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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2011

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b014qvgv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b0157984)
One on One

Episode 5

Life is made up of individuals meeting one another. Often it is the most fleeting of these encounters that, in the fullness of time, turn out to be the most noteworthy.

Salvador Dali sketches Sigmund Freud. 39 Elsworthy Road, London NW3 July 19th 1938
Sigmund Freud analyses Gustav Mahler. Leiden, Holland August 1910

Ingenious in its construction, witty in its narration, panoramic in its breadth, 'One on One' offers a delightful series of snapshots of the 20th century.

Readers: Eleanor Bron and Toby Stephens

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014qvgx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014qvgz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014qvh1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b014qvh3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b014qxd0)
With the Rev. Dr. Karen Smith.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b014qxd2)
"I'm the voice of widows, silenced by hackers" - how con men attacked a listener's charity. With Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b014qvh5)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b014qvh7)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b01508nn)
Listener's Walks

The Roaches and Lud's Church

In the second of a series of walks suggested by listeners to Ramblings, Clare Balding explores the area around the gritstone escarpment of The Roaches on the edge of the Peak District.

The Roaches form a prominent rocky ridge situated above Leek in Staffordshire and this spectacular rocky escarpment, worn into weird and wonderful shapes over centuries by the elements, almost seems to stand guard over all below it. On a clear day from the summit of the Roaches it is possible to look out over the Cheshire Plain towards the Welsh Hills with spectacular views all around.

Clare is joined by listener, Professor Mike Bode, and local author and historian, Doug Pickford, both of whom were born and brought up in Leek and share a passion for this landscape. Steven Bell, from the Peak District National Park, also guides Clare on the first part of her journey as she climbs up on to the gritstone edge of the Roaches. Before beginning the ascent, Clare visits the Bawdstone, where it is said that passers by can remove the devil from their backs by scrambling underneath. Climbing onto the ridge itself, Clare passes Rockhall Cottage, a tiny cottage literally built into the rock face, which was once the gamekeeper's residence and is now a converted climbing hut. Eventually reaching the top, Clare heads towards the "bottomless waters" of Doxey Pool, said to be the home of Jenny Greenteeth, a seductive mermaid or water spirit who lures her unsuspecting victims to a watery grave.

But, after continuing along the Roaches and descending towards Gradbach and Back Forest, it is Lud's Church that provides more than its fair share of myth and mystery. This huge natural cleft in the rock is a deep chasm, around 400ft long and 50 ft deep, with a cold, damp, feel. There are many legends linked with Lud's Church. It was almost certainly associated with the Lollards, followers of early church reformer John Wycliffe, but Lud's Church is also thought to be the inspiration for the setting of the Green Chapel in the classic medieval poem, "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight". Looking around, Clare can easily see why.

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01508nt)
Farming Today This Week

A million tonnes of sugar is produced each year in the UK from home grown sugar beet. Charlotte Smith joins the harvest or the 'beet campaign' as it is known at a 1,400 acre farm in Nottinghamshire. Contractors are working in the field to bring in the sugar beets, which look a little like a large turnip, before the crop is taken to the nearby British Sugar factory in Newark.

The bulk of the beets grown in the UK are used to make sugar but its bi-products are used many other products. These included a bio fuel which is added to petrol, clothing and makeup. Belinda Townsend from the UK's National Centre for Sugar Beet Research, Rothamstead Research Brooms Barn talks about the crops versatility.

Anna Hill is given rare access to one of the four British Sugar factories at Wissington in Norfolk. The site is processing sugar 24 hours a day for 6 months of the year.

At the moment the European Union imposes quotas limiting the amount of sugar which can be processed. The EU is considering dropping these quotas in five years time. In theory, that could mean that British farmers would be able to produce as much sugar beet as they wanted. The National Farmers Union explains its concerns over the plans saying the industry would need time to adjust and sugar prices for consumers could go up.

On the Trent Valley farm, Charlotte Smith talks to farmer James Fisher as he watches the harvesting process in action, she samples the raw sweet vegetable in the farmhouse kitchen and talks to horse owners at the farm's livery stables as they feed sugar beet bi-products to the animals.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith; Produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b014qvh9)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01508nx)
John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01508p1)
Richard Coles with violinist Nigel Kennedy, poet Matt Harvey, Red Rum's former stable lad, and an anti-fascist campaigner who used to be a member of the BNP. There's the story of a ballet shoe that used to belong to Rudolph Nureyev and war correspondent Janine di Giovanni shares her Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Simon Clancy.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b01508p5)
Burma - Egypt - World's longest climb

John McCarthy asks the historian Thant Myint-U, who visits Burma regularly, about the recent political developments there and its role in south east Asia. Thant reflects on the how the country's relationship with tourism might also change. The author and traveller Anthony Sattin tells John how the history of Egypt has attracted traders and tourists and how the change of government there too has affected tourism. John also finds out from Pauline Sanderson about her part in the world's longest climb from the Dead Sea to Everest which involved an eight thousand kilometre cycle ride through countries like Iran and Pakistan topped of with an ascent of the highest mountain.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b00v697r)
Series 3

Episode 4

Steve Punt turns detective, investigating the curse of the Crying Boy paintings and why, in house fires in the 80s, the pictures were the only items to survive unscathed.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b01509vl)
Where Next for Miliband's Labour?

As Labour conference approaches, Beyond Westminster explores different views within the party on what Ed Miliband needs to do to strengthen the party and build a successful electoral strategy. Inspired by Barack Obama, Miliband is enthusiastically adopting the notion of community organisers as the way forward. Gisela Stuart managed to hang onto her Edgbaston seat against the odds in the last election by recruiting campaign workers from outside the Labour Party. But how much can grass roots politics alone achieve? What positioning and policies need to lie behind it? And do any of these concepts matter if Labour is no longer trusted to run the economy? Anne McElvoy discusses the different philosophies now being developed by those who call themselves blue Labour, purple Labour and red Labour, and asks if Miliband is following a clear path or fudging the hard decisions he has to take.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01509vn)
Kate Adie shares stories behind the headlines with correspondents around the world. David Loyn is at the funeral of Burhanuddin Rabbani reflecting on the return to prominence of Afghanistan's warlords. Tim Mansel looks at the intimate relationship between football and politics in Turkey. Roland Buerk explains why the residents of Tokyo are cancelling the leases on their high rise apartments. Damien McGuiness is in the disputed territory of Abkhazia and Andrew Harding has the opportunity to check out a Libyan hospital .... as a patient.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01509vq)
The latest news from the world of personal finance. With Paul Lewis.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b014qxc5)
Series 75

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig with panellists Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Andy Hamilton and Julia Hartley-Brewer.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b014qvhc)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b014qvhf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b014qq77)
Winchester

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a discussion of news and politics from Kings Worthy Primary School in Winchester with Shadow Secretary of State, Douglas Alexander; Cabinet Office Minister, Oliver Letwin; Times columnist, Camilla Cavendish; and deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats, Simon Hughes.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b01509vs)
Your chance to call Jonathan Dimbleby on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. The panel at Kings Worthy Primary School in Winchester discussed Palestine's bid for statehood, the global economy, nursing standards and the Dale Farm travellers.


SAT 14:30 Grossman's War (b0150b0c)
Life and Fate

Fortress Stalingrad

As the Russian tanks encircle Stalingrad, the commanders of the German 6th Army realise that the end is in sight but Hitler will not permit a surrender.

Spiridonov abandons the power station to join his daughter, Vera, and her new baby on a barge frozen into the Volga. As the citizens of Stalingrad start to reclaim their wrecked city, the family begin to make plans for the future.

Stepan Spiridonov ..... Kenneth Cranham
Vera Spiridonova ..... Morven Christie
Pavel Andreyev ..... Malcolm Tierney
General Von Paulus ..... Matthew Marsh
General Schmidt ..... Elliot Cowan
Colonel Adam ..... Jonathan Cullen
Lieutenant Peter Bach ..... Geoffrey Streatfeild
Sergeant Eisenaug ..... Michael Shelford
Zina ..... Jessica Raine
Major Byerozkin ..... Sam Dale
Alexandra Vladimirovna ..... Ann Mitchell
Natalya ..... Alison Pettit
Sergeyevna ..... Christine Kavanagh
Hitler's Orderly ..... David Seddon
Stalin's secretary ..... Tony Bell
Petenkoffer ..... Lloyd Thomas
Driver ..... Jude Akuwudike

Dramatised by Jonathan Myerson.

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead.

Director: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested. Grossman died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


SAT 15:30 Page to Performance (b014pzzz)
Series 3

Mahler's Final Adagio

Musicians talk about the challenges they face as they prepare to perform a piece from the orchestral repertoire. In this programme Lowri Blake meets the young musicians of the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain. Aged between 13 and 19 they give an insight into the musical challenges offered them by the last piece of music that the Austrian composer Gustav Mahler completed - the Adagio from his unfinished 10th symphony.

It was a piece composed at the height of a personal crisis in Mahler's life. He had just found out that his wife was having an affair with a young architect, and he was also suffering from a heart condition that would kill him before he could complete the full symphony.

Lowri Blake talks to Edward Seckerson about this tumultuous time in the composer's life, how he sought a consultation with the up-and-coming psychiatrist Sigmund Freud, and how his passion for his wife and his despair were etched into the score. The Adagio itself opens quietly but towards the end erupts in a huge outburst of emotion, often described as 'a cry of pain', which the young players, under the baton of their conductor Vasily Petrenko, describe as they face the demanding musical challenge.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0150bqr)
Cook the Perfect Quiche Lorraine, Singer Janis Ian

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week presented by Jane Garvey. Cook the Perfect...Quiche Lorraine, New research into how sickle cell affects maternal health, Actress Patricia Routledge, Singer Janis Ian, Allison Pearson and Natasha Walter discuss women "having it all", Caring for older carers, Men and facial hair - love it or loathe it?


SAT 17:00 PM (b0150bqt)
With Ritula Shah. A fresh perspective on the day's news with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b014qnwx)
Economy and Rumours

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan asks his guests whether it's time to declare a state of emergency in the world economy and to adopt extreme measures to sort out the Euro crisis and the lack of economic activity in the West. They also discuss rumours, hearsay and speculation, and the role they play in business.

Evan is joined in the studio by Guy Berruyer, chief executive of global business software supplier Sage Group; internet entrepreneur Brent Hoberman, founder of online interior decoration business mydeco.com; Hugh Hendry, co-founder of hedge fund Eclectica Asset Management.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b014qvhh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b014qvhk)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014qvhm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0150bwh)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Broadcasting from a street of London, Ralph McTell will be in the Loose Ends Studio talking to Clive about his new musical releases that span six collections of live songs and instrumentals. Ralph has performed his unique folk music now for over 50 years and with a back catalogue of over 300 songs has plenty of great material for 'Songs For Six Strings'.

Meera Syal is known for her much loved comedic performances in such classic BBC television shows as 'Goodness Gracious Me' and more recently playing the fictional grandmother, to her real life husband on 'The Kumars at No.42'! Meera is now set to star as Sister George in the London revival of Frank Marcus's dark comedy, 'The Killing of Sister George'.

Also on the show talking to Clive is another much loved television comedy actor, Boycie himself, John Challis. Having been a star in the hugely successful sitcom 'Only Fools and Horses', John has now had the chance to reflect and revel in this success as the show is now celebrating it's 30th anniversary. To mark the occasion he is releasing his autobiography 'Being Boycie'.

Allegra McEvedy has a come long way since being expelled from school, so far in fact that she will be talking to Vic Goddard, the headmaster of Passmores School which has been dissected for Channel 4's new documentary series 'Educating Essex'.

Bringing his 'old school' and Motown musical charm is Michael Kiwanuka with the title track from his recently released EP, 'I'm Getting Ready'. Also performing will be David J. Roch on acoustic guitar with soaring vocals and the haunting melody of his next single 'Hour of Need'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b0150bwk)
Warren Buffett

As President Obama announces his deficit reduction plan, which includes the 'Buffett Rule', to increase taxes on America's richest, Profile looks at the billionaire investor Warren Buffett.

At 81 years of age, he's one of the richest men in the world closing in on a personal fortune of nearly 40 billion dollars. Recently Buffett decided to do a small tax survey in his Omaha office to find out what proportion of everybody's salary was being taxed. He discovered that he was paying a much lower share of his income in tax than his staff. So he proposed that that America's tax laws be changed so that he and his "mega-rich friends" pay more income tax.

President Obama took the call.

Mary Ann Sieghart talks to family, friends and Buffett experts to get an insight into the man known as the 'Oracle of Omaha' who many say has inspired a new American tax system.

Producer Deiniol Buxton.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0150bwm)
Sarfraz Manzoor and his guests writers Don Guttenplan and Dreda Say Mitchell and poet Cahal Dallat review the week's cultural highlights including Grief by Mike Leigh

Mike Leigh's new play Grief stars Lesley Manville as Dorothy - a war widow struggling to keep her grief and depression at bay in 1950s suburbia. She shares her home with an older brother and a teenage daughter both of whom become equally isolated by their own unhappiness.

Page One: Inside the New York Times is a documentary film by Andrew Rossi who was given access to those behind the paper during an eventful year which saw a vertiginous drop in advertising revenue and the rise of Wikileaks.

Colson Whitehead's novel Zone One is being marketed as 'a zombie novel for people with brains'. The world has been devastated by a plague that has turned its victims into mindless, cannibalistic zombies. Mark Spitz is a survivor who has been assigned to a project to clear lower Manhattan of the undead in preparation for resettlement. It's a tough job and the zombies just keep coming.

Costing an estimated £200,000 per screen minute, Terra Nova is apparently the most expensive TV series ever made. In the mid 22nd century, Earth is facing environmental collapse - the logical solution is to send a chosen group through a wormhole in the space/time continuum to found a colony in a parallel time-stream 84 million years in the past. Unfortunately the new Eden features carnivorous dinosaurs...

John Martin was one of the most popular artists of the 19th century - some 8 million people saw his triptych The Last Judgement when the paintings toured the country. Despite - or possibly because of - his popularity, the art establishment were dismissive of his work. The exhibition at Tate Britain - John Martin: Apocalypse - is the largest ever show of the artist's work and aims to restore his reputation.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0150bwp)
The Christiania Effect

Christiania celebrates its 40th birthday this year - quite an achievement for a place where an abrasive attitude to the Danish Government has meant it's always been about two weeks away from being shut down. The BBC has visited Christiania regularly over the past four decades and, in The Christiania Effect, writer and broadcaster David Goldblatt goes to the commune and examines some of those reports to tell the history of this bold experiment in free living. He has also gained access to a unique oral history of Christiania where long time members of the commune tell their own personal and sometimes surprising version of events.

In the programme David hears how an abandoned barracks in the heart of Copenhagen became a centre for liberal drugs laws, hands-off parenting and free-form architecture. He learns how it evolved from a dark and dangerous area for social drop-outs to being a focus of Copenhagen's tourist industry and a place that many of the city's residents would fight hard to defend. And he hears how it became a magnet for promoters and performers like Bob Dylan, Beck and the Arctic Monkeys.
As well as looking back at its history David assesses the future of this unique community and asks what mainstream society can learn from this unique counter-cultural experiment.


SAT 21:00 Grossman's War (b014ptrf)
Life and Fate

Viktor and Lyuda

Viktor, a nuclear physicist, is evacuated with his family from Moscow eastwards to Kazan.

It's October 1942 and the Russians are defending Stalingrad from the ferocious attack of the Germans. Viktor has a revelatory breakthrough in his research but his wife Lyuda learns of the death of her son and her grief drives a wedge between the couple: Viktor is drawn to the kindness of Marya, the wife of his close colleague.

Kenneth Branagh and David Tennant star in Vasily Grossman’s epic saga.

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Grossman’s huge novel charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly seen as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested.

Grossman died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

Dramatised by Mike Walker.

Viktor Shtrum.....Kenneth Branagh
Lyuda Shaposhnikova.....Greta Scacchi
Nadya.....Ellie Kendrick
Alexandra .....Ann Mitchell
Pyotr Sokolov.....Nigel Anthony
Akhmet Karimov....Stephen Greif
Marya Sokolova.....Harriet Walter
Leonid Madyarov.....Ralph Ineson
Sister.....Elaine Claxton
Anna Stepanovna....Alex Tregear
Soldiers.....Gerard McDermott, Jonathan Forbes, Henry Devas

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead.

Musicians: Oliver Wilson-Dickson, Tom Jackson, Stacey Blythe and Max Pownall

Translated by Robert Chandler

Director: Alison Hindell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b014qvhp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b014pxnq)
Securing Freedom: 2011

Eliza Manningham-Buller: Freedom

In this third and final Reith lecture the former Director General of the security service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller, discusses policy priorities since 9.11. She reflects on the Arab Spring, and argues that the West's support of authoritarian regimes did, to some extent, fuel the growth of Al-Qaeda. The lecture also considers when we should talk to "terrorists".


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b014pw4k)
(6/12)
What did Anne Boleyn almost certainly not have which blues musician Hound Dog Taylor, music hall star Little Tich, and Dr Hannibal Lecter, definitely did?

That's the question Tom Sutcliffe asked listeners to think about at the end of last week's Round Britain Quiz - and he's back with the answer, along with a host of other cryptic questions in the latest contest between Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Michael Alexander and Alan Taylor play for Scotland, against Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney of Northern Ireland. You can play along too, by taking a look at the questions on the Round Britain Quiz pages of the Radio 4 website.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b014ptrk)
Grumpy poets, redundant hangmen and rats feature in today's richly mixed bag of poetry requests, read by Paul Mundell. Roger McGough also introduces poets reading their own work; there's archive of WH Auden in typically terse mood as he does the rounds of a lecture tour in 'On the Circuit' and Jean Sprackland reads a moving remembrance of her father in her poem 'Dressing Gown'. There are other portraits of family life by the late Ken Smith and the Welsh poet, Tony Curtis.

Produced by Sarah Langan.



SUNDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 2011

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01507dz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 I Was There Too! (b00kbj2y)
Nothing But Blue Skies

By Dominic Power. Katherine Rudd, now 97, recalls events on the night of the Roswell incident in New Mexico, 1947. Read by Elizabeth Mastrantonio.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01507f1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01507f3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01507f5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01507f7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0150dsg)
The bells of St Mary's in Bishopstoke, Hampshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b0150bwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01507f9)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0150dsj)
Compassion

Fergal Keane reflects on the vital human instinct of compassion and how it benefits us as individuals to be compassionate. He considers how, when faced with evil, a sense of justice can interfere with compassion. He concludes that although there are times when compassion might overwhelm critical reasoning and propel us into disaster, it can also move us to mercy and the healing of wounds.

