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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 19 MARCH 2011

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00zf67c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Letters to the Arab World (b00zn0wl)
Episode 5

Five writers from North Africa and the Middle East consider the momentous events that are reshaping the Arab world. As the political and cultural landscape shifts around them, these authors and thinkers use open letters to reflect on the consequences for the region and for its people.

Today's letter is from the Libyan writer Hisham Matar.

Producer: Simon Elmes.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00zf67f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00zf67h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00zf67k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00zf67m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00zf67p)
With Canon Dr Ann Holt of the Bible Society.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00zfmy9)
"At least I won't die alone." Two musicians who survived the earthquake in Japan speak about the disaster and their wish to return to play for the nation as it tries to recover. Plus John Craven reads our bulletin of listeners' news. Presented by Becky Milligan. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00zf67r)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00zf67t)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00zgwhl)
Death on the Moors

Ponies have roamed the moors of Dartmoor and Bodmin for years and are as much a part of the moors as the heathers that grow there. But is the very survival of the Dartmoor pony, which is the symbol of the National Park, now under threat? Helen Mark is on Dartmoor to meet some of the people whose lives revolve around the ponies and who are fighting to preserve them and ultimately the moorland on which they roam.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00zgwhn)
Farming Today This Week

Farmers across the country are out sowing and planting in the hope of reaping a profitable harvest this summer. What gets planted where is determined on local factors like the quality of the soil and global factors like the price of wheat.

Caz Graham plants potatoes in Staffordshire and Martin Poyntz-Roberts visits a brassica farmer who is preparing to plant a batch of sapling cauliflowers in the Midlands.

Also, a trip to one Norfolk farm reveals the pea farmers of East Anglia are back in business after Birds Eye pulled out of the region last year. And Anna Hill goes to see millions of onion seeds in the sandy Brecklands in Suffolk.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Emma Weatherill.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00zf67w)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00zgwhq)
Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00zgwhs)
Fi Glover with best-selling crime writer crime writer Sara Paretsky and poet Aoife Mannix; interviews with a man who's just brought back to life the robot he built nearly 50 years ago, and a Japanese woman who's dealing at a distance with the catastrophes in her homeland. There's a Sound Sculpture about the windscreen wipers on a Humber, and actor Larry Lamb shares his Inheritance Tracks.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00zgwhv)
Australia - Georgia - St Pancras Station, London

Sandi Toksvig finds out about Georgia on the Black Sea with novelist Meg Clothier, hears about a motorbike trip around Australia's Highway 1 with biker and travel writer Geoff Hill and examines St Pancras Station in London and the newly refurbished St Pancras Hotel with architectural expert Simon Bradley.
Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 For One Night Only (b00zh1d6)
Series 6

The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart

Paul Gambaccini returns with the award-winning series to look back at four more occasions on which a classic live album was recorded. He hears from those who were there, on-stage, backstage and in the audience, to re-create the event for all of us who, each time we play the album, think: 'If only I could have been there'.

When 'The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart' appeared in 1960 it became the first comedy album ever to top the charts. From 'The Driving Instructor' to 'Abe Lincoln vs Madison Avenue', the sketches that earned Newhart Grammy Awards for Best New Artist and Best Comedy Performance were as popular in Britain as in the US. And they still raise a laugh more than fifty years on.

In this first edition of the new series, Paul Gambaccini talks to the now 81-year-old comedy star himself who, before the legendary album, was an accountant who leavened the office monotony by working up 'phone' routines with a colleague. When Chicago DJ Dan Sorkin heard a tape of the pair, he thought Bob's end of the act was good enough to record and managed to interest George Avakian of Warner Brothers Records. Avakian wanted Bob in front of a live audience and found a club in Houston - The Tidelands - where the manager, Dick Maegle, agreed to let the novice perform. Sorkin, Avakian and Maegle have all been interviewed for the programme.

So on 12 February 1960 a nervous Bob went out on stage. The result is as fresh today as it was then. Paul Gambaccini hears the story of the making of this classic album

Also in this series of For One Night Only: BB King's classic, Live at the Regal, the LSO's hit live performance of Berlioz's The Trojans and Keith Jarrett's unsurpassed jazz improvisation, the Cologne Concert.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00zh55p)
Jackie Ashley of The Guardian looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

The UN resolution authorising military action against Libya and the uncertainity of the ceasefire announced by Colonel Gaddafi has dramatically changed the course of events for the moment. But while bloodshed has so far been averted, what might be the consequences of Britain's potential involvement in the pro-democracy struggles in the Middle East? Richard Ottaway, Conservative MP and chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, and Gisela Stuart, a Labour member of the Defence Select Committee, discuss the latest developments.

The proposed NHS reforms have caused controversy amongst some Lib Dem members of the Coalition government, and Labour is condemning what it sees as the "marketisation" of the health service. So what is the basis of these concerns? John Leech Liberal Democrat, Liz Kendall Labour Health spokeswoman, and Nick De Bois Conservative MP give their judgment on plans to re-organise the health service.

There were two launches this week in the referendum campaign on AV showing cross party co-operation for both sides of the argument.
Lord Hattersley was active in the last UK wide referendum on membership of the EEC in 1975 and recounts his experience of that time.

Peter Hain Labour (supporting a YES vote) and George Eustice Conservative (supporting a NO vote) look at how well the co-operation is going amongst politicians, and the merits of the argument on both sides.

The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00zh55r)
Fear behind the public facade: growing fear of possible nuclear catastrophe in Tokyo.
We go out to a gun shop to discover just how easy it is to get armed in California.
And there's a story from Pakistan about a snow leopard that's forgotten what snow's like.

How much more can survivors of Japan's disaster endure? They wander through once-familiar neighbourhoods that are now no more than wastelands. They search for homes that exist only in their memories. And they've been going in fear of what the unfolding nuclear disaster might mean - uncertain of the safety of the air they breathe. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes has spent days reporting on the plight of the survivors, and considers what it takes to cope with adversity on this overwhelming scale.

It was a tiny event. A bit of routine local politics: a Congresswoman taking questions at a supermarket in Arizona. But suddenly a gunman opened fire. When the shooting was over six people were dead, and the Congresswoman, Gabrielle Gifford, was wounded in the head and fighting for her life. In recent years America has become disturbingly prone to these sort insane, murderous outbursts. Each is followed by periods of national soul-searching. And two months on from the bloodshed in Arizona, David Willis been looking at the impact it's had on America's attitudes towards guns.

The study of linguistics is littered with dead languages - tongues that have fallen silent. Some will have failed to evolve - failed to keep up with a changing world and faded into irrelevance. They'll have been swamped by other, more dynamic, more widely-spoken languages. Hundreds of smaller ones are struggling right now, and in danger of extinction. But Hannah Barnes has been talking to lovers of Hebrew who are determined to ensure that it remains as up to date as it can possibly be.

The mountains of Asia - like the Himalayas and the Hindu Kush - are home to a magnificent animal, the snow leopard. But all across its range it's under pressure and endangered. It has less and less room to roam, and poachers hunt it for its beautiful fur. It's believed that there are fewer than six thousand snow leopards in the wild. And Mohammad Hanif has been touched by the miseries of one that is in captivity.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00zhc3p)
On Money Box with Paul Lewis: The Japan crisis - what are the financial implications?
Plus: how being too successful in the Olympics ticket lottery could burn your bank balance.
And the programme reveals some surprising new numbers about the level of student debt.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b00zf5t4)
Comedians Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis host the latest edition of the topical stand-up and sketch show. They are joined by Mitch Benn and guests Lloyd Langford and Holly Walsh.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00zf67y)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00zf680)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00zf646)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the live debate from Liverpool Hope University with Greg Barker, Energy and Climate Change minister, Diane Abbott, Shadow Minister for Public Health, Jonathon Porritt, environmentalist and founder of Forum for the Future, and Toby Young, Founder of the West London Free School and Associate Editor of the Spectator.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00zhc3r)
Any Answers? Listeners respond to the issues raised in Any Questions? If you have a comment or question on this week's programme or would like to take part in the Any Answers? phone-in you can contact us by telephone or email. Tel: 03700 100 444 Email: any.answers@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00zhc3t)
Mike Walker - Landfall

Five misfits travel to a mysterious planet to recover ore left by a mining operation and encounter a truly extraordinary intelligence. An original Science Fiction adventure by Mike Walker.

Cally ... Nicola Miles-Wilden
Intaba ... Cyril Nri
Hudson ... Clare Perkins
JD ... Alex Tregear
Hussam ... Adeel Akhtar

Sound design by Pete Ringrose and Colin Guthrie

The director is Marc Beeby

When five lost souls, recruited by the Company travel to an abandoned planet, all they know is that they are to retrieve the only known sample of an ore left over from an old mining operation. But their task becomes considerably more complicated when one of their party has a close encounter with the indigenous plant life - plant life which seems to have some very odd, very powerful properties. Soon they are battling not only to stay alive, but to hang on to the very things that make them human.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b00zdl20)
Series 11

The Impossible Dream

In this series that explores those pieces of music that never fail to move us, this week we feature, 'The Impossible Dream', a song that talks of the resilience of the human spirit.

It tells the story of a quest and it's had a surprising journey of it's own. It was originally composed for the 1965 musical The Man of La Mancha which was inspired by Miguel de Cervantes story of Don Quixote. The music was written by Mitch Leigh and the lyrics by Joe Darion. Now in his 80's Leigh explains how his first writing partner was WH Auden and talks about why this particular piece struck a chord with African American friends at that time. Generations on, international Soprano Lesley Garrett recalls how this song inspired her childhood dreams in Doncaster, Yachtsman of the Year Geoff Holt talks about how this song carried him across the Atlantic on one of the most important voyages of his life and former advertising executive Rob Chew explains how this piece is helping him face lifes biggest challenge.

Contributors:
Geoff Holt
Rob Chew
Mitch Leigh
Stuart Pedlar
Lesley Garrett

Producer: Nicola Humphries

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00zhc9n)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Jane Garvey presents. Love letters: what they reveal about our younger selves and are they to be treasured or thrown away? Next week's budget and what it might mean for women and their families. Polyester - why one woman is still passionate about it seventy years after it was invented. Gemma Jones talks about working with director Woody Allen in his latest film to be set in London. More 'looked after' children than ever are asking for help - we discuss why and look at what support is on offer. Was God married? One Biblical scholar argues he did indeed have a wife. And after Comic Relief we look at what makes us laugh.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00zhc9q)
A fresh perspective on the day's news with sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00zfmqn)
Major Disaster Plans

The view from the top of business, presented by Evan Davis. The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

This week, Evan's top executive guests include two hoteliers and a soft drinks manufacturer. They discuss recent events in Japan, and explore to what extent companies can really prepare for major disasters.

They also reveal how much they know about life on the shop floor and where the problems lie.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00zf682)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00zf684)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00zf686)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00zhd1p)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

There's a sporting theme running through Loose Ends this week. The comedian described as 'A Hobbit with a wicked sense of humour' Bill Bailey joins Clive to talk about his acting career. He's often seen on TV in Never Mind the Buzzcocks, QI and Black Books, this time he's on the silver screen in the film ChaletGirl - a film featuring winter sports - though he doesn't get to do any skiing.

Clive is joined by a genuine Olympian, James Cracknell who since rowing gold at two Olympics in Sydney & Athens has taken on three of the toughest races on the planet. One of which nearly killed him last year. The TV series "Unstoppable? The James Cracknell Trilogy" follows James as he battles against gruelling conditions, fights for his life and the road to recovery.

Jessica Hynes stars as Head of PR in BBC4's timely mocumentary series 2012 which charts the bungling activities of the Olympic Deliverance Commission whose task is to smooth the run-up to 2012. How could you dream up a storyline involving the countdown clock going wrong?

Nikki Bedi might need to use her "I'm A Celebrity..... Get Me Out Of Here" card this week as she talks to Dom Joly.

Music comes from Manchester based multi-instrumentalist and singer Jesca Hoop who performs 'City Bird' from her new EP Snowglobe. Shady Bard's music may have been featured in US TV Drama Grey's Anatomy but for Loose Ends they play their new single 'Night Song' from their album Trials.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00zhd1t)
Marine le Pen

Claire Bolderson profiles Marine Le Pen, daughter of Jean Marie Le Pen who now leads the party that her father founded, the Front National. She has a different style to her father - more smiles than snarls - but are her political views as divisive and controversial as his? A recent opinion poll shows that support for Marine Le Pen is overtaking support for President Sarkozy and she may do very well at the next presidential election in 2012.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00zhd1w)
Tom Sutcliffe and guests writer Iain Sinclair, anthropologist Kit Davies and journalist Natalie Haynes review the week's cultural highlights including Neil LaBute's new play "In A Forest Dark and Deep" starring Matthew Fox and Olivia Williams.

Neil LaBute is a film director and writer as well as a prolific dramatist whose past credits include The Shape of Things and the Olivier Award nominated Fat Pig. In A Forest Dark and Deep is set in a country retreat deep in the woods to which college lecturer Betty (played by Olivia Williams) invites her brother Bobby (played by Matthew Fox). As a storm rages outside, a dramatic encounter unfolds within the cabin.

Dr Who's Matt Smith stars as writer Christopher Isherwood in a BBC drama - Christopher and his Kind - which recounts Isherwood's visit to the 1930s Berlin cabaret scene where he embarks on an affair with poet WH Auden and is based on Isherwood's own memoir which he wrote in 1976. The screenplay is written by the writer of "My Night With Reg" Kevin Elyot and Imogen Poots co-stars as Jean Ross, the Sally Bowles character played by Liza Minelli in Cabaret.

Submarine is the debut film of comedian Richard Ayoade and is a touching and funning coming of age story set in Swansea in which Oliver Tate (played by newcomer Craig Roberts) attempts to save his mother from running off with a mystic whilst encountering the perils of his own first love.

Jennifer Egan's new novel "A Visit From the Good Squad" spans several decades and travels across America from San Francisco to New York as it portrays the lives of a group of men and women whose lives collide and then fall apart as the story unfolds. It attracted rave reviews when it was published in the States last year.

And Keeping It Real: Material Intelligence at the Whitechapel Gallery looks at art and the everyday including work by Paul Chan, Arturo Herrera and Martin Kippenberger.

PRODUCER; HILARY DUNN.


SAT 20:00 Letters to the Arab World Omnibus (b00zmzxv)
All this week on Radio 4, five writers from North Africa and the Middle East have written personal letters considering the momentous events that are reshaping the Arab world. As the political and cultural landscape shifts around them, the authors have reflected on the consequences for the region and for its people. BBC Special Correspondent Razia Iqbal presents a special omnibus edition of the letters.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 21:00 Arnold Bennett - Anna of the Five Towns (b01nvmwm)
2. Defiance

Having inherited a fortune on her twenty first birthday Anna Tellwright begins to gain independence and freedom.

But on her return from an eventful holiday with the Suttons and Henry Mynors her joy is marred by some shocking news about one of her tenant's Titus Price. Anna's growing concern for his son William leads her to a defiant act that threatens everything.

Starring Charlotte Riley.

Conclusion of Arnold Bennett's powerful story of love, tyranny and rebellion set against the vitality and harshness of life in the Staffordshire Potteries in the late 19th century.

Dramatised by Helen Edmundson.

