorded in front of an audience in Manchester.

Justin ..... Justin Moorhouse
Gran ..... Anne Reid
Ray ..... Paul Copley
Lisa ..... Christine Bottomley
Bryn ..... Lloyd Langford
Tanya ..... Susan Cookson
Waiter ..... Jim Poyser
Head ..... Caimh McDonnell

Producer: Steven Canny

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b019fyqh)
Pat's heard that the phone lines could be down for a day or two yet. She's glad Peggy's got Elona and Darrell around to stop her feeling isolated. Pat tells Tony about Jim's rota to call on vulnerable people, and Chris and Alice's scheme to distribute spare mobiles. Tony hopes Peggy will finally see that mobile phones have their uses.

Pat really enjoyed her birthday party, and it's bucked her up. She's even decided she'd like to give the speech at the Ambridge Organics re-launch. She feels she owes it to them all to make a good job of it. Tony's delighted to see she's regained her enthusiasm for things.

Brian and Annabelle meet their PR company. Rufus doesn't recommend a village meeting just yet. He thinks they should try to communicate with local people on their own terms. He asks for favourable bullet points. Brian and Annabelle offer up: good for jobs, good for local and national economy, high welfare standards and very green credentials. This gives Rufus something solid to build on. He proposes they wage an informal personal campaign in the village, and listen to people's concerns. If that's what it takes, that's exactly what Brian's going to do.

Episode written by Carolyn Sally Jones.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b019fyqk)
Madonna's W.E. reviewed; Ian Rankin's unpublished novel

With Mark Lawson.

Madonna makes her feature film debut as director and co-screenwriter of W.E. The film intercuts the love story of Wallis Simpson and King Edward VIII with a modern-day tale of a woman obsessed by Wallis. A N Wilson reviews.

Chad Harbach discusses his debut novel The Art of Fielding, which took him 10 years to write and has been garlanded with praise by some of America's best-known writers.

It has been reported that some cinema goers have asked for refunds on finding that the award-winning film The Artist is silent. Lawyer Duncan Lamont discusses the rights of a dissatisfied arts consumer in this and other cases.

Crime writer Ian Rankin will give a reading from his first unpublished novel this weekend at the First Fictions festival, organised by Sussex University. He and crime writer Frances Fyfield, who also wrote an unpublished first book, look back on their early efforts, and how their styles have changed.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b019fxjc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Decision Time (b019fyqm)
Nick Robinson goes behind the closed doors of Whitehall and inside Westminster to explore how controversial decisions are reached. Each week, he asks people with senior experience of government and politics how a government, of whatever political colour, would approach a looming decision. Producer, Rob Shepherd.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b019fyqp)
Series 2

Clare Allan: Liberation Through Lies

Novelist Clare Allan asks why lying gets such a bad press. The truth, she argues, can be far more dangerous.

Can lies both liberate and illuminate? As a novelist she discusses how she takes full advantage of her position to tell stories, to invent the facts. But in so doing so, she says, fiction can lead us closer to the truth.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling.

Recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Frankenstein's Moon (b019fyqr)
Did the Moon shining into Mary Shelley's bedroom in June 1816 play a part in the genesis of her Frankenstein story? Forensic astronomer Don Olson has been investigating by charting the Moon's historical path over Lake Geneva and surrounding hills.

Adam Rutherford explores the influence of astronomical and other celestial phenomena on the work of writers and artists, such as Galileo's painter friend Ludovico Cigoli, Arthur Conan Doyle and modern Sherlock creator Mark Gatiss. Adam also talks to contemporary artists inspired by science: Semiconductor with their solar animation 'Brilliant Noise', and Cornelia Parker about her fascination with shooting stars. One of Cornelia's artistic ambitions is to send a meteorite back into space.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b019fxj7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b019dqjr)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b019fyqt)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b019p3w3)
My Dear I Wanted to Tell You

Peter, Julia and Rose

Louisa Young's story explores the impact of unthinkable changes on five young people during the First World War. Riley's experiences at the Front cause him to write in despair to Nadine "I do not exist .. that is my protection from all this." But to Nadine, he is the only boy she wants and the one she worries about continually; their future as a couple seems appallingly fragile. Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths and read by Olivia Colman.

Episode 3: Peter, Julia and Rose

1915. The War continues to challenge both men and women. Rose Locke, a nursing auxiliary, and her relative Julia - who has no occupation other than being beautiful - are discovering that all the old certainties about their lives are gone. For Rose, this is liberating; for Julia, it is an unlooked-for education in what a man is capable of when he has been brutalised.

Produced by Christine Hall.


WED 23:00 Tina C (b019fyqw)
Tina C's Global Depression Tour

Iceland

Country legend Tina C challenges the Secretary for the US Treasury, the Chairman of the Federal Reserve and the former CEO of Goldman Sachs.

Where they have failed, she can come up with a solution to the Global Recession.

So Tina has set off on a six country tour to prove it - and her next stop is Iceland.

Tina C ...... Christopher Green

With:

Sigrun Davidsdotti
Victoria Inez Hardy

Musical arrangements by Duncan Walsh Atkins and Christopher Green

Director: Jeremy Mortimer.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


WED 23:15 What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else (b00tmtwm)
Series 1

Communication

Andrew Lawrence examines the difficulties of human interaction and communication.

A four part mini-series of short comedic monologues taking a light-hearted look at various aspects of conventional living and the pressure we feel to conform to social norms and ideals.

From South London comedy club 'Up The Creek'.