To illustrate his argument Fergal Keane draws on the writing of Bernard Schlink and Cormac McCarthy, the poetry of Elizabeth Jennings and Michael Longley, and the music of Leonard Cohen and Morten Lauridsen.

The readers are Liza Sadovy and Patrick Drury.

Producer: Ronni Davis
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0150dsl)
The World Sheepdog Trials in Cumbria showcased the skills of the best 200 dogs and handlers over four days. It is the first time England has held the competition. The teams came from as far away as South America, Japan and New Zealand to take on the might of the established home nations. Caz Graham follows the excitement on Finals Day where the top 16 are put through their paces at the Lowther Estate near Penrith. The teams are scored over a series of rounds on skills including lifting, penning, rounding and driving the sheep. The 2008 World Champion Alex Owen with dog Roy from Wales defend their title but miss out on the final by just 2 points. 15 year old Robbie Welsh from Scotland watches on from the grandstand and there is sadness as the only female competitor, Lyle Lad and her dog Shep are disqualified.

This edition is presented by Caz Graham and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01507fc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01507ff)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0150dsn)
The religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b0150dsq)
MicroLoan Foundation

Gabby Logan presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the MicroLoan Foundation.

Reg Charity: 1104287

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope: MicroLoan Foundation
- Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01507fh)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01507fk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0150dss)
In ever corner sing - Salisbury Cathedral celebrates the 20th anniversary of the girls' choir in a grand reunion as they look back on how music inspires faith in God.
In 1991, the same year in which the 900th anniversary of the founding of the very first boys' choir was celebrated, Salisbury became the first English Cathedral to form a separate and independent foundation for girl choristers. They sang their first service in October of that year and nowadays the weekly services are equally divided between the boy and girl choristers.
Since 1991, almost 120 girls have been choristers at Salisbury. A significant number have subsequently become choral scholars in the Oxbridge Chapel Choirs, and some have sung with the country's top choral groups including the Monteverdi Choir and The Sixteen. Several are making names for themselves on the international music circuit.

Taking part in the service are the Precentor, the Revd Canon Jeremy Davies and the Dean, the Very Revd June Osborne
Director of Music: David Halls
Assistant Director of Music: Daniel Cook.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b014qxc7)
Churchill, chance and the black dog

"For a couple of days in May 1940, the fate of the world turned on the fall of a leaf" says John Gray. He outlines the strange conjunction of events - and the work of chance - that led to Churchill becoming Prime Minister.

He muses on how Churchill was found by one of his advisers around one o'clock on the morning of May 9th "brooding alone in one of his clubs". He was given a crucial bit of advice which may have secured him the job. What would have happened Gray wonders if he hadn't been found and that advice - to say nothing! - not been passed on?

He also ponders whether it was it Churchill's recurring melancholy which made for his greatness? "It's hard to resist the thought that the dark view of the world that came on Churchill in his moods of desolation enabled him to see what others could not".

"Churchill had not one life but several" says Gray. Without them all, "history would have been very different, and the world darker than anything we can easily imagine".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0150dsx)
As George Osbourne announces that we have just six weeks to save the Euro we take a closer look at the long term options for Europe with Henning Meyer, Senior Fellow at London School of Economics, Vanessa Therrode of law firm SJ Berwin and Economist Ha-Joon Chang from Cambridge University.

Plus is your garden fit for the Olympics? We head to Newham to hear how guerilla gardening is helping to spruce up the borough.

As NASA searches for its fallen satellite, we hear from Lottie Williams who was hit by a falling spacecraft.

Broadcaster Jad Abumrad explains the nature of genius.

Reviewing the papers: political columnist Allegra Stratton, historian Kate Williams and action author Andy McNab.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0150dsz)
For detailed synopsis, see daily episodes

Written by: Graham Harvey
Directed by: Rosemary Watts
Editor: Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ..... Jack Firth
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Debbie Aldridge ..... Tamsin Greig
Peggy Woolley ..... June Spencer
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Rosalind Adams
William Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Nic Hanson ..... Becky Wright
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Christopher Carter ..... William Sanderson-Thwaite
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Brenda Tucker ..... Amy Shindler
Bert Fry ..... Eric Allan
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Amy Franks ..... Vinette Robinson
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0150dt1)
Arthur Edwards

Kirsty Young's castaway is the royal photographer Arthur Edwards.

He is a Fleet Street legend and, for more than thirty years, has captured the most memorable moments of the House of Windsor - from the first tentative pictures of a teenage Lady Diana Spencer to the balcony kiss at the marriage of Prince William and Kate Middleton.

He's travelled the world, met the Pope and seen inside the Oval Office and the Kremlin - it's a life far removed from his early life in the East End of London where money was very tight and his mother saved up her wages as a cleaner to buy him his first camera.

Record: Panis Angelicus
Book: A photographic album with pictures of his family
Luxury: An inexhaustible supply of tea and a kettle

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b014pw4w)
Series 61

With guests Julian Clary, Phill Jupitus, Josie Lawrence and Rick Wakeman

The popular panel game hosted by Nicholas Parsons. The guests try to speak on a topic given to them without hesitation repetition or deviation. The guests this week are Julian Clary, Phill Jupitus, Josie Lawrence and ex-rocker Rick Wakeman

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0150dt3)
Food ads and children

Sheila Dillon explores the issue of advertising junk food to children, and how companies have changed their marketing since the banning of the showing of food advertisements during children's television programmes four years ago.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01507fm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0150dt5)
National and international news presented by Shaun Ley at the Labour Party Conference in Liverpool. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Drone Wars (b0150dt7)
The pilotless drone aircraft has become key to current conflicts such as Afghanistan. Pilots flying drones remotely by computer link from thousand of miles away are replacing pilots flying aircraft over combat zones. As well as use by the military, drones have also been used extensively by the CIA to attack suspected al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders in Pakistan and other countries. Critics have said there have been many civilian casualties as a result of these attacks. Drones are also likely to play a major role in Western strategy for containing al-Qaeda and the Taliban after military withdrawal from Afghanistan. And many countries around the world are rushing to acquire these new weapons.
But increased of drones raises all kinds of ethical as well as military questions. How far can technology take over combat? In an updated version of a programme first broadcast last year, Stephen Sackur investigates a secretive and controversial change in how we wage war.
Producer: Chris Bowlby.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0150gh9)
Avebury Manor

Matthew Wilson, Anne Swithinbank and Bob Flowerdew answer gardening queries in Avebury Manor, Wiltshire where the Victorian kitchen garden is undergoing meticulous restoration.

Matthew Wilson delivers updates from the Olympic garden in Stratford.

Scale insects : how a bit of soap can go a long way and when to lift your infested potatoes.

The programme is chaired by Eric Robson.

Questions addressed in the programme are:
How do I protect my fruit from being eaten before they ripen?
What are the white, powdery spots on my potted Bay tree?
My Auriculas and Primulas bloomed twice this year. What will happen next year?
Plant suggestions for half-barrels in part sun, part shade:
Suggestions included: Aralia Elegantissima, Hydrangeas and Ligustrum lucidum (Privet)
Why haven't my 1 year old raspberry canes grown?
Why hasn't my five year-old Magnolia never flowered?
My potatoes showed signs of blight. I cut the tops off. How long can I leave them in?
Why does my Florence fennel always bolt

Produced by Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Picturing Britain (b0150ghc)
Series 2

The Lady Bangers

In Picturing Britain, Adil Ray explores British life through the lens of some of the country's photographers.

In this programme, Adil takes to the track - the oval track - to discover the wild world of banger racing and meet the diehard foot-soldiers and fans of the sport.

He goes to an evening meeting just outside Eastbourne with documentary photographer Chloe Dewe Mathews as she works on her latest project. Their main focus - to follow the lady banger drivers as they prepare to for the first of the evening's races.

As he wanders around the arena, Adil discovers banger racing is very much alive and kicking thanks to a small but devoted band of followers who invest all their time and energy, not to mention money, in doing up old, useless and scrap cars and making them safe to race.

The cars are painstakingly stripped inside and out, all glass removed, doors taped and then painted in bright colours - only to have them smashed them to pieces on the track.

As he discovers, it's very much a family affair - bringing together two or three generations with a passion for the sport.

And it is a close-knit community and a warm and welcoming one - but keen to share the love of this forgotten motorsport with all newcomers.

Producer: Mohini Patel.


SUN 15:00 Grossman's War (b0150ghf)
Life and Fate

Viktor and the Academy

Viktor's scientific breakthrough has not brought him the success he expected. Instead he is gradually ostracised for his 'anti-Soviet' science. He starts to dread the knock at the door.

Zhenya's visit to Moscow brings some distraction but it is Marya in whom he longs to confide.

Conclusion of Vasily Grossman’s epic saga.

Viktor Shtrum ..... Kenneth Branagh
Lyuda ..... Greta Scacchi
Marya Sokolova ..... Harriet Walter
Zhenya ..... Raquel Cassidy
Nadya ..... Ellie Kendrick
Shishakov ..... Jack Shepherd
Boris Badin ..... Carl Prekopp
Anna Stepanovna ..... Alex Tregear
Markov ..... Simon Bubb
Chepyzhin ..... James Greene
Vanya ..... Gerard McDermott
Stalin........ Philip Madoc

With Elaine Claxton, Jonathan Forbes and James Lailey

Dramatised by Mike Walker.

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead

Performed by Oliver Wilson-Dickson, Tom Jackson, Stacey Blythe and Max Pownall.

Translated by Robert Chandler

Director: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate is a sweeping historical tale that charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested and Grossman was told that it would not be published for at least 200 years. He died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0150grg)
Open Book marks the 50th anniversary of Catch 22 and the role of the writer-in-residence

Open Book marks the 50th anniversary of Joseph Heller's bestseller Catch 22, the story of Captain John Yassarian, a bombardier stationed in an American bomber squadron off the coast of Italy during the last months of the second World War. Yossarian is furious because thousands of people he's never met keep trying to kill him and his attempts to survive by claiming to be mad are thwarted by the eponymous Catch 22 - anyone rational enough to want to be grounded could never be insane and therefore must return to their perilous duties. Soldier turned author Andy McNab and Professor Christopher Bigsby discuss why this 1961 book about the madness of war remains so popular and examine Heller's subsequent lesser remembered novels.

Many writers dreams of escaping the distractions of everyday life in order to concentrate on their work, or to be immersed in different cultural experiences to encourage their creative juices. An increasing number of organisations have responded to that need by creating the role of a writer in residence. Mariella Frostrup explores what these organisations, the writers and ultimately the readers, get out of the arrangement, with Horatio Clare, writer-in-residence for Maersk lines and Naomi Alderman, who has just done the role for the W hotel in central London and soon to be writer-in-residence at the Gladstone Library.

On the programme a couple of weeks ago we talked to the literary agent Carole Blake about some of the literary apps currently available. To respond to your feedback and outline what the publishing industry has in store for us in the future Mariella is joined by Dan Franklin, Digital Editor at The Random House Group, Philip Jones, dept Editor of the Bookseller and Henry Volans, Head of Digital at Faber

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0150grj)
Roger McGough presents a selection of favourite poetry requests, read by Paul Mundell and Mark Meadows.
Today's programme includes two tense cradle songs by Louis MacNeice, poems about significant pauses by Paul Muldoon and Jean Sprackland, and two wonderful pieces of distinctly Welsh verse. Singer, 6 music presenter, and poetry lover Cerys Matthews reads a poem by the miner turned poet Idris Davies that's a clever take on the Welsh National Anthem. 'Welsh Incident' by Robert Graves captures a fantastically odd conversation, and there are other surreal offerings from Jules Renard and Günter Grass.

Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b014q04r)
Cyber Spies

The criminal exploitation of the internet poses one of the biggest threats to UK national security. As organised crime gangs and terrorists use it to communicate and plan their activities, the police and security agencies are turning to hacking to conduct surveillance and gather intelligence.

In the first of a new series, File on 4 looks at the covert techniques being used to get beyond the firewall of a suspect's PC. But are the tactics legal? One leading expert says the rules governing interception are inconsistent and on occasions, misinterpreted by the police.

Reporter Stephen Grey also examines the way British companies are helping to proliferate this hi-tech snooping to countries with questionable human rights and which use it to monitor political opponents and dissidents.

And, with the Ministry of Defence developing its defences against sophisticated international attacks how vulnerable is the UK to "cyber warfare". Why did a Chinese state telecommunications company briefly 'hijack' most of the world's internet traffic one day last year?
Producer: David Lewis
Reporter: Stephen Grey.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b0150bwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01507fp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01507fr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01507ft)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0150grl)
Liz Barclay makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio.
While the rest of the world worries about the economic climate there's a mellow feel to Pick of the Week this week. Honey, apples and ripening fruit to tempt the tastes buds with the harmonious strains of Liszt, Squeeze and Alexi Sayle providing a soothing backdrop as we hear about mysterious chance encounters between the famous and infamous and consider the future in a world beyond Facebook. So join Liz Barclay for Pick of the Week.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme - Radio 4
Picking Round Apples - Radio 4
Gardeners' Question Time - Radio 4
BOTW: One on One - Radio 4
Great Lives - Radio 4
Jodie Gardner Interview - Radio Merseyside
WH Drama - Life and Fate: Anna's Letter - Radio 4
Gillian Duffy Interview - Radio Manchester
After I Was Gorgeous - Radio 4
Face It - Radio 4
Four Thought - Radio 4
Alexei Sayle Interview - Radio Scotland
Lyrical Journey - Radio 4
In Tune - Radio 3

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Helen Lee.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0150grn)
Freddie's full of enthusiasm for his autumn hunting practice, and wants to see Fabian, the pony he rides. Elizabeth reminds him he still has homework to complete.

Lynda is doing her best to ensure the flower and produce show runs smoothly. James and Leonie are there to collect material for their book, and are impressed with Peggy's enamelled brooch entry in the craft section. They'd love to get her take on things, as an old village resident. Leonie loves how everyone takes the event so seriously. After visiting Jack, Peggy returns and Tony comes in with her to see how she's got on. Leonie's still around, and Tony is amused to hear her refer to Peggy as "Gran".

Leonie finds the judges' comments amazing. Lynda explains the importance of the rules, which James finds ridiculous. Leonie thinks they're wonderfully villagey and quaint - exactly what they're looking for.

Peggy is delighted to win first place but wishes she could share her news with Jack. Elizabeth congratulates her. She has enjoyed being out and feeling part of village life again. They both agree the day's outing has done them good.


SUN 19:15 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b0150grq)
Series 1

Episode 2

John Finnemore, writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-up in things like Miranda and That Mitchell and Webb Look returns with half an hour of his own sketches, each funnier than the last. Although, hang on, that system means starting the whole series with the least funny sketch. Might need to rethink that. OK, it's a new show filled with sketches written and performed by John Finnemore, but now no longer arranged in strict order of funniness. Also, he's cut the sketch that would have gone first.

This week's show reveals the truth behind the war effort, sty construction, and evolution.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme is written by and stars John Finnemore. It also features Carrie Quinlan (The News Quiz, The Late Edition), Lawry Lewin (The Life & Times of Vivienne Vyle, Horrible Histories) and Simon Kane (Six Impossible Things).

Producer: Ed Morrish.


SUN 19:45 The Time Being (b0150grs)
Series 5

Photo Finish

The latest season of The Time Being brings another showcase for new voices, none of whom have been previously broadcast. Previous series have brought new talent to a wider audience and provided a stepping stone for writers who have since gone on to enjoy further success both on radio and in print, such as Tania Hershman, Heidi Amsinck, Sally Hinchcliffe and Submarine author and National Short Story judge Joe Dunthorne.

Photo Finish written by Louise Lee.

Terri discovered her talent for running when she was chased by her mother's angry boyfriend. Fifteen years later it's the Olympic marathon. Terri is tipped for gold, but she will have to overcome her rivals: voluptuous World No. 1 Jana de Groot and the surgically modified Nadine Uberhang.

Louise Lee had a proper job once but gave it all up to become a private investigator. A current Birkbeck MA student in Creative Writing, she is busy writing her first novel, The Last Honeytrap, based on her own experiences in the seedy and often comical world of entrapment.

Reader: Philippa Stanton

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b014qxbq)
Does light music still have a place on the BBC? As listeners voice their doubts, Radio 2 controller Bob Shennan explains his decision to end Alan Titchmarsh's programme Melodies for You.

As Americana also comes to an end over on Radio 4, Roger recalls controller Gwyneth Williams' reasons for the change and hears your reaction to the comedy which replaces it.

The sounds of the past transport Roger back in time as he visits the new BBC Archive building, and hears about an ambitious project to make all the archive available in time for the BBC's 100th birthday in 2022.
And as Philip Glass-watch moves into its second week, there's yet another sighting of the composer's ubiquitous piece.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b014qxbz)
Burhanuddin Rabbani, Kurt Sanderling, Arthur Evans and Walter Bonatti

Matthew Bannister on

The former Afghan president Burhannudin Rabbani, assassinated as he was leading attempts to start peace talks with the Taliban.

The conductor Kurt Sanderling, who fled from the Nazis to the Soviet Union and was renowned for his interpretations of Shostakovitch. We hear from his son, Thomas, also a well known conductor.

The gay rights activist Arthur Evans who led non violent protests against discrimination in 1970s New York.

The Italian mountaineer Walter Bonatti, who was falsely accused of trying to sabotage the first successful ascent of the world's second highest mountain, K2

And the banjo player Wade Mainer who was 104 when he died - a last surviving link to the heyday of hillbilly music on 1930s American radio.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01509vq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0150dsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b014pw7g)
Non-Riotous Behaviour

This summer's riots provoked much speculation about the factors which prompted so many people to break the law. But philosopher-turned-commentator Jamie Whyte is more interested in understanding why this sort of thing doesn't happen more often. Is it fear of arrest or is it morality that makes most of the people abide by the law for most of the time? In search of the causes of mass civil obedience, Jamie Whyte speaks to leading experts in the fields of philosophy, psychology and anthropology.

Contributors include:
Roger Scruton, philosopher and writer
Quentin Skinner, professor of the humanities & expert on modern political thought
Tim Harford, the Financial Times Undercover Economist and presenter of More or Less on Radio 4
George Klosko, political philosopher
Alex Bentley, anthropologist
Carol Hedderman, criminologist

Producer: Simon Coates.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0150gsm)
Carolyn Quinn reports from the Labour Party conference in Liverpool. She speaks to MPs and activists about the mood of the party.