Anna.....Charlotte Riley
Tellwright.....David Schofield
Young Agnes.....Emilia Harker
William Price.....Michael Socha
Henry Mynors.....Lee Williams
Beatrice/Older Agnes.....Rosina Carbone
Mrs Sutton.....Olwen May
Mr Sutton/Coroner.....Jonathan Keeble
Sarah Vodrey.....Jacqueline Redgwell

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00zf688)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00zf34d)
The Medicalisation of Misbehaviour

The medicalisation of misbehaviour.
The 'DSM' - The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the Bible of American psychiatry - is reported this week to be debating whether to recognise 'sex addiction' as a treatable medical condition.
Private 'rehab' clinics say that more and more clients are seeking treatment for sex addiction. Those who have already undergone therapy for it include Russell Brand, Tiger Woods and Michael Douglas.
So should we tear up the seventh commandment and replace it with 'If you commit adultery you should seek therapy'?
We could replace a few more commandments. In place of 'Remember the Sabbath', 'Thou shalt not covet', 'Thou shalt not steal' and 'Honour thy father and mother', we could have 'Recognise that you may be a workaholic, a shopaholic or a kleptomaniac, or that you may have Oppositional Defiant Disorder.'
If any socially-unacceptable behaviour is a symptom of a condition that can be treated with drugs or therapy or both, where does that leave those quaint old moral terms good and bad, right and wrong? Are we nowadays too willing to excuse bad behaviour as the morally-neutral symptom of some newly-defined mental disorder? Or is medical science finding new ways to diagnose and treat the causes of deviance where traditional morality has failed?
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Clifford Longley, Melanie Phillips and Kenan Malik.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b00zdh7m)
Series 1

Reading

Coming this week from the University of Reading, host Steve Punt quizzes students and lecturers of Food Science & Technology, International Relations, and English and American Literature.
Which is why you're going to find out the meanings of such obscure and outlandish concepts as "interregnum", "Tetrapak", "Spationaute", "Myanmar", "Thermidore", "golem" and "Chris Moyles"

"The 3rd Degree" is a funny, lively and dynamic new quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners whilst delighting the current ones. It's recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

Together with host Steve Punt, the show tours the (sometimes posh, sometimes murky, but always welcoming!) Union buildings, cafés and lecture halls of six universities across the UK.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and Lady Gaga... In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, were particularly lively, and offered plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides...

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list...

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 The Company of Poets (b00zd92g)
Susannah Clapp looks through Angela Carter's journals to discover her unknown poetry. She introduces Angela's circle - her editors Andrew Motion (former Poet Laureate), and Carmen Callil (founder of Virago Press), and her close friend Salman Rushdie, as well as the critic Marina Warner - not just to the verse itself, but to the fact that Angela even wrote poetry, which none of them knew.

Angela Carter is one of the most pungent writers of the last fifty years and yet her poems are more or less unknown. They were written at the beginning of her life as a writer: her first novel was published in 1966, and so have a particular interest as showing a path not taken. In this programme Susannah and guests argue that they strikingly anticipate her fiction and other writing, in both the richness of expression and in subject matter and sometimes even the very violence of the verse makes her concerns plainer. Through readings and analysis, the programme explores Carter's poetic interest in fairy tale, her fascination with the 18th-century (Susannah will argue that she was both a romper and a sceptic secularist), her feminism, her foul tongue, and her fascinating politics. And her poetry will also illustrate Carter's vivid visual sense and tastes, such as her love of cats.

For the programme Susannah goes to the British Library to look at the poems in Angela Carter's journals, and her lists of the things that she was reading at the time she wrote them.

Readings will be done by Olivia Williams (The Sixth Sense, The Ghost Writer and the RSC.)

Susannah was a close friend of Angela Carter's.

Contributors: Salman Rushdie, Andrew Motion, Marina Warner, Carmen Callil, Jamie Andrews. Readings by Olivia Williams.

Producer: Rebecca Stratford.



SUNDAY 20 MARCH 2011

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00zjcmk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Lent Talks (b00zf34g)
Lord Ian Blair

This year's Lent Talks sees six well known figures reflect on different elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

In the first Lent Talk of the series, Former Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Lord Ian Blair, explores the conflict of religion in public life, considering conflict as a force for both good and evil.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love. The main theme for this year's talks will explore conflict in different forms and how it interacts with various aspects of society and culture.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00zjcmm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00zjcmp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00zjcmr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00zjcmt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00zjcwz)
The bells of St George's, Poynton, Cheshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00zhd1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00zjcmw)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00zjcx1)
Happy Accidents

Irma Kurtz considers how serendipity influences and moulds our lives in 'Happy Accidents'.

This propensity for finding something unexpected and useful while searching for something else entirely can be related to science, geography and of course, love. Serendipity differs from mere coincidence - it doesn't knock at the door and you can't go out to look for it.

We know now that the early explorers who voyaged before there were maps and navigational equipment were masters of serendipity. We will hear a letter from Christopher Columbus which reveals very clearly that America was a serendipitous discovery which came about while the explorer was actually looking for a route to the Indies.

Presented by Irma Kurtz

Produced by Ronni Davis
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00zjcx3)
Caz Graham visits a farm for children who are visually impaired and have disabilities. When the Royal London Society for the Blind opened Hollybank Farm in Kent 18 months ago many of their students were terrified of the animals. Now they have overcome that fear and everyone gets involved from collecting the eggs to selling the sausages.

These children don't have traditional lessons but use the farm to learn outside the classroom. Due to their disabilities the children are unlikely to ever become farmers but this vocational learning has taught them basic maths and English, and more importantly has provided a vital connection to the outside world. Caz Graham mucks out with some of the students and with Chris Ely, the agricultural manager.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00zjcmy)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00zjcn0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00zjcx5)
Edward Stourton presents a special edition of the programme from Cairo as Egyptians go to the polls for the first time in decades.

He looks at the rise in sectarian tensions that have marked the post revolution era by visiting the Coptic community that lost nine of its members in recent fighting with local Muslims. He travels to the monastry carved into the bare rock hillside to meet the local priest.

Women played a significant role in the revolution and Edward sits at the centre of the uprising, Tahrir Square, with two female activists, Sally Zohney and Ethar Kamal El-Katatney, who talk about their hopes for the future.

We hear from Dr Khaled Fahmy Head of History at the American University in Cairo, who talks about the strong political culture of Egypt and how that has rippled accross the Middle East.

Edward examines whether fundamental Islamic groups will aim to take advantage of the infant Egyptian democracy with Dr Sara Silvesti from City University, London.

What does all this upheaval mean for the future of the region? Edward will be joined by Gil Hoffman of The Jerusalem Post, Tarek Osman, author of "Egypt on the Brink- From Nassar to Mubarak" and Maye Kassem, Associate Professor of Middle East Politics at the American Univeristy in Cairo to discuss.

E-mail: sunday@bbc.co.uk

Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00zjcx7)
Canon Collins Trust

Graça Machel presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Canon Collins Trust.

Donations to Canon Collins Trust should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Canon Collins Trust. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. You can also give online at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide School Home Support with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 1102028.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b00zjcn2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00zjcn4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00zjcx9)
The Unreconciled - Separation and Unity

Part of our series for Lent from St John's Presbyterian Church, Newtownbreda, Belfast. Preacher: The Minister, the Rev Wilfred Orr. Producer: Bert Tosh.

In our journey through Lent, we are looking at issues in Christian reconciliation. Download web resources specially written for the series from the Churches Together in Britain and Ireland website. As we travel towards Easter, we prepare ourselves to meet the ultimate reconciling work - what God has done for us in the crucifixion, death and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ. Our service this morning comes from an area of Northern Ireland where issues of community identity have separated people for generations. What does the hope of unity mean to Christians and others in Northern Ireland in light of this troubled history?


SUN 08:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00zf648)
Series 2

Cicada

One of the great wild sounds of North America is the purring of insects in the evening, especially that of Cicadas, one of the great stridulating sounds in the wild.

This is the tale of one Cicada; the 17-year periodic Cicada that stunned the community in New England 13 years after the Pilgrim Fathers had landed. There was a plague of insects, all with red eyes on stalks - and all emerging continuously out of the soil.

When the plague subsided a few weeks later the people of Plymouth Rock were braced for another onslaught, but nothing happened until 17 years later.

Sir David Attenborough recalls a filming trip to New England to film this species of Cicada with both fascinating natural history and a hilarious twist.

Written and presented by David Attenborough

Producer: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00zl4dl)
As allied forces attack Libya, we've the latest on the ground and analysis of the conflict.

Colonel Franklin Childress of US African Command tells us of the military operations overnight. French politician and member of France's Foreign Affairs Committee Jacques Myard explains why his nation's planes were the first to take the offensive. We hear from Murad Hemayma - a former Libyan diplomat who has defected to the rebels. And our correspondent Alan Little describes the scene in the Libyan capital - Tripoli.

Japan's Prime Minister says the country needs to be rebuilt. But we've a warning that trust in the authorities will never be the same again. We've a brains trust to tackle all those unanswered scientific questions with Professor Heinz Wolf, Professor James Jackson and research fellow Malcolm Grimston.
Former BBC Japan Correspondent and adviser to the Japanese government - William Horsley - suggests that scathing criticism of the Tokyo government may bring a shift in the country's political culture.

And reviewing the Sunday papers are Heinz Wolf the scientist, Fiona Reynolds the head of the National Trust, and author Jojo Moyes.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00zl4dn)
For detailed synopsis, see daily episodes.

Written by: Carole Simpson Solazzo
Directed by: Kim Greengrass
Editor: Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ..... Jack Firth
Lily Pargetter ..... Georgie Feller
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Jolene Perks ..... Buffy Davis
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Kathy Perks ..... Hedli Niklaus
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Rosalind Adams
Roy Tucker ..... Ian Pepperell
Caroline Sterling ..... Sara Coward
Robert Snell ..... Graham Blockey
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Andrew Eagleton ..... John Flitcroft.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b00zl4dq)
Brixton Riots

In this edition of The Reunion, Sue MacGregor reunites five people who lived through the dramatic events which stunned the nation when simmering tensions erupted into an all out battle between police and youths in Brixton in April 1981.

On Saturday the 11th of April 1981 Brixton was set ablaze as hundreds of local youths fought the Metropolitan Police in running street battles. The police came under a hail of bricks and bottles, and petrol bombs were thrown at them for the first time on mainland Britain. Ill equipped and lacking in training at one point they struggled even to defend the police station on Brixton Road.

What was shocking to many people was the unexpectedness of events. But below the surface tensions had been building. Many young black men believed officers discriminated against them, particularly by use of the 'sus' law under which anybody could be stopped and searched if officers merely suspected they might be planning to carry out a crime.

In early April, Operation Swamp - an attempt to cut street crime in Brixton which used the sus law to stop more than 1,000 people in six days - heightened tensions.

Whilst the press called it "the Brixton riots", giving the impression that it was the work of a hysterical mob. Linton Kwesi Johnson redefined the moment as "di great insohreckshan". "It is noh mistri/we mekkin histri," he wrote.

Joining Sue around the table is: novelist Alex Wheatle ; Ted Knight, then the leader of Lambeth Borough Council; journalist and broadcaster Darcus Howe and former policemen Brian Paddick and Peter Bleksley.

Producer: Emily Williams and David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00zf9tf)
Series 59

Episode 6

Nicholas Parsons hosts the long running panel game in which panellists attempt to talk on a subject without hesitation, repetition or deviation. This week the guests are Marcus Brigstocke, Paul Merton, Sheila Hancock and Sue Perkins. Subjects include 'The Aztecs', 'My Garden Shed' and most unusually... 'Anything and Everything'. What will the panellists do when given such free rein with the subject matter?
Produced by Tilusha Ghelani.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00zl4ds)
Frozen Food

In France there is no shame in shopping in Picard. The specialist frozen food chain commands 18% of the french frozen market by selling quality frozen food to meet the needs of a time poor, food loving bourgeoisie.

Simon Parkes explores today's frozen food market, and asks if our own frozen sector could follow their lead?

Natalie Berg, Global Research Director of Planet Retail looks at current trends in the market which has seen a strong recovery during the recession. Brian Young, Director General of the British Frozen Food Federation, outlines the potential for the market, and constraints, most notably the success of chilled food ranges. Ian Keyes talks about the challenges of launching their value added, local "Yorkshire Peas" range. And Christine Tacon, Managing Director of Co-operative Farms, outlines the work done by the Fruit and Vegetable Taskforce which means that from 6th April plain frozen fruit and veg will be included in the Healthy Start voucher scheme.

Producer: Rebecca Moore.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00zjcn6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00zl4dv)
The latest national and international news, with an in-depth look at events around the world. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on Twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Tracing Your Roots (b00zl4dx)
In this Tracing Your Roots Census Special, Sally Magnusson visits Fox Lane in Leyland. With the help of genealogist Nick Barratt, she explores how, through the Census, we can piece together a street's changing history and also uncover secrets about our own family's past.

The first census records date back to the early 1800s. At this time, Leyland was a small village which became a small town over the nineteenth century. Sally visits one of the original weaver's cottages where the owners are intrigued to find out more about the original residents. Through the census records we build up a picture of how the weaving industry declined in the 1830's, with the weavers required to sub-let their cellars to poorer families. As the Industrial Revolution progresses we can see in the occupations listed in the census how the town evolves through to the beginnings of its famous motor industry.

Plus Sally and Nick are joined by Peter Christian, author of The Online Genealogist, and The Expert Guide to the Census. They'll discuss how having the Census available online has transformed family history research and reflect on what future family historians would lose if the Census is abolished.

And we convince one Fox Lane resident to fill out a form for the first time, by illustrating what they can learn about their own family's past from previous census records.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00zf5sy)
Eden Project, Cornwall

Eric Robson and panellists Matthew Biggs, Anne Swithinbank and Chris Beardshaw gather at the Eden Project in time for its 10th birthday.

A profile on the world's largest greenhouse.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Genius Unrecognised (b00zl941)
Gyroscopic Travel

Tony Hill, Director of Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry honours the scientists who revolutionised microscopic technology, electrical power, air navigation, gyroscopic travel and digital sound. In their day they were dismissed as blue-sky time-wasters but now we recognise their genius.

Louis Brennan (1852-1932)

Louis Brennan earned £100,000 from the War Office by patenting the first steerable torpedo. But his design for a monorail locomotive, to be kept stable by gyroscopes, was demonstrated in 1909 and promptly ignored. If Brennan's idea had been adopted, the cost of laying rail-track would have been slashed.

During the early 1920s he designed a helicopter but the Air Ministry couldn't see the point of it and stopped funding its development in 1926. There's a working scale-model of Brennan's monorail locomotive at the Science Museum.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00zl943)
Arthur Conan Doyle - The Lost World

A Bridge to the Unknown

1/2 A Bridge to the Unknown
By Arthur Conan Doyle, dramatised by Chris Harrald. The hot-headed Professor Challenger claims that extinct species of animals are still to be found living on an isolated Amazonian plateau. Dr Summerlee, Lord John Roxton and the intrepid reporter, Edward Malone, find themselves committed to a journey of a lifetime.

Professor Challenger...David Robb
Dr Diana Summerlee...Jasmine Hyde
Lord John Roxton...Jamie Glover
Edward Malone...Jonathan Forbes
Gomez...Milton Lopes
Beaumont...Sam Dale
Meldrum...Sean Baker
Maple White...Nyasha Hatendi
Tarp Henry...Brian Bowles
Edith Challenger...Jane Whittenshaw
Indian tribesman...Vinicius Salles
Directed by Marilyn Imrie

Dramatist Chris Harrald is a writer for radio film and television. He won the 2009 Sony Gold award for radio drama for his play 'Mr Larkin's Awkward Day'.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00zlbl3)
Mariella Frostrup talks to writer Will Self about cuts to UK libraries. He explains why he's lending his voice to a campaign to preserve funding for local libraries, but he also examines how a crisis can be turned into an opportunity.

