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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 JUNE 2011

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b011jx96)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b011mt39)
Ox Travels

The Wrestler

Ox Travels features original stories from twenty-five top travel writers; this week we'll be featuring five of these stories.

Each of the stories takes as its theme a meeting life-changing, affecting, amusing by turn and together they transport readers into a brilliant, vivid atlas of encounters.

Rory Stewart tells the story of the Turquoise Mountain project which he launched with local people to regenerate a poverty-stricken district in Kabul.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011jx98)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011jx9b)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011jx9d)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b011jx9g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011jx9j)
Tina Beattie

With Dr Tina Beattie, Director of Catholic Studies at Roehampton University.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b011jx9l)
"It started as a normal party, then turned into an orgy." Tales of a listener who went from Bunny Girl to feminist during the sexual revolution of the 1960s. With Eddie Mair. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b011jx9n)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b011jx9q)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b011mr7j)
Literary Walks

Malcolm Saville - Shropshire

Clare Balding joins walkers and members of the Malcolm Saville society in the Shropshire Hills where the author of children's fiction based his Lone Pine series.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b011mr87)
Farming Today This Week

Many upland farmers say they can't make a living from their difficult land and are reliant on subsidies. Caz Graham asks if its time to take farming away from the uplands.

This week a new report - the National Ecosystem Assessment - proposed reassessing how land is valued - putting a price on beautiful views, clean water, recreation, and all the other things the uplands provide. It aims to calculate how land could be used for the greatest benefit. But for some farms that might not be for food production.

Caz Graham visits the Peak District national park, to see first hand the challenges and opportunities for those farming this wild and difficult terrain.

Presented by Caz Graham. Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b011jx9s)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b011msk2)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Evan Davis.
08:10 How effective are plans to curb provocative images seen by children?
08:30 Lord Lamont and Alistair Darling on the economy.
08:44 The man who inspired the classic film The Battle of Algiers.
08:49 Does London need its new Playboy club?


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b011msk4)
Richard Coles with actor and director Richard Wilson, poet Susan Richardson, a woman who discovered her outwardly respectable father was in fact a criminal gangster, and a man who kept a lion as a pet. There's an I Was There feature from a man who worked on the world's first international satellite TV broadcast, and writer Jodi Picoult shares her Inheritance Tracks.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b011msk6)
Greek islands - Ireland by Kayak

John McCarthy talks to travel journalist Harry Bucknall about his journey round the Greek islands which vary from the crowded to the deserted and novelist Meaghan Delahunt reveals her love of Naxos an island less frequented by tourists. They discuss the appeal of the islands to the history lover and the holidaymaker.

John also meets the writer Jasper Winn who paddled his way around Ireland in a kayak. The journey led him to see his home island from a new perspective with its wild coastline, wildlife - and wild winds which on one occasion stranded him on an uninhabited island.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 What's So Great About ...? (b011msk8)
Series 3

The Pogues

Lenny Henry never quite got The Pogues. From the fist time he saw the band on the TV in the 80's, with the singer banging a tray on his head during a drunken reverie, they have mystified this Luther Vandross fan. He goes on a journey of enlightenment through Poguedom speaking to musicians, the former manager, music critics and die hard fans to gain a better appreciation of this unmissable London Irish band. He explores the romantic and brutally realistic poetry of Shane McGowan and summons up the raw energy of their live performances as he asks - what's so great about The Pogues?

Producer Neil McCarthy.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b011mskb)
The political map of Scotland has changed dramatically following the resounding success of the Scottish National Party in the May 2011 elections. Michael Buchanan goes behind the scenes at the SNP and the Scottish Labour Party to find out how the SNP achieved its victory and what the result means for Scotland's future. The election pitted the use of modern campaigning techniques against more traditional politics and marked a transformation of the argument for independence. But what are the forces at work behind the campaign rhetoric and why were so many in Scotland surprised by the extent of the SNP's success?


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b011p0fg)
A mysterious encounter with the sinister Colonel Tariq, thought to be from Pakistani Intelligence, is described by Aamer Ahmed Khan. Tim Whewell's in the Sinai Desert looking for terrorists and finding a roaring trade in rifles. A guided tour of Benghazi with Andrew Hosken: he finds that Colonel Gaddafi couldn't make the railways run on time -- he couldn't make the railways either! An acute housing shortage in Beijing is described by Martin Patience - it's meant people living in air raid shelters, bunkers and tunnels. And there's joy and some plum brandy in the foothills of the Carpathians as Caroline Juler joins a cheerful crowd of farmers at their annual measuring of sheep's milk.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b011p0fj)
On Money Box with Paul Lewis:

A crucial weekend for those hoping to get 2012 Olympic tickets but had banking teething problems
Plus:Can teenagers be liable in law if they've signed up for a service that has misleading charges?
And: would you invest in a fund classified as A, B, C, or D? The programme will reveal all.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b011jx7l)
Series 74

Episode 8

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Rory Bremner, Jeremy Hardy, Mark Steel and Fred Macaulay.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b011jx9v)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b011jx9x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b011jx7s)
Jonathan Dimbleby presents a discussion about politics and what's in the news from St Julian's Methodist Church, Newport, Gwent, with the historian and biographer of Georgiana, the Duchesss of Devonshire, Amanda Foreman; shadow Labour minister for Wales, Owen Smith; Conservative MP, Nadine Dorries; and Helen Mary Jones, who was Plaid Cymru's assembly member for Llanelli but lost her seat in May's elections.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b011p0fl)
Your chance to respond to the issues raised in last night's edition of Any Questions? Call Jonathan Dimbleby on 03700 100 444 or email any.answers@bbc.co.uk

On the panel were: The former Plaid Cymru Assembly Member Helen Mary Jones, the historian Amanda Foreman, Shadow Wales Office Minister Owen Smith and Conservative MP Nadine Dorries. They discussed F1 in Bahrain later this year, corruption in FIFA, Care homes: collapse of Southern Cross and mistreatment of residents in a Bristol home. Should drug use be decriminalised? and does Abstinence work in the teenage pregnancy?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b011p0fn)
Little Platoons

by Steve Waters

Separated from her partner, Martin, and disillusioned with teaching at the west London comprehensive which their son Sam attends, Rachel's looking for an outlet for her evangelical zeal. More out of curiosity than conviction, she goes to a pilot meeting of a free-school initiative headed by middle-class Nick and Lara. Only to find herself embroiled in a mix of private and public rows that exposes the confusion that surrounds the subject of how we can best educate our children.

Rachel de Witt ..... Claire Price
Martin ..... Richard Henders
Nick Orme ..... Andrew Woodall
Lara Orme ..... Susannah Harker
Parvez Akhtar ..... Christopher Simpson
Polly Tyneham ..... Joanne Froggatt
Samuel ..... Otto Farrant
Marcus ..... Kerron Darby
Amitha ..... Mandeep Dhillon
Sadie ..... Holli Dempsey
Brandon ..... Joe Cole

Directed for stage by Nathan Curry
Produced by Jeremy Mortimer

This radio production is presented with the original cast from the Bush Theatre production which premiered earlier this year. Reviews for the Bush Theatre production:

[Little Platoons] wittily exposes the confusion that surrounds the subject of how we best educate our children.... **** Michael Billington, Guardian

I can't recall a more urgently satirical local play at this address in all the wonderful 38 years of its existence. It's also a witty paradigm of subsidised theatre in its subject matter: a middle-class initiative born of self-interested motives using public money. Perfect. **** Michael Coveney, Whatsonstage.com.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b011p0fq)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Presented by Jane Garvey. Slutwalk: is it okay for women to wear what they want, when they want, and where they want? We talk to Frederick Leboyer, the father of natural childbirth; news of a retrospective on the work of the fashion designer Joyce Ridings; author Ann Patchett on her new book; what was the practice of baby farming in history? Ballerina Tamara Rojo; and champion bowler Betty Morgan from Wales.

Producer Jane Thurlow

Presenter Jane Garvey.


SAT 17:00 PM (b011p0fs)
With Carolyn Quinn. A fresh perspective on the day's news with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b011p0fv)
Is Greed is Good?

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

With plenty to worry about in the world economy, Evan asks his panel of influential business leaders whether now is a good time for companies to sit tight and play it safe, or to take a risk or two. They also discuss greed - is there anything wrong with a touch of it in business?

Evan is joined in the studio by Geoff Cooper, chief executive of builders merchant Travis Perkins; Harriet Green, chief executive of electronic components distributor Premier Farnell; serial technology entrepreneur Sir Terry Matthews.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b011jx9z)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b011jxb1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011jxb3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b011p0fx)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive talks to singer-songwriter k.d. lang. Her ground breaking twenty five year career has see her collect four GRAMMY Awards, a Brit, a VMA and Canada's highest civilian honour, The Order of Canada. With the release of her album Sing It Loud, she joins us on the tail end of her UK tour with her band the Siss Boom Bang.

Although Anthony Horowitz's phenomenally successful Alex Ryder books have come to an end (which persuaded the notoriously difficult market of teenage boys to read), Anthony is no less busy. 81 years after the death of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Anthony has written a new Sherlock Holmes book and has penned a new series for ITV1 - 'Injustice' a psychological thriller set in the British legal system.

The explorer Ed Stafford Walked the Amazon, from source to sea, 4000 miles in total and it took him 853 days. So it was a stroll in the park to get himself to the Loose Ends studio and tell us about his adventures.

Rachael Stirling talks to the Fairy Jobmother Hayley Taylor who has her work cut out trying to help the unemployed and seemingly unemployable back to work for her second series on Channel 4.

There's music from the effortlessly inventive, Brit award winning four piece Guillemots, performing their new single 'I Must Be A Lover' from their album Walk the River.

And American bluesman Seasick Steve performs on a variety of customised guitars for his latest album 'You Can't Teach An Old Dog New Tricks'. It could be a 3 String Trace Wonder, a Cigar Box guitar or even one made from a Morris Minor hubcap - which one will it be when he plays 'It's A Long, Long Way' for us in the Loose Ends studio?

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b011p0fz)
Series 10

Episode 6

With the governance of international football being so much in the news this week, Ed Jones takes a look at how morality plays out at a more local level. Two football dads meet over a pint and discuss their lads.

Jonah....Greg Wood
Robbie...Will Ash

Director Gary Brown

The return of the award-winning series in which writers create a fictional response to the week's news. A 15 minute stand-alone drama created from scratch during the week.

To complement Radio 4's News and Current Affairs output, our weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. The form and content is entirely led by the news topic - so drama can come in many guises, as well as poetry and prose.

It's uniquely radio - an instant reaction to the mood of the moment - a concept impossible to imagine in any other medium.

FF2F presents writers with the creative opportunity to work in a bold and instinctive way as they respond to events in the news, beginning on a Monday when an idea is selected through to Friday when the programme is recorded and edited.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b011p0g1)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests film-maker James Runcie and writers Lisa Appignanesi and Kevin Jackson review the cultural highlights of the week including Much Ado About Nothing.

Josie Rourke's production of Much Ado About Nothing at Wyndham's Theatre in London stars David Tennant as Benedick and Catherine Tate as Beatrice - the pair of bickering lovers who overcome their mutual antipathy. Rourke has relocated the action to somewhere resembling Gibraltar in the early 1980s complete with Princess Di masks and lurid cocktails.

Senna is Asif Kapadia's film about the three times World Champion Brazilian Formula 1 driver. Using only archive footage, the documentary follows Senna from his first Formula 1 season in 1984 to his final race at Imola ten years later and also charts the increasingly bitter rivalry between Senna and Alain Prost.

Veteran American writer Cynthia Ozick's new novel Foreign Bodies is partly set in early 1950s Paris - a city still recovering from war and populated by many displaced people. Bea travels there from New York to retrieve a nephew who she barely knows on behalf of her overbearing brother, but her attempts to resolve the family's problems have their own unforeseen consequences.

There are two new comedies on BBC TV this week. Angry Boys is Chris Lilley's follow up to Summer Heights High and sees him playing six characters including twin brothers Daniel and Nathan and their grandmother who employs unconventional methods in her work at a young offenders institution. In With the Flynns is a family-based sitcom starring Will Mellor and Niky Wardley as a Manchester couple juggling work and parenthood.

The Royal Academy's annual Summer Exhibition is the world's largest open submission contemporary art show and this is its 243rd year. This year's co-ordinator is sculptor and painter Christopher Le Brun who says that because of some of the Royal Academicians' mixed feelings about the exhibition in previous years, a greater emphasis has been placed on how the work is hung and curated. Most of the work in the exhibition is for sale.

Producer Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b011p0hz)
A Life Less Ordinary

Episode 2

This is the second programme in a series of three looking at how an ordinary life can be transformed by extraordinary events. One minute Kim Cotton was a housewife, the mother of two children, but then she saw a programme about an American agency looking for surrogate mothers in the UK. She was fascinated and decided it would be a way for her to earn money for her family. She became pregnant with a child that became known as Baby Cotton for a fee of £6,000. Everything was fine until she decided to sell her story to the Daily Star for £15,000. She was vilified by much of the media and the public for both selling the baby and then making money from the newspaper. Kim goes back through the archive and speaks to journalists who interviewed her at the time.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b011j3kf)
Plantagenet: Series 2

Edward I - Old Soldiers

Edward the First - Old Soldiers
by Mike Walker. Inspired by Holinshed's Chronicles. Edward Longshanks - the Hammer of the Scots - was grief-stricken after the death of his first wife. But he finds new love with Margaret, sister of the French King. And heartache with his son Ned.
Edward 1st ... Philip Jackson
Margaret ...Ellie Kendrick
Ned ... Sam Troughton
Gaveston ...Simon Bubb
Wallace.. .James Lailey
Roger Bigod ... Jonathan Forbes
With Sean Baker, Brian Bowles, Nyasha Hatendi, Stuart McLoughlin, Joanna Monro, Peter Polycarpou, Daniel Rabin, Alun Raglan and Jane Whittenshaw.

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer and Jessica Dromgoole

Philip Jackson, Sam Troughton and Patrick Kennedy take the roles of Edward the First, Edward the Second and Richard the Second in a new series of plays by Mike Walker chronicling the Plantagenet dynasty.

These plays tell the story of the birth of a new Europe after the dark ages. The issues of control, of freedom, of belief, above all, perhaps, the temptations of power which are so familiar to us now were new to an age which had no template for domination on this scale.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b011jxb5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b011jv8m)
Science and morality

You wouldn't have thought that a book on the latest discoveries in the science of human behaviour would be high on the reading lists of politicians, but think again. David Brooks' The Social Animal is required reading for politicians on both sides of the Atlantic. When he visited the UK a couple of weeks ago he had meetings with both the Prime Minister and leader of the Labour Party. Politicians, it seems, are increasingly turning to disciplines like neuroscience and evolutionary anthropology to understand why we do things, so they can better tailor and design policies that will work in the real world. That all sounds very sensible, but how far should we take this new found enthusiasm for scientifically designed political policies? As science increasingly begins to explain our behaviour it is also challenging our assumptions about moral and social values. For millennia our moral reasoning has been guided by first principles - theology and philosophy. Should we embrace rather than fear the knowledge science brings as it helps unravel some of morality's muddles that have so far defeated our greatest thinkers? We almost un-questioningly accept that science can be used to improve our physical wellbeing, but why shouldn't it be used to make us better people? If neuroscience can change our understanding of human behaviour - and misbehaviour - why should it not be used to frame our laws, our ethics, our morality, to make the world a better place?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by David Aaronovitch with Claire Fox, Clifford Longley, Kenan Malik and Matthew Taylor.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b011j7v7)
Series 25

Episode 9

(9/13)

The contest to find this year's musical mastermind reaches a crucial stage, with Paul Gambaccini chairing the ninth and last heat of the 2011 series. One of today's competitors will take the only remaining place in the semi-finals of this year's competition.

