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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 17 SEPTEMBER 2011

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b014f0vq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b014m93d)
Tim Jeal - Explorers of the Nile

Episode 5

Having found Dr Livingstone, Stanley is determined to continue the doctor's quest to find the source of the Nile

Nothing obsessed explorers of the mid-nineteenth century more than the quest to discover the source of the White Nile. It was the planet's most elusive secret, the prize coveted above all others. Between 1856 and 1876, six larger-than-life men and one extraordinary woman accepted the challenge. Showing extreme courage and resilience, Richard Burton, John Hanning Speke, James Augustus Grant, Samuel Baker, Florence von Sass, David Livingstone, and Henry Morton Stanley risked their lives and reputations in the fierce competition.

Award-winning author Tim Jeal deploys fascinating new research to provide a vivid tableau of the unmapped 'Dark Continent', its jungle deprivations, and the courage as well as malicious tactics of the explorers.

Jeal weaves the story with authentic new detail and examines the tragic unintended legacy of the Nile search that still casts a long shadow over the people of Uganda and Sudan.

Tim Jeal is the author of acclaimed biographies of Livingstone, Baden-Powell, and Stanley, each selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times and the Washington Post. He lives in London.

Reader: Alex Jennings
Abridger: Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014f0vs)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014f0vv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014f0vx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b014f0vz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b014gk87)
with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b014lzfx)
"I can't meet Anne Robinson, because I'm a criminal" A listener discusses having a record and warns against criminalising young rioters. And a daughter tells us about her mother's wish to have her body donated to medical science. And Fergal Keane read Your News. Plus a short story based on a sentence sent in by listeners. With Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b014f0w1)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b014f0w3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b014lzfz)
Listener's Walks

John Jones - Walking & Gigging

Clare Balding returns with a new series of walks based on suggestions from listeners to the programme. The series begins as Clare joins John Jones, lead singer and melodeon player of the folk rock group, Oysterband. Back in 2009, John decided to bring together the two passions in his life, walking and music. Marrying the private and public for the first time, he set off on the Feet Don't Fail Me Tour, in which he walked from gig to gig sometimes covering up to 20 miles a day before arriving in the next town for the next evening's show. Since then, John has completed two further walking tours, the latest being the "Spine of England" in May 2011 during which he walked with his group the Reluctant Ramblers across the Pennines. Playing gigs in and around the Peak District, he picked up friends, fans and fellow musicians along the way. Today Clare joins John high up in the Chiltern Hills. They take one of the most spectacular paths down the chalk escarpment and on to the Ridgeway, walking through the villages of Crowell and Chinnor before descending into the Vale of Oxfordshire. Accompanied by Darren Spratt, Walks Leader with the Chiltern Society, they pass through red kite country and follow ancient footpaths to arrive at the Towersey Folk Festival where John will perform at the end of the walk.
Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b014lzg1)
Farming Today This Week

UK egg farmers have spent £400million replacing conventional battery cages with higher welfare 'enriched' cages. Battery systems will become illegal across the EU from January next year but many countries admit they won't have made the switch in time. Campaigners are calling for a ban on the export of illegal eggs from those countries but there are fears they may still get into the UK if used in products like cakes and quiches.
Charlotte Smith visits a Leicestershire farm with 400,000 hens in cage and free-range systems to find out what the cost of the changeover has been, how it will impact the price of eggs and to ask what really is the kindest system for hens.
Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anne-Mare Bullock.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b014f0w5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b014lzg3)
With John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b014lzg5)
Sir William Atkinson, Murray Lachlan Young, hurricane girl Pauline Brannigan, Chris Hargreaves, Francis Rossi and Jean Marsh

Richard Coles with headmaster Sir William Atkinson and poet Murray Lachlan Young.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b014lzg7)
Rowing to the North Pole - Malta - Tidal islands

John McCarthy talks to adventurer Jock Wishart about his recent expedition rowing to the North Pole. He and his team were the first to achieve this feat made possible this year by global warming melting the ice. They were under threat from polar bears and crushing ice floes and had to return before the sea froze over again. John also meets novelist Jo Baker whose stay in Malta led to the discovery of her family's First World War connection with the island. And Peter Caton who has visited all of Britain's tidal islands tells John about the variety of history and landscape of these fascinating places isolated from the mainland at high tide. The best known are Lindisfarne and St Michael's Mount but there are many others from the Thames to the Highlands.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b014lzg9)
Series 4

Episode 3

Steve Punt turns gumshoe, investigating the mysterious disappearance of a silent film about Prime Minister David Lloyd George just after the First World War.

The Life Story of David Lloyd George was the first ever biopic of a living Prime Minister. A lavishly filmed silent movie, it charted the rise of the wartime leader from the Welsh Valleys. Just after the close of the Great War - as the film was destined for the big screen - lawyers paid £20,000 to cancel the movie's release. To this day, nobody knows why.

Steve examines the evidence and asks whether it's a case of political shenanigans or personal peccadilloes. Among those called in for questioning are biographer of Lloyd George, Lord Hattersley, and Ffion Hague, who's studied the war leader's affair with Frances Stevenson.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b014lzgc)
George Parker of The Financial Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

Parliament completed its September fortnight sitting and MPs set out their stalls for the party conference season.

First up was a group of roughly 100 Conservative MPs s who want to look again at the European Union and re-assess its workings.
Andrea Leadsom is a founder of the group and Charles Grant runs the Centre for European Reform. .What kind of change do Andrea and colleagues require and are they realistic?

One of Alistair Darling's last tasks as chancellor was to attend an EU Finance Ministers meeting on the Greek debt crisis. Why, in his view, is the crisis still unresolved?

The boundary Commission published its proposals for changes to constituencies in England and Northern Ireland. Many MPs are dismayed. Robert Hayward who is an independent expert on boundary changes and a former Conservative MP, discusses the impact of the proposals with Scottish Labour MP Sheila Gilmore, and Liberal Democrat MP Dan Rogerson.

Simon Hughes argues that the Liberal Democrats have got better at being in government, and Professor Peter John explains why David Cameron has got a unit in Downing St to help "nudge" people into a sense of civic responsibility.

The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b014lzgf)
Reprisals and revenge in a desert oasis as the battles continue against the final Gaddafi loyalists -- Justin Marozzi's been learning of the tensions in a small community in the far south of Libya. Katy Watson in Doha on how the Gulf state of Qatar was one of the first countries to declare its support for the Libyan rebels and how it is now reaping the benefits. Jonathan Head, who accompanied Turkish premier Erdogan on part of his North African tour, contends that a Turkish leader, elevated to the status of an Arab champion, is extraordinary. Claudia Hammond is in Costa Rica: tle elderly there reach a greater age than in any other nation in the Americas but the burden, she tells us, hangs heavily on the country's healthcare system. And Daniel Schweimler took some long bus trips and walked a great distance to visit a remote part of Argentina which is almost untouched by the modern world.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b014lzz1)
On Money Box with Paul Lewis:

One of Britain's biggest insurers has been singled out by a judge for apparently inflating the price of car repairs.The judge says the practices by Royal and Sun Alliance are viewed by some of its rivals as falling somewhere between "sharp practice" and "outright fraud." Money Box has been at the forefront of investigating why car insurance premiums have risen steeply over the past year or so. Bob Howard reports.

Since 2007 landlords in England and Wales have had a legal obligation to place tenants' deposits in one of three named protection schemes. The Government introduced this to provide a fairer system for settling disputes between landlords and tenants. However Money Box has found out that there are significant loopholes in the law which make it difficult for many tenants to get their deposits back at the end of their tenancy. Shelter and the Residential Landlords Association, speak to the programme.

The case of Kweku Adoboli, the UBS trader, who allegedly lost his bank £1.3bn in unauthorised trading, has highlighted how trading in derivatives is still a risky business. The subject of the lack of risk controls by banks has been in the headlines this week as the Independent Commission on Banking urged that investment and retail banking should be ringfenced from each other.Terry Smith, chief executive officer of investment specialists Tullett Prebon joins the programme.

The last of the 'big six' energy companies, EDF, is to raise gas prices by 15.4% and electricity prices by 4.5% for domestic customers from next month. The regulator, Ofgem, is studying whether higher prices are justified. Joe Malinowski runs the comparison website The Energy Shop.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b014gjwp)
Series 75

Episode 2

Ghettos, Gap Years and The God Particle. In the week that Ian Duncan Smith warned the middle classes not to ignore problems on sink estates, David Cameron claimed the KGB tried to recruit him on his gap year, and physicists admitted they may never find the elusive Higgs-Boson particle, Sandi Toksvig presents another edition of Radio 4's popular topical quiz. She is joined by panellists Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Marcus Brigstocke and Hugo Rifkind, and Neil Sleat reads the news. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b014f0w7)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b014f0w9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b014gk70)
Ryde, Isle of Wight

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs a debate about news and politics from Ryde School, on the Isle of Wight with Shadow Leader of the Commons,Hilary Benn; Dail Mail columnist and editor of their new political comment website, Simon Heffer; Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Chris Huhne; and General Secretary of the University and College Union, Sally Hunt.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b014lzz3)
Your chance to respond to the panel. Call Jonathan Dimbleby on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. The topics: Rogue traders and banking reform, Is the Euro worth saving? Strike action this Autumn, statehood for Palestine? Materialism and happiness.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00q07c7)
Raven Black

By Ann Cleeves.

Dramatised for radio by Iain Finlay MacLeod.

Atmospheric dramatisation of the award-winning crime novel set deep in a Shetland winter.

When a young woman is found strangled in a snow-covered field, the inhabitants of small Shetland hamlet Ravenswick are thrown into shock. Disbelief soon turns to anger and suspicion falls upon elderly loner Magnus Tait. But Detective Jimmy Perez has a hunch that the case is more complicated than that solution might suggest.

Raven Black was named Best Crime Novel of the Year by the Crime Writers Association in 2006. It's the first in a series of novels set in Shetland, featuring Detective Jimmy Perez.

Cast:

Jimmy Perez ... Grant O'Rourke
Magnus ... John Shedden
Fran ..... Rosalind Sydney
Sally ... Clare Yuille
Robert ..... John Kielty
Duncan ..... Kenny Blyth
D.I. Taylor ..... Robin Laing
Euan ..... Greg Powrie
Annie Perez ..... Sandra Voe
Catherine ..... Melody Grove

Producer/Director: Kirsteen Cameron.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b014fdbp)
Series 12

Let's Face the Music and Dance

The enduring Irving Berlin classic, Let's Face the Music and Dance is celebrated by those for whom it has a special significance. Written in 1932 as one of the dance numbers for Follow The Fleet, a movie starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, it's since taken on a life of it's own, being recorded by hundreds of artists from Diane Krall to Shirley Bassey, Frank Sinatra to Vera Lynn, Ella Fitzgerald to Matt Munroe.

For Sir John Mortimer's widow, Penny, it conjures up the very essence of her husband, who loved life, romance and dancing - even though he was no Fred Astaire , a fact he always deeply regretted.

Lawrence Bergreen , Berlin's biographer and academic Morris Dickstein explain why this song has such a unique place in popular culture and the cabaret singer and composer, Kit Hesketh Harvey explains why the melody continues to haunt us.

We hear from the bride and groom who decided to dance down the aisle to it after their wedding and the redundant welder for whom the song will be forever associated with the demise of our ship building industry. While one insurance executive recalls how the the song became central to their advertising campaign, bringing success to the firm and also placing Nat King Cole's version back in the charts nearly sixty years after it was written.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b014lzz5)
Joan Collins, Jo Brand, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week presented by Jane Garvey. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Cook the Perfect...Potato Dauphinoise, Actress Joan Collins, Home Secretary Theresa May, how to deal with the problem of urinary incontinence, Jo Brand , should schools girls be forced to wear trousers to stop rising hemlines? Composer Debbie Wiseman and author Anna Funder.


SAT 17:00 PM (b014lzz7)
With Ritula Shah. A fresh perspective on the day's news with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b014lzfx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b014f0wc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b014f0wf)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014f0wh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b014lzz9)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Celia Birtwell will be talking about her well timed autobiography and design scrapbook. Celia was at the heart of the bohemian 60's and 70's creating fashion from her iconic designs with her then partner Ossie Clark and acting as muse for friend David Hockney. She has of course now been introduced to another generation via collections for Top Shop and other outlets.

As well as Celia, Clive will be speaking to another famous former resident of Salford, none other than the original 24-hour party person, Shaun Ryder. As the lead singer for the Happy Mondays, Shaun was at the forefront of the 'Madchester' scene releasing huge hits such as 'Step On' which opening lyrics form the title for his autobiography 'Twisting My Melon'.

Jane Asher, the queen of cakes and sugarcraft is now set to star as Lady Bracknell in 'The Importance of Being Earnest' and the one act play 'Farewell to the Theatre' in Kingston. Jane has starred in everything from 'Alfie' alongside Michael Caine through to 'Doctor Who' and 'Crossroads' on the small screen.

In 1999, Jeremy Gilley founded Peace One Day, a non-profit organisation that has gone on to establish the global 'Peace Day' with unanimous support from the United Nations and held annually on September 21st. Emma Freud will be talking to him about the Peace One Day Concert at the O2 Arena, which begins the 365 day countdown to a Global Truce on Peace Day 2012.

Bringing his mandolin virtuosity and bluegrass tales to the Loose Ends studio is Chris Thile who plays 'Rabbit in the Log'. And Femi Temowo, former musical director and band leader for Amy Winehouse, plays 'Asiko Aye' from his new album Orin Meta.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b014lzzc)
Bernard Hogan-Howe

Profile looks at the man who was appointed this week to the top job in policing - the new Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Bernard Hogan-Howe.

Described as a tough, straight northerner, he spent five years running the Merseyside police to 2009.

He introduced a zero tolerance approach to crime which he describes as "total policing". Under his leadership there were significant falls in crime and anti-social behaviour.

He is not afraid to court controversy and spoke out against judges for being soft on gun crime.

He adopted a high public profile with regular web-chats and appearances on radio phone-ins.

He has a love of horses and also made regular public appearances on horseback

Danny Shaw talks to former colleagues, politicians and criminologists and others and finds out what drives Bernard Hogan-Howe and what sort of Metropolitan Police Commissioner he might be.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b014lzzf)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests writer Miranda Sawyer, critic John Mullan and novelist Liz Jensen review the week's cultural highlights including Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Tomas Alfredson's film Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is an adaptation of the classic John le Carre Cold War thriller. Gary Oldman stars (amongst a wealth of British acting talent) as George Smiley - a retired spook who is tasked with uncovering a mole at the very heart of MI6 or 'the Circus'.

My City is Stephen Poliakoff's first play for 12 years. Tracey Ullman stars as Miss Lambert - a retired primary school headmistress who is discovered lying on a London park bench by one of her former pupils. When they meet up a few days later a night of storytelling and revelation ensues.

Michela Murgia's novel Accabadora has won six literary prizes in Italy including the prestigious Campiello Prize. Growing up in rural Sardinia in the 1950s, Maria is taken from her impoverished family and given to her adoptive mother - Bonaria Urrai - who is ostensibly the village seamstress but also has a darker role.

The Channel 4 documentary series Educating Essex is set in a secondary school and focuses on pupils in their final year there. Sixty-five fixed cameras around the school recorded events without the intrusive presence of a film crew and the resulting footage has been edited to provide a fascinating portrait of life behind the school gates.

Degas and the Ballet: Picturing Movement at the Royal Academy brings together more than 80 of the artist's paintings, sculptures, pastels, drawings and prints of ballet dancers and presents them in parallel with the experiments his contemporaries were undertaking to capture movement with photography.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b014m1px)
The Life and Fate of Vasily Grossman

Jim Riordan crosses the former Soviet Union to explore the life and fate of Soviet writer Vasily Grossman, author of Life and Fate. Grossman was both a heroic war journalist and post war heretic feared by the state.

In 1961 the K.G.B. came not to arrest writer Vasily Grossman but his masterwork, Life & Fate. Its direct comparison of Nazism and Stalinism, set against the terrible battle of Stalingrad, so alarmed the Soviet authorities that they compared it to the threat of Western nuclear weapons, telling him it would not be published
for 200 years. The novel would finally be smuggled to the West and published long after Grossman's death in 1964.

Jim Riordan goes in search of those who knew Grossman in the war ravaged city of Stalingrad (present day Volgograd), reads Grossman's celebrated war diaries in the Moscow archives and hears from those who smuggled his masterpiece Life and Fate abroad. There it began a new life in the West where it has become increasingly viewed as one of the most significant works of the 20th Century. Reader Ken Cranham.
Producer: Mark Burman.


SAT 20:45 Vasily Grossman from the Frontline (b014m1pz)
The Stalingrad Army

Elliot Levey reads the second of Vasily Grossman's front line despatches from the battle of Stalingrad. The Stalingrad Army. Red Star -January 13th 1943. Translated by Jim Riordan.

'How can I convey my feelings at this moment in the dark basement which hadn't surrendered the factory to the enemy?'

As the 'special correspondent' for Red Star newspaper Vasily Grossman conveyed the 'ruthless truth of war' from the first disastrous weeks of the Nazi invasion in 1941 to victory in the ruins of Berlin. His intimate portraits of baby faced snipers, taciturn machine gunners and enthusiastic 'tankists' brought home the struggle to both the Soviet people and a wider world. Never more so than during the terrible battle for Stalingrad between July 1942 to February 1943.