Novelists Joseph O'Connor and Maggie O'Farrell discuss why dead lovers haunt the pages of their books, as well as the back catalogue of English literature.

Plus, have young novelists forgotten how to be funny? Open Book responds to a reader's query for new comic fiction from writers under the age of thirty-five - comedian Robin Ince is on hand to offer guidance.

Producer: Aasiya Lodhi.


SUN 16:30 Make Perhaps This Out Sense Of Can You (b00zlbl5)
Bob Cobbing's playful experiments with sound and text have inspired a generation of poets, artists and composers. A writer whose work skittered between literature and music, poetry and artwork - he is, perhaps, best remembered for his extraordinary poetry readings. With his operatic, resonant voice he would boom, howl, chant and whisper leaving his audience enchanted and enraged in equal measures.

In this programme we delve into the work of Bob Cobbing - exploring his influence on the publishing world, his role in one of the most turbulent periods at the Poetry Society and the visual poem that outraged Margaret Thatcher.

Revered and reviled - he has been a controversial figure at times. In this feature the writers Iain Sinclair, Peter Finch, Alan Brownjohn and Paula Claire, amongst others, reflect on the musicality of his work, how he challenged the conventional notion of poetry and the surprising controversy sound and visual poetry caused in the twentieth century.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00zf202)
Egypt's Missing Millions

File On 4. Banks and fraud squads across the world are beginning the task of tracing a vast fortune stolen from the Egyptian people by members of the Mubarak regime. Some estimates have suggested the missing money could run into many billions of pounds.
Ministers, businessmen and members of the president's family have deposited vast sums in Swiss bank accounts and bought luxury properties in London. Where did all this wealth come from? How was the Egyptian government able to continue abusing its power for three decades? And could the regime's business partners in multinational corporations really have been blind to what was happening?
Fran Abrams travels to Egypt to investigate and to assess the chances of the money being recovered.
Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00zhd1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00zjcn8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00zjcnb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00zjcnd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00zlbl7)
Sheila McClennon makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio.

This week, why Winston Churchill never gave up his childhood toys and the Rise and Rise of the Third Reich - why it's the publishing world's surprise success story. Gary Bellamy almost gets a Royal exclusive on Down the Line whilst Matt Everitt does get Queen. There's also Gershwin, a tipsy Sinatra and the story behind one of the most successful records ever - Bob Newhart's Button Down Mind and how it very nearly didn't get made at all.

Churchill's Other Lives - Radio 4
Ciao Bella - Radio 4
They Write the Songs - Radio2
The Gun Goes to Hollywood - Radio 4
Nazi Gold: Publishing the Third Reich - Radio 4
The Paris Wife - Radio 4
The Essay: The Book That Changed Me - Radio 3
While the Boys are Away - Radio 4
The First Time with Roger Taylor - 6 Music
Down the Line - Radio 4
The Now Show - Radio 4
Animals on Trial - World Service
How My Country Speaks - World Service
For One Night Only: Bob Newhart - Radio 4
Alex Horne Presents the Horne Section - Radio 4

PHONE: 0370 010 0400
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Kathryn Blennerhassett.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00zlbl9)
Joe and Eddie look forward to a real Sunday lunch at the Snells but, to their dismay, Robert's embracing the Lenten appeal and serves them a meal of rice and lentils. They retire to The Bull, still hungry and order pasty and chips but when Robert walks in for an after-dinner pint they make out that Fallon's made a mistake.

Jamie and Fallon arrange to watch a film together but when Jamie arrives he bumps into Kenton. Jamie tells Kenton that he saw him and Jolene snogging last week, and accuses Kenton of womanising. Kenton insists that he was going to tell Jamie about the relationship when they were ready but for now they're just building things slowly. Jamie reminds Kenton of Holly but Kenton insists it's different with Jolene.

Fallon tries to talk to Jamie. She explains it was a shock to her at first but realises now that Kenton and Jolene seem genuine. Fallon's surprised when Jamie alleges that Kenton cheated on Kathy. But she insists they shouldn't let Kenton spoil their evening.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00zlblc)
The Death Penalty:
America's first settlers brought the death penalty with them from Britain and ever since, crime and punishment have been continually debated and revised across the United States. Katty Kay talks to Governor Pat Quinn of Illinois who recently banned capitol punishment in the state.

Freedom Bail Bonds:
If you get arrested and you don't have the cash to make bail, a bail bondsman can help you out, but he'll track you down if you try to skip town. David Gambale of Freedom Bail Bonding explains the business of doing business with (potential) criminals.

James Lee Burke:
And best-selling author James Lee Burke talks to Americana about the cornucopia of creative criminal stories born from the United States.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00cqfyp)
Nick Walker - The Further Adventures of the First King of Mars

A Shocking Discovery

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the launch of Sputnik, Nick Walker was commissioned to write the sci-fi adventure 'The First King Of Mars'.

Leonid's funeral is overshadowed by a shocking discovery.

Nick Walker's theatre work has been presented extensively in the UK as well as Europe, and the USA. His plays and short stories are often featured on BBC Radio 4 and 3 series of the late-night show The Bigger Issues. He is the author of two critically acclaimed novels Blackbox and Helloland, published in the UK, US, Australia, Japan and across Europe.

Performed by Peter Capaldi.

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00zf5sw)
In the week that the fate of the Asian Network is being reconsidered, Roger Bolton talks to controller Andy Parfitt about the station's future. Parfitt also heads Radio 1, and three young listeners join the interview to quiz him on the network's approach to celebrity presenters and listening on digital.

Is it ever possible to have too much of a good thing? Archers fans will have the opportunity to find out, following the announcement that the spin-off Ambridge Extra will be launching on the digital station Radio 4 Extra in April. Head of Programmes Mary Kalemkerian reveals all.

And many of you were deeply moved by the Afternoon Play, "Black Roses: The Killing of Sophie Lancaster". Sylvia Lancaster, Sophie's mother, joins Roger to talk about why she agreed to take part in the production. She explains how Simon Armitage, whose poetry featured in the production, captured her daughter's voice perfectly.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00zfmw0)
Donny George, Owsley Stanley, Harold Massingham and Bob Greaves

On Last Word this week:
Donny George - the archaeologist who tried to stop looters ransacking the Iraqi national museum after the invasion of 2003..
Owsley Stanley who supplied more than one million tablets of LSD to San Francisco hippies and designed the Grateful Dead's sound system.
Yorkshire poet Harold Massingham - Ian Macmillan pays tribute.
Local TV news presenter Bob Greaves who was immortalised when an elephant got a little too intimate with him on screen
And Hugh Martin, composer of classic songs, including "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas".

Producer: Neil George.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00zhc3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00zjcx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00zdj03)
Muscular Liberalism

The prime minister has proposed a new 'muscular liberalism', aimed at better integrating Britain's Muslims. It aims to counter the alienation that has led to a few young British Muslim men being prepared to mount terrorist attacks. David Walker asks what the new policy will mean on the ground, and how easily it can be reconciled with government plans for more local diversity and faith schools.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00zlblf)
Carolyn Quinn talks to the Political Editor of the Financial Times, George Parker, and the Political Correspondent of the Economist, Janan Ganesh about the big political stories including Libya and the Budget.

The Conservative MP Mark Field and the former Labour minister Pat McFadden join our MPs' panel.

We preview a seminar on the history of coalitions with Professor Vernon Bogdanor, author of 'The Coalition and the Constitution' and Alun Wyburn-Powell, biographer of the former Liberal leader Clement Davies.

Programme Editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b00zlblh)
Episode 44

BBC Radio 4 brings back a much-loved TV favourite - What the Papers Say. It does what it says on the tin. In each programme a leading political journalist has a wry look at how the broadsheets and red tops treat the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond. This week Jan Moir of the Daily Mail takes the chair.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00zf5t0)
Richard Ayoade - who found fame as a computer geek in The IT Crowd - has directed his first film, Submarine, based on a novel by Joe Dunthorne. They join Francine Stock to discuss the comedy of adolescence and the influence of French director Eric Rohmer.

Neil Brand is behind the piano to deconstruct the recurring hook in film scores from Taxi Driver to True Grit.

Filmmaker Richard Jobson assesses The Singer Not the Song, starring Dirk Bogarde as a Mexican bandit in this 1961 curio.

Ken Loach talks about his latest - Route Irish - a Liverpudlian thriller exploring the consequences suffered by private contractors in Iraq.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00zjcx1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 21 MARCH 2011

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00zlby0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00zfkfn)
Stuart Hall

The Prime Minister recently criticised what he called 'state multiculturalism' and said it had failed, arguing that Britain needs a stronger national identity. Is it time to turn our backs on the multi-cultural idea? And what would a stronger national identity mean to people who feel at the cultural margins of our society? As the politicians debate, Laurie Taylor speaks to Britain's leading cultural theorist, Stuart Hall. They discuss culture, politics, race and nation in a special edition of Thinking Allowed.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00zjcwz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00zlby2)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00zlby4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00zlby6)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00zlby8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00zlcnx)
Dr Ann Holt

With Canon Dr Ann Holt of the Bible Society.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00zlcnz)
Claims that young drivers in rural areas may be suffering due to the high cost of car insurance. A 20 year old farmer worries that he will have to give up his job because he cannot afford the high cost of his car insurance for his 4x4.

The Comprehensive Spending review in October last year sought to reduce the public sector deficit over 4 years. As part of that process grants to local authorities are being cut by 28%. Graham Biggs, Chief Executive of the Rural Services Network, explains how these cuts will effect rural communties.

The Cumberland sausage has just become the 44th food product in the UK to gain Protected Geographical Indication - or PGI - status under EU law. Suzanne Cauldwell from the "Made in Cumbria" group, explains why it's so important.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00zlbyb)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00zlcp1)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb, including:
08:10 Foreign Secretary William Hague on the wider context of the attacks on Libya.
08:20 Twitter is five years old today, but will it go the same way as Bebo and Myspace and eventually lose interest from the public?


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00zlcp3)
Andrew Marr talks to Pamela Yates about filming the mass killing of Guatemala's indigenous population during the 1980s, and how thirty years later her footage has become the evidence in a genocide case against a military dictator. And from the countryside of South America to the vast landscape of the Arctic: in Melanie McGrath's latest book, White Heat, nothing rots on the tundra, and all bones and memories are left exposed. The light and sea of Margate inspired Turner, and the Director of the Turner Contemporary gallery, Victoria Pomery, aims to put the Isle of Thanet on the artistic map. And a chest carved with wave forms is the centre piece of a show celebrating 50 years of design by the furniture maker, John Makepeace.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00zlfh1)
John Julius Norwich - The Popes

Episode 1

Well known for his histories of Norman Sicily, Venice, the Byzantine Empire and the Mediterranean, John Julius Norwich has now turned his attention to the oldest continuing institution in the world, tracing the papal line down the centuries from St Peter himself - traditionally (though by no means historically) the first pope - to the present day. Of the 280-odd holders of the supreme office, some have unquestionably been saints; others have wallowed in unspeakable iniquity.

John Julius Norwich begins reading The Popes today in suitably sensational fashion, with a 9th century scandal, believed for several centuries and doubted for as many again. The pope reputed to have given birth on a Roman street, who inspired a bizarre and unlikely ritual which was inflicted on future pontiffs to ensure their gender was male... meet Pope Joan.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00zlfh3)
Jane Garvey presents. Is the kitchen now the most important room in the house? We look at how the kitchen's changed from being a functional room for preparing food to the main family living area. Following the recent revolution in Egypt how difficult is it now going to be for Egyptian women to liberate themselves, as they've helped liberate their own society from dictatorship? There has been an increasing worldwide focus on the role of men in families, evident in the rise of the availability of paternity leave but according to a new book by the United Nations, policy makers have been slow to recognise the need for effective public policy supporting men's roles and we hear about the Suffragettes and the 1911 census.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zlfh5)
Cottonopolis

Episode 1

Cottonopolis is an ambitious new, 6 part drama series spread across Woman's Hour all this week and linked to the Afternoon Play next Monday.

The series unfolds as 6, linked, personal stories, that each explore what happens when fear changes people's behaviour; a fear is created by a growing media frenzy.

We start Cottonopolis with Maggie's story.

Cast:
Maggie ..... Judith Barker
Dave / Newsreader ..... Chris Hannon
Verity Henry ..... Newsreader/ Paramedic
Taxi Driver/ Henri ..... Chris Jack

Producer/Director: Justine Potter
A Red production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 Cadbury Kraft: A Year On (b00zlfh7)
Episode 2

When Kraft took over Cadbury, there was widespread talk of a boycott together with an industry belief that the American food giant had paid 'a fancy price'. Their first month in charge was marked by an epic PR disaster and then a humbling appearance in the Commons in which one of their executives was forced to apologise. Even today there are incessant rumblings about a tax move to Switzerland, and the reduction in the size of a Dairy Milk. So how traumatic has the last year been for Cadbury Kraft, and what will be the long term effect on British jobs ? The presenter is Miles Warde and the programme is produced by Emma Harding and Miles Warde.


MON 11:30 Brian Gulliver's Travels (b00zlfh9)
Series 1

Erosia

Brian Gulliver, a seasoned presenter of travel documentaries, finds himself in a hospital's secure unit after claiming to have had a number of bizarre adventures.

This week he travels to Erosia which has a very different view of sexual politics.

Written by Bill Dare
Produced by Steven Canny

Brian Gulliver's Travels is a new satirical adventure story from Bill Dare. The series has attracted an excellent cast led by Neil Pearson and award winning star of the RSC's current season, Mariah Gale. Cast includes fantastic actors Tamsin Greig, John Standing, Paul Bhattacharjee, Christopher Douglas, Catherine Shepherd, Vicky Pepperdine, Phil Cornwell, Antonia Campbell Hughes, Jo Bobin and Katherine Jakeways.

For years Bill Dare wanted to create a satire about different worlds exploring Kipling's idea that we travel, 'not just to explore civilizations, but to better understand our own'. But science fiction and space ships never interested him, so he put the idea on ice. Then Brian Gulliver arrived and meant that our hero could be lost in a fictional world without the need for any sci-fi.

Satirical targets over the series: the medical profession and its need to pathologize everything; the effect of marriage on children; spirituality and pseudo-science; compensation culture; sexism; the affect of our obsession with fame.

Gulliver's Travels is the only book Bill Dare read at university. His father, Peter Jones, narrated a similarly peripatetic radio series: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00zlfhc)
Universities are employing existing students to call former students to try and increase alumni donations. While Cambridge has become the first University outside north America to raise more than a £1 billion in philanthropic gifts, some of the younger, less prestigous institutions are trying to raise funds from similar sources.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00zlbyd)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00zm85p)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on Twitter: #wato.


MON 13:30 The 3rd Degree (b00zlfhf)
Series 1

Salford

Coming this week from the University of Salford, host Steve Punt puts the questions to lecturers and students alike. So if you'd like to hear a Military Historian humming Beatles songs, a Senior Lecturer in Criminology trying to identify Rihanna, or students trying to list types of fruit that begin with the letter 'P', then this is the quiz show for you. Plus the only time in recording history that the word "pebble" has earned a massive cheer.

"The 3rd Degree" is a funny, lively and dynamic new quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners whilst delighting the current ones. It's recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

Together with host Steve Punt, the show tours the (sometimes posh, sometimes murky, but always welcoming!) Union buildings, cafés and lecture halls of six universities across the UK.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and Lady Gaga... In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, were particularly lively, and offered plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides...

