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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 JUNE 2011

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b011vhvn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b011vhsg)
James Joyce - A Biography

Episode 5

"Living In Ireland had lost all meaning for Joyce; and the lure of 'exile' began to possess him. But if he was to elope with Nora he would need to secure an income, and would Nora go with him? Fortunately, she was as captivated by him as he was by her..."

Our five part reading of this voluminous account looks at Joyce's years spent in Europe, when he held down menial jobs, caroused a lot, experienced the ups and downs of married life, but still managed to produce works of literature that have stood the test of time.

5. To Trieste, then later to Paris, and by 1919 it's the efforts of some determined women, Margaret Anderson, Harriet Weaver and Sylvia Beach, who help Joyce in the publication of Ulysses.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011vhvq)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011vhvs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011vhvv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b011vhvx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011vjjj)
With Quaker and author Alastair McIntosh.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b011vjjl)
'Mum brought eyes and hearts home from the butcher'. The early life of plastic surgeon Nigel Mercer. Also his thoughts on NHS funding, taking 'jug ears' seriously and 'good' death. With Eddie Mair. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b011vhvz)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b011vhw1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b011zj68)
Literary Walks

Daphne Du Maurier - Fowey

Daphne Du Maurier lived and worked in Cornwall and the area surrounding Fowey features in many of her novels. Today the town is home to the annual Daphne Du Maurier festival and this year is it's 10th anniversary. Clare Balding discovers how the area inspired many features of Du Mauriers work and meets local experts including Du Maurier's son.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b011zj6b)
Farming Today This Week

Farmers say the drought could mean this year's wheat harvest will be the worst for 30 years. Some farmers in East Anglia say they're expecting a 50% drop in yield. If this spring is a taste of things to come, farmers in the UK could be planting "less water dependant strains" in the next few decades. Charlotte Smith meets scientists at the University of Nottingham's Research centre who are crossing traditional wheat with distant relatives from warmer climates to see if they can identify drought resistant crops.

Producer; Angela Frain. Presenter; Charlotte Smith.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b011vhw3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b011zj6d)
Morning news and current affairs, with John Humphrys and Justin Webb:
08:10 Alistair Darling on the Greek debt rollover.
08:30 The TUC's Brendan Barber outlines whether the UK faces a summer of discontent.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b011zj7c)
Richard Coles with broadcaster Esther Rantzen, poet Luke Wright, a man who hoaxed the nation in to believing that Jimi Hendrix had recorded the Welsh national anthem, and a woman who discovered after his death that her husband of 46 years has kept his sexuality secret. There's a guerilla report about pamper parties for young girls and opera singer Lesley Garrett shares her Inheritance Tracks.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b011zj7f)
Catalonia - Cornish Coast

Sandi Toksvig meets novelist Richard Gwyn and translator Peter Bush to discuss Catalonia and its relationship with Spain. She hears how life is changing there, not just in the big city of Barcelona but in the more rural areas near the Pyrenees. Sandi also talks about the Cornish coast with the historian and author Philip Marsden who has lived in the Falmouth area for many years and reflects on the role of the sea in the lives of the residents and visitors from the days of sail to the present.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 Royal Racers and Fascinators (b011zkl5)
Every June thousands of men and women step out at Ascot railway station wearing clothes that would grace the Garden Parties of Buckingham Palace - gentlemen in top hats and grey morning suits, ladies in fine silks and satins, and often wearing fizzing little creations on their heads - the fascinator. This is Royal Ascot, and Hardeep Singh Kohli is there to talk to the racegoers and to mark the card of Ascot's 300 year old history.

The connection with Royalty and fashion has been there from the start. The hunting-mad Queen Anne in 1711 noticed that, just by the kennels where her hounds were kept, there was a clearing which would make an excellent racecourse. It was a stone's throw from her Royal residence at Windsor Castle, and the first races took place in August of that year. Immediately Ascot became a place where apart from wagers, people came to show themselves off and have a very good time.

The Royal connection was enhanced by the George IV, who could set off after a heavy night at Windsor to have a Royal flutter. It was he who initiated the Royal Procession down the course, which marks the arrival of the current Queen.

Hardeep talks to the historian of Ascot, Sean Magee, about the landmark moments - from the early days when cock-fighting and bare-knuckle boxing added to the entertainment, to the memorable races of champion jockeys and their steeds - Arkle, Yates, Nijinsky, and Desert Orchid have all graced the course, with the record-breaking moment when jockey Frankie Dettori rode the winner of all seven races in September 1996.

Hardeep hears about the highspots of his commentating career from Sir Peter O'Sullevan, talks to the TV presenter Clare Balding and meets the Chief Executive Charles Barnett and Clerk of the Course Chris Stickels.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b011zkl7)
Steve Richards of The Independent looks behind the scenes at Westminster

What future for Ed Miliband as Leader of the Opposition? It's a question the press have been asking in the last few days. But how far is their criticism justified? And what task faces him now? The former Conservative leader Michael - now Lord - Howard reflects on the demands of the job with Tim Montgomerie, a former chief of staff for Iain Duncan Smith. The President of YouGov, Peter Kellner, interprets the latest polls. The chief economics correspondent at The Observer, William Keegan, takes issue with the former Conservative Chancellor, Lord Lawson on the government's strategy for economic recovery. And how political is Bob Dylan? Two Labour MPs who are big fans, Kevin Brennan and Kerry McCarthy, reflect on his talents.

The Editor was Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b011zkl9)
The ultimate failed state. That's what some call Somalia in the Horn of Africa. Peter Greste is in the capital Mogadishu, perhaps the most dangerous city in the world. He's finding out why thousands of Somalis are leaving homes in the country and flooding in to the city? Another mass migration's going on in China. But, as Julianna Liu tells us, difficulties can lie ahead for the country people heading for town in search of a better life. Paul Henley's been looking at an economic boom that's lifting parts of Poland; one port city's described as the Sydney and Dubai of the Baltic. The worst drought in fifty years has hit Texas. Jonny Dymond finds one rancher whose fortunes are suffering -- but he says he's battling on: it's the American way. And she's called the Miss Marple of the Himalayas; Joanna Jolly meets the woman who keeps climbers in Nepal roped to the truth.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b011zklc)
How insurance policies are literally getting excessive.
Plus: watch out for that online small print - you may end up with a credit account you don't want.
And: has the cheque been saved? A government minister says he may intervene.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b011vjhr)
Series 34

Episode 2

Coalition health reforms, opposition leadership squabbles and Leicester's preparedness against the unknowable zombie threat.

This week's Now Show Audience Question was:

As "Your Desert Island Discs" showed last week, particular songs recall particular memories for people. Give us one of yours.

What does it make you think of?

Starring Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis; with Mitch Benn, Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin and special guest Andy Zaltzman.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Steve Hall, Jon Hunter, Ben Partridge, Ava Vidal and Andy Wolton.

Produced by Colin Anderson.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b011vhw5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b011vhw7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b011vjhy)
Jonathan Dimbleby presents a political and topical discussion from the Barnaby Festival in Macclesfield with Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Angela Eagle; Daily Telegraph and Spectator columnist, Charles Moore; general-secretary of the ATL teacher's union, Mary Bousted; and business minister, Edward Davey.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b011zklf)
Listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b011zklh)
In Praise of Love

A number of Terence Rattigan's plays e.g. The Winslow Boy, Separate Tables, The Deep Blue Sea, Cause Celebre were triggered by real incidents - and In Praise of Love is no exception. In the mid-1950s his friend, Rex Harrison, told him that his wife, the talented Kay Kendall, was dying of leukaemia, but she but she didn't know and he would never tell her.

Twenty years later Rattigan wrote this, his very last stage play, which was produced in 1973 and subsequently on Broadway, with Rex Harrison himself in the lead, triggered by this true event.

The play is precisely what the title says it is - but it doesn't praise youthful passion; it praises mature, spiritual love and devotion.

Within the play a character says that the English vice is never to show emotion. Each of the two middle-aged spouses withhold information from the other to protect their partner. But each knows the truth - Lydia, the wife, is dying of an incurable disease and only an American friend is told the true facts by both of them. Of course we, the audience, know their secrets too, and therein lie our tears. The critic Harold Hobson called it "the most moving expression of love that I have ever seen on a stage...a compact heart-breaking masterpiece".

Cast:
Lydia Cruttwell ..... Sarah Badel
Sebastian Cruttwell ..... Martin Jarvis
Mark Walters ..... Kerry Shale
Joey Cruttwell ..... James Joyce

Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b011zklk)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Presented by Jane Garvey. Highlights from the Woman's Hour week including: French Icon Catherine Deneuve talks about her new film Potiche. Live music from singer Nerina Pallot, compulsory contraception for drug addicted mothers? Artist Judy Chicago, Should twins be in the same class at school? Will the ban on women being able to drive in Saudi Arabia ever be lifted? and can you influence whether you have a boy or a girl baby?


SAT 17:00 PM (b011zklm)
A fresh perspective on the day's news with sports headlines. Presented by Ritula Shah.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b011vhdm)
Contacts and Contracts

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan and his guests swap thoughts on contacts and contracts. Is it who you know that counts in business? Are informal networks the way business is allocated? Or do more formal arrangements now apply? Evan also asks his guests to reveal their greatest business regrets.

Evan is joined in the studio by Will Butler-Adams, managing director of folding bicycle manufacturer Brompton Bicycle; Charles Cohen, chief executive of mobile gambling company Probability plc; Ralph Oppenheimer, chairman of steel trading company Stemcor.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b011vhw9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b011vhwc)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011vhwf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b011zklr)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive is joined by the comedienne and actress Kathy Griffin. She's a double Emmy award winner for her television series Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D List, she's featured on The New York Times Bestselling list for her memoir 'Official Book Club Selection' and she's been nominated for two Grammys for her comedy albums. Kathy's here in the UK to perform for one day only, with two shows at London's Palace Theatre.

Marcus Brigstocke has got ranting down to an art form, from his Now Show monologues to his team captaincy on Argumental. This time he's having a go at religion in his new book 'God Collar'. His need for it, his lack of it, the myths surrounding it...... Oh and he's about to play Station Master Perks in the stage adaption of The Railway Children.

Douglas Henshall has been on our screens in Dennis Potter's Lipstick On Your Collar' and recently as Professor Nick Cutter in Primeval. Now he's starring on stage alongside Kristin Scott Thomas in Harold Pinter's Betrayal at the Comedy Theatre in London.

Political incorrectness in music are explored with columnist and author Terence Blacker. He talks to Jo Bunting about his two part documentary Taboo De Do featuring songs with the power to upset and offend from jazz to rock to hip hop.

Music comes from the multi-talented singer-songwriter, dancer and actress Fatoumata Diawara who blends her Wassalou traditions with wider influences in her music. She performs Bakanoba from her debut EP 'Kanou'.

And introducing the fearsome talent of Kyla La Grange who brings one of her passionate, epic pop songs 'Been Better' to the Loose Ends studio.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b011zklt)
Series 10

The Gotcha Moment

"Perhaps the highest pinnacle in the career of the legendary newspaper editor Gary Wells - known affectionately by his colleagues as The Guv'nor".

In THE GOTCHA MOMENT, Terence Blacker responds to the Sarah Palin emails leak, when 24,000 pages of her missives appeared in the public domain. He imagines how a newspaper editor would deal with such a mountain of stuff, if it came his way. Would he rise to the challenge of making something of it all, or would he sink without trace!

Gary Wells ..... Adrian Scarborough

Producer Duncan Minshull.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b011zklw)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests writer Rowan Pelling, poet Paul Farley and novelist Deborah Moggach review the week's cultural highlights.

Harold Pinter's 1978 play Betrayal tells the story of a love affair, starting two years after it has ended and travelling back to the moment when it began. In Ian Rickson's production at the Comedy Theatre in London Kristin Scott Thomas plays Emma, Ben Miles is her husband and Douglas Henshall her lover.

The visit of a young undergraduate poet to a suburban house in Middlesex in 1913 sets in motion the events of Alan Hollinghurst's novel The Stranger's Child. Over the course of nearly a century the reputation of both the poet and his most celebrated poem - written during that pre-war visit - are wrestled over and reappraised.

Kevin MacDonald's film Life In A Day was actually filmed by some of the 80,000 people from around the world who responded to his invitation to record a short video clip of what they were doing on 24th July 2010. The resulting 4,500 hours of footage was edited down to create this 95 minute film.

Joan Crawford won an Oscar for her performance in the 1945 film adaptation of James M Cain's novel Mildred Pierce. Now Kate Winslett is playing the title role in Todd Haynes's five part TV version (which is more faithful to Cain's book) about a California divorcee struggling to bring up her imperious daughter, Veda, during the Depression.

Although it was christened by Ezra Pound, Vorticism was a self-consciously British branch of Modernism, reacting to the Italian Futurists. The Tate Britain exhibition The Vorticists: Manifesto for the Modern World gathers together many of the works which appeared in the two shows the Vorticists put on before the movement fizzled out and includes work by Jacob Epstein and Henri Gaudier Brzeska.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b011zkly)
The Light Music Festival

Although many Radio 4 listeners grew up tuning in to light orchestral music, it's now largely been forgotten. Most of us will be still be familiar with at least one very famous piece of light music: 'By The Sleepy Lagoon' - better known as the theme tune to 'Desert Island Discs' and composed by Eric Coates.

When BBC Radio was much slimmer than it is today - made up of just the Home Service, the Light Programme and the Third Programme - listeners tuned in to hear a live concert for the Festival of Light Music. it began in 1953 and was broadcast every June.

With the disappearance of the Light Programme in 1967 when it split into Radios 1 and 2, light music began to disappear from the airwaves. Eventually its only home was a single slot 'Friday Night is Music Night'. So why did such a popular style of music fade away?

The music journalist and broadcaster Paul Morley uses BBC archive to explore light music at its peak, including interviews with some of the major composers of British light music - Eric Coates, Ronald Binge and Ernest Tomlinson. He traces its decline, and looks at its possible resurgence in 2011, with events like the 'Light Fantastic Festival'.

Paul travels to Preston to meet Ernest Tomlinson and takes a tour around the Light Music Society's remarkable archive of thousands of pieces of light music - all rescued by Tomlinson and his daughter Hilary after the BBC and music publishers threw it away.

Paul also meets Christopher Austin at the Royal Academy of Music and the young conductor John Wilson, who is passionate about light music: for him, this music is not about nostalgia but beautifully written miniatures of orchestral music.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b011tw7v)
Plantagenet: Series 2

Richard II - And All Our Dreams Will End in Death

by Mike Walker. Inspired by Holinshed's Chronicles. Richard II, having proved his mettle in quelling the Peasants' Revolt, disappoints his courtiers as he pursues peace and culture as an alternative to fighting and swiving.

'Plantagenet' tells the story of the birth of a new Europe after the dark ages. The issues of control, of freedom, of belief, above all, perhaps, the temptations of power which are so familiar to us now were new to an age which had no template for domination on this scale.

Richard II ..... Patrick Kennedy
Henry Bolingbroke ..... Blake Ritson
Queen Ann ..... Alex Tregear
Gloucester ..... Peter Polycarpou
John of Gaunt ..... Sean Baker
DeVere ..... James Lailey
Burley ..... Stuart McLoughlin
Tyler ..... Simon Bubb
Walworth ..... Daniel Rabin
John Ball ..... Jonathan Forbes
Joan ..... Claire Harry
Welshman ..... Alun Raglan

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer and Jessica Dromgoole.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b011vhwh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Decision Time (b011vg9r)
Nick Robinson goes behind the closed doors of Whitehall and Westminster to ask how controversial decisions are reached.