The whole world was transfixed by a struggle that might determine the course of the war as Hitler's Sixth Army found the early success of late summer turning into disastrous defeat in the icy winter amidst the rubble. Throughout these months of terrible battle Grossman endured countless dangers to cross the river Volga and enter the ruined city. There he would listen & gather material for his detailed portraits for Red Star, stories from those who would most likely die in this pitiless 'war of the rats'. A war in which every cellar and every building became a front line. By January 1943 the desperate defence of the city had shifted as the surviving soldiers of the Red Army sensed a priceless victory. 2: The Stalingrad Army.

Reader: Elliot Levey
Translator: Jim Riordan
Producer: Mark Burman.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b014f5tj)
Jessie Kesson - Another Time, Another Place

by Jessie Kesson.

Dramatised by Sue Glover.

1944. To a tiny farming community in the far north-east of Scotland come three Italian POWs. Until now, the war has scarcely touched this isolated world and the Italians are regarded by the locals as dangerous. However, to Janie, the young wife of the cattleman, the Italians are thrilling and exotic. Their experience of imprisonment and yearning mirror her own feelings and she is gradually drawn to the vibrant Neapolitan, Luigi.

Janie ... Claire Knight
Robert ..... Robert Jack
Luigi ..... Cesare Taurasi
Kirsty ..... Vicki Liddelle
Elspeth ..... Meg Fraser
Umberto ..... Tony Kearney
Finlay ..... Paul Young

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane

Jessie Kesson is one of Scotland's best loved authors. She was born in 1916 and died in 1994, living most of her life in northern Scotland. Born into poverty, raised in orphanages and trained as farmhand and domestic servant, she wrote about her experiences in The White Bird Passes and Another Time, Another Place. Both of these novels were made into feature films.

Sue Glover is one of Scotland's leading playwrights. Her work has been performed worldwide.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b014f0wk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b014fcyw)
Securing Freedom: 2011

Eliza Manningham-Buller: Security

The former Director-General of the Security Service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller gives the second of her BBC Reith Lectures 2011. In this lecture called " Security" she argues that the security and intelligence services in a democracy have a good record of protecting and preserving freedom.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b014f9qc)
(5/12)
Tom Sutcliffe welcomes Wales and the Midlands for their second contest in the current series of the cryptic quiz. David Edwards and Myfanwy Alexander play for Wales, while Stephen Maddock and Rosalind Miles are the Midlands team.

Among the puzzles they face today is: why could Michael Caine on Tyneside, Peter Falk in Los Angeles, and half of Starsky and Hutch, also be heard in Asia?

Tom will also have the answer to last week's cliffhanger puzzle, and there'll be the usual devious contributions from Round Britain Quiz listeners.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b014f72r)
Roger McGough introduces a wide range of poetry requests, read by Mark Meadows and Catherine Cusack.
Michael Longley, Jean Sprackland and Clare Pollard also read their own work.

Bicycles, skips, alarm clocks and public statues all feature in poems today. Topics include travel, faith, and political power, with work by Percy Shelley, T.S. Eliot, George Herbert, Jenny Lewis and an archive recording of Michael Donaghy who died in 2004. There are poems by two members of the Rhymers' Club, founded by Yeats in 1890. One is by Ernest Dowson - listen out for a phrase that became a famous film and book title. Robinson Jeffers and James Fenton consider existence with the help of vultures and skips, and there is an elegant story by David Scott of how the Marquis of Ripon rescued an Italian church from the brink of destruction.

Producer: Sarah Langan.



SUNDAY 18 SEPTEMBER 2011

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b014htr1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 I Was There Too! (b0156nd1)
That Door

By Elizabeth Kuti. Fresh 'witness' insights into history. In Wittenberg 1517, Brother Martin meets the indomitable Frau Sprenger. Read by Eleanor Bron.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014htr3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014htr5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014htr7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b014htr9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b014m6qv)
The bells of St Chad's in Shrewsbury, Shropshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b014lzzc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b014htrc)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b014m6qx)
A Language That Speaks The Truth

Studs Terkel, the celebrated American broadcaster and oral historian, had, in his own words, a big mouth that regularly landed him in trouble. But he also passionately cared about politics, social justice, art and culture - and in particular, the way we use language to articulate our ideas about ourselves.

In this special edition of Something Understood, we hear Studs speaking shortly before his death in 2008 intertwined with readings from authors he knew and admired - among them, Bertrand Russell, Kathryn Simmonds and James Cameron - and music by those he held in highest esteem, including Mozart and Mahalia Jackson.

Readers: Emma Fielding and Jonathan Keeble
Produced by Eleanor McDowall & Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b014m6qz)
At the start of the 20th century it is estimated that a quarter of a million people left the smog of urban life in cities like Birmingham and London for a few weeks to earn extra cash and piled down to the countryside to pick hops in the September sunshine. The exodus of people was such that whole families would come arrive on specially charted trains and live in makeshift homes, stables and so called hoppers' huts in places like Kent and Hereford.

The introduction of mechanisation, consumers changing tastes and crop itself proving to be commercially high risk for farmers meant that just a few decades later the industry has shrunk dramatically. At one time there were 40,000 acres of hops grown in the UK - now there is just 2,500.

Charlotte Smith meets farmers and pickers in Kent who are bringing in this years hops harvest. She also visits the Royal Tunbridge Wells Brewery Company to taste a rare 'wet hops' beer which has to be brewed on the same day as the plants are picked.

This edition of On Your Farm is presented by Charlotte Smith and produced in Birmingham by Angela Frain.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b014htrf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b014htrh)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b014m6r1)
Edward Stourton with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b014m6r3)
Eden Project

Monty Don presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Eden Project.

Reg Charity: 1093070

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Send a cheque payable to Eden Project to Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal.
Mark the back of the envelope Eden Project. All donations will go to Gardens for Life.
- Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b014htrk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b014htrm)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b014m6r5)
'Manna in the Desert' - live from Jordanhill Parish Church, Glasgow, with the Rev Colin Renwick & the Rev Fiona Lillie.
Jordanhill congregation and Community Choir directed by Alan Tavener.
Reading: Exodus 16: 1-5, 13-21. Producer: Mo McCullough.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b014gk72)
Believing in Belief

John Gray argues that the scientific and rationalist attack on religion is misguided. Extreme atheists do not realise that for most people across the globe, religion is not generally about personal belief. Instead, "Practice - ritual, meditation, a way of life - is what counts." Central to religion is the power of myth, which still speaks to the contemporary mind. "The idea that science can enable us to live without myths is one of these silly modern stories." In fact, he argues, science has created its own myth, "chief among them the myth of salvation through science....The idea that humans will rise from the dead may be incredible" he says, "but no more so than the notion that humanity can use science to remake the world"
Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b014m6r7)
With Kevin Connolly. News and conversation about the big stories of the week.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b014m6r9)
For detailed synopses, see daily episodes

Written by ..... Graham Harvey
Directed by ..... Jenny Stephens
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Debbie Aldridge ..... Tamsin Greig
Peggy Woolley ..... June Spencer
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Rosalind Adams
William Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Bert Fry ..... Eric Allan
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0156jy6)
Martin Clunes

Kirsty Young's castaway is the actor Martin Clunes.

He became a household name in the 1990s in the comedy "Men Behaving Badly" and, in the years since, has performed at The National Theatre, presented a number of natural history documentaries and become the gruff GP in the comedy drama "Doc Martin."

His prominent ears are among his trademarks and he reveals that early in his career he turned down an opportunity to have them pinned back. He said: "I just didn't fancy it - maybe I hadn't noticed them".

Record: Sailing - Rod Stewart
Book: Puckoon by Spike Milligan
Luxury: An electric guitar

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b014fblm)
Series 61

Sheila Hancock, Graham Norton, Paul Merton and Tony Hawks

The ever popular panel game, hosted by Nicholas Parsons. With guests Sheila Hancock, Graham Norton, Paul Merton and Tony Hawks.

Guests try to speak for a minute on a subject without hesitation, repetition or deviation. This week, subjects include 'Red Sky at Night' and 'The Meat Raffle'... except only one of the panellists seems to know what it is.

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b014m76w)
The Honey Business

Honey, prized since ancient times, is today shipped all over the planet. It is used as a pure foodstuff, a sweetening agent, in food manufacturing as well as in pharmaceuticals and more.

In this edition of The Food Programme, Sheila Dillon looks at the business of honey.

The story starts in rural Oxfordshire, where Rich Ward goes on a production site tour with Patrick Robinson - factory manager at Rowse, the biggest honey packer in the UK. The company brings honey in from all over the world for use in its own-label honeys and in honeys that it packs for its many customers. Rowse also blends honeys - matching the exact specifications of customers, including most of the major supermarkets.

Sheila meets Thomas Heck, a honey trader based in the City of London. His company procures large quantities of honeys from many countries that are shipped in large metal drums.

Hattie Ellis, author of 'Sweetness & Light: The Mysterious History of the Honeybee' joins Sheila to talk honey history and adulteration.

Journalist Andrew Schneider discusses his recent article about 'honey laundering' that sent shockwaves around
the USA, portraying a situation in which mislabelled honey and fake honeys are finding their way on to the shelves.

Tony Spacey, the founder of Littleover Apiaries in Derbyshire, explains why his company has the need for an on-site laboratory.

The highest court in the EU has just issued a ruling concerning GM pollen and honey, which will have far-reaching implications both for the honey trade and beyond. As global demand grows year on year, could the EU be facing a honey shortage?

Produced by Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b014htrp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b014m76y)
With Shaun Ley. The latest national and international news, with an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Waiting for Independence Day (b012qrtq)
Quebec has been asked twice whether it wants to become independent. Scotland will be asked the same question soon. Iain MacWhirter travels to Montreal and Ottawa to ask whether the experience of having a referendum hanging over it has harmed or galvanised Quebecois society?


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b014gjwc)
Postbag Edition, Sparsholt College

Pippa Greenwood, Matthew Wilson and Bunny Guinness answer the gardening questions you've posted and emailed in.

Grapes, figs, and pomegranates : cultivation tips and tricks from the panel. Pippa Greenwood advises how to tackle the highly contagious Brown Rot or Sclerotinia on apples and plums.

Sparsholt's Rosie Yeoman explains how to take lavender and hedge cuttings in preparation for next year. Chaired by Eric Robson.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Picturing Britain (b014m770)
Series 2

From Pop to Pregnancy

In Picturing Britain, Adil Ray examines the country through the lens of it's most distinctive photographers.

In this second programme Adil meets Andy Fallon, a music photographer whose gritty, authentic style enlivens Britain's music magazines and newspapers. As he shoots the indie band Wild Beasts, Adil gets a glimpse into the artistry and gaffa tape behind the taking of iconic music photographs.

His wife Elle was also a music photographer, but she has left behind the mud of Glastonbury and crush of concerts, to take classic black and white portraits of bumps and babies. Adil hears how women, four weeks before their birth, no longer hide in tent-shaped clothes but celebrate the beauty of their changing bodies.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.


SUN 15:00 Grossman's War (b014ptrf)
Life and Fate

Viktor and Lyuda

Viktor, a nuclear physicist, is evacuated with his family from Moscow eastwards to Kazan.

It's October 1942 and the Russians are defending Stalingrad from the ferocious attack of the Germans. Viktor has a revelatory breakthrough in his research but his wife Lyuda learns of the death of her son and her grief drives a wedge between the couple: Viktor is drawn to the kindness of Marya, the wife of his close colleague.

Kenneth Branagh and David Tennant star in Vasily Grossman’s epic saga.

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Grossman’s huge novel charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly seen as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested.

Grossman died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

Dramatised by Mike Walker.

Viktor Shtrum.....Kenneth Branagh
Lyuda Shaposhnikova.....Greta Scacchi
Nadya.....Ellie Kendrick
Alexandra .....Ann Mitchell
Pyotr Sokolov.....Nigel Anthony
Akhmet Karimov....Stephen Greif
Marya Sokolova.....Harriet Walter
Leonid Madyarov.....Ralph Ineson
Sister.....Elaine Claxton
Anna Stepanovna....Alex Tregear
Soldiers.....Gerard McDermott, Jonathan Forbes, Henry Devas

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead.

Musicians: Oliver Wilson-Dickson, Tom Jackson, Stacey Blythe and Max Pownall

Translated by Robert Chandler

Director: Alison Hindell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b014ptrh)
Charles Frazier, author of Cold Mountain, discusses his latest book Nightwoods with Mariella Frostrup

Charles Frazier is the bestselling author of Cold Mountain, which became the popular Oscar and Bafta winning film starring Nicole Kidman, Renee Zellweger and Jude Law. He discusses his long awaited third novel, Nightwoods, which he's located once again in the verdant forests and mountains of his beloved North Carolina. He explains to Mariella Frostrup why he's drawn to this landscape, his visual writing style and why there are always several year gaps between this novels.

With the closure of the real Travel Bookshop made famous in the film Notting Hill, travel writers Sara Wheeler and Michael Jacobs discuss the nature of travel writing, what makes a wonderful travel book and if the genre will survive in the age of the internet, cheap flights and apps

Magic in adult literature has had a difficult time over the past couple of centuries. Once used by the greats such as Shakespeare and Milton, it has spent many years thought of as the preserve of children's stories only. However authors and fans of the genre are now fighting back and finally writing the books they've been desperate to read. Lev Grossman, author of The Magician's King and Erin Mortenstern, whose debut novel is called The Night Circus, discuss why they felt compelled to write magic literature for adults and how their books differ from traditional children's fantasy novels.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b014ptrk)
Grumpy poets, redundant hangmen and rats feature in today's richly mixed bag of poetry requests, read by Paul Mundell. Roger McGough also introduces poets reading their own work; there's archive of WH Auden in typically terse mood as he does the rounds of a lecture tour in 'On the Circuit' and Jean Sprackland reads a moving remembrance of her father in her poem 'Dressing Gown'. There are other portraits of family life by the late Ken Smith and the Welsh poet, Tony Curtis.

Produced by Sarah Langan.


SUN 17:00 The Price of Power (b014fkx3)
When British MPs voted for the first time in August 1911 to receive salaries, they took a big step towards creating a professional cadre of career politicians rather than a gentleman's club.

Writer and journalist Jonathan Freedland addresses the knotty problem of MPs' pay and conditions by beginning with the current level of MPs' pay - £64, 766 - and then exploring pensions and expenses. He will examine the history of MPs' pay awards, from what Lloyd-George intended to be a sort of stipend rather than a salary, to recent years when MPs were compared with the Civil Service and to the present day system put in place by Parliament, in consultation with the Senior Salaries Review Body.

Interviewees include MPs David Davies, Tristram Hunt, Adam Afriye, Chris Mullin, John Mann, Denis McShane; former MP Dave Nellist; IPSA director and former Liberal Democrat MP Jackie Ballard, SSRB boss Bill Cockburn; a Divisional Manager for Executive Headhunters, James Parr; ITV chairman and former MP Archie Norman; the Adam Smith Institute; Matthew Sinclair from the Taxpayers' Alliance and Kenyan MP Ababu Namwamba.

Writer/presenter: Jonathan Freedland

Producer: Neil Rosser
A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b014lzzc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b014htrr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b014htrt)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014htrw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b014ptrm)
Sheila McClennon makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio
This week, the human heart's capacity for love- as an elderly couple marooned in a council tower block refuse to leave their memories. And how a brilliant biologist maps the intricate workings of the heart too late to save his own from being broken. We hear about an unexpected and moving encounter on the New York subway days after 9/11 and there's just a taste of Vasily Grossman's masterly "Life and Fate" which will be all over Radio 4 in the coming week.

Breakfast - Radio 5live
Ayckbourn of Action - Radio 4
BBC National Short Story Award - Radio 4
A Shoebox of Snow - Radio 4
Beyond Belief - Radio 4
The Call of the Arab Spring - Radio 4
Explorers of the Nile - Radio 4
Giant Ladies That Changed The World - Radio 4
Portrait of Winston - Radio 4
Today - Radio 4
Front Row - Radio 4
Life and Fate - Radio 4
Reader's Digest - Trouble in Pleasantville
Paul Jones - Radio 2

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Helen Lee.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b014ptrp)
Eddie and Clarrie prepare the food for Joe's 90th birthday. Keen to help, a friendly David welcomes Clarrie back after her break. However, Clarrie remains anxious about facing everyone again later.

Alice tells Amy about the extent of Pat and Tony's current situation. It has prompted Alice to work voluntarily for them with friends, and Amy agrees to help. Alice has also bribed her friend Chloe with the promise of a place at the Highfield Manor party. Meanwhile, Amy needs somewhere for her dad to organise the harvest supper.

Over potato picking, they also discuss Amy's job as a midwife and how Chris is supportive about Alice forthcoming MSc studies.

Sampling Joe's cider, David and Bert learn that Oliver Sterling is supporting Joe's enterprise. Clarrie arrives with Eddie, and they're all delighted to see her back.

David tells Joe that Mike's interested in managing the green burial site. Jim later makes an ill-judged comment about hygiene standards. He's talking about cider brewing, but Clarrie feels awkward anyway. David helpfully steers the conversation elsewhere. Alice and Amy finally arrive to join the celebrations, with others from the potato field in tow.


SUN 19:15 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b0156jzr)
Series 1

Episode 1

John Finnemore, writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-up in things like Miranda and That Mitchell and Webb Look returns with half an hour of his own sketches, each funnier than the last. Although, hang on, that system means starting the whole series with the least funny sketch. Might need to rethink that. OK, it's a new show filled with sketches written and performed by John Finnemore, but now no longer arranged in strict order of funniness. Also, he's cut the sketch that would have gone first.