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list...

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00zlbl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00zlfhh)
Don't Buy a Winter Coat

When Megan first tells Anton that she's afraid something's wrong, he brushes her fears away. Later, when they're sitting in the waiting room at the Oncology Department, he still refuses to believe that Megan is ill. Even when the diagnosis of cervical cancer is given, he struggles to accept it. He hopes against hope for a miracle. But in this story there is no miracle, and Meic Povey's play traces the journey of a man faced with losing the woman he loves. It's a searingly honest account, based on his own experience, of facing up to the reality of a partner's terminal illness.

A BBC/Cymru Wales production, directed by Kate McAll

Further Information

Macmillan Cancer Support provides quality assured, up-to-date cancer information, written by specialists for patients, relatives and carers. They also offer advice on how to deal with the practical and emotional effects that a cancer diagnosis may have. If you have any questions about cancer, need support or just want someone to talk to, ask Macmillan on 0808 808 0000 or log onto www.macmillan.org.uk

Cancer Research UK carries out research to improve understanding of the disease and find out how to prevent, diagnose and treat different kinds of cancer. It also runs a patient information website, www.CancerHelpUK.org.uk which provides easy to understand information to the public. Anyone affected or concerned about cancer can also call their team of specialist nurses on 0808 800 4040, Monday to Friday between 9am and 5pm, or log onto the main website at www.cancerresearchuk.org

Marie Curie Nurses provide free care to terminally ill patients in their own homes. The charity's nine hospices also provide expert care and a better quality of life, for patients with cancer and other illnesses. To get help from the Marie Curie Nursing Service speak to your GP, district nurse or discharge nurse. For more information on the Marie Curie Nursing Service visit www.mariecurie.org.uk

Cruse Bereavement Care exists to promote the well-being of bereaved people and to enable anyone bereaved by death to understand their grief and cope with their loss. They can be contacted on 0844 477 9400 Mon to Fri 9:30 - 5pm, or in Northern Ireland, call 02890 792 419, or log onto www.cruse.org.uk.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00ts5mm)
The Feynman Variations

Following on from his archive portrait of Carl Sagan, Physicist Brian Cox presents a tribute to Richard Feynman. Widely regarded as the finest physicist of his generation and the most influential since Einstein, Feynman did much to popularise science, through lectures, books and television, not least his dramatic revelation before the world's media at a press conference in which he demonstrated the exact cause of the Challenger Shuttle explosion in 1986.

Described as the 'Mozart of physics', Feynman's amazing life and career seemingly had no end of highlights. A student at MIT and then Princeton (where he obtained an unprecedented perfect score on the entrance exam for maths and physics), he was drafted onto the Manhattan Project as a junior scientist. There his energy and talents made a significant mark on two of the project's leaders, Robert Oppenheimer and Hans Bethe. The latter would become Feynman's lifelong mentor and friend. Bethe called his student "a magician", setting him apart from other scientists as no ordinary genius. In 1965, Feynman shared a Nobel for his unique contribution to the field of Quantum Electrodynamics making him the most celebrated, influential and best known American Physicist of his generation. Something that would continue until his death from cancer in 1988.

At the same time as his scientific reputation was building, Feynman's unconventional attitude and behaviour was helping to create his reputation for eccentricity. When bored of writing equations on chalk boards or lecturing in his lab, he would go off in search of inspiration down at the local strip club, watching the go-go girls and scribbling his calculations on napkins. He played bongos and cracked safes. He was multi-disciplined before the term was even invented, allowing his curiosity to stray into biology, psychology and computing. He was playful and imaginative because he saw the value in not being solely focused on applied research. His eccentricity would at times infuriate his colleagues but it was simply a natural consequence of how he thought. From a young age, as he explains in the programme, his father instilled in him an insatiable curiosity about the world, a desire to know at a fundamental level, how it operated. It simply wasn't enough to know the name of something. His father also taught him to carry a healthy disrespect for the natural hierarchy of things. Recounting a hilarious story about his Father's dislike of the Pope, Feynman saw status and honours as little more than ephemera: "epaulets and uniforms" and his father, a uniform salesman by trade, "knew the difference between a man with the uniform on and the uniform off - it's the same man".

Though few ever understood mathematics or physics like Feynman, he truly believed that science was simply too important to be left exclusively to scientists and his energy and humour was essential in getting the public interested and inspired to find out how the world works for themselves, something that is essential today as science plays an increasingly central role in world events and everyday life.

Producer: Rami Tzabar.


MON 15:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zlcpw)
Cinema

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Winston Churchill was a film fanatic and sought an active role in the movie business. He became friends with Charlie Chaplin and collaborated as a screenwriter in the 1930s with the great Hungarian-born director Alexander Korda. A scene set in the trenches of World War One from Churchill's screenplay - never made into a film - is dramatised here for the first time, as Sir David Cannadine explores Winston Churchill's love affair with cinema and his growing awareness of the power of the moving image. Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00zl4ds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 It's My Story (b00xpng0)
The Imam of Peace

Nadene Ghouri profiles John Butt, an Englishman who travelled to South Asia on the hippy trail, converted to Islam and trained as an imam. For the last few decades his mission has been to spread a message of peace and tolerance across Pakistan and Afghanistan. He set up a series of radio stations across the Swat Valley in Northern Pakistan and established a madrassa in Jalalabad in Afghanistan, preaching his own version of a moderate inclusive Islam. Now this work is getting tougher. The Swat operation was hit by last year's flooding while militants attacked his madrassa, burning down a building. The jihadist threat means it is too dangerous for John Butt to travel to the Swat Valley or to visit his project in Jalalabad. Nadene Ghouri asks who's winning - John or the extremists?
Producer: Bill Law.


MON 17:00 PM (b00zm4wc)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00zlbyg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00zlfkp)
Series 59

Episode 7

Nicholas Parsons hosts this long running panel game. This week, panellists Tony Hawks, Paul Merton, Ross Noble and Liza Tarbuck attempt to speak for a minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation. Subjects include the Theory of Relativity and Moby Dick.
Produced by Tilusha Ghelani.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00zlfkr)
Elizabeth welcomes Roy to Lower Loxley. He's soon making a positive contribution, suggesting a posh milliner friend of Caroline's could judge the Easter bonnet competition. She'd pull in a good crowd.

Kenton and Jolene have no regrets about getting together but agree that Jamie is a casualty. Jolene's sure they can make it right with him but Kenton's rueful that Jamie's the second kid he's failed. Fallon asks Kenton about Holly. Kenton admits he had a fling but swears it was after he moved out of April Cottage. Kenton wouldn't hurt Jolene for the world. Fallon understands how hard it must be for Jamie. Kenton wishes he could find a way to get through to him and asks Fallon to help him.

With two positive dung tests, David and Ruth need Alistair to do blood tests to identify the cows infected with Johne's disease. Ruth hopes David's going to get back on top of things now he's not needed at Lower Loxley. David still wants to check on Elizabeth. Ruth doesn't think he's helping her by fussing. She needs him now, on the farm. David believes Elizabeth will always need him but Ruth tells him it's time to move on.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00zm88q)
The Eagle reviewed and Jack Rosenthal's Smash!

The Eagle stars model-turned-actor Channing Tatum as young centurion Marcus and Jamie Bell as his slave Esca. Set in Roman-ruled Britain and based on a novel by Rosemary Sutcliff, the film charts how master and slave set off on a brutal quest via Hadrian's Wall to reinstate the Eagle of the Ninth, the golden emblem of a lost legion. Rachel Cooke reviews.

Jack Rosenthal's play Smash! is a comic and scathing look at the journey to get a musical from page to stage. Rosenthal, who died in 2004, won great acclaim for his TV dramas, including Bar Mitzvah Boy, now released on DVD. Mark considers his career with Amy Rosenthal, who adapted the new version of Smash!, actors Tom Conti and Richard Schiff, and director Tamara Harvey.

As Sheffield's Ruskin Collection prepares to re-open after a four month redevelopment project, Mark visits the stores that house the art and natural history specimens of this Victorian writer, critic and artist.

Sebastian Coe, chairman of the 2012 Olympic organizing committee, tonight makes a cameo appearance in Twenty Twelve, a TV comedy about a floundering fictional team of London Olympic organizers. Lord Coe joins a long line of high-profile figures who have played themselves in films and TV dramas. Stephen Armstrong discusses who benefits most from these brief but often memorable moments.

Producer Beth Meade.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zlfh5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Document (b00zlfkt)
In 1918 Russia was in turmoil and that summer the Soviet leader, Vladimir Lenin, was shot and very nearly killed. The following morning, the British representative in Moscow was arrested. The Soviet secret services accused him of being at the centre of a dastardly imperialist plot to overthrow the young, fragile Bolshevik regime and to assassinate both Lenin and Trotsky. And that is a story the Russians have stuck to ever since. The British, on the other hand, have consistently dismissed the Soviet allegations as far-fetched propaganda. But were the Russians right? The alleged plot soured Anglo-Soviet relations for years afterwards - even to the present day. Using as yet unpublished archives, Mike Thomson investigates the truth behind this "plot."

Producer: John Murphy.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00zlgdl)
Blue Labour

Labour's traditional working class supporters are abandoning the party in their droves. But can Labour win them back without alienating the middle-class voters it needs to win the next election? David Goodhart explores the tensions between two traditions in the Labour movement - a liberal wing focussed on equality and diversity and a conservative strand that is more concerned with issues of solidarity and community. And he examines the new Blue Labour school of thought, which believes that the best way to unite the two traditions is to rethink the Big State approach that became a defining element of the post-war Labour Party's identity.


MON 21:00 Material World (b00zf4j5)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. He talks to the scientists who are publishing their research in peer reviewed journals, and he discusses how that research is scrutinised and used by the scientific community, the media and the public. The programme also reflects how science affects our daily lives; from predicting natural disasters to the latest advances in cutting edge science like nanotechnology and stem cell research.

The producer is Ania Lichtarowicz.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00zlcp3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00zlbyj)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00zlgdn)
The latest news from Libya and reaction from Westminster where MPs are voting on the no fly zone.

Does military intervention risk spreading MoD resources too thinly?

And in Yemen - army units and tribal leaders desert President Saleh.

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00zlgdq)
Mathilda

Episode 1

With a new production of Frankenstein opened at The National Theatre directed by Danny Boyle - Radio 4 presents a reading by Emilia Fox of the only other finished work of fiction by the celebrated author of Frankenstein - Mary Shelley.

With its shocking theme of father-daughter incest, Mary Shelley's publisher father, known for his own subversive books -not only refused to publish Mathilda when she sent it to him early in 1820, he also refused to return her only copy of the manuscript, calling it 'disgusting and detestable'. The work was never published in her lifetime and was only brought to light in the early 1950's when it was unearthed in the Bodleian Library, Oxford.

In our own times the novella doesn't seem nearly so shocking - but her father's attempted suppression is perhaps understandable: unlike Frankenstein, written a year earlier, Mathilda uses fantasy to study a far more personal reality. As she lies on her deathbed, the narrator tells her story. She is a young woman whose mother died in her childbirth - just as Shelley's own mother died after hers - and whose relationship with her bereaved father becomes sexually charged as he conflates her with his lost wife, while she herself becomes involved with a handsome poet.

Yet, despite characters clearly based on herself, her father, and her husband, the narrator lifts the story beyond autobiographical resonance into something more transcendent: a passionate tale of a brave woman's search for love, atonement, and redemption.

From her deathbed in an isolated country cottage, Mathilda, a young gentlewoman with a tragic past, sets out to tell her closest friend and the wider public the secret behind her long depression and self imposed seclusion.....

Abridged by Eileen Horne
Read by Emilia Fox

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 With Great Pleasure (b00zlgds)
Dr Oliver James

This week's presenter is psychologist Dr Oliver James, whose first choice is one of the best-known examples in literature of very strong language, "This Be the Verse" by Philip Larkin. The programme includes extracts from Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh, Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen Fielding, The Importance of Being Ernest, by Oscar Wilde, some TS Eliot and RD Laing.

Producer: Christine Hall.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00zlgdv)
Sean Curran and the BBC's parliamentary team report on today's events in Parliament where MPs debate and vote on military action in Libya. The Prime Minister is asking MPs to back a motion welcoming the UN Security Council resolution authorising a no-fly zone over Libya. The resolution also allows "all necessary measures" to be taken to protect civilians. The Labour leader, Ed Miliband urged all MPs to vote for the motion. But during the debate some MPs raised concerns about "mission creep" and wanted to know what the "end-game" was. They also called for Arab countries to be fully engaged in the operation. Also in the programme: MPs vote on their salaries; and a report on education question-time.



TUESDAY 22 MARCH 2011

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00zlhh0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00zlfh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00zlhh2)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00zlhh4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00zlhh6)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00zlhh8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00zlhhb)
Dr Ann Holt

With Canon Dr Ann Holt of the Bible Society.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00zlhhd)
Anna Hill hears claims council cuts could have a devastating impact on rural schools. The National Association of Small Schools warns hundreds of rural schools are under threat.

New government figures show the levels of TB in cattle in England are still climbing, and Carl Padget of the British Veterinary Association warns that TB is still out of control.

And as councils along the route of the proposed High Speed Rail line debate its benefits, Farming Today hears from the government's environmental advisors that the expected £32 billion cost would be better spent on local transport.

Presented by Anna Hill, Produced by Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00zm4wy)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, featuring:
08:10 Former First Sea Lord, Lord West, analyses if there is a disagreement between politicians and the military over the Libya campaign's objectives.
08:22 James Watt's attic workshop comes to London's Science Museum
08:31 Does it matter if national insurance and income tax are merged?


TUE 09:00 On the Ropes (b00zlhhg)
David Bermingham

In a frank and challenging interview David Bermingham, one of the 'NatWest 3', speaks to John Humphrys about his extradition to the United States to face charges of fraud. He was subsequently imprisoned.


TUE 09:30 The Narrowcasters (b00zlhhj)
EITB

European business correspondent Nigel Cassidy visits EITB, the Basque TV station that makes its own soap opera to boost the popularity of the ancient language of Euskara.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00zlhhl)
John Julius Norwich - The Popes

Episode 2

Well known for his histories of Norman Sicily, Venice, the Byzantine Empire and the Mediterranean, John Julius Norwich has now turned his attention to the oldest continuing institution in the world, tracing the papal line down the centuries from St Peter himself - traditionally (though by no means historically) the first pope - to the present day.

Of the 280-odd holders of the supreme office, some have unquestionably been saints; others have wallowed in unspeakable iniquity.

John Julius Norwich continues his history of the papacy today with a period of immense political turmoil. In 1152 Frederick Barbarossa became King of the Romans - determined to take his place as successor to the great Charlemagne. At the same time the Norman King William of Sicily harboured expansionist ambitions and in Rome the threat of civil war simmered. In the middle stood the only English pope in the Papacy's history: Nicholas Breakspear, Hadrian IV.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00zlhhn)
With Jane Garvey. New research suggests that most girls have already ruled out careers in science and engineering by the time they're fourteen - so how do we encourage more young women to become scientists? Esther Freud's new novel 'Lucky Break' is set in a drama school. She talks to Jane about her own experiences as a young actor. When you're pregnant - how much alcohol is too much? At a new referral service opens in Keighley, Jane discusses the best way to help those who overindulge. And dirt - a new exhibition at the Wellcome Trust looks at dirt from the perspectives of anthropologists, artists, historians and scientists. So what does it tell us about this filthy subject?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zlhhq)
Cottonopolis

Episode 2

Cottonopolis is an ambitious new, 6 part drama series spread across Woman's Hour all this week and linked to the Afternoon Play next Monday.