This week, he and his panel examine the European Court of Human Rights, which has generated controversy with its judgement on prisoner voting. With him to examine the case for changing Britain's relationship with the court are Jack Straw MP, the former Home, Foreign and Justice Secretary who has been leading the criticism of the Court on prisoner voting, Carl Gardner, a former government lawyer, Priti Patel, the Conservative MP, Sir Stephen Wall, the former Permanent Representative to the EU and former chief European adviser the Prime Minister, and Allegra Stratton, political correspondent for the Guardian.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b011tzkx)
Series 25

Semi 2

(11/13)
The evergreen general knowledge music quiz reaches the second semi-final of its 25th anniversary series, with Paul Gambaccini asking the questions.

The three competitors today come from Sussex and the Midlands. They've already won their respective heats, and will be going all-out for a place in the grand Final later this month. As ever, they'll have to answer on the widest possible range of music - encompassing the classics, show tunes, film themes, jazz, rock and pop. Paul will have plenty of musical extracts to illustrate the questions, including old favourites along with a few surprises.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 James Joyce - Blind Date With Bloomsday (b011tynw)
Much quoted but arguably little read, James Joyce's Ulysses is a Modernist classic. Set on June 16th 1904, the author cannily assigned his novel its own annual feast day. Peter White travelled to Dublin on Bloomsday last year to meet the celebrants who enthusiastically enact sections of the book.

Among them - resplendent in boater and blazer - is Irish Senator David Norris, a founder of Dublin's Joyce Centre, explaining how an apparently random string of consonants precisely captures the sound of a breaking wave. But there's also the writer and Irish Times journalist John Waters who's courageous enough to confess that he's only ever managed to get as far as page 35 of Ulysses. "It's more important to Irish tourism", he says, "than to readers".

What Peter White realises is that whilst the text of Ulysses might be dense and difficult on the page, it is in fact perfectly suited to the ear, as radio - filled with gleeful linguistic tricks, puns and jokes and stream of consciousness bawdiness.

Having read Ulysses in Braille, Peter finds out that Joyce was long troubled by eye problems, and that the author's eyesight worsened considerably whilst writing the book when exiled in Zurich. As a blind man himself, Peter is interested to hear how Joyce uses blindness and myopia to great symbolic effect in his work - evoking the whole of Dublin society by emphasising all the senses - sound, touch and smell as much as sight.
Producer Mark Smalley.



SUNDAY 19 JUNE 2011

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b011y46f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nfmks)
Sophie Hannah - The Fantastic Book of Everybody's Secrets

You Are a Gongedip

Three chilling tales from crime writer Sophie Hannah's first short story collection mark her debut on Radio 4. Read by Charles Swift

When William's daily routine is interrupted by an irate woman he vaguely recognises, he is irritated and soon shakes her off. But he vastly underestimates her capacity for revenge.

Producer: Melanie Harris
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011y46h)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011y46k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011y46m)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b011y46p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b011zlcp)
The bells of St. Mary Magdalene, Chewton Mendip, Somerset.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b011vg9t)
Series 2

Steve Jones: The Legacy of Eugenics

Biologist Professor Steve Jones reflects on the legacy of the father of eugenics, Francis Galton, and warns against the danger of overstatement by geneticists.

Four Thought is a series of taks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling.

Recorded live in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b011y46r)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b011zlcr)
Art of Prediction

Mark Tully polishes his crystal ball and, with the help of prophets ancient and modern, ponders the value of prediction. Should we be grateful to those who can see the follies of our ways while we are in the thick of them? And should we be more prepared to listen to their foretellings, even if the news is bad.

In an interview for the programme, Julius Lipner, Professor of Hinduism and the Comparative Study of Religion at Cambridge University, explains the prophetic aspects of Hinduism, where the actions of this life can influence the next. He is sceptical about some of the devices used by soothsayers to ensure that what they say can be interpreted as correct, whatever actually happens. He has some sympathy, though, for those who make predictions and expose themselves to our tendency to 'shoot the messenger' if we don't like the message.

Tully, himself, wonders briefly if there is any point in trying to prophesize what is ahead:'To those who will be alive in the future, our present, and its prophecies will be irrelevant, as they look to their futures.' But, in the end, he comes down very much in favour of contemplating the future consequences of our current actions.

It's unlikely, though, that all our predictions will be as prescient as Friar Roger in the 13th century, quoted in the programme as foreseeing, 'optical instruments, mechanically propelled boats and flying machines'.

Producer: Adam Fowler
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b011zlct)
Agricultural shows act as a shop window for farming. Caz Graham prepares sheep in Cumbria ready to be paraded on display this summer in the hope that they will sell well later in the year.

The Buckles family breed Beltex sheep near Kirkby Stephen in East Cumbria. If the sheep perform well at agricultural shows then their price will increase when it comes to auction time.

But the family is divided - the parents have one flock and their sons another - and this year they will be competing against each other to win a prize at the Great Yorkshire Show.

Presented by Caz Graham. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b011y46t)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b011y46w)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b011zlcw)
Edward Stourton with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories familiar and unfamiliar.

Escalating violence against civilians in Sudan's South Kordofan state is a humanitarian catastrophe in the making; the Archbishop of Canterbury warned this week that it could turn into another Darfur. Edward speaks to Bishop Anthony Pogo of the Southern Sudan about his fears for the region.

Next week the House of Lords start to debate how the re-modelled second chamber will look. But what will its faith make-up be and should the Church of England be the only religion represented? Edward debates with Bishop Tim Stevens, Rabbi Julia Neuberger and Jonathan Bartley.

Edward meets Phillip Pullman who once described himself as a "Church of England Atheist". He will ask him how he turned away from organised religion and about his own spirituality.

Writer Symon Hill is walking from Birmingham to London as a public act of repentance for his youthful homophobia. Trevor Barnes joins him on the first few miles and finds out more about his journey.

The Chief Rabbi Lord Sacks tells Edward about his new book -"The Great Partnership. God, Science and the Search for Meaning" which explores Judaism's relationship with science.

A BBC1 documentary will investigate the sexual abuse by teachers of the Catholic Rosminian order in two schools in the UK and Africa. Reporter Olenka Frienkel tells Edward how after initially supporting the victims, the head of the order is now ignoring their claims for compensation.

The Treasures of Heaven exhibition opens next week at the British Museum. Kati Whitaker explores the relics on show, including the arm of St George!

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b011zlcy)
Book Aid International

Alan Bennett presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Book Aid International.

Donations to Book Aid International should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Book Aid International. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. You can also give online at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Book Aid International with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 313869.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b011y46y)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b011y470)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b011zld0)
Caring in Action

To mark the end of Carers Week, a service from Nazareth House, a Nursing and Residential Home in Cardiff. Worship is led by Sister Margaret Gibbons and the preacher is the Reverend Professor Maurice Scanlon. The Cardiff Polyphonic Choir is directed by Neil Ferris and the Organist is David Geoffrey Thomas. Producer: Sian Baker.


SUN 08:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b011vjj0)
Series 2

Waterton

Squire Waterton of Walton Hall was an eccentric Englishman and gentleman who made many visits to South America and wrote about his travels.

His travel books are "amongst the oddest I know" David Attenborough tells us, written in an odd, almost biblical style. But nevertheless, these books are accounts of natural history two hundred years ago. Attenborough argues that Waterton shouldn't be just remembered for his writing. He should be credited with establishing the first nature reserve in this country.

Appalled by the ravages of the industrial revolution's impact on the landscape, he built a wall around his estate to protect the wildlife - and free of charge allowed people to visit, which they did in their masses.

Written and presented by David Attenborough
Producer: Julian Hector.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b011zld2)
With Patrick O'Connell. News and conversation about the big stories of the week.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b011zld4)
For detailed synopsis, see daily episodes.
Written by ... Mary Cutler
Director ..... Julie Beckett
Editor ... Vanessa Whitburn

David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Josh Archer ..... Cian Cheesbrough
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane ..... Kellie Bright
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Kathy Perks ..... Hedli Niklaus
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'hanrahan
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Hayley Tucker ..... Lorraine Coady
Oliver Sterling ..... Michael Cochrane
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Jazzer Mccreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Usha Franks ..... Souad Faress
Annabelle Shrivener ..... Julia Hills
Harry Mason ..... Michael Shelford
Zofia ..... Izabella Urbanowicz
Spencer Wilkes ..... Johnny Venkman.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b011zld6)
Len Goodman

Kirsty Young's castaway is the international dance judge, Len Goodman.

He became a star of Strictly Come Dancing and the US show Dancing with the Stars, after a forty year career as a ballroom dancer and judge. Born in London's east end, as a kid he was a barrow-boy, selling fruit and veg on his grandfather's stall. He went on to work on the docks as a welder. But come Saturday night he would don his best threads and head for the Embassy ballroom in Welling.

He was in his sixties when he found international fame and it was, he says, perfect timing. "If it had happened when I was thirty, I'd have been one these people that would be seen rolling out of nightclubs drunk, with a couple of dolly-birds on my arm. The pilot was on my sixtieth birthday and I think it was the perfect age because I was sensible by then, my feet were planted firmly on the ground."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b011tzl5)
Series 60

From 13/06/2011

Graham Norton, Jenny Eclair, Paul Merton and Josie Lawrence join chairman Nicholas Parsons for the most devious of panel games. The four panellists are asked by Mr Parsons to speak on subjects he gives them for sixty seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation. A surprisingly taxing task.

This week Graham Norton reveals his thoughts on Internet Dating and How to Make Smalltalk at Parties, Jenny Eclair describes her Favourite Shoes, Josie Lawrence shares her ability to Leave on a High and Paul Merton talks about Plankton and Smoothies.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b011zld8)
Sanjay and the Sardine

Cornish based chef Sanjay Kumar goes on a cooking mission to Italy to save the Cornish sardine.

The pilchard and its young offspring the sardine used to be the basis of a thriving fishing and processing industry in Cornwall. In the late 19th century nearly 20 thousand tonnes of sardine was caught, salted, packed and sent to northern Italy where it was highly prized.

By the end of the 20th century the fish had fallen out of favour. Supplies of the fish were still abundant but consumers had started to switch to more aspirational fish like cod and salmon. Sardines being landed fell below 10 tonnes. Fisherman gave up the profession, boats were destroyed and processing plants closed.

Now with concerns over global stocks, one solution is for more of us to switch to "poorer" more abundant fish species like the sardine and pilchard.

Chef Sanjay Kumar, born in Calcutta and now based in Cornwall, wants to help make that happen. He moved to the county five years ago, fell in love with Cornish food and its fishing traditions.

In May Sanjay travelled to a bi-annual event held in Italy called Slow Fish. It brings together fishermen, chefs, policy experts and fish scientists, all keen to promote small scale, traditional and sustainable forms of fishing. His mission was to use the event to find new ideas to help revive Cornish fishing tradition.

As well as cooking a traditional Italian sardine dish, meeting fellow campaigning chefs, Sanjay also gets to interview the European Union's Fisheries Commissioner, Maria Damanaki. Find out how Sanjay's trip can make a difference to how we all think about fish.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b011y472)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b011zldb)
Shaun Ley presents the latest national and international news, with an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Return to Joujouka (b011zldd)
Neil McCarthy retraces Brian Jones' 1967 journey to Morocco to encounter the first stars of world music- The Master Musicians of Joujouka.

This year the Master Musicians will hypnotize a new audience when they open Glastonbury, but they have been stars on the world stage for more than 40 years now, the first stars of 'world music' in fact. Their trance-like and cacophonous sounds have spread far from their home in the foothills of Morocco's Rif Mountains.

In 1967 their sounds cast a spell on Rolling Stone Brian Jones. Just as they already had over Beat writers like Brion Gysin and William Burroughs, drawn to the exotic and hallucinatory world of Tangiers where the musicians had first played for Westerners. The results of Jones' journey came in 1971- effectively the first 'World Music album' featuring the Master Musicians,' Brian Jones Presents the Pipes of Pan at Joujouka'.

The Rolling Stone took recording engineer George Chkiantz along to capture the essence of this wildly hypnotic music, passed from generation to generation and designed to first entice and then whip you into a frenzy for Bou Jeloud - the Goat God Pan.

Neil McCarthy retraces Jones' journey. Meeting Chkiantz before travelling to Morocco in the company of Frank Rynne, another under Joujouka's spell. There he meets Mohamed Hamri, effectively ambassador for the village musicians, befriending Jones and other Westerners including the woman he would marry, Blanca. His charms persuading her to leave New York's jazz scene far behind for a very different life.

As the night wears on McCarthy finds himself drowned in sound as the Master Musicians summon up the spirit of Bou Jeloud before the dawn finally breaks.

NB. Revised repeat of a feature first broadcast in 2000

Producer Mark Burman.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b011vjhk)
Yorkshire Dales

Pippa Greenwood, Chris Beardshaw and Christine Walkden join Eric Robson for another horticultural discussion.

Anne Swithinbank advises on how to create a garden pond from scratch. Chris Beardshaw explores the flora of limestone pavements.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 GPs Who Need GPS (b00tmj2h)
Doc of the Antarctic

GP Phil Hammond compares his commute to that of Claire Lehman, who travelled to work via Madrid, Santiago and the Falkland Islands before flying into Rothera in the Antarctic.

As she watches for killer whales, carries out postmistress duties, cooks for her colleagues and prepares for potential Antarctic casualties, the differences between this remote job and the life of a typical GP like Phil is brought sharply into focus.

Produced by Lucy Adam.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b011zldj)
LP Hartley - The Hireling

Episode 1

Dramatised by Judith Adams from the novel by L.P.Hartley.

In this 1957 thriller by the author of The Go-Between, L.P.Hartley, ex-Sergeant Stephen Leadbitter, raised from an unhappy working class childhood between the wars, is on a peacetime mission to business success as a chauffeur and car for hire.

He uniformly despises his clients, especially the ladies, until the young, widowed, naive and immensely rich Lady Franklin hires him to take her on trips to cathedrals which she had visited with her late husband. Lady Franklin has been in mourning for her late husband 'a man considerably older than her and an invalid' for two years, and is finding it impossible to return to normal life.

In the confines of the car, and in search of a cure for her depression, she shares her burden with him. He obliges with a story of his own, a fiction, which grows, monster-like, to plague the inventor. Two alien classes are put on a collision course, causing salvation or destruction to all involved, from the epicentre of an unexpected burst of love.

Simon Day (The Simon Day Show (R4), The Fast Show) stars as the lonely damaged anti-hero and Lisa Dillon (Cranford, Bright Young Things) as the hugely rich and very young widow who is the unwitting cause of his downfall. Kenneth Cranham narrates.

Cast:
Narrator ..... Kenneth Cranham
Steve Leadbitter ..... Simon Day
Lady Franklin ..... Lisa Dillon
Hughie ..... Joseph Millson
Constance ..... Ursula Burton
Clarice ..... Nicola Duffett
Simmonds ..... Anthony Gleave
Bert Standing ..... Kevin James
Landlady ..... Jane Purcell
Porter ..... Andrew Cullimore

Producer: Chris Wallis
An Autolycus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b011zldl)
Margaret Drabble, Helen Oyeyemi and Beach Reads

Mariella Frostrup presents.

Margaret Drabble discusses A Day in the Life of a Smiling Woman - the first time her 13 short stories, published between 1966 and 2000, have been put together in one volume

As summer approaches, and with Book At Beachtime about to launch on Radio 4Extra, John Crace - the man behind the Guardian newspaper's Digested Reads - puts forward his thoughts about the best books to read while relaxing on a beach, and stands up for the classics.

And author Helen Oyeyemi on her new novel Mr Fox, a modern day re-telling of the Bluebeard tale, and why - aged 9 - she had to kill off her imaginary friend

Producer: Ella-Mai Robey.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b011zldn)
Roger McGough makes another foray into listeners' poetry requests, and comes up with a selection which largely reflects the season. With guest appearances by contemporary poets Kate Clanchy and Helen Dunmore.