This week's show sees a big job, a small job, the career path of the average TV executive, and a tiger with a gun.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme is written by and stars John Finnemore. It also features Carrie Quinlan (The News Quiz, The Late Edition), Lawry Lewin (The Life & Times of Vivienne Vyle, Horrible Histories) and Simon Kane (Six Impossible Things).

Producer: Ed Morrish.


SUN 19:45 Vasily Grossman from the Frontline (b014ptrt)
Ukraine without Jews

Elliot Levey reads the final front line despatch from Vasily Grossman's wartime journalism. 3: Ukraine Without Jews. 'Stillness. Silence. A people has been murdered.'

The author of Life and Fate, which begins its dramatization on Radio 4 today, conveyed the 'ruthless truth of war' that revealed itself to the Soviet Union after Nazi invasion in June 1941. This devastating piece was one of the very first articles to describe the results of Nazi genocide as the war still raged.

Grossman's own mother would be one of the thousands murdered in his home town of Berdichev which lay in the path of the Nazi's lightning quick advance through the Ukraine. Some one and half million Jewish people lived in these newly conquered areas, nearly all would be shot in what has become known as 'shoa by bullet'

Grossman had volunteered for military service partly in reaction to his mother's fate. Instead he found himself assigned as frontline correspondent for the military newspaper Red Star. From the disastrous year of 1941 to final victory in ruined Berlin, Grossman gave the Soviet people a sense of their war.

But his attempts to detail the murder of the millions of Jews on Soviet soil would only be met by official silence. As the Red Army began reconquering the occupied lands Grossman travelled with them, recording the empty villages and towns, the mass graves and terrible silence. Ukraine Without Jews was rejected by the military censor & would only appear in the Yiddish newspaper Einkayt in November 1943. The full version, from which this is an extract, would only be rediscovered in the late 1990's and appeared in English earlier this year.

Reader Elliot Levey
Translators Jim Riordan & Polly Zavadivker

Producer Mark Burman.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b014gjw5)
Listeners' champion Roger Bolton returns with a new series of Feedback in which conflict inevitably plays its part.

From seemingly wall-to-wall coverage of 9/11 to changes to the Radio 3 schedule, Roger hears your views.
Got eight hours plus to spare next week? Roger finds out more about the making of Russian wartime epic "Life and Fate" which takes up all of Radio 4's drama slots next week (apart from The Archers) and he finds out how you will be listening.

We'll also be asking if the BBC's new services for Libya are part of a Foreign Office political offensive.
And is the BBC trying to save money by recycling Philip Glass? Listeners wonder after the same piece pops up five times in one week.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b014gjwh)
Richard Hamilton, Michael Hart, Gabriel Valdes and Wardell Quezergue

Matthew Bannister on

Richard Hamilton - the father of pop art who was inspired by technology and modern life.

Michael Hart, who founded Project Gutenberg to digitise great works of literature and make them freely available to all.

Gabriel Valdes, the Chilean politician who played a leading role in ousting Pinochet's military junta

Wardell Quezergue, the arranger credited with developing the New Orleans sound. He worked with Paul Simon, The Rolling Stones and Paul McCartney

And the poet Herbert Lomas, whose work on the death of his wife inspired Ted Hughes to write his Birthday Letters.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b014lzz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b014m6r3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b014ggh5)
The Apprentices

With big increases looming in the cost of going to university, the number of people choosing apprenticeships is rising fast. Peter Day finds what modern apprenticeship means . to apprentices and the companies who employ them.
Producer: Caroline Bayley.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b014ptrw)
Carolyn Quinn reports from the Liberal Democrat conference in Birmingham. She talks to ministers, MPs and party activists.

Two leading Lib Dem activists, Mark Pack and Linda Jack, discuss the party's prospects live in the conference studio.

This week's MPs panel consists of the Conservative Rob Wilson and Labour's Liz Kendall. They discuss the attitudes of their respective parties towards the Liberal Democrats. They also debate the economy and public sector pensions.

Programme Editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b0156k0d)
Episode 70

Dennis Sewell of The Spectator analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b014gjwk)
Who can forget James Dean in Rebel without a Cause or Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame in the thriller, In a Lonely Place. Come to that who can forget the man who directed them both - Nicholas Ray? Ray was one of the Hollywood greats and was hero- worshipped by the French New Wave but he ended his career away from the limelight at a college in upstate New York where he made a multi-screen experimental feature with his students - We Can't Go Home Again. This has now been restored and is on release for the first time. Francine Stock discusses the film and its split screen experiments with Mike Figgis, director of Time Code and asks Ray's widow, Susan about her documentary examining the evolution and legacy of her husband's last project.
Francine will also be talking to Celine Sciamma, the writer and director of Tomboy - an exciting new film from France which vibrates with childhood's sense of self invention and features two dazzling central performances, one by a six year old girl - and to round things off Frank Cottrell Boyce, the man behind 24 Hour Party People and Millions, shares his thoughts on the art of screenwriting as well as some of the movie scenes he loves.
Producer: Zahid Warley.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b014m6qx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2011

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b014htsj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b014gcm9)
Tales from the Field - Beauty capital

Being beautiful apparently brings big dividends: "The total effect of facial attractiveness on income is roughly equal to that of educational qualifications or self-confidence", claims Catherine Hakim in her new book Honey Money. Perhaps it's time to give up on exams and spend more time at the spa because Laurie also hears from the U.S. economist Daniel Hamermesh that being beautiful can greatly inflate your pay packet.
Also on the programme, Louise Westmarland talks about some of the extraordinary experiences that criminologists have faced whilst researching crime.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b014m6qv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014htsl)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014htsn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014htsq)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b014htss)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b014pw3x)
with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b014pw3z)
Charlotte Smith visits the biggest wholesale market, New Spitalfields in London where traders are crying out for more British produce. She speaks to Lincolnshire Grower Charlotte Bratley about her cabbages and caterer Peter Thomas says tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers are some of the fruit and veg most in demand. British growers could be missing an opportunity.

The first GM wheat trials in the UK since the 1990's have been given the go-ahead. The government has approved a trial of genetically modified wheat at Rothamsted Research in Hertfordshire. Charlotte listens back on her visit to the centre earlier this year, where Professor Huw Jones explained what the field will gain if successful.

Some areas of the country are still in drought. Jamie Hannaford, Head of National River Flow at the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology explains which areas are being affected and what the solution is.

This week Farming Today is looking at the British sugar industry - sugar made from the root vegetable beet. Sugar grown in the UK is worth £800 million a year to the economy through farming, processing and selling it and its by-products. Bill Meredith, Head of Agriculture at the University of Lincoln explains why Europe started growing sugar beet in the first place.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Clare Freeman.


MON 05:57 Weather (b014htsv)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b014pw41)
With Evan Davis and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b014pw43)
Andrew Marr talks to the journalist Misha Glenny about the murky world of internet crime, as the cybercops pit their wits against the cyberthieves and hackers. The creative director at google, Tom Uglow, celebrates the art and ingenuity that comes with he calls, 'the post-digital age'. It's more colourful, but no less subversive, at an exhibition of Postmodernism at the V&A. The curator Jane Pavitt argues that for this radical movement, style was everything. And the art historian Martin Kemp explores how image, branding and logos have become the obsessions of our age - from the coca cola bottle to the images of Christ and Che Guevara.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b014pw45)
One on One

Episode 1

Life is made up of individuals meeting one another. Often it is the most fleeting of these encounters that, in the fullness of time, turn out to be the most noteworthy.

Rudyard Kipling talks of the boche with John Scott-Ellis. Chirk Castle, Wrexham, North Wales Summer 1923
John Scott-Ellis knocks down Adolf Hitler. Briennerstrasse, Munich August 22nd 1931

Ingenious in its construction, witty in its narration, panoramic in its breadth, 'One on One' offers a delightful series of snapshots of the 20th century.

Readers: Eleanor Bron and Tom Hollander

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b014pw47)
Barbara Taylor Bradford, Carers, Women in motorsports

How easy is it for women to make their way in motorsports racing? We hear from two women with different experiences. Novelist Barbara Taylor Bradford discusses the importance of letter writing in the digital age and reveals why she treasures a hand-written letter which was sent to her by the wife of Winston Churchill. We discuss a recent report calling for more support for older carers whose own health is endangered as a result of looking after others and ask how GPs could help lighten their load. Ksenija Sidorova has taken accordion playing to world class level. She plays live in the studio and puts the case for the accordion to be recognised as a fully-fledged classical instrument. Presented by Jane Garvey.


MON 10:45 Grossman's War (b014pw49)
Life and Fate

Anna's Letter

Viktor's mother, Anna, writes him a farewell letter in September 1941.

As a Jew in Berdichev, in the Ukraine now occupied by the Nazis, she has been forced into a ghetto and understands what will come next. The letter somehow finds its way to Viktor and is to be a source of strength for him in days to come.

Anna Semyonovna ..... Janet Suzman

Kenneth Branagh, Janet Suzman, David Tennant, Greta Scacchi and Harriet Walter star in Vasily Grossman's epic saga.

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate is a sweeping historical tale that charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested and Grossman was told that it would not be published for at least 200 years. He died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

Dramatised by Mike Walker

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead.

Performed by Oliver Wilson-Dickson, Tom Jackson, Stacey Blythe and Max Pownall

Translated by Robert Chandler

Director: Alison Hindell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


MON 11:00 After I Was Gorgeous (b014pw4c)
Deborah Bull - former principal dancer of the Royal Ballet - probes society's obsession with beauty, and what happens to the 'beautiful' when the interest begins to fade away.

With interviews featuring sixties icon Jean Shrimpton, former Bond girl Tania Mallet, and 'Face of the Eighties' Lysette Anthony, Deborah explores how beauty icons deal with the ageing process. Tania Mallet describes the day when she noticed that she had 'not young skin anymore.'

Annabel Giles explains why having a brow-lift restored her self-confidence. Jilly Johnson recounts the snobbery she faced when starting out in acting. And Lysette Anthony admits to finally enjoying her beauty now that she's 'about to lose it all'. Deborah also explores the pressures that icons face, and speaks to a current model about one day losing her looks. After I Was Gorgeous is a programme about being beautiful and what happens next.

Producer: Parvin Kumar Ramchurn
An Alfi Media production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 When the Dog Dies (b013229w)
Series 2

Temptation

Ronnie Corbett reunites with the writers of his hit TV comedy 'Sorry', Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent, in the second series of their Radio 4 sitcom.

Ronnie plays Sandy Hopper, who is growing old happily along with his dog Henry. His grown up children, both married to people Sandy doesn't approve of at all, would like him to move out of the family home so they can get their hands on their money earlier. But Sandy's not having this. He's not moving until the dog dies. And not just that, how can he move if he's got a lodger? His daughter is convinced that his too attractive lodger Dolores (Liza Tarbuck) is after Sandy and his money.

Luckily Sandy has three grandchildren and sometimes a friendly word - a kindly hand on the shoulder can really help a Granddad in the twenty-first century. Man and dog together face a complicated world. There's every chance they'll make it more so.

Episode Three - Temptation
Generous Sandy splashes out just a little - with his sponsorship of son-in-law Blake's noble efforts in a charity marathon. Too late, he discovers he's splashed out a whole lot. But the promise is signed, his generosity even announced on the net. Is there a way round this? Listeners should have a pencil and paper handy.

Cast:
Sandy ..... Ronnie Corbett
Dolores ..... Liza Tarbuck
Mrs Pompom ..... Sally Grace
Ellie ..... Tilly Vosburgh
Blake ..... Jonathan Aris
Damon ..... Stephen Critchlow

Producer: Liz Anstee
A CPL production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b014pw4f)
Consumer news with Julian Worricker.

What come back do students who sign up for a course at university have if part way through elements that attracted the student in the first place are changed or disappear?

Dozens of consumers who have struck deals to rent their roofs to companies who supply solar panels say there's been no sign of the panels and they haven't been able to claim back hefty fees they have paid up front.

The deadline for insurance claims relating to the riots in August passes on Tuesday, September 20th. Two traders badly hit by looters tell us how they are recovering from the trauma of having their businesses trashed.

The nation's leading commercial property developers meet in Manchester for their annual conference amid continuing gloom on the high street.

The station with the least frequent train service in the UK is campaigning for a proper service. It is no out of the way rural community but a large suburb of Manchester which suffers severe traffic jams.


MON 12:57 Weather (b014htsx)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b014pw4h)
With Martha Kearney. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:30 Round Britain Quiz (b014pw4k)
(6/12)
What did Anne Boleyn almost certainly not have which blues musician Hound Dog Taylor, music hall star Little Tich, and Dr Hannibal Lecter, definitely did?

That's the question Tom Sutcliffe asked listeners to think about at the end of last week's Round Britain Quiz - and he's back with the answer, along with a host of other cryptic questions in the latest contest between Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Michael Alexander and Alan Taylor play for Scotland, against Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney of Northern Ireland. You can play along too, by taking a look at the questions on the Round Britain Quiz pages of the Radio 4 website.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b014ptrp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Grossman's War (b014pw4m)
Life and Fate

Krymov and Zhenya - Lovers Once

October 1942. Evacuated from Moscow to Kuibyshev before the invading German army, the beautiful Yevgenia (Zhenya), Lyuda's sister, is alone.

While she tackles Soviet bureaucracy for the residence permit she needs for food, her ex-husband, the Commissar Nikolai Krymov, is posted into the heart of the battle for Stalingrad, hundreds of miles away.

Continuing Vasily Grossman's epic saga.

Nikolai Krymov ..... David Tennant
Zhenya Shaposhnikova ..... Raquel Cassidy
Jenni ..... Eleanor Bron
General Rodimtsev ..... Bruce Alexander
Major Byerozkin ..... Sam Dale
District Inspector Grishin ..... Peter Polycarpou
Limonov .... Adrian Scarborough
Seryozha Shaposhnikov ..... Freddie Fox

With Elaine Claxton, James Lailey, Gerard McDermott, Simon Bubb, Alun Raglan, Jonathan Forbes, Carl Prekopp, and Katie Angelou.

Dramatised by Jonathan Myerson

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead

Director: Jonquil Panting

Producer: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, this huge novel charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested. Grossman died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


MON 15:00 Meeting Myself Coming Back (b00ltmpv)
Series 1

Rev Jesse Jackson

Witness to the murder of Martin Luther King; the first African-American to make a significant bid for the US Presidency: in a new series on BBC Radio 4, the Reverend Jesse Jackson joins presenter John Wilson to reflect on the soundtrack to his life, drawn from a half century of BBC archive.

Being close to Dr King during the troubled years of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement was just one of the formative experiences for the Reverend Jesse Jackson. Here he gets the chance to listen back to his younger self, recall his thoughts at the time, and apply the self-knowledge that comes from distance.

Other episodes in his life include addressing the first black political rally; negotiating with President Saddam Hussein of Iraq over hostages; running twice for President of the USA; witnessing the swearing in of the first black President; and most recently defending one of America's most controversial black icons, Michael Jackson.

Producers: Emma Kingsley and Sara Jane Hall (SNF).


MON 15:45 The Paper Round (b014pw4p)
Sir Alan Parker

A series in which five public figures revisit the route of their paper round to reveal how it influenced their attitudes to work, creativity and independence.

Having a paper round is a rite of passage for many children, and many successful public figures claim to have braved the early mornings and the elements to deliver newspapers. For some, it's a chance for independence and freedom, or a temporary escape from the horrors at home. For others, it provides money to spend on music, fashion and girl/boyfriends.

Actor and former paper boy Bob Kingdom joins his guests in England, Wales and Northern Ireland as they reflect on the formative years of their paper round.

In the first episode, award-winning film director Sir Alan Parker retraces his route in North London which provided the inspiration for some of the key moments in his films.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b014m76w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b014pw4r)
In the film "The Rite," released earlier this year, Anthony Hopkins plays the part of an American priest who travels to Italy to study at an exorcism school. The film is based on one of the Vatican's Chief Exorcists, Father Gary Thomas, who says his work brings him into daily contact with demons.

The idea that human beings can be possessed by evil spirits clashes with scientific and medical explanations of mental disturbance, but the belief persists in many Christian and other religious circles. Exorcism is widely practised in charismatic and Afro Caribbean churches and even the Church of England has official exorcists or deliverance ministers.

Joining Ernie to discuss Exorcism are the Rt Rev Graham Dow former Bishop of Carlisle; Dr Simon Dein, a Psychiatrist with an interest in the Anthropology of Religion; and the Rev Elizabeth Baxter, Executive Director of Holy Rood House Therapeutic Centre.


MON 17:00 PM (b014pw4t)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014htsz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b014pw4w)
Series 61

With guests Julian Clary, Phill Jupitus, Josie Lawrence and Rick Wakeman

The popular panel game hosted by Nicholas Parsons. The guests try to speak on a topic given to them without hesitation repetition or deviation. The guests this week are Julian Clary, Phill Jupitus, Josie Lawrence and ex-rocker Rick Wakeman

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b014pw4y)
Will complains to Nic about Emma moaning at him for sending George home without his book bag. Nic has spoken to her ex, Andrew. He'll collect the kids on Thursday so they can make the most of their gig night. Struggling to find the book bag, Nic suspects that Emma has misplaced it and is wrongly blaming them.