The series unfolds as 6, linked, personal stories, that each explore what happens when fear changes people's behaviour; a fear is created by a growing media frenzy.

Today's drama follows Hospital Cleaner Dot, who is moved to drastic measures, as the disappearance of a 3rd woman in Manchester, puts her own dull existence into sharp relief.

Created by Nick Leather and today's episode is written by Michelle Lipton

Cast:
Dot ..... Siobhan Finneran
Susie ..... Verity Henry
Tony ..... James Quinn
The Taxi Driver /Henri Mally ..... Chris Jack
Maggie ..... Judith Barker
Joe ..... Jack Dean

Producer/Director: Justine Potter
A Red production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 The Search for Growth (b00zlhhs)
Episode 2

On the day before the Budget, the BBC's Economics Editor, Stephanie Flanders, concludes her search for growth in Britain's economy. Where might it come from, can we deliver it and will it provide the jobs we need? In conversation with business gurus, economists and those struggling to re-boot UK PLC, Stephanie asks whether Britain's economy has a bright future or is set for decades of low growth.

Producers: Julia Johnson and John Murphy.


TUE 11:30 What's in a Meme? (b00zlk03)
An internet meme is something that spreads like wildfire on the web- seemingly for no explicable reason. A meme can be as sublime as one of the many intricate Downfall parodies or as ridiculous as a rickroll - both reached millions of people. Dr Susan Blackmore examines what drives us to create and share internet memes, questions their cultural significance and finds out why, if you want a successful meme, you should probably get yourself a cat.
Producer: Jessica Treen.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00zlk05)
In tomorrow's Budget, the Chancellor, George Osborne, sets out his plans to boost growth and jobs in the UK. He's promised that there will be no more tax rises and no more spending cuts. But what would you like to see included? What would help you and your family? Call You and Yours with Julian Worricker. Share your views by emailing youandyours@bbc.co.uk or call 03700 100 444 (lines open at 10am Tuesday).


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00zlhhv)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00zm859)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on Twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:30 Soul Music (b00zlk07)
Series 11

Schubert's Winterreise

Winterreise was written the year before Franz Schubert's death aged just 31, these 24 songs based on poems by Wilhelm Müller describe a journey that takes us ever deeper into the frozen landscape of the soul.

Singers Thomas Hampson, Mark Padmore, Alice Coote and David Pisaro describe the experience of immersing themselves in this music.

And Bernard Keefe tells of the time he sang these songs in Hiroshima to survivors of the bomb.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Producer: Rosie Boulton

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00zlfkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00zlk09)
The Magnificent Andrea

The Magnificent Andrea is the first original radio play by NIGEL PLANER, famous for appearances in comedy and drama ranging from 'The Young Ones' to the recent 'Hairspray' in the West End. Nigel has created two wonderful characters, both in love with the same woman - who has just - tragically - died. One is her former husband, boozy columnist Barry (ROGER ALLAM) at the tail end of a career marked by low-achievement in pugnacious, snide journalism. The other is Andrea's recent partner until her sudden death: alternative but ultra-orthodox, politically-correct naturopath Nigel (NIGEL PLANER). We join Barry after a typically hearty breakfast on his way from Chelsea to attend the funeral in South London. (As he succinctly but tellingly puts it: 'In former times, a breakfast of egg on toast and two glasses of red wine would have cost considerably less than fifteen nicker') There he confronts his squeaky-clean nemesis Nigel. The lugubrious Barry is appalled at the ceremony: 'Andrea would have wanted a troupe of African drummers at her sending off, with mytho-poetic speeches by the priest, a Guetamalan shaman. What she got is a couple of hymns, a bit of Bible and a shunt into the automatic incinerator of Wandsworth Crematorium just off the A217') It is while milling outside that the basically decent Nigel makes the mistake of inviting Barry back to the house - Barry's house - for the reception. Now the fireworks really start.

Nigel Planer has created an explosive comedy drama as these two moral polarities collide, wrestling over the memory of their shared inspirational warrior woman, and of course, her home. Also a dark and funny play about mourning, loss and recovery as the cantankerous columnist's wit evaporates to reveal an unexpected tenderness.

CAST:

Barry ..... Roger Allam
Nigel ..... Nigel Planer
Tania/Receptionist ..... Sally Orrock
Taxi Driver ..... Brian Bowles
Preacher ..... Jane Whittenshaw
George ..... Sam Dale
Sarah/Waitress ..... Joanna Monro
Ambulance Driver ..... Stuart McLoughlin

Directed by Peter Kavanagh.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00zlk0c)
Tom Holland and the team explore recent historical research and follow up listeners questions and comments.
Today: How enlightened were they in the age of the enlightenment?

Lucy Worsley, Curator at the Royal Historic Palaces, explores the story of Peter the Wild Boy, a feral dumb child who was found in the woods near Hamburg and brought to the court of King George in the 1720's as an object of fascination. How did Peter's experience differ to others who were 'different' in the age of the enlightenment.

Bristol's links with the slave trade are well known... or are they? Tom Holland explores the little-known history of slavery in medieval England.

We assess the impact of the Marshall Plan on post-war reconstruction and Helen Castor discovers more about the personal sacrifices made to feed Britain during the Second World War.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00zlk0f)
Census 2011

The Suffragette's Party

A new story by Beatrice Colin written to mark the national census.

A suffragette's dedication to the cause is tested to the hilt on the night of the census in 1911. Read by Melody Grove.

Beatrice Colin is a novelist, short story writer and creative writing teacher who has written plays for Radio 4 and novels including The Songwriter and The Luminous Life of Lilly Aphrodite.


TUE 15:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zlk0h)
Money

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Winston Churchill's finances were never comfortable. Despite being born in a palace, he had to work as a writer to fund his lavish lifestyle and lack of money was a constant source of anxiety. He spent more than he earned for most of his life, gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and was prevented from selling Chartwell by the generous intervention of supporters. Today, Sir David Cannadine explores Churchill's vexed relationship with money.

Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b00zlknd)
First of a new series. Michael Rosen looks at the speaking of English in the UK - who speaks English and who doesn't? If you live in the UK should you speak English - and if so, what will be the effect of cutting the funding for ESOL English language classes?
Michael meets people settled in the UK who are studying English, to find out how they learn it, and how it's paid for.
Then he chairs a discussion on the wider issues with John Eversley, Senior Lecturer in Public Health and Primary Care at City University; Douglas Murray, author and political commentator, and Director of the Centre for Social Cohesion; Sarah Mulley, Associate Director for Migration, Trade and Development at the Institute for Public Policy Research and Ceri Williams, Warden and Principal of Mary Ward Settlement and Centre.
Producer: Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00zlkng)
Andi Osho and Toby Young

Sian Williams and her guests - comedian, Andi Osho and journalist, Toby Young - discuss their favourite books by Stewart Lee, Kingsley Amis and Kathryn Stockett.

How I Escaped My Certain Fate by Stewart Lee
Publisher: Faber and Faber

Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis
Publisher: Penguin

The Help by Kathryn Stockett
Publisher: Penguin

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00zlkqy)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00zlhhx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Down the Line (b00zlhhz)
Series 4

Episode 2

The return of the ground-breaking, Radio 4 show, hosted by the legendary Gary Bellamy; brought to you by the creators of The Fast Show.

Down The Line stars Rhys Thomas as Gary Bellamy, with Amelia Bullmore, Simon Day, Charlie Higson, Lucy Montgomery, and Paul Whitehouse.

Special guests are Rosie Cavaliero, Kevin Eldon, Robert Popper and Adil Ray.

Producers: Paul Whitehouse and Charlie Higson
A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00zlknj)
Gardeners' Question Time is considering Ambridge as a venue to record the programme. Jim checks the hall's availability with Christine, who offers to help him fill in the programme's detailed questionnaire.

Caroline checks on Elizabeth and Roy. Elizabeth wants to discuss payment for Roy but Caroline's not looking for anything - they can sort something if he stays longer. Elizabeth's really touched by a photo Caroline has framed for Freddie and Lily, of Nigel on Topper.

Jim's first to arrive at the Vicarage for the inaugural book club meeting, closely followed by Caroline who arrives at the same time as uninvited Joe and Nathan. Joe hasn't even read the book and is more interested in telling his tale of the Civil War drummer boy, much to everyone's frustration. Joe enjoys the nice social occasion, especially the 'grub and that', and enquires about the date for the next meeting.

Jim believes the evening was a success but Usha's not so sure. Jim's still considering his book choice for the next meeting. It's going to be hard though, considering the thousands of classic books so dear to his heart.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00zlkqm)
Midsomer Murders, Alison Krauss, James Watt's workshop

With Mark Lawson.

Midsomer Murders producer Brian True-May caused controversy when he said that the crime drama did not include ethnic minorities because 'it wouldn't be the English village with them'. With True-May now suspended for his remarks, crime writer Dreda Say Mitchell reviews the new series of Midsomer Murders, with Neil Dudgeon taking over the lead role played by John Nettles for 14 years.

When the industrial inventor James Watt died in 1819, his workshop was locked and its contents left undisturbed as a shrine. In 1924 the entire workshop and contents were transported to the Science Museum in London, who will now invite visitors to enter the re-assembled workshop for the first time, complete with many of the thousands of objects used or created by Watt. The writer Jenny Uglow visits the exhibition and gives her response.

American bluegrass-country singer, songwriter and fiddler Alison Krauss has won 26 Grammys, which makes her the most awarded female artist in Grammy history. Known for her performance on film soundtracks such as O Brother Where Art Thou, and her recent collaboration with Robert Plant, Alison Krauss is about to release a new disc, Paper Airplane, with her band Union Station.

Sofie Grabol, who stars in the Danish crime series The Killing, has said that during filming she received only one script at a time, and didn't know how the story would develop. Actor Michael Simkins reflects on whether only seeing part of the script helps or hinders a performance.

The Lowry in Salford has launched a search for paintings by Adolphe Valette, a French artist who taught L S Lowry in Manchester. Mark finds out why the gallery believes that a number of Valette works could be found in homes in the north-west.

Producer India Rakusen.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zlhhq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00zlkpz)
Organs Failure?

Is the NHS doing enough to combat the crisis in organ donations for transplants? Allan Urry examines the challenge of ensuring more suitable donors are available at a time when those waiting for life saving operations are increasing. Surgeons are reporting worse outcomes for some patients, as poorer quality organs have to be used because of chronic shortages. This comes despite a big drive by the Department of Health to improve availability. But, are opportunities to recover more organs being missed because of the way doctors manage the care of patients who are close to death?
Producer: Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00zlkq1)
Can the NHS cope with demand for treatment for the UK's most common cause of blindness?

We speak to a leading ophthalmologist who says patients' eyesight is at risk as the NHS is being forced to ration services. With increasing demand for the treatment of Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration - which is the UK's most common form of blindness - can the NHS cope ? We go to the opening of a new mobile eye clinic in North Yorkshire hoping to help.

And in a second helping of Can't See Will Cook, Richard Lane learns how to make shortbread biscuits.


TUE 21:00 The Herschel Space Telescope (b00nycw3)
Episode 2

The second of two programmes which follows the engineers and astronomers who are working on the biggest telescope ever sent to space, in one of the most important missions in the history of European spaceflight. Jonathon Amos joins Professor Matt Griffin of Cardiff University and his international team as they aimed to peer through the areas in space that are invisible to other telescopes. This is the story of their aims to solve the mystery behind galaxy and star formation and how these processes eventually gave rise to life-bearing planets like Earth. In this episode, first broadcast in 2009, the telescope is blasted into space, and the team reflect on their first discoveries and future possibilities for the astronomers around the world.


TUE 21:30 On the Ropes (b00zlhhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00zlhj1)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00zlkq3)
Who is in control of the military campaign against Gaddafi in Libya?

Has time run out for President Saleh in Yemen?

What does the North East of England want to hear in tomorrow's budget?

With Robin Lustig and Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00zlkq5)
Mathilda

Episode 2

Mathilda and her father enjoy high society together in London, until a sudden reversal in his behaviour; he begins to shun her without reason. Mathilda is devastated. What can be the reason for this extraordinary volte face?

Abridged by Eileen Horne
Read by Emilia Fox

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Laura Solon - Talking and Not Talking (b00nvwg8)
Series 3

Episode 1

Perrier Award-winning comedian Laura Solon presents her third series of sketches, monologues and one-liners.

With characters ranging from infuriating call-centre staff, drunk mothers intent on ruining everyone else's Christmas and recently deposed ex-soviet tyrants trying to settle in the British suburbs, Laura Solon continues to turn the things that most irritate us all into sharply observed and occasionally surreal comic gems.

Laura is joined once again by Rosie Cavaliero, Ben Moor and Ben Willbond.

Produced by Colin Anderson.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00zlkqp)
The Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls says there is "nothing" of importance in the government's growth strategy, after apparently getting a leaked copy.
In the Commons, the Chancellor, George Osborne, denies that is the case and accuses Labour of making too many spending commitments.
The document is due to be published when Mr Osborne delivers his Budget tomorrow.
In the Lords, peers debate the coalition's proposals for a "referendum lock" on any future transfers of power to the European Union.
And on the committee corridor, the Health Secretary, Andrew Lansley faces questions over his plans for changing the way the health services operates.
Rachel Byrne and team report on today's events in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 23 MARCH 2011

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00zlljy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00zlhhl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00zllk0)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00zllk2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00zllk4)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00zllk6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00zm07t)
Dr Ann Holt

With Canon Dr Ann Holt of the Bible Society.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00zllq3)
People living in rural communities say they will not be able to cope if fuel prices go up in today's Budget. The Countryside Alliance are campaigning for lower fuel duty in rural areas, and say a fuel rebate scheme will not go far enough.

Also, around 400 village shops close in the UK each year. With the current financial pressure of running them more could be going out of business. At the moment just 5% of those that close are resurrected as community-owned and run stores. Anna Hill visits one of these in Great Ryburgh near Fakenham in Norfolk.

And new research shows that we throw away, on average, twice as much water a year in the form of uneaten food, as we use for washing and drinking. The Waste and Resources Action Programme claims that discarded food accounts for 6.2 billion cubic metres of water per year - or 6% of all the UK's water needs.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Weatherill.


WED 06:00 Today (b00zm4zd)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, including:
07:49 Former military chiefs Sir Michael Graydon and Lord Dannatt analyse the longer-term options on Libya.
08:10 Stephanie Flanders, Robert Peston and Nick Robinson preview today's Budget.
08:18 With the royal wedding coming soon, the Cartoon Museum in London features a new exhibition on married "bliss".


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00zm07w)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Ben Goddard, Dame Catherine, Jeff Pearce and David Wood.

Ben Goddard is playing the role of Jerry Lee Lewis in the musical 'Million Dollar Quartet' inspired by the actual event that took place on 4th December 1956 at Sun Records in Memphis, when Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis came together to make music for the first and only time. 'Million Dollar Quartet' is at the Noel Coward Theatre, London WC2.

Dame Catherine was a banker before becoming a Benedictine Nun. She co-founded The Benedictine Nuns of Holy Trinity Monastery, East Hendred, the first community of contemplative Benedictine nuns to be established in England for more than fifty years. They are using the internet and other innovations in order to make their message work in the 21st Century and are launching online retreats this month.