Producer Christine Hall.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b011vf2f)
PFI Profits

For two decades, the Private Finance Initiative has been a controversial way of building new hospitals, schools, roads and prisons. Well over £200bn of taxpayers' money has been committed to the companies managing these projects.
The coalition government describes some PFI contracts as 'ghastly' and wants some of this cash back. One cabinet minister says 'the people on the other side must have been laughing all the way to the bank'.
But, while public services are facing cuts, PFI payments are guaranteed under watertight contracts. So experts say the government can win only small amounts in rebates.
Much of the money has already gone offshore. Huge profits have been made by selling and reselling many contracts in a secretive 'secondary market' - with none of the proceeds returning to the taxpayer.
Gerry Northam investigates gaps in HM Treasury's knowledge of this trade and asks if PFI represents value for public money.
Producer: Rob Cave.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b011zklt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b011y474)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b011y476)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011y478)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b011zlxn)
Sheila McClennon makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

This week on Pick of the Week: MC Millan, Barnsley's newest Sodcaster tries out a bit of Vaughan Williams on the local bus - with mixed results. Sir Stirling Moss on why he's decided now's the time to stop racing competitively. Sarah Millican lends support to a man with a delicate dilemma, and the Hungarian sisters whose father trained them from toddlers to be chess Grand Masters. And another chance to hear some of Christopher Reid's A Scattering - a collection of poems charting love and loss written after the death of his wife.

The Choice - Radio 4
The Infinite Monkey Cage - Radio 4
The Chess Girls - Radio 4
This Is Not Magritte - Radio 4
A Scattering - Radio 4
Twenty Minutes - Emotional Breakdown - Radio 3
The 219 Sodcast Project - Radio 4
Sarah Millican's Support Group - Radio 4
Park Life - Radio 4
Meet David Sedaris - Radio 4
Americana - Radio 4
Lilo - Radio 4
The Day of the Jackal - Radio 4

Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Cecile Wright.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b011zlxq)
Robert and Lynda reflect upon the 25 years they've lived in Ambridge, and decide to host a garden party to celebrate the happy times they've had. Lynda mentions the problem of fundraising for the Britain in Bloom committee, and to her delight Robert suggests they open some village gardens to the public.

Shula invites her mum to lunch to try to distract her from the rift in the family. Jill hopes the fact that Pip's going to work at Lower Loxley over the summer is a sign that Elizabeth is relenting, but Shula's not convinced. Jill becomes concerned when she hears that Freddie has also stopped visiting Topper, But then Shula gets a text from Elizabeth asking if they can meet the next day.

Ruth, Josh and Ben arrive at the Three Counties Show to meet David and celebrate Father's Day. Ruth is pleased to see David looking more relaxed while they discuss Pip's exams, which are almost over. However, when they return to Brookfield David discovers a letter from Elizabeth. He is horrified to learn that she is changing her will, removing him and Ruth as Freddie and Lily's guardians.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b011zlxs)
As President Obama travels the country hoping to inspire job creation, Americana examines the changing fortunes of American cities from Omaha, Nebraska to Fresno, California.

Presenter Adam Brookes talks to Jennifer Grant, about her famously charismatic father Cary and about life as a Hollywood kid.

Jeffery Deaver tries to explain how an American author such as himself could dare to take on the challenge of writing new episodes in the James Bond series,

And pianist Monty Alexander traces the surprising connections between Jamaican reggae and American jazz.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00nmt7y)
Tales From the Low Countries

In Landlocked Frontiers

Georges Hausemer is one of Luxembourg's most prolific writers, having published more than a dozen novels, short stories and poetry collections.

Read by Michael Pennington
Translated by Michael Hoffman
Produced by Emma Harding.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b011vjhf)
Roger Bolton encounters a sticky problem on You and Yours after listeners question the validity of a nine minute report on a doughnut manufacturer. You and Yours editor Andrew Smith defends the decision.

Radio 3 devotee Chris Newman joins Roger for a behind the scenes visit to a live broadcast and find out some of the unexpected things that can go wrong during a performance.

And 25,000 of you submitted your Desert Island Discs - so why were only five listeners' stories featured in a special programme celebrating the public's favourite discs? Desert Island Discs editor Alice Feinstein explains why- and says she hopes there's more to come.

Contact the Feedback team to let Roger know what you'd like him to tackle this series about anything you've heard on BBC radio.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b011vjhm)
Albertina Sisulu, MF Husain, Patrick Leigh Fermor and John Mackenzie

Jane Little on:

Albertina Sisulu, whose contribution to the end of apartheid in South Africa led to her being called The Mother of the Nation.

Adventurer, travel writer, and war hero Sir Patrick Leigh Fermor.

TV and film director John MacKenzie, best known for The Long Good Friday.

Carl Gardner, singer and founder of the 1950s hitmakers, The Coasters.

And the 'Picasso of India', prolific artist MF Husein.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b011zklc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b011zlcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b011tzlf)
Egypt's New Islamists

Edward Stourton asks if the Egyptian revolution spells the end of old-style Islamism. As groups like the Muslim Brotherhood embrace democracy, how will they - and Egypt - change?

The overthrow of Hosni Mubarak has been described as the Middle East's first "post-Islamic" revolution: there were no religious slogans or chanting in Tahrir Square and the protestors we saw on television were largely young, seemingly secular liberals. But Islam is likely to play a major role in the development of post-revolution Egypt, with the Muslim Brotherhood the biggest and best organised political force in the country.

Edward Stourton asks what kind of society Egypt's Islamists want to create and explores how they are changing as they form political parties and prepare to contest their first fully democratic elections.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b011zlxv)
Carolyn Quinn talks to the Economist's political correspondent about the big political stories including threats of strikes over changes to public sector pensions and plans for a White Paper on public services.

The MPs panel features a Conservative, Priti Patel, and Labour's Katy Clark. They discuss the Labour Party's attitude to strikes and calls for changes to the law on industrial action. They also comment on speculation that the government may back down on plans to change the retirement age for women.

There is a report on the Speaker John Bercow. Why does he have detractors on the Conservative benches? We hear from Conservative MPs, a biographer of Mr Bercow and a Parliamentary sketchwriter.

What are the prospects for co operation between members of the Labour and Liberal Democrat parties? We hear from Neil Lawson who heads a Labour campaign group, Compass, and a leading Liberal Democrat supporter of co operation between the two parties, Professor Richard Grayson.

Programme editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b011zlxx)
Episode 57

Dennis Sewell of The Spectator analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b011vjhp)
Topping the bill in this week's Film Programme are Kevin Macdonald and Brendan Gleeson. Macdonald discusses his extraordinary documentary, Life in a Day, which he quarried from more than eighty thousand clips submitted via the internet and Gleeson offers insights into Gerry Boyle, the quirky Connemara cop he plays in John McDonagh's The Guard. Francine Stock also talks to the critic, Jane Graham, about Edinburgh's International Film Festival which opened this week and invites the film historian Pasquale Iannone to reflect on Paolo Sorrentino, one of Italy's modern masters.

Producer: Zahid Warley.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b011zlcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 20 JUNE 2011

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b011y47x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b011vg9h)
HG Wells, Utopias, Paraphernalia

HG Wells was so involved in establishing sociology in this country that he wrote to Prime Minister Balfour to ask for a special endowment so he could give up on his novels. His emphasis was on utopias, he felt that social science could only progress if an ideal version of society was created with which to compare our own. He lost his battle but the sociologist Ruth Levitas tells Laurie that sociology has become boring and that Wells was right!
Also, some everyday things - keys, combs, glasses - have the ability to enchant or absorb. Laurie Taylor talks to Steven Connor and Michael Bywater about how paraphernalia can have an almost magical power.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b011zlcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011y47z)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011y481)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011y483)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b011y485)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011zm10)
With Quaker and author, Alastair McIntosh.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b011zm12)
There are demands for farmers to stop using as many antibiotics in their animals. Dr Mark Holmes is a lecturer in veterinary medicine from the University of Cambridge and says that the government needs to bring in new regulations to govern the use of antibiotics in farming. He claims that this would take pressure off production and raise the price of milk.

There will be a shortage of hay this year. That's according to the Hay and Straw merchants association which warns many fields harvested so far are only yielding 30% of their potential, following the driest spring for a generation. Ruth Sanderson went to meet Roly Fenwick - President of the Straw and Hay association - who says that this year's hay yield will depend on what the weather will do in the next week.

There are new calls for Chinese lanterns to be banned. Alan Buckwell is the policy Director at the Country Land Business Association and says that they are causing huge amounts of damage each year, and the problem is not getting any better.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


MON 05:57 Weather (b011y487)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b011zm14)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Justin Webb:
08:10 Older peoples' basic human rights are being overlooked when they are cared for at home in England, according to an interim report by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.
08:30 The BBC's John Simpson meets Burma's democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi.
08:49 Is Afghanistan a war without end?


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b011zm16)
Andrew Marr talks to Tim Harford about the key to success. The 'undercover economist' argues that the fear of failure paradoxically leads to greater and more dangerous failures - from oil disasters to world conflict. Success in parliament is often mercurial, but the new Director of the Institute for Government and former Labour Minister, Andrew Adonis believes the pool of talent for the top jobs is too small, and that Ministers should be better prepared for their role. Priyamvada Gopal argues that university education is becoming one of the country's biggest failures. She believes the humanities have been denigrated, as consecutive governments have emphasised the value of work, over knowledge. And Eli Pariser explores the world of internet personalisation in which your every move is tracked and individual choices assessed: he warns that it's the end of objective news and the free exchange of ideas.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b011zm18)
Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit

Episode 1

Ian Leslie traces the line from the great apes - who are no mean liars themselves - to humans and documents studies which suggest that becoming human wasn't a simple evolutionary process of the best forager and builder surviving, but the building blocks came from our social contacts and our understanding of deceit.

Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidential election, was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian, the Times and the BBC. He also blogs about all these things at Marbury, named one of the fifty 'Most Powerful' blogs in the world by the Observer.

'Consistently startling and fascinating. Most popular psychology books follow a depressingly familiar path: there's some dodgy theorising at the beginning, then a raft of dubious statistics with a few anecdotes to back them up. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light.' - 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail

Written by Ian Leslie
Abridged by Pete Nichols

Reader: Tim McInnerny

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011zm1b)
Presented by Jane Garvey. Is crying in the office really a sign of weakness? We talk to an occupational health psychologist who's researched workplace tears. Shortlisted Orange prize author Kathleen Winter discusses her first novel Annabel in which the central character is born as an inter-sex person. Her book also features as the drama on Woman's Hour this week. Latest figures on abortions carried out in England and Wales show a rise in the number performed on women over forty - we discuss the possible reasons and the challenges facing women making this decision. Song-writer Emmy the Great performs live and talks about how the breaking off of her engagement influenced her latest album.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b011zm1d)
Annabel

Episode 1

Kathleen Winter's compelling debut novel is the moving story of a child born as both a girl and a boy, growing up in the Canadian wilderness

In 1968, a mysterious child is born into the bleakly beautiful environment of remote coastal Labrador: a baby with both male and female sex organs. Only three people share the secret - the baby's parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and a trusted neighbour, Thomasina. Together the adults make a difficult decision: to go through surgery and raise the child as a boy named Wayne.

But as Wayne grows up within the masculine, Labradorian hunting culture of men such as father, his shadow-self - a girl he thinks of as 'Annabel' - is never entirely extinguished. As Wayne approaches adulthood, the woman inside him begins to cry out. The changes that follow are momentous not just for him, but for the three adults that have guarded his secret.

CAST:

Narrator ..... Buffy Davis
Thomasina ..... Genevieve Adam
Jacinta ..... Madeleine Sims-Fewer
Treadway ..... Simon Lee Phillips
Eliza ..... Gwenneth Holmes
Joan ..... Teresa Gallagher
Wayne ..... Kristopher Bosch
Young Wayne ..... Amelia Clarkson
Young Wally ..... Jessica Little
Derek Warford/ Dr Ho ..... Jason Durran
Steve/ Dr Lioukras ..... Christopher Bailey
Roland/ Dr Carr ..... Simon Bubb

Adapted for radio by Emma Harding and Miranda Davies

Directed by Emma Harding

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Kathleen Winter has written dramatic and documentary scripts for Sesame Street and CBC Television. Her first collection of short stories, boYs, was the winner of both the Winterset Award and the Metcalf-Rooke Award. A long-time resident of St. John's, Newfoundland, she now lives in Montreal. Annabel has been shortlisted for the 2011 Orange Prize for Fiction.


MON 11:00 When Wesley Went to Winchester (b011zm1g)
In 1970, broadcaster Wesley Kerr was awarded a County Bursary to study at the prestigious public school Winchester College. Over forty years later, he opens the gates of memory and attends a special reunion to find out what happened to the other bursary boys and explores the scheme's attempts at 'social engineering.'

From a working class background, Wesley was a black foster child growing up in Hampshire. With the odds against him, he passed the exam and interview and took the opportunity that was presented to him, later becoming BBC's television news' first black reporter and later Royal correspondent. His early success even made the national press - one newspaper headlined 'Coloured Boy Wins place at Public School'. For Wesley and many of these boys, they were parachuted into a new life at one of Britain's top public schools.

The national bursary scheme, initiated by Winston Churchill, MP Rab Butler and Lord Fleming, ran from 1947 to 1974, after a request by Churchill that a quarter of public schools places were to be taken by state school boys and were funded by the local education authority. A number of other schools such as Eton and Rugby also gave bursaries.

At the unique springtime reunion, Wesley meets over thirty former pupils, who include a former judge, the man who's designing the new Routemaster bus and the Bishop of Gibraltar. With stories of strange accents, public school pranks and those who struggled to fit into an alien environment, Wesley hears how the experience gave them new opportunities and shaped their lives.

Producer: Tamsin Barber

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


MON 11:30 When the Dog Dies (b00s7f9r)
Series 1

Spying Is Believing

Grandad Sandy has started snooping on his daughter-in-law Victoria, hiding in a car boot and climbing a tree. With Ronnie Corbett and Liza Tarbuck. From May 2010.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b011zm1j)
Our national tourism agency, Visit Britain, unveils its latest international TV ad campaign

We report on fears that academies - very much the centrepiece of education policy - will be reluctant to admit children with special educational needs.

And the man who thinks we can have too much technology - how one man dumped his smartphone in a rubbish bin to stop it taking over his life.


MON 12:57 Weather (b011y489)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b011zm1l)
With Martha Kearney. National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:30 Counterpoint (b011zm1n)
Series 25

Episode 12

(12/13)
Which British songwriter connects Petula Clark's 'Downtown' with the themes from the TV soaps 'Crossroads' and 'Neighbours'?

Paul Gambaccini has the answer to this and many other musical teasers, as he chairs the third semi-final in the current series of the long-running music quiz. The three contestants are each aiming for the one remaining place in next week's grand Final, to stand a chance of becoming the 25th Counterpoint champion.

As usual the questions cover every genre of music, from the classical repertoire through film and show tunes, light music, jazz, and sixty years of the pop charts.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b011zlxq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00hvgbt)
Brett Goldstein - Success Story

When Ray's low-budget film is picked up by a major studio his dreams of Hollywood start to become a reality. Then, holed up in a hotel room doing endless publicity interviews, he finds the past coming back to bite him. By Brett Goldstein.