Discussing job hunting, Clarrie tells Eddie she's considering selling home products. Eddie and Joe have had another idea and suggest that Clarrie signs on. Clarrie takes against this on principle. Clarrie confides in Nic, who sees nothing wrong in signing on. Clarrie agrees to look for George's book bag when she's next at Emma's. Nic's keen to avoid offending Emma, so discretion is essential.

Learning that Elizabeth didn't send David a birthday card, Pip worries about being disloyal to her father by frequently visiting Elizabeth. Ruth assures her he'd never think that. Pip later dismays Ruth by revealing she has agreed to let Alan use their barn for the harvest supper.

Later, Eddie tells Clarrie about a possible cleaning job. Clarrie agrees to attend an interview on Wednesday, and also has a change of heart about signing on, admitting she has other people to consider.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b014k56h)
Ryan Gosling's two new films reviewed

With John Wilson. Ryan Gosling stars in two contrasting films in cinemas from Friday. In Drive, a thriller based on the cult novel by James Sallis, he plays a Hollywood stunt driver moonlighting as a getaway driver in the criminal underworld of Los Angeles. In the rom-com Crazy, Stupid, Love, he plays a handsome lothario acting as wingman for an older guy returning to the singles scene. Antonia Quirke reviews and discusses Ryan Gosling's career.

Mike Scott of the band The Waterboys explains how the Nobel-winning Irish poet W B Yeats has become co-writer on his new album. A selection of Yeats' poems - including September 1913 and An Irish Airman Forsees His Death - have been set to music by Scott on the Waterboys' record An Appointment With Mr Yeats.

John Wilson takes a tour of 'Firstsite', the new £28m art gallery in Colchester, Essex, designed by Uruguayan-born Rafael Vinoly. The architect explains how Roman archeaological remains beneath Colchester dictated the form of the single-storey, crescent-shaped building - dubbed the 'golden banana'. Architect Rafael Viñoly shows John around the Firstsite art centre in Colchester.

Andrew O'Hagan's debut book, The Missing, was a meditation on people who disappear from their lives- and the families they leave behind. Inspired by his own experience as a reporter camped outside Fred and Rosemary West's home while the bodies of their victims were being discovered, and acclaimed as a portrait of mid-1990s Britain, it was shortlisted for three major literary awards. Now O'Hagan, together with director John Tiffany (Black Watch), has adapted his book into a new production for Glasgow's Tramway theatre. Critic Mark Brown reviews.


MON 19:45 Grossman's War (b014pw49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 It's My Story (b014pw7d)
Getting Bi

Tom Robinson was the first rock star to be out-and-proud from the off and in early 1978, at the height of his fame and barely ten years after homosexuality was decriminalised in Britain, he released the song 'Glad To Be Gay'. He put it in the Top 20 and it made him an overnight gay icon - becoming the anthem of the Gay Liberation Front and sung with gusto at Pride festivals all over the country.

But then in the mid 80s something happened which changed Tom's life overnight - he fell in love with a woman! The tabloid press had a field day and he was booed when he appeared on stage at the 1987 London Gay Pride Festival.

In this programme, Tom assesses his own changing attitudes to bisexuality and asks if it's still a bit of a taboo in Britain today?

He hears from men and women struggling to be accepted by both their straight and gay friends and relatives before dropping in on a support group for bisexual people in Birmingham.

Does the extension of LGBT rights really extend to the B in the acronym? The programme hears from Stonewall, the Lesbian and Gay Foundation, from Peter Tatchell and from researchers examining how LGBT Equalities initiatives deal with bisexuality in local government.

Tom finds an often invisible community struggling to be accepted and nervous about being more open.

There's few statistics about the prevalence of bisexuality so Tom's trip to Bristol to hear about some new research into male bisexuality is rather enlightening.

And what of the media? And what do bisexual women think of how they're portrayed?

Tom finishes the programme with his own assessment of society's tendency to put people into neat little boxes as well as the updated version of 'Glad to Be Gay' which references his struggle to be accepted as bisexual.

Producer: Ashley Byrne
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b014pw7g)
Non-Riotous Behaviour

This summer's riots provoked much speculation about the factors which prompted so many people to break the law. But philosopher-turned-commentator Jamie Whyte is more interested in understanding why this sort of thing doesn't happen more often. Is it fear of arrest or is it morality that makes most of the people abide by the law for most of the time? In search of the causes of mass civil obedience, Jamie Whyte speaks to leading experts in the fields of philosophy, psychology and anthropology.

Contributors include:
Roger Scruton, philosopher and writer
Quentin Skinner, professor of the humanities & expert on modern political thought
Tim Harford, the Financial Times Undercover Economist and presenter of More or Less on Radio 4
George Klosko, political philosopher
Alex Bentley, anthropologist
Carol Hedderman, criminologist

Producer: Simon Coates.


MON 21:00 Material World (b014gdxv)
Quentin Cooper reports from the British Science Festival in Bradford on nuclear power from thorium, plants to clean up explosives residues, lie detection through facial expression, ethical use of human tissue and geoengineering with artificial volcanoes to counter global warming.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b014pw43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b014htt1)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b014pw9j)
Fresh violence as protestors are attacked in Yemen: will President Saleh stand down?

President Obama sets out his plan to cut the US deficit.

Carolyn Quinn reports from the Lib Dem party conference in Birmingham.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b014pw9l)
The Day of the Sardine

Episode 1

Published in 1961, The Day of the Sardine evokes an educational no-hoper slipping into the treacherous waters of manhood by the River Tyne.

Young Arthur Haggerston has zero educational qualifications, absentee father, a mother who gives him a hard time, and a home in a slum-clearance area of Newcastle. In his first job as a coal delivery boy he discovers the joy and sadness of sex with an older married woman; drawn by his wayward pal Nosey into a series of violent encounters with Newcastle gangs,he's forced to crawl to Uncle George (deeply corrupt foreman and Labour councillor) for manual work on the laying of a new sewerage pipe .

Arthur's Ma's lodger (and sometime lover), the philosophical Harry, whose career has peaked in a sardine cannery, fashions a lesson Arthur will finally understand: don't be a sardine, don't swim with the shoal; navigate your own way through life. Acclaimed by critics when first published, Sid Chaplin described his book as 'a social thriller' and its themes remain relevant today. Chaplin saw in Tyneside's fracturing working-class culture source material for a raw, comic, humane novel. Fifty years after first publication, it's abridged by his son, Michael Chaplin. Who has written extensively for radio, television and the theatre.

Reader: Joe Caffrey

Producer: Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Micky Flanagan: What Chance Change? (b00sg13d)
1970s

Cockney geezer Micky Flanagan regales us with the story of his journey from tabloid to broadsheet; from the street party to the dinner party; from apples and pears to stocks and shares... Well you've got the idea.

Each week's episode focuses on a different decade of Micky's life. Micky regales us with stories from his life told through stand up comedy. In between, the programmes goes 'behind the scenes' with short interviews that give an insight into the stand up.

In this opening episode Micky talks about growing up in the East End in the 1970's. He chats to his school friends about their shared experiences of leaving with no qualifications to work at Billingsgate Fish Market. He also interviews Sociology Professor Paul Willis about his research on working class boys in a 1970's school.

Micky's transition from the mean streets of the East End, working as a Billingsgate Fish Porter to an entertainer living in the leafy lanes of Dulwich is a fascinating story, all the better for being told through jokes. The issue of class is a crucial theme in Micky's stand up. However it is framed less as "Do we now have a classless society?" and more as "Is it ok to ask for Tomato sauce in a fancy French restaurant?"

The series is written and performed by Micky Flanagan.
The producer is Tilusha Ghelani.


MON 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b00pxng6)
Series 5

Living in a Movie

The journalist and documentary maker Jon Ronson talks to the conflict photographer Jason Howe. Jason had gone to Colombia to photograph both sides of the war when he met a Colombian woman Marilyn at a bus stop. They quickly became romantically involved but then she revealed she was a paramilitary fighter. Suddenly Jason was living his life as if it were a movie, going down a dangerous path that would end in tragedy.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 2011

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b014httm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b014pw45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014http)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014httr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014httt)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b014httw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0153lj0)
with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b014pwcq)
Anna Hill hears how over a million tonnes of sugar is grown on British farms, as Farming Today joins the sugar beet harvest in Lincolnshire.

As British Food Fortnight gets underway, aiming to promote British menus and ingredients, the major supermarkets will not be taking part . The campaign organisers say it's because major retailers do not like to collaborate, but the British Retail Consortium says supermarkets support British products all year round.

And an anti-GM group is calling for a public consultation on genetically modified crops, following government approval of a GM wheat trial. The GM wheat trial will include genes based on those found in peppermint and cows, to produce a smell which repels aphids. But Pete Riley, a director of GM freeze, says the science needs greater public examination.

Presenter Anna Hill Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 06:00 Today (b014pxnn)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, featuring:
08:10 Deputy PM Nick Clegg on the economy and the coalition.
07:43 Ry Cooder on using his music to take on the bankers.
08:20 Should movies showing smoking have an 18 certificate?


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b014pxnq)
Securing Freedom: 2011

Eliza Manningham-Buller: Freedom

In this third and final Reith lecture the former Director General of the security service (MI5), Eliza Manningham-Buller, discusses policy priorities since 9.11. She reflects on the Arab Spring, and argues that the West's support of authoritarian regimes did, to some extent, fuel the growth of Al-Qaeda. The lecture also considers when we should talk to "terrorists".


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b015797y)
One on One

Episode 2

By Craig Brown. Life is made up of individuals meeting one another. Often it is the most fleeting of these encounters that, in the fullness of time, turn out to be the most noteworthy.

Helen Keller and Martha Graham. 66 Fifth Avenue, New York December 1952

Ingenious in its construction, witty in its narration, panoramic in its breadth, 'One on One' offers a delightful series of snapshots of the 20th century.

Readers: Eleanor Bron and Tom Hollander

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b014pxns)
Patricia Routledge; Cook the Perfect quiche; London Fashion week trends

Annie Bell Cooks the Perfect quiche lorraine; Jane Garvey talks to Patricia Routledge; for London Fashion Week Jane discusses the latest fashion trends; and we look at the high levels of violence in relationships between disadvantaged teenagers. More than half of the girls in a new study said that they had been in a sexually violent relationship before they were 18, while a quarter of boys who responded said that they had dated physically aggressive partners. Jane talks to the lead author of the research, Christine Barter at the University of Bristol; Leoni Hodge, who set up a charity called Teen Boundaries after she suffered sexual abuse at the hands of a boyfriend when she was 13; and Equalities Minister Lynne Featherstone, who is calling for greater protection for victims of domestic violence.


TUE 10:45 Grossman's War (b014pxnv)
Life and Fate

Vera and Her Pilot

In a forest in northern Russia, Lenya, a pilot, longs to see his pregnant girlfriend, Vera. She is stranded in Stalingrad with her father, Stepan. Her mother (another sister of Lyuda) has drowned in the Volga. She watches the planes hoping to catch sight of Lenya.

Kenneth Branagh, Janet Suzman, David Tennant, Greta Scacchi and Harriet Walter star in Vasily Grossman’s epic saga.

Lenya Viktorov ..... Luke Treadaway
Vera Spiridonov ..... Morven Christie
Pavel Andreyevich ..... Malcolm Tierney
Stepan Spiridonov ..... Kenneth Cranham
Skotnoy ..... Jonathan Forbes
Solmatin ..... Carl Prekopp
Mukhin ..... Simon Bubb
Zakabluka ..... Gerard McDermott

Dramatised by Jonathan Myerson.

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead

Performed by Carl Prekopp & Gerard McDermott

Translated by Robert Chandler

Director: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate is a sweeping historical tale that charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested and Grossman was told that it would not be published for at least 200 years. He died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b014pzzq)
Series 2

Episode 18

18/30 The Spectacled Eider duck is extraordinary. As our American collaborator said "this is no regular duck"! The whole of the global population winter on the ice in the Bering Sea - a sight few people have seen, but as you can see from the photograph is as spectacular as seeing hundreds and thousands of penguins on ice. And of course this is the Arctic where seeing mass aggregations of birds on ice is not common at all. With reported 96% decline in the population that breeds in Alaska, the Spectacled Eider, a US endangered species, has become an important focus of conservation research. Julian Hector went to the "Slope" at 70 degrees north where some of the Alaskan population of "specs" breed. In this second report Saving Species discovers why the biologists of the U.S Geological Survey are putting so much effort into tracking the males, females and juveniles of this species for several years.

Closer to home, Tessa McGregor reports from Scotland on the future of the Slender Scotch Burnet Moth.

And we have Right Whales in the show, encountered off Cape Cod and a report on the work in the Atlantic trying to accurately assess their numbers, individuals and movements.

Presented by Brett Westwood
Produced by Sheena Duncan
Editor Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 The Chalet School (b014pzzs)
Crime writer Val McDermid reflects on her love of the Chalet School boarding school novels.

She credits them with inspiring her to go to Oxford and becoming a writer. So what did they have that the other boarding school books did not?

Nearly 60 Chalet School novels were published between 1925 and 1970, written by the South Shields novelist, Elinor Brent-Dyer. The school was initially located in Austria, but moved to Guernsey following the Anschluss. It relocated again after the Nazi invasion of The Channel Islands.

The books centred on Madge Bettany, the founder of the school, and her young sister Joey, its first pupil. The books dealt with financial hardship, illness and politics, which Val argues, is absent from most other boarding school novels of the period.

Produced at BBC Manchester by Nicola Swords.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b014pzzv)
Call You and Yours with Julian Worricker. An opportunity to contribute your views to the programme.

The 50p tax- is it helping or hindering economic growth? The top tax was imposed to raise £2.7 billion towards the deficit. The unions are planning to "fight tooth and nail" against any plans by the Coalition to scrap it saying it is only right that the rich should pay more. But George Osborne along with some economists say it deters enterprise and hard work. Mr Osborne has said that it is driving wealth creators out of Britain when they are needed to create jobs and boost growth. However people like Sir Stuart Rose, the ex boss of Marks and Spencer, have been speaking out in favour of the tax.

Should these people be paying more tax or if you're a high earner, do you resent paying more?

Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk or call 03700 100 444 (lines open at 10am).

Producer Bernadette McConnell.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b014htty)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b014pzzx)
With Martha Kearney. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:30 Page to Performance (b014pzzz)
Series 3

Mahler's Final Adagio

Musicians talk about the challenges they face as they prepare to perform a piece from the orchestral repertoire. In this programme Lowri Blake meets the young musicians of the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain. Aged between 13 and 19 they give an insight into the musical challenges offered them by the last piece of music that the Austrian composer Gustav Mahler completed - the Adagio from his unfinished 10th symphony.

It was a piece composed at the height of a personal crisis in Mahler's life. He had just found out that his wife was having an affair with a young architect, and he was also suffering from a heart condition that would kill him before he could complete the full symphony.

Lowri Blake talks to Edward Seckerson about this tumultuous time in the composer's life, how he sought a consultation with the up-and-coming psychiatrist Sigmund Freud, and how his passion for his wife and his despair were etched into the score. The Adagio itself opens quietly but towards the end erupts in a huge outburst of emotion, often described as 'a cry of pain', which the young players, under the baton of their conductor Vasily Petrenko, describe as they face the demanding musical challenge.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b014pw4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Grossman's War (b014q001)
Life and Fate

Journey

Sofya, a Jewish doctor, is taken prisoner in Stalingrad and put on a cattle-truck going west to Poland.

A German SS officer, Liss, oversees the building of the gas chambers and entertains Eichmann on an inspection tour. Liss is convinced that the Nazi and Soviet systems are more similar than their followers like to think.

Kenneth Branagh, Janet Suzman, David Tennant, Greta Scacchi, Samuel West, John Sessions and Harriet Walter star in Vasily Grossman's epic saga.

Sofya Levinton ..... Sara Kestelman
Liss ..... Samuel West
Eichmann ..... John Sessions
Mostovskoy ..... Peter Marinker
David ..... Laurence Belcher
Musya ..... Christine Kavanagh
Lyusia..........................Deeivya Meir
Khmelkov......................Henry Devas

With Adeel Akhtar, Sean Baker, Sam Dale and Sally Orrock

Dramatised by Mike Walker.

Director: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate is a sweeping historical tale that charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested and Grossman was told that it would not be published for at least 200 years. He died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b014q003)
Tom Holland is joined by Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe on a day trip to Sark in the Channel Islands during which the pair catch up on the latest archaeological research and dig into the new histories that are being revealed by it.

Sir Barry has been woking on the island for the past 7 years and he takes Tom to a site in a field on the central plateau where he thinks people were 'worshipping the ancestors' 2,000 years BC. The archaeological team have found coins and axe heads and Sir Barry believes that these confirm his ideas that the island was a scared place in the years before the Roman Empire. Nearby, is the spot where the Sark hoard was discovered in the early decades of the eighteenth century. Philip de Jersey, the archaeologist for Guernsey, explains that by the 1730's the hoard was lost but he has pictures of it and coins that date it to around 32BC. Included in the hoard was material from the Danube which shows how 'connected' the island was then to the rest of Europe.

In the years after the fall of Rome, monks made a home for themselves on the island and in 1066 it became English as it was territory owned by the Duchy of Normandy. Over the next few centuries the island was home to pirates and was caught between the conflicting territorial interests of England and France but the population was all but wiped out by the Black Death. In Elizabethan times efforts were made to re-colonise the island and local historian Richard Axton explained how this came about and how the island's famous feudal system developed.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b014q005)
Face It

Together

The first of three short story commissions on the theme of social networking.

Together by Naomi Alderman walks the line between science fiction and our own near future, in a love story involving eight loosely-networked friends.