The final trio of contestants this year come from the London area and Kent. To make it through, they'll have to demonstrate the widest possible knowledge of music in many genres, from the classical repertoire through show tunes, film themes, jazz, classic rock, and six decades of the pop charts.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b011j3kk)
A mixture of poetry requests to take us from dawn to dusk, with work by Norman MacCaig, Stephen Spender and Peter McDonald. There's a languid poem dreamt up by the American James Wright as he lay in a hammock at dusk, one by DH Lawrence longing for the company of his love to watch the sun setting and a 'crop of stars' growing silently, and a wry warning to a deluded Lothario as he takes the night air to try his luck.

The readers are Jonjo O'Neill, Peter Marinker and Alison McKenna.
Producer: Sarah Langan.



SUNDAY 05 JUNE 2011

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b011p0sf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nfmkn)
Sophie Hannah - The Fantastic Book of Everybody's Secrets

The Octopus Nest

Series of chilling tales from crime writer Sophie Hannah's first short story collection.

Claire and Timothy have no idea why there's a strange woman appearing in so many of their family photographs. As Claire stumbles across the answer, she is more frightened than ever.

Read by Helen Bradbury.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011p0sh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011p0sk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011p0sm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b011p0sp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b011p0st)
The bells of St Mary and St Chad, Brewood, Staffordshire.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b011jv8p)
Series 2

Anne Applebaum: Repressive Regimes

Anne Applebaum, the author of "Gulag", asks how governments can best compensate victims of former repressive regimes and turn secret police records into meaningful archives.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling.

Recorded live in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b011p0sw)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b011p10g)
Faith on the Frontline

The journalist Jo Fidgen examines how religious belief can be both diminished and strengthened during service on the frontline.

She talks with Padre Simon Rose of the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment about his experiences in Afghanistan and with Brian Turner, the American poet who served in Iraq. And she also draws upon the writings of soldiers who saw action in the First World War, including the Padre Geoffrey Studdert Kennedy, and Vietnam (the poet Yusef Komunyakaa).

With music by Bobby McFerrin, Sheryl Crow, Ivor Gurney and Penderecki.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b011p10j)
Colin and Pauline Dyer, and their 22 year old son Michael, have just reintroduced a herd of dairy cows to their farm near Bodmin. They are going against the tide, with many farmers deciding to stop milk production because it's not profitable or because they can't afford to re-invest in the business. The Dyers have bought a herd of Jerseys and are selling their milk at a good price for ice cream production. Presented and produced by Sarah Swadling.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b011p0sy)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b011p0t0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b011p10m)
William Crawley with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories familiar and unfamiliar.

Next week more than a thousand activists will descend on Westminster demanding to have a cup of tea with their MP. They also have a few other demands as Matthew Frost the Chief Executive of Tearfund tells William.

In the first of a three part series leading up to the summer solstice we look at paganism in the UK today. Charles Carroll starts by looking at what it is, that pagans believe.

The Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme sounds very dull but it has benefited thousands of places of worship for over a decade. We will find out how the coalition want to end this benefit and ask what it will mean for decaying and decrepit churches, synangogues and mosques many of which are places of historical interest.

Ratko Mladic made his first appearance at The Hague War Crimes Tribunal this week, refusing to enter a plea to what he called "monstrous" and "obnoxious" charges. We look back at the role played by the Serbian Orthodox Church in the conflict as William talks to Marcus Tanner, who reported on the war for The Independent and is now Editor of Balkan Insight Magazine.

As Egypt counts down to its first election of the post Mubarak-era, Tarek Osman joins us from Cairo to tell William about the rise in sectarian violence which could spoil the country's return to democracy.

A rash of newspaper headlines this week suggested that a culture of marrying first cousins in Bradford was leading to major health problems. Trevor Barnes speaks to the man behind the headlines, who claims he was misquoted and then travels to Bradford to investigate.

Why has the Vatican prevented Dr Lesley Ann Knight Director General of Caritas International from standing for a second term? Presenter William Crawley will discuss the controversy with her predecessor Duncan McClaren and our Rome Correspondent David Willey.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b011p10p)
Penny Brohn Cancer Care

Jessica Brohn presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Penny Brohn Cancer Care.

Donations to Penny Brohn Cancer Care should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Penny Brohn Cancer Care. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. You can also give online at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Penny Brohn Cancer Care with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 284881


SUN 07:57 Weather (b011p0t2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b011p0t4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b011p10r)
All ground is holy ground

As the BBC establishes a new broadcasting centre at MediaCityUK in Salford Quays, Sunday Worship swaps its traditional church setting for one of the BBC's new studios, for a service with the local community exploring the Christian belief that God is present everywhere, including in our places of work and play.

The BBC Philharmonic and Manchester Chamber Choir, conducted by Paul Brough, lead a congregation gathered from the city of Salford, from the BBC and of MediaCityUK representatives. The music will include the hymns Dear Lord and Father of Mankind, Angel-voices ever singing and Bach's beautiful anthem: Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring.

The preacher is the Bishop of Bolton, The Rt Revd Chris Edmondson, who has been closely involved in the development of MediaCityUK and its links to the wider community. The service is led by the Chaplain to MediaCityUK, The Revd Hayley Matthews. Producer: Simon Vivian.


SUN 08:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b011jx7v)
Series 2

Chameleon

Many of the world's chameleons live on the huge continental island of Madagascar off the Eastern coast of Africa. Some are tiny, as small as a finger nail - others in comparison are giants.

Sir David Attenborough gives us his warm personal insight into the natural history of chameleons through one very special individual - a chameleon he had as a pet, called Rommel.

Producer: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b011p10t)
Patrick O'Connell presents news and conversation about the big stories of the week.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b011p10w)
For detailed synopses, see daily episodes.

Written by: Adrian Flynn
Directed by: Kim Greengrass
Editor: Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Josh Archer ..... Cian Cheesbrough
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ..... Jack Firth
Lily Pargetter ..... Georgie Feller
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane ..... Kellie Bright
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Jolene Perks ..... Buffy Davis
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Christopher Carter ..... William Sanderson-Thwaite
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Hayley Tucker ..... Lorraine Coady
Caroline Sterling ..... Sara Coward
Lewis Carmichael ..... Robert Lister
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Annabelle Shrivener ..... Julia Hills
Harry Mason ..... Michael Shelford
Sofia ..... Izabella Urbanowicz
Penny Marsh ..... Elaine Claxton.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b011p13c)
Alfie Boe

Kirsty Young's castaway is the singer Alfie Boe.

He is one of our most popular tenors and, highly unusually, is a sell-out success in both opera houses and musical theatre. The youngest of nine children, he left school to work as a mechanic - before being plucked off the shop-floor for stardom. However, while he's at home on the stage, you won't necessarily find him in the stalls: "I like good singers, I don't necessarily like one genre of music, I just like good singers, good voices and good songs," he says, adding: "I never go to the opera.... it's just not my world."

Producer: Leanne Buckle.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b011j7vh)
Series 60

Episode 3

It's the panel game that rewards chatterboxes but only if they don't repeat themselves, hesitate or deviate from the subject given to them by chairman Nicholas Parsons.

Today's show sees Stephen Fry describing How to Clean a Chandelier, Sue Perkins revealing her violent style of Weeding, Paul Merton sharing all he knows about Aristotle and new girl Fi Glover describing The Best Sort of Babysitter.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b011tw7n)
Burgers and meat

The burger is one of the world's most popular foods and it made meat eating affordable for millions, but it also became the food that symbolised many of the failings of the world's modern food system.

Sheila Dillon looks at a new attempt to revive its reputation as a quality food. This new "burger scene" where immense care is taken with sourcing the meat and using the right cuts, reflects not only a shift in burger eating, but also in attitudes to meat eating itself.

The highly respected food and farming writers Simon Fairlie and Colin Tudge both share the views on eating meat in the 21st century.

Producer: Dan Saladino

Photography: Paul-Winch Furness.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b011p0t6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b011p1kg)
The latest national and international news, with David Eades. Listeners can comment via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The Balancing Bluebottle (b00jz7cc)
The natural history film is a hundred years old. Percy Smith was its greatest pioneer, making dozens of short but brilliant films on subjects like flies and slime mould. In his principal studio, the back garden of his home in north London, he developed innovative microscope- and time-lapse photography in the 1920s that still makes viewers gasp and filmmakers jealous.

Talking to historians and to Sir David Attenborough and eavesdropping on flickering reels of film, Tim Boon of the Science Museum tells how the balancing bluebottle came to be.

Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b011jx0h)
Kirkcudbright, Dumfries & Galloway

Eric Robson and the team join gardeners in Kirkcudbright, West Scotland. He is joined by Anne Swithinbank, Christine Walkden & Matthew Biggs. In addition, Christine Walkden visits Logan Botanic Garden.
Matthew Wilson updates on the 2012 Olympic Park in London.

Produced by Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 GPs Who Need GPS (b00tdmsr)
Doctor of the Isles

GP Rachel Weldon's Medical Practice stretches beyond the shores of the remote Isle of Eigg to cover the other Small Isles of Muck, Rum and Canna.

The very much suburban GP Phil Hammond narrates the journeys taken by Rachel, her husband and boatman Eric and collie dog Laurie, as they carry out their monthly round to Canna.

Produced by Lucy Lloyd.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b011p246)
Plantagenet: Series 2

Edward II - The Greatest Traitor

Edward the Second - The Greatest Traitor
by Mike Walker. Inspired by Holinshed's Chronicles. While Edward's power is prey to his passions, his queen, Isabella, and his most powerful ally, Roger Mortimer, find a passion of their own.

Cast
Edward the Second ..... Sam Troughton
Isabella ..... Hattie Morahan
Mortimer ..... Trystan Gravelle
Prince Edward ..... Joseph Samrai
Despenser ..... Jonathan Forbes

Other parts were played by Sean Baker, Simon Bubb, James Lailey, Peter Polycarpou, Daniel Rabin, and Alun Raglan .

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer and Jessica Dromgoole

Philip Jackson, Sam Troughton and Patrick Kennedy take the roles of Edward the First, Edward the Second and Richard the Second in a new series of plays by Mike Walker chronicling the Plantagenet dynasty.

These plays tell the story of the birth of a new Europe after the dark ages. The issues of control, of freedom, of belief, above all, perhaps, the temptations of power which are so familiar to us now were new to an age which had no template for domination on this scale.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b011p248)
Nicole Krauss - The History of Love

James Naughtie and readers talk to American writer Nicole Krauss, shortlisted for this year's Orange Prize.

Our chosen novel is her critically acclaimed The History of Love.

It's a complex tale of loss - a lost manuscript, lost homelands, characters grieving for lost loved ones. There are four separate narrators who are all drawn to the lost book - also called The History of Love.

Leo Gursky is at the end of his life, tapping his radiator each evening to let his neighbour know he's still alive, drawing attention to himself at the local coffee bar. He doesn't want to die on a day when no-one has seen him.

As a young man Leo wrote The History of Love in pre-war Poland. Although he doesn't know it, the book also survived, crossing oceans and generations and changing lives.

Fourteen-year-old Alma was named after a character in that book, and lives across New York City from Leo. She and her little brother, who thinks he is the Messiah, are recovering from the loss of their father.

The starting point for writing the novel was the story of her grandmother, who came to England as a chaperone on the Kindertransport, and lost all her family in the Holocaust. She had fallen in love with a young doctor, whom she had also presumed dead. Forty years later, he wrote to her grandmother from South America.

Nicole's History of Love is like a jigsaw, where all the pieces come together at the end - and she talks about how she has no preconceived idea about where the story will end as she begins. Nicole likens it to being a traveller in a foreign city, walking from street to street, finding her way.

July's Bookclub choice : 'The Music Room' by William Fiennes.

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b011p24b)
Roger McGough with a varied selection of poetry requested by listeners, including subjects as diverse as gardening, Heaven, and whether or not writing is poetry counts as proper work.

Producer Christine Hall.


SUN 17:00 The Men with the Ear of the President (b011jrh9)
Who advises the most powerful man in the world and what do they tell him? Jonathan Powell, Tony Blair's former Chief of Staff, speaks to key advisors to the American President including Karl Rove, the man described as George W. Bush's "brain." What is the role of the Chief of Staff? How do they break bad news to their boss? Are they sounding boards or punching bags? How do interpersonal dynamics intersect with developing strategy? How do they cope with global crises and what fits them for the job?


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b011p0fz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b011p0t8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b011p0tb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011p0td)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b011p24d)
It's a busy week on Pick of the Week this week which sees Steve Delaney, creator of Radio 4's Count Arthur Strong, travelling the globe, economy class of course, stopping off in Africa, with Fela Kuti, passing through Jamaica with Lenny Henry and popping over to Nashville with Suzi Quatro. Pausing only to have a quick listen to Tony Blackburn, take in a little bit of politics and experience Sore Fingers in the Cotswolds. Which hopefully you can get some ointment for. All without leaving the kitchen. How's that for reducing your carbon footprint!

Suzi Quatro in Search of Patsy Cline - Radio 2
Sounds of the 20th Century - Radio 2
Lives in a Landscape - Radio 4
Corrinne Come Back and Gone - Radio 4
Ox Travels - Radio 4
Fela Kuti Comes Home - Radio 4
PM - Radio 4
Tony Blackburn - Radio 2
Party - Radio 4
Boy Racers - Radio 4
Outlook - World Service
Sore Fingers - Radio 4
French and Saunders - Radio 2
Great Unanswered Questions - Radio 4
Words and Music - Radio 3

Steve Delaney makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Cecile Wright.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b011p24g)
Jill's comforted to have Shula with her at St Stephen's, and praises her to Alan. With Nigel's birthday on Wednesday they know it'll be a tough week for Elizabeth. Jill doesn't think it's a good idea that Elizabeth's decided to go on a day course with Roy, on historic houses, on Nigel's birthday. Alan suggests Jill needs to trust Elizabeth.

It's the South Borsetshire Hunt puppy show at Netherbourne. Christine congratulates Shula on a wonderful spread. Lily hopes she can be a puppy walker one day. Oliver's a bit embarrassed that Caroline isn't with him but the event goes well.

When Caroline finally arrives, Shula warns her that she's in the doghouse. Oliver tells Caroline that he feels thoroughly let down on such a big occasion. Caroline explains to Oliver that she's been short-staffed due to illness. Oliver knew the extra work at Grey Gables would be a problem and points out that Caroline has let everyone down. Caroline feels awful, as Oliver gets back to his guests.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b011p24j)
In the melting pot of the US, Americana explores the heated debate over immigration.

As U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services launches a new media campaign to encourage immigrants to apply for citizenship, Americana discusses the impact of immigrants on the economics, security and cultural richness of the United States today.

Lewis and Clark were among America's first immigrants - Americana asks what sort of reception they got from the native American tribes back in 1805.

The Pulitzer-Prize-winning author Oscar Hijuelos recalls a childhood between two worlds.

And musician Jauvon Gilliam explains how he had to disguise his identity in his bid to win the coveted position of Principal Timpanist with the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington D.C.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00nk4lm)
Tales From the Low Countries

My Father's Photo Album

When the Dutch-Moroccan character at the centre of Abdelkader Benali's short story learns that his mother is ill, he's compelled to make a long-overdue visit to his parents' house in Rotterdam. The visit proves to be the start of a journey through his childhood, family history and sense of himself.