Written by Andrew Lawrence.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b019fyqy)
As the latest batch of jobless figures come out, the Labour leader Ed Miliband again tackles David Cameron on the Government's economic record and its unemployment problem.
Also on the programme.
* Simon Jones reports on the pressure facing the Cabinet Minister Cheryl Gillan over the decision to give the go-ahead to the high-speed rail line that runs through her Buckinghamshire constituency.
* Peter Mulligan covers the announcement that an inquiry into the treatment of detainees is to be scrapped, following the start of new investigations into ill-treatment claims in Libya.
* Joanna Shinn reports on the latest developments in the long-running phone hacking saga.



THURSDAY 19 JANUARY 2012

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b019dqkb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01b3h20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b019dqkd)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b019dqkg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b019dqkj)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b019dqkl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b019p2yx)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4. With the Rev. Dr. Stephen Wigley.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b010r2zx)
Charlotte Smith visits a flock of Cotswold sheep, owned by Richard Mumford. The sheep were once known as 'Cotswold Lions', and the grand churches and houses in the area are testament to the wealth created by the wool trade. Prices have slumped and now a Cotswold fleece is worth about £5. Things could be about to change, though, with an interest in British fabrics beginning to re-emerge. We also hear about the growth of the British Alpaca industry, flax growing, and traditional leather tanning.
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


THU 06:00 Today (b019gy9m)
Morning news and current affairs, presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb, and analysing "moral capitalism" (0810 and 0854), plus the NHS reforms (0709 and 0839) and Adrian Mole at 30 (0849).


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b019gy9p)
1848: Year of Revolution

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss 1848, the year that saw Europe engulfed in revolution. Across the continent, from Paris to Palermo, liberals rose against conservative governments. The first stirrings of rebellion came in January, in Sicily; in February the French monarchy fell; and within a few months Germany, Austria, Hungary and Italy had all been overtaken by revolutionary fervour. Only a few countries, notably Britain and Russia, were spared.The rebels were fighting for nationalism, social justice and civil rights, and were prepared to fight in the streets down to the last man. Tens of thousands of people lost their lives; but little of lasting value was achieved, and by the end of the year the liberal revolutions had been soundly beaten.With: Tim BlanningEmeritus Professor of History at the University of CambridgeLucy RiallProfessor of History at Birkbeck, University of LondonMike RapportSenior Lecturer in History at the University of Stirling.Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01b3hdb)
El Narco

Episode 4

Written by Ioan Grillo.

Amid the violence and the bloodshed the drug underworld feeds its own peculiar culture including the 'narcocorridos' the ballads that depict the dramas and deaths of 'los valientes'.

As a teenager in Brighton the author witnessed the rise of drug use in 1980s Britain. He also knew four young men who died of heroin overdoses. Twelve years ago he arrived in Mexico with ambitions to be 'a foreign correspondent in exotic climes'. But the most compelling story that demanded attention was the extraordinary and terrifying power of the drug cartels and the violent world of 'El Narco'.

Read by Rupert Degas

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b019gy9r)
A growing number of women are reporting complications associated with an implant designed to help with Stress Urinary Incontinence. How safe are they and what information's needed if you are considering having one fitted?

The Olympics and sex trafficking. What expectation and evidence is there that there's likely to be any significant effect on the area around Stratford and the Olympic site?

Why Ghana is currently experiencing a reduction in the number of female members of parliament. With primaries taking place leading up to the election, gender equality is emerging as a hot topic.

Would the British benefit from adopting a more French style of parenting? A new book 'French Children Don't Throw Food', asks how the French, manage to raise children who are not picky eaters, do not throw tantrums, and play quietly.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b019gy9t)
Edith Wharton - Ethan Frome

Episode 4

Ethan becomes determined to escape his marriage and runaway with Mattie.

Ethan Frome ..... Dominic Mafham
Mattie ..... Jessica Raine
Zeena ..... Laurel Lefkow
Edith Wharton .... Fenella Woolgar

Written by Edith Wharton
Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Directed by Sally Avens

Ethan Frome is one of Edith Wharton's most enduring and powerful stories.
Set against the cold, grey, bleakness of a New England winter. Ethan Frome scrapes a living from his woodlot whilst trapped in an unhappy marriage with his hypochondriac wife, Zeena. A ray of light enters Ethan's life when his wife's cousin Mattie arrives to help. His life is transformed as he falls in love with Mattie but their fate is determined by their circumstances and the stifling conventions of the time.

Ethan Frome was deemed shocking when first published as it appeared to condone infidelity. What many readers did not know was that many of the novella's themes mirrored real events in the life of Edith Wharton. Her own story is told in a play 'The Jinx Element' which explores her own sexless marriage and a passionate affair that begun when she was 47.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b019gy9w)
The women are in charge -- and the men don't seem to be doing much about it. Timothy Allen tells us that's the position in one of the states in northern India where a nascent men's liberation movement is having little impact. Mark Lowen is in Libya where one of the biggest problems facing that country's new rulers is disarming the many fighters whose efforts helped overthrow the dictator Colonel Gaddafi. One of the consequences of China's big migration, from country to town, is rising tension in some of the city areas where the migrants have set up home - Mukul Devichand's been investigating in the southern city of Guangzhou and Nick Haslam has been to Ecuador finding out who's expected to pick up the bill when the developed world asks a developing country to forgo economic growth in favour of the world's environment.


THU 11:30 The Mystery of The Mystery of Edwin Drood (b019gz0c)
'The Mystery of Edwin Drood' is a tantalising element of the Dickens manuscript archive held by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Along with fellow crime-writer Simon Brett and Dickens scholar Professor Jenny Hartley, Frances Fyfield uses the packed manuscript pages, detailed number plans and early cover designs to try and make sense of one of English Literature's great mysteries: what really happened to the eponymous hero. Edwin Drood.