Read by Dan Stevens

Produced by Robert Howells

Naomi Alderman won the Orange New Writers Award for her first novel Disobedience and has subsequently been named as the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. She has published prize-winning short fiction in Prospect, Woman and Home, the Sunday Express and a number of anthologies and in 2009 was shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award. From 2004 to 2007 Naomi was lead writer on the BAFTA-shortlisted alternative reality game Perplex City.


TUE 15:45 The Paper Round (b014q007)
Molly Parkin

A series in which five public figures revisit the route of their paper round to reveal how it influenced their attitudes to work, creativity and independence.

Having a paper round is a rite of passage for many children, and many successful public figures claim to have braved the early mornings and the elements to deliver newspapers. For some, it is a chance for independence and freedom, or a temporary escape from the horrors at home. For others, it provides money to spend on music, treats and girl/boyfriends.

Artist and irrepressible Bohemian Molly Parkin joins actor Bob Kingdom in Dollis Hill, the location of the first of her two paper rounds.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Tracing Your Roots (b014q009)
Series 6

Life in Confinement

What happened to all those ancestors who were "disappeared" into institutions because society couldn't cope with them or deemed their behaviour unacceptable? Sally and Nick answer listeners questions about life in confinement.

And what if your ancestor was locked away indefinitely on the Queen's say-so? Sally visits the Tower of London looking for traces of a suspected traitor.

Produced by Liza Greig.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b014q00c)
Series 25

Hildegard Von Bingen

When the singer Cerys Matthews first played the music of the 12th century nun, Hildegard von Bingen, on her BBC 6 music show, she said she felt she could hear the tumble weed rolling through the listeners' houses. Matthew unravels Cerys's admiration for the woman who was given by her parents as a 'tithe' to the church at the age of eight and who became one of the most influential people of her time. She wrote about the visions that she experienced from the age of three, later deemed to have been migraines, but was a true polymath, writing liturgical texts, songs, botanical studies and morality plays. Despite her religious devotion, she was no demure subject. Her influence was widespread and she even had the ear of the Pope. Beatified but never officially canonized, Matthew, Cerys and guest expert (tbc) celebrate the life of the woman who was nonetheless known to millions as Saint Hildegard von Bingen
Producer: Sarah Langan.


TUE 17:00 PM (b014q00f)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014htv0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b00r0xt1)
Series 3

The Lenzie Splicer

Sitcom written by and starring Sanjeev Kohli and Donald McLeary, set in a Glasgow corner shop.

Dave is thrown into turmoil after an old school friend appears in the shop.

Ramesh ...... Sanjeev Kolhi
Dave ...... Donald McLeary
Sanjay ...... Omar Raza
Alok ...... Susheel Kumar
Father Henderson ...... Gerard Kelly
Ted ...... Gavin Mitchell
Michael Binfield ...... Sylvester McCoy
Mrs Armstrong ...... Maureen Carr

A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b014q04p)
Brian says he wants to see some robust figures before putting Debbie's mega-dairy proposal to the board. Chris borrows an old candle stick from Brian, which he plans to copy in steel as a surprise present for Alice. It's all part of their economy drive. Brian mentions Jenifer's concern at Alice selling her clothes online. Chris reassures Brian that she's only selling what she no longer wears.

Elizabeth's relieved to be driving again. She and Jill try out a tea room in Darrington. With the grape harvest coming up, Elizabeth will approach the venture in a more businesslike manner this year, with the help of paid casual workers.

Jill and Elizabeth discuss Pip. Proud David hopes to keep her on at Brookfield after she graduates. Jill's concerned that Freddie's going autumn hunting on Saturday, but Elizabeth says he's just emulating his father.

Weary Peggy gratefully declines Jennifer's offer to take her to the hospital. Jennifer wouldn't be able to visit with Peggy because of the way Jack is at the moment. Later, Jennifer worries when Peggy, who has a headache, declines to eat. Brian tries to reassure Jennifer that Peggy's a sensible eater, but Jennifer has noticed how much events are taking their toll.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b014k567)
Tom Hardy in Warrior; Muppets creator Frank Oz

With Mark Lawson.

Tom Hardy, Joel Edgerton and Nick Nolte star in Warrior, a new film in which two brothers take each other on in a brutal competition of Mixed Martial Arts fighting. BBC sports correspondent Eleanor Oldroyd reviews.

Frank Oz worked on Sesame Street before creating his own animation series The Muppet Show, providing the voice for Miss Piggy and Fozzie Bear. He moved on to voice Yoda in Star Wars. As he puts the finishing touches to directing Saul Rubinek's stage play Terrible Advice, Frank Oz looks back over his varied career.

Tenor Ian Bostridge talks about his new book A Singer's Notebook - a collection of diary entries, essays and reviews written about the world of classical music, where he has spent two decades working with many leading conductors and specialising in music by Britten, Janacek, Schubert and Weill.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 Grossman's War (b014pxnv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b014q04r)
Cyber Spies

The criminal exploitation of the internet poses one of the biggest threats to UK national security. As organised crime gangs and terrorists use it to communicate and plan their activities, the police and security agencies are turning to hacking to conduct surveillance and gather intelligence.

In the first of a new series, File on 4 looks at the covert techniques being used to get beyond the firewall of a suspect's PC. But are the tactics legal? One leading expert says the rules governing interception are inconsistent and on occasions, misinterpreted by the police.

Reporter Stephen Grey also examines the way British companies are helping to proliferate this hi-tech snooping to countries with questionable human rights and which use it to monitor political opponents and dissidents.

And, with the Ministry of Defence developing its defences against sophisticated international attacks how vulnerable is the UK to "cyber warfare". Why did a Chinese state telecommunications company briefly 'hijack' most of the world's internet traffic one day last year?
Producer: David Lewis
Reporter: Stephen Grey.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b014q04t)
David Rathband interview, BBC responds to iPlayer critics

Peter White talks to Daniel Danker, General Manager of BBC iPlayer about the problems being experienced by blind people trying to use iPlayer.
Daniel apologised to listeners and offered them a new BBC facility of an accessibility line providing technical support and advice, which Jim Taylor had requested on last week's programme.
Peter also talked to PC David Rathband, the policeman blinded in a shooting incident last year.
David said he is struggling with being blind and doesn't feel he's received enough support in 14 months he's been blind.


TUE 21:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b014q04w)
Series 1

The Ultimatum Game

Where do we get our sense of justice and fairness from? Is it hardwired in us? Are we nakedly self-interested creatures, or are we, at least partially, altruistic? These are questions philosophers - from Plato to Hobbes, from Rousseau to David Hume - have pondered for hundreds of years. And a famous game invented by economists- called The Ultimatum Game - may help provide some of the answers. All this is up for discussion and debate this week in The Philosopher's Arms.

Welcome to the Philosopher's Arms - a place where philosophical ideas, logical dilemmas and the real world meet for a chat and a drink. Each week Matthew Sweet takes a thought experiment with philosophical pedigree and asks why it matters in the everyday world. En route we'll learn about the thinking of such luminaries as Aristotle, Hume, Kant and John Stuart Mill. And all recorded in a pub in front of a live audience, ready to tap their glasses and demand clarity.

Questions we might confront along the way include: should the government put Prozac in the water supply? How should I treat my daughter if it turns out she's a robot? And is there anything morally wrong with having sex with a supermarket chicken? These will lead us into discussions about the treatment of mental illness, the structure of financial markets, and subjects as varied as happiness, infidelity and homosexuality. Our assumptions and intuitions will be challenged and, perhaps, undermined.

Producer: David Edmonds.


TUE 21:30 Bosphorus (b00yqp5s)
Episode 3

Istanbul is, famously, the only city in the world to straddle two continents - Europe and Asia. The dividing line is the Bosphorus and Edward Stourton has been exploring the life and rich history of this 19 mile long stretch of water.

The Bosphorus gives Istanbul its unique character, but, as he discovers in this, the last of the series, having a foot in both Europe and Asia forces the people who live there to ask themselves interesting questions about their identity and the future of Turkey.

Producer: Phil Pegum.


TUE 21:58 Weather (b014htv2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b014q05g)
With Robin Lustig. National and international news and analysis.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b014x8j6)
The Day of the Sardine

Episode 2

Sid Chaplin's acclaimed novel recounts how 50 years ago a Newcastle boy slipped into the treacherous waters of manhood. Adapted by Michael Chaplin.

Young Arthur Haggerston has left school in Newcastle in the early 60's with few prospects. A job delivering coal presents various temptations but ends suddenly, and his mother's lodger tells him he must find his own way through life, and not be a sardine swimming with the shoal.

Reader: Joe Caffrey

Producer: Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Old Harry's Game (b00j16ky)
Series 7

Episode 4

Why is a baby in Hell? Only God can bring people back to life, but can God be persuaded?

Stars Andy Hamilton as Satan, Annette Crosbie as Edith, Robert Duncan as Scumspawn, Jimmy Mulville as Thomas and Timothy West as God.

Other roles played by Felicity Montagu

Written by Andy Hamilton.

Producer: Paul Mayhew-Archer

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2009.


TUE 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b00pkbmr)
Series 5

When Small Talk Goes Wrong

Jon Ronson talks to Denis Fillion who was behind one of the first major internet hoaxes. Denis used to post threads and make small talk on a technical forum called Anandtech. Irritated by the misogyny he found on the site, he invented a female character to join in the chat.

Soon he found himself flirting with his own character and weaving a tale so believable that the character took on an air of reality, even for him. As the relationship deepened, Denis was forced to take drastic action to get out of his own hoax. With additional contributions from comedian Josie Long and Charlie Brooker.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A Unique Production for BBC Radio 4.



WEDNESDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2011

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b014htvn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b015797y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014htvq)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014htvs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014htvv)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b014htvx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0153lj2)
with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b014qnck)
Experts say the signs of an early autumn seen in early August turned out to be a false start and the season is now kicking off in earnest. It is thought the so called 'second autumn' is due to this year's warm and unusually dry spring earlier the year. Anna Hill visits the Pensthorpe Nature Reserve in Norfolk where the dry weather has seen some species of tree producing a bumper crop of seeds and fruits. Anna also talks to the Woodland Trust which is asking for public help to gather more data on the arrival of autumn across the UK.

Farmers across the East of England are out in the fields harvesting sugar beet. Dr Belinda Townsend from
the UK's national centre for sugar beet research at Rothamstead Research Brooms Barn near Cambridge explains some of the more unusual uses for the plant aside from the traditional sugar. It can be added to make fuel for cars, makeup and clothing. Around half of the two and a quarter million tonnes of sugar consumed each year in the UK is processed from home grown sugar beet.

Finally, ahead of tonight's 'Costing the Earth' on BBC Radio 4, Miranda Krestovnikoff reports on the futuristic ideas being developed to try to combat climate change. She visits Professor Andy Ridgewell at his lab at Bristol University. He is carrying out research to see if crops could be bred to help reflect sunlight away from the earth.

Presenter: Anna Hill; Producer: Angela Frain.


WED 06:00 Today (b014qncm)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Justin Webb, including:
08:10 Treasury Chief Sec Danny Alexander on whether the government needs to spend money on capital projects to get the economy moving.
07:50 WPC Yvonne Fletcher's colleague John Murray on the hunt for her killer.
08:35 Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger on the Met dropping its investigation of one of his journalists over phone hacking affair sources.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b014qncp)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Dan Brodsky-Chenfeld, Imran Khan, Freer Spreckley and Virginia Ironside.

Dan Brodsky-Chenfeld is a seven times World Champion in the sport of skydiving. He did this despite surviving a plane crash that killed sixteen of the twenty-two people on board, including a close friend and teammate, which left him seriously injured. He now runs Skydive Perris in Southern California, one of the largest skydiving centres in the world. His book 'Above All Else' is published by Skyhorse Publishing.

Imran Khan is the former international cricketer who is now the chairman of the political party, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf. A renowned fast bowler, he made his Test Match debut for Pakistan in 1971 and as Captain lead them to their first ever Test series win in India. Born only five years after Pakistan was created in 1947, his book 'Pakistan: A Personal History' draws on the experiences of his family and his wide travels within his homeland. 'Pakistan: A Personal History' is published by Bantam Press.

As a child, Freer Spreckley was a pupil at Summerhill, a progressive school in Suffolk. Founded by legendary educator AS Neill in 1921, celebrating its 90th anniversary this year, it is notable for the fact that it does not require any of its pupils to attend lessons. Freer was a real wild child who came out of Summerhill unable to read of write, travelled the world becoming a hippy but has gone on to become successful in many social enterprise projects. He appears in the book 'After Summerhill: What happened to the pupils of Britain's most radical school?' by Hussein Lucas, published by Herbert Adler.

Virginia Ironside is a writer and columnist. After starting her career as a journalist, she decided to apply for the job of agony aunt at Woman magazine. She stayed there for ten years, going on to work as problem page editor for the Sunday Mirror and Today. She currently writes the Dilemmas column for the Independent every Monday, and a monthly column for the Oldie and has just started a new career as a performer, touring the UK with the 'Virginia Monologues', which examine life, death and grand-mother-hood.

Producer: Chris Paling.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0157980)
One on One

Episode 3

By Craig Brown.

Life is made up of individuals meeting one another. Often it is the most fleeting of these encounters that, in the fullness of time, turn out to be the most noteworthy.

Elizabeth Taylor unnerves James Dean. Marfa, Texas June 6th 1955
James Dean is forewarned by Alec Guinness. The Villa Capri, Hollywood September 23rd 1955

Ingenious in its construction, witty in its narration, panoramic in its breadth, 'One on One' offers a delightful series of snapshots of the 20th century.

Readers: Eleanor Bron and Tom Hollander

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b014qncr)
Singer Janis Ian, Standards in Maths learning

Jenni Murray presents. The number of 14-year olds with a poor understanding of maths in England has doubled over the last 30 years according to new research - what can be done? Singer Janis Ian, Male facial hair: love it or loathe it? And the issues surrounding hiring and firing as part of our Women in Business season.


WED 10:45 Grossman's War (b014qnct)
Life and Fate

Abarchuk

Lyuda's ex-husband, Abarchuk, is still a staunch believer in the Party even though he was sent to a Russian labour camp some years ago.

In November 1942, he assumes his son, Tolya, is fighting for the motherland and composes a letter to him about his beliefs; beliefs that may have been shaken by a recent encounter with his former mentor, Magar.

Kenneth Branagh, Janet Suzman, David Tennant, Greta Scacchi, Malcolm Storry and Harriet Walter star Vasily Grossman's epic saga.

Abarchuk ..... Malcolm Storry
Rubin ..... Peter Polycarpou
Barkhatov ..... Alun Raglan
Magar ..... Sean Baker
Mishanin ..... Jonathan Forbes

With Simon Bubb, James Lailey, Stuart Mcloughlin and Daniel Rabin

Dramatised by Mike Walker.

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead.

Translated by Robert Chandler.

Director: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate is a sweeping historical tale that charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested and Grossman was told that it would not be published for at least 200 years. He died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


WED 11:00 Border Business (b014qncw)
Episode 2

In the second and final part of this series, Declan Curry is back in County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland to visit the Belleek Pottery in the village of Belleek. The factory is situated right on the border with the Republic of Ireland and as well as being a working pottery it has also become a tourist attraction.

However Belleek's continued success is not taken for granted. Established in the 1860s, its story is one of survival, with the recent economic downturn being the latest challenge to jobs and profits. Declan discovers that reinvention is the key to keeping a business going in one of the remotest parts of Northern Ireland.

Producer Claire Burgoyne.


WED 11:30 Paul Temple (b014qncy)
A Case for Paul Temple

5. In Which Mr Layland Tells the Truth

Hot on the heels of the Valentine gang, Paul and Steve set out on a high speed midnight drive to the coast.

In this 2011 recreation of the 1946 vintage crime serial, Paul and Steve brave great danger to reveal the identity of the mysterious West End drug dealer known only as 'Valentine'...

Crawford Logan stars as Paul Temple and Gerda Stevenson as Steve.

Between 1938 and 1968, Francis Durbridge's incomparably suave amateur detective Paul Temple and glamorous wife Steve solved case after baffling case in one of BBC radio's most popular series. They inhabited a sophisticated, well-heeled world of cocktails and fast cars.

Sadly, only half of their adventures survive in the archives. But in 2006, the BBC began recreating them using original scripts and incidental music, and recorded with vintage microphones and sound effects.

Paul Temple ...... Crawford Logan
Steve ...... Gerda Stevenson
Sir Graham ...... Gareth Thomas
Major Peters ...... Greg Powrie
Supt. Wetherby ...... Richard Greenwood
Sheila Baxter ...... Melody Grove
Mary ...... Eliza Langland
Charles Kelvin ...... Nick Underwood
Sir Gilbert Dryden ...... Michael Mackenzie
Layland ...... Robin Laing

Producer: Patrick Rayner

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b014qnd0)
We hear from the man who was left out of pocket and homeless when he found a house-share on the website, Gumtree. We ask whether our fondness for celebrity chef recipes is leading to expensive foods being thrown away in the bin. And we report on the local authorities selling off valuable assets like theatres, pubs and golf clubs.


WED 12:57 Weather (b014htvz)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b014qnd2)
With Martha Kearney. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b014qnd4)
Sir Harold Evans and press regulation

Veteran newspaper editor Sir Harold Evans discusses News International's payment to the Dowler family and whether the British press is in danger of statutory regulation.