Jeff Pearce was born in the slums of Liverpool in 1953, and from an early age he worked with his mother selling second hand clothes on a market stall. Leaving school at fourteen, unable to read or write, he embarked on an amazing journey, becoming a millionaire by the time he was thirty, losing everything in the nineties recession. Within ten years, however, he won the highest accolade in the fashion business, 'Independent Retailer of the Year 2002' at the Drapers Annual Awards. His memoir A Pocketful of Holes and Dreams is published by Penguin.

David Wood is a children's dramatist, author, actor, director, composer and magician. He wrote his first play for children in 1967 and has since written over seventy more. His adaptation of 'Goodnight Mister Tom' together with three of his other adaptations, 'George's Marvellous Medicine', 'The Tiger Who Came to Tea' and 'Shaun the Sheep' - the latter two, David directed - are simultaneously touring the UK. Also 'David Wood's Storytime' is at the Arts Theatre, London during Easter.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00zm07y)
John Julius Norwich - The Popes

Episode 3

Well known for his histories of Norman Sicily, Venice, the Byzantine Empire and the Mediterranean, John Julius Norwich has now turned his attention to the oldest continuing institution in the world, tracing the papal line down the centuries from St Peter himself - traditionally (though by no means historically) the first pope - to the present day. Of the 280-odd holders of the supreme office, some have unquestionably been saints; others have wallowed in unspeakable iniquity.

Irresistible to women, the father of at least six children before he became pope, Rodrigo Borgia became a byword for deviousness and corruption. Bribes helped him become pope and his notorious son Cesare helped him run the Vatican. As described by John Julius Norwich in today's episode of The Popes the Papacy of 1492 was a very different world.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00zm080)
With Jenni Murray. A new dramatisation of 'Women in Love' begins tonight on BBC Four. DH Lawrence's portrayal of women has long been the subject of debate - so what are we to make of it? A sibling carer is an older brother or sister who looks after their family, perhaps because a parent has died. As a report highlights the vital role they play, Jenni discusses whether they are being failed by social services. Kate Middleton's recent appearance in a fascinator has propelled the look onto the fashion pages, so how, and when, should you wear one? And Tanya Ewing is one of the three businesswomen being followed by Woman's Hour. We eavesdrop on her first meeting with her mentor, Nora Senior.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zm082)
Cottonopolis

Episode 3

Cottonopolis is created by Nick Leather. Written by Michelle Lipton.

The Series runs across Woman's Hour all this week and is linked to the Afternoon Play next Monday.

The media frenzy surrounding the search for the missing women in Manchester has taken over the lives of its residents.

The police appeal for measured calm as their search widens to question those on the sex offenders register, causing a difficult dilemma for Joe.

Cast:
Joe ..... Jack Deam
Kathy ..... Julie Mayhew
Police Officer ..... Sushil Chudasama
Carl ..... Joe Ransom
Anna ..... Rebecca Ryan
Henri ..... Chris Jack
Em ..... Eden Potter Williams
Irene/Newsreaders ..... Roberta Kerr

Producer/Director: Justine Potter
A Red production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 While the Boys Are Away (b00zp5w7)
Episode 2

Gareth Jones continues his detailed exploration of the experiences of the families of the soldiers of the Royal Welsh. With the men on the front line, the families wait for news.


WED 11:30 Turf Wars (b00zm084)
How's Your Mother?

Michael Maloney stars in Simon Brett's short play for this comedy drama series: 'Turf Wars'.

Epidsode 4: How's Your Mother

In a gossipy village Humphrey Partridge is reckoned to be anti-social, indeed stand-offish. But he always has an excuse - namely that he has to look after his ailing elderly mother. It raises eyebrows at work. For example when Humphrey's boss needs him to stand in for a colleague at a conference abroad, Humphrey point blank refuses to go. The boss ends up going himself. No-one has ever met the legendary matriarch. Not even nosy Raj the local postman. But then one morning when Humphrey is at work, Raj notices a fire in Humphrey's house, breaks in to put it out and makes an extraordinary discovery. Soon police are digging in Humphrey's garden. But just what is Humphrey's dark secret?

Written by Simon Brett

Directed by Peter Kavanagh.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


WED 12:00 Budget 2011 (b00zwdql)
Special programme presented by Martha Kearney of The World at One and Winifred Robinson of You and Yours. Live coverage of the Chancellor's Budget speech with analysis and reaction.


WED 13:57 Weather (b00zllk8)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00zlknj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 McLevy (b00zm08b)
Series 7

A Distant Death

Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond star in the latest episode of the detective series set in Victorian Edinburgh and Leith. Written by David Ashton.

4/4. Episode Four: A Distant Death. McLevy's dreams of death by drowning are about to become a reality when he and Jean Brash are trapped in a sea cave while the tide rushes in. Outside the cave a rifle marksman is ready to shoot them if they try to escape.

McLevy................................................BRIAN COX
Jean Brash.............................SIOBHAN REDMOND
Mulholland............MICHAEL PERCEVAL-MAXWELL
Lamb..... ..............................CRAWFORD LOGAN
Roach...........................................DAVID ASHTON
Olivia................................................KIM GERARD
Jethro Barr...............................STEWART PORTER
Ship's Officer ..................................KENNY BLYTH

Other parts played by the cast.

Producer/Director: Bruce Young.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00zm868)
If you need help finding a mortgage why not quiz the experts on Wednesday's Money Box Live.

How do you choose between the many products on offer? Should you go for a fix, discounted or variable mortgage?

Where can you find the best rates ? And what are the options for first time buyers or the self-employed?

Whatever your mortgage or remortgage question, Paul Lewis and guests will be ready with tips and advice.

Phone lines open at 1.30pm on Wednesday afternoon and the number to call is 03700 100 444. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher. The programme starts after the three o'clock news.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00zm0hw)
Census 2011

Everyone Who Lives Here

Stories to mark the national census. Meg Fraser reads a moving tale of neighbours connecting over a census form, written by Kathryn Simmonds.

Kathryn Simmonds is a short story writer and award-winning poet whose play 'Poetry for Beginners' was broadcast on Radio 4 in 2008. Her collected poems, 'Sunday at the Skin Laundrette' was awarded the Forward Prize for best first collection.


WED 15:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zllkb)
Painting

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Despite not taking up painting until he was 40, Winston Churchill produced more than 500 canvasses in his lifetime and became an honorary member of the Royal Academy. His show there in 1959 outsold every previous exhibition except one dedicated to Leonardo da Vinci. So why was painting such an important part of Churchill's life? Sir David Cannadine explores the hobby that meant most to Churchill and how it helped to keep what he called the 'black dog' of depression at bay.

Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00zm871)
The Impact of the Temperance Movement - The New North

Will power and prosperity shift to the frozen North? A new book predicts that Iceland, Greenland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, and Russia will be the beneficiaries of a new world order. By 2050, four megatrends - climate change, rising population, globalisation and resource depletion - will lead to the rise of 'The New North', as migration, energy bonanzas and international trade turn the world upside down. The geographer, Professor Laurence Smith, tells Laurie Taylor why these projections amount to more than planetary palm reading. Also, does the morality of the 19th century Temperance movement influence modern day attitudes to drinking? The law lecturer, Henry Yeomans, argues that prohibitionism - contrary to popular belief - lives on in 'binge drinking' Britain.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Story of Economics (b00zm0hy)
Cogs

In this three-part series Michael Blastland lays out the history of economic ideas to understand why economics goes wrong and whether it can ever go entirely right.

In the second programme, 'Cogs', Michael travels to Chicago to explore another view of economics: that it is a science, explaining the irrefutable mechanism of the market.

But has economics, with its language of 'laws', 'models' and 'forces', deceived itself and others by creating a false impression of precision? Why, despite decades of mechanical economics, do answers to some of biggest economic questions still elude us?

In the next programme, 'Monsters', Michael asks whether the problem is not the machine, but the people within it. In recent years economics has looked increasingly to the human factor, to experimental studies of behaviour, and to psychology. And that's where we turn next week.

Producer: Richard Knight.


WED 17:00 PM (b00zm52w)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00zllkd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Act Your Age (b00zm0mc)
Series 3

Episode 1

Simon Mayo hosts the three-way battle between the comedy generations to find out which is the funniest.

Will it be the Up-and-Comers, the Current Crop or the Old Guard who will be crowned, for one week at least, as the Golden Age of Comedy.

Holly Walsh is joined by Henry Paker, Lucy Porter by Miles Jupp and Tom O'Connor teams up with Duggie Brown.

Devised and Produced by Ashley Blaker and Bill Matthews.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00zm0mf)
Alistair takes blood samples from the herd. He tells David and Ruth that poor husbandry isn't always the cause of Johne's disease but Ruth reminds David recently he put off the repairs to the calf shed. David thinks that's unfair and insists he had to spend time with Elizabeth but Ruth argues that she couldn't do everything herself.

George is getting under Emma's feet as she makes room for the baby's things. She doesn't know how they'll manage for space, and wishes Clarrie wasn't coming round next Sunday for lunch. Ed thought she'd be pleased with the chance to get one over on Nic.

Alistair sees Jamie and Marty swigging cider on the green. He invites Jamie over to the Stables to hang out with Dan whenever he likes. Jamie's non-commital. Marty's step-dad is giving him grief about finding work for the summer but Jamie's not going to bother. It's a waste of time, especially as no-one gives a damn about him.

David and Alistair meet for a pint. David can't really think straight until he's got Nigel's inquest behind him. Alistair understands how he feels but thinks it will help both him and Elizabeth in the long run.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00zm0mh)
Elizabeth Taylor remembered; Gwyneth Paltrow in Country Strong

With Mark Lawson.

Following the news of the death of Elizabeth Taylor at the age of 79, Mark considers her life and career, with the director Nicolas Roeg who first worked with her in 1952, Paul Gambaccini, who was the DJ at her 50th birthday party, director Michael Winner and film reviewer Barry Norman.

Victoria Pile, creator and director of the TV comedies Green Wing and Smack the Pony, gives a rare interview, as she launches her new Channel 4 sitcom Campus. She discusses the development of her wide cast of characters, whether comedy has any boundaries, and why her new show puts the pus in Campus.

Gwyneth Paltrow acts and sings in the film Country Strong, playing a volatile country music star who gets involved with a rising young singer (Garrett Hedlund) while in rehab and attempts a comeback. Natalie Haynes reviews.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zm082)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b00zllkg)
Terrorism

The first in a new series of Unreliable Evidence with Clive Anderson, looks at the role of the law in preventing terrorism.

The programme brings together the former Director of Public Prosecutions, Lord Macdonald who has just overseen the Government's review of its counter terrorism powers and Lord Carlile, who for the past ten years been the government's independent reviewer of terrorism legislation.

They agree that the right balance has to be struck between security and the protection of civil liberties, but disagree about the extent to which this has been achieved.

Both men have been able to see the intelligence information on which government anti-terrorism legislation has been based. Lord Carlile believes security measures such as control orders have averted terrorist attacks, while Lord Macdonald worries they have often prevented justice being done.

Also taking part in the discussion is human rights barrister, Tim Owen QC, who has appeared in several leading cases relating to control orders and other anti-terrorism measures.

They discuss the law relating to torture, deportation, stop and search powers and the new measures being brought in to replace the highly controversial control orders.

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b00zllkj)
Austen Ivereigh

This year's Lent Talks sees six well-known figures reflect on different elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

In the second Lent Talk of the series, Catholic writer and commentator, Austen Ivereigh, explores how we can escape the cycle of conflict by becoming a forgiving victim rather than a vengeful one - whilst at the same time receiving justice.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love. The main theme for this year's talks will explore conflict in different forms and how it interacts with various aspects of society and culture.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00zphnr)
Britain's Nuclear Future

Britain is running out of power. Ten new nuclear reactors were supposed to provide the solution. In this week's 'Costing the Earth' Tom Heap asks if the events in Japan have dealt a fatal blow to the future of the industry.

Tom will be examining the changes in safety regimes that may be provoked by the ongoing disaster. He'll also be asking if the economic case for nuclear has changed and looking ahead to the future supply of uranium.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00zm07w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00zllkl)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00zm87p)
The latest on the Budget - is Britain on the right economic course?
Violence in Syria as protestors hold anti-regime demonstrations
The latest from Libya.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00zm0mm)
Mathilda

Episode 3

After hearing her father's devastating confession - Mathilda finds her father has fled during the night, leaving her a letter instructing her not to follow him and begging her forgiveness. She immediately gives chase in the midst of a howling storm - but will she arrive in time?

Abridged by Eileen Horne
Read by Emilia Fox

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Helen Keen's It Is Rocket Science (b00zm0mp)
Series 1

Episode 3

Helen Keen's off-beat but true account of the history of space flight.

With Peter Serafinowicz and Susy Kane.

* The breathtaking drama of the space race and its evil twin the Cold War

* The brilliant but secret life and tragically banal death of the Soviet Union's best rocket scientist

* The surprising tale of the last man on the moon (so far) and the songs he sang.

Written by Helen Keen and Miriam Underhill.

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


WED 23:15 The Ladies (b00t7fyq)
Series 2

Episode 3

Comedy featuring a bored woman who keeps randomly calling anyone she knows, and a terminally ill woman who tries to set her husband up with a stranger.

Written by Emily Watson Howes.

Cast List:
Emily Watson Howes
Kate Donmall
Susanna Hislop
Fran Moulds

Producer: Mark Talbot
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00zm0mr)
George Osborne presents his second Budget to the House of Commons, and Ed Miliband makes his Opposition Leader's speech in reply. Rachel Byrne presents the highlights. Also on the programme, Viv Robins has a round up of backbench opinions on the Budget. Simon Jones follows the exchanges between the party leaders at Prime Minister's Question Time. And Kristiina Cooper covers peers' views about the long-drawn-out saga of the British computer hacker Gary McKinnon, a sufferer from Asperger's Syndrome.



THURSDAY 24 MARCH 2011

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00zlllr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00zm07y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00zlllt)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00zlllw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00zllly)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00zllm0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00zm1kq)
Dr Ann Holt

With Canon Dr Ann Holt of the Bible Society.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00zllqw)
Despite vocal campaigns against it, Farming Today hears claims that putting a high speed rail link through the English countryside will benefit rural areas. It costs £2600 a year more to live in the countryside than the city, according to the Office for National Statistics. Charlotte Smith asks if it is worth it, and hears from economist Neil Lee, from the Work Foundation, who says despite the move towards living in cities, many of the cliches of the rural idyll ring true.

And it's BBC National School Report News Day. Brockhill Park Performance Arts College in Kent report how they have farmed their own meat from piglet to sausage.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


THU 06:00 Today (b00zm54w)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Sarah Montague, including:
08:10 George Osborne on his Budget.
07:52 Actress Angela Lansbury remembers Elizabeth Taylor.
08:41 On Schools Report day, Raymond, in Year 8 at a Hackney school, outlines the problems created by crime and gangs in the area.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00zm1ks)
The Iron Age

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the dawn of the European Iron Age.In around 3000 BC European metalworkers started to make tools and weapons out of bronze. A complex trading network evolved to convey this valuable metal and other goods around the continent. But two millennia later, a new skill arrived from the Middle East: iron smelting. This harder, more versatile metal represented a huge technological breakthrough.The arrival of the European Iron Age, in around 1000 BC, was a time of huge social as well as technological change. New civilisations arose, the landscape was transformed, and societies developed new cultures and lifestyles. Whether this was the direct result of the arrival of iron is one of the most intriguing questions in archaeology.With:Sir Barry CunliffeEmeritus Professor of European Archaeology at the University of OxfordSue HamiltonProfessor of Prehistory at University College LondonTimothy ChampionProfessor of Archaeology at the University of SouthamptonProducer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00zm1kv)
John Julius Norwich - The Popes

Episode 4

Well known for his histories of Norman Sicily, Venice, the Byzantine Empire and the Mediterranean, John Julius Norwich has now turned his attention to the oldest continuing institution in the world, tracing the papal line down the centuries from St Peter himself - traditionally (though by no means historically) the first pope - to the present day.