Dickens died shortly after bringing the curtain down on Chapter 23, barely half way through the twelve monthly instalments. He suffered a massive stroke later that day, 8 June 1870, and died the next day.

By that stage in Dickens' novel, Edwin has gone missing and it is suspected that he has been murdered but no body has been found. The finger of suspicion points at Neville Landless but the author seems to be hinting at the guilt of a more sinister figure, the leader of the Cathedral choir, John Jasper.

Ever since, Dickensian enthusiasts have searched the book for every hint of a clue as to what the author intended to do with the characters he'd created. Frances isn't afraid of joining these so-called 'Droodians' in trying to employ her crime-writer's insights to make sense of the pieces of the jigsaw left to us.

But her investigation, which takes her to Rochester where the novel is set, also examines the state of Dickens' mind at the time, and his fascination with the criminal mentality, including vintage Dickensian types like Mr Crisparkle, the angular Mr Grewgious and the hideous auctioneer Mr Sapsea.

Frances and her colleagues also search the manuscript for signs of the author's failing health, and, perhaps more importantly, failing ability.

What they find is the usual high octane writing style, brilliant inventiveness and perhaps a greater subtlety in characterisation than in many of the earlier works.

Producer: Tom Alban

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b019gz0f)
Fake Car Insurance & how healthy is the Health Lottery?

Hundreds of drivers have been tricked into buying invalid insurance by a fake internet firm.

Britain's newest nationwide lottery is accused of breaking the advertising code.

We hear from a man jailed after distributing his late father's compensation for industrial injury among his family. He says it fulfilled a dying wish, the courts ruled it to be a fraud.

We have the latest on another gap in the High Street as Peacocks goes bust and visit the Choir with No Name - a homeless project funded by Sports Relief.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


THU 12:57 Weather (b019dqkn)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b019gz0h)
Martha Kearney presents the national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 15 by 15 (b0118cn7)
Series 1

Spin

What's in a word? Where did it come from? Where does it lead? In a new series of five programmes Hardeep Singh Kohli chooses a word and sees where it leads him. In 15 minutes he expects to learn 15 things he didn't know before.

Hardeep spins round at over 600 miles per hour, visits the New Lanark Heritage site where Arkwright's revolutionary spinning machine is still in action, hears cricket commentator Christopher Martin Jenkins recall Shane Warne's test match debut, and touches on political spin with political commentator Peter Oborne.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b019fyqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b019gz0k)
Twelve Years

A love story told across the two New York blackouts of 1965 and 1977.

Larry and Nancy meet during the first blackout, while the prosperous city enjoys a spontaneous holiday. Twelve years on, the city is very different: rioting and looting accompany the blackout in a time of economic depression, and the couple must fight for their survival in a world which seems irrevocably changed.

Nancy...................... Megan Ketch
Larry........................ Brian Hastert

Written by Alexandra Wood
Directed by Lu Kemp.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b019gz0m)
It's been seven years since hunting with hounds was abolished. But it's claimed the country's hunts, which no longer chase a live animal but a trail of artificial scent instead, are in the best shape anyone can remember. So is the ban working? On Boxing Day, three hundred hunts took place across the country and Agricultural Minister, Jim Paice announced there'd be a vote on whether to repeal the act when there's time in the parliamentary calendar. So on today's Open Country, Helen Mark investigates what the latest is on both sides of the debate.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b019f6jk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b019lyhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b019gzqf)
In this week's Film Programme Francine Stock talks to Ralph Fiennes about his directorial debut, Coriolanus, and the juggling needed to act and direct in the same picture. She also examines the lure of the short film with Terry Gilliam and Ewan Bailey. Ewan is taking his beautiful and harrowing film, DeafBlind to the Slamdance festival this week --it was selected from thousands of entries for the prestigious showcase -- and Terry's stylish and sinister account of a foreign holiday -- The Wholly Family -- premieres on line next week...a first for him and an adventure which he's embraced with open arms. To bring the programme to a resounding close the critic Maria Delgado explains why the Spanish prison drama, Cell 211, which is released this week on DVD, deserves to cement the reputations of its leading actor, Luis Tosar and its director, Daniel Monzon.

Producer: Zahid Warley.


THU 16:30 Material World (b019gzqh)
This week, Quentin Cooper studies the most detailed 3D map yet made of the entire land surface of the Earth. He looks into a dusty cabinet containing some of Darwin's fossil collection and asks if climate change could have been responsible for the fall of the Khmer empire in Cambodia.

Adam Rutherford joins another of our amateur finalist in 'So You Want to Be a Scientist?'. Val Watham from Berkshire wonders if the right stripes really do make you look slimmer and embarks on an experiment to prove it.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


THU 17:00 PM (b019gzqk)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b019dqkq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Clare in the Community (b0151xsf)
Series 7

To Kill a Mocking Bird

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Each week we join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

In episode two 'To Kill A Mocking Bird' Clare ends her relationship with Brian and is surprised by her colleagues' reaction to the news.

Episode Two 'To Kill A Mocking Bird'

Clare ..... SALLY PHILLIPS
Brian ..... ALEX LOWE
Megan/Nali ..... NINA CONTI
Ray ..... RICHARD LUMSDEN
Helen ..... LIZA TARBUCK
Simon ..... ANDREW WINCOTT
Libby ..... SARAH KENDALL
Pru Granville ..... SOPHIE THOMPSON
Mr Collier ..... GERARD MCDERMOTT
Thomas ..... GEORGIA LOWE

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden

Producer by Katie Tyrrell.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b019gzqm)
Jennifer's pleased when Hayley suggests they join them at Lower Loxley to Skype Nolly on her birthday.