Read by Khalid Abdalla
Translated by David McKay
Abridged and produced by Emma Harding.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b011jx0f)
Is local radio in England worth its £110 million budget? Roger returns to his home county of Cumbria to speak to listeners there about why their local BBC radio station is one of the most popular in the country.

And you wanted to hear more from Sharon Shoesmith, the former director of Haringey children's services. Maybe you would have if it was someone other than John Humphrys interviewing her on The Today programme.

How many children listen to the radio in the middle of the night? None we hope, so why are so many of you being kept awake by CBeebies programmes at 2 o'clock in the morning? Radio 4's Network Manager Denis Nowlan explains.

And what exactly is a lamb bank? Well it helps save the lives of thousands of lambs each year - and there no bonuses involved.

Contact the Feedback team to let Roger know what else you'd like him to tackle this series about anything you've heard on BBC radio.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b011jx0k)
Dame Barbara Mills, Gil Scott-Heron, Leonora Carrington, Flick Colby

Matthew Bannister on:

Dame Barbara Mills QC, the successful barrister who became the first woman Director of Public Prosecutions.

The poet and singer Gil Scott-Heron who gave voice to the black American experience.

The surrealist artist Leonora Carrington who scandalised her father by running away with Max Ernst and became a national treasure in Mexico.

And Flick Colby who choreographed Pans People's weekly routines on Top of the Pops. We have a tribute from Babs.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b011p0fj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b011p10p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b011j7vr)
Unhealthy Expectations?

Is our NHS debate avoiding the key issue? The talk is of another reorganisation of the NHS and greater efficiencies enabling the NHS in England to face the future. But the overall challenge goes much deeper, and the politicians dare not address it. As well as the pressures of demography and inflation in health care costs, the health service faces what it has always faced - public expectation of ever better health care means an ever greater proportion of our national wealth has been spent on health. Now it is said that this must simply stop. But does this hope - one in a long history of so far unrealised hopes -simply obscure the more painful reality. One way or another, privately or publicly, our health care ambitions have to be paid for, and we are failing to decide how.

In 'Unhealthy Expectations' Michael Blastland looks at how this problem has loomed for years but never been faced - at least not in open political debate. He explores what the real choices are if constantly improved care is to be provided - and whether this must mean either much higher personal taxes or a population prepared to pay much directly for care. Or is there a realistic way of squaring the circle of rising demand within fixed budgets?
If something has to give, then what? Will you give up your expectations?


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b011p25n)
Carolyn Quinn previews the week ahead in Parliament with a leading political journalist.

She talks to the former Liberal leader David Steel. Lord Steel has proposed a bill to change the way members of the upper house are appointed. He explains why he believes a properly independent appointments commission is needed along with a means of allowing peers to retire. He also wants the Lords to be rid - over time - of hereditary peers.

This week's MPs panel is made up of the Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg and the Labour MP Gregg McClymont. They discuss some of the big political stories.

Maurice Glasman, a Labour peer and adviser to Ed Miliband, debates the meaning of 'Blue Labour' with Patrick Diamond, who advised the governments of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. They discuss Labour's record on the economy, the role of markets and the state and the direction Ed Miliband is taking Labour.

Programme editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b011p25q)
Episode 55

Miranda Green, the Editor of The Day analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and Beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b011jx0m)
Documentaries are in vogue. From Man on Wire to the films of Michael Moore they've captured our hearts and our minds. In this week's edition of The Film Programme Francine Stock examines the very latest and very best of the current releases such as Asif Kapadia's much lauded Senna and Jerry Rothwell's subtle account of the family in the age of the sperm bank, Donor Unknown. The BBC's Storyville editor, Nick Fraser, will be paying tribute to two acknowledged masters, the Maysles Brothers, whose work includes the iconic, Gimme Shelter and the beautiful and affecting portrait of down-at-heel American aristocracy, Grey Gardens. And to round things off Charlie Phillips, one of the organisers of the Sheffield Documentary Festival, and the director Emily James discuss crowd funding - a business model that's revolutionising the genre
Producer Zahid Warley.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b011p10g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 06 JUNE 2011

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b011p117)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b011jv8c)
Household breakup in New Orleans - Communist memories

Hurricane Katrina led to the compulsory evacuation of all the residents of New Orleans. They were sent to shelters in distant destinations ranging from Houston to Tennessee. The scale of the disaster meant that most were unable to stay with or near family. But new research finds that this trauma was compounded by the authorities' failure to recognise the prevalence of extended families amongst the New Orleans poor. The trailers to which they re-located were set up for nuclear families as was the reconstructed housing to which they returned. The American social scientist Michael Rendall discusses post Katrina family breakdown with Laurie Taylor. Also, the process of remembering Communism in Central Eastern Europe. The historian James Mark's new book considers how countries come to terms with the legacies of the past. He joins the Psychology lecturer, Dr Jovan Byford, to question whether people's actual memories of the communist era at odds with officially imposed narratives?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b011p0st)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011p119)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011p11c)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011p11f)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b011p11h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011p81r)
Tina Beattie

With Dr Tina Beattie, Director of Catholic Studies at Roehampton University.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b011p81t)
Caz Graham hears calls for Agricultural Wages Boards to be scrapped to make farming more competitive. But the Unite union claims that could lead to poverty and exploitation.

And the National Trust defends its decision to choose organic over conventional farming methods at its new interactive MY FARM project. The scheme aims to help people re-connect with farming, but some traditional farmers argue by going organic, it wont give the general public a representative view of farming

Presenter: Caz Graham; Producer: Angela Frain.


MON 05:57 Weather (b011p11k)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b011qfln)
With Sarah Montague and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b011p723)
Andrew Marr talks to the historian Jane Shaw about the story of Mabel Barltrop: she was renamed Octavia by her followers who believed she was the daughter of God. The theatre director, Jonathan Kent, brings the last non-Christian ruler of the Roman Empire to the stage, in the little known Ibsen play, Emperor and Galilean. Ziauddin Sardar gives his take on the Qur'an, drawing contemporary lessons from this Sacred Text on everything from power and politics, to sex and evolution. And Ross Perlin exposes the world of unpaid work, in his investigation into the deals done in the name of internships.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b011p5h8)
Malcolm X - A Life of Reinvention

Episode 1

Manning Marable spent over twenty years writing this exhaustive account of the life of Malcolm X. In it he challenges many preconceptions held about Malcolm and examines Malcolm's own autobiography - revealing the truth about his omissions and inaccuracies.

Malcolm's early life was extremely tough. Inspired by Marcus Garvey his parents kept moving home to spread the word but they always ran up against the Ku Klux Klan and other vigilante groups determined to see them run out of town.

Read by Colin McFarlane

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011p7sp)
Presented by Jane Garvey. Illustrator and writer Shirley Hughes on 30 years of her creation, Alfie. The MP who thinks 'shared parenting' should have the backing of the law when parents divorce - we discuss what's in the children's best interests. Argentinian pianist Ingrid Fliter on international success and her love of Chopin. Speech loss after a stroke is common but what help is available for those who suffer from long term communication difficulties?


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b011p5hn)
Christopher Nicholson - The Elephant Keeper

Episode 1

In this adaptation of Christopher Nicolson's vivid and dramatic novel, the central story is about the relationship between a boy and an elephant. But this is no whimsical love story - it's about power, and how power and violence distort relationships. It's about how the rich abuse the poor, and how humans abuse animals. And yet, this is also a simple moving drama, told by a young man, about the defining love of his life.

Tom is 16 when the story opens, a simple West Country boy, the son of a groom on a country estate in the 18th century. When his master acquires a pair of elephants, the job of keeper falls to him. Overcoming his fears, Tom begins a relationship with the elephants which will change the course of his life.

Adapted for radio by Elizabeth Burke

CAST
Tom .....Stuart McLoughlin
Lizzie .....Sarah Ovens
Mr Harrington .....Bertie Carvel
Mrs Harrington .....Claire Cage
Dr Chisholm .....Richard Mitchley

Producer: Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


MON 11:00 Good in Vestments (b011p7sr)
Amidst the rustle of silk, the drape of damask and the questions over whether the green or the red lining is better, the Reverend Richard Coles explores the ancient tradition of ecclesiastical vestment-wearing.

At the recent Royal Wedding, all eyes may have been on Catherine Middleton's dress, but the magnificent vestments worn by the Archbishop of Canterbury also caught peoples' attention.

Why do clergy still wear these clothes, who designs and sews them and has the emergence of women priests made any difference to who's wearing what in church?

In this programme, Rev Richard Coles talks to various members of the clergy and historians to find out more about the traditions and developments in the way vestments have been adopted by Anglicans and Catholics.

He goes to one of London's oldest vestment companies to meet priests being measured for their new clothes, and to talk to the seamstresses who stitch the chasubles and stoles by hand.

As well as hearing about the traditional designs, he investigates how some clergy are seeking out new pictures and patterns - and asks what that says about the role of vestments in an increasingly secular society.

Producer: Emma Kingsley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


MON 11:30 Mr Blue Sky (b011p7st)
Series 1

Good Luck

Harvey Easter (played by Mark Benton), 46, is the eternal optimist. He is able to see the good in every situation, the silver lining within every cloud, the bright side to every bit of bad news.

This, however, is his downfall. Someone for whom the glass is always half-full can be difficult to live with, as his wife of 19 years, Jacqui or "Jax" (played by Rebecca Front), knows all too well.

In this episode Robbie is taught a lesson whilst Harvey feels it's time to spill the beans, nothing is sure to get in the way...

Cast:
Harvey Easter .... Mark Benton
Jacqui Easter ..... Rebecca Front
Charlie Easter ..... Antonia Campbell-Hughes
Robbie Easter ..... Joe Tracini
Kill-R .... Javone Prince
Rakesh Rathi ..... Navin Chowdhry
Ray Marsh ..... Justin Edwards
Sean Cahoun ..... Michael Legge
Sergeant Major ..... Simon Day

Writer ..... Andrew Collins
Title Music performer/arranger ..... Jim Bob

Producer/Director ..... Anna Madley
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b011p7sw)
Julian Worricker on consumer news including the latest on the E. Coli outbreak in beansprouts in Germany. We discuss proposed benefits cuts for those living in social housing deemed too big for their needs. We explore claims that the plans will drive low income tenants towards debt and loan sharks as they try to stay in their homes. We consider a relatively unknown treatment approved for addressing Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. It's called EMDR which stands for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing and the Ministry of Defence is just one of the bodies beginning to use it. And Royal Mail privatisation - can we expect further delays as the legislation comes before Parliament?


MON 12:57 Weather (b011p11m)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b011x1ly)
With Martha Kearney. National and international news, featuring analysis, comment and interviews. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:30 Counterpoint (b011p7sy)
Series 25

Sem 1

(10/13)

Do you know which classical composer was humble enough to dedicate his ninth symphony to God?

You can find out the answer with Paul Gambaccini, as the general knowledge music quiz reaches the first semi-final of its 25th anniversary series. The three competitors taking part today have all come through their respective heats with flying colours. Which of them will take a place in the grand Final in a few weeks' time?

Producer Paul Bajoria.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b011p24g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b011p7t0)
Jimmy McAleavey - Hearing Voices

D.I. James McCoy is an old style, hard-man copper, who though tempted by an offer of redundancy, determines to nail the killer of a colleague involved in undercover work. McCoy knows what he has to do to gain a conviction, but for the first time in his career he finds himself undermined not only by a psychopathic murderer, but by a somehow familiar voice in his head which ridicules and emasculates him, and threatens to completely destroy him.

Hearing Voices by Jimmy McAleavey

James McCoy - Tim McInnerny
The Voice - Danny Webb
Kenny -Ian Bartholomew
McKenzie - Daniel Rabin
Fairleigh - Ewan Bailey
Anika - Jane Slavin
Davide - Nyasha Hatendi
Psychologist - Joanna Munroe

Hearing Voices was directed and produced by Eoin O'Callaghan.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b011p0hz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 The Rattigan Versions (b011s7zd)
Memories of Terence Rattigan from Princess Jean Galitzine

Memories of playwright Terence Rattigan, from people with a close personal or professional connection to him, in conversation with Mark Lawson. Princess Jean Galitzine was a good friend and neighbour, and was the basis for a central character in Separate Tables.

Producer India Rakusen.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b011tw7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b011p6yz)
Series 4

Six Degrees

The Infinite Monkeys, Brian Cox and Robin Ince, are joined on stage by special guest Stephen Fry and science writer Simon Singh to find out whether we really are only 6 degrees of separation from anyone else? What started as an interesting psychology experiment in connectedness, back in the 1960's, has not only taken on a life of its own in popular culture, but in the last 10 years has begun to influence everything from mathematics, to engineering and even biology. Brian and Robin look at how the concept of 6 degrees has influenced a whole new field of science and whether, in this age of social network sites such as Twitter and Facebook, we are in fact, far more connected than ever before. We also find out what Robin's "Bacon" number is. Whether Brian has an "Erdos" number, and whether, like Russell Crowe, any of the panel have successfully managed to combine the two.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 17:00 PM (b011r5q7)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011p11p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b011p7t2)
Series 60

Episode 4

On this week's show, which Nicholas Parsons describes as having affection and aggro in equal measure, the panellists are Paul Merton, Julian Clary, Gyles Brandreth and Tony Hawks.

Nicholas metes out the subjects and challenges each panellist to speak on a subject for one minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation - a task much more fiendish than it sounds.

This week Tony Hawks describes The First Signs of Summer, Paul tells us some Reasons Not to Go On Holiday, Gyles reveals his theory on Dividing Household Chores and Julian reveals what gives him A Good Laugh.

Producer: Claire Jones.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b011p605)
Elizabeth's impressed by Jessica's new photos of her birds. Roy wants the website to draw people in for experience days.

Ed's called home for a coffee. Oliver knocks on the door so Ed invites him to join them. A loud laugh from Oliver wakes Keira, so Oliver leaves them to it - but leaves Ed wondering if Oliver's checking up on him. He hopes Oliver doesn't think he can't hack it.

Oliver stops by at Brookfield. He and David chat about the Three Counties Show. Oliver has no regrets at handing the herd over to Ed, praising Ed's ability to spot any problems. Oliver comments on Elizabeth not being at the puppy show. It seems as if she'll never get over Nigel's death.

Roy tries to explain to Phoebe that a year is too long to go to South Africa. Phoebe's keen to properly get to know her family there, and is determined to go, no matter how different the lifestyle might be. Roy points out that lots of people will miss her so much, especially him and Hayley. Phoebe calmly and maturely says that she loves Roy and Hayley, but needs to get to know everything about her real mum now.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b011p7t4)
Ray Davies on long-lost tapes; Derren Brown

Ray Davies tells John Wilson how he recently discovered long-lost early recordings of The Kinks in his attic, and discusses the acts he's programmed in this year's Meltdown Festival at the Southbank Centre, London.

Illusionist Derren Brown discusses the ethics of hypnosis and mind games as he prepares for his new stage show Svengali.

The American Ambassador's residence in Regent's Park, which recently played host to the Obamas, holds a collection of art, including two paintings by Rothko. John is given a tour by the US Ambassador's wife Mrs Marjorie Susman.

The French crime thriller Point Blank (A bout portant), directed by Fred Cavayé, is an action-packed story of a male nurse racing against time to save his kidnapped, pregnant wife. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews.

Producer Andrea Kidd.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b011p5hn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Blogging against Bribery (b011p7t6)
Imagine if you had to pay a bribe to see your newborn baby, get your water supply connected or just obtain your driving licence?