Of the 280-odd holders of the supreme office, some have unquestionably been saints; others have wallowed in unspeakable iniquity.

Nepotistic, vain, pompous and idle - Pius VI was not an ideal choice as pope at any time and certainly not during the revolutionary tumult of the late eighteenth century. In today's episode of The Popes, John Julius Norwich explores one of the most dangerous times for the authority of the Vatican.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00zm1kx)
Jenni Murray presents: including Anne-Marie Duff who rose to fame as Fiona in the BAFTA winning TV drama Shameless. She is now back on the London stage as Alma Rattenbury in Terence Rattigan's play Cause Celebre - a tale of love, betrayal, loyalty and obsession set in the 1930s. Yesterday's Budget: has there been too much help for business at the expense of those with family responsibilities and those less well off? Jenni is joined by Frances O'Grady, deputy general secretary of the TUC, and by Katja Hall, chief policy director of the CBI. Ivory Coast is the midst of a serious and violent political stand-off following disputed presidential elections that culminated on 28 November 2010. A recent peaceful demonstration of 15,000 women ended in the deaths of seven women. Jenni speaks to Aya Virginie Toure who organised the march, and then to Liesl Gerntholz, Director of the Women's Division for Human Rights Watch and the BBC correspondent John James. And a national audit has produced the first figures on how breast cancer patients view the outcome of mastectomy and breast reconstruction surgery. Jenni asks Dick Rainsbury, President of the Association of Breast Surgery, who chaired the audit, how important reconstructive surgery is for women, and whether enough women are offered it.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zm1kz)
Cottonopolis

Episode 4

Cottonopolis is created by Nick Leather. Written by Michelle Lipton.

Cottonopolis is a 6 part drama series spread across Woman's Hour all this week and linked to the Afternoon Play next Monday. Linked, personal stories, explore how fear changes people's behaviour.

It is 4 days after the first media reports of the missing women and the city is in meltdown as a white lie sparks hysteria across the city of Manchester; and, for one of the two teenagers at the centre of the storm, a darker sexual secret is revealed.

Cast:
Anna ..... Rebecca Ryan
Lucy ..... Lisa Brooks
Joe ..... Jack Deam
Teacher ..... Beatrice Comins
Henri Mally ..... Chris Jack
Anna's Dad/PC Dwyer ..... Chris P Hallam
Newsreader ..... Roberta Kerr

Producer/Director: Justine Potter
A Red production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b00zq2kc)
Baghdad Airport

Gabriel Gatehouse hears the extraordinary tales of the people coming into and out of Iraq - and paints a portrait of a still troubled country through its international gateway.

It's not been the safest of places: one worker describes seeing a car bomb attack on the airport road and you still need to pass through five checkpoints to enter the terminal. Gabriel meets the people entering the country - like British and Ugandan security men, and pilgrims from Iran, bound for Iraq's Shia holy sites. There are the people leaving Iraq, including a Christian family who fear for their lives if they stay. And then there are the people who live in the airport compound - like the American air traffic controller who never leaves, except to return home on holiday.

Producer: Becky Lipscombe.


THU 11:30 House Beautiful (b00zm1l1)
Laurence Llewelyn Bowen considers the effect of the Aesthetic movement on the home in Britain.

Many artists and craftsmen were repelled by the ugly mass produced goods on show at the 1851 Exhibition. A reactive movement started that made BEAUTY the focus and ambition, not only of art but of all things including household goods and furnishings.

Laurence starts at Leighton House in London, the opulent studio-home of the painter Frederic Lord Leighton, which was open for the public to admire and emulate. Rossetti, Whistler and Wilde also had houses which became hugely fashionable for their muted colour, their harmonious furnishings and their refined collection of art and objects, many from Japan and the Middle East.

Laurence traces the style to the very heart of middle class suburbia where all things 'artistic' became an obsession.

And we hear how much we owe to that movement today - how our glassy home magazines are descendants of the Victorian 'home hints', how the tiles and wallpapers we choose, the idea of lifestyle' and of 'good taste' can be attributed to what happened during the 1870s.

Producer: Susan Marling

A Just Radio production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


THU 12:00 Budget Call (b00zq50q)
Join Vincent Duggleby, Paul Lewis and guests who will be taking your personal finance questions arising from the Budget.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00zllm2)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00zm85f)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on Twitter: #wato.


THU 13:30 The Media Show (b00zm088)
Cuts in local radio, dropping Wimbledon and Formula 1, closing down networks at night: just some of the radical options reported in this week's papers as the BBC looks to find ways of balancing its budget after the latest licence fee settlement. Will any of them actually happen and are they even needed? We hear from the senior BBC executive running the review, Pat Younge. Maggie Brown of the Guardian and Richard Brooks of the Sunday Times discuss the ideas.

And last week Ofcom announced a full-on review of the TV advertising sales system. Matthew Horsman of Mediatique gives his view on what this might mean for viewers, advertisers and commercial broadcasters.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00zm0mf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00h369x)
Cavity

Cavity
By Sean Grundy

Kirsty is having an affair with a married man, Adrian. When his wife Lucy returns unexpectedly from a business conference Kirsty hides in the attic. In a panic, she falls down the back of the attic into the cavity wall. A story then unfolds which combines the domestically mundane with the utterly bizarre.

A strange but funny story about sex, betrayal, the housing market and a love triangle that follows its own surreal logic.

Cast:

Kirsty - Ingrid Oliver
Adrian - Julian Rhind-Tutt
Lucy - Kerry Godliman
Sandra - Hayley Doherty
Estate Agent - Jim Howick
Dan the Cavity Man / Matt - Paul Mundell
Jemma - Deirdre Mullins

Director: Alison Crawford.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00zgwhl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00zjcx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00zm31t)
Census 2011

Realm of the Census

Rebecca Elise reads a new story by Louise Welsh, written to mark the national census. A lonely girl takes a low-paid job, chasing census evaders, which leads to a disturbing encounter in a dark tenement.

Louise Welsh is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, playwright and journalist. Her works include novels 'The Cutting Room' and 'Naming the Bones', and stage plays 'Panic Patterns' and 'Memory Cells'. Louise Welsh is Writer in Residence at the University of Glasgow and Glasgow School of Art.


THU 15:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zllm4)
Horses

Winston Churchill took part in Britain's last imperial cavalry charge at Omdurman, had a passion for polo, hunting, and racing, which brought him into friendly competition with the Queen later in his life.

In this programme, historian Sir David Cannadine explores Churchill's sentimental connection to the horse as a symbol of the fast disappearing, aristocratic world he so strongly believed in.

With Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00zlbl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00zm31w)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. He talks to Professor Robin Grimes, the Director of the Centre of Nuclear Engineering at Imperial College, London about the latest developments at the Fukushima nuclear plant. We speak to an ornithologist who is battling to save penguins in one of the remotest parts of the world - the islands of Tristan da Cunha - following an oil spill. Also on the programme; can Hollywood put real science into the movies and the latest in sport engineering and how it can lead to gold medals.

The producer is Ania Lichtarowicz.


THU 17:00 PM (b00zm629)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00zllm6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 So Wrong It's Right (b00zm31y)
Series 2

Episode 3

Charlie Brooker hosts the new comedy panel show that revels in glorious failure. He is joined by comedians Lee Mack, Shappi Khorsandi and David Schneider in a comedy contest to give the wrongest answer to each of Charlie's challenges.

Amongst the questions Charlie throws at his guests in this episode is 'what's the worst thing you've done in the pursuit of romance'. The panel's pitches - Lee Mack's first kiss whilst playing 'spin the bottle', Shappi's ill-fated attempts to impress a boy by showing how fast she can walk, and David's unfortunate heroics at the local swimming pool - are all subjected to Charlie's unique comic interrogation.

Added to this are the panel's hilariously terrible ideas for a new museum and their nominations for the worst irritants of modern life...

The host of So Wrong It's Right, Charlie Brooker, also presents BBC4's award-winning series Newswipe and You Have Been Watching on Channel 4 - plus writing for The Guardian. He won Best Newcomer at the British Comedy Awards 2009 and Columnist of the Year at the 2009 British Press Awards for his column.

Produced by Aled Evans
A Zeppotron Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00zm320)
Elizabeth's worried that Freddie's picking up her wobbles about the inquest. Jill reminds her that she doesn't have to go but Elizabeth doesn't want to look back and regret not being there.

Bert's heard that Elizabeth will be laying people off and she reassures him that it's a rumour. She just won't be taking on so many casuals. Bert's also relieved to know that the allotments aren't under threat.

Elizabeth's pleased to have Roy for another week. She thanks him for his help but he feels he should be thanking her. The work is really energising him. He thinks the grounds would be a brilliant place for a gig, which would attract a younger crowd. Elizabeth agrees it's something to think about in the future.

Lewis isn't at his best today and Jill puts him in his place when he shouts at Freddie for being too demanding over what he wants for supper. Lewis goes to talk to Freddie and Freddie lets it out that Nigel had promised he could join his Pudding Club this year. Lewis apologises for snapping earlier. He knows he's being a grumpy old man but explains that they're all just doing their best.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00zm322)
Peter Brook at 86

With Kirsty Lang.

Room at the Top is the landmark novel by John Braine, first published in 1957. It was made into a film two years later, with Laurence Harvey starring as the ambitious young working class hero. Now it's been adapted as a TV drama. Writer and critic Harry Ritchie reviews.

The visionary director Peter Brook has worked in the theatre for seven decades. In the 1950s he worked with John Gielgud, Laurence Olivier and Paul Schofield, and in 1970 he left British theatre and set up his own company in Paris. Kirsty interviews Brook in the week of his 86th birthday, as he brings A Magic Flute to Britain, a stripped-down, 90 minute version of Mozart's opera involving only nine performers and a piano.

Novelist Gillian Slovo, the new President of the writers' organization English PEN, debates whether writers should boycott literary festivals for political reasons, with Roma Tearne, who was born in Sri Lanka, but decided not to attend a recent event there.

My Dear I Wanted to Tell You, the new novel from Louisa Young, focuses on a solder who suffers serious facial disfigurement during the First World War. The physical and emotional trauma has repercussions far beyond the wounded man in hospital. Louisa Young discusses her extensive research into facial damage, and how loved ones left behind came to terms with the shock of the nature of the injury.

Producer Philippa Ritchie.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00zm1kz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00zm324)
Evangelical Christians and Equality

The newspaper headlines read "Christian couple barred from fostering children because of their views on homosexuality" and "B&B owners punished for being faithful to Christian teaching".

They refer to two recent cases brought to court under the 2006 Equality Act: Eunice and Owen Johns who believed their Pentecostal faith was being used to prevent them caring for foster children and Stephen Preddy and Martyn Hall, a gay couple who won damages again patrons of a guesthouse run in line with what the owners believe are Christian teachings and who refused to rent out double bedded accommodation to the couple.

In "The Report" Matthew Hill asks what really happened in these cases, and why they ended up in court. He talks to the key people involved - and the organisations supporting the different sides. They include a Christian campaign organisation, a Christian charity and the Equality and Human Rights Commission, funded by the taxpayer.

Are these cases part of a "battle for influence" amongst groups using the law as a way of increasing their leverage in society?


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00zm326)
Fashion

The view from the top of business, presented by Evan Davis. The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

This week, Evan's guests are all top executives from the world of fashion and clothing. They discuss whether normal business rules apply in their world. They also get down to the nitty gritty of the business itself - who makes the money and how do they set the prices?

The panel also talks about marketing, and the role of PR in getting their products noticed.

Evan is joined in the studio by Jane Sheperdson, chief executive of Whistles; Simon Berwin, managing director of Berwin & Berwin; Kim Winser, fashion and retail expert with private equity group 3i.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


THU 21:00 Science Betrayed (b00zm328)
Episode 2

Science Betrayed: Part 2 - Andrew Wakefield and the MMR scare.

In the second and final part of this series, Dr Adam Rutherford tells the extraordinary story of one of the most contentious cases of medical misconduct of the last few decades, and the serious public health consequences that followed.

Andrew Wakefield was the doctor at the centre of the MMR scare that dominated the public health debate at the beginning of this century. His research, published in the Lancet in 1998, argued that there is a link between the triple vaccine MMR and the onset of autism in some children.

What followed was a public health scare that led to a dangerous drop in uptake of the vaccine, and the biggest outbreak of measles in this country for 20 years. Almost 13 years later, Andrew Wakefield has been found guilty of dishonesty and serious professional misconduct on several counts by the General Medical Council, and has now been struck off.

But the consequences of his misconduct live on. Why did it take so long for the extent of his deception to be revealed? Adam Rutherford talks to the key players in this incredible saga, and asks whether there are lessons to be learned about how scientific misconduct is investigated, and who is responsible for making sure scientists tell the truth.

Producers: Alexandra Feachem and Roland Pease.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00zm1ks)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00zllm8)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00zm87k)
Syria's government promises a package of reforms as it cracks down on dissent.

Turkey backs NATO command of the Libyan no-fly zone.

Can Portugal avoid an EU bailout?

with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00zm32b)
Mathilda

Episode 4

A mournful Mathilda longs to escape her concerned relatives who have no idea why her father killed himself. She fakes her own suicide and escapes with a modest sum to live on a remote heath in the North of England, alone with her memories of joy and tragedy.

After two years, just when she longs for a friend, she meets the young poet Woodville. He tries to lift her out of despair - but will she confide in him?

Abridged by Eileen Horne
Read by Emilia Fox

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 It's Your Round (b00zm32d)
Series 1

Episode 6

Angus Deayton hosts the comedy panel show with no format.

Johnny Vaughan, Alan Davies, Roisin Conaty and Arthur Smith battle it out to see who can beat each other at their own games each has brought along.

Angus valiantly tries to make sure everyone comes out of it with their reputations intact.

Writers: Angus Deayton, Ged Parsons and Paul Powell

Devised by Benjamin Partridge

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00zm32g)
The Shadow Chancellor accuses the Government of plunging the economy back into the danger zone.
Continuing the Budget debate, Ed Balls says that Labour left the Coalition an economic legacy pointing towards recovery.
But the Business Secretary, Vince Cable, insists spending cuts were "painful but very necessary" and were due to Labour's economic record.
The Foreign Secretary, William Hague, accuses pro-Gaddafi forces of continuing "appalling" acts of violence and that claims of a ceasefire were a "sham".
And peers debate the economy.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



FRIDAY 25 MARCH 2011

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00zllmq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00zm1kv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00zllms)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00zllmv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00zllmx)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00zllmz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00zm3hn)
Dr Ann Holt

With Canon Dr Ann Holt of the Bible Society.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00zllpx)
Charlotte Smith hears the concerns of an anti-gun group over children being allowed to shoot. But one farmer says shooting is a natural part of country life and should remain so. Neil McDonald takes his seven year old shooting and sees it as a skill to be passed from father to son.

In Wales, the plan to cull badgers control TB remain on track, despite an attempt to halt it in the Welsh Assembly. The aim of the proposed cull is to reduce the number of cattle with TB, a disease which costs £100 million of taxpayers money each year to control across the UK.