Caroline's pleased that Oliver found the manual credit card readers in the cellar; they're a big help. Caroline's taking everything in her stride now and is grateful to Oliver for being so brilliant.

Adam helps David check the cereal crops, pleased to get away from Home Farm for a few hours. They agree the news of the dairy has stirred up a lot of strong feelings. Adam thinks Borchester Land deserve everything they've got coming to them.

Brian calls on Jill and asks if there might be an opportunity for BL to sponsor Britain in Bloom. Jill advises him to talk to Jim. Jill bumps into Adam in the shop, and tells him how shocked she was at Brian's attempt to bribe her.

Outside the shop, a reporter from Radio Borsetshire asks Adam for his opinion about the dairy. Adam's taken by surprise but tells her exactly how he feels - the dairy is bad for the village, bad for farming and bad for the cows. The reporter's delighted to have got exactly what she was looking for.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b019gzqp)
Leonard Cohen; Abi Morgan interviewed

With Mark Lawson.

Playwright and screenwriter Abi Morgan's recent credits include The Hour on TV and The Iron Lady and Shame in the cinema. Her TV adaptation of Sebastian Faulks' best-selling novel Birdsong begins on Sunday. She reflects on her approaches to writing for the screen and stage.

Ralph Fiennes makes his debut as a film director with a contemporary version of Shakespeare's political thriller Coriolanus. Fiennes also takes the title role, with Vanessa Redgrave as his fierce mother Volumnia and Gerard Butler as his rival Aufidius. Andrew Dickson reviews.

Singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen tells Mark how his new album Old Ideas was partly inspired by the responses of audiences around the world during his last tour. Mark Ellen reviews the disc, Cohen's first studio album for eight years.

Antony Sher stars in Nicholas Wright's new play about the early days of cinema and the contribution of Jewish Eastern European immigrants to the Hollywood film industry. Peter Kemp reviews.

Producer Philippa Ritchie.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b019gy9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b019gzqr)
PIP Breast Implants

As the NHS prepares to deal with the 3,000 women it treated with PIP implants, Simon Cox asks what will happen to the many more thousands of women who had their surgery in private clinics. How did this faulty product come to be so widely used by the big cosmetic surgery companies, and who will ultimately foot the bill?

Despite repeated warnings to the government regulator, French company Poly Implant Prothese was allowed to sell its cheap breast implants filled with industrial-grade silicone to women in the UK for a decade.

Big companies like Transform and Harley Medical Group now have thousands of former patients demanding that they take the government's lead and remove or replace their implants for free. But thousands more paid companies which have gone bust. Women now battling to get their potentially dangerous implants removed recount their ordeal since finding out they paid for implants filled with silicone never designed for use in people.

Surgeons involved in the urgent review called by Health Secretary Andrew Lansley tell of the days that followed the French government's announcement that it would pay for all PIP implants to be removed. And those involved in the drive to train and educate cosmetic surgeons properly call for government support for ideas that could stop a repeat of this very expensive scandal.


THU 20:30 In Business (b019gzqt)
Do It Yourself Jobs

If times are hard, why not set up your own business rather than try to find a job somewhere else? Peter Day hears from young entrepreneurs who think that one way of beating recession is to start from scratch.
Producer: Caroline Bayley.


THU 21:00 Nature (b019f9hf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b019gy9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b019dqks)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b019h1gg)
David Cameron calls for 'popular capitalism' to create a fairer economy. What does it mean in practice? And do politicians have any control over the economy any more?

Another Republican drops out of the race for the presidential nomination. So is a contender to take on Obama finally emerging?

And Norway's debate on immigration, six months after the Oslo massacre.

With Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b019p4wc)
My Dear I Wanted to Tell You

Love and Duty

Louisa Young's story explores the impact of unthinkable changes on five young people during the First World War. Rose Locke, plain and capable, is at last released from the indignity of not being marriageable and has volunteered to be a nurse. Meanwhile, her cousin's wife Julia, ornamental and helpless, has been horrified by what the war has done to her husband. Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths and read by Olivia Colman.

Episode 4: Love and duty

On leave in London, Riley meets Nadine again after three years; they renew their love for and commitment to one another. Riley returns to France and has to deal with an outbreak of sheer terror among the men; there is about to be a very big military operation.

Produced by Christine Hall.


THU 23:00 Meanwhile, It's Will & Greg (b019h1gj)
Episode 3

Comedy performers William Andrews and Greg McHugh explore the surreal and the absurd through characters and everyday situations in their first sketch show for BBC Radio 4. Along with live sketches recorded in front of an appreciative Glasgow audience, the show also features studio based sketches with Will & Greg as "themselves" exploring a particular scenario and utilizing their hilarious relationship with each other and their trademark skew-whiff logic. The studio based sketches allows them to play with sound and atmosphere of the radio sketch form and blend them with the live audience material.

Together with brand new regulars and one-off sketches, the series explores the bizarrely familiar, the recognisably odd and the upbeat offbeat way of life that only exists when the planet is touched by Will and Greg.

Stars William Andrews and Greg McHugh with Gavin Mitchell and Kirsten Mclean.

Director: Iain Davidson
Script editor: Chris Grady
Original music by Alex Attwood.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b019h1gl)
How to bring in fairer capitalism; how to force errant MPs to seek re-election, and why Holocaust Memorial Day matters. Susan Hulme reports on the day's stories from Westminster.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



FRIDAY 20 JANUARY 2012

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b019dqlc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01b3hdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b019dqlf)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b019dqlh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b019dqlk)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b019dqlm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b019p2yz)
A reading and a reflection to start the day on Radio 4. With the Rev. Dr. Stephen Wigley.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b019h2b0)
Charlotte Smith hears the latest government plans for a badger cull to control TB in cattle. The culls can take place in in west Gloucestershire and west Somerset this year, though exact locations are being kept secret for security reasons.