This sort of everyday bribery corrodes the lives of millions of people across India. But campaigners are now trying to harness the power of the internet to tackle this insidious problem. As Mukti Jain Campion reports from Bangalore, the founders of ipaidabribe.com says its mission is to "uncover the market price of corruption" by enabling ordinary people to record their experiences of bribery, where it took place and how much was involved. No naming is permitted as it is not about targeting individuals but instead highlights which areas and procedures are most prone to corruption so that they can be tackled.

The website has already had a number of notable successes such as with Bangalore's head of regional transport who decided to use the website's revelations to tackle corruption amongst his own staff using technology to bypass the bribe-taking middlemen - including the introduction of the world's first automated driving centre.

The website is just part of a growing use of the internet and social media by civil society groups to tackle corruption. In April this year the blogosphere was set abuzz by the hunger protest of veteran campaigner Anna Hazare to force the Government to enact an anti-corruption bill that had been stalled for 42 years. His fast in Delhi was supported by campaigners across India and the world, fuelled by Facebook and Twitter to make it the most successful use of social media in an Indian protest. In the face of mass media coverage and spread of what is being nicknamed click-tivism, the Indian Government conceded to Anna Hazare's demands after just 4 days.

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b011p7t8)
Goodbye the Golden Eggs of Banking?

Time was when the City of London and the financial services industry generally were the apple of most politicians' eyes. The fabulous wealth they generated and taxes they paid seemed to set Britain on the road to lasting prosperity without having to worry about its manufacturing sector. With the crash, the political consensus has turned. Now, metal-bashing is back in favour and the bankers can do no right. The ritual call, heard at least once a generation, for Britain's economy to be more like Germany's is echoing across the land again.

But is making things rather than financial innovation really the way to make Britain's economy grow faster? When we have a competitive edge in banking and managing money, should we cast it aside? And why should Britain's economy be the same as that of other countries?

Janan Ganesh of the "Economist" asks if we should be turning our back on the goose that has laid our golden eggs for so many years. And, with no immediate signs that manufacturing is taking off on a bountiful new trajectory, considers if we should try to understand the City better and how it can assist Britain grow again.

Producer: Simon Coates.


MON 21:00 Material World (b011jvz3)
New E-coli strain found in Germany.
Quentin Cooper talks to Professor George Griffin, Head of the Academic Centre for Infection at St George's, University of London.

Hominid teeth

Early cavemen had foreign brides! An international team of researchers has been studying hominid teeth from two caves in South Africa. They were looking at the ratios of different types or isotopes of strontium in the teeth which they thought might reflect changing diet due to seasonal migration. Instead, they found a significant difference between the teeth of males and females. Most of the males had strontium values similar to those in the nearby rocks, suggesting they had lived in the same area for most of their lives, whereas many of the females seems to have come from different areas. Professor Julia Lee-Thorp, from the University of Oxford, explains more.

Science and Innovation
Writer Mark Stevenson, has curated a series of talks at the British Library as part of their Out of This World exhibition. His talk, ‘The Age of Entanglement’ looks at human interaction with science and innovation and whether we are too dependent on technology and how we view progress. He believes that science and innovation in the UK is being stifled and that there is a fear about progress. Last week, David Cameron and President Obama announced a key collaboration initiative concentrating on science, innovation and education. Obama called science education "critical to our future prosperity" and said that the U.S. and U.K could continue to emphasize "investments in education, science, technology, infrastructure -- things that help our economies grow". How dependent are we on technology and innovation? Quentin talks to Mark Stevenson and Sir Martin Taylor.

Fly Your Thesis!

Postgraduate students from Leicester have just had the next best thing to a spaceflight. They are back from a series of flights in France with the European Space Agency aboard a plane sometimes dubbed ‘the vomit comet'. It was part of an initiative called ‘fly your thesis’ in which PhD student projects get the chance to fly in a series of parabolic flights that simulate the weightlessness of space. Apart from the fun of experiencing zero gravity, they were also investigating one of the mysteries of the early stages of planetary formation.
David Gray and Dr Charly Feldman from Leicester University, join Quentin to explain more.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b011p723)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b011p11r)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b011r7zn)
The IMF broadly supports the Chancellor's economic plans, who are the main winners and losers?

The International Development Minister has just returned from Libya - he tells us about his visit.

And we look at the role of the militiary in Thai politics

All that and more with Ritula Shah on the World Tonight.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011p7z2)
Please Look After Mother

Episode 3

Kyung-Sook Shin is arguably Korea's most popular and acclaimed novelist. Please Look After Mother has already sold over 1.5 million copies in Korea and has been reprinted over 100 times, turned into plays and a film. It is now published in 19 countries.

Please Look After Mother tells the story of So-nyo, an elderly wife and mother, who goes missing on Seoul station. Only with her gone, do her children and her husband begin to appreciate not only all she has done for them, but who she really was and how much they have left unsaid.

A story in part about the cultural clash between the generation who inhabit modern, urban Seoul and their parents steeped in the rural traditions of Korea, Please Look After Mother is also a universal reminder of how easy it is to take the people we love for granted.

In today's episode, Hyong-Chol, the first born and favourite son, continues to search fruitlessly for his mother. As he does so, memories of his youth surface and he begins to realise all that he owes to her.

The reader is Sian Thomas
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The translator is Chi-Young Kim
The producer is Di Speirs.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b011jvyx)
Foreign

When did you first notice that not everyone was like you ? For American satirist Joe Queenan, growing up in an Irish American neighbourhood of Philadelphia, it was the moment he walked into an Italian cheese shop. Poet Elvis MacGonagall, sole resident of the Graceland caravan park outside Dundee, dodges the question by writing a brilliant poem that rhymes foreign with sporran. And Amanda Mitchison recounts an episode in a Cairo market where she was continually shortchanged in her efforts to buy chicken breast. In short she says, to be foreign is always to be the fool, unsure how to dress, to speak, and to buy a decent piece of chicken.

New writing and discussion on the subject of Foreign, what it means and why it matters, chaired by Dominic Arkwright. The programme is produced by Miles Warde.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011p7z4)
With MPs not back from their half term break until tomorrow, Sean Curran reports on demands in the Lords to allow the humble cheque to stay in use in the digital age; and on moving tributes to the heroism of female secret agents dropped behind enemy lines in World War Two.



TUESDAY 07 JUNE 2011

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b011p11w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b011p5h8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011p11y)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011p120)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011p122)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b011p124)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011p5hb)
Tina Beattie

With Dr Tina Beattie, Director of Catholic Studies at Roehampton University.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b011p5hd)
As the government prepares its vision for England's natural environment, Anna Hill asks what part food production should play. A trip to the Norfolk Broads reveals the careful management needed to nurture tourism, wildlife and farming together. Economist Sean Rickard claims industrial-style farming should play a key role - he says large intensive farms are better run and are better for the eco-system. The Soil Association tells Farming Today that the government needs to look at farming which increases bio-diversity and uses fewer resources. And the Campaign to Protect Rural England argues that planning laws need to be adapted to avoid the tranquillity of the countryside being lost

Presenter: Anna Hill Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 06:00 Today (b011p5hg)
With James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk at 6.25am, 7.25am, 8.25am; Weather 6.05am, 6.57am, 7.57am; Yesterday in Parliament 6.45am; Thought for the Day 7.48am.


TUE 09:00 The Choice (b011p5hj)
Joe Glenton

Joe Glenton was a bright young soldier, destined for leadership and intent on helping the local people, when he made his first trip to Afghanistan in 2006.
But what he experienced there led him to make the hardest choice of his life.. to honour his commitment to his colleagues and the people of Afghanistan or abandon his men, break his promise and run away to the other side of the world.


TUE 09:30 Britain's Labs (b00shrc2)
The Institute for Cancer Research

In the first of four programmes looking at Britain's leading laboratories, Professor Iain Stewart visits the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton in Surrey. The laboratory grew out of the Royal Marsden Hospital with which it shares a site and the two work closely together.

The ICR is one of the main centres for the investigation of the genetic causes and possible cures/remedies for cancer. The effort is going into identifying the genetic drivers for the disease and then finding a way to turn these off. The work has been hugely accelerated by the completion of the Human Genome Project and by information technology which allows researchers to sift through genetic data at unprecedented speed.

Iain hears about new drugs which are being developed and about how we will think differently about the nature of cancer in years to come.

Producer: Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b011s4nh)
Malcolm X - A Life of Reinvention

Episode 2

Manning Marable spent over twenty years writing this exhaustive account of the life of Malcolm X. In it he challenges many preconceptions held about Malcolm and examines Malcolm's own autobiography - revealing the truth about his omissions and inaccuracies.

Malcolm travels to Boston and New York and has his eyes opened about what city life really means. He attempts to hold down a job as a sandwich salesman on the railways but soon becomes embroiled in petty thievery and small time drug trafficking culminating in a prison sentence.

Read by Colin McFarlane

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011p5hl)
Presented by Jane Garvey.

In July 2009 Sarah Shourd was arrested, along with two other Americans, for allegedly straying over the Iraqi border into Iran. Sarah Shourd talks to Jane about surviving her time in jail, solitary confinement and her campaign to get her fiancé and friend released. Ahead of this week's Orange Prize for fiction Erica Wagner, literary editor of the Times and writer, Bidisha discuss the shortlist. Ann Oakley considers the legacy of Barbara Wootton, the first woman to sit on the woolsack and do you have a Gran, Grandma or Gaga? What do grandparents today want to be called?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pq29)
Christopher Nicholson - The Elephant Keeper

Episode 2

In this second episode of our adaptation of Christopher Nicholson's novel, Tom grows close the elephants and gives them names - Jenny for the female and Timothy for the male. But Timothy is approaching sexual maturity and having a frustrated and aggressive elephant on the estate proves difficult for Tom, though it provides much amusement for the other estate workers. Then one night the elephants escape from their stables and run amok in the gardens of the Harrington Hall. After that Mrs Harrington is determined that they should be sold.

Adapted for radio by Elizabeth Burke

Tom ... Stuart McLoughlin
Lizzie ... Sarah Ovens
Mr Harrington ... Bertie Carvel
Mrs Harrington ... Claire Cage

Producer: Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b011p5nt)
Series 2

Episode 7

7/30 This week's Saving Species explores the mysteries of bird migration. Joanna Pinnock joined the British Trust for Ornithology on an early morning expedition to put a special transmitter on a Cuckoo. Many birds undertake extraordinary long distance migrations to find favourable conditions and resources for feeding and breeding. Very little is known about the Cuckoo's migration - and we'll be following the progress of the male being followed by the BTO biologists. Chris Sperring is in Somerset finding out about the fortune of the pied flycatcher, a summer visitor to this country which migrates from Africa to breed in woodlands on the Western and South West side of the UK. Scientists are ringing chicks to try and monitor when the adults breed and the numbers of chicks that survive and leave the nest. And Mark Brazil reports from the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido watching the little understood Latham's Snipe that migrates from Hokkaido to the southern tip of Australia each year.

Presenter: Brett Westwood
Producer: Sheena Duncan
Editor: Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Unbuilding Detroit (b011p5nw)
In a city that has shed almost fifty percent of its population since its peak in 1950 - the problem of abandoned houses and crumbling neighbourhoods in Detroit is a significant one.

As architect Dan Hoffman, remarked, "unbuilding has surpassed building as the city's major architectural activity." Since 1970 almost one-third of the city's occupied houses, more than the total number of occupied dwellings in the entire city of Cincinnati, has been demolished - but many more still remain.

The city has become a site of artistic pilgrimage for some - often times painted as a ghost town, with images that contain no trace of humanity - just skeletal, abandoned structures reaching up into the sky. But concealed behind the symbolism of this grand, decaying industrial city and its emptiness lies a vibrant network of artists, activists and architects - seeking to beautify, to transform and to re-imagine Detroit.

In this programme we discover how charred, crumbling buildings and dilapidated factories - remnants of Motown's industrial past- have been transformed into riots of colour and sound. Featuring contributions from the artists Scott Hocking, Tyree Guyton and Olayami Dabls.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b011p5ny)
How should we revitalise Britain's struggling high streets? The government's appointed retail marketing consultant, Mary Portas, to look at ways to make our shops more prosperous and diverse. How would you tackle the problem of empty units and towns that look the same? Is the answer lower rents, fewer chain stores and extra help for independent retailers? Latest figures suggest consumer spending is likely to remain sluggish, so how to breathe new life in your local high street? Call You and Yours with Julian Worricker. Your chance to share your views on the programme. Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk, text 84844 and we may call you back or call 03700 100 444 (lines open at 10am Tuesday).


TUE 12:57 Weather (b011p126)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b011r45k)
National and international news, presented by Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:30 Liszt and His Women (b011p603)
In the two hundredth year of his birth, Franz Liszt's reputation as a piano virtuoso - he was after all, the inventor of the recital and a pioneer of the celebrity tour - is eclipsed only by his reputation as a womaniser.

Ken Russell's 1970s film 'Lisztomania', with the composer played by a mostly bare-chested Roger Daltrey, is bizarrely not as over-the-top as it might first appear. Adoring woman fans fought over his cigar stubs to wear on chains on their bosom!

The pianist Lucy Parham, who's long been in love with Liszt's music, investigates the truth behind his romantic image, visiting his home in Weimar, where his bohemian lifestyle obliged him to keep a house on the edge of the town.

She talks with pianists Cora Irsen, who's boyfriend admitted a jealousy for the long-dead composer, and Stephen Hough, who sees in Liszt a soul struggling to balance the necessities of concert life with a deeply spiritual inclination. She hears from cultural historian Donald Sassoon about the context in mid-19th Century Europe for Liszt's lucrative tours. And she asks Rick Wakeman, a flamboyant musical star of later generation, about his involvement with Liszt's music and that Ken Russell biopic!

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b011p605)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b011p607)
Andy Merriman - A Monstrous Vitality

by Andy Merriman

June Whitfield stars as the indomitable actress Margaret Rutherford in a tale of chimpanzees, Jordanian Princes, an adoring husband and falling in love with a musician 30 years her junior.

Director: David Hunter.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b011p609)
Helen Castor talks to Professor Mark Stoyle of the University of Southampton about the moment that the reality of the civil war hit home for the English in 1642 and people had to chose between King or Parliament. Forced out of London, King Charles 1st uses Commissions of Array to recruit supporters but as Mark Stoyle explains there were many places where these simply did not work.

Reporter Lizz Pearson meets listener Eileen Fardon who has come across letters from the Bloomfield family in Coney Weston in Suffolk to a son serving in France in 1918. Within the letters is the revelation that the boys' mother travels to Abbeyville in France by herself after receiving a telegram that says he's been wounded.
When was the last trial of a witch in England?

Professor Owen Davies tells Helen Castor about the trial of Jane Wenham in 1712 and how a belief in witchcraft continued for more than 200 years despite laws that outlawed and further prosecutions.

In our 'Double Top Domesday' series, Professor Ian Rotherham at the University of Sheffield Hallam throws a dart and ends up near Barnsley where his reading of the local vegetation reveals a surprisingly wet landscape history.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b011p60c)
Lido

To Brixton Beach

by Stella Duffy.

Three stories that explore the most evocative experience of summer - outdoor swimming.
A mysterious swimmer spends all day in the pool at Brockwell Lido. Read by Adjoa Andoh.