Ray ..... Geoffrey Streatfeild
Tara ..... Caroline Catz
Emily ..... Sasha Pick
Kristen ..... Laurel Lefkow

Directed by Toby Swift.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b011zkly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 The Completists (b00xp1fm)
Episode 1

The word 'completist' was coined in the 1950s and was originally applied to collectors who aspired to own an entire set of records by a particular artist (usually a jazz musician). But now completists come in many different forms with different ambitions. Ian Marchant meets five "completists" - each of them driven by the need to tick off the entire collection.
The internet has revolutionised everything for this group dragging them out of their cellars, kitchens, bedrooms and sheds and into web forums, specialist chatrooms and onto the blogosphere to exchange opinions, tips and secrets with whole tribes of fellow completists. The opportunities to complete their goal are more available because of global communication but the logistics are harder and the goal posts are higher.
Ian Marchant, a former Charing Cross Road bookseller, is an old friend and admirer of completists. He recalls the story of one book collector who regularly asked for a particular volume habitually adding '...but you won't have it.' When the book (at last and amazingly) turned up, the collector refused to buy it because, once he owned it, he'd no longer have a reason to live.
Ian's completism? He owns all the records of Brinsley Schwarz. It took him ten years to find a copy of their first album and it turned out to be lousy.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b011zld8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b011zm32)
Series 4

Is Cosmology Really a Science?

Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined on stage by V for Vendetta author and legendary comic book writer Alan Moore, cosmologist Ed Copeland, and science broadcaster Dallas Campbell to ask whether Cosmology is really a science? Do scientific theories need to be testable to make them, well - scientific? And if so, where does that leave some of the more mind-bending theories that Cosmology has postulated over the last few years? From String Theory to the idea of multiple universes, the maths might work, but if there is no way of observing whether it is correct, is it science or science fiction? Does Cosmology have more in common with the fantastical stories dreamt up by fiction writers such as Alan Moore, and will science ever progress enough to really get to the bottom of some of the more weird and wonderful theories about the way our universe works? This programme was recorded as part of the Cheltenham Science Festival.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 17:00 PM (b011zm34)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011y48c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b011zm36)
Series 60

Episode 6

Stephen Fry, Sue Perkins, Paul Merton and Fi Glover are the panellists on this, the final show of the series. Chairman Nicholas Parsons hands out subjects on which the panellists attempt to speak for sixty seconds without being buzzed by fellow players of the game.

This week Stephen Fry speaks on The Right Way to Greet Someone and Fi Glover speaks on The Wrong Way to Greet Someone, Paul Merton declaims on the American Dream and Sue Perkins reveals she is less than loyal to the idea of Loyalty Cards.

This week both Sue Perkins and Stephen Fry achieve the coveted aim of speaking for a whole minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation. A task much more testing than it sounds.

The programme was devised by Ian Messiter.

The producer was Claire Jones.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b011zm38)
Brian and Jennifer have taken Ruairi to look around the boarding school they'd like him to attend. Both Brian and Ruairi are really taken with the place, but Jennifer's reserved since she stands to lose both Phoebe and Ruairi at the same time. Brian tries to convince her that the change will leave them with more time to spend together. But after finally finishing her book club choice 'Mistress of the Paddocks' Jennifer becomes mysteriously cold with him.

Elizabeth calls on Shula to ask her and Alistair to replace Ruth and David as her children's guardians. Shula is appalled by Elizabeth's decision, but has no option but to agree, however awkward it makes her feel.

Shula visits David to apologise, and sees how much Elizabeth's bombshell has upset their brother. When they're alone, Ruth attempts to cheer David up but he is inconsolable, believing he's ruined his family and his father's legacy. Ruth determines to speak to Elizabeth, but David tells her there's nothing she or anybody else can do to rectify the situation now.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b011zm3b)
Bridesmaids reviewed; Stephen Frears at 70; Folkestone Triennial

With Mark Lawson.

As film director Stephen Frears celebrates his 70th birthday, he looks back on his illustrious career and discusses how Palace insiders indicated that he got The Queen spot on. He also talks about what he calls the crisis in American acting, and why being a film director can be bad for your character.

Mark reports from Folkestone, which is preparing for its second festival which sees art placed around the town. Andrea Schlieker, curator of the Folkestone Triennial, gives Mark a tour of exhibits which include a bell suspended 20 metres in the air by the shoreline and 100 miniature boats hanging from a church ceiling. Mark also meets the Folkestone woman who responded to an advert in the local paper saying: Wanted - one mermaid, any shape or size.

The new film Bridesmaids focuses on a group of woman in the run-up to a wedding. Saturday Night Live regular Kristin Wiig both co-wrote and co-stars in it, and it's produced by Judd Apatow, who has made his name with comedies largely centred on groups of men. Antonia Quirke gives her verdict.

Producer Jack Soper.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b011zm1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Root of All Evil: Christianity and Money (b011zm3d)
Episode 2

Giles Fraser tells the story of how Christians came to have such mixed feelings about a subject we all obsess about: money.

Giles is the Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral. As well as being responsible for the Cathedral's money, his job is to reach out to the people who work in the City of London. But with Jesus' instructions to give up all worldly goods, what can Giles say to people earning millions of pounds a year? At what point does profit become immoral? And what can the Church of England as a whole say to the financial community, when itself has hundreds of millions of pounds on the stock market? Is that why the Church went rather quiet during the credit crunch?

In this second programme Giles uncovers how, over the centuries, the church changed its mind about money. From it's origins as a religion based on ideals of poverty, the medieval church grew to be the richest institution Europe had known.

But at the heart of the church's changing attitude to money is the Reformation, which whilst starting as a rebellion against the riches of the medieval church, relaxed laws on usury and opened the way for today's capitalism. Giles talks to historian Niall Ferguson and to Lord Griffiths, Vice President of Goldman Sachs and a committed Christian, to explore how the Reformation paved the way for our attitudes to money today.

Producer: Jane Greenwood
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b011zm3g)
Hague's Middle East

"The eruption of democracy movements across the Middle East and North Africa is, even in its early stages, the most important development of the early 21st century." These were the words of Foreign Secretary William Hague May 2011. Events from Cairo to Benghazi have shaken the very foundations of the Middle East, and with it the West's longstanding friendships with Arab dictators. But what will happen next?

In this week's Analysis, Edward Stourton meets Foreign Secretary Hague and explores the map of the new Middle East as seen from London, Washington and Brussels. Amid the talk of massive economic investment, customs unions, and a newfound support for democratic transition, what will really change in terms of Western relations with the Middle East?

The "Arab Spring" came just as the world began to recover from the 2008 crash -- with oil prices already high. Edward looks at how the economic pressures will shape our policy, and explores divisions within the EU -- with some nations afraid of opening up to the Arab world, while others are pushing for it.

Support for Israel has long been a cornerstone of Western interests in the region, but recent comments by British leaders and the US President about "1967 borders" have left many in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv seething. In the new Middle East, what future do Britain and the US see for Israel and the Palestinians -- and will it change things enough to make a difference?

Western foreign policy on the Middle East has been through massive convulsions -- from die-hard "realism" that saw close relations with dictators to the "neo-conservatism" that called for the invasion of Iraq. So what is now driving our new vision for the region?


MON 21:00 Material World (b011vhdh)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. This week he hears about: plans to drill the ocean floor to study climate, disasters and life underground; advanced technologies for the planes of the future; the influx of science words being added to the Oxford English Dictionary and why, what and when we dream.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b011zm16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b011y48f)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b011zm45)
President Assad of Syria calls protestors 'saboteurs' but promises reform.

How will care of the elderly have to change into the future?

And the tramp in Utah who has inherited a fortune.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011zm47)
Three Stations

Episode 6

Written by Martin Cruz Smith. Abridged by Jane Marshall.

Renko is approached by an oligarch who has fallen on hard times and discovers that even multimillionaires have their problems in modern day Moscow. And we find out what has happened to Maya's baby.

Read by Philip Jackson

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b011vh4y)
Instant Gratification

Cheap credit and immediate online access to infinite availability have contributed to one of the defining characteristics of our time - the 'have it all' culture of being able to instantly gratify our wants and needs. But at what cost?

Dominic Arkwright explores the pleasures and pitfalls of instant gratification in the company of three speakers from very different walks of life. Representing the complete antithesis of the quick hit, tapestry weaver Jane Freear-Wyld shows Dominic a textile the size of a paperback, explaining how it takes 250 hours, or six working weeks, to make. Hers is a world away from the work of advertising creative director Matt Beaumont who arguably fuels our lust for not only jam today, but yesterday and tomorrow too. Meanwhile, Times columnist and writer Sathnam Sanghera, recently returned from a holiday in Mumbai, argues that it's the recent shift towards instant gratification that is fuelling India's rapidly rising standard of living, very different to an ethos that promises fulfilment neither now nor in in this life at all, but in the next one.
Producer Mark Smalley.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011zm49)
The Work and Pensions Secretary tells the Commons he is to stick to his timetable to raise and equalise the age when men and women can claim the state pension.
A number of MPs fear the move will be unfair to thousands of women in their mid to late 50s who will have to wait another 18 months, even two years, before they get their pension.
A former Foreign Secretary, Labour's Jack Straw, says the Euro is facing a "slow death" as the Greek debt crisis worsens.
And peers tell the Government it should take steps to encourage more people from ethnic minorities to go to the UK's top universities.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 21 JUNE 2011

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b011y490)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b011zm18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011y492)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011y494)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011y496)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b011y498)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011zmpv)
With Quaker and author, Alastair McIntosh.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b011zmpx)
As Wimbledon begins Anna Hill hears how British cattle are used to make tennis strings. Gut strings are making a comeback and Roger Federer, Serena and Venus Williams now all use gut to string their racquets.

Farming Today is told by one of the country's largest conservation charities that EU budget cuts could penalise wildlife. As the EU budget is prepared the RSPB claim that money for environmental schemes is in the firing line.

And while some rain may now have fallen, it has come too late for the first hay harvest, and the British Horse Society warn that horse owners across the country are running out of hay to feed their animals.

Presenter: Anna Hill
Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 06:00 Today (b011zmpz)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Evan Davis, including:
08:10 Business editor Robert Peston examines the prospect of Greece defaulting on its debts.
08:20 The government is to abandon its proposed changes to sentencing guidelines in England and Wales.
07:41 Dave Lee Travis on Aung San Suu Kyi's revelation that his show made her "world much more complete".


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b011zmq1)
Super Injunctions and William Hone

Jonathan Freedland returns with a new series of The Long View, the programme that sheds old light on new stories. This week Jonathan looks at super-injunctions through the trial of William Hone, scurrilous gossip and high-minded political campaigner.

In the early 19th century, Hone used the communications technology of his day - pamphlets and cartoons - to keep one step ahead of the libel laws, whether over allegations of sexual impropriety among the royals or political corruption. As with today, the message proliferated far ahead of the law's ability to keep up with it. Pamphlets were printed and passed with such speed the authorities struggled to track the source or arrest the perpetrators.

Join Jonathan Freedland and guests for the Long View of public gossip, political freedom and the way communications technology challenges the law.

Image: Detail of 'Economy': Lord Brougham as John Bull, calling on the Prince Regent (later George IV) to retrench and curb his extravagance and to think of the people. Sitting next to the Regent is his mistress, Lady Hertford. Cartoon by George Cruikshank, London 1816.


TUE 09:30 Britain's Labs (b00shrlz)
Rothamsted Research

Presented by Prof Iain Stewart.

Rothamsted Research is the oldest agricultural research centre in the world. It has planted wheat experiments that have been running since the 1840s.

But these days, amid worries over food security, scientists are being asked to redouble their efforts to make crops more productive and cheaper, and more sustainable to grow.

Their approach is often genetic - looking to use genetic investigation into plants to identify ways in which their cropping or resistance to pests can be enhanced. This use of GM as a 'tool' in experiment has been very successful. But the use of genetically modified crops is currently banned in Britain - something the scientists discuss.

Producer: Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b0122vx4)
Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit

Episode 2

Children learn deceit very early in their lives, but they are not very good at it. Then, at roughly between the ages of three and a half and four and a half, something changes. Ian Leslie explains how children's deceit becomes more sophisticated and the social processes that change (or sometimes not) their behaviour for the better.

Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidential election, was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian, the Times and the BBC. He also blogs about all these things at Marbury, named one of the fifty 'Most Powerful' blogs in the world by the Observer.

'Consistently startling and fascinating. Most popular psychology books follow a depressingly familiar path: there's some dodgy theorising at the beginning, then a raft of dubious statistics with a few anecdotes to back them up. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light.' - 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail

Written by Ian Leslie
Abridged by Pete Nichols

Reader: Tim McInnerny

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011zmq3)
Presented by Jane Garvey. As the Football Association approves mixed teams for 13 year olds, we discuss whether girls benefit from playing football with boys. Should hospitals continue to provide formula milk for newborn babies? 20 year old Bahraini student and poet Ayat al-Qarmezi has just been sentenced to a year in prison by a military court. She was arrested for reading poems at a pro-democracy rally in which she criticised the ruling family in Bahrain and asked for transparency in her country's governance. The life and times of a leading campaigner for women's rights, Constance Lloyd, wife of Oscar Wilde.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f9)
Annabel

Episode 2

Kathleen Winter's compelling debut novel is the moving story of a child born as both a girl and a boy, growing up in the Canadian wilderness.

In 1968, a mysterious child is born into the bleakly beautiful environment of remote coastal Labrador: a baby with both male and female sex organs. Only three people share the secret - the baby's parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and a trusted neighbour, Thomasina. Together the adults make a difficult decision: to go through surgery and raise the child as a boy named Wayne.

But as Wayne grows up within the masculine, Labradorian hunting culture of men such as father, his shadow-self - a girl he thinks of as 'Annabel' - is never entirely extinguished. As Wayne approaches adulthood, the woman inside him begins to cry out.

In today's episode, Thomasina faces up to the deaths of her husband and daughter, Annabel, while Jacinta reluctantly takes her baby in for surgery.

CAST:

Narrator ..... Buffy Davis
Thomasina ..... Genevieve Adam
Jacinta ..... Madeleine Sims-Fewer
Treadway ..... Simon Lee Phillips
Eliza ..... Gwenneth Holmes
Joan ..... Teresa Gallagher
Wayne ..... Kristopher Bosch
Young Wayne ..... Amelia Clarkson
Young Wally ..... Jessica Little
Derek Warford/ Dr Ho ..... Jason Durran
Steve/ Dr Lioukras ..... Christopher Bailey
Roland/ Dr Carr ..... Simon Bubb

Adapted for radio and directed by Emma Harding

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Kathleen Winter has written dramatic and documentary scripts for Sesame Street and CBC Television. Her first collection of short stories, boYs, was the winner of both the Winterset Award and the Metcalf-Rooke Award. A long-time resident of St. John's, Newfoundland, she now lives in Montreal. Annabel has been shortlisted for the 2011 Orange Prize for Fiction.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b011zmq5)
Series 2

Episode 9

9/30 As part of our mini-series "Citizen Conservation", produced and presented by Sarah Pitt, we feature the conservation of Dormice. In woods up and down the country local conservation groups are taking responsibility for monitoring and managing the habitat and nest sites of these small mammals. Together with sophisticated annual counts of their population, the expert placement of nest boxes and management of their woodland habitat - who are these conservationists? How much do we rely on our community of amateur naturalists to look after our natural heritage? We hear that looking after scrubland is one of the most important measures to look after this creature.

We continue our reporting of seabirds with a a piece recorded on location on Canna near the Isle of Skye by Bob Swann on Manx Shearwater.

And we hope to bring you Large Blue Butterflies.