Labour commentator Dan Hodges discusses the challenges facing Labour leader Ed Miliband with the political editor of Prospect magazine, James Macintyre.

We hear from the Economics Editor of The Times, Sam Fleming, about a new plan to tackle the Eurozone debt crisis.

This week's panel has the Conservative MP Mark Pritchard debating the big political stories with the Liberal Democrat peer Matthew Oakeshott. They discuss relations between their two parties following criticisms of Conservative policies at the recent Lib Dem conference.

Programme editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b0150gsp)
Episode 71

John Kampfner analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b014qxc1)
If you fancy a change of gear or need your batteries charging The Film Programme is the place for you. Francine Stock talks to Nicholas Winding Refn about his new film, Drive, starring Ryan Gosling as a stuntman who drives getaway cars in his spare time. He falls for the wife of a criminal played by Carey Mulligan and soon falls foul of the local gangsters. Its a turbo-charged ride and shares the fascination with violence evident in Refn's earlier work.
Drive's 21st century sheen is more than matched by the vision of Humphrey Jennings...the man Lindsay Anderson described as the only poet of British cinema. A collection of films from the beginning of his career is being released on DVD for the first time this month and Francine Stock is joined by Jennings' biographer, Kevin Jackson, to assess them and their place in his achievement.
There's also an interview with Andrew Rossi who went undercover to produce Page One, a documentary about the New York Times and Neil Brand is on hand to diagnose some of your least favourite film scores -- the ones you feel miss the mark by a million miles.

Producer: Zahid Warley.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0150dsj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2011

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01507gj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b014qndd)
Understanding Suicide - Families, Secrets And Memories

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works. He examines a new book seeking to understand suicide and talks to a sociologist about family secrets. Ben Fincham is a Lecturer in Sociology at Sussex University and his book 'Understanding Suicide: A Sociological Autopsy' assesses sociological work in this area and explores what can be known about the motivation and lives of suicidal people. He's joined by Dr Mike Shiner, a Senior Research Fellow in the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at London School of Economics. Laurie also talks to Professor Carol Smart from the University of Manchester about her paper exploring family secrets and memories.
Producer Chris Wilson.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0150dsg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01507gl)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01507gn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01507gq)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01507gs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0150m83)
With the Rev. Dr. Karen Smith.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0150m87)
Charlotte Smith hears how an interactive map is helping cheese-lovers taste the 700 named British varieties.
As part of British Cheese Week, a Cheese Flavour Map has been launched to encourage people to taste more regional and old varieties of cheese. Currently, 55% of Brits still regard Cheddar as their favourite variety.
Nigel White, secretary of the British Cheese Board tells Charlotte Creamy Lancashire could be a good alternative for her favourite - Blue Stilton.

Whilst the UK national pig herd has dropped by more than half a million animals over the past 5 years, there is a growing market for home grown pigs in China. This year four and a half thousand pigs are being flown to China. And according to the National Pig Association several more thousand are in the pipeline for next year.
Farming Today revisits one pig producer who says international business is booming after flying his first 2,000 pigs earlier this year. Charlotte asks whether farmers are exporting to avoid the high welfare standards set in the UK.

There are warnings that farmers could end up paying for the price cuts introduced today by Tesco. The National Farmers Union fears that suppliers will be squeezed as the supermarket cuts the cost of 3000 items. But Tesco states the campaign is about helping families in hard times with lower prices and that it's not about making life harder for suppliers. Charlotte asks the NFU why farmers aren't as positive as consumers about the cuts.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Clare Freeman.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01507gv)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b0150m89)
07:50 The BBC's Lyse Doucet assesses the mood on the street in Damascus.
08:10 Ed Balls outlines his prescription for the British economy.
08:20 Stephen Fry on how the English language is constantly reinvented.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0150m8c)
Simon Jenkins' History of England, and the National Poet of Wales, Gillian Clarke

Andrew Marr discusses the work of the 'Godfather' of new music Pierre Boulez. The French pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard explains the joy of his compositions, which are in a state of permanent revolution. The writer Peter Conrad pits Verdi against Wagner to ask whether it's possible to love both composers, or does taste, nationality and ideology still get in the way. With a very English temperament Simon Jenkins romps through the history of England in a bid to answer why the nation lost America, avoided a French revolution and gradually lost its world supremacy. And the Welsh National Poet, Gillian Clarke, talks about her country's literary heritage.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b0150m8f)
John Cooper - The Queen's Agent: Francis Walsingham at the Court of Elizabeth I

Episode 1

Written by John Cooper. Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

Elizabeth I came to the throne at a time of insecurity and unrest. Rivals threatened her reign; England was a Protestant island, isolated in a sea of Catholic countries. Spain plotted an invasion, but Elizabeth's Secretary, Francis Walsingham, was prepared to do whatever it took to protect her and the reformed religion to which he was devoted.

As a young man he had witnessed the massacres in Paris on St Bartholomew's Day, when French Protestants were attacked by Catholic mobs. He was determined to save England from a similar fate.

Walsingham ran a network of agents in England and Europe who provided him with information about invasions or assassination plots. He recruited likely young men and 'turned' others. He encouraged Elizabeth to make war against the Catholic Irish rebels, with extreme brutality, and oversaw the execution of Mary Queen of Scots.
The Queen's Agent is a story of secret agents, cryptic codes and ingenious plots, set in a turbulent period of England's history. It is also the story of a man devoted to his queen, sacrificing his every waking hour to save the threatened English state.

Reader: Hugh Bonneville

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0150m8h)
Harriet Harman, Mary Soames, AL Kennedy

Is Harriet Harman right to insist that the Labour Party should change its rules to keep a woman in one of its top posts? She joins Jane Garvey to discuss why she thinks all-male leaderships are a bad thing. Lady Mary Soames remembers her father Winston Churchill, her childhood at Chartwell and what it was like to live with a Prime Minister at war. Can working during the night increase your creativity? Novelist AL Kennedy talks about why she works in the small hours. Award-winning folk artist Jackie Oates performs live and discusses why her style of music and singing is attracting increasing attention, pushing her to the top of one of the folk charts.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0150m8k)
Second Honeymoon

Ghosts

SECOND HONEYMOON
By Joanna Trollope
Dramatised in five episodes by Rachel Joyce
Episode One - Ghosts
When Edie's youngest son leaves home she tries to come to terms with the empty nest but her husband's thoughts turn to the second honeymoon that is about to begin. Or, so he thinks ...

Edie.............Christine Kavanagh
Russell.........Sam Dale
Vivien...........Liza Sadovy
Matt.............Jonathan Forbes
Rosa............Alex Tregear
Ben.............Simon Bubb
Lazlo...........Carl Prekopp
Max.............James Lailey

Directed by Tracey Neale

STORY
"Edie put her hand out, took a breath and slowly, slowly pushed open his bedroom door. The room inside looked as if he had never left it" - a mum tries to come to terms with her empty nest but a husband can only think about the second honeymoon that can now begin ...

Joanna Trollope's most heartfelt and enthralling novel has been dramatised into five episodes for Woman's Hour by Rachel Joyce. SECOND HONEYMOON explores what happens when the empty nest is suddenly full again.

Ben is leaving home to move in with his girlfriend. At twenty-two he's the youngest of the family and the last to leave. His mother, Edie, an actress, is distraught. She has defined her life as the necessary cog in her family's lives and suddenly she feels unnecessary and unimportant. Her husband, Russell, an agent, is glad to be freed of daily parental roles and is looking forward to having Edie to himself. Then Edie lands the unexpected lead role in 'Ghosts' by Ibsen and it is then the children begin to make noises about coming home again. Their other son, Matt, is struggling in a relationship in which he achieves and earns less than his girlfriend. His sister, Rosa, is wrestling with debt and the end of a turbulent love affair. Rosa is the first of the Boyd children to think she may have to move back in with her parents - just until she can make ends meet again. Russell is determined to fend her off but things don't quite go according to plan.

This is the empty nest, twenty-first-century style. Grown children going and then wanting to come back again but at a time when their parents should be getting ready for their second honeymoon. The story of two generations struggling with love, careers and parenthood makes for a riveting and funny family drama for Woman's Hour.

THE WRITER
Joanna Trollope, the author of eagerly awaited novels, often centred around the domestic nuances and dilemmas of present-day life, has also written a number of historical novels and 'Britannia's Daughters', a study of women in the British Empire. In 1988 she wrote her first contemporary novel, 'The Choir' and this was followed by a number of hugely successful novels including: 'The Rector's Wife', 'Other People's Children', 'Brother and Sister' and 'Daughters in Law'.

THE DRAMATIST
Rachel Joyce has many radio credits to her name. Her most recent dramatisations for Radio 4 include - 'The Professor', 'The Portrait of a Lady' and 'Villette'. At present she is working on a dramatisation of 'The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.


MON 11:00 Robots that Care (b0150m8m)
Episode 1

In the first of a two-part series, Robots that Care, Jon Stewart charts the advances in robotics that are increasingly leading to direct one-to-one contact between humans and robots. Stewart visits robotocists and their collaborators in the USA and UK and asks how the robots will be used in the future. He examines the way cinema has shaped our ideas of robots and investigates the gulf between our expectations of what robots can do and the reality.

A fundamental question that scientists are posing is how we should consider the robots who, in the near future, will live alongside us in our homes. Should they be considered slaves, pets or friends? And Jon Stewart explores how the ideas of Isaac Asimov, that firstly robots should do no harm, have evolved over the decades.

Producer: Colin Grant.


MON 11:30 When the Dog Dies (b0139d46)
Series 2

The Never Ending Story

Ronnie Corbett and the writers of his hit sitcom Sorry, Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent, return for a second series of this popular sitcom about Sandy Hopper, a granddad happily growing old along with his dog Henry and his lodger, Dolores (Liza Tarbuck).

Dolores seems to have taken up with a married man but Sandy's grandfatherly duties come before his fatherly ones. And thus Sandy discovers the power of the story. Tyson's sister Zoe is desperate to find out what happened next. If it were just a matter of googling Emily Bronte, it would be simple enough but things are never that easy for Sandy. Just who is Byron Queasley, for a start?

Cast:
Ronnie Corbett ...... Sandy
Liza Tarbuck ...... Dolores
Sally Grace ...... Mrs Pompom
Tilly Vosburgh ...... Ellie
Philip Bird ....... Lance
Amelia Clarkson ...... Zoe
Stephen Critchlow ...... Queasley

Producer: Liz Anstee
A CPL Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b0150m8p)
We look back at the fire which took hold of a block of flats in South London 2 years ago and hear from the loved ones of some of the people who died. But why is the police investigation still going on.

And shower gel, or shower HELL? Why it gets up the nose of broadcaster and columnist, Matthew Parris.

Producer - Siobhann Tighe.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01507gx)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0150m8r)
Presented by Martha Kearney at Labour Conference in Liverpool. As Ed Balls sets out his economic plans, we speak to Liam Byrne who chairs Labour's Policy Review.
Also Robert Peston on plans to prop up the Euro zone.
And are parents pushing young children too fast by filling their days with yoga, swimming, music and even salsa classes?


MON 13:30 Round Britain Quiz (b0150m8t)
(7/12)
The South of England are preparing to avenge their recent defeat by the North of England as they clash again in Round Britain Quiz.

Marcel Berlins and Fred Housego, the regular South of England team, are hoping to get their own back on Jim Coulson and Diana Collecott of the North. Tom Sutcliffe chairs the good-natured contest of intellectual convolutions and cryptic connections.

There'll be the usual fiendish questions devised by Round Britain Quiz listeners, as well as musical connections to unravel. Tom will also have the answer to last week's cliff-hanger question, which was: what is common to Tchaikovsky, Lenin, and the protagonist of a Tolstoy short story?

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0150grn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b0150mld)
Henry's Demons

On a cold February day Henry Cockburn waded into the freezing water of Newhaven Estuary and tried to swim across. Voices, he said, had told him to do it.

Nearly halfway round the world in Afghanistan journalist Patrick Cockburn learned from his wife that Henry, their son had been admitted to a hospital mental ward. Thus begins Henry, Patrick and wife Janet Montefiore's extraordinary account of Henry's rapid descent into mental illness.

Raps and song by Henry Cockburn

Cast:
Henry Cockburn .............. Tom Riley
Patrick Cockburn ..............Tim McInnerny
Janet Montefiore ..............Joanna David
Evelyn Waugh....................Sam Dale
Young Henry.....................Julien Stockwell and Oscar Richardson

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b0150bwp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 A View Through a Lens (b0150mlg)
Series 3

Taking the Plunge

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

1/5 Taking the Plunge:

John travelled with a team whilst making the BBC series, Frozen Planet, to Dream Island a remote, cold, hostile island despite its name, whose only inhabitants are elephant seals and Adelie penguins. Over fifteen years ago, another team from the BBC came here to film what happens when young penguins go to sea. There were thousands of chicks in the colonies then, and when they reached the water, several hundred leopard seals were waiting for them. But John discovers the colony is less than a fifth of its original size, and there are far fewer leopard seals so he travels further south where the breeding season is shorter and later. On the Fish Islands, he finds what he's looking for; a larger colony of Adelie adults and chicks. The young penguins head down the rocky shore to the water's edge for their first swim, flapping their wings up and down before they take their first plunge. They are like nervous ducks, waiting for someone to make the first move. Eventually a young penguin dives into the water. Others follow. John watches anxiously; the penguins seem unaware of the dangers of diving into water with leopard seals nearby. What follows next is a tense game of 'cat and mouse' as a leopard seal hunts the young swimmers.

Producer Sarah Blunt.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b0150dt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b0150mlj)
Around 60% of the people who attend church in London on a Sunday are of African or Caribbean origin. Some of their churches are celebrating their 50th anniversary this year. Many argue that they have the capacity to breathe fresh life into mainline British churches, and offer a version of Christianity uncorrupted by western liberalism. Ernie Rea and his guests discuss the history of these churches; they analyse the breadth of their appeal, and they ask how comfortably some of their theological and cultural beliefs sit with Western culture?


MON 17:00 PM (b0150mll)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01507gz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b0150mln)
Series 61

With Tony Hawks, Pam Ayres, Miles Jupp and Gyles Brandreth

Nicholas Parsons challenges Tony Hawks, Pam Ayres, Miles Jupp and Gyles Brandreth to speak on a topic without hesitation, deviation or repetition for 60 seconds. From Sep 2011.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0150mlq)
Pat tells Kathy of her worries about how much money she and Tony will need to cover their mortgage and other costs. Kathy wishes there was more she could do to help.

Clarrie arrives to help Joe and Eddie collect the windfalls in the orchard. Jim's glad Leonie and James aren't there - they drove him mad at the flower and produce show. They agree to keep the cider-making secret from them.

Joe and Clarrie reminisce, and agree that Grange Farm's orchard has been neglected because there's no one to look after it properly, especially since Oliver has a lot on his plate. Jim thinks it would be a good project for the community, and it would be a wonderful opportunity to preserve the old varieties of apples, pears and all kinds of fruit. Jim knows the difficulties of relying on volunteers though, and explains how Jill's struggling to cover a shift in the shop on Thursday.

Joe's been thinking about how to earn some money, and is considering selling Bartleby. He started thinking about it the night Clarrie went missing, when he thought he'd never see her again. Clarrie dismisses his idea, and insists she's all right now.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0150mls)
BBC NSSA winner; Nick Mason on Pink Floyd

With John Wilson, who presents live from the BBC National Short Story Award ceremony, with news of this year's winner of the £15,000 prize, announced by the chair of judges Sue MacGregor.

Pink Floyd's drummer Nick Mason reveals some of the untold stories behind previously-unheard tracks by the band, now released for the first time. Jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli played on a version of Wish You Were Here (Yehudi Menuhin declined the invitation), and you can hear the results on tonight's progamme.

Helen Mirren stars as a former Mossad agent, brought out of retirement to catch an elderly Nazi, in the new film thriller The Debt. Mark Eccleston reviews.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0150m8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 In Defence of Politics (b0150mt8)
Episode 1

This is the first of a three-part series presented from a personal viewpoint in which Professor Matthew Flinders challenges fashionable political cynicism and presents the case for defending politics.

In this episode he explores the 'expectations gap' between the challenges an inconsistent and demanding public pose for politicians and what they can reasonably be expected to deliver. Interviewees include Tony Blair and John Bercow.

Matthew Flinders is Professor of Politics at Sheffield University.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0150mtb)
Libya's Islamic Capitalists

Under Colonel Gaddafi, Libya was subject to the dictator's so-called Third Universal Theory. Hugh Miles asks what sort of ideology is likely to dominate in post-Gaddafi Libya.

Western media have been keeping a close eye on Libya's governing National Transitional Council, and there have been warnings about splits between Islamists and secularists, and about Libya's tribal society. But, as Hugh Miles discovers, amongst Libya's new ruling class there is broad consensus about support for one ideology: capitalism.

Gaddafi's idiosyncratic economic and political philosophy fused elements of socialism and Islam. The suppression of free markets was at times taken to bizarre extremes with, at one point, the banning of the entire retail sector. Support for capitalism is perhaps a reaction to the years in which entrepreneurship was suppressed.

Hugh Miles looks at the background of the new rulers and asks how Libyan Islamic capitalism might work.


MON 21:00 Material World (b014qnwl)
Ehsan Masood with a weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. He hears from the scientists who are publishing their research in peer reviewed journals, and discuss how that research is scrutinised and used by the scientific community, the media and the public. The programme also reflects how science affects our daily lives; from predicting natural disasters to the latest advances in cutting edge science.

Producer: Martin RedfernEhsan Masood asks if an intergovernmental panel can protect biodiversity. He looks at how the slippery surface of the pitcher plant might be harnessed to make new nonstick coatings and at a substance isolated from invasive harlequin ladybirds that could be the next antimalarial drug. Also, are wildfires a natural part of the environment, even in Britain, and what can we do to prepare for them?

Producer: Martin Redfern.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0150m8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01507h1)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0150mwz)
Eurozone crisis plan: is there one and will the markets like it?

Russia's finance minister resigns in protest at Putin's Presidential ambitions.

And the Labour Party conference discusses the economy.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0150mx1)
Catch 22

Episode 1

by Joseph Heller

Joseph Heller's iconoclastic novel is 50 years old.