Stella Duffy is an award winning novelist, short story writer and playwright. In addition to her writing work, Stella is an actor, comedian and improviser. She has performed in Improbable Theatre's highly acclaimed Lifegame throughout Britain, off-Broadway in New York, and in Australia. She has also recorded several plays and the sitcom Losers for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 The Rattigan Versions (b011vp7f)
Memories of Terence Rattigan from Ronald Harwood

Memories of playwright Terence Rattigan, from people with a close personal or professional connection to him, in conversation with Mark Lawson. Oscar-winning screenwriter Sir Ronald Harwood sought advice from Rattigan as a young writer and later adapted The Browning Version for cinema.

Producer India Rakusen.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b011p60f)
Super injunctions

While every paper has been revelling in the fact they can now name the mystery footballer who had an injunction to keep his name and his alleged affair secret, the fact remains that the injunction protecting him is still in place. This has led to a ridiculing of the judiciary in the press and on the internet and the announcement of a commission by the government to look at how our privacy laws work. This week Joshua Rozenberg looks at what has gone wrong, if the courts can control the internet and what options are available to the government if they want to change our privacy laws.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b011p60h)
Chris Smith and Mavis Cheek

Harriett Gilbert and her guests - politician, Lord Chris Smith and novelist, Mavis Cheek - discuss their favourite books by Robert Macfarlane, Frances Kay and Jackie Kay.

Trumpet by Jackie Kay
Publisher: Picador

The Wild Places by Robert Macfarlane
Publisher: Granta Books

Micka by Frances Kay
Publisher: Picador

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


TUE 17:00 PM (b011r5mj)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011p128)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Clare in the Community (b00sx2ql)
Series 6

The Crush

Clare decides to focus on her son, sparking a chance meeting at Toddler Tunes that could change the course of her life.

Meanwhile, Brian's admiration for Nali grows when she visits his school and tames Year 9. All this plus Clare and Libby both interview for the Team Leader post.

Clare Barker is the self-absorbed social worker who has the right jargon for every problem she comes across, though never a practical solution. But there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Clare ..... Sally Phillips
Brian ..... Alex Lowe
Ray ..... Richard Lumsden
Helen ..... Liza Tarbuck
Megan ..... Nina Conti
Libby ..... Jess Robinson
Clerk .... Alex Tregear
Howard ..... Paterson Joseph

Other parts played by the cast.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2010.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b011p6yl)
Brian's having second thoughts about Open Farm Sunday, especially when the insurance quote is high. David advises Adam on a cheaper insurer. Brian's spoken to Cliff Alladay, who will look at bringing the market completion date forward to mid-November.

Harry mentions that Jazzer's put his name down for the pickers' trip on Friday without realising it's an open air Shakespeare. Harry's keen to know if Zofia's going.

Elizabeth worries about her first quarterly meeting with Graham Ryder. Lewis suggests that David would know where to find some missing information, but Elizabeth doesn't want him to contact. After a discreet call to David, Lewis tells Elizabeth he's tracked it down.

Jill offers to help with the children after school tomorrow but Elizabeth's made arrangements. When Jill reminds Elizabeth it's Ruth's birthday next week, Elizabeth abruptly ends the call.

Jill's serving Kathy in the shop. They comments on Oliver being at a loose end, unlike Jamie who's busy with exams. Kathy thinks Jamie's turning a corner, probably influenced by his new girlfriend. It's the anniversary of Sid's death tomorrow and his birthday would have been Thursday. Jill encourages Kathy to make sure Jamie knows she's there if he wants to talk, even if Jamie doesn't take up the offer.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b011p6yn)
John Berger, Julia Donaldson the new Children's Laureate

With Mark Lawson, including an interview with Julia Donaldson, the new Children's Laureate, whose appointment was announced today.

John Berger won the Booker Prize in 1972 and donated half his prize money to the British Black Panther movement. His essays on art criticism Ways of Seeing is a set text in universities. He discusses his latest novel, Bento's Sketchbook, and how his relationship with Britain has changed since he moved to live in France.

A silver workshop in Birmingham has been taken over by English Heritage and preserved as it was left, when the family company closed its doors in 2008. Founded in 1881, J W Evans has kept its stamps, dies, pattern books, inventories, account books and examples of the silverware made there in situ. Mark Lawson tours the building with curator Nick Hill and Tony Evans from the family firm.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pq29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b011p6yq)
The Iran Connection

Is Iran exploiting the turmoil caused by the Arab Spring, and the uncertainly following the killing of Osama Bin Laden? After Iranian military rockets were found on the battlefields of Afghanistan, Allan Urry assesses new evidence alleging Iran's closer ties with al Qaeda and the Taliban. And, with more illicit shipments of weapons from Iran being seized in the Middle East, in breach of a UN arms embargo, the programme also reports on the discovery of a weapons smuggling ring set up in the heart of Europe to service Tehran. It also investigates the involvement of a former British Royal Marine in the ring.
Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b011p6ys)
A new treatment for a common form of vision loss, retinal vein occlusion, has been recommended by NICE. The health watchdog has issued final draft guidelines for Ozurdex to be funded as a treatment for retinal vein occlusion on the NHS. This condition is thought to affect 25 000 people in the UK. We speak to the patients who have been affected and the one of the ophthalmologists involved in the clinical trials.

Plus Lee Kumutat goes to a beauty session aimed at helping visually impaired teenagers and get to grips with putting on make-up when you have limited sight.

And your experiences of applying for the new increase in Disability Living Allowance. We hear from one woman who, despite being blind for over 50 years, is paying for a certificate to prove she has no sight.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Steven Williams.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b011p6yv)
Compassion and Faith - Junk Food Adverts - Magicians

Compassion for our fellow human beings is something that's long been taught by different faiths and traditions. But could it be used as a tool within therapy to improve mental health? There's a growing interest in compassion-focussed therapy - both for other people and for oneself. It has its roots in the understanding of how the brain evolved. At the moment it is being used most often with people from neglectful or abusive backgrounds. Professor Paul Gilbert, who's the Director of the Mental Health Research Unit at Derbyshire Mental Health Trust and one of his patients - "Jo" - explain what's involved.

Could a "junk food" adverts watershed help in the battle against childhood obesity? Since 2009 there's been a ban on adverts for junk food during children's TV programmes and on dedicated children's channels. But advertisements for high fat, salt or sugar foods are still allowed during programmes like soap operas - which families often watch together. At a conference in London this week - "Marketing to Children: Implications for Obesity", Dr Emma Boyland is calling for a 9pm watershed on such adverts to help reduce their influence on children. She explains the psychological responses of children to such advertising in her study in primary schools.

Magicians persuade their audiences that their eyes are indeed deceiving them - when they dazzle with disappearing rabbits and great feats of memory. But can our knowledge of the brain teach a magician a thing or two? A husband and wife team of neuroscientists from the Barrow Neurological Institute in Arizona - Susanna Martinez Conde and Stephen Macknik - have written a book "Sleights of Mind", explaining how magicians can make the mind work against you.


TUE 21:30 The Choice (b011p5hj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b011p12b)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b011r7zb)
Will Syria respond to violence in Jisr al-Shughour?

David Cameron sets out his views on NHS reforms.

And a special report from Russia - how far does corruption hold back the economy?

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011p6yx)
Please Look After Mother

Episode 4

Kyung-Sook Shin is arguably Korea's most popular and acclaimed novelist. Please Look After Mother has already sold over 1.5 million copies in Korea and has been reprinted over 100 times. It is now published in 19 countries.

Please Look After Mother tells the story of So-nyo, an elderly wife and mother, who goes missing on Seoul station. Only with her gone, do her children and her husband begin to appreciate not only all she has done for them, but who she really was and how much they have left unsaid.

A story in part about the cultural clash between the generation who inhabit modern, urban Seoul and their parents steeped in the rural traditions of Korea, Please Look After Mother is also a universal and humbling reminder of how easy it is to take the people we love for granted.

In today's episode, Hyong-chol recognises his mother's hopes for him, and his father returns their rural home, to an extraordinary revelation about his missing wife.

The reader is Sian Thomas
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The translator is Chi-Young Kim
The producer is Di Speirs.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b011p6yz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011p6z1)
Susan Hulme reports on a packed day at Westminster including proposed changes to anti-terror laws, discussion of reforms to the Lords and the NHS, the future of RAF Lossiemouth and an overhaul of the government's Prevent strategy for combating extremism.



WEDNESDAY 08 JUNE 2011

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b011p12v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b011s4nh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011p12x)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011p12z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011p131)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b011p133)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011pkfh)
Tina Beattie

With Dr Tina Beattie, Director of Catholic Studies at Roehampton University.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b011pkfk)
Plans for 12 new 'nature improvement areas' are planned for England. It's one of many proposals outlined in the Government's blue print for natural environment. It covers everything from wildlife, rivers and forests to improving the balance of wildlife on farmed land. The action plan called the 'Natural Choice' is the first White Paper of its kind in 20 years. Environment Secretary Caroline Spelman outlines how the proposals will help prevent the loss of endangered species and biodiversity across the country. Also in the programme, a BBC opinion poll reveals that 63% of those questioned in the UK would be opposed to a cull of badgers. One alternative to the cull is vaccination. The four year project is being carried out on farms in Gloucestershire and on an estate in Devon. Reporter, Sarah Swadling follows the team carrying out the trial.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Angela Frain.


WED 06:00 Today (b011pkfm)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including:
07:40 Why do sensible people sometimes believe the most unlikely conspiracy theories?
07:50 Home Secretary Theresa May explains why she is setting up the National Crime Agency.
08:10 Are expected energy price increases fair?


WED 09:00 Midweek (b011pkfp)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Meeta Raval, Kate Allatt, Gene David Kirk and Nell Gifford.

Meeta Raval is recognised as a rising star of the new generation of opera singers and is one of the contestants in the BBC Cardiff Singer of the World competition. She attended Wells Cathedral School and was the first Head Girl Chorister in the country. The competition will be broadcast on BBC Two, BBC Four, BBC Two Wales, Radio 3, Radio Wales and Radio Cymru.

Fell-runner and mother of three, Kate Allatt's life was torn apart when she suffered a massive stroke leading to locked-in syndrome. Totally paralysed, she became a prisoner inside her own body and her family were warned that she may never walk, talk or lead a normal life again. However, through her own determination she made a remarkable recovery and did run again. Her book 'Running Free: Breaking out from locked-in syndrome' is published by Accent Press.

Gene David Kirk is Artistic Director of London's Jermyn Street Theatre, who served in the Royal Air Force before embarking on a career in theatre. To mark the 100th birthday of one of the greatest playwrights in history, he directs Tennessee Williams 'A Cavalier for Milady' at the Jermyn Street Theatre, the only published work of his that has never been produced.

Nell Gifford is the founder of Gifford's Circus which she set up eleven years ago. An Oxford graduate, she spent her gap year working in a circus, and never looked back, setting up her own circus eleven years ago, with the aim of recreating the magic of the traditional English travelling show. Their latest production is Tolstoy's 'War and Peace' which they are performing around the West of England this summer.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b011s4qg)
Malcolm X - A Life of Reinvention

Episode 3

Manning Marable spent over twenty years writing this exhaustive account of the life of Malcolm X. In it he challenges many preconceptions held about Malcolm and examines Malcolm's own autobiography - revealing the truth about his omissions and inaccuracies.

In prison, Malcolm converts to Islam and joins the Nation of Islam. He educates himself and quickly becomes an inspiring orator. Once released he becomes one of the most successful recruiters the NOI has ever had - and slowly realises that in order for the NOI to prosper, it needs to engage with the whole population.

Read by Colin McFarlane

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011pkfr)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Pamela Stephenson-Connolly on how our sex lives define us. After a female academic wins a landmark equal pay case, we look at equal pay for male and female academics. Cerys Matthews - ex-Catatonia singer - sings live and Arundhati Roy who shot to fame in 1997 with her Booker Prize winning novel 'The God of Small Things' talks about her new collection of essays.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pkft)
Christopher Nicholson - The Elephant Keeper

Episode 3

In the third episode of our adaptation of Christopher Nicolson's novel, Tom and Jenny the elephant are living happily on Lord Bidborough's estate. The old man is eccentric but kindly and takes great delight in the relationship between the boy and the elephant. But then he falls ill and his son, Charles, arrives from abroad to take over the estate. Charles likes to drink and begins to use 'rides on the elephant' as a way of seducing local women. Uneasy and guilty, Tom is forced to be complicit in this but is bribed by Charles to keep quiet.

Adapted from the novel by Elizabeth Burke.

Tom ... Stuart McLoughlin
Lizzie ... Sarah Ovens
Lord Bidborough ... John Rowe
Mr Harrington ... Bertie Carvel
Charles Singleton ... Matthew Gravelle

Producer: Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


WED 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b011pkfw)
Series 8

Life Model

Alan Dein meets Arthur Lowe, a 75-year-old life model and former financial adviser, from Shipston-On-Stour who poses for art students as a contribution to society. Arthur puts his trim physique down to the lengths he regularly swims in his local pool - training which helped him win a gold medal at last year's world master's swimming competition in Sweden.

Alan visits an art class and observes the students at work as they capture the essence of the man at the front of the class. Although, he is physically naked before them, many know little of the life within and the issues that concern Arthur. Away from the studio, Alan explores exposure, vanity and the ageing process with Arthur who is acutely aware that his days as a model may be numbered.


WED 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b00jsykr)
Series 1

Portland

In the last show of this repeated series Comedian Mark Steel gets to grips with the bird observatory, stone quarries and customs of the Isle of Portland in order to find out what makes it so distinctive. Find out why the locals are obsessed with obelisks and why you must never say the 'r' word. From April 2009.

Producer - Julia McKenzie.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b011pkfy)
Thousands of men who fished the seas around Britain have missed out on receiving the pension they are entitled to. As a national campaign to 'Find a Fishermen' draws to a close we ask what happens next to reunite the men with their money.

After the release of disappointing sales figures for May, can smartphones be the retail sector's salvation? In the last 9 months, research shows online purchases using a mobile have increased by 13 percent. We look at what's driving this trend and how retailers can make the most of it.

And we report on the latest increase in household fuel bills which has prompted the energy watchdog to call for an investigation by the Competition Commission.


WED 12:57 Weather (b011p135)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b011r45m)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b011pkg0)
Channel 4 is to screen what it calls "probably the most horrific images it has ever shown" and which, last year, it said were too gruesome to transmit. They are part of a documentary on the final days of the Sri Lankan army's battle with the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, shown last week at the UN Human Rights Council. The UN special rapporteur says the images are prima facie evidence of war crimes, something the Sri Lankan government strongly refutes, saying the videos are not authentic. C4's head of news and current affairs, Dorothy Byrne, explains the decision to broadcast and, with Prof Richard Tait of Cardiff University, discusses the value and risks of showing death on screen.

The Financial Times reports that Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt's plans for Local TV may be facing a further setback, with claims that commercial TV companies have rebuffed his requests for funding. The FT's Ben Fenton joins Steve Hewlett in the studio with an update on this and on the NewsCorp BSkyB bid.

Caryn Mandabach was one of the key people behind a string of comedy hits in the 1980s and 1990s, including "Roseanne", "The Cosby Show" and "3rd Rock from the Sun". Tonight, she's launching "In with the Flynns" on BBC1, a UK version of one of another of her US shows, "Grounded for Life". How confident can she be that a US comedy format can work in the UK?


WED 14:00 The Archers (b011p6yl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b011pkg2)
The 40 Year Twitch

Yvonne's having a wobble. Her husband's always been one for the birds and now she's worried she's finally lost him. But do blue tits really lure men into midlife crises? Can sparrows be a bad influence? Comedy drama by Daniel Thurman.