Presenter: Brett Westwood
Producer: Mary Colwell
Editor: Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Dr Seuss and the Butter Battles (b011zmq7)
"...most of my books don't carry heavy morals. The morals sneak in, as they do in all drama. Every story's got to have a winner, so I happen to make the good guys win... it's probably a pretty dirty thing I'm doing. When I do it, though, I don't consider it propaganda; I consider it making sense." - Dr Seuss

Twenty years on from his death, Theodor 'Dr Seuss' Geisel remains one of the best-loved children's authors in America. Famed for his witty and often subversive stories such as, 'The Cat in the Hat' and 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas!' his whimsical characters and playful rhymes are deeply embedded in American childhoods and those of children around the world. However, few readers are aware of the surprising political subtext to many of his tales.

One of Geisel's earliest jobs was as a political cartoonist for the left-wing newspaper PM in the 1940s. These cartoons reveal the beginnings of a Seussian universe - prototypes of Yertle the Turtle and the Cat in the Hat sit alongside images of Hitler and Charles Lindbergh - attacked with artistic fervour and biting wit.

Despite the move to children's literature, Dr Seuss' political sympathies still bubbled under the surface of his innocuous sounding rhymes where his cast of characters rallied against anti-Semitism, fascism, the arms race and environmental recklessness. With contributions from his former editor Michael Frith, the writers Michael Rosen and Giles Andreae and the political cartoonist Dave Brown we explore the political passions of Dr Seuss.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b011zmq9)
Is streaming young pupils the best way to help them in class? One in six UK children is being streamed according to their ability by the age of seven, according to research by the Institute of Education. It suggests the oldest children in the year are more likely to be in the top classes. But critics say it has a negative effect on those in the bottom streams. So what is the best way to deal with mixed abilities? Do brighter pupils help motivate those needing to go at a slower pace? Is there a risk of labelling pupils a failure before they even turn eight? And where children are split into streams, how important is it to keep reviewing their progress - so they don't get demoralised? If you're a parent, teacher or pupil we'd like to hear from you. Call You and Yours with Julian Worricker. Your chance to share your views on the programme. Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk, text 84844 and we may call you back or call 03700 100 444 (lines open at 10am Tuesday).


TUE 12:57 Weather (b011y49b)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b011zmqc)
National and international news, with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:30 Free Wales Harmony: When Pop Went Welsh (b011zmqf)
Andy Votel is a DJ, producer and record label boss from Manchester who first found fame setting up Twisted Nerve Records, home to the singer Badly Drawn Boy. Obsessed with collecting records, today Andy runs Finders Keepers, a record company which specialises in releasing non-English language pop music from all over the world. About 9 years ago, in a charity shop, he stumbled across a collection of vinyl which he'd never seen or heard before. Not able to place the language, he initially guessed it was Icelandic, Breton or Hungarian. But on closer inspection it turned out the records were made less than a hundred miles from his house. These unidentified spinning objects were from Wales.
From that moment on Andy's world was opened up to whole discography of idiosyncratic pop music. Girl-groups, close harmony pop, Acid Folk, Prog Rock, concept albums, pop poetry, indie rock and DIY punk. And to his amazement he discovered that - outside of Wales - this very cool music scene had been virtually ignored. Researching further in to his new found obsession, Andy discovered the story behind the songs was just as intriguing as the music: a tale of passion, politics, poetry, oppression, triumph and a bloody good disco!
In this Radio 4 documentary Andy reveals a cultural revolution that happened on our doorsteps and the music that made it sing. A struggle to save a dying language that involves protest, prison, Mabinogion concepts, the Royal family, cottage burning and even the death of Jimi Hendrix. With contributions from Super Furry Animals' Gruff Rhys, Cerys Matthews, Dafydd Iwan, Heather Jones, Meic Stevens and Geraint Jarman amongst others.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b011zm38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b011zmqh)
A Terrible Beauty

The poet WB Yeats travels to propose to legendary beauty Maud Gonne soon after her husband was executed by the British in the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin.

by David Pownall

with original music composed and performed by Max Pownall

YEATS...............JOHN KAVANAGH
MAUD............. .FIONA VICTORY
YSEULT................LYDIA WILSON
ELSIE...............JANE WHITTENSHAW

Directed by Peter Kavanagh

Irish patriot John MacBride was shot by the British after the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin. His estranged English wife, Maud Gonne, actress, fanatical Irish republican and famous beauty, was in Paris helping nurse war casualties at the time. Forbidden by the British from returning to Ireland to fight for the cause, she went to the coast of Normandy for the summer with her children and there she was visited by Yeats who had been in love with her for many years.
With him he brought the draft of a poem in which MacBride is attacked for his private behaviour but praised for what his sacrifice will achieve in sanctifying the struggle. Over many weeks Yeats pleads with Maud to marry him now she is free, reading his poem to her as he works on improving it. Why, she asks, is Ireland's greatest poet doing the job of the British press in vilifying John MacBride, a national hero? But will Yeats change his poem, realising doing so will greatly increase the chances of his proposal?


TUE 15:00 Making History (b011zmqk)
Fiona Watson presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b011zmqw)
New Welsh Writing from Ty Newydd

A Very Private View

Ty Newydd, near Snowdonia, is the National Writing Centre for Wales as well as being the former home of Lloyd George. These three stories were created there on a Writing for Radio course, and showcase both new and established Welsh writers.

In A Very Private View, a young man in Vienna keeps company with one of the city's most famous doctors. Peter Taylor's story is read by Ioan Gruffudd.

Director Nigel Lewis
Executive Producer: Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


TUE 15:45 The Completists (b00y203z)
Episode 2

The word 'completist' was coined in the 1950s and was originally applied to collectors who aspired to own an entire set of records by a particular artist (usually a jazz musician). But now completists come in many different forms with different ambitions. Ian Marchant meets five "completists" - each of them driven by the need to tick off the entire collection.
The internet has revolutionised everything for this group dragging them out of their cellars, kitchens, bedrooms and sheds and into web forums, specialist chatrooms and onto the blogosphere to exchange opinions, tips and secrets with whole tribes of fellow completists. The opportunities to complete their goal are more available because of global communication but the logistics are harder and the goal posts are higher.
Ian Marchant, a former Charing Cross Road bookseller, is an old friend and admirer of completists. He recalls the story of one book collector who regularly asked for a particular volume habitually adding '...but you won't have it.' When the book (at last and amazingly) turned up, the collector refused to buy it because, once he owned it, he'd no longer have a reason to live.
Ian's completism? He owns all the records of Brinsley Schwarz. It took him ten years to find a copy of their first album and it turned out to be lousy.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b011zmqy)
The New Business of Law

The liberalisation of the legal services market in the autumn has been described as the sectors 'big bang' comparable with the deregulation of financial services in the eighties.

Change might not come overnight but the legal landscape will see a huge shift in the next five to ten years with new players coming into the market and some firms going out of business. Co-op is already staking it's claim - trialling legal services in branches of Britannia building society and smaller law firms are banding together to form countrywide chains, seeing strength in numbers.

t is the result of the Legal Services Act introduced by the last government and it aims to increase competition, make services better for consumers and improve access to justice. But those hostile to the changes believe that a drive for profit compromises lawyers professional ethics and will drive down standards.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b011zms3)
Laura Solon and Fleur Adcock

Harriett Gilbert discusses favourite paperbacks with writer Fleur Adcock and comedian Laura Solon. Their choices include a modern classic by Evelyn Waugh and two coming-of-age novels, one set in France and the other in the north of England.

Harriett Gilbert's choice: The Greengage Summer by Rumer Godden
Publ. Pan

Laura Solon's choice: Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh
Publ. Penguin Modern

Fleur Adcock's choice: Bilgewater by Jane Gardam
Publ. Abacus Books

Producer Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


TUE 17:00 PM (b011zms5)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011y49d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Sarah Millican's Support Group (b010y7bp)
Series 2

2. 'I think I'm addicted to plastic surgery'

"I think I'm addicted to plastic surgery"

"My retired Dad has more of a social life than me - how can I get him to swap stripping for slippers?"

Sarah Millican is a life counsellor and modern-day agony aunt tackling the nation's problems head on, dishing out real advice for real people.

Assisted by her very own team of experts of the heart - man of the people local cabbie Terry, and self qualified counsellor Marion,

Sarah tackles the nation's problems head on and has a solution for everything.

Sarah ...... Sarah Millican
Marion ...... Ruth Bratt
Terry ...... Simon Daye
Rachel ...... lsy Suttie
Ian ...... William Andrews
Jeff ...... Kevin Eldon
Clive ...... Malcolm Tierney.

Written by Sarah Millican.

Producer: Lianne Coop

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2011


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b011zms9)
Vicky's really excited that Lynda has asked if she'd like to include her garden in the open gardens fundraiser. Hayley is more worried about Phoebe possibly moving to South Africa. She's worried about the change of lifestyle and the influence Kate has over Phoebe. Although Vicky tries to calm her down, Hayley complains that she's outnumbered three to one.

While chatting about what they need to buy for her party, Phoebe reassures Hayley that if she goes to South Africa she will be in contact all the time, and that she loves her.

During the milking, Oliver drops in on Ed who is again short with him, convinced that Oliver thinks he can't cope. Oliver tries to make amends, but when Ed becomes defensive gives up and leaves.

When he returns home that evening, both Ed and Emma are completely shattered. Emma suggests that Ed should ask Oliver to help with the milking. It would leave him with more free time to spend with his family, and help keep Oliver occupied while Caroline works. Ed is unwilling at first, but after hearing Emma's reasoning agrees to the plan.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b011zmsc)
Russell T Davies; Christos Tsiolkas

With Mark Lawson.

Screenwriter and producer Russell T Davies discusses taking Wales to LA for the latest Torchwood story, Miracle Day. He responds to the claim that the watershed is being ignored in British TV, and reveals that he has written the first episode of his next original drama.

Incendies, from Quebec director Denis Villeneuve, was Oscar-nominated for best foreign language film in 2011. It's a thriller - set nowadays but with a timeless quality - in which twin Canadian immigrants travel to the Middle-East after their mother has died, in search of their father. Film critic Jenny McCartney reviews.

Australian writer Christos Tsiolkas generated considerable debate with his 2010 novel The Slap. As his first novel Loaded is published in the UK, he talks about why his parents found it hard to read and discusses the use of explicit language in his fiction.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b011zmsf)
A Living Death

A review into the care of patients in vegetative or low awareness states has been launched by the Royal College of Physicians. There are thought to be as many as 5000 such people in the UK.
The working party will look at concerns that assessment and diagnosis of patients is not consistent across the country and will ask whether the cost of long term care is affordable to the NHS.
Ann Alexander examines calls for a reform of the process to end the life of such patients where their families believe their loved one would no longer wish to be alive.
The programme reveals how some hospitals appear unaware of the law and hears how the process can be lengthy and costly, putting families under further strain.
Producer: Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b011zmsh)
We hear about the barriers faced by young people who've lost their sight, what would they like to change about the services they are offered? Jonathan Conteh explains how he's fighting to provide education to blind children in Sierra Leone. Sylvia Syms tells us about the latest research on falls and we hear your feedback on ebooks and reading.

Producer Clare Walker

Presenter Peter White.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b011zmsk)
The Stress Special

What exactly is stress and how does it affect our mental health? In collaboration with BBC Lab UK, this week's All in the Mind is launching a pioneering online scientific experiment to test the nation's mental health and well being. Complete the test online and you can get personalised feedback about your own levels of stress, your coping strategies and tips on how to manage stress. Peter Kinderman, clinical psychologist at the University of Liverpool explains how the experiment will help us understand the causes of mental health problems like anxiety and depression.

Also in the programme - Angela Clow from the University of Westminster unravels the way the physical effects of chronic stress can hijack the very sensitive workings of the brain to cause long term effects on our mental well being. Also in the programme Mark Williams from the University of Oxford offers practical tips on the techniques of mindfulness and he explains why changing your awareness of your body and surroundings has proven effects on tackling depression and anxiety and can ward off the possible effects of stress.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b011zmq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b011y49g)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b011zmsm)
George Papandreou faces a vote of confidence tonight - but will Greeks put up with more austerity?

Silvio Berlusconi gears up for his vote of confidence tomorrow.

And do museums do enough to explain to visitors why art matters?

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011zmsp)
Three Stations

Episode 7

Written by Martin Cruz Smith. Abridged by Jane Marshall

When his wife rejects the baby he has acquired for her the General puts it in a shopping bag and abandons it on a platform at Three Stations. And Renko receives a letter summonsing him to a suspension hearing.

Read by Philip Jackson

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b011zm32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011zmsr)
Susan Hulme reports on the day's proceedings at Westminster.

The Justice Secretary, Kenneth Clarke, defends the decision to drop lighter sentences for those who plead guilty early.

Betty Boothroyd calls on peers to resist government plans for an elected House of Lords.

And young people who took part in a TV reality show tell MPs what it was really like to be in "Jamie's Dream School".



WEDNESDAY 22 JUNE 2011

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b011y4b1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b0122vx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011y4b3)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011y4b5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011y4b7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b011y4b9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011zn5c)
With Quaker and author, Alastair McIntosh.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b011zn5h)
Controversial plans to cull badgers in Wales have been put on hold whilst a scientific review is carried out. The Welsh Environment Minister, John Griffiths has announced he'll be putting together a panel of independent experts to report on the best way to control the spread of TB. The Badger Trust has welcomed the decision but farmers groups and some opposition Welsh Assembly Members say the issue has been kicked into the long grass. Also in the programme, 50 thousand new apprentices will be recruited across the UK over the next 18 months to work in all aspects of food production. And as farmers are reporting a shortage of straw with the cost tripling in recent years, we ask whether straw should be burnt as a biofuel.

Presenter: Anna Hill; Producer; Angela Frain.


WED 06:00 Today (b011zn5k)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Evan Davis, featuring:
08:10 Sir Leon Brittan, former EU Commission vice president, on prospects for the Greek economy.
07:50 A committee of MPs and peers want the government to renegotiate the European arrest warrant.
08:22 What your favourite number says about you.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b011zn5p)
This week Libby Purves is joined by guests including Princess Campbell, Simon Day, Clare Peake and Henry Winkler.

Princess Campbell was one of the first black ward sisters working in the NHS; she was one of a pioneering group of African-Caribbean workers who began to challenge barriers of prejudice. Her uniform goes on display at M-Shed, Bristol's new city museum in the old 1950s transit sheds at Prince's Wharf on the historic waterfront.

Simon Day is the actor and stand-up comedian, probably best known from 'The Fast Show'. He publishes his memoir, 'Comedy and Error' in which he writes about his life as a celebrity as well as his childhood growing up in SE London, being sent to borstal for petty thieving, and about his addiction to drugs, money and success. 'Comedy and Error' is published by Simon & Schuster.

Clare Peake is the daughter of the writer Mervyn Peake, author of the Gormenghast series of novels. Her memoir, 'Under a Canvas Sky', tells of her bohemian childhood and the impact of her father's Parkinson's disease on her life. Radio 4 is broadcasting several programmes about Mervyn Peake and Gormenghast: 'A Hundred Years of Mervyn Peake' and 'The History of Titus Groan' in the classic serial slot. 'Under a Canvas Sky' is published by Constable.

Henry Winkler is the American actor, director and children's author, best known for playing 'The Fonz' in television's 'Happy Days'. He is in the UK and will be touring the country visiting schools with 'First News', the national newspaper for children, on the My Way! Tour. He'll be introducing British schoolchildren to his Hank Zipzer stories (published by Walker Books), which focus on a ten year-old boy with dyslexia and are based on his own past experiences.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0122vzn)
Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit

Episode 3

We think that people are lying when they mumble or they are embarrassed, but the liars amongst us are often those who are the most fluent speakers, the most charming people. Ian Leslie describes how two researchers discovered ways to pick those who were being economical with the truth.

Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidential election, was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian, the Times and the BBC. He also blogs about all these things at Marbury, named one of the fifty 'Most Powerful' blogs in the world by the Observer.