And Farming Today explores the world of hi-tech machinery at LAMMA 2012, a vast celebration of agricultural gizmos and gadgets. Whether you want a £900,000 sugar beet harvester, a cow-lifting sling or a hydraulic squirrel trap, the stalls at the Newark showground can fulfil your every need.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


FRI 06:00 Today (b019h2b2)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b019f6jt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01b3hgn)
El Narco

Episode 5

Written by Ioan Grillo.

Crime and punishment. Politics and the law. Is El Narco a criminal movement or is it an insurgency that threatens the very state itself ?

As a teenager in Brighton the author witnessed the rise of drug use in 1980s Britain. He also knew four young men who died of heroin overdoses. Twelve years ago he arrived in Mexico with ambitions to be 'a foreign correspondent in exotic climes'. But the most compelling story that demanded attention was the extraordinary and terrifying power of the drug cartels and the violent world of 'El Narco'.

Read by Rupert Degas

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b019h2b4)
Orchids v Roses, Revenge and Julie Jones

Presented by Jenni Murray. Orchid sales have soared in recent years and led to a massive production boom in this country. Intricate and exquisite - could the orchid ever usurp the rose in the nation's affections? Jenni hears from orchid grower, Tom Hart Dyke and from Jennifer Potter, author of 'The Rose: A True History'.
Revenge, it's said, is a dish best served cold, but while we might find temporary relief in getting back at someone who has caused us pain, in the longer term do we demean ourselves? Is revenge a dish best not served at all? Poet and novelist, Sophie Hannah, and agony aunt, Suzie Hayman, discuss the appeal and the pitfalls of taking revenge. Julie Jones, a single mother of three, granted her best friend's made dying wish by adopting her five children. She joins us to talk about what she describes as an 'natural and ordinary' undertaking.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b019h2b6)
Edith Wharton - Ethan Frome

Episode 5

Mattie and Ethan take desperate measures not to be separated.

Ethan Frome ..... Dominic Mafham
Mattie ..... Jessica Raine
Zeena ..... Laurel Lefkow
Mrs Hale ..... Tracy Wiles
Edith Wharton ..... Fenella Woolgar

by Edith Wharton
dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Directed by Sally Avens

Ethan Frome is one of Edith Wharton's most enduring and powerful stories.
Set against the cold, grey, bleakness of a New England winter. Ethan Frome scrapes a living from his woodlot whilst trapped in an unhappy marriage with his hypochondriac wife, Zeena. A ray of light enters Ethan's life when his wife's cousin Mattie arrives to help. His life is transformed as he falls in love with Mattie but their fate is determined by their circumstances and the stifling conventions of the time.

Ethan Frome was deemed shocking when first published as it appeared to condone infidelity. What many readers did not know was that many of the novella's themes mirrored real events in the life of Edith Wharton. Her own story is told in 'The Jinx Element' that explores her own sexless marriage and a passionate affair that begun when she was 47.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


FRI 11:00 The Politics of Pandas (b019h2b8)
1/1
Mao gave them to Nixon, Edward Heath desperately wanted some, and now Alex Salmond has got his hands on two. Has there ever been a more political animal than the panda? In this special programme tied to the arrival of the two pandas at Edinburgh Zoo, Philip Dodd investigates how a lazy, bamboo munching bear with a marked reluctance to procreate became the political gift par excellence.


FRI 11:30 The Write Stuff (b019h2bb)
Series 15

Sir John Betjeman

James Walton hosts another series of the book-based panel show. This episode's Author of the Week is former poet laureate, Sir John Betjeman.

Sebastian Faulks is joined by children's author, Sue Limb, and John Walsh is joined by Sir Andrew Motion, a previous poet laureate himself, to solve more literary challenges, based on Betjeman's life and work, as posed to them by James Walton.

The teams are also asked to imagine what Betjeman might have written about were he alive today, and still poet laureate.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b019h2bd)
Broadband speed, exercise in parks, and crumbling heritage

An investigation by this programme has discovered that more than a third of local authorities in the UK charge for fitness classes in their public parks. Peter White finds out what impact will this have on sports participation.

We ask what more needs doing to improve rural broadband speeds.

New jobs and one day delivery in the north east - what the DX Group can offer online shoppers.

Preserving crumbling heritage from the Coliseum in Rome to a maltings in Lincolnshire.

Children come free or do they? How the travel firm Tui has been misleading customers.

And why South Tyneside has fallen out of love with Catherine Cookson.

Producer: Rebecca Moore.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b019dqlp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b019h2bg)
National and international news with Edward Stourton. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 15 by 15 (b011j3gq)
Series 1

Stroke

What's in a word? Where did it come from? Where does it lead? In a new series of five programmes Hardeep Singh Kohli chooses a word and sees where it leads him. In 15 minutes he expects to learn 15 things he didn't know before.

Along the way Hardeep talks to art critic Richard Cork about the brushstrokes of Claude Monet, meets massage therapist Martin Kingston, remembers Botham's cricket strokes, and hears about the Stroke Association's preventative campaign.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b019gzqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00rfhzz)
Annamaria Murphy - Scummow: Things Washed Up By the Sea

When a delirious Irishman arrives in a Cornish harbour, baker Mary Kneebone takes him in, and soon the sick and gullible are queuing at her door. A wry comedy about faith, love and redemption from outstanding Cornish playwright Annamaria Murphy.