Yossarian is in hospital with a pain in his liver and is given the task of censoring letters. Keen to be grounded after a disastrous mission to Avignon, Yossarian has the unassailable circular logic of Catch 22 explained to him. "There was only one catch and that was Catch 22."

Abridged by Robin Brooks

Read by Stuart Milligan

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 23:00 Micky Flanagan: What Chance Change? (b00sjcvd)
1980s

Cockney comedian Micky Flanagan's first radio series is about his progression from working-class Herbert to middle-class intellectual and being caught awkwardly between the two. His story is told through reflective interviews, but mainly, Micky's acclaimed stand up comedy. Micky's transition from the mean streets of the East End to the leafy lanes of Dulwich is a fascinating story, with each episode focusing on a different decade of Micky's life.

In this episode Micky takes us through his 1980's, spent running away to New York and being the international lover and player of the East End. He chats to his parents, his sister and his school friends in interviews that shed light on the stand up comedy.

The series is written and performed by Micky Flanagan.

The Producer is Tilusha Ghelani.


MON 23:30 Ford Madox Ford and France (b00tg2ly)
Julian Barnes and Hermione Lee on Ford Madox Ford

The advice Julian Barnes offers young writers is "study The Good Soldier as an example of perfect and completely original narration and at the same time study his life as an example of negative career management."

Julian Barnes and Hermione Lee tell the story of Ford Madox Ford - author of The Good Soldier and editor of a Paris based magazine which published James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway and Jean Rhys. In fact Ezra Pound complained that Ford "kept on discovering merit with monotonous regularity" although his lack of financial acumen meant the magazine only lasted a year.

Hermione and Julian visit the site of the Transatlantic Review offices where Ford's assistant (and work-horse) the Northumberland poet Basil Bunting "bunked down in a squalid little scullery." The cafés of Paris provided the venue for a weekly soirée, organised by Ford and his then companion Stella Bowen, which offered guests red wine, hot dogs and dancing. And in the Luxembourg Gardens we hear a discussion of the tangled love life of Ford Madox Ford, his elopement with Elsie Martindale, a stint in Brixton prison and the women who followed Elsie: Violet Hunt "who took arsenic to keep herself looking younger" and the Australian painter Stella Bowen who described Ford as "the wise man I crossed the world to see".

Rebecca West described being embraced by Ford as like "being the toast under the poached egg." Others called him "a beached whale" or a "behemoth in grey tweed." He had a pink face, very blue eyes, very blond hair, and was rather chinless with a little moustache and a drawly voice. Henry James is said to have used Ford for the model of the character Morton Densher in Wings of a Dove.

In his novel The Good Soldier he creates one of the best examples in literature of the unreliable narrator and his embroidered accounts of his own life provide a test for biographers. Hermione and Julian swap examples of their favourite "whoppers" which include the church service he couldn't possibly have attended with DH Lawrence; the claim that he helped Marconi transmit the first wireless message across the Atlantic; that the chef Escoffier had said to him "I could learn cooking from you" and that he attended the second trial of Dreyfus.

Producer: Robyn Read.

Reader: Kerry Shale.



TUESDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2011

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01507hm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b0150m8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01507hp)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01507hr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01507ht)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01507hw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01579s1)
With the Rev. Dr. Karen Smith.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0150p5g)
Anna Hill hears that hundreds of pig farmers are leaving the business each year. The industry blames the rising price of feed, which accounts for over half the cost of raising the animals. Mick Sloyan from the industry body BPEX warns that farmers are losing seven pounds on each animal they sell.

The number of hedgehogs has reduced to fewer than one and a half million - down from thirty million in the 1960s. That's according to Oxford University's wildlife conservation unit which has been researching Britain's mammals. Farming Today hears that agriculture has played a big part in their decline, as hedgerows have been taken out and habitat has dwindled.

The hot weather expected this week might be welcomed by many, but fruit farmers are worried that pests could benefit and the rest of the apple harvest could be affected. And Helen Chivers from the Met Office says after the hot spell, farmers will be faced with October frosts.

Presenter: Anna Hill Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 06:00 Today (b0150p5j)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis in London and James Naughtie at the Labour Party Conference in Liverpool: including:
07:50 Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper defends her party's record on immigration.
08:10 How much should the state spend to prolong someone's life by a few months?
08:21 Olympic gold medallist Chris Boardman and former cricketer Ed Smith discuss the place of altruism in professional sport.


TUE 09:00 Capitalism on Trial (b0150p5l)
Episode 1

Capitalism dominates the globe as never before, but after a summer of riots, bailouts, downgrades and market instability, twenty-first century capitalism is looking a little tarnished. In the first of two programmes, Michael Portillo talks to leading thinkers from around the world as he weighs up the costs and benefits of the economic system that governs our lives.

Amartya Sen, Will Hutton, Ha-Joon Chang, Gillian Tett and former Chancellor Nigel Lawson are among the critics and defenders of the free-market as Michael begins the series by asking whether capitalism makes us greedy and divided or rich and free.

Producer: Julia Johnson.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b015b3wc)
John Cooper - The Queen's Agent: Francis Walsingham at the Court of Elizabeth I

Episode 2

Written by John Cooper. Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

Walsingham, principal secretary and spymaster to Elizabeth I, is focussed on a royal wedding, to settle the question of succession and the threat from Catholic dissidents.

The Queen's Agent is a story of secret agents, cryptic codes and ingenious plots, set in a turbulent period of England's history. It is also the story of a man devoted to his queen, sacrificing his every waking hour to save the threatened English state.

Reader: Hugh Bonneville

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0150p5n)
Is fashion bad for chilren; Kanya King; sex the continental way

Children's fashion is big business. Any designer worth their salt now has a kid's line, not to mention the high street, supermarket and catalogues. A recent Unicef report found fears of 'brand bullying" in the UK, and a letter this weekend signed by over 200 experts warns that children suffer from a diet of 'too much, too soon' and calls for a ban on all forms of marketing directed at the under sevens. So is fashion bad for children? Jane discusses. Kanya King founded the MOBO - music of black origin - awards in 1996. Inspired from an early age by urban music, Kanya re-mortgaged her house to get the first awards off the ground. Ahead of the 16th ceremony next week, she joins Jane in the studio to talk about her career, the successes and controversies surrounding the awards and the place of black music in Britain today. The latest in our women in business series. And sex across the Channel - the French writer Sophie Fontanel has been vilified in her home country for announcing that she has given up sex. What would have been the reaction if a writer had said this in the UK? How different are French and British women in the way that they view sex? Jane is joined by Sophie Fontanel, and the French commentator Agnes Poirier.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0150p5q)
Second Honeymoon

Episode 2

SECOND HONEYMOON
By Joanna Trollope
Dramatised in five episodes by Rachel Joyce
Episode Two - Lodgers
Edie is to play the lead part in 'Ghosts' but will that help to ease the sense of loss she's feeling?

Edie....................Christine Kavanagh
Russell................Sam Dale
Vivien...................Liza Sadovy
Rosa....................Alex Tregear
Matt.....................Jonathan Forbes
Lazlo....................Carl Prekopp

Directed by Tracey Neale

STORY
"Edie put her hand out, took a breath and slowly, slowly pushed open his bedroom door. The room inside looked as if he had never left it" - a mum tries to come to terms with her empty nest but a husband can only think about the second honeymoon that can now begin ...

Joanna Trollope's most heartfelt and enthralling novel has been dramatised into five episodes for Woman's Hour by Rachel Joyce. SECOND HONEYMOON explores what happens when the empty nest is suddenly full again.

Ben is leaving home to move in with his girlfriend. At twenty-two he's the youngest of the family and the last to leave. His mother, Edie, an actress, is distraught. She has defined her life as the necessary cog in her family's lives and suddenly she feels unnecessary and unimportant. Her husband, Russell, an agent, is glad to be freed of daily parental roles and is looking forward to having Edie to himself. Then Edie lands the unexpected lead role in 'Ghosts' by Ibsen and it is then the children begin to make noises about coming home again. Their other son, Matt, is struggling in a relationship in which he achieves and earns less than his girlfriend. His sister, Rosa, is wrestling with debt and the end of a turbulent love affair. Rosa is the first of the Boyd children to think she may have to move back in with her parents - just until she can make ends meet again. Russell is determined to fend her off but things don't quite go according to plan.

This is the empty nest, twenty-first-century style. Grown children going and then wanting to come back again but at a time when their parents should be getting ready for their second honeymoon. The story of two generations struggling with love, careers and parenthood makes for a riveting and funny family drama for Woman's Hour.

THE WRITER
Joanna Trollope, the author of eagerly awaited novels, often centred around the domestic nuances and dilemmas of present-day life, has also written a number of historical novels and 'Britannia's Daughters', a study of women in the British Empire. In 1988 she wrote her first contemporary novel, 'The Choir' and this was followed by a number of hugely successful novels including: 'The Rector's Wife', 'Other People's Children', 'Brother and Sister' and 'Daughters in Law'.

THE DRAMATIST
Rachel Joyce has many radio credits to her name. Her most recent dramatisations for Radio 4 include - 'The Professor', 'The Portrait of a Lady' and 'Villette'. At present she is working on a dramatisation of 'The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b0150p5s)
Series 2

Episode 19

19/30 We have our third report from the tundra of the Alaskan North Slope. At 70 degrees north this is where the land stops and the Arctic Ocean begins - the place where Saving Species has been reporting the work of U.S. Geological Survey biologist Matt Sexson on Spectacled Eiders. Spectacled Eiders breed in Arctic Russia and Alaska and uniquely winter as a single global population on the sea ice of the Bering Sea. Little is know about their migration. Zoo vets Maria Spriggs and Gwen Myers of Mesker Park Zoo Indiana and Columbus Zoo Ohio respectively, provide the clinical support in the field. So what is conservation medicine and is there an increasing role for vets in the wider world of saving wildlife in our increasingly stressed planet? Julian Hector spoke to them in Alaska about "One Health", where the health of wildlife, people, wilderness, habitats and domestic animals are seen as one entity.

Also in the programme: we hear from the British Trust for Ornithology about a UK garden bird disease getting into Europe. And whilst the BTO are on the line we hope to find out about the Cuckoos they are tracking heading south into Africa.

And Kelvin Boot is live from Aberdeen at an international conference on marine biodiversity -

And we acknowledge the death this week of Professor Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan woman who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her work teaching women to plant trees. Wangari Maathai believed the destruction of the natural world was directly linked to sustained poverty in Kenya.

Presented by Joanna Pinnock
Produced by Mary Colwell
Editor Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Repainting Giverny (b0150p5v)
The writer and broadcaster Irma Kurtz travels to Monet's garden at Giverny to hear how losing his wife and his sight affected the last years of his life and work. Monet's famous Water Lilies series was his last great masterpiece. It nearly wasn't painted as exactly 100 years ago in 1911 his wife died and he stopped painting for the first time in his life.

At the same time, Monet was losing his sight and cataracts changed the way he saw things. It was his great friend and Prime Minister of France, Clemenceau who encouraged him to pick up his brush again.

Irma Kurtz meets one of Monet's few remaining relatives - Claire Joyes - to walk in the gardens Monet created at his home in Giverny, Northern France. Clare tells Irma about the passion Monet had for his wife Alice and how his garden became an obsession. He painted the garden time after time, and re-touched his canvasses many times as well in the search for perfection. A cataract operation towards the end of his life changed the way he saw things again and he went over some of his previous work. Irma ends her journey in Paris looking at the famous Water Lilies canvasses.

The programme contains interviews with James Priest, British head gardener at Giverny, and the painter Sargy Mann who has experienced cataracts and is now blind but still painting.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b0150p5x)
Should families help care for sick relatives whilst they're in hospital? The head of the Royal College of Nursing wants to encourage family members to assist with feeding patients and with toilet duties when nursing staff are very busy. Dr Peter Carter says the NHS is facing problems with elderly patients in particular, because there isn't enough long-term planning for their care. And he's suggesting hospital visiting times should be extended to allow more families to get involved. So should they do more to help hospital staff look after their elderly relatives? With an ageing population and a health service already stretched, does it make sense to get families involved in their care? Or do you worry that this could be the thin end of the wedge? Whether you're a patient, a nurse or other health professional, we'd like to hear from you. 03700 100 400 is the phone number, or you can e-mail via bbc.co.uk/radio4/youandyours. Or you can text us on 84844. We may call you back on that number. You'll be charged at your standard operator message rate.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01507hy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b0150p5z)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews presented by Martha Kearney from the Labour Party Conference in Liverpool with guests including Labour's Deputy Leader Harriet Harman.
You can watch the programme as it is broadcast here: http://bbc.in/qAFlrr
To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:30 Page to Performance (b0150p61)
Series 3

Billy The Kid

Musicians talk about the challenges they face as they prepare to perform a piece from the orchestral repertoire.

This week it's one of American composer Aaron Copland's most lively and dramatic scores as he portrays in music the life and death of Billy The Kid. Lowri Blake meets musicians from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra who enjoy all the challenges that this theatrical score offers.

Adding his own expertise to the programme is the Music Director and Conductor of the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra Adam Stern, an enthusiast for Copland's music. He shows how Copland evokes the wide open spaces of the American prairie as well as the rough and tumble of life in the Wild West. In his portrayal of a frontier town Copland uses old cowboy songs to help him weave the atmosphere, and the story leads up to a dramatic gunfight, with drums and trumpets illustrating the ricochet of shots as Billy faces the posse and they haul him off to jail.

The percussionist Alasdair Malloy describes how the bass drum, timpani and snare drum are all brought into the thick of the action during the gunfight, while violinist Eric Chapman remembers those endless vistas of his Texan childhood - a canyon, some mesquite trees, the blue sky - so powerfully summoned up by Copland in the first of the three major scores which evoked the time when American pioneers were heading West.

Producer: Richard Bannerman.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0150mlq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00fm033)
Development

Doug Lucie's dark comedy about the credit crunch, set in Britain in 2008. Mike is a property developer who appears to have it all, but the foundations are shaky.

When the debts are called in, his au pair's brother offers a solution, but is it what it seems?

Cast:
Mike ..... Mark Bazeley
Zoe ..... Samantha Spiro
Marie ..... Amy Shindler
Joe ..... Ashley Cook
Tatyana ..... Larissa Kouznetsova
Leo ..... Basher Savage

Location Recordist: David Chilton
Sound Designer: Lucinda Mason Brown

Producer: Janet Whitaker
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b0150p8y)
Tom Holland presents more stories that deliver new insight into our past.

Tom travels to Winchester to ask Dr Ryan Lavelle from the University of Winchester who Odda of Devon was and whether he should be remembered for helping Alfred defeat the Danes?

Simon Evans visits the now redundant colliery at Snowdown near Dover to hear former miners who want the decaying pit buildings to be restored. Tom talks to Judith Martin, who has been advising local people, about the importance of Kent's coal heritage and the specific local difficulties which conspire to prevent it being preserved.

Dr Andrew Petersen from the University of Wales, Trinity St David, invites Tom to the British Museum to hear about a new exhibition about the Hajj and how Making History listeners might be able to help with information about 3 lost forts which guarded pilgrims on their long trek to Mecca.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 One Hundred and Forty Characters (b0150p90)
Between the Tweets

By Jojo Moyes.

First in a series of specially commissioned short stories inspired by the social networking phenomenon, Twitter. (For non "tweeters", the title derives from Twitter's format where "tweets" - the postings - can be no longer than 140 characters.)

A daytime TV star's reputation hangs in the balance when an anonymous woman accuses him on Twitter of having an affair with her. Who is the mysterious tweeter and why is she so determined to destroy the celebrity's career? 'Reputation manager' Bella is called in to handle the situation and, using her I.T. contacts, makes a surprising discovery.

Jojo Moyes is an award-winning author, former newspaper journalist and a regular Tweeter. Her story title was suggested by one of her Twitter followers.

Read by Claire Knight.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 15:45 A View Through a Lens (b0150p92)
Series 3

Funky Chickens

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

2/5 Funky Chickens:
Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison travels to Kansas, land of the prairies, the wild west and, as John discovers, some funky chickens. Under the cover of darkness, and after checking for rattle snakes, John crawls into his hide and waits. A strange sound, rather like that produced when you blow across the top of a bottle, begins to fill the air. The chickens are coming! Prairie chickens are a type of grouse, short-legged and dumpy. Their bodies are striped pale yellow brown and black, so they are well camouflaged in the long grass. Male birds gather in groups called leks and compete with one another to attract a female by engaging in an elaborate display; a kind of dance. First, long feathers rise up from the neck, revealing orange patches of skin on either side of the throat. Combs of orange inflate above their eyes. They drop their wings to the ground, shake their heads and inflate their orange throat patches. And then the birds begin to boom, and drum their feet. From his hide John watches this bizarre and hilarious performance. And then a bird flies up and lands on the roof of his hide, and begins to drum his feet! Now John feels he is really part of the crowd!

Producer Sarah Blunt.


TUE 16:00 Tracing Your Roots (b0150p94)
Series 6

Follow the Money

The uncle who lost millions, and the family legend of a pile of cash just waiting to be released from chancery....Sally and Nick attempt to trace what happened to the money.

Delving into the debtors' prison system- how to land in there, how to earn your way out, and whether there really are millions stuck in chancery just waiting to be released to families today.

Produced by Lucy Lloyd.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b0150p96)
Series 25

Gerald Durrell

Former England footballer Graeme le Saux champions the life of writer, broadcaster and conservationist Gerald Durrell. Graeme and presenter Matthew Parris are joined in the studio by Durrell's widow, Lee.

Gerald Malcolm Durrell (1925 - 1995) was a pioneering conservationist who took on the established "zoo community" by emphasising the need to preserve endangered species, rather than just repeatedly dip in to the natural world for more animals to amuse and entertain. His work culminated in the creation of his own zoo on Jersey. It was there that a teenage islander called Graeme le Saux helped out in the gorilla enclosure, before moving on to play at left back for Chelsea and England.


TUE 17:00 PM (b0150p98)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01507j0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b00r7kys)
Series 3

Bacon Punctuation

The hit Radio 4 series 'Fags, Mags & Bags' returns to the airwaves of Radio 4 with more shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave.

Written by and starring Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli - 'Fags, Mags & Bags' has proved a hit with the Radio 4 audience with the show also collecting a Sony nomination and a Writers' Guild award in 2008. This series features guest appearances from Sylvester McCoy (7th Doctor Who) and Ron Donachie (Titanic).