Professor Roy Greenslade and Baroness Jay discuss how the press might be regulated in future and whether newspapers would be able to break stories like the MPs' expenses scandal if there were tighter regulation of the press.

A new documentary, Page One, follows the fortunes of the New York Times's media desk as the paper faces new challenges in a digital world. Steve is joined by New York Times media reporter and star of the film, David Carr, to discuss how newspapers can survive.

There has been criticism of the X-Factor after Ceri Rees, a contestant on the programme, performed and was rejected for the fourth time. Steve Hewlett hears from her singing coach, Amanda Richards, who believes the programme makers have exploited Ceri - something the X Factor team denies.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b014q04p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Grossman's War (b014qnd6)
Life and Fate

Building 6/1 - Those Who Were Still Alive

Late October 1942. Building 6/1 is a former apartment building in the centre of Stalingrad, being held by a rag-tag band of Russian soldiers against all the odds, in the teeth of the German advance.

Soon the building, and its charismatic Commander, Captain Grekov, are a legend across Russia. But inside the building, Commissar Krymov has arrived to tackle what appears to be subversion, while the radio operator, Katya, falls in love with his nephew, Seryozha.

Kenneth Branagh and David Tennant star in Vasily Grossman’s epic saga.

Captain Grekov ..... Joseph Millson
Commissar Krymov ..... David Tennant
Vasya ..... Stephen Hogan
Katya ..... Katie Angelou
Lyakhov ..... Carl Prekopp
Polyakov ..... Peter Polycarpou
Seryozha Shaposhnikov ..... Freddie Fox
Batrakov ..... James Lailey
Zubarev ..... Gerard McDermott
Bunchuk ..... Jonathan Forbes

Dramatised by Jonathan Myerson.

Director: Jonquil Panting

Producer: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, this huge novel charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested. Grossman died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b014qnd8)
Discussion and advice on personal finance. With Vincent Duggleby.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b014qsws)
Face It

The Deletion

The second of three short story commissions on the theme of social networking.

"It soon becomes apparent that I don't need to even see Emma White's account because she's sprawled all over my ex's page like spilt bleach. I decide my next move is self-deletion."

The Deletion, by Laura Dockrill, shows how reliant people are becoming on social networks and makes us wonder whether, after setting up an account, it's ever possible to truly quit.

Read by Laura Dockrill

Produced by Robert Howells

Laura Dockrill is a poet and illustrator from South London. A graduate of The Brit School of Performing Arts, twenty-two year old Laura was named one of the top ten literary stars of 2008 according to The Times and voted Elle's top face to look out for in 2009.


WED 15:45 The Paper Round (b014qndb)
Tony Macaulay

A series in which five public figures revisit the route of their paper round to reveal how it influenced their attitudes to work, creativity and independence.

Having a paper round is a rite of passage for many children, and many successful public figures claim to have braved the early mornings and the elements to deliver newspapers. For some, it's a chance for independence and freedom, or a temporary escape from the horrors at home. For others, it provides the money to spend on music, treats and girl/boyfriends.

Northern Ireland peace builder and writer Tony Macaulay recalls his paper round on the Shankill Road in 1970s Belfast with actor Bob Kingdom.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b014qndd)
Understanding Suicide - Families, Secrets And Memories

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works. He examines a new book seeking to understand suicide and talks to a sociologist about family secrets. Ben Fincham is a Lecturer in Sociology at Sussex University and his book 'Understanding Suicide: A Sociological Autopsy' assesses sociological work in this area and explores what can be known about the motivation and lives of suicidal people. He's joined by Dr Mike Shiner, a Senior Research Fellow in the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at London School of Economics. Laurie also talks to Professor Carol Smart from the University of Manchester about her paper exploring family secrets and memories.
Producer Chris Wilson.


WED 16:30 The Philosopher's Arms (b014q04w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b014qndg)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014htw1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Castle (b00gs3kv)
Series 2

Pool Party of Doom

Hie ye to "The Castle", a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley", "Four Weddings & A Funeral") and Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley")

In this episode, a heatwave and an archaeological excavation leads to an unexpected swimming pool...

Cast:
Sir John Woodstock ..... James Fleet
Sir William De Warenne ...... Neil Dudgeon
Lady Anne Woodstock ..... Montserrat Lombard
Cardinal Duncan ...... Jonathan Kydd
Lady Charlotte ....... Ingrid Oliver
Master Henry Woodstock ...... Steven Kynman
Merlin ...... Lewis Macleod

Written by Kim Fuller with additional material by Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b014qnm5)
Brenda's impressed by Tom's new logo design. He's not looking forward to showing it to Pat and Tony, as the title will no longer include Bridge Farm. They agree that Tom would need to do something special to attract buyers if he were to have a launch event for the new brand.

After her job interview, Clarrie's persuaded by Jennifer to join her for cake. Jennifer admits the house feels empty, with Ruairi at boarding school and Brian busy with projects. Jennifer suggests Clarrie volunteers to help Jill with catering for the harvest supper. It's unpaid, but Clarrie's expertise would be valued.

Shula's training Freddie at The Stables, where he's making great progress and cites some words of his father's as motivation. Freddie mentions his friend Lachlan, whose brother Sam is autistic. Shula suggests Freddie invites Lachlan to Lower Loxley. Freddie says that though his friend would not take to hunting, he'll want to know all about it on Monday.

Tom and Jazzer show Brenda Tom's new marketing idea. It involves football-playing pigs, which they hope to video and put on the internet. Tom feels it would be crazy not to try and push the brand in a new way.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b014k569)
Tom Stoppard; Page One reviewed

With Mark Lawson.

Page One: A Year Inside the New York Times is a new cinema documentary in which the film-makers were given unprecedented access to the newsroom for a year, at a time when this American institution was undergoing a period of great change. Former newspaper editors Kelvin MacKenzie and Andreas Whittam Smith review.

Tom Stoppard discusses a revival of his classic comedy Travesties, which depicts a fictional meeting between James Joyce, Lenin and Tristan Tzara. Over 30 years after its original performance, the playwright reflects on which of the jokes are lost to a modern audience.

Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong, the writers behind Peep Show, discuss their new TV comedy series Fresh Meat. It follows six ill-assorted student house-mates starting out at university, with a cast including stand-up comic Jack Whitehall.

Producer Philippa Ritchie

Presenter Mark Lawson.


WED 19:45 Grossman's War (b014qnct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b014qndj)
Dale Farm

The attempt to evict hundreds of travellers at Dale Farm in Essex has taken 10 years, cost the local council millions of pounds and attracted coverage around the world. The site is the country's largest illegal encampment of gypsies and the move is being described as the UK's biggest eviction in modern history. For Basildon Council and many of the residents who live in the area, the issue is simple; the travellers have flouted planning law for years - the eviction order has been tested in the courts right up to the House of Lords and the result has always been the same - the gypsy camp is illegal and must go. For the travellers and their supporters, who this week won a temporary injunction stopping the bailiffs, this is one more act in a shameful history of often violent and systematic persecution. A UN committee has called on the government to stop the evictions because of the effect it will have on children and the elderly and the Council of Europe's commissioner for Human Rights has warned of the risk of human rights violations.

This week the Moral Maze asks, do we have a moral obligation to protect a vulnerable ethnic minority's way of life and if so, how do we balance that against the cost to wider society and where do we draw the lines? If the sign of a civilised society is its ability to tolerate diversity is this an assault on people's right to live life as they please, or the defence of the value of law and order. How far should we accommodate different cultures if that means allowing them to break laws which the rest of us have to obey?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Claire Fox, Matthew Taylor, Melanie Phillips and Michael Portillo.

Witnesses:
Joseph G. Jones - Gypsy Council
Doug Bacon - Vice Chair, Meriden RAID (Residents Against Irresponsible Development)
Max Wind-Cowie - Head of the Progressive Conservatism Project at Demos
Owen Jones - author of Chavs: the demonization of the working class, fame.

Producer: Phil Pegum.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b014qndl)
Series 2

Russell M Davies: The Next Technological Revolution

After the internet and social media, what will be the next technological revolution?

Writer, blogger and social entrepreneur Russell M. Davies argues that like the early days of blogging, we are about to witness another flowering of individual creativity. This time, he says, it will unleash "all sorts of interesting gadgety things", and determine our relationships with them.

"It's about making your own stuff, which might be a bit silly and a bit trivial and pointless, but you get the satisfaction of making it yourself," he says. This revolution in individual gadgetry - and designing our relationship with them - will prove "exciting, radical, life-affirming stuff".

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling. Recorded in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b014qndn)
A Very Large Hole in the Sahara

Scientists are looking at novel ways to halt sea-level rise and reverse global warming, but not the way in which Miranda Krestovnikoff is attempting to do her bit on Exmouth Beach...

One idea proposed was to flood lowing lying parts of the planet - parts of the Sahara desert in order to accomodate rising sea level caused by global warming and the melting of ice-sheets and glaciers. An idea quickly dismissed by climate scientist Tim Lenton who joins Miranda on the beach as she attempts to empty the water from the ocean.

Futuristic visions of the sky filled with trillions of tiny mirrors and giant man-made clouds over the oceans to reflect the power of the sun are just two ideas scientists have come up with in their quest to make a giant sunscreen for the planet and to try and cool the climate.

And just next month a team of scientists from universities in the UK are carrying out an experiment to see if they can hoist a giant hosepipe one kilometre into the air. If successful they will attempt to upscale the experiment. The aim is to see if they can extend the pipe up to 20km should they ever need to spray aerosol particles into the air to recreate the effects of a volcanic eruption. Matt Watson leads the project and he explains how successful Mount Pinatubo was in lowering the earth's temperature for two years after it erupted.

Miranda Krestovnikoff investigates which futuristic geoengineering concepts could become a reality if we continue to fill the atmosphere with greenhouse gases and what impact messing about with the climate could potentially have on weather systems across the globe.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b014qncp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b014htw3)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b014qndq)
With Robin Lustig. National and international news and analysis.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b014x8j8)
The Day of the Sardine

Episode 3

Sid Chaplin's acclaimed novel recounts how 50 years ago a Newcastle boy slipped into the treacherous waters of manhood. Adapted by Michael Chaplin.

In the Newcastle of the early 60's, Arthur Haggerston is forced to beg for a job on a building site with his Uncle George, hears of the bizarre relationship between his pal's brother and a ragman's daughter and is drawn into the excitement of an affair with an older woman and the violence of a gang vendetta.

Reader: Joe Caffrey

Producer: Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else (b014qnds)
Series 2

Home Making

Andrew Lawrence explores the perils and frustrations of decorating and furnishing our homes and then inviting people round.

More short comedic monologues taking a light-hearted look at various aspects of conventional living and the pressure we feel to conform to social norms and ideals.

Written by Andrew Lawrence.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011


WED 23:15 The Music Teacher (b00s3h48)
Series 1

Episode 1

An aural feast of a musical comedy written by and starring Richie Webb as multi-instrumentalist music teacher Nigel Penny.

Shut away in a windowless practice room in a regional arts centre, music teacher Nigel endures a succession of pupils: the middle-aged bachelor with his homemade Moog; the six year old trombonist who's arms aren't quite long enough; and the female student who's forever in a state of tearful crisis and never gets her oboe out - all these and more enter Nigel's airless little room.

Nigel also has to contend with the panicked manager of Letchington Arts Centre, Belinda, who's continued struggle to keep the Arts Centre a going concern impacts bizarrely on Nigel's world.

Nigel suffers from crippling stage fright. He hasn't performed in public for years and frankly, he's not looking to rectify this. Belinda, however, is. And not because she appreciates his rare talent, but mainly because she always seems to have some act that's cancelled and needs Nigel to fill in.

We are privy to Nigel's thoughts: conversations and musical performances are littered with the 'real' Nigel's asides, which flit from commenting on what is happening to wandering off on a tangent to becoming consumed with the prospect of performing again.

Musically, though, the show sounds like no other: Accordians; singing dogs; death metal guitar - we hear them all. And the entire show takes place in Nigel's tiny, windowless room. The claustrophobia is audible.

This opening episode sees Nigel having to contend with an atonal Barbershop Quartet and a depressed orchestral timpanist - whilst Belinda is desperate to fill the slot vacated by the Gilbert and Sullivan Society.

Nigel Penny ...... Richie Webb
Belinda ...... Vicki Pepperdine
Other roles: Dave Lamb, Jim North and Jess Robinson.

Producer: Richie Webb
Director: Nick Walker

A Top Dog Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in April 2010.


WED 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b00pnt6h)
Series 5

Fear of Flying

The writer Jon Ronson looks at one of our deepest fears. When Vicky Coren realised her fear of flying was stopping her travelling, she sought help from a specialist councillor. He cured her - only to die a year later in an air crash.

Mike Thexton tells Jon of his ordeal on board a hijacked plane, waiting to be shot for 12 hours. And comedian Danny Robins is terrified of death - so terrified that Jon decides to send him to a near death experience festival in Spain in order to try to cure his phobia. Finally, Jon finds a scientist who is working on finding an answer to eternal life.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.



THURSDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2011

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b014htwp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0157980)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014htwr)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014htwt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014htww)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b014htwy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0153lj4)
with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b014qnl8)
How consumer power can boost the British food industry. Charlotte Smith visits chef Richard Corrigan who says shoppers hold the key to supporting British farmers. At the chef's London restaurant, Bentley's, he says that British Food Fortnight is an ideal time for restaurant-goers and shoppers to be more pro-active in demanding more British food. Richard explains that chefs Jamie Oliver and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall have shown how people can support regional food, but that the public still underestimate their influence.

And Farming Today hears claims that sugar prices could increase if EU laws are changed. The National Farmers' Union warn that if sugar quotas are reviewed, the full force of the global market will raise prices and damage the UK industry.

And following some of the most extreme weather in decades, farmers in Scotland are struggling with a late and damp harvest, while some English farmers can't get their potatoes out of the baked earth.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Clare Freeman.


THU 06:00 Today (b014qnlb)
With John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b014qnld)
Shinto

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Japanese belief system Shinto.A religion without gods, scriptures or a founder, Shinto is perhaps better described as a system of belief. Central to it is the idea of kami, spirits or deities associated with places, people and things. Shinto shrines are some of the most prominent features of the landscape in Japan, where over 100 million people - most of the population - count themselves as adherents.Since its emergence as a distinct religion many centuries ago, Shinto has happily coexisted with Buddhism and other religions; in fact, adherents often practise both simultaneously. Although it has changed considerably in the face of political upheaval and international conflict, it remains one of the most significant influences on Japanese culture.With:Martin PalmerDirector of the International Consultancy on Religion, Education, and CultureRichard Bowring Professor of Japanese Studies at the University of CambridgeLucia DolceSenior Lecturer in Japanese Religion and Japanese at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b0157982)
One on One

Episode 4

Life is made up of individuals meeting one another. Often it is the most fleeting of these encounters that, in the fullness of time, turn out to be the most noteworthy.

Paul McCartney is congratulated by Noel Coward. The Adriana Hotel, Rome - June 27th 1965
Noel Coward is serenaded by Prince Felix Youssoupoff. Biarritz July 29th 1946

Ingenious in its construction, witty in its narration, panoramic in its breadth, 'One on One' offers a delightful series of snapshots of the 20th century.

Readers: Eleanor Bron and Tom Hollander

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b014qnlg)
Allison Pearson on "having it all"; History of Harris Tweed

Presented by Jenni Murray. The history of women and Harris Tweed, new research on sickle cell and maternal health in the UK, Allison Pearson and Natasha Walter on "having it all" and Egyptian blogger Sahar Elmougy on political life in her country as elections approach.


THU 10:45 Grossman's War (b014qnlj)
Life and Fate

Lieutenant Peter Bach

Peter Bach, a German officer, is wounded and treated at a military field hospital in November 1942.

The brief respite from the fighting gives him time to contemplate his secret affair with a Russian girl, Zina, an affair that he roughly denies when confronted with it.

Kenneth Branagh, Janet Suzman, David Tennant, Greta Scacchi and Harriet Walter star in Vasily Grossman's epic saga.

Lieutenant Peter Bach ..... Geoffrey Streatfeild
Gerne ..... Lloyd Thomas
Fresser ..... Michael Shelford
The Goalkeeper ..... Tony Bell
Zina ..... Jessica Raine
Hospital Sister ..... Christine Kavanagh
Hospital Orderly ..... David Seddon

Dramatised by Jonathan Myerson.

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead

Director: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate is a sweeping historical tale that charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested and Grossman was told that it would not be published for at least 200 years. He died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b014qnll)
Katie Adie presents more despatches from foreign correspondents. As forces try to oust Gaddafi loyalists holding out in his home town of Sirte, our correspondent Alastair Leithead ponders the dilemmas of keeping the story in the news. In Pakistan the monsoon season has left thousands homeless once again - Aleem Maqbool travels through Sindh, one of the worst-affected provinces and find people feeling abandoned by their government and the world. We're up close and personal as Robin Irvine takes part in a wrestling match on the grasslands of Eastern Mongolia. In Beirut, appearances are everything - even when giving birth as Georgia Paterson-Dargham finds out. And in New England Julian May discovers why lobster fishing is apparently helping to increase the crustacean's numbers.


THU 11:30 Lyrical Journey (b014qnln)
Series 1

Up the Junction

In a series which explores the mysterious relationship between much-loved songs, and the places which inspired them, presenter Jonathan Maitland goes on a lyrical journey close to his heart. A passionate 'Squeeze' fan, he meets the band's lyricist Chris Difford and takes him to Clapham Common which features in his 1979 hit 'Up the Junction'.