Mary Kneebone ..... Mary Woodvine
Edna Lugg ..... Barbara Jefford
Declan Credan ..... Stephen Hogan
Virgin Mary ..... Alison Pettit
Eamon Credan ..... John O'Mahony
Davey Ellis ..... Charles Barnecut

Director ..... Claire Grove.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b019h3pk)
Spalding

Eric Robson chairs a gardening Q&A with Springfields Horticultural Society. Matthew Wilson, Bunny Guinness and Christine Walkden join him on the panel.

Bunny Guinness looks into some different peas and beans to try next season, making some encouraging revelations about growing Edamame beans. How to deal with blown sprouts and is it worth trying to grow a banana plant?

Question answered in the programme:

Why do my Brussels sprouts blow?
Should I give up trying to grow grapes in these windy, clay conditions in Peterborough?
After 30 years, our Judas tree have produced pods. Will the seeds be viable?
Do the panel recommend trying the lime-tolerant rhododendrons?
When is the right time to prune a 'Ruby Glow' Hibiscus bush?
I plan to dig up my Salix contorta willow tree and replace it with an apple tree. Will the willow roots leave antagonistic chemicals in the soil?
Can the panel recommend fast-growing trees for summer and autumn colour?
Suggestions included: Amelanchier Canadensis, Crabapples. Sorbus Prunus Avium and Crataegus Prunifolia.
What can I plant in the shade of a great tree canopy, to provide summer colour? Suggestions include: Deschampsia goldtau, Millium effusum, Sweet rocket, Lunaria annua 'Honesty', Astelias.
My stored potatoes have sprouted whilst in dark storage. Why is this?
What are our chances of growing banana plants?

Produced by Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 New Year, New Writers (b019h3pm)
Una and Coll Are Not Friends

Stories to mark the New Year by new writers from Scotland.
'Una and Coll are not Friends' by Kirsty Logan. A magical island tale in which two squabbling teenagers resist the well-meaning forces which push them together.
Read by Finn den Hertog and Claire Knight.
Produced by Eilidh McCreadie.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b019h3pp)
Lady Runcie, Wylie Vale, Israel Baker, Barry Reckord and Reginald Hill

Matthew Bannister on

The unconventional wife of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Lady Runcie

The endocrinologist Wylie Vale who discovered the hormone that governs our response to stress,

The violinist Israel Baker who played the searing music for the shower scene in Psycho

The pioneering black playwright Barry Reckord

And the crime novelist Reginald Hill, best known for creating Dalziel and Pascoe.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b019h3pr)
The Radio 2 breakfast show is normally captained by Chris Evans. But, during a recent absence, Richard Madeley filled the presenter chair instead - and many listeners wish he hadn't. In the first programme of the new series, Roger Bolton talks to Lewis Carnie, head of programmes at Radio 2, about the delicate business of finding suitable stand-in presenters.

After countless tales of woe from listeners trying to contact programmes, Roger issues a challenge to Radio 4's network manager Denis Nowlan. Can he negotiate the website and deliver a listener's message? And will it be read? Feedback, of course, faithfully reads every message, so do send in your experiences, whether of triumph or disaster, of contacting any programme on any BBC station.

And what are your hopes and fears for radio in 2012? Listeners share their aspirations, and presenter Jane Garvey provides a sneak peak of what 2012 will hold for Woman's Hour listeners.

Presenter: Roger Bolton

Producers: Karen Pirie and Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b019h3pt)
Eddie Mair presents full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b019dqlr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b019h3pw)
Series 76

Episode 5

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b019h3py)
Brian and Jennifer are relieved to be back online.

Brian calls on Jim and explains that Borchester Land is looking to sponsor good local causes. With BL a bit of a hot potato right now, Jim prefers to wait before linking up for Britain in Bloom. He'll keep an open mind about the dairy but it seems an unnatural method of farming to him.

Jim tells Christine that the phones and internet are working again. He's furious with Brian, but over afternoon tea they agree that the other events of the week have been quite a novelty.

Tom's meeting with a wholesaler in Felpersham results in in a sizeable contract for Tom Archer brands and positive feedback on Ambridge Organics. Pat congratulates him. Tony hopes he can now count on Tom's help on the farm. He's not enjoying doing Tom's milking as well as his own.

Tony speaks to a journalist on the Borchester Echo. He suggests that most people are against the dairy, including members of Brian's own family.

Tony gets on with the milking. When Tom eventually arrives, Tony's pretty fed up. Tom protests that he's hardly been twiddling his thumbs. But Tony loses it, reminding Tom that he too has been working all hours. It's really getting him down.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b019h3q0)
Norma Percy on Putin; soldiers' stories on stage

With John Wilson

Soldiers injured in Afghanistan and Iraq are starring in The Two Worlds of Charlie F, a play in London's West End written by the poet Owen Sheers and inspired by the soldiers' own stories. John Wilson talks to Rifleman Daniel Shaw, a soldier in the Infantry who lost both legs in Afghanistan, Sapper Lyndon Chatting-Walters, a combat engineer who suffered serious spinal injury in Afghanistan and to Owen Sheers.

Blues Singer and Radio 2 presenter Paul Jones pays tribute to the singer Etta James whose powerful and evocative voice has inspired audiences and singers alike, most recently Adele and Amy Winehouse cited her as an influence.

Award-winning TV documentary maker Norma Percy discusses her latest project - Putin, Russia and the West - which began last night. Vladimir Putin, current Prime Minister of Russia, is the focus of the four-part series, which includes interviews with members of Putin's inner circle as well as leading figures from the West, including Condoleeza Rice, Colin Powell, and Tony Blair's former Chief of Staff, Jonathan Powell.

Placido Domingo and Joyce DiDonato are starring at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York in The Enchanted Island - an opera inspired by Shakespeare's The Tempest and featuring the lovers from A Midsummer Night's Dream. The British composer and director Jeremy Sams has created the piece using original Baroque arias by Handel, Vivaldi and Rameau. David D'arcy reviews.