In this episode the future of the shop's much loved Wall of Crisps comes under threat after someone from the EU visits the shop. The wall is contravening European Crisp regulations by stocking corn and maize based snacks alongside potato based 'crisps' and has to be dismantled which causes outrage amongst the Lenzidens.

Cast:
Ramesh ...... Sanjeev Kohli
Dave ...... Donald Mcleary
Sanjay ...... Omar Raza
Alok ...... Susheel Kumar
Father Henderson ...... Gerard Kelly
Ted ...... Gavin Mitchell
Mutton Jeff ...... Sean Scanlan
Jeff Etc ...... Steven McNicoll
Hilly ...... Kate Brailsford
Mr Hepworth ...... Tom Urie

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b0150p9b)
Clarrie offers to cover a volunteering shift in the shop. Jill's delighted she wants to help, so Clarrie will now be covering on Thursday.

Susan's been trying out loads of recipes in preparation for hosting the next book club evening. Christopher's scrounging her trial efforts for Alice's birthday picnic on Thursday. Clarrie samples Susan's cooking, and is surprised to learn that Joe was round earlier to try it too. Clarrie's pleased to hear he's decided to go to book club next week, as he's seemed a bit off colour since his birthday.

Peggy tells Elona that Jack hasn't done too well with his food. Elona reassures her that he ate a good breakfast. Peggy and Elona have a friendly chat. Elona talks about her childhood, and how much she enjoyed the freedom of living in the country. Elona regrets that Darrell naïvely got involved with the wrong people. She doesn't know who would employ him with his criminal record. Elona hopes that Peggy understands that they need to move to the city to give him any chance of employment, so she can't stay in the countryside however much she'd like to.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0150pcl)
Tim Pigott-Smith on King Lear, Fiona MacCarthy on Ford Madox Brown

With Mark Lawson, who talks to actor Tim Pigott-Smith as he takes the title role in King Lear at the West Yorkshire Playhouse in Leeds.

Cultural Historian and Pre-Raphaelite biographer Fiona MacCarthy reviews the new Ford Madox Brown retrospective at Manchester Art Gallery.

And novelist Nicholas Royle reviews Hidden, a new BBC One conspiracy thriller starring Philip Glenister.

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0150p5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b0150phx)
NHS Procurement

The Department of Health wants to slash £1.2 billion off the bill for hospital supplies -- everything from bandages and rubber gloves to operating tables and medical equipment.

The planned savings form part of the £20 billion in NHS efficiency savings the Government has pledged to make by 2014.

There's plenty of scope for savings. A recent survey found one Hospital Trust bought 177 different types of surgical gloves. Across the NHS, hospitals buy more than 1,700 different kinds of canula. Rationalising this medical shopping list could free-up £500 million a year for investment in patient care, the National Audit Office estimates.

But can the increasingly complex NHS procurement system in England deliver the major savings the Government wants to see?

Critics say Foundation Hospital Trusts increasingly make their own buying decisions, with little or no national co-ordination. Inside hospitals, managers tasked with purchasing millions of pounds worth of equipment often lack the authority or the support of their superiors to drive through savings. Meanwhile new private sector companies are moving in to take over the purchase and supply of NHS equipment.

Will the Government's plans for a more devolved health service help or hinder the drive to save taxpayers' money. Jenny Cuffe investigates.

Producer: Andy Denwood.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0150phz)
Concerns about eligibility for PIPs - 27/09/2011

Baroness Thomas of Winchester on her worries about the criteria for receiving Personal Independence Payments. What aids and adaptations used by visually impaired and blind people will be eligible for payment under the new scheme?

And as the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association celebrates its 80th Birthday Lee Kumutat visits a new state of the art dog training Centre and talks to their CEO Richard Leaman about how they plan to deliver their services in the decades to come.


TUE 21:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b0150pj1)
Series 1

Moral Disgust

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms. A place where moral dilemmas, philosophical ideas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink. Matthew Sweet presents with a live audience.


TUE 21:30 Capitalism on Trial (b0150p5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01507j2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0150pj3)
Ed Miliband give's a powerful speech at the Labour Party conference outlining his 'vision'. But where's the detail on policy?

Greece's Parliament to vote on more taxes to meet the country's deficit.Will it make German MPs feel diiferently about bailing the country out ?

Is Libya's National Transitional Council becoming ' islamicised' ?

with Carolyn Quinn in Liverpool and Ritula Shah in London.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0150pj5)
Catch 22

Episode 2

by Joseph Heller.

Colonel Cathcart keeps raising the number of missions to be flown by the men. Yossarian is determined not to fly any more missions but keeps coming up against the unassailable logic of Catch 22.

Abridged by Robin Brooks.

Read by Stuart Milligan

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


TUE 23:00 Old Harry's Game (b00j4kbz)
Series 7

Episode 5

Hell is not what it was since the baby turned up.

Satan's become a one-man adoption agency whilst his chief demon is reading Penelope Leach. But can Satan place the baby with a good family?

Stars Andy Hamilton as Satan, Annette Crosbie as Edith, Robert Duncan as Scumspawn and Jimmy Mulville as Thomas.

Other roles played by Mike Fenton Stevens, Philip Pope and Felicity Montagu.

Written by Andy Hamilton.

Producer: Paul Mayhew-Archer

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2009.


TUE 23:30 Ford Madox Ford and France (b00tj82c)
Julian Barnes and Hermione Lee on The Good Soldier

Ford Madox Ford said France "begins on the Left Bank of the Seine" and described Provence as "a frame of mind". His last lover, the painter Biala, said "we grow our own vegetables, we have six (not very magnificent) rooms, and a garden with the finest view in the world".

Julian Barnes and Hermione Lee visit Aix-en-Provence to explore the life of Ford Madox Ford, author of The Good Soldier and - 4 years before his death in 1939 - of a book about Provence which includes descriptions of bull-fighting, a recipe for bouillabaisse, an argument about the Albigensian religious heresy and a history of troubadour poetry.

Hermione Lee explores the way these interests are woven into the plot of his best known book - The Good Soldier - "a tale of two couples with additional victims who come into their orbit -and it's about adultery, betrayal madness, suicide, desperate love" which she believes is a book about Albigensian beliefs.

Julian Barnes explains that "the great emotional smash of Ford's own life was in 1924 when he received a contribution from the Transatlantic Review from a young woman" who was then called Ella Lenglet. He gave her work the title "Triple Sec" and gave her the pen-name Jean Rhys. "She had three francs, a cardboard suitcase and a lot of talent, her husband was in jail and the bad move was to move her in with him and Stella Bowen." All four parties in this affair then wrote books which depicted their tangled relationships.

The programme ends by considering his end. When he arrived in France in 1922, Ford was one of over five hundred mourners to attend the funeral of Proust. In June 1939 Ford was taken ill, en route to his beloved South of France, and buried at a ceremony in the port town of Deauville attended by only 3 people.

Producer: Robyn Read

Reader: Kerry Shale.



WEDNESDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2011

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01507jx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b015b3wc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01507jz)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01507k1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01507k3)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01507k5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01579sf)
With the Rev. Dr. Karen Smith.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0151ndd)
Pig farmers say more will leave the industry and stop supplying British pork if they continue to be paid less than their production costs. They say they're losing £7 per pig as higher welfare laws in the UK mean production costs are higher and in the last year feed prices have rocketed by around 40%. Retailers say they have to price pork at a rate consumers will buy and they have farmers happy to supply them. The National Pig Association say eventually consumers will be left without the option of buying British.

A new project is looking to help reintroduce salmon to the River Ure in North Yorkshire. The Environment Agency say rivers are clean enough that the fish are returning but farmers may need to change what they do to help them thrive.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock. Presented by Anna Hill.


WED 06:00 Today (b0151ndg)
With Evan Davis and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b0151ndj)
Angie Beasley is the Director of Miss England. A former beauty queen, she won over twenty-five titles including Miss Cleethorpes, before going on to work for Miss World impressario, Eric Morley. Her memoir, Frog Princess, is published by Penguin Fiction.

For the past forty years, Neil Powell has worked with dogs - in mountain search and rescue, drowned victim recovery, collapsed structure searching, and drug detection. Together they have participated in countless rescues and saved many lives throughout the world from Turkey to Scotland (Lockerbie) to Pakistan. He is also a founder member of the British International Rescue Dog team. His book 'Search Dogs and Me: One Man and his Life-saving Dogs' is published by Blackstaff.

Muyiwa is a gospel singer, radio presenter and station director of Premier Gospel radio station. He will be performing with Riversongz at the Metropolitan Black Police Association's "Celebration of Life" concert at the Royal Festival Hall, Soutbank Centre.

Hugh Lupton is a professional storyteller. He is also the great nephew of writer Arthur Ransome and will be performing at the storytelling festival, 'Settle Stories', a piece entitled The Homing Stone, based on the story of how his great uncle travelled across Russia during the 1917 Revolution to collect folktales and how he became swept up in events of the time.

Producer: Chris Paling.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b015b3yt)
John Cooper - The Queen's Agent: Francis Walsingham at the Court of Elizabeth I

Episode 3

Written by John Cooper. Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

England faces the threat of invasion from overseas and a potential Catholic rebellion. Walsingham is dealing with intelligence pouring into his office from his network of spies.

The Queen's Agent is a story of secret agents, cryptic codes and ingenious plots, set in a turbulent period of England's history. It is also the story of a man devoted to his queen, sacrificing his every waking hour to save the threatened English state.

Reader: Hugh Bonneville

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0151ndl)
The cold case archive; gastric bands in the under 25s; women and parking

Presented by Jane Garvey. The closure of the Forensic Science Services (FSS) is scheduled for next March as part of Home Office cost cutting - what impact will this have on justice for women? Garden writer Margaret Willes joins Jane to explain why the history of the English garden does not begin and end with Capability Brown. She claims a "horticultural revolution" took place between 1560 and 1660 resulting in an enduring British obsession with gardening for both business and pleasure. The numbers of overweight under 25's being given weight-loss surgery on the NHS is rising and eating-disorder groups are concerned about this increase and the amount of support being given before and after the surgery. Why are more young people opting for such life changing surgery and what are the long term consequences for their health? And Jane manoeuvres her way through a discussion on women and parking: some men like to suggest that they are better drivers than women in particular when it comes to parking and new figures have revealed that almost a third of women who failed their driving test last year came unstuck on the parking element.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0151ndn)
Second Honeymoon

First Night

SECOND HONEYMOON
By Joanna Trollope
Dramatised in five episodes by Rachel Joyce
Episode Three - First Night
As Edie's first night approaches she finds there are distractions at home due to Matt's return.

Edie...................Christine Kavanagh
Russell...............Sam Dale
Vivien..................Liza Sadovy
Matt...................Jonathan Forbes
Rosa..................Alex Tregear
Ben....................Simon Bubb
Lazlo..................Carl Prekopp
Max....................James Lailey

Directed by Tracey Neale

STORY
"Edie put her hand out, took a breath and slowly, slowly pushed open his bedroom door. The room inside looked as if he had never left it" - a mum tries to come to terms with her empty nest but a husband can only think about the second honeymoon that can now begin ...

Joanna Trollope's most heartfelt and enthralling novel has been dramatised into five episodes for Woman's Hour by Rachel Joyce. SECOND HONEYMOON explores what happens when the empty nest is suddenly full again.

Ben is leaving home to move in with his girlfriend. At twenty-two he's the youngest of the family and the last to leave. His mother, Edie, an actress, is distraught. She has defined her life as the necessary cog in her family's lives and suddenly she feels unnecessary and unimportant. Her husband, Russell, an agent, is glad to be freed of daily parental roles and is looking forward to having Edie to himself. Then Edie lands the unexpected lead role in 'Ghosts' by Ibsen and it is then the children begin to make noises about coming home again. Their other son, Matt, is struggling in a relationship in which he achieves and earns less than his girlfriend. His sister, Rosa, is wrestling with debt and the end of a turbulent love affair. Rosa is the first of the Boyd children to think she may have to move back in with her parents - just until she can make ends meet again. Russell is determined to fend her off but things don't quite go according to plan.

This is the empty nest, twenty-first-century style. Grown children going and then wanting to come back again but at a time when their parents should be getting ready for their second honeymoon. The story of two generations struggling with love, careers and parenthood makes for a riveting and funny family drama for Woman's Hour.

THE WRITER
Joanna Trollope, the author of eagerly awaited novels, often centred around the domestic nuances and dilemmas of present-day life, has also written a number of historical novels and 'Britannia's Daughters', a study of women in the British Empire. In 1988 she wrote her first contemporary novel, 'The Choir' and this was followed by a number of hugely successful novels including: 'The Rector's Wife', 'Other People's Children', 'Brother and Sister' and 'Daughters in Law'.

THE DRAMATIST
Rachel Joyce has many radio credits to her name. Her most recent dramatisations for Radio 4 include - 'The Professor', 'The Portrait of a Lady' and 'Villette'. At present she is working on a dramatisation of 'The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.


WED 11:00 Turkish Delight? (b0151nxr)
The most visible sign of the Turkish community in the streets of the UK today is the kebab shop.

Yasmeen Khan looks behind the shopfront at a community with a history and cultural variety that has depth and richness. In fact Turkish influence on this country began with the arrival of coffee houses in the 17th century. Now it is estimated that there are 150,000 immigrants from mainland Turkey as well as 300,000 Turkish Cypriots, many leaving Cyprus during the 50's and 60's during the internal war.

Yasmeen Khan takes a snapshot of the issues within the Turkish and Turkish-Cypriot communities, and talks to one of their main leaders, Baroness Meral Hussein-Ece. Baroness Ece has worked in Islington and Hackney over many years and was instrumental in setting up the first Turkish Women's Group, as well as becoming the first woman of Turkish origin in the House of Lords, as a peer in 2010. Yasmeen talks to the playwright Cosh Omar, whose plays reflect the feelings and attitudes of the younger generation, and asks to what extent do they feel British, how closely do they want to integrate; and, as second or third generation people of Turkish origin, how close do they feel to either Turkey or to the divided island of Cyprus?

Yasmeen will visit the streets of Harringay and Stoke Newington in London, and she'll talk to the smaller Turkish populations in the Midlands. Many of them run kebab shops, open to the early hours, with customers who pour in after a night out on the town. Their strength was certainly tested in the recent riots, when they came together to defend their property. She talks to them about the pride they have in improving the areas where they choose to work, and, of course, she tastes the shish, doner and shawarma kebabs and wraps that are their livelihood.

Producers: Yasmeen Khan/Neil Gardner
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Paul Temple (b0151nxt)
A Case for Paul Temple

6. In Which Valentine Strikes

Temple and Sir Graham go looking for the gang's hideaway - and fall into a deadly trap.

In this 2011 recreation of the 1946 vintage crime serial, Paul and Steve brave great danger to reveal the identity of the mysterious West End drug dealer known only as 'Valentine'...

Crawford Logan stars as Paul Temple and Gerda Stevenson as Steve.

Between 1938 and 1968, Francis Durbridge's incomparably suave amateur detective Paul Temple and glamorous wife Steve solved case after baffling case in one of BBC radio's most popular series. They inhabited a sophisticated, well-heeled world of cocktails and fast cars.

Sadly, only half of their adventures survive in the archives. But in 2006, the BBC began recreating them using original scripts and incidental music, and recorded with vintage microphones and sound effects.

Paul Temple ...... Crawford Logan
Steve ...... Gerda Stevenson
Sir Graham ...... Gareth Thomas
Major Peters ...... Greg Powrie
Supt. Wetherby ...... Richard Greenwood
Sheila Baxter ...... Melody Grove
Mary ...... Eliza Langland
Charles Kelvin ...... Nick Underwood
Layland ...... Robin Laing
Sergeant Turner ...... Michael Mackenzie

Producer: Patrick Rayner

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b0151py0)
Unpaid work trials and zero hours contracts - are they fair?

Are unpaid work trials, and zero hours contracts fair ways to assess skills and manage unpredictable work patterns, or exploitation? Winifred Robinson finds out.

More about Richard Desmond's Hospital Lottery - is it set to challenge the National Lottery?

We find out whether having a lodger can affect your insurance.

The government is withdrawing elderly and disabled concessions on coach travel in England, but the Welsh Assembly and Scottish Parliament aren't. We find out what impact this will have on travellers.

Reevoo has launched a mark to guarantee authentic social media content. We find out why it is needed, and whether it will work.

And ahead of the Office of Fair Trading report into off-gas grid domestic energy market we look at the effectiveness of price comparison for this part of the market, and whether customers off grid should be buying now, or waiting till the winter.

Producer: Rebecca Moore.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01507k7)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b0151py2)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews presented by Martha Kearney from the Labour Party Conference in Liverpool with guests including Labour's Shadow Home Secretary, Yvette Cooper.
You can watch the programme as it is broadcast here: http://bbc.in/qAFlrr
To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b0151py4)
Chris Blackhurst and Facebook

Chris Blackhurst, the editor of the Independent, joins Steve Hewlett to discuss Ivan Lewis's suggestion that journalists guilty of malpractice should be "struck off", his plans for the Independent and the decision to suspend, but not dismiss, Johann Hari after he admitted to plagiarism.

Facebook has unveiled major changes, including a revamped timeline page that encourages you to share information to "tell your story on the web" and partnerships with organisations such as The Guardian, Huffington Post and The Independent.

But some users have raised concerns about privacy and what Facebook will do with their data. Meg Pickard of The Guardian explains how the new social apps will work and Christian Hernandez, Facebook's director of platform partnerships, discusses what the changes mean for Facebook users.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b0150p9b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0151py6)
Gwennie

Michael and Gwen are looking back at their relationship, trying to pinpoint exactly where it all went wrong. They were happy, once. Their relationship was full of love, fun and lust. But with time, bitterness and jealousy has settled in, with arguments and mind games becoming normality. Something had to give.....and it does. Gwen's treasured drawing turns out to be fake. Michael's pleasure at this discovery is the last straw for Gwen. Ian Rowlands' play is a dark and honest account of facing up to the reality of a relationship in crisis.

Michael ... David Birrell
Gwen ... Lynne Seymour
Mother ... Jennifer Hill
Art Dealer ... Richard Mitchley

A BBC/Cymru Wales production, directed by Gwawr Lloyd.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b0151py8)
Vincent Duggleby and a panel of guests answer calls on tax and self assessment.

Do you need help completing your tax return or dealing with a tricky tax question?

The deadline for filing your paper 2010/11 tax return is midnight Monday 31 October. Those who file online have until 31st January 2012 to submit their return. If your return is late, HM Revenue and Customs will charge an automatic £100 penalty. Further fines are payable if you do nothing.