'Consistently startling and fascinating. Most popular psychology books follow a depressingly familiar path: there's some dodgy theorising at the beginning, then a raft of dubious statistics with a few anecdotes to back them up. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light.' - 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail

Written by Ian Leslie
Abridged by Pete Nichols
Reader: Tim McInnerny

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011zn5t)
Caitlin Moran, Women in Prison, Birthing Buddy Scheme

Presented by Jenni Murray. Caitlin Moran explains why she thinks the next wave of feminism needs to be as exciting as rock'n'roll. We hear about a new Birthing Buddy scheme in London helping women in labour; women in prison: changes to sentencing policies with the new justice bill? And early washing machines - the latest in our series about household gadgets.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f1)
Annabel

Episode 3

Kathleen Winter's compelling debut novel is the moving story of a child born as both a girl and a boy, growing up in the Canadian wilderness.

In 1968, a mysterious child is born into the bleakly beautiful environment of remote coastal Labrador: a baby with both male and female sex organs. Only three people share the secret - the baby's parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and a trusted neighbour, Thomasina. Together the adults make a difficult decision: to go through surgery and raise the child as a boy named Wayne.

But as Wayne grows up within the masculine, Labradorian hunting culture of men such as father, his shadow-self - a girl he thinks of as 'Annabel' - is never entirely extinguished. As Wayne approaches adulthood, the woman inside him begins to cry out.

In today's episode, Wayne's childhood is torn between the conflicting desires of his father, Treadway, who wants to make a true Labradorian man of him - and of the two women in his life, who secretly cultivate his female self.

CAST:

Narrator ..... Buffy Davis
Thomasina ..... Genevieve Adam
Jacinta ..... Madeleine Sims-Fewer
Treadway ..... Simon Lee Phillips
Eliza ..... Gwenneth Holmes
Joan ..... Teresa Gallagher
Wayne ..... Kristopher Bosch
Young Wayne ..... Amelia Clarkson
Young Wally ..... Jessica Little
Derek Warford/ Dr Ho ..... Jason Durran
Steve/ Dr Lioukras ..... Christopher Bailey
Roland/ Dr Carr ..... Simon Bubb

Adapted for radio and directed by Emma Harding

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Kathleen Winter has written dramatic and documentary scripts for Sesame Street and CBC Television. Her first collection of short stories, boYs, was the winner of both the Winterset Award and the Metcalf-Rooke Award. A long-time resident of St. John's, Newfoundland, she now lives in Montreal. Annabel has been shortlisted for the 2011 Orange Prize for Fiction.


WED 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b011zn5y)
Series 8

The Home

Millie is about to reach the astonishing age of 104; at 94, Lily is a mere youngster, while 95-year-old Hetty is still as voluble and lively as she was when she worked in a football factory or ran her own business... Alan Dein visits Vi and John Rubens House in Ilford, Essex, where elderly residents of the old East End Jewish community in London now spend their days. Talking to them about how they spend their time now he discovers a rich landscape of experience in the lives of these entertainingly lively and thoughtful old people.

Producer: Simon Elmes.


WED 11:30 Meet David Sedaris (b00s0vqr)
Series 1

Kookabura; With a Pal Like This...

From Carnegie Hall to the BBC Radio Theatre - American humourist David Sedaris reads from his extensive collection of published stories and articles.

"Kookabura", and "With a Pal Like This...."

The producer is Steve Doherty.
This is a Boomerang Plus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b011zn64)
The NHS chief executive who tore up the rule book - chemotherapy at home, for example - can we expect more of this under the new-look NHS?

Our undercover Royal Mail postman reveals the tricks of the trade that mean poorly addressed letters - "To the woman in the house with the blue door on the seafront" - still get delivered.

And standardising the cost of getting married in a church.


WED 12:57 Weather (b011y4bc)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b011zn66)
National and international news, with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b011zn6b)
The chief executive of the Guardian Media Group, Andrew Miller, has warned staff that The Guardian and Observer could run out of money in three to five years if the newspapers don't make drastic changes. To try and avoid a cash crisis, the newspapers are planning to move from a print to a "digital first" model. The editor of The Guardian, Alan Rusbridger, explains his plans for the transformation.

The BBC is going to broadcast this year's Wimbledon finals in 3D and Sky is also investing in 3D programmes and coverage of sporting events. But, despite investment in the technology from broadcasters, a report from Informa suggests that 3D TV will remain a novelty, rarely watched even by those with 3D enabled TVs. To discuss whether anyone will actually be watching programmes in 3D, Steve Hewlett is joined by the BBC head of 3D Danielle Nagler and Sky's head of 3D John Cassy.

The Shadow Culture Secretary Ivan Lewis has accused opponents of the BBC's move to Salford of "outdated prejudices" against the north of England. Ivan Lewis explains why he believes the BBC's new MediaCity site will benefit the BBC and outlines how he would distribute money from the BBC licence fee.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b011zms9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b011zn6g)
Shelley Silas - The People Next Door

by Shelley Silas.

directed by Mary Peate.

Sarah has never much liked her next-door-neighbours Samuel and Teresa - he plays his music too loud and she's just plain creepy, but are they as weird as Sarah thinks, or is she just letting her imagination run away with her? Husband James is sure it's the latter.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b011zn6j)
If you are confused by banking you can ask the experts for advice on Wednesday's Money Box Live.

Whether your question is about the service you receive, charges, switching accounts or resolving disputes, if you want to know your rights as a customer, Vincent Duggleby and guests will be ready to help.

Phone lines open at 1.30pm on Wednesday afternoon and the number to call is 03700 100 444. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher. The programme starts after the three o'clock news.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b012036k)
New Welsh Writing from Ty Newydd

Translation

Ty Newydd, near Snowdonia, is the National Writing Centre for Wales as well as being the former home of Lloyd George. These three stories were created there on a Writing for Radio course, and showcase both new and established Welsh writers.

Translation is Julie Ma's story about a young Chinese girl having to translate sensitive information for her mother. It's read by Liz Sutherland.

Director Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


WED 15:45 The Completists (b00y517j)
Episode 3

The word 'completist' was coined in the 1950s and was originally applied to collectors who aspired to own an entire set of records by a particular artist (usually a jazz musician). But now completists come in many different forms with different ambitions. Ian Marchant meets five "completists" - each of them driven by the need to tick off the entire collection.
The internet has revolutionised everything for this group dragging them out of their cellars, kitchens, bedrooms and sheds and into web forums, specialist chatrooms and onto the blogosphere to exchange opinions, tips and secrets with whole tribes of fellow completists. The opportunities to complete their goal are more available because of global communication but the logistics are harder and the goal posts are higher.
Ian Marchant, a former Charing Cross Road bookseller, is an old friend and admirer of completists. He recalls the story of one book collector who regularly asked for a particular volume habitually adding '...but you won't have it.' When the book (at last and amazingly) turned up, the collector refused to buy it because, once he owned it, he'd no longer have a reason to live.
Ian's completism? He owns all the records of Brinsley Schwarz. It took him ten years to find a copy of their first album and it turned out to be lousy.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b011zn6q)
The Politics of Sleep - Women Who Kill

One third of us now think we are sleep deprived. Why should that be? Who loses the most and how is society reacting? Laurie is joined by Stephen Williams to discuss a new area for sociology, the contested area of the 'politics of sleep'.
Also, what happens when a woman commits murder? It is a very rare event and can challenge ingrained notions about the nature of femininity. Perhaps because of that, a new study finds that there are existing stereotypes which guide the reaction of both the media and the judiciary to women who kill. Lizzie Seal and Louise Westmarland join Laurie to discuss our attitudes towards women, murder and femininity
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 All in the Mind (b011zmsk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b011znh5)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011y4bf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Party (b011znh7)
Series 2

Is the Party Over?

The aspiring politicians of the new political party move on to tackle drugs and housing and come up with a convenient catch-all solution.

But is there any point if Jared's all set to move to the Isle of Wight?

Second series of Tom Basden's satirical comedy.

Simon ..... Tom Basden
Duncan ..... Tim Key
Jared ..... Jonny Sweet
Mel ..... Ann Crilly
Phoebe ..... Katy Wix

Producer: Julia McKenzie

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b011znh9)
Pat and Susan come to the rescue and Ed raises a sensitive subject.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b011znhc)
Magritte and Warhol shows reviewed; Nico Muhly; Sirens

With Mark Lawson.

A major exhibition of works by the surrealist Rene Magritte opens this week at Tate Liverpool, while the Lowry in Salford unveils a selection of portraits by Andy Warhol. Under the title Warhol and the Diva, the show includes his renowned images of Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor. Writers Jane Rogers and M J Hyland review the work of these 20th century artists who shared a passion for challenging convention.

American composer Nico Muhly, 29, writes for the concert hall, the cinema, and for musicians such as Bjork. Now he has completed his first opera, Two Boys, based on the true story of a teenager who tried to arrange his own murder via the internet. Muhly explains why he sees the internet as a contemporary masked ball, where true identities are hidden, and so is an ideal subject for operatic treatment.

Sirens is a new TV comedy drama centred on the lives of three members of the ambulance service. It's partly based on a blog by former ambulance driver Brian Kellett. Writer Brian Fillis has created the TV series, and he and Brian Kellett discuss the lexicon of the ambulance crew, and why the fire brigade has a monopoly on cups of tea.

Producer Ekene Akalawu.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Decision Time (b011znhk)
Nick Robinson goes behind the closed doors of Whitehall and Westminster to ask how controversial decisions are reached. This week, he and his panel examine changing the rules for calling strikes.

Should our local school, the train we take to work, even the local job centre, be closed by strikes which do not have the majority of members backing them? Pressure is certainly growing for a change, from the Mayor of London, business leaders and some Conservative MPs. They want a minimum threshold of support before a union can call its members out on strike.

Critics, though, point out that no government in history would cross such a high democratic hurdle, that the right to strike is fundamental and anyway, workers these days only strike in extreme circumstances.

Nick is joined by the Conservative MP Dominic Raab, who has a backbench bill on the issue, by John Edmonds, the former General Secretary of the powerful GMB union, by Lord Tebbit, the former Employment Secretary who was largely responsible for the current laws, by Helen Leiser, a former senior civil servant responsible for employment relations, and by Sam Coates, Deputy Political Editor of The Times.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b011znl3)
Series 2

Ed Smith: Professionalism in Sport

Former England cricketer Ed Smith argues that too much professionalism in sport and in other areas of life spoils rather than promotes the chance of success.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling.

Recorded live in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b011znl5)
Large numbers of seismologists fear the recent earthquake in Japan reveals greats gaps in their science. Attention in the country has focused on the threat to Tokyo and to the south, where danger still lurks; but experts admit they underestimated the danger to the north, where the quake and tsunami struck in March. If even the Japanese experts, the best prepared in the world, can get it wrong, what other dangers is seismology missing? Roland Pease investigates from Japan.

Producer Roland Pease

Presenter Roland Pease.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b011zn5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b011y4bh)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b011znl7)
What's behind the explosion of violence from Protestants in Northern Ireland?

As President Obama prepares to announce a troop drawdown in Afghanistan, what chance for security in the region?

Ai Wei Wei is released from custody.

with Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011znl9)
Three Stations

Episode 8

Written by Martin Cruz Smith. Abridged by Jane Marshall

Renko is dismissed from his job but still he pursues the killer of Vera Antonova and his enquiries lead him back to the Nijinsky Club where he is intrigued by a photograph of the choreographer's son.

Read by Philip Jackson

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Shedtown (b011znlc)
Series 1

Storm

A layer-cake of disaster threatens the creosoted community. And where's Colin?

Cast:
Barry ...... Tony Pitts
Jimmy & Johnny ...... Kevin Eldon
Colin ....... Johnny Vegas
Diane ...... Suranne Jones
Dave ....... Shaun Dooley
Eleanor ...... Ronni Ancona
Deborah Dearden ...... Emma Fryer
William ....... Adrian Manfredi
Carly ...... Jessica Knappett
Father Michael ...... James Quinn
Wes ......Warren Brown
Petshop Owner ...... Caron May

Narrator...Maxine Peake
Music......Paul Heaton

Written and created by Tony Pitts
Directed by Jim Poyser

Producer: Sally Harrison
A Woolyback Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011znlf)
Sean Curran and the BBC's parliamentary team with all the day's top news stories from Westminster. There's a report on exchanges at Prime Minister's Questions where the Labour leader Ed Miliband challenges David Cameron over plans to stop the retention of DNA from rape suspects. Mr Miliband also describes as "crass" the Prime Minister's comment yesterday that military chiefs should do the fighting, not the talking. Mr Cameron countered that the police WERE able to keep DNA on the computer. And he insisted that British forces can maintain the current level of operations in Libya despite concerns raised by senior military figures. Also on the programme: MPs accuse the energy regulator failing to do enough to stop price rises; and anger among Scottish nationalists at being described as "neo-fascists". We also report on a proposal to ban smoking in cars when children are present and on the feisty clashes between the Chancellor George Osborne and his Labour opposite number, Ed Balls.



THURSDAY 23 JUNE 2011

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b011y4c2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0122vzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011y4c4)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011y4c6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011y4c8)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b011y4cb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011zzh0)
With Quaker and author, Alastair McIntosh.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b011zzh2)
Honey bee colonies are in decline for the fourth year in a row across the UK. This is a puzzle to beekeepers as last winter should have been perfect conditions for the bees. Charlotte Smith hears from the President of the British Beekeeping Association that although bee colonies are declining, it is an improvement on previous years.

No decision will be made as to whether to cull badgers in Wales until this autumn. John Griffiths, the Welsh Environment Minister, explains why he's creating a panel of experts to review how to eradicate bovine TB.

Hay flower meadows in the UK have declined by 97% over the past 60 years. However, in the North Pennines they are in the middle of a restoration project which has seen a massive improvement in its fields. Caz Graham sees the benefit it is giving to local wildlife.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Weatherill.


THU 06:00 Today (b011zzh4)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Webb in London and James Naughtie in Brussels, including:
07:50 Lady Boothroyd expresses her concerns over House of Lords reform.
08:10 What does Obama's announcement of troop withdrawals from Afghanistan mean for the UK strategy?
08:20 Should the Greek financial crisis herald more or less EU integration?


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b011zzh6)
Malthusianism

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Malthusianism.In the eighteenth century, as expanding agriculture and industry resulted in a rapid increase in the European population, a number of writers began to consider the implications of this rise in numbers. Some argued it was a positive development, since a larger population meant more workers and thus more wealth. Others maintained that it placed an intolerable strain on natural resources.In 1798 a young Anglican priest, the Reverend Thomas Malthus, published An Essay on the Principle of Population. Malthus argued that the population was increasing exponentially, and that food production could not keep pace; eventually a crisis would ensue. He suggested that famine, disease and wars acted as a natural corrective to overpopulation, and also suggested a number of ways in which humans could regulate their own numbers. The work caused a furore and fuelled a public debate about the size and sustainability of the British population which raged for generations. It was a profoundly influential work: Charles Darwin credited Malthus with having inspired his Theory of Natural Selection.With:Karen O'BrienPro-Vice-Chancellor for Education at the University of BirminghamMark PhilpLecturer in Politics at the University of OxfordEmma GriffinSenior Lecturer in History at the University of East Anglia Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b0122w87)
Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit

Episode 4

In principle, the lie detector solves the problems of society: it can pick the thief or the philanderer or the dodgy politician. But the polygraph, as it was christened, has had a chequered history, it's reputation being more effective than the machine itself.

Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidential election, was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian, the Times and the BBC. He also blogs about all these things at Marbury, named one of the fifty 'Most Powerful' blogs in the world by the Observer.