So how has the area changed since he wrote the song, and who else has it inspired? Could the song only ever have been about Clapham - or could the man in the song have had 'some or other passion' with a girl from Balham? And how does Chris feel about performing at the station itself?


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b014qnlq)
Helen Browning talks about her new role as Director and the new strategy for the Soil Association.
As councils sell off their assets we hear how Hampshire County Council is already sharing with Havant Borough Council.
Guaranteed loans to small businesses have fallen by 42% in a year. Why won't the banks lend more money?
As part of the Caring for our Future initiative, Minister of State for Care Services Paul Burstow tells us why he wants to hear people's views on how the care services can be improved for users.
And who holds the secret recipe for Earl Grey tea? Trish Cavell tells us about her grandfather Herbert Bowtell who held and passed down the secret recipe and supplied Earl and Lady Grey with their tea.
Presented by Winifred Robinson. Produced by Maire Devine.


THU 12:57 Weather (b014htx0)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b014qnls)
With Shaun Ley. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b014qndn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b014qnm5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Grossman's War (b014qnwg)
Life and Fate

Novikov's Story

November, 1942. Novikov, a tank commander, prepares his troops for Operation Uranus, the campaign which is to be the turning point in the Battle of Stalingrad.

On his way to the front, he visits Zhenya, his lover, in Kuibyshev. He dreams of marrying her but she is still torn between him and Krymov. She tells an anecdote about Krymov and Trotsky, a slip of the tongue that leads to betrayal.

Kenneth Branagh and David Tennant star in Vasily Grossman’s epic saga.

Pyotr Pavlovich Novikov ..... Don Gilet
Getmanov ..... Philip Jackson
Nyeudobnov ..... Peter Wight
Zhenya Shaposhnikova ..... Raquel Cassidy
Nicky ..... Simon Bubb
Vershkov ..... Stuart Mcloughlin
Galina Terentyevna ..... Jane Whittenshaw
Mashuk ..... Peter Polycarpou
Zhakharov ..... Sean Baker

With Jonathan Forbes, James Lailey, Daniel Rabin and Alun Raglan

Dramatised by Mike Walker

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead

Directors: Alison Hindell and Jonquil Panting.

Producer: Alison Hindell.

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Vasily Grossman’s huge novel charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested. Grossman died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b014lzfz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b014m6r3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b014qt0b)
Face It

Confirm/Ignore

The third of three short story commissions on the theme of social networking.

Confirm/Ignore, by Nikesh Shukla, is a moving story about coping with grief in the age of social media.

Read by Nikesh Shukla

Produced by Robert Howells

Nikesh Shukla is a London-based author and poet. His first book, 'Coconut Unlimited' was shortlisted for the Costa First Book Award 2010.


THU 15:45 The Paper Round (b014qnwj)
Melanie Walters

A series in which five public figures revisit the route of their paper round to reveal how it influenced their attitudes to work, creativity and independence.

Having a paper round is a rite of passage for many children, and many successful public figures claim to have braved the early mornings and the elements to deliver newspapers. For some, it's a chance for independence and freedom, or a temporary escape from the horrors at home. For others, it provides the money to spend on music, fashion and girl/boyfriends.

Gavin and Stacey star Melanie Walters joins Bob Kingdom as she retraces her paper round route in Swansea.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b014ptrh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b014qnwl)
Ehsan Masood with a weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. He hears from the scientists who are publishing their research in peer reviewed journals, and discuss how that research is scrutinised and used by the scientific community, the media and the public. The programme also reflects how science affects our daily lives; from predicting natural disasters to the latest advances in cutting edge science.

Producer: Martin RedfernEhsan Masood asks if an intergovernmental panel can protect biodiversity. He looks at how the slippery surface of the pitcher plant might be harnessed to make new nonstick coatings and at a substance isolated from invasive harlequin ladybirds that could be the next antimalarial drug. Also, are wildfires a natural part of the environment, even in Britain, and what can we do to prepare for them?

Producer: Martin Redfern.


THU 17:00 PM (b014qnwn)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014htx2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b014qnwq)
Series 3

Arabella Weir

My Teenage Diary returns with four more brave celebrities ready to revisit their formative years by opening up their intimate teenage diaries and reading them out in public for the very first time.

Comedian Rufus Hound is joined by actor Arabella Weir who describes a teenage life full of drinking, calorie-counting and boys.

Producer: Harriet Jaine
A Talkback Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b014qnws)
Debbie is travelling back to Hungary today. She tells David there is room for all kinds of dairy farms to co-exist, but David thinks mega-dairies will force down UK prices.

Brian finds Jennifer at home waiting for Debbie. He tells Jennifer of Harry and Zofia's tearful farewell. Jennifer isn't enjoying the latest book club choice but wants the discussion to go well.

At the airport, Debbie and Brian discuss dairy farming figures. Debbie agrees to give the presentation should Brian propose her plans to the Board. Jennifer wishes they could have spent more time together, but Debbie hopes to be back in about three weeks time.

Looking forward to the gig tonight, Nic plans to spend her afternoon pampering herself before an early supper. However, Will arrives home to learn that Andrew didn't pick the children up from school as promised. Instead Nic had to, dropping them at her mother's. Her evening's ruined. Will tells Nic to continue pampering herself, while he puts supper on.

Nic worries that something may have happened to Andrew. Will notices how lovely Nic looks and says they mustn't allow him to spoil their night. Agreeing, happy Nic kisses Will and tells him she loves him.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b014k56c)
Mike Leigh's new play; A S Byatt on the end of the Gods

With Mark Lawson.

Mike Leigh's new play at the National Theatre, Grief, didn't have a title until two weeks ago, but it still sold out months ago, such is the anticipation around a new Mike Leigh work. Secrecy surrounded the project and the cast, including Lesley Manville, Leigh's long-term collaborator, were forbidden to give interviews about it. Will it live up to expectations? Gaylene Gould reviews.

Booker prize-winning author A S Byatt describes her life-long fascination with Ragnarok, the Norse mythological story of Armageddon, and explains her approach to re-working ancient gods for modern readers.

Nirvana's Nevermind, Primal Scream's Screamadelica and Simply Red's Stars were all released in September 1991. All three albums made a huge impact in the 1990s, but two decades on have they stood the test of time? Caspar Llewellyn Smith and Rebecca Nicholson, music writers from different generations, give their verdict.

What does postmodernism mean, and where did it come from? These questions are explored by the V&A's new exhibition, Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970-1990. Author Lawrence Norfolk reviews.

Producer: Philippa Ritchie.


THU 19:45 Grossman's War (b014qnlj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b014qnwv)
Forced Marriage

This summer as many as 350 people may have been sent abroad and forced to marry against their will. Figures from the Forced Marriage Unit suggest 4 out of 10 of those affected are schoolchildren, so as the new academic year begins there will be empty seats in classrooms across the UK. In the last quarter, the number of protection orders issued by the courts identifying those at risk of being married against their will has doubled, year on year.

In April the Prime Minister said he was determined to stamp out forced marriage, and had no time for talk of cultural sensitivies. But three years after the Forced Marriage Unit was set up in England and Wales, and guidance was issue to all professionals working with children there's evidence that the legislation is not working as effectively as it should.

Schools are on the frontline of efforts to try and prevent forced marriage, but the Report has learned that even in areas where there's are communities of South Asian origin, some schools are unaware there's a problem, don't raise the issue with pupils, or even flout the guidelines by immediately contacting parents.

Angus Crawford asks whether the government is doing enough to help vulnerable young people.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b014qnwx)
Economy and Rumours

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan asks his guests whether it's time to declare a state of emergency in the world economy and to adopt extreme measures to sort out the Euro crisis and the lack of economic activity in the West. They also discuss rumours, hearsay and speculation, and the role they play in business.

Evan is joined in the studio by Guy Berruyer, chief executive of global business software supplier Sage Group; internet entrepreneur Brent Hoberman, founder of online interior decoration business mydeco.com; Hugh Hendry, co-founder of hedge fund Eclectica Asset Management.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b014pzzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b014qnld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b014htx4)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b014qq1r)
With Robin Lustig. National and international news and analysis.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b014x8jb)
The Day of the Sardine

Episode 4

Sid Chaplin's acclaimed novel recounts how 50 years ago a Newcastle boy slipped into the treacherous waters of manhood. Adapted by Michael Chaplin.

In the Newcastle of the early 60's, teenager Arthur Haggerston discovers his Uncle George is corrupt, clashes with his mother about her relationship with the lodger and takes part in a street battle before glimpsing redemption - and the beautiful Dorothy - at the Golden Bowl Mission.

Reader: Joe Caffrey

Producer: Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Very Old Pretenders (b014qq1t)
In Therapy

Written by multi award-winning writer Carl Gorham, creator of cult TV animation show "Stressed Eric", the series explores what happens when two Jacobite soldiers from 1745 are found alive and well in a cave in Perthshire and have to be integrated into modern Scottish society by English academic Andrew Merron.

Friction between the two Jacobite soldiers comes to a head and results in a bust-up with broadswords. This prompts anthropologist Andrew Merron to introduce them to the modern world of therapy. The two soldiers can't agree who should have therapy first; they can't even agree how they should decide who should have therapy first. It is only when they are forced to live separately, with a dreary cousin of Merron's and his fussy Uncle that Rab and Macdonald start to realise each other's true merits.

Cast:
Andrew Merron......................David Haig
Denise Merron..................Rebecca Front
Rab /Therapist....................................Jack Docherty
Macdonald/Uncle Jed........................Gordon Kennedy
Dougie / Waiter ......Moray Hunter
Keef Van Leer ..... Carl Gorham

Producer: Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b00q3gjq)
Series 5

Being Alone

The writer Jon Ronson asks are we more ourselves or less ourselves when we are alone? He confronts David Quantick, who Jon noticed avoiding him in the street one day.

Father Ted writer Graham Linehan reveals the moment he was ignored. We also talk to Yoshiro Nakamatsu, the world's most prolific inventor about the moment he invents - alone and under water. Finally we hear of the British man who was jailed in Japan and wasn't allowed to speak to anyone in his daily life for nearly 3 years.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2011

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b014htxq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b0157982)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b014htxs)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b014htxv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b014htxx)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b014htxz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0153lj6)
with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b014qxb8)
The Food Standards Agency is advising the Government to keep the ban on using pigs and poultry in animal feed. The European Commission wants it lifted, saying that with tight controls it would be safe to allow pig meat to be fed to poultry or vice versa. The FSA has said the risk of disease is small but worth keeping the ban in place. But farmers say science is on their side and using animal protein in feed would reduce imports of soya - so be better for conservation - and would add value to their animals.

Anna Hill gets a rare step inside one of the UK's sugar factories where beet is processed into sugar. The country once had 12 plants but now only 4. As sugar quotas could be coming to an end Anna asks whether UK farmers could produce more beet and if more factories will be built.

Charlotte returns to The People's Supermarket which aimed to connect the public with farmers and collect and reuse crops from farmers rejected from other retailers. One year on she finds out how well it's worked and sees who's missing.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


FRI 06:00 Today (b014qt2m)
With John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0156jy6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b0157984)
One on One

Episode 5

Life is made up of individuals meeting one another. Often it is the most fleeting of these encounters that, in the fullness of time, turn out to be the most noteworthy.

Salvador Dali sketches Sigmund Freud. 39 Elsworthy Road, London NW3 July 19th 1938
Sigmund Freud analyses Gustav Mahler. Leiden, Holland August 1910

Ingenious in its construction, witty in its narration, panoramic in its breadth, 'One on One' offers a delightful series of snapshots of the 20th century.

Readers: Eleanor Bron and Toby Stephens

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b014qxbb)
Children and Organ Donation; the Law on Cohabitation; Lullabies; Iron Age Women

Presented by Jenni Murray. There is an increasing shortage of children's organs being donated in the UK. This has prompted a leading doctor at Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital to ask if discussions about organ donation should become a mandatory part of the National Curriculum. At what age are children mature enough to take such a decision? The government has announced it won't be changing the law on cohabitation - despite recommendations by the Law Commission to do so. So should cohabiting couples be given any legal protection? Lullabies from around the world: what do they tell us about the culture they come from? Women in the Iron Age: what role did women play in the construction of an Iron Age causeway that has been excavated in East Anglia?


FRI 10:45 Grossman's War (b014qxbd)
Life and Fate

A Hero of the Soviet Union

November, 1942. Krymov denounces Grekov as an enemy of the state.

After speeches marking the 25th anniversary of the Revolution at which he is cold-shouldered by his colleagues, he slips out to find Stepan Spiridonov at the Central Power Station. He recalls the heady days of 1917 and Lenin's funeral and compares those ideals with the days of the show-trials.

Kenneth Branagh, Janet Suzman, David Tennant, Kenneth Cranham, Greta Scacchi and Harriet Walter star Vasily Grossman's epic saga.

Nikolai Krymov ..... David Tennant
Stepan Spiridonov ..... Kenneth Cranham
Pryakhin ..... Gerard McDermott
Pavel Andreyev ..... Malcolm Tierney
Ogibalov ..... Carl Prekopp
Makuladze ..... James Lailey

Dramatised by Jonathan Myerson.

Original music by John Hardy with Rob Whitehead.

Translated by Robert Chandler.

Director: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Life and Fate is a sweeping historical tale that charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested and Grossman was told that it would not be published for at least 200 years. He died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


FRI 11:00 Picking Round Apples (b014qxbg)
Steve Carver lives the life of a seasonal apple picker on a farm in Herefordshire.

In his previous programmes for Radio 4 'Dancing Round the Mediterranean' and 'Touring Round Torquay' , Steve immersed himself in a new line of work, living alongside co-workers and experiencing their way of life.

Now he is 'Picking Round Apples' in Herefordshire:

For a week in mid-August, Steve gave up his home comforts and moved into a small campervan parked in the corner of a field in rural Herefordshire.

Every year a small band of retired people establish a make-shift and temporary, but close community. Every day, all day, they pick apples. The money they earn boosts their pensions, and a simple and quietly sociable life is also a great draw.

However it's hard work - bad backs, scratched arms, and sore feet are the wounds that must be borne.

The retired pickers live in their motor-homes for the summer, with many over-wintering in Spain when the weather begins to cool. No such luxury (or destination) for Steve - we gave him a basic campervan, with no electrical 'hook-up'; the use of a microwave in a farm-building, which also houses the showers and loos.

He was cold at night (trekking socks a necessity in bed, even in August), he got a little sick of microwave meals, but he enjoyed meeting the other pickers, appreciating what they meant by 'getting into the zone' of apple picking: reach... pick... put in bucket... reach... pick... put in bucket... almost - as Steve said - like a form of meditation.

Join Steve to find out how he got on 'Picking Round Apples' at Tillington Fruit Farm near Ledbury in Herefordshire.

Producer: Karen Gregor

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


FRI 11:30 Clare in the Community (b014qxbj)
Series 7

The Prisoner

Clare in the Community returns with Sally Phillips as Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Each week we join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life. In her private life Clare is struggling to come to terms with Brian's infidelity. Will their relationship survive?

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Clare: SALLY PHILLIPS
Brian: ALEX LOWE
Megan/Nali: NINA CONTI
Ray: RICHARD LUMSDEN
Helen: LIZA TARBUCK
Simon: ANDREW WINCOTT
Libby: SARAH KENDALL
WPC Petherington: SOPHIE THOMPSON
Mr. Chisholm: GERARD MCDERMOTT
Mr Barton: SIMON BUBB
Shuliman Olibaju/Annabel: VICTORIA INEZ HARDY
School Girl: GEORGIA LOWE

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden

Produced by Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b014qxbl)
Holidays for the broken hearted - the German company offering a new kind of package holiday, one that comes with all inclusive counselling.

The Irish golf industry is in trouble. During the boom years courses opened up across the country. But after the crash, memberships have plummeted and the greens are empty.

And are you looking to buy a tablet computer or ebook reader? Peter has a selection of the latest models in the studio - and experts to assess them.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b014hty1)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b014qxbn)
With Shaun Ley. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b014qxbq)
Does light music still have a place on the BBC? As listeners voice their doubts, Radio 2 controller Bob Shennan explains his decision to end Alan Titchmarsh's programme Melodies for You.

As Americana also comes to an end over on Radio 4, Roger recalls controller Gwyneth Williams' reasons for the change and hears your reaction to the comedy which replaces it.

The sounds of the past transport Roger back in time as he visits the new BBC Archive building, and hears about an ambitious project to make all the archive available in time for the BBC's 100th birthday in 2022.
And as Philip Glass-watch moves into its second week, there's yet another sighting of the composer's ubiquitous piece.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b014qnws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Grossman's War (b014qxbs)
Life and Fate

Krymov in Moscow

Moscow, Winter 1942. Commissar Nikolai Krymov has been denounced and arrested. He's taken to the dreaded Lubyanka prison in Moscow: a place where, in the past, he has denounced others.

Meanwhile his ex-wife Zhenya arrives in Moscow, to stay with Viktor and Lyuda, and to face the consequences of her actions.

Kenneth Branagh and David Tennant star in Vasily Grossman's epic saga.

Commissar Nikolai Krymov ..... David Tennant
Viktor Shtrum ..... Kenneth Branagh
Lyuda Shaposhnikova ..... Greta Scacchi
Zhenya Shaposhnikova ..... Raquel Cassidy
Marya Sokolova ..... Harriet Walter
Nadya ..... Ellie Kendrick
Katsenelenbogen ..... Ewan Bailey
NKVD Interrogator ..... Elliot Levey

With Simon Bubb, Elaine Claxton, Jonathan Forbes, James Lailey, Gerard McDermott, Chris Pavlo, Peter Polycarpou, Carl Prekopp, Alun Raglan and Susie Riddell

Dramatised by Jonathan Myerson.