Whatever your question Vincent Duggleby and guests are ready to help.

Phone lines open at 1.30pm on Wednesday afternoon and the number to call is 03700 100 444. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher. The programme starts after the three o'clock news.


WED 15:30 One Hundred and Forty Characters (b0156mnq)
Songbirds by Oliver Emanuel

A young man, devastated by a messy relationship break-up, finds solace in bird watching.

Robin Laing reads Oliver Emanuel's short story.

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


WED 15:45 A View Through a Lens (b0151pyd)
Series 3

Patience

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

3/5 Patience. Its summer and wildlife cameraman John Aitchison travelled to Svalbard as part of a team making the BBC series Frozen Planet to film polar bears hunting for food. In summer, when there is no ice from which to hunt, the polar bears on land resort to hunting sea birds. This is what John has come here to film. But it proves far harder than he expects, as the bears are in no hurry to hunt, and John is left watching and waiting for a bear which does little else but sleep, day after day after day. Whilst he waits, John's attention turns to other things; like the sounds of the kittiwakes, the sounds of gas escaping from the ice and the dives and breaths of white beluga whales in a nearby fjord. As he listens, watches and waits, John reflects on what it means to be patient.

Producer Sarah Blunt.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0151pyg)
Tour guide - Changing incomes

New research compares income distribution in the UK with a multi storey apartment building in which the poorest dwell in the basement, the richest occupy the penthouse and most of us still live on the floors in between the two extremes. The economist, Professor Stephen Jenkins discusses income mobility and the dynamics of poverty with Laurie Taylor. They're also joined by the sociologist, Professor John Holmwood. Also, the raucous sidewalk culture of New York Tour Guides. The sociologist Jonathan R. Wynn introduces us to the eccentrics, educators and radicals who provide introductions to New York's dizzying array of attractions.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Path of Least Resistance (b0138361)
Last year the Director General of the World Health Organisation forecast that 'the world is heading for a post-antibiotic era'. In July this year a strain of gonorrhea completely resistant to antibiotics was identified in Japan, with the warning that the infection could now become a global threat to public health.

Dr Stuart Flanagan works in a sexual health clinic and regularly treats patients with gonorrhea. So far the resistant strain hasn't arrived in the UK but, with international travel and the established pattern of migration shown by other resistant bacteria, it won't be long.

It's inevitable that bacteria will evolve and the ones able to resist the antibiotics aimed to kill them - the fittest - will survive. But over-prescription, failure to complete courses, and factors such as poor hygiene have all contrived to help bacteria become resistant. For immuno-suppressed patients, like those with HIV or undergoing chemotherapy, resistant bacteria can prove fatal.

Over 80% of antibiotics in the UK are prescribed by GPs; Stuart Flanagan hears from Professor Chris Butler, Head of Primary Care and Public Health at Cardiff University about the STAR study, aimed at reducing antibiotic prescribing, and from Dr Jennifer Byrne of Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, about treating immuno-suppressed patients. Dr David Livermore of the Health Protection Agency explains how we've helped resistance to grow. Especially in the developing world, where poverty and fake medicines exacerbate the situation. Newly affluent India and China, show resistance levels as high as 60%. And Otto Cars of ReAct - an independent global network tackling antibiotic resistance - considers the global options. The Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies, reflects on the UK's role.


WED 17:00 PM (b0151pyj)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01507k9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Castle (b00h3840)
Series 2

Be Sure to Wear Some Flowers in Your Visor

Hie ye to "The Castle", a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley", "Four Weddings & A Funeral") and Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley")

In this episode, Sir John decides to raise money by holding a rock festival in the grounds of Woodstock... Let's hear it for kicking sounds from the electric lute, new-fangled hummous from the Levant and much disapproval from Pope Innocent the VIth!

Cast:
Sir John Woodstock ..... James Fleet
Sir William De Warenne ...... Neil Dudgeon
Lady Anne Woodstock ...... Montserrat Lombard
Cardinal Duncan ....... Jonathan Kydd
Lady Charlotte ....... Ingrid Oliver
Master Henry Woodstock ...... Steven Kynman
Merlin ....... Lewis Macleod

Written by Kim Fuller with additional material by Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0151pyl)
Tom shows Brenda footage of his pigs playing football - it's part of his new marketing campaign. He's also got a bargain priced pitch at Westbury food fair and believes his luck may finally be changing. Brenda's irritated by having to constantly speak to James when he phones the office, and having to hear about the book he and Leonie are working on. She's still angry for being taken in by him during their past relationship. Tom points out she was far too good for him.

Ruth asks David to help her clear the barn for the upcoming harvest supper. Pip's staying with a friend after tonight's student union party, so won't be around to help.

Peggy tells Lilian, in confidence, that Elona may have turned down the tenancy at 3, The Green because she didn't want to disclose Darrell's criminal record. Peggy wants Lilian to offer the tenancy to Elona again at an affordable rent. Peggy will stand as guarantor for the deposit, and will make up the rent that Amside is asking - without Elona knowing. Lilian's still not sure but Peggy thinks Lilian, of all people, should be understanding about giving ex-cons a chance. Peggy is pleased when Lilian agrees, and can't wait to tell Elona the good news.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b0151pyn)
Melancholia review, Lee Child

With Mark Lawson.

Film director Lars von Trier hit the headlines with his provocative remarks about Hitler and Nazism at the Cannes
Film festival, while promoting his new film Melancholia. It stars Kirsten Dunst and Charlotte Gainsbourg as two sisters reacting to the news that the earth is on a collision course with another planet, called Melancholia. Jenny McCartney reviews.

The latest novel in Lee Child's best-selling Jack Reacher series arrives in bookshops tomorrow. This is the 16th thriller following the life of former military policeman Reacher, and Lee Child reflects on why he keeps returning to his grizzled hero.

Steven Spielberg's latest project is the multi-million dollar television drama Terra Nova. The action takes place 85 million years ago in a prehistoric alternate reality. Naomi Alderman reviews.

Paratrooper turned artist Derek Eland asked front-line soldiers in Afghanistan to write about their experiences. The notes are on display in a new installation at the Imperial War Museum North. Eland discusses how the soldiers felt about sharing their feelings.

As the source of the catchphrase 'Fire up the Quattro' from Ashes to Ashes becomes a matter of dispute between the actor and the writer, Michael Simkins reflects on the complex relationship between performers and script-writers.

Producer Georgia Mann.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0151ndn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b0151pyq)
Euro Crisis

The moral hazard at the root of the Euro crisis is plain to see - especially if you're a German tax payer. The temptation to see the world being made up of morally upright savers and morally deficient debtors must be overwhelming when it's you that's going to have to foot the bill, possibly for generations to come. The view from that moral high ground may be clear and its certainty comforting, but this crisis has grown to such a scale that the moral limits of autonomy and sovereignty are being tested more than at any time in the history of the European project. Should we recognise that we do have a duty to those countries in trouble and that duty goes beyond any self-interest? Will Europe be stronger and everyone better off if we promote solidarity and set aside sectional national interests? Are those politicians, and they're not just German, who are dragging their feet over stumping up extra funds for a bail out, behaving badly? Or do we have to recognise that moral responsibility follows the contours of our emotions and there's no reason why the Germans, or any anyone else in Europe, should feel any moral solidarity or duty to the Greeks and the other countries on the edge of the financial abyss?

Witnesses:
The Rt Revd Geoffrey Rowell
Bishop of Gibraltar in Europe:

Jamie Whyte - Philosopher and Journalist; currently Head of Research and Publishing at the management consultancy Oliver Wyman.
Christian Kellermann - Director of the Nordic Office of the Friedrich Ebert Foundation in Stockholm and author of "Decent Capitalism; A Blueprint for Reforming our Economies"
Prof Marcus Kerber - Professor of Finance at Berlin Technical University.

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Claire Fox, Kenan Malik, Michael Portillo and Matthew Taylor.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b0151pys)
Series 2

Matthew Goodwin: An Electable Far Right?

Matthew Goodwin says supporters of the far right are generally neither irrational nor isolated, and that a far right party without extremist baggage could be electable in Britain.

He has spent much of the last decade with members and supporters of the British far right, examining their hopes and aspirations, what they wish to achieve.

As an expert in electoral behaviour and extremism at the University of Nottingham, he has also been carefully studying hundreds of polls to explore whether there is a wider resonance for their message. It is an intensely controversial area of study - particularly in the light of the recent atrocities in Norway.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling.

Recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b0151pyv)
Waters of Arabia

Take a walk through the narrow streets of Sana'a, capital of Yemen and you'll come across the last remaining radish gardens. These small bursts of greenery amidst the desert dust are all that remain of a system that once fed and watered the city. At the height of Arabic science and ingenuity elaborate irrigation systems brought water into the mosques to wash the faithful. The used water was then diverted into large gardens of fabulous fertility.

Today Yemen is on the verge of a humanitarian crisis provoked largely by a chronic shortage of water. A fast expanding population coupled with a diversion of scarce water for the production of the narcotic drug, Khat has pushed the country's water supply to the limit. Reporter Leana Hosea has visited Yemen to find out if the wisdom of the Arabic engineers of the past can help bring water back to this parched nation.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b0151ndj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01507kc)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0151pyx)
Ed Miliband comes under attack for his 'anti-business' Leader's speech.How do you distinguish predatory from creative business models?

The campaign for Ireland's new President gets underway.What are Martin McGuinness' chances?

How to deal with a football 'diva' like Carlos Tevez.

with David Eades.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0151pyz)
Catch 22

Episode 3

by Joseph Heller

Faced with a bombing raid to Bologna, Yossarian decides to take direct action.

Abridged by Robin Brooks

Read by Stuart Milligan

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


WED 23:00 What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else (b0151pz1)
Series 2

Travel

Andrew Lawrence explores how we go about the various journeys we take in everyday life - whether it's the journey to work or to a holiday destination, or just down to the shops.

Another short comedic monologue taking a light-hearted look at various aspects of conventional living and the pressure we feel to conform to social norms and ideals.

Written by Andrew Lawrence.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011


WED 23:15 The Music Teacher (b00s9gbs)
Series 1

Episode 2

An aural feast of a musical comedy written by and starring 2009 Writers' Guild Award winner Richie Webb as long suffering multi-instrumentalist music teacher Nigel Penny. Featuring Vicki Pepperdine as Arts Centre Manager Belinda.

Shut away in a tiny windowless practice room in a regional arts centre, music teacher Nigel Penny endures his usual succession of bizarre pupils whilst wrestling with the latest curveball thrown at him by panicked Arts Centre manager, Belinda.

Episode 2 sees Nigel faced with having to up the rate he charges his students; but he finds his negotiating skills somewhat thwarted by a guitarist with no strings, a Cameo tribute act and possibly the world's most confusing busker.

Belinda meanwhile is struggling to cope with the Arts Centre's new emergency procedures - and therefore so is everyone else.

Cast:
Nigel Penny ..... Richie Webb
Belinda ..... Vicki Pepperdine
Other roles by Dave Lamb, Jim North and Jess Robinson.

Written by Richie Webb.

Producer: Richie Webb
Director: Nick Walker
A Top Dog Production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Weird Tales (b00vknmp)
Series 2

Connected

WEIRD TALES: Connected
By Melissa Murray

Hoarder of horror Lovecraft returns for a new series to share more of his chilling tales.

When her brother-in-law is killed in a car crash, Steph is overcome with sadness. One day, feeling maudlin, she rings his mobile number. She just wants to hear his voice really. The next day he rings her back...

Steph ..... Fiona Glascott
Ray ..... Joseph Kloska
Jamie ..... Piers Wehner
Lovecraft ..... Stephen Hogan
Mother ..... Kate Layden
Jan / Flight Attendant ..... Melissa Advani
Passenger ..... Ewan Hooper
Shop Assistant ..... Rhys Jennings
Passerby ..... John Biggins
Passerby 2 / Estate Agent ..... Tessa Nicholson

Directed by Mary Peate

Introduced by the mysterious H.P. Lovecraft, Weird Tales is a series of three chilling and intimate plays for the late night slot on Radio 4.

Drawing the audience into a claustrophobic and disturbing world, the plays set out to explore the characters' deepest fears and torments. The series will concentrate on the psychological element of the horror genre stirring the imagination of the listener.

One hundred years ago, H.P. Lovecraft created The Necronomicon, a grimoire of lost souls, magical rites and forbidden lore. Locked away, he is after new stories, new blood, to add to his collection. From ghosts to demons, the plays draw the audience into a claustrophobic and disturbing world, exploring the audience's deepest fears and neuroses.



THURSDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2011

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01507l0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b015b3yt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01507l2)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01507l4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01507l6)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01507l8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01579sw)
With the Rev. Dr. Karen Smith.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b0151q7d)
Charlotte Smith hears plans for the Yorkshire Dales and Lake District National Parks to be extended. After years of debate and consultation, Natural England has recommended that the beautiful Howgill Fells and Lune Valley should become part of the Parks. Some farmers say the move will damage their business, but David Butterworth, the chief executive of the Yorkshire Dales National Park says this could enhance farming and the economy of the area.

The European Commission have suggested that cod fishing should once again be banned off the West of Scotland. And despite a recovery in numbers, the Haddock quota should only increase by 25%. Scottish fisheries minister Richard Lochhead tells Charlotte Smith the decision ignores the relevant science, but the Marine Conservation Society believes the Commission is trying to look after the long term interest of fish stocks.

And a new welfare-friendly pig pen is being trialled by British farmers. Research from the Scottish Agricultural College suggests that keeping sows in larger pens to give birth in is better for both them and their piglets. Charlotte Smith asks Dr Emma Baxter how much this new style of pig-keeping will add to the price of meat.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Clare Freeman.


THU 06:00 Today (b0151q7g)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Justin Webb, including:

07:50 Nearly one in four universities and colleges failed to meet their own targets to recruit more poor students last year. Universities minister David Willetts reacts to the figures.
08:10 Are NHS emergency surgery patients being unduly put at risk?
08:40 Larry Summers, a senior economic adviser to Barack Obama, gives an outsider's perspective on Europe's woes.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b0151q7j)
The Etruscan Civilisation

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Etruscan civilisation.Around 800 BC a sophisticated civilisation began to emerge in the area of Italy now known as Tuscany. The Etruscans thrived for the next eight hundred years, extracting and trading copper and developing a sophisticated culture. They were skilled soldiers, architects and artists, and much of their handiwork survives today. They are also believed to have given us the alphabet, an innovation they imported from Greece. Eventually the Etruscan civilisation was absorbed into that of Rome, but not before it had profoundly influenced Roman art and religion, and even its politics.With:Phil PerkinsProfessor of Archaeology at the Open UniversityDavid RidgwaySenior Research Fellow at the Institute of Classical Studies at the University of LondonCorinna RivaLecturer in Mediterranean Archaeology at University College London.Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b015b430)
John Cooper - The Queen's Agent: Francis Walsingham at the Court of Elizabeth I

Episode 4

Written by John Cooper. Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

Walsingham searches for proof that Mary Queen of Scots is guilty of treason against Queen Elizabeth I, and encourages the new wave of exploration to America and the New World.

The Queen's Agent is a story of secret agents, cryptic codes and ingenious plots, set in a turbulent period of England's history. It is also the story of a man devoted to his queen, sacrificing his every waking hour to save the threatened English state.

Reader: Hugh Bonneville

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0151q7l)
New Stalking Law? Stef Penney, First Aid, Women in Libya

Presented by Jane Garvey. Stalking : do the laws covering this area need reforming? Woman's Hour looks at why there are continued demands for laws to specifically cover stalking and how Scotland's already successfully introduced a stalking law. How much First Aid should we know if we want to save lives? More on our Zero Waste Challenge - how one woman's trying to reduce her families waste. The author Stef Penney talks about her new book "The Invsible Ones" about the travelling community and what role will women have in the new Libyan society?


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0151q7n)
Second Honeymoon

Chaos

SECOND HONEYMOON
By Joanna Trollope
Dramatised in five episodes by Rachel Joyce
Episode Four - Chaos
Edie had dreamt about the house being full again but in her daydream there were no long queues for the bathroom!

Edie.............Christine Kavanagh
Russell.........Sam Dale
Vivien...........Liza Sadovy
Matt.............Jonathan Forbes
Rosa............Alex Tregear
Ben..............Simon Bubb
Lazlo............Carl Prekopp

Directed by Tracey Neale

STORY
"Edie put her hand out, took a breath and slowly, slowly pushed open his bedroom door. The room inside looked as if he had never left it" - a mum tries to come to terms with her empty nest but a husband can only think about the second honeymoon that can now begin ...

Joanna Trollope's most heartfelt and enthralling novel has been dramatised into five episodes for Woman's Hour by Rachel Joyce. SECOND HONEYMOON explores what happens when the empty nest is suddenly full again.

Ben is leaving home to move in with his girlfriend. At twenty-two he's the youngest of the family and the last to leave. His mother, Edie, an actress, is distraught. She has defined her life as the necessary cog in her family's lives and suddenly she feels unnecessary and unimportant. Her husband, Russell, an agent, is glad to be freed of daily parental roles and is looking forward to having Edie to himself. Then Edie lands the unexpected lead role in 'Ghosts' by Ibsen and it is then the children begin to make noises about coming home again. Their other son, Matt, is struggling in a relationship in which he achieves and earns less than his girlfriend. His sister, Rosa, is wrestling with debt and the end of a turbulent love affair. Rosa is the first of the Boyd children to think she may have to move back in with her parents - just until she can make ends meet again. Russell is determined to fend her off but things don't quite go according to plan.

This is the empty nest, twenty-first-century style. Grown children going and then wanting to come back again but at a time when their parents should be getting ready for their second honeymoon. The story of two generations struggling with love, careers and parenthood makes for a riveting and funny family drama for Woman's Hour.

THE WRITER
Joanna Trollope, the author of eagerly awaited novels, often centred around the domestic nuances and dilemmas of present-day life, has also written a number of historical novels and 'Britannia's Daughters', a study of women in the British Empire. In 1988 she wrote her first contemporary novel, 'The Choir' and this was followed by a number of hugely successful novels including: 'The Rector's Wife', 'Other People's Children', 'Brother and Sister' and 'Daughters in Law'.

THE DRAMATIST
Rachel Joyce has many radio credits to her name. Her most recent dramatisations for Radio 4 include - 'The Professor', 'The Portrait of a Lady' and 'Villette'. At present she is working on a dramatisation of 'The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b0151q7q)
With Kate Adie. The BBC's foreign correspondents take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines.