Producer Erin Riley.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b019h2b6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b019h3q2)
Ingatestone, Essex

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a live discussion of news and politics from the Anglo-European School, Ingatestone, Essex, with Shadow Olympics minister, Tessa Jowell; Chief Secretary to the Treasury and Liberal Democrat MP, Danny Alexander; Chief Political Commentator of The Daily Telegraph, Peter Oborne; and general secretary of the PCS civil service union, Mark Serwotka.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b019h3q4)
Volume Control

Lisa Jardine reflects on her aversion to today's new sources of noise and traces the history of some attempts at noise abatement.
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 The Prague Trial (b019h3q6)
By Arianne Mnouchkine and Patrice Chereau.

The show trial of dissident writer Vaclav Havel and others in the former Czechoslovakia in 1979 is explored using dramatic reconstruction, testimonies and expert analysis, revealing their roles in overcoming the Soviet Union's control and the event's place in the wider context of post-war Europe. Dramatised by Christopher Hampton, and narrated by Jane Whittenshaw.

Cast:
Narrator ...... Jane Whittenshaw
Judge ...... Gerard Murphy
Dana Nemcova ...... Teresa Gallagher
Jiri Dienstbier ...... Andrew Branch
Anna Sabatova ...... Elaine Larkin
Otta Bednarova ...... Sarah Badel
Vaclav Benda ...... Geoffrey Whitehead
Petr Uhl ...... Nicholas Boulton
Vaclav Havel ...... Michael Maloney
Prosecutor ...... Keith Drinkel

Producers: Paul Dodgson and Nick Patrick
Director: Martin Jenkins
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b019dqlt)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b019h3q8)
In a special report from Jerusalem, our Iran correspondent asks how serious the nuclear threat to Israel is.

The clock is ticking on reaching an agreement on Greek debt. We ask whether a deal can be done to avert another crisis.

And the government promises a register of lobbyists - but will it really tell us who is schmoozing whom in the corridors of power?

With Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b019p9q7)
My Dear I Wanted to Tell You

Consummation

The First World War brought changes unimaginable before 1914 to every aspect of life. Louisa Young's novel explores the impact on the lives of women, on the challenge to the Edwardian class structure and on assumptions about patriotism and duty.

Episode 5: Consummation

1916. Riley leads his men through an important attack on German lines on the Somme, in which many men are lost. The following spring he meets Nadine again in London, and they are able at last to share the love which they have kept alive for so many years.

Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Producer: Christine Hall.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b019fx9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b019h3qs)
Should England and Wales go on to a separate time zone from Scotland? It's a timely question in more ways than one, and Mark D'Arcy reports on what MPs had to say about it in the day's proceedings at Westminster. Also on the programme:
* the Labour MP Keith Vaz talks about a new look at the shady world of private investigators;
* two political experts discuss the change that means official state papers are released after 20 years rather than 30.
* a Conservative MP talks about a new inquiry into the future of educational provision for children with special needs.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b019f8bc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b019f8bc)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b019f9hc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b019f9hc)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b019fxjc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b019fxjc)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b019gy9t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b019gy9t)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b019h2b6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b019h2b6)

15 by 15 13:45 MON (b010t3jt)

15 by 15 13:45 TUE (b010xy3q)

15 by 15 13:45 WED (b0112d58)

15 by 15 13:45 THU (b0118cn7)

15 by 15 13:45 FRI (b011j3gq)

A Dalmatian Trilogy 19:45 SUN (b019f6kg)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b0196vgy)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b019h3q4)

A Short Gentleman 11:30 WED (b019fxjh)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b019dtlw)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b0196vgw)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b019h3q2)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b019dzpp)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b019f6j9)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b019f6j9)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b019f8bt)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b019fxb9)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b019p3nn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b019p3w3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b019p4wc)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b019p9q7)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b019lzsy)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b019f8b7)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b019f8b7)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b01b3gjy)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b01b3gjy)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b01b3h20)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b01b3h20)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b01b3hdb)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b01b3hdb)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b01b3hgn)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b0194kky)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b019f8bp)

Brief Sparks 00:30 SUN (b019h1c3)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b019f6jp)

Clare in the Community 18:30 THU (b0151xsf)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b01946wd)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b019f6k4)

Continuity 23:15 TUE (b00tjq8m)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b0196tcw)

David Cameron's Big Idea 13:30 SUN (b019f6k0)

Decision Time 22:15 SAT (b0196rpp)

Decision Time 20:00 WED (b019fyqm)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b019f6jt)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b019f6jt)

Drama 14:15 MON (b019ly12)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b019fx9l)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00qx43c)

Drama 14:15 THU (b019gz0k)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00rfhzz)

Dying Inside 17:00 SUN (b0194n0q)

Everyone Quite Likes Justin 18:30 WED (b0124nql)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b019h157)

Face the Facts 12:30 WED (b019fxjm)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b019h151)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b019f8b1)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b019f9h3)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b019fxj3)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b010r2zx)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b019h2b0)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b019h3pr)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b0196rpr)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b019fyqp)

Frankenstein's Moon 21:00 WED (b019fyqr)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b019dzpk)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b019dzpk)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b019dtlr)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b019gy9w)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b019f9cc)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b019fx9z)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b019fyqk)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b019gzqp)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b019h3q0)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b0196v3s)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b019h3pk)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b019fx9s)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b019fx9s)

I'm Rather Worried about Jim 16:00 MON (b019f8br)

I, Regress 23:00 TUE (b019fxbc)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b0196tn9)