Directors: Alison Hindell and Jonquil Panting

Producer: Alison Hindell

Set against the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, Vasily Grossman's huge novel charts the fate of both a nation and a family in the turmoil of war and is increasingly hailed as the most important Russian novel of the 20th century. Its comparison of Stalinism with Nazism was considered by Soviet authorities to be so dangerous that the manuscript itself was arrested. Grossman died in 1964, never knowing that his book would be smuggled to the West and eventually published in 1980.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2011.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b014qxbv)
Avebury Manor

Matthew Wilson, Anne Swithinbank and Bob Flowerdew answer gardening queries in Avebury Manor, Wiltshire where the Victorian kitchen garden is undergoing meticulous restoration.

Matthew Wilson delivers updates from the Olympic garden in Stratford.

Scale insects : how a bit of soap can go a long way and when to lift your infested potatoes.

The programme is chaired by Eric Robson.

Questions addressed in the programme are:
How do I protect my fruit from being eaten before they ripen?
What are the white, powdery spots on my potted Bay tree?
My Auriculas and Primulas bloomed twice this year. What will happen next year?
Plant suggestions for half-barrels in part sun, part shade:
Suggestions included: Aralia Elegantissima, Hydrangeas and Ligustrum lucidum (Privet)
Why haven't my 1 year old raspberry canes grown?
Why hasn't my five year-old Magnolia never flowered?
My potatoes showed signs of blight. I cut the tops off. How long can I leave them in?
Why does my Florence fennel always bolt

Produced by Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 The Paper Round (b014qxbx)
Stephen K Amos

A series in which five public figures revisit the route of their paper round to reveal how it influenced their attitudes to work, creativity and independence.

Having a paper round is a rite of passage for many children, and many successful public figures claim to have braved the early mornings and the elements to deliver newspapers. For some, it's a chance for independence and freedom, or a temporary escape from home. For others, it provides the money to spend on music, fashion and girl/boyfriends.

Award-winning comedian Stephen K Amos recalls his paper round route with Bob Kingdom in Balham, South West London.

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b014qxbz)
Burhanuddin Rabbani, Kurt Sanderling, Arthur Evans and Walter Bonatti

Matthew Bannister on

The former Afghan president Burhannudin Rabbani, assassinated as he was leading attempts to start peace talks with the Taliban.

The conductor Kurt Sanderling, who fled from the Nazis to the Soviet Union and was renowned for his interpretations of Shostakovitch. We hear from his son, Thomas, also a well known conductor.

The gay rights activist Arthur Evans who led non violent protests against discrimination in 1970s New York.

The Italian mountaineer Walter Bonatti, who was falsely accused of trying to sabotage the first successful ascent of the world's second highest mountain, K2

And the banjo player Wade Mainer who was 104 when he died - a last surviving link to the heyday of hillbilly music on 1930s American radio.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b014qxc1)
If you fancy a change of gear or need your batteries charging The Film Programme is the place for you. Francine Stock talks to Nicholas Winding Refn about his new film, Drive, starring Ryan Gosling as a stuntman who drives getaway cars in his spare time. He falls for the wife of a criminal played by Carey Mulligan and soon falls foul of the local gangsters. Its a turbo-charged ride and shares the fascination with violence evident in Refn's earlier work.
Drive's 21st century sheen is more than matched by the vision of Humphrey Jennings...the man Lindsay Anderson described as the only poet of British cinema. A collection of films from the beginning of his career is being released on DVD for the first time this month and Francine Stock is joined by Jennings' biographer, Kevin Jackson, to assess them and their place in his achievement.
There's also an interview with Andrew Rossi who went undercover to produce Page One, a documentary about the New York Times and Neil Brand is on hand to diagnose some of your least favourite film scores -- the ones you feel miss the mark by a million miles.

Producer: Zahid Warley.


FRI 17:00 PM (b014qxc3)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b014hty3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b014qxc5)
Series 75

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig with panellists Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Andy Hamilton and Julia Hartley-Brewer.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b014qq75)
Clarrie tells Emma about Nic and William's evening out but Emma's not really interested in hearing about the band Jumping Dakota, nor the problem Emma has with her ex-husband. Clarrie asks if Emma's school bag turned up, and suggests Emma should tell Nic it's been found. Emma reluctantly agrees to call her.

Eddie drops Clarrie at the job centre. He's shocked to hear she might not be entitled to anything at the moment because she gave up her job voluntarily.

Jazzer insists Pat and Tony watch the pigs playing football. They're sceptical about Tom's new marketing idea but wish him good luck. Jazzer can really see it taking off on-line.

Pat's saddened to see Tom's new packaging, without Bridge Farm on it. Tony's more concerned about their own business and decides to try again to ask Peggy for a loan.

But Tony is shocked at the mess he finds at the Lodge. He stays to tidy the place up. Pat and Tony acknowledge that Peggy's got enough to worry about, without them asking her about money. Now, somehow or other, they're going to have to take more of the burden off her.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b014k56f)
Martin Scorsese's film about George Harrison

With Kirsty Lang.

Martin Scorsese's latest music documentary focuses on the 'quiet Beatle' George Harrison, with contributors including Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Pattie Boyd and Phil Spector. Beatles fan David Hepworth gives his verdict.

In February this year a Cultural Olympiad project invited people to contribute a piece of wood with a personal significance to create a 30-foot modern sailing boat. The resulting 7-man boat will sail to the site of the London Olympics next year, and will be a living archive of people's stories and lives. Olympic silver-medalist sailor and boat builder Mark Covell and Gary Winters, the co-founder of the team behind The Boat Project, take Kirsty round the boatyard to see how far the vessel is progressing.

Shirley Bassey's rise from poverty to international stardom has been dramatised for BBC Two. The title role is played by rising star Ruth Negga, best known for her role in Misfits, with Lesley Sharp playing Shirley's mother. Music writer Jacqueline Springer assesses this portrayal of the legendary singer.

Bridget Nicholls, artist-in-residence at London Zoo, refers to herself as a dating agent: bringing artists and scientists together to work on insect-related projects, such as the Ant Ballet which can be seen at London Zoo next month. Bridget explains how much we have to learn from insects, both scientifically and artistically.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


FRI 19:45 Grossman's War (b014qxbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b014qq77)
Winchester

Jonathan Dimbleby presents a discussion of news and politics from Kings Worthy Primary School in Winchester with Shadow Secretary of State, Douglas Alexander; Cabinet Office Minister, Oliver Letwin; Times columnist, Camilla Cavendish; and deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats, Simon Hughes.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b014qxc7)
Churchill, chance and the black dog

"For a couple of days in May 1940, the fate of the world turned on the fall of a leaf" says John Gray. He outlines the strange conjunction of events - and the work of chance - that led to Churchill becoming Prime Minister.

He muses on how Churchill was found by one of his advisers around one o'clock on the morning of May 9th "brooding alone in one of his clubs". He was given a crucial bit of advice which may have secured him the job. What would have happened Gray wonders if he hadn't been found and that advice - to say nothing! - not been passed on?

He also ponders whether it was it Churchill's recurring melancholy which made for his greatness? "It's hard to resist the thought that the dark view of the world that came on Churchill in his moods of desolation enabled him to see what others could not".

"Churchill had not one life but several" says Gray. Without them all, "history would have been very different, and the world darker than anything we can easily imagine".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 The Complete Ripley (b00j5h53)
The Boy Who Followed Ripley

by Patricia Highsmith. Ian Hart stars as charming, cultured Tom Ripley, in Patricia Highsmith's classic thriller. A rich young man arrives at Belle Ombre. He and Tom end up having to fight for their lives in sexually-ambiguous, underworld Berlin.

Tom Ripley...Ian Hart
Frank Pierson...Nicholas Hoult
Heloise...Helen Longworth
Lily Pierson...Janice Acquah
Reeves Minot...Paul Rider
Eric Lanz...Jonathan Tafler
Ralph Thurlow...Philip Fox
Max...Matt Addis

Dramatist Stephen Wyatt
Director Steven Canny and Claire Grove.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b014hty5)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b014qxc9)
World leaders gather to discuss what to do about global economic problems - the former Chancellor, Alistair Darling, berates their lack of action.

Palestinians go to the UN to ask for the state of Palestine to be recognised.

And, we hear about the philosophy of science.

All that and more on the World Tonight with Ritula Shah.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b014x8jd)
The Day of the Sardine

Episode 5

Sid Chaplin's acclaimed novel recounts how 50 years ago a Newcastle boy slipped into the treacherous waters of manhood. Adapted by Michael Chaplin.

In the Newcastle of the 1960's, the young life of Arthur Haggerston reaches a crisis, as he finally meets the father who abandoned him, takes part in a vicious street battle and witnesses the aftermath of a murder.

Reader: Joe Caffrey

Producer: Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b014q00c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b00qcj8w)
Series 5

Ambition

The writer Jon Ronson asks how our driving ambitions shape us. By interviewing several people at different points in their lives, he sees how ambition can make and break people.

He talks to an 11 year old boy who has plans to be a world class architect, a young woman who has set her sites on being Prime Minister and an ambitious stock broker whose success led him down a dangerous path towards a high security prison in the US.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b014gk72)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b014qxc7)

After I Was Gorgeous 11:00 MON (b014pw4c)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b014q005)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b014qsws)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b014qt0b)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b014pw7g)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b014lzz3)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b014gk70)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b014qq77)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b014m1px)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b014m6qv)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b014m6qv)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b014pw4r)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b014pw9l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b014x8j6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b014x8j8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b014x8jb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b014x8jd)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b014m93d)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b014pw45)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b014pw45)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b015797y)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b015797y)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0157980)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0157980)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b0157982)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b0157982)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b0157984)

Border Business 11:00 WED (b014qncw)

Bosphorus 21:30 TUE (b00yqp5s)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b014m6r7)

Clare in the Community 11:30 FRI (b014qxbj)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b014f5tj)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b014qndn)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b014qndn)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0156jy6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0156jy6)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b014lzg7)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 TUE (b00r0xt1)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b014lzg1)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b014pw3z)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b014pwcq)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b014qnck)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b014qnl8)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b014qxb8)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b014gjw5)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b014qxbq)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b014q04r)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b014qndl)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b014lzgf)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b014qnll)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b014k56h)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b014k567)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b014k569)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b014k56c)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b014k56f)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b014gjwc)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b014qxbv)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b014q00c)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b014q00c)

Grossman's War 15:00 SUN (b014ptrf)

Grossman's War 10:45 MON (b014pw49)

Grossman's War 14:15 MON (b014pw4m)

Grossman's War 19:45 MON (b014pw49)

Grossman's War 10:45 TUE (b014pxnv)

Grossman's War 14:15 TUE (b014q001)

Grossman's War 19:45 TUE (b014pxnv)

Grossman's War 10:45 WED (b014qnct)

Grossman's War 14:15 WED (b014qnd6)

Grossman's War 19:45 WED (b014qnct)

Grossman's War 10:45 THU (b014qnlj)

Grossman's War 14:15 THU (b014qnwg)

Grossman's War 19:45 THU (b014qnlj)

Grossman's War 10:45 FRI (b014qxbd)

Grossman's War 14:15 FRI (b014qxbs)

Grossman's War 19:45 FRI (b014qxbd)

I Was There Too! 00:30 SUN (b0156nd1)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b014ggh5)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b014qnld)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b014qnld)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b014q04t)

It's My Story 20:00 MON (b014pw7d)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 19:15 SUN (b0156jzr)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 MON (b00pxng6)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 TUE (b00pkbmr)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 WED (b00pnt6h)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 THU (b00q3gjq)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 FRI (b00qcj8w)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b014fblm)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b014pw4w)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b014gjwh)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b014qxbz)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b014lzz9)

Lyrical Journey 11:30 THU (b014qnln)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b014q003)

Material World 21:00 MON (b014gdxv)

Material World 16:30 THU (b014qnwl)

Meeting Myself Coming Back 15:00 MON (b00ltmpv)

Micky Flanagan: What Chance Change? 23:00 MON (b00sg13d)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b014f0vq)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b014htr1)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b014htsj)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b014httm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b014htvn)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b014htwp)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b014htxq)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b014qncp)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b014qncp)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b014qnd8)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b014lzz1)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b014lzz1)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b014qndj)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 THU (b014qnwq)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b014f0vz)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b014htr9)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b014htss)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b014httw)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b014htvx)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b014htwy)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b014htxz)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b014htrc)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b014f0w1)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b014htrh)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b014htrm)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b014f0wk)

News 13:00 SAT (b014f0w9)

Old Harry's Game 23:00 TUE (b00j16ky)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b014m6qz)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b014ptrh)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b014ptrh)

PM 17:00 SAT (b014lzz7)

PM 17:00 MON (b014pw4t)

PM 17:00 TUE (b014q00f)

PM 17:00 WED (b014qndg)

PM 17:00 THU (b014qnwn)

PM 17:00 FRI (b014qxc3)

Page to Performance 13:30 TUE (b014pzzz)

Paul Temple 11:30 WED (b014qncy)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b014ptrm)

Picking Round Apples 11:00 FRI (b014qxbg)

Picturing Britain 14:45 SUN (b014m770)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b014f72r)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b014ptrk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b014gk87)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b014pw3x)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0153lj0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b0153lj2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0153lj4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b0153lj6)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b014lzzc)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b014lzzc)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b014lzzc)

Punt PI 10:30 SAT (b014lzg9)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b014m6r3)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b014m6r3)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b014m6r3)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b014lzfz)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b014lzfz)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b014f9qc)

Round Britain Quiz 13:30 MON (b014pw4k)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00q07c7)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b014lzg5)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b014lzzf)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b014pzzq)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b014pzzq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b014f0vv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b014htr5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b014htsn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b014httr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b014htvs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b014htwt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b014htxv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b014f0vs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b014f0vx)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b014f0wc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b014htr3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b014htr7)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b014htrr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b014htsl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b014htsq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b014http)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b014httt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b014htvq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b014htvv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b014htwr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b014htww)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b014htxs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b014htxx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b014f0wh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b014htrw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b014htsz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b014htv0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b014htw1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b014htx2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b014hty3)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b014m6qx)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b014m6qx)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b014fdbp)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b014pw43)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b014pw43)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b014m6r5)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b014m6r1)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b014m6r9)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b014ptrp)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b014ptrp)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b014pw4y)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b014pw4y)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b014q04p)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b014q04p)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b014qnm5)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b014qnm5)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b014qnws)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b014qnws)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b014qq75)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b014qnwx)

The Castle 18:30 WED (b00gs3kv)

The Chalet School 11:30 TUE (b014pzzs)

The Complete Ripley 21:00 FRI (b00j5h53)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b014gjwk)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b014qxc1)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b014m76w)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b014m76w)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b014qnd4)

The Music Teacher 23:15 WED (b00s3h48)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b014gjwp)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b014qxc5)

The Paper Round 15:45 MON (b014pw4p)

The Paper Round 15:45 TUE (b014q007)

The Paper Round 15:45 WED (b014qndb)

The Paper Round 15:45 THU (b014qnwj)

The Paper Round 15:45 FRI (b014qxbx)

The Philosopher's Arms 21:00 TUE (b014q04w)

The Philosopher's Arms 16:30 WED (b014q04w)

The Price of Power 17:00 SUN (b014fkx3)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b014fcyw)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b014pxnq)

The Report 20:00 THU (b014qnwv)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b014lzgc)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b014m76y)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b014pw9j)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b014q05g)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b014qndq)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b014qq1r)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b014qxc9)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b014gcm9)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b014qndd)

Today 07:00 SAT (b014lzg3)

Today 06:00 MON (b014pw41)

Today 06:00 TUE (b014pxnn)

Today 06:00 WED (b014qncm)

Today 06:00 THU (b014qnlb)

Today 06:00 FRI (b014qt2m)

Tracing Your Roots 16:00 TUE (b014q009)

Vasily Grossman from the Frontline 20:45 SAT (b014m1pz)

Vasily Grossman from the Frontline 19:45 SUN (b014ptrt)

Very Old Pretenders 23:00 THU (b014qq1t)

Waiting for Independence Day 13:30 SUN (b012qrtq)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b014f0w3)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b014f0w5)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b014f0w7)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b014f0wf)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b014htrf)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b014htrk)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b014htrp)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b014htrt)

Weather 05:57 MON (b014htsv)

Weather 12:57 MON (b014htsx)

Weather 21:58 MON (b014htt1)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b014htty)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b014htv2)

Weather 12:57 WED (b014htvz)

Weather 21:58 WED (b014htw3)

Weather 12:57 THU (b014htx0)

Weather 21:58 THU (b014htx4)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b014hty1)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b014hty5)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b014ptrw)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b0156k0d)

What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else 23:00 WED (b014qnds)

When the Dog Dies 11:30 MON (b013229w)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b014lzz5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b014pw47)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b014pxns)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b014qncr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b014qnlg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b014qxbb)

World at One 13:00 MON (b014pw4h)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b014pzzx)

World at One 13:00 WED (b014qnd2)

World at One 13:00 THU (b014qnls)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b014qxbn)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b014pw4f)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b014pzzv)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b014qnd0)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b014qnlq)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b014qxbl)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b014lzfx)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b014lzfx)