Directed by Toby Swift

When Yvonne loses her job at the age of 64, she starts to fear that husband Neil's devotion to birding - birdwatching to the uninitiated - is actually all about escaping her and their humdrum life together. Thus begins a somewhat overenthusiastic pursuit of the truth as she trains her binoculars firmly on Neil's every move. Can best friend Wendy bring her back to earth?


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b011pkg4)
Do you know the cheapest and most efficient way of paying for goods and services or spending money both in the UK and abroad?

If you want to avoid those hidden extra charges join Vincent Duggleby and his guests for Money Box Live.

One method that's free is the Faster Payments Service, which moves money between UK banks in seconds rather than days. But banks still get complaints about gaps in the service and slow payments.

You will often have to pay though for other types of transactions when using a debit or credit card. For example, if you want to purchase goods abroad or buy foreign currency. How can you reduce those extra fees?


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b011pkg6)
Lido

Lido Lover

by Michèle Roberts.

Three stories that explore the most evocative experience of summer - outdoor swimming.
An English woman finds a kind of fulfilment on the Venetian Lido.

Read by Joanna Tope.

Michèle Roberts is the author of twelve highly acclaimed novels, including The Looking Glass and Daughters of the House which won the WHSmith Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Her memoir Paper Houses was BBC Radio 4's Book of the Week in June 2007. She has also published poetry and short stories, most recently collected in Mud- stories of sex and love (2010). She is Emeritus Professor of Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia.

Producer Gaynor Macfarlane.


WED 15:45 The Rattigan Versions (b011vpt3)
Memories of Terence Rattigan from Adrian Brown

Memories of playwright Terence Rattigan, from people with a close personal or professional connection to him, in conversation with Mark Lawson. Director Adrian Brown had a relationship with Rattigan in the last part of his life.

Producer India Rakusen.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b011pkqd)
Dirt is dust, soil, refuse, excrement, bacteria, filth, sleaze, slime, smut. How easily the word changes its meaning from the physical to the moral. It is this fascinating relationship and threat which dirt seems to pose that is explored in the Wellcome Collection's exhibition 'Dirt: The Filthy Reality of Everyday Life'.

In a special edition recorded with an audience of the public at Wellcome, Laurie Taylor and a panel of experts explore the meaning of dirt, its relationship to order and how hygiene and the mass generation of dirt have become such potent symbols of civilisation.

He is joined by the anthropologist Adam Kuper, the writer and cartoonist Martin Rowson and the historian Amanda Vickery to discuss dirt and why it provokes such fear, loathing and occasionally desire.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 All in the Mind (b011p6yv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b011r5ml)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011p137)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Party (b011pkqg)
Series 2

It's Technology, Stupid

The young aspiring politicians of the new political Party get to grips with technology and whether it is making people stupid.

Meanwhile, they launch a recruiting campaign on the internet.

Second series of Tom Basden's satirical comedy.

Simon ..... Tom Basden
Duncan ..... Tim Key
Jared ..... Jonny Sweet
Mel ..... Ann Crilly
Phoebe ..... Katy Wix
Jared's Mum ..... Jane Whittenshaw

Producer: Julia McKenzie

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b011pkqj)
It would have been Nigel's birthday today. Trying to carry on as normal, Elizabeth goes on a course with Roy. He tells Elizabeth about the possibility of Phoebe living in South Africa. He feels stuck in the middle between Phoebe and Hayley. Elizabeth admits that although it's none of her business, she agrees with Hayley. On the way back Elizabeth's relieved when conversation turns to Nigel and she gets the chance to talk about him.

Later Roy tells Kate they've still not decided whether Phoebe should go to South Africa and are concerned about her schooling. Kate stresses that Phoebe will be going to a good school but her real education will be outside the school. Roy says he won't promise anything yet. They are a long way from a decision.

On the anniversary of Sid's death, Kenton takes Jolene out to take her mind off things. They reminisce about Sid's sudden death, and the funny times too. Jolene tells Kenton that the fact she can talk about him shows how far she's come with Kenton and Fallon's help. Later, Kenton suggests he keep Jolene company overnight at The Bull. She says she's fine, but that Elizabeth may need a nightcap and a listening ear.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b011pkql)
Arnold Wesker's play Chicken Soup with Barley, Michael Longley, the Orange Prize winner

Mark Lawson interviews the winner of this year's Orange Prize for Fiction live from the ceremony.

Arnold Wesker's play Chicken Soup with Barley depicts Jewish family life over three decades. First staged in 1958, Naomi Alderman reviews a revival at The Royal Court Theatre in London.

Poet Michael Longley discusses the virtue of short poems and writing about Ireland as he publishes his first collection for ten years, A Hundred Doors.

Rupert Christiansen and Quentin Letts discuss whether it's ever right to walk out of a play and if you should feel guilty giving up on a book before you've reached the end.

Producer: India Rakusen.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pkft)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Decision Time (b011pkqn)
Nick Robinson goes behind the closed doors of Westminster and Whitehall to ask how controversial decisions are reached.

In the first of a new series, Nick discusses whether it is time for the government to get tough with tax avoidance. He is joined by Caroline Lucas MP, the Green Party leader who has a private member's bill on tax avoidance, the former Trade Minister Lord Digby Jones, Sir Nicholas Montague, the last head of the Inland Revenue, by Michael Jacobs, a former special adviser in both the Treasury and Number 10, and by Fraser Nelson, the Editor of the Spectator.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b011pkqq)
Series 2

Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: The Myth of the Protestant Work Ethic

Professor Felipe Fernandez-Armesto explodes what he sees as the newly revived myth of the Protestant work ethic and debunks cultural explanations for economic progress or decline in different parts of the world.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling.

Recorded live in front of an audience at the RSA in London, speakers take to the stage to air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b011pkqs)
Disease resistant chickens may be the first genetically engineered farm animals to reach the supermarket. Scientists in Scotland and Cambridge have produced poultry that can stop bird flu from spreading and are working on complete resistance to infection. The same technology can be used for pigs, sheep and cattle for a range of diseases . Sue Broom reports on the current state of the science of genetically engineered farm livestock and the ethical concerns that surround them.

Producer, Erika Wright.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b011pkfp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b011p139)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b011r7zd)
The UN debates action on Syria
The latest from Libya
A special report on political freedom in Russia.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011pkqx)
Please Look After Mother

Episode 5

Kyung-Sook Shin is arguably Korea's most popular and acclaimed novelist. Please Look After Mother has already sold over 1.5 million copies in Korea and has been reprinted over 100 times, turned into plays and a film. It is now published in 19 countries.

Please Look After Mother tells the story of So-nyo, an elderly wife and mother, who goes missing on Seoul station. Only with her gone, do her children and her husband begin to appreciate not only all she has done for them, but who she really was and how much they have left unsaid.

A story in part about the cultural clash between the generation who inhabit modern, urban Seoul and their parents steeped in the rural traditions of Korea, Please Look After Mother is also a universal reminder of how easy it is to take the people we love for granted.

In today's episode, back in their rural home, Father remembers the early years of love and marriage, and realises just how often he failed to understand his wife.

The reader is Sian Thomas
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The translator is Chi-Young Kim
The producer is Di Speirs.


WED 23:00 Shedtown (b011pkqz)
Series 1

Foundations

Written by Kevin Eldon. Colin (Johnny Vegas) is all at sea as the foundations of Jimmy's dream take shape on the beach. Wes and Father Michael witness the profits of some not-so-spiritual meat.

Cast:
Barry ......Tony Pitts
Jimmy & Johnny ...... Kevin Eldon
Colin ..... Johnny Vegas
Diane ..... Suranne Jones
Dave ..... Shaun Dooley
Eleanor ..... Ronni Ancona
Maureen ..... Emma Fryer
William ..... Adrian Manfredi
Carly ..... Jessica Knappett
Father Michael ..... James Quinn
Wes ...... Warren Brown

Narrator ..... Maxine Peake
Music ..... Paul Heaton

Created by Tony Pitts. Directed by Jim Poyser

Producer: Sally Harrison
A Woolyback Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011pkr1)
Ed Miliband says the Government is in a "total mess" after it emerges that ministers are rethinking planned changes to sentencing policy.
But David Cameron accuses the Labour leader of "empty opposition" as the pair engage in a heated exchange in the Commons.
MPs and Peers pay tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh ahead of his 90th birthday.
And the Business Secretary tells the banks to increase lending or face higher taxes.
In the Lords, peers press for the UN to condemn the suppression of protests in Syria.



THURSDAY 09 JUNE 2011

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b011p13k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b011s4qg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011p13m)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011p13p)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011p13r)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b011p13t)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011pldf)
Tina Beattie

With Dr Tina Beattie, Director of Catholic Studies at Roehampton University.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b011pldh)
Despite recent rainfall around the UK, the ground remains very dry for many farmers. Terry Marsh from The Centre for Ecology and Hydrology says that the area of land affected by the agricultural drought has become smaller but where it still remains, it's become more severe.

Ruth Sanderson visits potato farmer James Daw who grows potatoes in Staffordshire to see how the dry weather is affecting his crop, and what methods he is using to conserve water.

There's been mixed reaction to the government's White Paper for the Natural Environment in England. Mary Creagh, Labour's Shadow Environment Secretary says she believes the government needed to go further. Martin Harper - the RSPB's conservation director - says that while it's good that there are lots of environmental targets, the government could make these even more specific. Whilst Andrew Clarke from the National Farmers Union thinks that farmers are being split between too many environmental schemes and are not being incentivised enough.

Producer: Ruth Sanderson. Presenter: Charlotte Smith.


THU 06:00 Today (b011pldk)
With James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk at 6.25am, 7.25am, 8.25am; Weather 6.05am, 6.57am, 7.57am; Yesterday in Parliament 6.45am; Thought for the Day 7.48am.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b011pldm)
The Origins of Infectious Disease

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the origins of infectious disease. Infectious disease has been with us for millennia. There are reports of ancient outbreaks of plague in the Bible, and in numerous historical sources from China, the Middle East and Europe. Other infections, including smallpox, tuberculosis and measles, have also been known for centuries. But some diseases made their first appearances only recently: HIV emerged around a century ago, while the Ebola virus was first recorded in the 1970s.But where do the agents of disease come from, and what determines where and when new viruses and bacteria appear? Modern techniques allow scientists to trace the histories of infective agents through their genomes; the story of disease provides a fascinating microcosm of the machinery of evolution.With:Steve JonesProfessor of Genetics at University College LondonSir Roy AndersonProfessor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at Imperial College LondonMark PallenProfessor of Microbial Genomics at the University of Birmingham.Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b011s54x)
Malcolm X - A Life of Reinvention

Episode 4

Manning Marable spent over twenty years writing this exhaustive account of the life of Malcolm X. In it he challenges many preconceptions held about Malcolm and examines Malcolm's own autobiography - revealing the truth about his omissions and inaccuracies.

Feeling his faith shaking, Malcolm decides to undertake a pilgrimage to Mecca. Here he encounters a huge panoply of peoples all aspiring to follow the true Islamic path. He becomes convinced that unless he engages with the wider community - his ideals will falter. But some ill-chosen words after the assassination of President Kennedy leads him to become alienated from the Nation of Islam.

Read by Colin McFarlane

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011pldp)
Presented by Jenni Murray.This month's Italian Vogue may have a predictable enough title, 'Real Beauties'. Instead of the super-thin, androgynous models of the catwalk, it shows three voluptuous women. But will high fashion ever embrace women bigger than a size 6? We hear about the volunteer army currently being recruited for the Olympic Games next year, Samantha Spiro talks about her new role in a production of "Chicken Soup with Barley" at the Royal Court and we look at the decline in popularity of women's studies at universities today.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pldr)
Christopher Nicholson - The Elephant Keeper

Episode 4

When Charles, Tom's drunken master, offers to take another young girl for a 'ride on the elephant, Tom knows that he plans to rape her. To save the girl he encourages Jenny the elephant to stampede. The master is furious and lashes out at Tom with a metal hook, disfiguring him. What happens next, in this fourth episode of our adaptation of Christopher Nicolson's powerful novel, propels Tom on a new and even more wretched path.

Adapted for radio by Elizabeth Burke

Tom ... Stuart McLoughlin
Charles Singleton ... Matthew Gravelle
Ellie ... Rebecca Newman
Alice ... Kate Sobey
Susan ... Grace Williams

Producer: Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b011plrq)
Amid uproar in and around Syria, Kevin Connolly considers suggestions that there have been attempts by the authorities in Damascus to manipulate the news agenda to distract the world from events going on in their country. A year after violent disturbances in the Kyrgyz town of Osh, Rayhan Demytrie, who covered those events, considers the difficult legacy they've left in their wake; Tracey Logan is in the Republic of Ireland examining how an EU directive, aimed at protecting Ireland's peat bogs, is being widely flouted. Tom Blass takes a walk in a Belgian village which has been swallowed up by the inexorable growth of Antwerp's docklands. And South Korea's a country which takes recycling very seriously - it's causing our correspondent there, Lucy Williamson, some difficulty.


THU 11:30 The Twilight World of Syd Barrett (b011plrs)
Since his death on the 7th July 2006, Syd Barrett lives on freeze-framed, still young and a striking lost soul of the 1960s whose brief moment of creativity outshines those long years of solitude shut away in a terraced house in his home town of Cambridge.

This revealing programme hears how his band Pink Floyd (and family) coped with Barrett's mental breakdown and explores the hurriedly arranged holiday to the Spanish island of Formentera - where the star unravelled. We also hear about his pioneering brand of English psychedelic pop typified on early Pink Floyd recordings 'Arnold Layne', 'See Emily Play' and the strange songs on Pink Floyd's impressive debut album 'The Piper At the Gates of Dawn'.

Undoubtedly Barrett's experimentation with the drug LSD affected him mentally and the band members reveal how concerned they were when he began to go catatonic on-stage, playing music that had little to do with their material, or not playing at all.

By Spring 1968 Barrett was out of the group and after a brief period of hibernation, he re-emerged in 1970 with a pair of albums, 'The Madcap Laughs' and 'Barrett', but they failed to chart and Barrett retired to a hermit life existing under the watchful gaze of his caring sister Rosemary (featured in the programme)

David Gilmour, Nick Mason and Rick Wright (one of the last interviews before his sad passing) reveal how there was little understanding of mental illness when it came to the drug fused culture of the time. These days a strung out star is hurriedly booked into the Priory and given counselling. Barrett's mental breakdown was not understood and the steps taken to help him were inappropriate and still rankle the members of Pink Floyd today...

Producer: John Sugar

A Sugar Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2011.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b011plrv)
After two men plead guilty to fraud, Winifred Robinson has the latest on a nationwide wine scam plus: the companies offering to store your stem cells and how to defend your reputation online.


THU 12:57 Weather (b011p13w)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b011r45p)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:30 Off the Page (b011plrx)
Terrible Food

What's the worst thing that could be served to you for lunch? Fox lasagne? Tripe? Raw seal blubber? Dominic Arkwright joins three guests for new writing and stimulating discussion on the subject of Terrible Food.

His first guest Jonathan McGowan explains how liver turns his stomach, but doesn't think anything of eating dead rats - as long as they're rats from the countryside. Johann Hari reveals how for many years he's had a culinary addiction that now makes him shudder, and Stephanie Calman describes what definitely not to serve at a dinner party.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b011pkqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b011plrz)
Gerda Stevenson - The Apple Tree

Family drama set on a Scottish island, starring Juliet Stevenson.

Maria is an Englishwoman who has fallen in love with her husband Iain's Highland heritage - but there's a shock in store for them when they take a trip home to his mother's island croft.