'Consistently startling and fascinating. Most popular psychology books follow a depressingly familiar path: there's some dodgy theorising at the beginning, then a raft of dubious statistics with a few anecdotes to back them up. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light.' - 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail

Written by Ian Leslie
Abridged by Pete Nichols
Reader: Tim McInnerny

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011zzh8)
Nancy Dell'Olio, Male Circumcision, Pensions Update

Presented by Jenni Murray. Nancy Dell'Olio on turning 50. Male Circumcision: Can it cause problems later in life? Pensions Update - the effect on women.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f3)
Annabel

Episode 4

Kathleen Winter's compelling debut novel is the moving story of a child born as both a girl and a boy, growing up in the Canadian wilderness.

In 1968, a mysterious child is born into the bleakly beautiful environment of remote coastal Labrador: a baby with both male and female sex organs. Only three people share the secret - the baby's parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and a trusted neighbour, Thomasina. Together the adults make a difficult decision: to go through surgery and raise the child as a boy named Wayne.

But as Wayne grows up within the masculine, Labradorian hunting culture of men such as father, his shadow-self - a girl he thinks of as 'Annabel' - is never entirely extinguished. As Wayne approaches adulthood, the woman inside him begins to cry out.

In today's episode, Wayne becomes close friends with a girl, Wally Michelin - much to his father Treadway's consternation.

CAST:

Narrator ..... Buffy Davis
Thomasina ..... Genevieve Adam
Jacinta ..... Madeleine Sims-Fewer
Treadway ..... Simon Lee Phillips
Eliza ..... Gwenneth Holmes
Joan ..... Teresa Gallagher
Wayne ..... Kristopher Bosch
Young Wayne ..... Amelia Clarkson
Young Wally ..... Jessica Little
Derek Warford/ Dr Ho ..... Jason Durran
Steve/ Dr Lioukras ..... Christopher Bailey
Roland/ Dr Carr ..... Simon Bubb

Adapted for radio by Miranda Davies

Directed by Emma Harding

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Kathleen Winter has written dramatic and documentary scripts for Sesame Street and CBC Television. Her first collection of short stories, boYs, was the winner of both the Winterset Award and the Metcalf-Rooke Award. A long-time resident of St. John's, Newfoundland, she now lives in Montreal. Annabel has been shortlisted for the 2011 Orange Prize for Fiction.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b011zzhb)
A voice from Croatia's war-torn past is recalled by Allan Little in Zagreb as the EU prepares to admit this country to full membership of the Union. Chris Morris is in Athens as Greece faces fresh hurdles in its attempts to avoid defaulting on its debt repayments. Lobsters are big business but in Nicaragua, as Conor Woodman's been hearing, catching them can be dangerous. Reggie Nadelson tells us how the price of property's soaring in Harlem, a part of New York once associated with poverty and crime. But, she wonders, is the price of development the loss of the district's soul? It's all change on the buses in Malta. Jake Wallis Simons has been finding out that the island's getting rid of its fleet of characterful and individualistic buses and replacing them with something altogether more modern and efficient. But, it seems, not all the islanders welcome the change.


THU 11:30 Vampires V Zombies! (b011zzhd)
The Vampire is dead, Long live the Zombie. Natalie Haynes investigates our contemporary obsession with Vampires and Zombies from Buffy to the Walking Dead. She examines the various anxieties they express about food, addiction, sex and disease and talks to writers who've found themselves depicting these creatures in fiction. What happens when you put a vampire family in a semi in bradford? Do zombies know they are zombies? Why is an American High School the perfect setting for a Vampire slayer? The answer to all these and more as Natalie Haynes pits Vampires against Zombies.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b011zzhg)
Peter White on the sale of the RAC and what it means for its members and the proposal to offer the public shares in Government-saved banks. Plus - putting the pizzazz back into the pictures - as cinemas compete with an expanding array of ways to view at home we talk to the people liberating films and film-goers from the multiplex, complete with fancy dress, and props.

And at 1230 Shari Vahl with a special report on a huge police investigation into "boiler room" fraud.


THU 12:57 Weather (b011y4cd)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b011zzhj)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:30 Off the Page (b011zzhl)
Pleasure and Pain of Public Transport

The three contributors to this edition of Off the Page are all seasoned travellers who know very well both the pleasures and the pain of public transport. Ian Marchant wanted to write a book about inland waterways but was persuaded to write about trains instead and while researching that he fell in love with the idea of the railway; poet Lavinia Greenlaw has been making a sound installation based on comments overheard at a station; and writer and broadcaster Simon Fanshawe has never owned a car. But presenter Dominic Arkwright throws a spanner in the works when he reveals a loathing for public transport and that he will go to any length to avoid it.

Producer Paul Dodgson.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b011znh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b011zzhn)
Crimes of Mancunia

Criminals' loved ones are being kidnapped around Manchester. When the kidnapper starts asking for very specific amounts of ransom money, word soon spreads that he is an ex-cop with a dangerous grudge against the criminal community. DCI Lise Lazard and DI Mikey Finn take up the case before time runs out for the kidnapper's victims. A noir drama in verse by Michael Symmons Roberts.

Producer: Charlotte Riches
Director: Susan Roberts.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b011zj68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b011zlcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b01204xl)
New Welsh Writing from Ty Newydd

The Wake

Ty Newydd, near Snowdonia, is the National Writing Centre for Wales and these three stories created there on a Writing for Radio course, showcase new and established Welsh writers.

A woman returns to Aberystwyth for her mother's funeral and finds the past is still very much present. Beth Robert reads a story by Francesca Rhydderch.

Director: Willa King
Executive Producer: Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


THU 15:45 The Completists (b00yhv38)
Episode 4

The word 'completist' was coined in the 1950s and was originally applied to collectors who aspired to own an entire set of records by a particular artist (usually a jazz musician). But now completists come in many different forms with different ambitions. Ian Marchant meets five "completists" - each of them driven by the need to tick off the entire collection.
The internet has revolutionised everything for this group dragging them out of their cellars, kitchens, bedrooms and sheds and into web forums, specialist chatrooms and onto the blogosphere to exchange opinions, tips and secrets with whole tribes of fellow completists. The opportunities to complete their goal are more available because of global communication but the logistics are harder and the goal posts are higher.
Ian Marchant, a former Charing Cross Road bookseller, is an old friend and admirer of completists. He recalls the story of one book collector who regularly asked for a particular volume habitually adding '...but you won't have it.' When the book (at last and amazingly) turned up, the collector refused to buy it because, once he owned it, he'd no longer have a reason to live.
Ian's completism? He owns all the records of Brinsley Schwarz. It took him ten years to find a copy of their first album and it turned out to be lousy.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b011zldl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b011zzhq)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. He talks to the scientists who are publishing their research in peer reviewed journals, and he discusses how that research is scrutinised and used by the scientific community, the media and the public. The programme also reflects how science affects our daily lives; from predicting natural disasters to the latest advances in cutting edge science.


THU 17:00 PM (b01206c0)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011y4cg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 It's Your Round (b00z5zyh)
Series 1

Episode 4

Angus Deayton hosts the comedy panel show with no format.

Russell Kane, Josie Long, Alun Cochrane and Milton Jones battle it out to see who can beat each other at their own games each has brought along.

How will they fare at Russell Kane's "Mood News" round? What superhero would Milton Jones like to be? And what is josie Long's "Nine Previous Convictions" all about? Find out the answers to these questions and more in this show.

Angus Deayton valiantly tries to make sure everyone comes out of it with their reputations intact.

Writers: Angus Deayton, Ged Parsons and Paul Powell

Devised by Benjamin Partridge

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01206c2)
Usha arrives early for dinner at Brookfield. Although Ruth tries to pretend everything is okay, she ends up telling Usha about Elizabeth's recent bombshell, removing Ruth and David as guardians. She explains how upset David is by the situation. She wants to go and see Elizabeth to make her realise what she's doing to her brother. Usha is wary, suggesting that Ruth write a letter instead. But she agrees that Elizabeth needs some sort of counselling and says that it will be Ruth's responsibility to keep things calm and under control if she does visit Lower Loxley.

The fruit pickers gather at Jaxx for an event funded by Home Farm. Adam and Kenton discuss the shortcomings of the cricket team and their embarrassing loss against Darrington. Unsurprisingly Jazzer and Harry turn up looking for Zofia, although it turns out that she thinks they're both gay!

After Kenton has corrected this misconception, and later rescued her from Jazzer's determined but unwanted advances, Zofia suggests to a surprised but delighted Harry that they leave together and get something to eat elsewhere, just the two of them.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01206c4)
With Kirsty Lang.

Writer Ian Rankin reports on an exhibition of 60 images of The Queen, spanning the six decades of her reign, and including official portraits, photographs and unofficial works.

Singer and songwriter Barry Manilow discusses the nature of fame, as he releases an album inspired by the pressures of celebrity. He also reveals his close encounter with a stalker, and why he has no desire to create another Broadway musical.

Patrick Ness has today been awarded the 2011 Cilip Carnegie medal for Children's Literature for his novel Monsters of Men, which completes his Chaos Walking trilogy. He talks about writing for a teen audience, his attitude to computer games, and creating a book inspired by another writer: his most recent book, A Monster Calls, is based on the final idea of the late author Siobhan Dowd.

The stage version of the hit TV show Glee, about an American high school singing group, arrived in Britain last night. Kirsty finds out whether the cast can reproduce their screen success in the theatre.

Producer Jack Soper.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b011zmqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b01206c6)
Keeping Score

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

This week Evan's executive guests hail from the worlds of banking, headhunting and advertising. He asks them about loyalty - or rather the seeming lack of it in business. Are companies generally looking for short-term relationships of convenience, with loyalty gone and promiscuity the rule? Evan also asks them how they measure how well they're performing.

Evan is joined in the studio by Michael Morley, chief executive of private bank Coutts & Co; Robin Wight, president of communications agency Engine; Alistair Cox, chief executive of global recruitment firm Hays.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b011zmq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b011zzh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b011y4cj)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01206cb)
With David Eades. National and international news and analysis.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01206cd)
Three Stations

Episode 9

Written by Martin Cruz Smith. Abridged by Jane Marshall.

Dismissed from his job as an investigator but still on the trail of a killer Renko discovers his own life is in danger. And Maya's baby is discovered once more but still her mother has no idea how close she is to her missing daughter.

Read by Philip Jackson

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 The Headset Set (b01206cg)
Series 1

Episode 1

It's Sailesh's first day as team leader at Smile5, the mail order catalogue company selling everything from Rolex watches to lawnmowers, from financial products to phone and broadband, from holidays to health insurance.

And somewhere in a brown-field wasteland, miles from the nearest town, it runs one of the largest call centres operating in the UK. This is the world of The Headset Set.

Eavesdrop on both sides of the bizarre, horrific and ludicrous phone calls when customers call in as events unfold with company staff.

Aleesha and other characters ..... Chizzy Akudolu
Bernie and other characters ..... Margaret-Cabourn Smith
Big Tony, Ralph and other characters ..... Colin Hoult
Sailesh, Bradley and other characters ..... Paul sharma
Various ..... Philip Fox

Writers: James kettle, Stephen Carlin, Andy Wolton, Ben Partridge, Colin Hoult, Dan Tetsell, Dale Shaw, Kevin Core, Rob Gilroy and Tom Neenan

Script editor: Dan Tetsell
Producer: Tilusha Ghelani

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01206cj)
Susan Hulme reports on a day when MPs defied the government by backing a motion calling for a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses in England.

They also voiced fears about plans to cut the number of children's heart surgery centres.

And they urged ministers to drop plans to cut the number of coastguard stations in the name of modernisation.



FRIDAY 24 JUNE 2011

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b011y4d3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b0122w87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011y4d5)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011y4d7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011y4d9)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b011y4dc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b012077v)
With Quaker and author, Alastair McIntosh.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b012077x)
Charlotte Smith visits a lab developing genetically modified wheat. Rothamstead Research is applying for a field trial, but Friends of the Earth warn that outside the lab, GM contamination is inevitable.

The animal welfare group Compassion in World Farming has welcomed the conditions in which pigs will be kept at a proposed mega-pig farm in Derbyshire. The development at Foston would house 2 and a half thousand sows and could produce a thousand pigs for sale every week. CIWF says the pigs will be better treated than in most UK pig farms.

And the Woodland Trust is asking people to search for the first ripe blackberry of the season. This year's unusual weather has made brambles flower a month early, and the fruit should soon follow.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith. Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


FRI 06:00 Today (b012077z)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys in London and James Naughtie in Brussels, including:
07:30 James Naughtie reports from Brussels on the EU dispute over immigration and asylum.
08:20 Musician Paul Simon on his life and music.
08:30 Can Google do anything about online extremism?


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b011zld6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b0122w98)
Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit

Episode 5

The 'murderer at the door' refers to the moral dilemma of whether you tell the truth if the honest answer will threaten someone's life. How did philosophers square with that conundrum?

Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To be President (Politicos, 2008), an account of the 2008 US presidential election, was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian, the Times and the BBC. He also blogs about all these things at Marbury, named one of the fifty 'Most Powerful' blogs in the world by the Observer.

'Consistently startling and fascinating. Most popular psychology books follow a depressingly familiar path: there's some dodgy theorising at the beginning, then a raft of dubious statistics with a few anecdotes to back them up. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light.' - 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail

Written by Ian Leslie
Abridged by Pete Nichols
Reader: Tim McInnerny

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0120781)
Presented by Jenni Murray. The making and marketing of perfume - what is the future for this multi-billion dollar industry? The Asian theatre company that performs in your kitchen. The Aftermath of Suffrage - the achievements of the women's movement between the wars.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f5)
Annabel

Episode 5

Kathleen Winter's compelling debut novel is the moving story of a child born as both a girl and a boy, growing up in the Canadian wilderness.

In 1968, a mysterious child is born into the bleakly beautiful environment of remote coastal Labrador: a baby with both male and female sex organs. Only three people share the secret - the baby's parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and a trusted neighbour, Thomasina. Together the adults make a difficult decision: to go through surgery and raise the child as a boy named Wayne.

But as Wayne grows up within the masculine, Labradorian hunting culture of men such as father, his shadow-self - a girl he thinks of as 'Annabel' - is never entirely extinguished. As Wayne approaches adulthood, the woman inside him begins to cry out.

In today's episode, Wayne faces the emotional and physical challenges of adolescence.

CAST:

Narrator ..... Buffy Davis
Thomasina ..... Genevieve Adam
Jacinta ..... Madeleine Sims-Fewer
Treadway ..... Simon Lee Phillips
Eliza ..... Gwenneth Holmes
Joan ..... Teresa Gallagher
Wayne ..... Kristopher Bosch
Young Wayne ..... Amelia Clarkson
Young Wally ..... Jessica Little
Derek Warford/ Dr Ho ..... Jason Durran
Steve/ Dr Lioukras ..... Christopher Bailey
Roland/ Dr Carr ..... Simon Bubb

Adapted for radio by Miranda Davies

Directed by Emma Harding

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Kathleen Winter has written dramatic and documentary scripts for Sesame Street and CBC Television. Her first collection of short stories, boYs, was the winner of both the Winterset Award and the Metcalf-Rooke Award. A long-time resident of St. John's, Newfoundland, she now lives in Montreal. Annabel has been shortlisted for the 2011 Orange Prize for Fiction.


FRI 11:00 Reversing Dr Beeching (b0120783)
1/1
Without much fanfare, Scotland has been systematically reversing Dr Beeching's cuts to rural rail services. In the last 30 years, 62 railway stations in Scotland have reopened- more than anywhere else in the British Isles. In December 2009 the Airdrie to Bathgate Line which had been closed to regular passenger traffic since 1956 started to run again. The reopened service brought rail to an area which had lived without it for half a century. Rail reopenings have enjoyed a cross party consensus in Scotland - but can the programme survive public spending cutbacks?