In Business 20:30 THU (b019gzqt)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b019gy9p)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b019gy9p)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b019fxb3)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b019fxb5)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b019fxb5)

It's Your Round 19:15 SUN (b019f6kd)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b0196v3x)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b019h3pp)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b019dzph)

Material World 21:00 MON (b0194kz4)

Material World 16:30 THU (b019gzqh)

Meanwhile, It's Will & Greg 23:00 THU (b019h1gj)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0196vj7)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b019dqdh)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b019dqg3)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b019dqh6)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b019dqj9)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b019dqkb)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b019dqlc)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b019fxj7)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b019fxj7)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b019fyq5)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b019dtlt)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b019dtlt)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b0196v3z)

Mr and Mrs Smith 18:30 TUE (b01bgp22)

Musical Migrants 09:30 TUE (b015zqv7)

Nature 11:00 TUE (b019f9hf)

Nature 21:00 THU (b019f9hf)

New Year, New Writers 15:45 FRI (b019h3pm)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0196vjh)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b019dqdr)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b019dqgc)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b019dqhg)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b019dqjk)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b019dqkl)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b019dqlm)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b019dqdt)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0196vjk)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b019dqdy)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b019dqf2)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0196vk2)

News 13:00 SAT (b0196vjt)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b019f6jf)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b019lyhg)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b019lyhg)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b0196td6)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b019gz0m)

PM 17:00 SAT (b019dzpf)

PM 17:00 MON (b019f8bw)

PM 17:00 TUE (b019fx9v)

PM 17:00 WED (b019fyqf)

PM 17:00 THU (b019gzqk)

PM 17:00 FRI (b019h3pt)

Party 11:30 MON (b011vg9k)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b019f6k8)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b01946wj)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b019f6k6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b0196vl5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b019f89z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b019p3xd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b019p2yv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b019p2yx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b019p2yz)

Questions, Questions 15:30 TUE (b013852h)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b019f6jk)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b019f6jk)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b019f6jk)

Reasons to be Cheerful 10:30 SAT (b019h159)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00g3ycd)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b019h155)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b019dzpm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0196vjc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b019dqdm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b019dqg7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b019dqhb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b019dqjf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b019dqkg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b019dqlh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0196vj9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0196vjf)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0196vjw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b019dqdk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b019dqdp)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b019dqfb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b019dqg5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b019dqg9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b019dqh8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b019dqhd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b019dqjc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b019dqjh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b019dqkd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b019dqkj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b019dqlf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b019dqlk)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b019fx9n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0196vk0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b019dqfg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b019dqgk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b019dqhl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b019dqjp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b019dqkq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b019dqlr)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b019f6jc)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b019f6jc)

Songs for Tahrir 11:00 WED (b019fxjf)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b019f8b5)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b019f8b5)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b019f6jm)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b019f6jh)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b019f6jr)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b019f6kb)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b019f6kb)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b019f8c0)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b019f8c0)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b019fx9x)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b019fx9x)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b019fyqh)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b019fyqh)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b019gzqm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b019gzqm)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b019h3py)

The Bishop and the Prisoner 20:00 MON (b019h3xs)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b0196td8)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b019gzqf)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b019f6jw)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b019f6jw)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b019f9h7)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b019f9h7)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b019fyqc)

The Mystery of The Mystery of Edwin Drood 11:30 THU (b019gz0c)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b0196vgp)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b019h3pw)

The Politics of Pandas 11:00 FRI (b019h2b8)

The Prague Trial 21:00 FRI (b019h3q6)

The Print Master 11:30 TUE (b019fwvx)

The Report 20:00 THU (b019gzqr)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b0194kl6)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b019f8by)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b019dtlp)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b019f6jy)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b019h3xv)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b019fxb7)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b019fyqt)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b019h1gg)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b019h3q8)

The Write Stuff 11:30 FRI (b019h2bb)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b0196rp1)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b019fyq7)

Three Generations of Incarceration 20:00 TUE (b019fxb1)

Tina C 23:00 WED (b019fyqw)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b019h3xx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b019fxbf)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b019fyqy)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b019h1gl)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b019h3qs)

Today 07:00 SAT (b019h153)

Today 06:00 MON (b019f8b3)

Today 06:00 TUE (b019f9h5)

Today 06:00 WED (b019fxj5)

Today 06:00 THU (b019gy9m)

Today 06:00 FRI (b019h2b2)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b0196vjm)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b0196vjp)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b0196vjr)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b0196vjy)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b019dqdw)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b019dqf0)

Weather 08:57 SUN (b019dqf4)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b019dqf6)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b019dqfd)

Weather 05:57 MON (b019dqgf)

Weather 12:57 MON (b019dqgh)

Weather 21:58 MON (b019dqgm)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b019dqhj)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b019dqhn)

Weather 12:57 WED (b019dqjm)

Weather 21:58 WED (b019dqjr)

Weather 12:57 THU (b019dqkn)

Weather 21:58 THU (b019dqks)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b019dqlp)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b019dqlt)

Welsh's Scottish Journey 14:45 SUN (b019f6k2)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b019f6kj)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b019f6kl)

What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else 23:15 WED (b00tmtwm)

What's the Benefit? 11:00 MON (b019f8bf)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b019dtly)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b019f8b9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b019f9h9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b019fxj9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b019gy9r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b019h2b4)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b0194mw1)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b019fx9q)

World at One 13:00 MON (b019f8bk)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b019fx9j)

World at One 13:00 WED (b019fxjp)

World at One 13:00 THU (b019gz0h)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b019h2bg)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b019f8bh)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b019fwvz)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b019fxjk)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b019gz0f)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b019h2bd)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b0196vl7)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b0196vl7)