It is Hogmanay. Iain, an artist, and the son of a crofter, has just received news of his mother's death. He and Maria set off from Edinburgh to attend the funeral. They drive north in blizzard conditions. Eventually they reach Iain's mother's house, where brother James, sister-in-law Ishbel, and the church elders are gathered. In the aftermath of this family crisis Maria's love affair with the island way of life will be severely tested.

Maria..............Juliet Stevenson
Iain.................Iain MacRae
James.............David Walker
Ishbel..............Carina MacLeod
Minister..........Angus Peter Campbell

Producer/director: Bruce Young

Gerda Stevenson is a Scottish actress, writer and director. She is married to the Gaelic poet, Aonghas MacNeacail.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b011mr7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b011p10p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b011pls1)
Lido

The Horizon Pool

by Linda Cracknell.

Three stories that explore the most evocative experience of summer - outdoor swimming.

An unexpected swimming companion in the UK's northernmost outdoor pool - the Trinkie in Wick - may hold the key to recovery for a teenage boy. Read by Finn den Hertog.

After winning the Macallan/Scotland on Sunday short story competition in 1998 Linda Cracknell's first collection, Life Drawing, was published, which was shortlisted for the Saltire First Book of the Year Award in 2001. Her second collection, The Searching Glance, was published in 2008.

As well as fiction, Cracknell has written numerous radio plays and drama scripts, and teaches creative writing in workshops across Scotland and internationally. In 2002 to 2005 she was writer-in-residence at Brownsbank Cottage near Biggar, the final home of Hugh MacDiarmid.


THU 15:45 The Rattigan Versions (b011vp8v)
Memories of Terence Rattigan from Thea Sharrock

Reflections on playwright Terence Rattigan, from people with a close connection to him or his work, in conversation with Mark Lawson. Young theatre director Thea Sharrock recently revived two largely forgotten Rattigan plays - After the Dance and Cause Celebre.

Producer India Rakusen.


THU 16:00 Bookclub (b011p248)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b011pls3)
Quentin Cooper investigates how to stimulate stem cells to make broken hearts heal themselves; how improved dating techniques have revealed a building boom in the Neolithic, nearly 6 000 years ago; and an old tail in the hunt for amber fossils.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


THU 17:00 PM (b011r5qw)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011p13y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 It's Your Round (b00yrfwr)
Series 1

Episode 2

Angus Deayton hosts the comedy panel show with no format.

Andy Parsons, Rebecca Front, Miles Jupp and prog-rock legend, Rick Wakeman battle it out to see who can beat each other at the games they've each brought along.

Can the teams guess the concept for Rick's new prog rock album in his "What's The Concept?" round? And what happens when the teams have to play Andy's inventively titled "It's Not Your Round"? And would Rebecca Front like to marry Prince William?

Angus tries valiantly to ensure everyone comes out of it with their reputations intact.

Writers: Angus Deayton, Ged Parsons and Paul Powell

Devised by Benjamin Partridge

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2011.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b011pls5)
It would have been Sid's birthday today. The school calls Kathy to say Jamie didn't turn up for his RS exam. Kathy eventually finds Jamie at the cricket pavilion. Jamie can't hold back his emotions and tells Kathy that he misses Sid every day but reassures her that he'll be ok for his maths exam tomorrow.

Pip has a break from revision for tomorrow's business studies exam. She hopes she's got enough volunteers to help at Open Farm Sunday. Ruth hopes it's not too much for her, ahead of her biology exam on Monday.

Shula's still concerned about the situation with Elizabeth. Shula's glad Kenton's there for the twins, and Alistair's glad Shula's there for the whole family.

Shula calls to see how things are at Brookfield. The situation is affecting everyone, including Pip. Ruth's pleased that David's got the Three Counties Show to look forward to. Shula agrees the change of scene will do him good.

As David washes down the cows, Josh films him for the farm website, and they enjoy a moment of frivolous fun.

Alistair is envious of David getting three days away from it all at the Three Counties Show. David tells him he needs something else to think about, that's for sure.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b011pls7)
Julian Barratt from The Mighty Boosh; Bath's Roman Baths

With Kirsty Lang.

Kirsty visits Bath's Roman Baths Museum, shortlisted for the Art Fund Prize 2011 - a £100,000 award, given annually to the museum or gallery of the year. This year's winner will be announced by Michael Portillo, chair of judges, on Front Row on 15 June.

Julian Barratt and Doon Mackichan are both steeped in British comedy: Julian as one half of The Mighty Boosh and Doon in TV series such as Smack The Pony and The Day Today. They talk about their roles on stage in a Russian comic classic, Gogol's Government Inspector. When a corrupt small-town mayor discovers a government official is coming to inspect them, chaos breaks out.

Award-winning British film-maker Nick Broomfield talks about his campaign to restore an art deco cinema in Zanzibar.

South African crime writers Deon Meyer and Mike Nicol discuss the way news events inform their writing.
Mike Nicol's Black Heart ends his Revenge trilogy, which features private security operatives Mace Bishop and Pylon Buso and their nemesis, Sheemina February. Deon Meyer's Thirteen Hours follows the multi-racial Cape Town police force tracking down an American tourist who has been kidnapped.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pldr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b011p60f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b011pnml)
Raw Materials

The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

With so many people now living in high-consuming industrial nations, and with many commodity prices increasing, Evan asks his business guests how they plan to economise in their use of raw materials. They also discuss building design and appraise the importance of form and function.

Evan is joined in the studio by Eugene Kohn, co-founder and chairman of architecture firm Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates; Mark Price, managing director of supermarket chain Waitrose; Andy Bond, former chief executive and chairman of Asda.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b011p5nt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b011pldm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b011p140)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b011r7zg)
Is there evidence of systematic rape in Libya?
A chief constable tells his officers to use common sense not the rule book.
Has the Archbishop of Canterbury gone too far?


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011pnmq)
Please Look After Mother

Episode 6

Kyung-Sook Shin is arguably Korea's most popular and acclaimed novelist. Please Look After Mother has already sold over 1.5 million copies in Korea and has been reprinted over 100 times. It is now published in 19 countries.

Please Look After Mother tells the story of So-nyo, an elderly wife and mother, who goes missing on Seoul station. Only with her gone, do her children and her husband begin to appreciate not only all she has done for them, but who she really was and how much they have left unsaid.

A story in part about the cultural clash between the generation who inhabit modern, urban Seoul and their parents steeped in the rural traditions of Korea, Please Look After Mother is also a universal reminder of how easy it is to take the people we love for granted.

In today's episode, Park So-nyo tells her own story at last.

The reader is Sian Thomas
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The translator is Chi-Young Kim
The producer is Di Speirs.


THU 23:00 Dave Against the Machine (b011pnms)
The Bilderberg Group

Dave Lamb's brand new sitcom series about conspiracy theorist Dave Railings continues and this week he's wrestling with the Bilderberg Group.

The Bilderberg Group are an elite council of the world's most powerful industrialists and politicians who secretly rule the world. They meet once a year in a different highly secured five star hotel and this year Dave's convinced that they're meeting near the high security flat he shares with his frustrated younger brother Jim.

Dave's suspicions are further aroused when a girl Jim's met just a few hours earlier invites herself round. Meanwhile, community police officers Nigel and Geoff are investigating a series of car thefts, no-one's asked them to, they're just doing it because Nigel's convinced that this is the case that'll finally win them a place on the police force proper. A car-jacking rollercoaster ride of an adventure pits Dave against the Bilderberg Group in a battle he simply has to win... that's assuming the Bilderberg Group actually exists.

Cast:
Dave Railings ..... Dave Lamb
Jim Railings ...... Jim North
Nigel Spikes ...... Nick Walker
Geoff Brown ...... Richie Webb
Katie Jones ...... Carrie Quinlan

Written by Dave Lamb
Script edited by Anil Gupta

Directed by Adam Tandy
Produced by Richie Webb
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011pnmv)
Susan Hulme with the day's top news stories from Westminster.



FRIDAY 10 JUNE 2011

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b011p144)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b011s54x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b011p146)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b011p148)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b011p14b)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b011p14d)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b011ppp3)
Tina Beattie

With Dr Tina Beattie, Director of Catholic Studies at Roehampton University.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b011ppp5)
Drought status is announced for much of Eastern England. The Environment Agency tells Charlotte Smith that farmers are worst affected and domestic supplies are safe, for now. The area is hugely important for crop production and some farmers have already warned that yields will be down by as much as 50%.

Farming Today looks at the Government's idea of 'biodiversity offsetting', where developers can build on a piece of land which is important to wildlife, if they compensate by creating, or buying a wildlife area elsewhere. The Wildlife Trusts warn that this must not be at the expense of valuable habitats.

And as 450 farms preparing to open their gates to 180,000 people for Open Farm Sunday, the BBC's Farmer of the Year shows the lengths to which farmers must go, to keep the public safe.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


FRI 06:00 Today (b011ppp7)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and James Naughtie, including:
07:30 Employment minister Chris Grayling on the government's new Welfare to Work programme.
08:10 With drought warnings across Britain, what more can the government do?
08:20 Letters from Ed Balls reveal how Gordon Brown's allies led a "brutal" plot to remove Tony Blair from power.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b011p13c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b011s5f3)
Malcolm X - A Life of Reinvention

Episode 5

Manning Marable spent over twenty years writing this exhaustive account of the life of Malcolm X. In it he challenges many preconceptions held about Malcolm and examines Malcolm's own autobiography - revealing the truth about his omissions and inaccuracies.

Having fallen out with Elijah Muhammad the leader of the Nation of Islam, Malcolm feels his life may be under threat. However he believes that keeping a very public profile is essential and may even keep him safe. But on Sunday Feb 21st 1965 he is assassinated just as he starts a speech at the Audubon Theatre in Harlem. No one has ever been sure who ordered his murder.

Read by Colin McFarlane

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b011ppp9)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Scotland's First Minister - Alex Salmond - talks about booze and bigotry. Jazz singer Nailah Porter performs live in studio. Men and hair loss. Women in Business: how does flexible working affect small companies? Natalia Koliada - the founder of the Belarus Free Theatre. Presented by Jenni Murray. Scotland's First Minister - Alex Salmond - talks about booze and bigotry. Jazz singer Nailah Porter performs live in studio. Men and hair loss. Women in Business: how does flexible working affect small companies? Natalia Koliada - the founder of the Belarus Free.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pppc)
Christopher Nicholson - The Elephant Keeper

Episode 5

Tom has fled to London where he and Jenny the Elephant are working in a seedy Menagerie. A country boy, he is shocked by the poverty and filth of the city. Then one day he thinks he sees his old sweetheart, Lizzie, in the streets and follows her. We soon see what this woman has become but for Tom in his loneliness and isolation, this is love. In this final episode of our adaptation of Christopher Nicolson's novel, Tom begins to hatch a plan to take the elephant back to her former home, the Indies. At last, he has hope of escape - of escaping England, his position in the class system, and all the violence and abuse - thanks to the elephant.

Adapted for radio by Elizabeth Burke

Tom ... Stuart McLoughlin
Lizzie ... Sarah Ovens
Lord Bidborough ... John Rowe
Mrs Harrington ... Claire Cage
Charles Singleton ... Matthew Gravelle

Producer: Kate McAll
BBC Cymru Wales.


FRI 11:00 A Child to Sponsor (b011pppf)
Sponsoring a child in the developing world is a hugely popular form of giving. Millions of donors are linked with millions of children thousands of miles away. But this form of aid has often sparked controversy. Over the years, many of the large sponsorship charities have revised the way they operate their child sponsorship schemes. There are now two very different approaches - that of regular donations to an individual child versus giving sponsorship money to community development.

Emily Buchanan visits Ghana to see what impact different models of child sponsorship have on the ground and explores some of the unexpected dilemmas they throw up.

How is the money used? Why do donors choose to give in this way? What are the advantages for charities of this form of fundraising? What are the ethical issues involved in managing the relationship between the donor and the child? And what do the children make of it all?

Producer Jane Ashley.


FRI 11:30 Polyoaks (b011ppph)
Series 1

Episode 2

Nigel Planer, Celia Imrie, David Westhead, Phil Cornwell and Tony Gardner star in a timely satire on the NHS set in the bewildering new world of Coalition healthcare. This new sitcom is written by Private Eye's medical columnist, broadcaster, comedian and practising GP Dr. Phil Hammond and David Spicer ('Double Income, No Kids Yet' and 'Three Off the Tee'.)

As responsibility for the Health Service is stripped from managers and handed to doctors, brothers-in-medicine Roy & Hugh Thornton are struggling to work out what to do with all this sudden money and power. If they can diagnose acute appendicitis surely they can manage an £80 billion health budget. Can't they?

But a useless Celebrity TV Doctor, an overly-aggressive South African Nurse and a sinister GP Consortium Chairman don't make their lot any easier.

In this second episode TV's Dr. Jeremy and the two Dr. Thornton brothers have been persuaded by their Consortium to buy the Polyoaks Walk-In centre and set up a polyclinic. It's now their Practice Manager Betty's unenviable task to show them how manage the money. Well they couldn't do it on their own, could they? Hugh's too busy playing squash with local politicians and Roy has started filming consultations. And if, God forbid, any of their patients is seriously ill, will anybody notice?

Cast:
Dr Roy Thornton: Nigel Planer
Dr Hugh Thornton: Tony Gardner
TV's Dr Jeremy: David Westhead
Betty Crossfield: Celia Imrie
Vera Du Plessis: Carla Mendonca
Mr Devlin/Patient: Phil Cornwell
Mr Stafford: David Holt
Nanny/Mrs Grafton: Kate O'Sullivan
Oliver: Hugo Docking

Written By Phil Hammond and David Spicer

Producer/Director: Frank Stirling
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b011pppk)
Why the airline industry is bracing consumers for an end to cheap air travel..

The live music events which, far from being simply about sex, drugs and rock and roll, are stimulating local economies across the UK.

As four regions of the UK are declared drought stricken, what precautions can gardeners take in the face of more dry weather?

And the new generation of street traders who are taking their passion for good food on the road.

The presenter is Peter White. The producer is Kathryn Takatsuki.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b011p14g)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b011r45r)
National and international news, presented by Shaun Ley. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b011pppm)
Radio 5Live has been accused by its commercial rival as being too focused on footie and being weak on news. Some listeners agree and the BBC Trust says more clarity is needed. Roger asks Adrian Van Klaveren, the controller of Radio 5Live to answer your criticisms.

Is there a one-size fits all to Today programme interviews? Father Ted creator Graham Linehan wonders why there are "no positions possible except diametrically opposed ones". Many of you back him up.

And the endless search for new comedy talent for BBC radio. A Feedback listener gets an access all areas pass to the Radio 2 New Comedy Awards to find out what the judges are looking for.

Contact the Feedback team to let Roger know what you'd like him to tackle this series about anything you've heard on BBC radio.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b011pls5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00bqf6h)
The Antisocial Behaviour of Horace Rumpole

Going for Silk

Rumpole has successfully rebutted his colleagues attempts to quash his ebullient lifestyle with an ASBO, and now turns his attention back to the continuing case against young Bertie Timson whose sole 'crime' seems to be playing football in the street. Why are the residents pursuing their case against the boy quite so strongly? Could they have more sinister reasons for wanting him off their street? And could it be connected in any way to the lonely death of a prostitute across town, in which the prime suspect is a hapless young bachelor protesting his innocence; a call to arms Rumpole can scarcely ignore?