FRI 11:30 Polyoaks (b0120785)
Series 1

Episode 4

Written By Phil Hammond and David Spicer.

Nigel Planer, Celia Imrie, David Westhead, Phil Cornwell and Tony Gardner star in a timely satire on the NHS set in the bewildering new world of Coalition healthcare.

This new sitcom is written by Private Eye's medical columnist, broadcaster, comedian and practising GP Dr Phil Hammond and David Spicer ('Double Income No Kids' and 'Three off the Tee'.) As responsibility for the Health Service is stripped from managers and handed to doctors, brothers-in-medicine Roy and Hugh Thornton are struggling to work out what to do with all this sudden money and power. If they can diagnose acute appendicitis surely they can manage an £80 billion health budget. Can't they? But a useless celebrity TV doctor, an overly-aggressive South African nurse and a sinister GP Consortium Chairman don't make their lot any easier.

This week, to Practice Manager Betty's horror, Hugh discovers an enormous fiscal hole in the Consortium budget. Polyoaks has no money, even though they're swamped with patients, most of whom are 'frequent flyers.' The worried well may well have not very much wrong with them, but they can prove very expensive to treat. The practice has to come up with a way of getting rid of them. Hugh is advocating swingeing cuts in the treatments on offer and Roy's beloved therapies are under threat. Could the brilliant bedside manner of the incompetent Dr Jeremy provide them with a surprising solution?

Cast:
Dr Roy Thornton ..... Nigel Planer
Dr Hugh Thornton ..... Tony Gardner
TV's Dr Jeremy ..... David Westhead
Betty Crossfield ..... Celia Imrie
Vera Du Plessis .... Carla Mendonca
Mr Devlin ..... Phil Cornwell

All Patients played by David Holt and Kate O'Sullivan

Producer/Director: Frank Stirling
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b0120787)
If you missed out on Olympic tickets in the first round, then it's time to stop whining and start taking action. We'll bring you the best advice on how and where to buy tickets for 2012.

A mega-pub has just opened in Brisbane, Australia with room for 7000 drinkers. But does size matter and what makes a great pub? We speak to the man who runs a 6 foot x 4 foot pub in the UK.

And we're talking electric bikes. The Peak district has them, the Lake District is getting them... but will tourists really get out of their cars to ride them?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b011y4df)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b0120789)
National and international news, with Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b012078c)
What is the secret of making children's radio - which children actually want to listen to?

As listeners young and old object to the loss of much of BBC children's on-air programming, Roger Bolton asks Paul Smith, Head of Editorial Standards for BBC Audio & Music, if the BBC has given up trying to find an answer. Gregory Watson, Managing Director of children's station Fun Kids and Susan Stranks of the National Campaign for Children's Radio add their views to the debate.

Does BBC 6 Music really offer an alternative to more mainstream stations? If so, why is it playing so much Coldplay? Bob Shennan, controller of 6 Music, defends the playlist.

And listeners have been concocting fake Radio 4 programmes on Twitter. Apparently Feedback is 30 minutes of unbearable noise.

Contact the Feedback team to let Roger know what you'd like him to tackle this series about anything you've heard on BBC radio.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01206c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b012078f)
Playing for His Life

Written by John Peacock.

Already under Gestapo Surveillance, tennis ace Baron Gottfried Von Cramm, married but secretly homosexual, offends Hitler, by refusing to join the Nazi Party. He believes himself to be safe as long as he remains Germany's number one and winning. 'But I must win. I can't lose, and I can't quit.' He was left playing for his life.

Producer/Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b012078h)
Dumfries & Galloway

Eric Robson and the team are in Dumfries & Galloway for some gardening trouble-shooting.
Christine Walkden discovers some extraordinary Gunnera in Logan Botanic Gardens.
Matthew Wilson reports from Gardeners' World Live in Birmingham.

Produced by Lucy Dichmont.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 The Completists (b00yn83l)
Episode 5

The word 'completist' was coined in the 1950s and was originally applied to collectors who aspired to own an entire set of records by a particular artist (usually a jazz musician). But now completists come in many different forms with different ambitions. Ian Marchant meets five "completists" - each of them driven by the need to tick off the entire collection.
The internet has revolutionised everything for this group dragging them out of their cellars, kitchens, bedrooms and sheds and into web forums, specialist chatrooms and onto the blogosphere to exchange opinions, tips and secrets with whole tribes of fellow completists. The opportunities to complete their goal are more available because of global communication but the logistics are harder and the goal posts are higher.
Ian Marchant, a former Charing Cross Road bookseller, is an old friend and admirer of completists. He recalls the story of one book collector who regularly asked for a particular volume habitually adding '...but you won't have it.' When the book (at last and amazingly) turned up, the collector refused to buy it because, once he owned it, he'd no longer have a reason to live.
Ian's completism? He owns all the records of Brinsley Schwarz. It took him ten years to find a copy of their first album and it turned out to be lousy.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b012078k)
Brian Haw, Mike Waterson, Yelena Bonner and Mietek Pemper

Matthew Bannister on

Brian Haw - the anti war protester who camped in Parliament Square for ten years;

Mike Waterson who made singing traditional British music a family affair;

Yelena Bonner - wife of the Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov - and campaigner in her own right

Mietek Pemper - the Jewish secretary who helped to type Schindler's List and saved thousands from the gas chamber

And Gunnar Fischer - the cinematographer who gave the films of Ingmar Bergman their distinctive look.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b012078m)
Comedian Kristen Wiig on Bridesmaids, her rom-com from the female point of view. Co-written by Wiig, Bridesmaids is produced by Judd Apatow, king of the buddy comedies. Andrew Collins assesses his influence.

Director Denis Villeneuve discusses his Oscar-nominated film Incendies, about a pair of twins who travel to the Middle East to shed light on their family's complicated past.

Viva Riva director Djo Munga reveals his struggle to make the Congo's first gangster film, where there are no studios and very few professional actors or trained technicians.

This month marks the centenary of Bernard Herrmann's birth. One of the giants of film music composition his scores include Citizen Kane, Psycho and Taxi Driver. Friend and fellow composer Laurie Johnson remembers.

Producer: Craig Smith.


FRI 17:00 PM (b012078p)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011y4dh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b012078r)
Series 34

Episode 3

With Steve Punt off playing the part of Eric Idle in a new Monty Python biopic, Hugh Dennis is joined by Jon Culshaw to present the Now Show's guides to next week's public sector strikes and the BBC's week of out-door broadcasting. Meanwhile Jon Holmes discovers that Aung San Soo Kyi has been listening to the Hairy Cornflake and guest stand-up Tom Wrigglesworth writes a letter to Sue Barker.

Starring Hugh Dennis and Jon Culshaw, with Mitch Benn, Jon Holmes, Jess Robinson and Tom Wrigglesworth.

Written by the cast and Steve Punt, with additional material from Gareth Gwynn, Steve Hall, Will Ing, Ben Partridge and Andy Wolton. Oh, and that Benghazi joke from when Rory Bremner last did the show.

Produced by Colin Anderson.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b012078t)
On their first free afternoon thanks to Oliver milking, Emma and Ed walk along the Am. They chat about Harry and Zofia getting together, their own relationship, and the possibility of christening Keira. They agree to ask Oliver and Caroline to be her godparents.

At Ambridge Hall, Lynda is becoming increasingly excited about the party and working out the logistics, but is horrified when Robert interrupts to show her the llamas - someone has sprayed them pink! However, Robert has managed to wash some of the colour out, and the llamas themselves seem unfazed. So after a moment of doubt they decide to have the party anyway, on the first Sunday in August.

Ruth calls on Elizabeth and insists they talk. She tries to make Elizabeth see how unreasonable she's been in changing Freddie and Lily's guardians, and how much she has hurt David. However, things become heated as Elizabeth refuses to change her behaviour and Ruth struggles to maintain her composure. Elizabeth reiterates that David is to blame for Nigel's death. When Ruth suggests she get some kind of counselling, Elizabeth is furious, telling Ruth to imagine it was David that had died. Counselling would do nothing to help.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b012078w)
Stevie Nicks' solo album; Arthur Wood: Archers' composer

With Kirsty Lang, who finds out more about composer Arthur Wood, whose works include Barwick Green, well known to Radio 4 listeners as the theme music for The Archers.

Singer and songwriter, Stevie Nicks, discusses the influences behind her latest solo album of new material, In Your Dreams, her collaboration with Dave Stewart and her on-going relationship with her fellow band members in Fleetwood Mac

Lucy Walker's latest documentary film, Countdown To Zero, traces the history of the atomic bomb from the first nuclear weapons to the political state of the world today.
Her previous film Waste Land was nominated for an Academy award. Investigative journalist Paul Lashmar reviews.

As it prepares for UK City of Culture 2013, Londonderry is opening a Peace Bridge and unveiling the largest public artwork on either side of the Irish border this weekend. Artists Vong Phaophanit and Claire Oboussier discuss Mute Meadow, which creates animated light patterns generated from sounds captured by the city's residents through a community engagement programme.

Producer: Rebecca Nicholson.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b01224f5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b012078y)
Jonathan Dimbleby presents a discussion of news and politics from Victoria Hall, Saltaire in West Yorkshire, with editor of the Spectator, Fraser Nelson, editor of the New Statesman, Jason Cowley, Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Mary Creagh and Conservative MP, David Davis.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b0120790)
Series 2

Fireflies

The chemistry that allows the combustion of natural chemicals to generate light without heat is wonderfully harnessed by the firefly.

Fireflies are insects with several species in the group; each with its own species specific code and signalling regime.

In this life story David Attenborough tells of his personal experience filming the antics of fireflies and the insight this gave him into this secret world of messaging.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Producer: Julian Hector.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


FRI 21:00 Stone (b00j1fdm)
Series 1

The Ties That Bind

By Damian Wayling.

When a body dredged up from a lake implicates an ex-police officer and a respected headteacher, DCI Stone has a difficult decision to make as he discovers the real truth that lies behind the murder.

Stone ...... Hugo Speer
Catriona ...... Zoe Henry
Thomas ...... Rob Pickavance
Sally ...... Danielle Henry
Tanner ...... Craig Cheetham
Chloe/DS Addison ...... Maxine Burth
Tyler ...... Reece Noi
Wise ...... James Nickerson
Piotra/Lawler ...... Greg Wood

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b011y4dk)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0120792)
Financial tremors in Italy as banks get a credit downgrade. We assess Italy's austerity challenge and ask if the ideal of European Union has been shattered by the Eurozone crisis.

The Rwandan female Minister for the Family convicted today for genocide. Why brutality transcends gender.

The Libyan Opposition network plans to bring down Gaddafi. Can they succeed?

with Felicity Evans.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0120794)
Three Stations

Episode 10

Written by Martin Cruz Smith. Abridged by Jane Marshall.

Renko has discovered the identity of the killer but with no power of arrest his own life is in danger as he races through the streets of Moscow. And Maya is close to giving up hope in the search for her child.

Read by Philip Jackson

Producer: Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b011zms3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0120796)
Mark D'Arcy with the day's top news stories from Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b011zm1d)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b011zm1d)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b01224f9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b01224f9)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b01224f1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b01224f1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b01224f3)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b01224f3)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b01224f5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b01224f5)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b011zms3)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b011zms3)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b00nfmks)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00nmt7y)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b011zmqw)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b012036k)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b01204xl)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b011zmsk)

All in the Mind 16:30 WED (b011zmsk)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b011zlxs)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b011tzlf)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b011zm3g)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b011zklf)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b011vjhy)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b012078y)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b011zkly)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b011zkly)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b011zlcp)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b011zlcp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b011zm47)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b011zmsp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b011znl9)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b01206cd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0120794)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b011vhsg)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b011zm18)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b011zm18)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b0122vx4)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b0122vx4)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0122vzn)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0122vzn)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b0122w87)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b0122w87)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b0122w98)

Britain's Labs 09:30 TUE (b00shrlz)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b011zld2)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b011tw7v)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b011zldj)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b011tzkx)

Counterpoint 13:30 MON (b011zm1n)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 08:50 SUN (b011vjj0)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 20:50 FRI (b0120790)

Decision Time 22:15 SAT (b011vg9r)

Decision Time 20:00 WED (b011znhk)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b011zld6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b011zld6)

Dr Seuss and the Butter Battles 11:30 TUE (b011zmq7)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00hvgbt)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b011zmqh)

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Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b011zj7f)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b011zj6b)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b011zm12)

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Feedback 20:00 SUN (b011vjhf)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b012078c)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b011vf2f)

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Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b011vg9t)

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Free Wales Harmony: When Pop Went Welsh 13:30 TUE (b011zmqf)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b011zklt)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b011zklt)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b011zkl9)

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Front Row 19:15 MON (b011zm3b)

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Frontiers 21:00 WED (b011znl5)

GPs Who Need GPS 14:45 SUN (b00tmj2h)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b011vjhk)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b012078h)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b011zzh6)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b011zzh6)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b011zmsh)

It's Your Round 18:30 THU (b00z5zyh)

James Joyce - Blind Date With Bloomsday 23:30 SAT (b011tynw)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b011tzl5)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b011zm36)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b011vjhm)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b012078k)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b011zmqy)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b011zmqy)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 WED (b011zn5y)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b011zklr)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b011zmqk)

Material World 21:00 MON (b011vhdh)

Material World 16:30 THU (b011zzhq)

Meet David Sedaris 11:30 WED (b00s0vqr)

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Midweek 09:00 WED (b011zn5p)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b011zn5p)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b011zn6j)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b011zklc)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b011zklc)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b011vhvx)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b011y46p)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b011y485)

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News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b011y46r)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b011vhvz)

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News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b011y470)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b011vhwh)

News 13:00 SAT (b011vhw7)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b011vh4y)

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On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b011zlct)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b011zldl)

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Party 18:30 WED (b011znh7)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b011zlxn)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b011zldn)

Polyoaks 11:30 FRI (b0120785)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b011vjjj)

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Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b011zlcy)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b011zlcy)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b011zlcy)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b011zj68)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b011zj68)

Return to Joujouka 13:30 SUN (b011zldd)

Reversing Dr Beeching 11:00 FRI (b0120783)

Royal Racers and Fascinators 10:30 SAT (b011zkl5)

Sarah Millican's Support Group 18:30 TUE (b010y7bp)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b011zklh)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b011zj7c)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b011zklw)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b011zmq5)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b011zmq5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b011vhvs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b011y46k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b011y481)

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Shedtown 23:00 WED (b011znlc)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b011vhwf)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b011zlcr)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b011zlcr)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b011zm16)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b011zm16)

Stone 21:00 FRI (b00j1fdm)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b011zld0)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b011zlcw)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b011zld4)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b011zlxq)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b011zlxq)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b011zm38)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (b01206c2)

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The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b011vhdm)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b01206c6)

The Completists 15:45 MON (b00xp1fm)

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The Completists 15:45 THU (b00yhv38)

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The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b011vjhp)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b012078m)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b011zld8)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b011zld8)

The Headset Set 23:00 THU (b01206cg)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b011zm32)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b011zm32)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b011zmq1)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b011zmq1)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b011zn6b)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b011vjhr)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b012078r)

The Root of All Evil: Christianity and Money 20:00 MON (b011zm3d)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b011zkl7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b011zldb)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b011zm45)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b011zmsm)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b011znl7)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b01206cb)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b011vg9h)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b011zn6q)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b011zm49)

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Vampires V Zombies! 11:30 THU (b011zzhd)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b011zlxv)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b011zlxx)

When Wesley Went to Winchester 11:00 MON (b011zm1g)

When the Dog Dies 11:30 MON (b00s7f9r)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b011zklk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b011zm1b)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b011zm1l)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b011zm1j)

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You and Yours 12:00 THU (b011zzhg)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b011vjjl)