THU 11:30 Lyrical Journey (b0151rkt)
Series 1

Day Trip to Bangor

Eminently singable, 'Day Trip to Bangor', which sold more than half million copies in 1979, has entered popular culture in an astonishing way. Covered by no end of bands, parodied in rugby songs, by comedians (e.g.Jasper Carrot's 'Daytrip to Blackpool') - it even got mashed up 2010 style by Paul Dakeyne at the Chris Moyles' Weekender in Bangor.

Presenter Jonathan Maitland takes the writer of the song - Debbie Cook - and Cathy Lesurf, the original singer from Fiddler's Dram (who recorded the song) back to Bangor in Wales to find out why so many people find it hard to believe it is indeed a song about that city.

Why did people claim at the time (and still do) that Debbie must have based it on a day-trip to Rhyl instead? And do the lyrics of song (the fairground, the pier etc) have any basis in reality? What happened to the woman in the song who had a 'cuddle with Jack' and delighted in getting the whole day-trip for 'under a pound'?

Cathy is asked to perform the song on the pier alongside real day-trippers, and finds out how much it has meant to some of the residents to have their home celebrated in this way.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b0151rkw)
Keep calm and carry on

Why the Students Loans Company is taking millions of pounds each year from former students who don't owe them anything at all.

As over 500 new books hit the shelves today in the hope of cashing in on Christmas sales, find out what "Super-Thursday" means for both the big chains and independent stores.

Wales becomes the first part of the UK to introduce a levy on plastic bags.

And, "Keep Calm and Carry On" - The battle for the trade mark of the wartime slogan that was never used.

Producer - Joe Kent.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01507lb)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b0151rky)
With Martha Kearney. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b0151pyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0151pyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b0151t3t)
Stephen Wyatt - Strangers on a Film

By Stephen Wyatt. To accompany Radio 4's Classic Chandler season, Patrick Stewart plays Raymond Chandler and Clive Swift is Alfred Hitchcock in their famous collaboration on 'Strangers on a Train'. In 1950, Alfred Hitchcock invited Raymond Chandler to work with him on a screenplay based on Patricia Highsmith's novel. Chandler was not only recognised as a fine novelist and had also received an Academy Award nomination for his original screenplay, The Blue Dahlia. The omens were good but their collaboration turned out to be a disaster.

Directed by Claire Grove.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b01508nn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0150dsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 One Hundred and Forty Characters (b0154y6q)
Would You Like To Reconnect?

By Joanne Harris.

A grieving woman retreats into the world of social networking, finding comfort in the traces left behind there by her dead son. Then, one afternoon, as she scrolls through her timeline, she receives an unsettling message, apparently sent from beyond the grave.

Last in a series of specially commissioned short stories inspired by the social networking phenomenon, Twitter. (For non "tweeters", the title derives from Twitter's format where "tweets" - the postings - can be no longer than 140 characters.)

Read by Monica Gibb.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 15:45 A View Through a Lens (b0151t3w)
Series 3

Fur Seals

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

4/5 Fur Seals. Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison travelled with a team filming the BBC series Frozen Planet to Bird Island, a small island at the western tip of South Georgia in the South Atlantic to film fur seals giving birth. But fur seals are extremely aggressive seals and trying to walk, let alone film, amongst them is both difficult and frightening. A colleague of John's makes him a metal barrel which acts as protective shield from which he can film. From inside this hide, John looks out across a colony of thousands of fur seals; the males engage in fierce and bloody fights, whilst the females run the gauntlet from the beach to their natal site to give birth. John finds it hard to feel empathy with animals which seem intent on doing him harm, but when amidst the noise and aggression of the battlefield, something beautiful and tender happens, John soon changes his mind.

Producer Sarah Blunt.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b0150grg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b0151t3y)
So You Want to Be a Scientist launch

Material World announces the return of 'So You Want to Be a Scientist?' - the search for the BBC's Amateur Scientist of the Year.

Long Desc
Material World announces the return of 'So You Want to Be a Scientist?' - the search for the BBC's Amateur Scientist of the Year.

Last year 69 year old gardener Ruth Brooks from Devon was crowned the winner for her research into the homing distance of snails. With the help of ecologist Dr Dave Hodgson from the University of Exeter, she created an experiment in her back garden to measure how far she should move her snails away to stop them coming back to eat her petunias.

"The whole year was filled with fun," said Ms Brooks. "For a non-scientist like me, it was great to have my research idea taken seriously. If I can do it, anyone can - just have a go!"

Now you can put your ideas, hunches and theories to the test. If you're chosen as one of Material World's four finalists, your entry will be turned into a real experiment which you'll carry out with the help of a professional scientist.

A panel of judges, chaired by Nobel prize winning scientist Sir Paul Nurse, will select four finalists in December. The amateur scientists start their research in January and will present their results at the Cheltenham Science Festival in June 2012, where the judges will choose a winner.

Entries are open online from 26 Sept until 31 Oct: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/scientist.


THU 17:00 PM (b0151t40)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01507ld)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 So Wrong It's Right (b00s943r)
Series 1

Episode 1

Charlie Brooker hosts the new comedy panel show celebrating one of Britain's favourite subjects - failure.

It's a game of competitive ineptitude, the aim of which is to come up with the wrongest answer to each question. In this episode, the guests joining him to try and out-wrong each other with their ideas and stories are panellists comedians David Mitchell & Rufus Hound and presenter Victoria Coren.

In this show the panel's worst holiday experiences, the internet and Anthea Turner all come under the 'wrong' spotlight - as well as the guests best ideas for the worst new reality TV show. Will anyone beat Rufus Hound's pitch - the primetime reality show 'Blaze Of Granny'?

Producer: Aled Evans
A Zeppotron production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0151t42)
It's Alice's birthday. She loves the candleholder Chris has made, but is disappointed that her parents have bought her expensive clothes. They enjoy a lovely day, and discuss further ways to save money.

Peggy tells Elona about Lilian's offer of 3, The Green, explaining that Lilian is aware, in confidence, of Darrell's criminal record. Peggy suggests that Darrell could help with maintenance jobs around the house for her, and then she could recommend him to her friends. Elona grows enthusiastic and hopes that Darrell will say yes.

Elona tells Peggy that she would like to take up her offer of the tenancy and Darrell will gladly undertake any maintenance jobs. Peggy is delighted.

Nic drops the children off with Andrew. She tells Will that he was off with her when she asked if there was anything going on that she needed to know about. Will thinks that Andrew reacted unfairly. Nic doesn't want to talk about it.

Pat and Tony receive a hefty bill for their latest consignment of fuel oil. They can't cover their mortgage and the fuel oil, as well as Underwood's product withdrawal charge. Pat goes through the accounts again and is in despair.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b0151t44)
James Corden; Rock of Ages

With Mark Lawson.

Actor and writer James Corden reflects on his career so far, and admits that some of the work he produced after his initial successes was sub-standard. Corden has just published an autobiography, and is touring in the acclaimed National Theatre production One Man, Two Guvnors.

Justin Lee Collins and X Factor winner Shayne Ward star in Rock of Ages, a new musical touted as 'Mamma Mia! for men'. The show weaves a narrative around 80s rock anthems. David Quantick reviews.

Leeds enjoys a special place in the history of British cinema: it was once the centre for the manufacture of film projectors. This has inspired a new work from Turner Prize nominee Lucy Skaer. She and cinema projectionist Alan Foster give Mark a guided tour in the Lyric Picture House, Armley, Leeds,

Producer Georgia Mann.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0151q7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b0151t46)
Stepping Hill Hospital

After charges against the polices main suspect, Rebecca Leighton, were discontinued police now have an uphill struggle to find out who contaminated bags of saline at Stepping Hill hospital in Stockport. Police are currently investigating three deaths and four other cases all of whom are thought to have been given the saline contaminated with insulin.
Linda Pressly asks whether anyone will ever be convicted of murder in this case and the obstacles that stand in the way of the police in gathering enough evidence to make the link between the deaths and the saline.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b0151t48)
McDonald's and New Tech

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan and his guests discuss McDonald's. After a rocky period in the middle of the last decade, how well has the global burger chain managed to revive its famous fast-food formula? They also debate whether the progress of radical new technology has slowed down.

Evan is joined in the studio by Greg Lucier, chief executive of US biotechnology company Life Technologies; Rita Clifton, chairman of branding consultancy Interbrand; Jill McDonald, chief executive of McDonald's UK.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b0150p5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b0151q7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01507lg)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0151t4d)
The German parliament votes to approve the EU bailout plan. But what next for the euro? We hear from Germany, Slovakia and Greece.

On the day the US ambassador is pelted with tomatoes in Damascus, we debate the future of Syria.

And the story of an unusual legal action in India

All that and more with Robin Lustig on The World Tonight.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0151t4g)
Catch 22

Episode 4

by Joseph Heller.

Marking the 50th anniversary of Heller's ground-breaking novel.

After a terrifying mission to Ferrara, Yossarian bails out on the next. The revenge from the powers-that-be is to make Yossarian fly lead on the next bombing raid, to Bologna, where they encounter heavy flak. Orr is forced into yet another emergency crash landing.

Abridged by Robin Brooks.

Read by Stuart Milligan

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


THU 23:00 Very Old Pretenders (b0151t4j)
The Dating Game

This week in Carl Gorham's culture clash comedy anthropologist Andrew Merron takes his two Jacobite soldiers from 1745 into the modern world of speed - dating. There, a super confident Macdonald fails spectacularly to attract anyone whilst a nervous Rab is mistaken for the strong silent type and overwhelmed with offers. With Rab already on a date, Merron manages to fix Macdonald up with someone via the internet then succeeds in arranging a special evening out for himself and long suffering wife Denise. But far from pleasing everyone, the three dates quickly prove a nightmare for all concerned.

Cast:
Andrew Merron......................David Haig
Denise Merron..................Rebecca Front
Rab ....................................Jack Docherty
Macdonald........................Gordon Kennedy
Gail ......... Morwenna Banks
Speed daters ....... Lucy Barter / Rebecca Front /Sinead Merron
Taxi Driver/Rita ....... Moray Hunter

Producer: Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Weird Tales (b00vknrq)
Series 2

Split the Atom

Hoarder of horror Lovecraft returns to share three more chilling tales.

By Lynn Ferguson. Frank Ivory is full of anger: burning, simmering, steaming anger. On his way home one night, after making his colleagues lives a misery, he meets Gwen, who is determined to tell him the story of the Morrigan, the Celtic goddess in charge of who should live and who should die.

Frank ......Derek Riddell
Gwen ......Rachel Ogilvy
Lovecraft ...... Stephen Hogan
Louise ...... Emma Stansfield
Bill ...... Rhys Jennings
Barbara/Delivery Woman ...... Tessa Nicholson
George ...... Ewan Hooper
William Perkins/Homeless Guy ...... Piers Wehner

Directed by Luke Fresle.



FRIDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2011

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01507m1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b015b430)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01507m3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01507m5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01507m7)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01507m9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01579t4)
With the Rev. Dr. Karen Smith.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0151w2w)
Scientists are using new ways of exploding straw and waste food to create better biofuel for racing cars. Anna Hill heads to the race circuit to put it to the test.

British farmers argue they're being paid less than the cost of production for ham, pork and bacon. They say higher welfare standards coupled with the rising cost of feed have seen it become even more expensive. Charlotte Smith asks consumers if they care about welfare, price or just the look of the meat when it comes to what they buy and challenges one of the major supermarkets about how much they pay farmers.

Farmers and landowners will find out later today the exchange rate for their Single Farm Payment subsidies. Those who fixed their exchange rate up to 3 years in advance will see if the gamble's paid off or cost them thousands.

Charlotte also finds out if the decline in hedgehog numbers is because they're being eaten by badgers.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0151w2y)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb:
07:33 Bahraini doctor Nada Dhaif, sentenced to 15 years in jail for treating anti-government protesters, on her alleged ordeal while in custody.
08:10 Communities Secretary Eric Pickles on encouraging weekly bin collections.
08:36 Can a modern retelling of The Iliad inspire readers to tackle Homer?


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0150dt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b015b44t)
John Cooper - The Queen's Agent: Francis Walsingham at the Court of Elizabeth I

Episode 5

Written by John Cooper. Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Through his network of spies, Walsingham prepares the country for the defeat of the Spanish Armada. It would be the last triumph of his career.

The Queen's Agent is a story of secret agents, cryptic codes and ingenious plots, set in a turbulent period of England's history. It is also the story of a man devoted to his queen, sacrificing his every waking hour to save the threatened English state.

Reader: Hugh Bonneville

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0151w30)
Cook the Perfect choux pastry, Supporting victims' families and Garden sharing

Presented by Sheila McClennon. Our How to Cook series shows you how to make the perfect choux pastry. Also in the programme : families bereaved by murder have to cope with increased costs and loss of earnings that can amount to around £37,000. But who should help foot the bill for the necessary help and support such families might need?. Is it the responsibility of the state, public charity or should the extended family burden the cost? A shortage of allotments is forcing keen gardeners to find more inventive and resourceful ways to obtain plots where they can grow their own produce. Garden sharing is a new way of bringing together people who crave a plot with those who are either too busy or too elderly to manage their own garden. But how do you ensure that everyone involved can reap the benefits? And what it's like to live in a polygamous marriage?


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0151w32)
Second Honeymoon

Beginning Again

SECOND HONEYMOON
By Joanna Trollope
Dramatised in five episodes by Rachel Joyce
Episode Five - Beginning Again
Matt, Rosa, Ben and Lazlo have all moved in. Edie thought this is what she wanted but now she's not so sure.

Edie...........Christine Kavanagh
Russell.......Sam Dale
Vivien.........Liza Sadovy
Rosa..........Alex Tregear
Matt...........Jonathan Forbes
Ben............Simon Bubb
Lazlo..........Carl Prekopp
Max...........James Lailey

Directed by Tracey Neale

STORY
"Edie put her hand out, took a breath and slowly, slowly pushed open his bedroom door. The room inside looked as if he had never left it" - a mum tries to come to terms with her empty nest but a husband can only think about the second honeymoon that can now begin ...

Joanna Trollope's most heartfelt and enthralling novel has been dramatised into five episodes for Woman's Hour by Rachel Joyce. SECOND HONEYMOON explores what happens when the empty nest is suddenly full again.

Ben is leaving home to move in with his girlfriend. At twenty-two he's the youngest of the family and the last to leave. His mother, Edie, an actress, is distraught. She has defined her life as the necessary cog in her family's lives and suddenly she feels unnecessary and unimportant. Her husband, Russell, an agent, is glad to be freed of daily parental roles and is looking forward to having Edie to himself. Then Edie lands the unexpected lead role in 'Ghosts' by Ibsen and it is then the children begin to make noises about coming home again. Their other son, Matt, is struggling in a relationship in which he achieves and earns less than his girlfriend. His sister, Rosa, is wrestling with debt and the end of a turbulent love affair. Rosa is the first of the Boyd children to think she may have to move back in with her parents - just until she can make ends meet again. Russell is determined to fend her off but things don't quite go according to plan.

This is the empty nest, twenty-first-century style. Grown children going and then wanting to come back again but at a time when their parents should be getting ready for their second honeymoon. The story of two generations struggling with love, careers and parenthood makes for a riveting and funny family drama for Woman's Hour.

THE WRITER
Joanna Trollope, the author of eagerly awaited novels, often centred around the domestic nuances and dilemmas of present-day life, has also written a number of historical novels and 'Britannia's Daughters', a study of women in the British Empire. In 1988 she wrote her first contemporary novel, 'The Choir' and this was followed by a number of hugely successful novels including: 'The Rector's Wife', 'Other People's Children', 'Brother and Sister' and 'Daughters in Law'.

THE DRAMATIST
Rachel Joyce has many radio credits to her name. Her most recent dramatisations for Radio 4 include - 'The Professor', 'The Portrait of a Lady' and 'Villette'. At present she is working on a dramatisation of 'The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.


FRI 11:00 Home from Home (b0151w34)
Bangalore

As India's economy has boomed, many British Indians - born or brought up in the UK to immigrant Indian parents - have been encouraged to make the reverse journey. In two programmes Hardeep Singh Kohli visits the busy centres of Bangalore and Mumbai and tracks down some of those who have decided to change their lives and make a go of it in India. But do they see themselves as Indian or British? What do they relish and what do they miss?

In the first programme Hardeep is in Bangalore - centre for IT, finance and outsourcing - where he meets is Nina Bual. She arrived in India on a one-way ticket, having become fed up with her PR job in London. Now she is a successful entrepreneur running four spas. The second returnee decided on an unlikely venture - to open a French patisserie with his French wife. This is Shashi Halai from Finchley and together they have expanded their business to pizzas and quiches - and not a curry in sight.

Many of the returnees work for major international companies, who find Bangalore offers the chance to expand into the huge Indian market. One of these is Rajiv Sagar. His wife gave up her UK job and they and their 2 children moved to one of the prestige gated communities. Once past security you enter a world of manicured lawns and ordered comings and goings - totally unlike the rest of the heaving city. The Sagar's will eventually be moving back, but that's not the case for Sati and Priti Joshi who have put down firm roots, bought a house, and committed themselves - but adapting to life in India is not easy, and the ever-present custom of bribes, is something they fight against

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Clare in the Community (b0151xsf)
Series 7

To Kill a Mocking Bird

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Each week we join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

In episode two 'To Kill A Mocking Bird' Clare ends her relationship with Brian and is surprised by her colleagues' reaction to the news.

Episode Two 'To Kill A Mocking Bird'

Clare ..... SALLY PHILLIPS
Brian ..... ALEX LOWE
Megan/Nali ..... NINA CONTI
Ray ..... RICHARD LUMSDEN
Helen ..... LIZA TARBUCK
Simon ..... ANDREW WINCOTT
Libby ..... SARAH KENDALL
Pru Granville ..... SOPHIE THOMPSON
Mr Collier ..... GERARD MCDERMOTT
Thomas ..... GEORGIA LOWE

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden

Producer by Katie Tyrrell.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b0151xsh)
The landlords and publicans who think 'The Good Pub Guide' is in danger of losing its integrity - after its decision to charge up to two hundred pounds for pubs to appear in the 2012 edition.

The National Trust for Scotland's Chief Executive explains how a rise in membership and donations has helped the organisation recover from a turbulent year, and a financial situation previously described as 'dangerously low'.