John Mortimer's two part BBC Radio 4 Rumpole story brings us the magician of the Old Bailey at his implacable best as he defends our ancient freedoms, while remaining uneasy about exactly what Hilda is up to in her continuing friendship with a high court judge.

Cast:
Horace Rumpole ..... Timothy West
Hilda Rumpole ..... Prunella Scales
Bonny Bernard ..... Nicholas le Prevost
Police Doctor ..... Roger May
Anna McKinnon ..... Jillie Mears
Graham Wetherby ..... David Holt
Prosecutor Noakes ..... Matthew Morgan
Detective Inspector Belfrage ..... David Shaw-Parker
Judge Barnes ..... Geoffrey Whitehead

Director: Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b011pppp)
Totnes, Devon

The GQT team are guests of Transition Town Totnes, Devon. Eric Robson is joined by Pippa Greenwood, Christine Walkden and Chris Beardshaw.

Anne Swithinbank visits an innovative garden share scheme in Devon. Chris Beardshaw catches up with the Eastmans near Bristol as part of the Listeners' Gardens series.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 The Rattigan Versions (b011vp8x)
Memories of Terence Rattigan from Donald Sinden

Memories of playwright Terence Rattigan on the day of his centenary, in conversation with Mark Lawson. Sir Donald Sinden appeared in several Rattigan projects and delivered the address at his memorial service in 1978.

Producer India Rakusen.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b011pppr)
Lawrence Eagleburger, Josephine Hart, Miriam Karlin, Jack Kevorkian and Roy Skelton

Matthew Bannister on

The American diplomat Lawrence Eagleburger who played important roles in the first Gulf war and the Balkans crisis. His former boss Henry Kissinger pays tribute;

The author and poetry enthusiast Josephine Hart, best known for her novel "Damage". We have memories from Dame Eileen Atkins, Jeremy Irons and Melvyn Bragg;

Roy Skelton, the man who provided the voices for the Daleks and the children's TV characters George and Zippy. Elvis McGonagall pays homage in verse..

America's Dr Death, Jack Kevorkian. We hear from his helper in more than one hundred and thirty assisted suicides

And the actress Miriam Karlin - shop steward in the Rag Trade on TV - and political activist in real life.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b011pppt)
The Film Programme this week is all about seeing double - from acting partnerships to technological innovation. Francine Stock will be investigating Francois Ozon's new film, Potiche, which stars Catherine Deneuve and Gerard Depardieu - you could say the Bogart and Bacall of contemporary French cinema - and there's also a revaluation of one of the lost gems of the Eighties, Ivan Passer's Cutter's Way which features Jeff Bridges and Lisa Eichhorn. For those fascinated by the mechanics of cinema the acclaimed cameraman, Seamus McGarvey, is joined by the BFI's Bryony Dixon to consider how doubling the frame rate at which films are shot -as Peter Jackson intends to do with The Hobbit - might affect the clarity and poetry of the images we see on our screens. And Steve James, the director of Hoop Dreams, talks about his latest film - The Interrupters, a vivid account of a courageous project aimed at tackling street violence in Chicago.

Producer: Zahid Warley.


FRI 17:00 PM (b011r5mr)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b011p14j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b011pppw)
Series 34

Episode 1

Olympic tickets, universities and nightmarish raunch-confusion. Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are back for a new series of The Now Show, with Laura Shavin, Jon Holmes, John Finnemore and Mitch Benn. Producer: Colin Anderson.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b011pppy)
Adam and Jennifer are busy with final preparations for Open Farm Sunday.
Brian's still worrying about the extra costs of trying to vacate the market site early. Jennifer suggests they walk part of the farm tour after supper, to help him unwind.

Jazzer's looking forward to an evening at a theme park. Harry's dressed and ready for an open-air Shakespeare play and doesn't let on that Jazzer's misinformed about tonight's venue.

Zofia thanks Adam for organising tonight's trip. She arrives for the minibus at the same time as Harry. He starts to feel self-conscious about his attire but Zofia assures him his tie looks smart. Jazzer turns up in his casual gear, wearing his wrap-around shades.

Harry helps Zofia off the minibus at the end of the evening. Jazzer realises Harry knew they were going to a play all along, and wants his money back. He accepts it wasn't a complete waste of time as, to Harry's annoyance, he got to sit next to Zofia on the drive home.

Adam's tired after such a busy day but is glad they decided to do Open Farm Sunday. Jennifer is pleased too, and crosses her fingers for a success. Adam's sure the visitors will have a brilliant day.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b011ppq0)
Kristin Scott Thomas, Terry Pratchett's documentary, Neil MacGregor

Mark Lawson reviews Terry Pratchett's TV documentary in which he visits a clinic and witnesses an assisted suicide.

Kristin Scott Thomas talks about starring in a West End production of Harold Pinter's Betrayal and life in France.

The winner of this year's Art Fund Prize for museums and galleries is announced next week. Front Row is reporting from the four finalists. Today Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, explains why their A History of the World in 100 Objects project should win.

Novelists Justin Cartwright and Julie Myerson and documentary film-maker David Sington discuss work which responds to or is influenced by the global financial crisis.

Producer: Robyn Read.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b011pppc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b011ppq2)
Jonathan Dimbleby presents a discussion of politics and the week's news from the Cheltenham Science Festival in Gloucestershire, with panellists Peter Hain, Shadow Secretary of State for Wales; Chris Grayling, Minister for Work and Pensions; James Harding, editor of The Times; and science broadcaster Vivienne Parry.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b011ppq4)
Series 2

Nectar

The beautiful thick, sweet and luscious tasting delicacy of honey is one of the world's natural goodies.

Indigenous peoples from all over the world will go to great lengths to get the honey from wild bees - and for most of us less connected to the natural world, we love this product of bees bought from the shop.

Honey is nectar and David Attenborough poignantly points out this "was the first bribe in nature..." - it evolved 100,000,000 years ago with the flowering plants and drove the evolutionary relationship between animals and plants.

Written and presented by Sir David Attenborough.

Producer: Julian Hector.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2011.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00cxy4r)
This Is a True Story

The story of Howard Neal, based on his own handwritten accounts and adapted for radio by Pia Di Mattina from a stage version by Nick Harrington and Tom Wright.

Howard, who has a low IQ, has been in prison for 25 years. Proceedings will soon be completed in the US courts to have him finally removed from death row on account of his mental impairment.

Howard ...... Tom Wright

Directed by Susan Roberts.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b011p14l)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b011r7zj)
Opposition activists in northern Syria are accusing the army of adopting a scorched earth policy around the town of Jisr Al-Shughur - we get an eyewitness account from a man who watched the day's events from a hillside overlooking his home town.

Turkish voters go to the polls on Sunday and the PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is universally expected to emerge the winner for his third successive victory - we examine his record in office.

Are you - the way the Duke of Edinburgh tells it - past your sell-by date by the time you reach the age of 90 - we talk to Diana Athill who recently won the coveted Costa literary prize at the tender age of 91.

The World Tonight with Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b011ppq6)
Please Look After Mother

Episode 7

Kyung-Sook Shin is arguably Korea's most popular and acclaimed novelist. Please Look After Mother has already sold over 1.5 million copies in Korea and has been reprinted over 100 times, turned into plays and a film. It is now published in 19 countries.

Please Look After Mother tells the story of So-nyo, an elderly wife and mother, who goes missing on Seoul station. Only with her gone, do her children and her husband begin to appreciate not only all she has done for them, but who she really was.

A story in part about the cultural clash between the generation who inhabit modern, urban Seoul and their parents steeped in the rural traditions of Korea, Please Look After Mother is also a universal reminder of how easy it is to take the people we love for granted.

In today's episode, Park So-nyo finishes her own story and her daughter Chi-hon makes a pilgrimage to Rome.

The reader is Sian Thomas
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The translator is Chi-Young Kim
The producer is Di Speirs.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b011p60h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b011ppq8)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster on efforts to change the law on dangerous dogs and a plan to introduce roadside testing to catch out drivers using illegal drugs.

He also investigates why some new MPs, having fought for years to get the job, are so unhappy just one year on from the election. A study carried out by the parliamentary thinktank The Hansard Society found that most new MPs took a pay cut when they arrived at Westminster. Many are now struggling to balance the demands of family life with long working hours and travel. Mark talks to some of the class of 2010 as well as some older hands.

Away from Westminster, there's a report from Strasbourg where it's been a lively week at the European Parliament. The political fall out from the E. coli crisis reached the debating chamber where one politician brandished a cucumber. There's a big row brewing about the size of the EU budget and the suggestion it should go up by five per cent.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b011p5hn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b011p5hn)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b011pq29)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b011pq29)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b011pkft)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b011pkft)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b011pldr)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b011pldr)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b011pppc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b011pppc)

A Child to Sponsor 11:00 FRI (b011pppf)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b011p60h)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b011p60h)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b00nfmkn)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00nk4lm)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b011p60c)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b011pkg6)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b011pls1)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b011p6yv)

All in the Mind 16:30 WED (b011p6yv)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b011p24j)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b011j7vr)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b011p7t8)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b011p0fl)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b011jx7s)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b011ppq2)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b011p0hz)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b011p0hz)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b011p0st)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b011p0st)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b011mskb)

Blogging against Bribery 20:00 MON (b011p7t6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b011p7z2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b011p6yx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b011pkqx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b011pnmq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b011ppq6)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b011mt39)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b011p5h8)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b011p5h8)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b011s4nh)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b011s4nh)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b011s4qg)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b011s4qg)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b011s54x)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b011s54x)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b011s5f3)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b011p248)

Bookclub 16:00 THU (b011p248)

Britain's Labs 09:30 TUE (b00shrc2)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b011p10t)

Clare in the Community 18:30 TUE (b00sx2ql)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b011j3kf)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b011p246)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b011j7v7)

Counterpoint 13:30 MON (b011p7sy)

Dave Against the Machine 23:00 THU (b011pnms)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 08:50 SUN (b011jx7v)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 20:50 FRI (b011ppq4)

Decision Time 20:00 WED (b011pkqn)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b011p13c)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b011p13c)

Drama 14:15 MON (b011p7t0)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b011p607)

Drama 14:15 WED (b011pkg2)

Drama 14:15 THU (b011plrz)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00bqf6h)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b011msk6)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b011mr87)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b011p81t)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b011p5hd)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b011pkfk)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b011pldh)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b011ppp5)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b011jx0f)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b011pppm)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b011p6yq)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b011jv8p)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b011pkqq)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00cxy4r)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b011p0fz)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b011p0fz)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b011p0fg)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b011plrq)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b011p7t4)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b011p6yn)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b011pkql)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b011pls7)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b011ppq0)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b011pkqs)

GPs Who Need GPS 14:45 SUN (b00tdmsr)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b011jx0h)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b011pppp)

Good in Vestments 11:00 MON (b011p7sr)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b011pldm)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b011pldm)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b011p6ys)

It's Your Round 18:30 THU (b00yrfwr)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b011j7vh)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b011p7t2)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b011jx0k)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b011pppr)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b011p60f)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b011p60f)

Liszt and His Women 13:30 TUE (b011p603)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 WED (b011pkfw)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b011p0fx)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b011p609)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 WED (b00jsykr)

Material World 21:00 MON (b011jvz3)

Material World 16:30 THU (b011pls3)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b011jx96)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b011p0sf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b011p117)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b011p11w)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b011p12v)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b011p13k)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b011p144)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b011pkfp)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b011pkfp)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b011pkg4)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b011p0fj)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b011p0fj)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b011jv8m)

Mr Blue Sky 11:30 MON (b011p7st)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b011jx9g)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b011p0sp)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b011p11h)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b011p124)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b011p133)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b011p13t)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b011p14d)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b011p0sw)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b011jx9n)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b011p0t0)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b011p0t4)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b011jxb5)

News 13:00 SAT (b011jx9x)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b011jvyx)

Off the Page 13:30 THU (b011plrx)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b011p10j)

PM 17:00 SAT (b011p0fs)

PM 17:00 MON (b011r5q7)

PM 17:00 TUE (b011r5mj)

PM 17:00 WED (b011r5ml)

PM 17:00 THU (b011r5qw)

PM 17:00 FRI (b011r5mr)

Party 18:30 WED (b011pkqg)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b011p24d)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b011j3kk)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b011p24b)

Polyoaks 11:30 FRI (b011ppph)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b011jx9j)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b011p81r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b011p5hb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b011pkfh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b011pldf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b011ppp3)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b011p10p)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b011p10p)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b011p10p)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b011mr7j)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b011mr7j)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b011p0fn)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b011msk4)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b011p0g1)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b011p5nt)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b011p5nt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b011jx9b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b011p0sk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b011p11c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b011p120)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b011p12z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b011p13p)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b011p148)

Shedtown 23:00 WED (b011pkqz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b011jx98)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b011jx9d)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b011jx9z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b011p0sh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b011p0sm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b011p0t8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b011p119)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b011p11f)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b011p11y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b011p122)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b011p12x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b011p131)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b011p13m)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b011p13r)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b011p146)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b011p14b)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b011jxb3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b011p0td)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b011p11p)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b011p128)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b011p137)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b011p13y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b011p14j)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b011p10g)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b011p10g)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b011p723)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b011p723)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b011p10r)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b011p10m)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b011p10w)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b011p24g)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b011p24g)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b011p605)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b011p605)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b011p6yl)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b011p6yl)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b011pkqj)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b011pkqj)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b011pls5)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b011pls5)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b011pppy)

The Balancing Bluebottle 13:30 SUN (b00jz7cc)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b011p0fv)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b011pnml)

The Choice 09:00 TUE (b011p5hj)

The Choice 21:30 TUE (b011p5hj)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b011jx0m)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b011pppt)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b011tw7n)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b011tw7n)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b011p6yz)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b011p6yz)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b011pkg0)

The Men with the Ear of the President 17:00 SUN (b011jrh9)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b011jx7l)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b011pppw)

The Rattigan Versions 15:45 MON (b011s7zd)

The Rattigan Versions 15:45 TUE (b011vp7f)

The Rattigan Versions 15:45 WED (b011vpt3)

The Rattigan Versions 15:45 THU (b011vp8v)

The Rattigan Versions 15:45 FRI (b011vp8x)

The Twilight World of Syd Barrett 11:30 THU (b011plrs)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b011p1kg)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b011r7zn)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b011r7zb)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b011r7zd)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b011r7zg)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b011r7zj)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b011jv8c)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b011pkqd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b011p7z4)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b011p6z1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b011pkr1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b011pnmv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b011ppq8)

Today 07:00 SAT (b011msk2)

Today 06:00 MON (b011qfln)

Today 06:00 TUE (b011p5hg)

Today 06:00 WED (b011pkfm)

Today 06:00 THU (b011pldk)

Today 06:00 FRI (b011ppp7)

Unbuilding Detroit 11:30 TUE (b011p5nw)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b011jx9q)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b011jx9s)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b011jx9v)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b011jxb1)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b011p0sy)

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Weather 12:57 SUN (b011p0t6)

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Weather 21:58 THU (b011p140)

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Weather 21:58 FRI (b011p14l)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b011p25n)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b011p25q)

What's So Great About ...? 10:30 SAT (b011msk8)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b011p0fq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b011p7sp)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b011p5hl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b011pkfr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b011pldp)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b011ppp9)

World at One 13:00 MON (b011x1ly)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b011r45k)

World at One 13:00 WED (b011r45m)

World at One 13:00 THU (b011r45p)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b011r45r)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b011p7sw)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b011p5ny)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b011pkfy)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b011plrv)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b011pppk)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b011jx9l)