The one hundred and ten million pounds for community projects in England aimed at improving the lives of the over fifties.

Why delays to an upgrade of a railway line in Northern Ireland could cause problems for Londonderry in its 2013 City of Culture year.

And sign language for the radio - the deaf actor making signed radio plays for the deaf and hearing impaired.

The presenter is Peter White. The producer is Kathryn Takatsuki.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01507mf)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b0151xsk)
With Shaun Ley. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b0151xsm)
Is it possible to give listeners access to the riches of the BBC archive - without releasing material that was deemed acceptable when it was made but is offensive now? As you voice concerns about Orwellian attitudes, Roger ask David Jordon, director of Editorial Policy and standards what the rules are.

And following a furore in the press Roger finds out if it's really no longer acceptable to use the terms AD and BC, instead of CE and BCE, on the airwaves?

We celebrate the 50th birthday of In Touch, BBC Radio 4's programme for blind and partially-sighted people, and ask whether the BBC is doing enough for listeners with disabilities. Liz Carr, presenter of the irreverent podcast Ouch!, drops in on the different networks to find out what's on offer.

And a listener has sent in a play-let. It's set in a dark basement, features fingernail extraction, and stars a character called Roger Wright, apparently the controller of Radio 3...

Presented by Roger Bolton, this is the place to air your views on the things you hear on BBC Radio.

This programme's content is entirely directed by you.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0151t42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Bad Faith (b0151xsp)
Unoriginal Sin

by Peter Jukes
Unoriginal Sin

After the death of his father and the breakdown of his marriage, Jake needed to get away from home, so he has accepted his old friend Sufiq Khan's invitation to come on secondment as Police Chaplain to Khan's West Yorkshire division.

Jake arrives in his new posting the week before Christmas with a mission to clean up a rough division, but he is immediately plunged into the question of original sin as an 11-year-old is investigated for murder.

Jake Thorne ..... Lenny Henry
Chief Supt Sufiq Khan ..... Vincent Ebrahim
Father Frank Gilligan ..... John Rowe
Kevin Stanhope ..... Conrad Nelson
Alyssa Mayes ..... Seroca Davis
Edie Gosling ..... Nadine Marshall
Tony Wingard ..... Clive Russell
Amanda Copley ..... Alex Tregear
French Woman ..... Susie Riddell

directed by Mary Peate


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0151xsr)
Colne

Peter Gibbs chairs a gardening Q&A with Christine Walkden, Bunny Guinness and Chris Beardshaw.
How to grow and process natural plant dyes at home: Anne Swithinbank reports.

Chris Beardshaw debunks a longstanding myth about nitrogen-fixing pea shoots. How to encourage fruiting on your grape vines.

Questions answered in the programme:

Can the panel suggest plants for a Pendle Witches Commemoration garden.
Suggestions included: Hemlock, Aquilegias, and Dandelions.

Can I plant my herbs in silt? How can I improve its nutritional qualities?

My Bottlebrush flowered last summer, was over-wintered indoors but did not flower this summer. Why not?

Which Fuchsia can I plant intermittently in a Hawthorne hedge to brighten it up?

My mother's grapevine survives the winters under glass. Will it ever fruit?

Which edibles can I grow in a shady, winter terraced-house back yard?

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 A View Through a Lens (b0151xst)
Series 3

Shearwater Hurricane

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

5/5 Shearwater Hurricane. Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison travelled with a team filming the BBC series Frozen Planet to the Aleutian islands, a chain of islands which stretches more than a thousand miles in the far west of Alaska. The Aleutians are famous for their strong fickle tides, for their fog and for their storms. The currents rushing between the islands pump nutrients between the Pacific and Bering Sea and where there are nutrients, there are plankton. Plankton are food for krill, and krill are food for Humpback whales. But its not only whales that gather here, so too do herring, and the herring attract birds; Short-tailed shearwaters which fly thousands of miles here from the south of Australia to feed on the herring. These waters are transformed into the scene of an extraordinary banquet; and one of Nature's greatest feeding spectacles.

Producer Sarah Blunt.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b015brnn)
Wangari Maathai, David Croft, Gusty Spence, Carl Wood

Matthew Bannister on

The Kenyan human rights and environmental campaigner Wangari Maathai who became the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace prize in 2004

The writer and producer David Croft, who brought us some of TV's best loved comedies, including Dad's Army, Are You Being Served and Hi De Hi.

The former leader of the Ulster Volunteer Force, Gusty Spence, who turned his back on violence while serving an eighteen year prison sentence for murder

And the Australian pioneer of in vitro fertilisation, Professor Carl Wood.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b0151xsy)
Francine Stock talks to Lars von Trier about his new film Melancholia starring Kirsten Dunst as depressed bride Justine and Charlotte Gainsbourg as her sister Claire, responding in their different ways to their imminent annihilation - a rogue planet is hurtling towards earth and there is nothing they can do to stop it.

John Madden reveals the details of his new spy thriller The Debt starring Helen Mirren, Tom Wilkinson and Ciaran Hinds. The film is set in Israel in the 1990s with extensive flashback to Berlin in the 60s when the protagonists, a trio of Mossad agents, were tasked with finding an influential Nazi doctor who had slipped back into civilian life after the war. It's a fictional film but its plot is no more fantastic than some of the real life scenarios which it resembles.

Ali Samadi Ahadi discusses his film documenting the protests in Iran in 2009, The Green Wave. Against expectations elections held in that year reinforced the power of the ultra-conservative President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Protestors under the banner 'Where is my Vote?' gathered in the streets, wearing green to signify Islam but also hope and the campaign of the opposition candidate Mir Housain-Mousavi. The response of the authorities to the demonstrations was violent and whilst the full extent of injury and death among the protestors is not known fragmented accounts made their way out via the internet - blogs, social media and amateur video posts. The Green Wave shapes some of this material into a polemical account of the backlash to the Green movement and its ambitions:

And Francine also looks at digital projection and why it's leaving some cinema goers in the dark. Regular contributor, cinema owner Kevin Marwick of the Picture House in Uckfield, explains why some cinemas appear to be delivering a projection murky beyond any moody intention of the art director.

Producer - Craig Smith.


FRI 17:00 PM (b0151xt0)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01507mh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b0151xt2)
Series 75

Episode 4

Weirdos, War Games and Website Dating: in the week that Ed Miliband defended himself against accusations of being "weird", ITV edited footage of a militaristic video game into a documentary, and figures suggested more than 200,000 Britons had been duped by internet dating scams, Sandi Toksvig presents Radio 4's topical panel show. She is joined by Laura Solon, Jeremy Hardy, Fred Macaulay and Phill Jupitus, and Charlotte Green reads the news. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0151xt4)
Jolene tells Kenton that her offer of him moving in is still open, whenever he feels it is the right time. He decides that the right time is now. Elizabeth gives them her blessing.

Jennifer is preparing Ruairi's welcome home party from school. Tony goes to speak to her about his financial troubles but Jennifer doesn't take the hint. She firmly tells Tony that times are difficult for everyone. Tony understands what this means, and leaves in dudgeon.

Nic is in tears over a nasty voicemail message from Andrew. Will is furious and wants to do something about it, but Nic won't let him. She doesn't want Will to be with Andrew as he is with Ed.

Clarrie tells Nic about her first day volunteering at the shop. She feels good doing something with her time. Clarrie picks up on the tension between Will and Nic, and asks Nic if Will is ok. Nic hastily replies that he is.

Will needs to talk. Nic explains that she's always had to tread carefully with Andrew and she doesn't want Will upsetting that. It's bad enough with Will and Ed at one another's throats. She doesn't want Andrew spoiling their relationship too. If that happens, she doesn't know what she'd do.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b0151xt6)
Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy

Mark Lawson meets the Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy, as she publishes The Bees - her new collection of poems.

They discuss her love of the book as a physical object, how she writes from the body, and why now, when she starts to write a poem she always finishes it.

She reflects on the role of the Poet Laureate, and describes the impossibility of writing poetry after the death of her mother and the poem that resurrected her poetic ability.

She also talks about her love of football and the deal she's struck with David Beckham. Finally she explodes the myth of the Poet Laureate's "butt of sack".

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0151w32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b0151xt8)
Orrell, Wigan

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a panel discussion of news and politics from Saint Peter's Catholic High School in Orrell, Wigan with panellists Andy Burnham, Shadow Secretary of State for Education; Alan Duncan, Minster of State for International Development; Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee and UKIP MEP Paul Nuttall.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0151xtb)
Political party membership

Will Self attacks the people who join political parties as "donkeys led by donkeys". He criticises the spectacle of the party conferences, a parade of "endlessly biddable Dobbins" displaying "a mental passivity that makes the average X-factor audience look like the participants in one of Plato's symposia." He argues that members repeatedly see their principles betrayed by the actions of the leaders of their parties who are continually fighting over the same patch of turf, "butting and biting the other herds".
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 The Complete Ripley (b00jb1sp)
Ripley Under Water

by Patricia Highsmith. Ian Hart stars as charming, cultured Tom Ripley, in Patricia Highsmith's classic thriller. Strange new neighbours show an overdeveloped interest in Ripley's past. Tom discovers they are not who they say they are but will his shady dealings be exposed after all?

Tom Ripley...Ian Hart
Heloise...Helen Longworth
Madame Annette...Caroline Guthrie
David Pritchard...William Hope
Janice Pritchard...Janice Acquah
Jeff Constant...Stephen Hogan
Cynthia Gradnor...Lizzy Watts
Policeman...Matt Addis

Dramatist Stephen Wyatt
Director Steven Canny
Producer Claire Grove.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01507mk)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0151xtd)
Al Qaeda's Anwar al-Awlaki is killed in a US attack in Yemen.How important was he to the organisation ?

Renewable energy output in Scotland has fallen despite a big increase in windfarms.

Tongue in cheek ? One year as a good observant Christian woman living according to the Bible.

with Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0151xtg)
Catch 22

Episode 5

by Joseph Heller

Colonel Cathcart is plagued by several Yossarians, there is an outbreak of moaning in the briefing room and Major Danby is faced with summary execution.

Abridged by Robin Brooks

Read by Stuart Milligan

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b0150p96)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Weird Tales (b00wr8s9)
Series 2

The House on Pale Avenue

Hoarder of horror Lovecraft returns to share three more chilling tales.

By Richard Vincent. Scratching in the walls, under the floorboards, in the pipes: their new home is trying to tell the Williams family something and they won't be given a moment's peace until its secret is out in the open.

Geoff Williams ...... Jamie Glover
Jane Williams ...... Julia Ford
Sarah Williams ...... Agnes Dromgoole
Martin Crabtree ...... John Biggins
DCI Cram ...... Piers Wehner
Psychiatrist ...... Melissa Advani
Lovecraft ...... Stephen Hogan

Directed by Gemma Jenkins.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b0150m8k)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b0150m8k)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b0150p5q)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b0150p5q)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b0151ndn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0151ndn)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b0151q7n)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b0151q7n)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b0151w32)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b0151w32)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b014qxc7)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0151xtb)

A View Through a Lens 15:45 MON (b0150mlg)

A View Through a Lens 15:45 TUE (b0150p92)

A View Through a Lens 15:45 WED (b0151pyd)

A View Through a Lens 15:45 THU (b0151t3w)

A View Through a Lens 15:45 FRI (b0151xst)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b014pw7g)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0150mtb)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b01509vs)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b014qq77)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b0151xt8)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0150bwp)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b0150bwp)

Bad Faith 14:15 FRI (b0151xsp)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0150dsg)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0150dsg)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b0150mlj)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b01509vl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0150mx1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b0150pj5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b0151pyz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b0151t4g)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0151xtg)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b0157984)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b0150m8f)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b0150m8f)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b015b3wc)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b015b3wc)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b015b3yt)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b015b3yt)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b015b430)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b015b430)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b015b44t)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0150dsx)

Capitalism on Trial 09:00 TUE (b0150p5l)

Capitalism on Trial 21:30 TUE (b0150p5l)

Clare in the Community 11:30 FRI (b0151xsf)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b0151pyv)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b0151pyv)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0150dt1)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0150dt1)

Drama 14:15 MON (b0150mld)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00fm033)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0151py6)

Drama 14:15 THU (b0151t3t)

Drone Wars 13:30 SUN (b0150dt7)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b01508p5)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 TUE (b00r7kys)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b01508nt)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0150m87)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0150p5g)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0151ndd)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b0151q7d)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0151w2w)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b014qxbq)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b0151xsm)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b014q04r)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b0150phx)

Ford Madox Ford and France 23:30 MON (b00tg2ly)

Ford Madox Ford and France 23:30 TUE (b00tj82c)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b0151pys)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b01509vn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b0151q7q)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0150mls)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0150pcl)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0151pyn)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0151t44)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b0151xt6)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b0150gh9)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0151xsr)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b0150p96)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b0150p96)

Grossman's War 14:30 SAT (b0150b0c)

Grossman's War 21:00 SAT (b014ptrf)

Grossman's War 15:00 SUN (b0150ghf)

Home from Home 11:00 FRI (b0151w34)

I Was There Too! 00:30 SUN (b00kbj2y)

In Defence of Politics 20:00 MON (b0150mt8)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b0151q7j)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b0151q7j)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0150phz)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 19:15 SUN (b0150grq)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b014pw4w)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b0150mln)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b014qxbz)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b015brnn)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0150bwh)

Lyrical Journey 11:30 THU (b0151rkt)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b0150p8y)

Material World 21:00 MON (b014qnwl)

Material World 16:30 THU (b0151t3y)

Micky Flanagan: What Chance Change? 23:00 MON (b00sjcvd)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b014qvgv)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b01507dz)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b01507gj)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b01507hm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b01507jx)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b01507l0)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b01507m1)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b0151ndj)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b0151ndj)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b0151py8)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b01509vq)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b01509vq)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b0151pyq)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b014qvh3)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b01507f7)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b01507gs)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b01507hw)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b01507k5)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b01507l8)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b01507m9)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b01507f9)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b014qvh5)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b01507ff)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b01507fk)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b014qvhp)

News 13:00 SAT (b014qvhf)

Old Harry's Game 23:00 TUE (b00j4kbz)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0150dsl)

One Hundred and Forty Characters 15:30 TUE (b0150p90)

One Hundred and Forty Characters 15:30 WED (b0156mnq)

One Hundred and Forty Characters 15:30 THU (b0154y6q)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0150grg)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b0150grg)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0150bqt)

PM 17:00 MON (b0150mll)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0150p98)

PM 17:00 WED (b0151pyj)

PM 17:00 THU (b0151t40)

PM 17:00 FRI (b0151xt0)

Page to Performance 15:30 SAT (b014pzzz)

Page to Performance 13:30 TUE (b0150p61)

Paul Temple 11:30 WED (b0151nxt)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0150grl)

Picturing Britain 14:45 SUN (b0150ghc)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b014ptrk)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0150grj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b014qxd0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b0150m83)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b01579s1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b01579sf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b01579sw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b01579t4)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b0150bwk)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b0150bwk)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0150bwk)

Punt PI 10:30 SAT (b00v697r)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b0150dsq)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0150dsq)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0150dsq)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b01508nn)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b01508nn)

Repainting Giverny 11:30 TUE (b0150p5v)

Robots that Care 11:00 MON (b0150m8m)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b014pw4k)

Round Britain Quiz 13:30 MON (b0150m8t)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b01508p1)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0150bwm)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b0150p5s)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b0150p5s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b014qvgz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b01507f3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b01507gn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b01507hr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b01507k1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b01507l4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b01507m5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b014qvgx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b014qvh1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b014qvhh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b01507f1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b01507f5)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b01507fp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b01507gl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b01507gq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b01507hp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b01507ht)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b01507jz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b01507k3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b01507l2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b01507l6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b01507m3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b01507m7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b014qvhm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b01507ft)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b01507gz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b01507j0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b01507k9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b01507ld)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b01507mh)

So Wrong It's Right 18:30 THU (b00s943r)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0150dsj)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0150dsj)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0150m8c)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0150m8c)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0150dss)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0150dsn)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0150dsz)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0150grn)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0150grn)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0150mlq)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0150mlq)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b0150p9b)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b0150p9b)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0151pyl)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0151pyl)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0151t42)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0151t42)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0151xt4)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b014qnwx)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b0151t48)

The Castle 18:30 WED (b00h3840)

The Complete Ripley 21:00 FRI (b00jb1sp)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b014qxc1)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b0151xsy)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0150dt3)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b0150dt3)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b0151py4)

The Music Teacher 23:15 WED (b00s9gbs)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b014qxc5)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b0151xt2)

The Path of Least Resistance 16:30 WED (b0138361)

The Philosopher's Arms 21:00 TUE (b0150pj1)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b014pxnq)

The Report 20:00 THU (b0151t46)

The Time Being 19:45 SUN (b0150grs)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0150dt5)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0150mwz)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0150pj3)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0151pyx)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0151t4d)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b0151xtd)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b014qndd)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0151pyg)

Today 07:00 SAT (b01508nx)

Today 06:00 MON (b0150m89)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0150p5j)

Today 06:00 WED (b0151ndg)

Today 06:00 THU (b0151q7g)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0151w2y)

Tracing Your Roots 16:00 TUE (b0150p94)

Turkish Delight? 11:00 WED (b0151nxr)

Very Old Pretenders 23:00 THU (b0151t4j)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b014qvh7)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b014qvh9)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b014qvhc)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b014qvhk)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b01507fc)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b01507fh)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b01507fm)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b01507fr)

Weather 05:57 MON (b01507gv)

Weather 12:57 MON (b01507gx)

Weather 21:58 MON (b01507h1)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b01507hy)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b01507j2)

Weather 12:57 WED (b01507k7)

Weather 21:58 WED (b01507kc)

Weather 12:57 THU (b01507lb)

Weather 21:58 THU (b01507lg)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b01507mf)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b01507mk)

Weird Tales 23:30 WED (b00vknmp)

Weird Tales 23:30 THU (b00vknrq)

Weird Tales 23:30 FRI (b00wr8s9)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0150gsm)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b0150gsp)

What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else 23:00 WED (b0151pz1)

When the Dog Dies 11:30 MON (b0139d46)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0150bqr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0150m8h)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0150p5n)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0151ndl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b0151q7l)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0151w30)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0150m8r)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b0150p5z)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0151py2)

World at One 13:00 THU (b0151rky)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b0151xsk)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b0150m8p)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b0150p5x)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b0151py0)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b0151rkw)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b0151xsh)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b014qxd2)