And as village pubs watch anxiously to see whether trade might dwindle after the rise in beer tax, Farming Today visits a rural local in Dorset. It was closed down 6 years ago, but given a new lease of life by enthusiastic locals.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith Producer: Ruth Sanderson.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00zm4jx)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including:
08:10 Andrew Balls, head of European investments at Pimco, one of the world's largest investment managers, analyses how Portugal's debt crisis could affect prospects for the whole Eurozone.
07:48 Why did the Met fail to arrest serial rapist Delroy Grant earlier?
08:45 Playwright Sir Tom Stoppard discusses his role in the campaign against censorship in Belarus.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b00zl4dq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00zm3hq)
John Julius Norwich - The Popes

Episode 5

Well known for his histories of Norman Sicily, Venice, the Byzantine Empire and the Mediterranean, John Julius Norwich has now turned his attention to the oldest continuing institution in the world, tracing the papal line down the centuries from St Peter himself - traditionally (though by no means historically) the first pope - to the present day. Of the 280-odd holders of the supreme office, some have unquestionably been saints; others have wallowed in unspeakable iniquity.

In the final episode of The Popes, John Julius Norwich concludes with the election of the people's pope John XXIII a welcome antidote to Pius XII. Expected to be nothing more than a brief, caretaker pope, John turned out to be anything but. Dragging the Church into the twentieth century, he shook the world.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00zm3hs)
Jenni Murray presents. Leonora Rustamova, the teacher sacked for writing a controversial book starring real life pupils, who has just lost her case against unfair dismissal. In these straitened times, more and more people are swapping their home with as a cost-effective holiday solution. But is it really so simple? 45 years after they were first created, the Monkees are back, reuniting for a British tour in May. We'll be asking if teenage crushes ever die? And the Irish poet Eavan Boland will be discussing her new book of essays; A Journey with Two Maps: Becoming a Woman Poet.


FRI 10:45 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00lcmcq)
Series 1

Songsters

Humans aren't the only species who sing. Many birds do and even another ape.

What messages are conveyed in the syllables, melodies and repeated phrases, and who is listening?

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Produce: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b01fd2tq)
Series 7

The Devils of Broughton

St Peter's church, a 13th century jewel, is empty.

Inside, the workings of the clock tick ominously, moving the hands towards midnight. On the street outside a group of people, maybe a hundred, huddle against the cold, waiting for the clock to strike.

This is the scene on the second Sunday in December, every year, in the village of Broughton, near Kettering in Northamptonshire. This is a quiet village, the bypass takes traffic away, the few commuters leaving town early in the morning. The few pubs are jolly, but not rowdy, and the Co-op acts as an unofficial meeting point for the locals.

Not much to distinguish it from the other villages nearby; flat, farmland stretching from one village to the next, with the odd superstore or garden centre between them. But come midnight something different happens; something unique, ancient, mysterious; something rather noisy. For every year for as long as anyone can remember, and even further back, the devil is beaten out of Broughton, by the tin can band - a collection of villagers who patrol the streets after midnight, banging, pots and pans, milk churns and hip baths, drums and hammers, colanders and frying pans - anything that makes a noise in fact, and for one night a year, Broughton becomes the noisiest place in Northamptonshire. And no one quite knows why... Alan Dein joins them with a microphone.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


FRI 11:30 Spread a Little Happiness (b00zm3hz)
Series 2

Hope Is the Thing With a Lorry

Maria's ex-boyfriend turns up looking for love.

Debra Stevenson and Nicola Duffet star in episode 5 of John Godber and Jane Thornton's comedy set in a sandwich bar in Beverley, near Hull

'Spread A Little Happiness' is sung by Debra Stevenson.

Cast:
Hope ..... Debra Stevenson
Maria ...... Nicola Duffett
Dave ..... Neil Dudgeon
Mam ..... Anne Reid
Ray ..... Shaun Prendergast
Gavin ..... Ralph Brown
Jenny ..... Sarah Moyle
Anita ..... Sherry Baines
Carrie ..... Elizabeth Godber
Eve ..... Helen Longworth
Bob ...... Ben Crowe
Monty ..... Stephen Critchlow
Blinds man ..... James Weaver

Producer/Director: Chris Wallis
An Autolycus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00zm3j1)
From the humble plastic brick, Lego's profits are now towering. We find out how Star Wars and Indiana Jones have helped inspire a new generation of builders and boosted sales by 50%.

Plus a detailed look at what this year's budget means for the Travel and Tourist industry.

And with 'Open Water Swimming' experiencing a resurgence in popularity, Peter White dips more than just a toe in the water to experience first hand the attraction, or not, of swimming in an ice cold pond.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00zlln1)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00zm85h)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4. Thirty minutes of intelligent analysis, comment and interviews. To share your views email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on Twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00zm482)
If the pips are always late on DAB radio, how will we know what the real time is when we all switch over to digital?

Roger Bolton talks to Rupert Brun, the BBC's head of technology who says - actually - we won't.
Some listeners question Jenni Murray's use of language during her recent stand-up routine for Comic Relief - the Woman's Hour presenter reveals why she abandoned PC in favour of street slang.

Sir Michael Lyons is coming to the end of a turbulent four years as the chairman of the BBC Trust. In his last interview for Feedback he discusses whether the BBC "lost its moral compass" during the Ross/Brand affair, how executive pay was brought into line and how listeners will be consulted on the next round of BBC cuts.
And MPs put their weight behind your arguments in favour of local radio.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00zm320)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00zm484)
Western Stars

Ash lost her singing voice when her mum died. How can she get it back? Her boyfriend wants to settle down; her dad wants her to follow her dreams.

Aged 31 and faced with the prospect of either settling down to small-town life or pursuing her dreams of a singing career, Ash is struggling. Her mother died some years ago - she is still coming to terms with her loss. She hasn't sung since her mother's funeral. Rose, her best friend and colleague at the hated nylon trouser factory, is keen they re-form their band and make a career out of music; her boyfriend Vince is pressuring her to move in with him and say goodbye to any thoughts of career in favour of family with him. Her father, Dai, just wants his daughter to be happy. Then Vince's get-rich scheme goes horribly wrong - one night, he is collecting a drugs drop in the bay when he crashes into Dai's boat. Dai is killed and Ash is distraught. The crisis deepens when Vince is arrested for manslaughter and drugs smuggling. How will Ash cope?

Lucy Gough writes for theatre radio and television. She wrote Hollyoaks Channel 4 for ten years and now writes for BBC drama Doctors. She is currently under commission to Aberystwyth Arts Centre for a stage adaptation of Wuthering Heights. She has also just been awarded a Creative Wales Award by the Arts Council. In Western Stars, she draws on personal experience of living in a West Wales fishing village in an upbeat, music filled drama about finding our true voice.

The cast
Ash... Eiry Hughes
Rose ... Vivien Care
Dai .. William Thomas
Vince ... Aled Pugh
Frankie ... Rhys ap Hywel
Policeman ... Rhys ap William
Producer ... Polly Thomas
A BBC Cymru/Wales production.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00zllrd)
The Edible Garden Show

A 'Grow your own' edition where Eric Robson and the team are trouble-shooting at The Edible Garden Show, Warwickshire.

In addition, Pippa Greenwood, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank explore this new gardening event.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zllpz)
Religion

Churchill once admitted he did not support the Church from the inside like a 'pillar' but from the outside more like a 'flying buttress'. His relationship with God blew hot and cold and yet he had a sense of himself as a man gifted by fate with a higher purpose, as he called it, a 'glow worm'.

In this programme, historian Sir David Cannadine explores Churchill's faith and his powerful and driving sense of destiny.

With Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.
Written and Presented by Professor Sir David Cannadine

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00zm4jz)
Elizabeth Taylor, Warren Christopher, Fred Titmus and Jet Harris

Matthew Bannister remembers:

Elizabeth Taylor - we assess her as movie actress, sex symbol and celebrity icon. We have memories from Richard Burton's nephew and the playwright David Wood who appeared alongside Burton and Taylor in an Oxford student production of Dr Faustus.

Also Warren Christopher, the American Secretary of State under Bill Clinton - Lord Hurd pays tribute.

Middlesex and England bowler Fred Titmus, who lost some of his toes in a boating accident, but was playing again within weeks.

And Jet Harris of the Shadows - said to be the first person in the UK to play an electric bass guitar.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00zm4hw)
This week in The Film Programme Francine Stock travels north of Hadrian's Wall in search of lost Romans and backwards in time to ponder the mysterious and beautiful Palaeolithic paintings found on the walls of a cave in southern France. Her companion for the foray into the land of the Picts is Kevin MacDonald who has directed a film version of Rosemary Sutcliff's classic book, The Eagle of the Ninth; and for the trip to the caves she's joined by the veteran German director, Werner Herzog. His documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams is shot in 3D and has been hailed as his best film to date....quite a claim for a man with Fitzcarraldo and Aguirre, Wrath of God in his back catalogue. There's also an interview with Brian Cox about two of his favourite films and the sound designer, Matt Wand, offers us a glimpse into the world of the Foley artist - the people who not only make Marilyn's heels go clickety clack and Clint's horses go cloppity clop but invite us to dream.

Producer - Zahid Warley.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00zm6g6)
Eddie Mair presents the day's top stories. Including Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00zlln3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b00zm4hy)
Series 33

Er - I thought we didn't have any money? With Rory Bremner.

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis count the cost of war with special guest, impressionist Rory Bremner. Mitch Benn performs an elegy for Knut the polar bear; stand-up Imran Yusuf ponders the unifying talents of a prospective Miss Universe; Laura Shavin whisks us off on a National Insurance holiday and pop singer Alistair Griffin says roll up, roll up for Kate and Wills wedding souvenirs.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00zm4j0)
Brian and Annabelle are pleased that Cliff Alladay is confirmed as site manager for Borchester Market Development. Now it's all systems go.

Elizabeth and Jill call into Jaxx after Elizabeth has her stitches out. Jill asks if the effort of running Lower Loxley is worth the risk to her health. Elizabeth is confident that she'll cope now she's got her ICD. Nigel put so much into the place. She has to do it for him and for their children. But Roy's made such a difference. She is considering employing someone permanently to share the load.

Peggy introduces Brian to Elona, Jack's carer. Elona tells Peggy that she was brought up on a small farm but went to work in a city, where she met her English husband who was on holiday. Now she's settled in England with him and their children.

Kenton asks after Jamie but he's not been to The Bull since Sunday. Jolene's seen him out drinking though. They agree he still needs to be given space. While they discuss Jolene's plans for The Bull for the royal wedding, Brian invites Kenton to join him and Peggy, who have come for lunch. Peggy remarks that Jolene's looking happy. Kenton agrees she's radiant.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00zm4j2)
The Aesthetic Movement at the V&A, and Kylie's Show Director

'Art for Art's sake' was the mantra of the 19th century Aesthetic Movement and Oscar Wilde was probably its most famous disciple. A major new exhibition The Cult of Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement in Britain 1860-1900 includes work by Aubrey Beardsley, Burne-Jones, Whistler and Oscar Wilde, displays of sculpture, furniture, fashion and literature, and explores how the idea of the 'house beautiful' became a touchstone of cultured life. Author and art historian Lucinda Hawkesley reviews.

Kylie Minogue's new stage spectacular, the Aphrodite-Les Folies Tour, is directed by William Baker, who is also Director of The Hurly Burly Show, a burlesque review in London's West End, staring Miss Polly Rae. William Baker discusses his work on both projects.

Man Booker Prize-shortlisted novelist Philip Hensher discusses his new novel King of the Badgers, a contemporary slice of life set in a small English town. Following the disappearance of an eight-year-old girl, a search for the missing child exposes deep cracks and divisions in a small community keen to maintain its privacy.

And as Britney Spears releases Femme Fatale, her seventh studio album, we ask Rowan Pelling, journalist and former editor of Erotic Review, to assess the modern femme fatale. French for 'deadly woman' the femme fatale flourished in popular culture through the success of the film noir during the 40s and 50s, and became synonymous with dangerous sexuality. Is Britney Spears a convincing modern femme fatale?

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00zlk0f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00zlln5)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical discussion from Kingston Grammar School in Surrey, with panellists Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, Shadow Justice Secretary, Bob Crow, general Secretary of the RMT union and Ann Leslie, the veteran foreign correspondent for the Daily Mail.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00zm4j4)
Series 2

Earthworms

Although Charles Darwin is especially well known for his work on the Theory of Evolution through his seminal work "On the Origin of Species", he also published a lot of his research on earthworms.

Earthworms fascinated Darwin, so much so that his observations led him to believe that they showed marked intelligence. And earthworms fascinate Sir David Attenborough too.

He recalls a visit to Australia to film the giant earthworm and intriguingly used his ears more than any other sense to find them. What did they sound like and what did they look like? He reveals all.

Producer: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00znyh8)
The Cairo Trilogy

Episode 2

Dramatised by Ayeesha Menon from the novels of Nobel Prize-winning author Naguib Mahfouz the drama was recorded on the streets of Cairo.

This episode begins is the late 1920s with Egypt nominally independent but still under British influence, and ends in the mid 1930s with an outbreak of typhoid which has a tragic effect on the family.

Cast:
Old Kamal......Omar Sharif
Kamal............Amr Waked
Al-Sayyid Ahmad Abd al-Jawab...Ihab Sakkout
Aida...............Shirine El Ansari
Zanuba...........Maryam El Khoshed
Zubayda..........Zeinab Moubarak
Yasin..............Tamer Nasrat

Other cast members: Rena Malak, Caroline Khalil, Yara Goubran, Ola Roshdy, Nairy Avedissian, Ekram Zalat, Sherif Nour , Salah Fahmy, Yeve Youssef, Sedky Sakhar, Dina Nadim, Ahmed Nour, Saymaa Shalan, Radwa Elgabry, Mika Thabet, Hany Seef, Hugh Sowden.

Music by Sacha Puttnam
Dramatised by Ayeesha Menon

Producer/Director: John Dryden
A Goldhawk Essential Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00zlln7)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00zm87m)
Pro and anti government demonstrations in Yemen as President Saleh clings on.

What's the next step for NATO in Libya? Arm the rebels?

A Palestinian engineer alleges he was kidnapped by Mossad in Ukraine.

Felicity Evans investigates.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00zm4j6)
Mathilda

Episode 5

Unable to trust anyone with her secret - Mathilda decides to test Woodville's friendship and love for her by asking him to join her in committing suicide; he desperately tries to persuade her that this is a selfish act - but she then immediately falls ill.

As she contemplates death - but a possible joyful reunion with her father - she finally puts her story down on paper for all the world to know...

Abridged by Eileen Horne
Read by Emilia Fox

Produced by Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00zlkng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00zm4j8)
News from Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00zlfh5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00zlfh5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00zlhhq)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00zlhhq)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00zm082)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00zm082)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00zm1kz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00zm1kz)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00zlkng)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00zlkng)

Act Your Age 18:30 WED (b00zm0mc)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00cqfyp)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00zlk0f)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00zm0hw)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00zm31t)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 FRI (b00zlk0f)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00zlblc)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00zdj03)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00zlgdl)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00zhc3r)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00zf646)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00zlln5)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00ts5mm)

Arnold Bennett - Anna of the Five Towns 21:00 SAT (b01nvmwm)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00zjcwz)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00zjcwz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00zlgdq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00zlkq5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00zm0mm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00zm32b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00zm4j6)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00zlfh1)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00zlfh1)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00zlhhl)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00zlhhl)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00zm07y)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00zm07y)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00zm1kv)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00zm1kv)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00zm3hq)

Brian Gulliver's Travels 11:30 MON (b00zlfh9)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00zl4dl)

Budget 2011 12:00 WED (b00zwdql)

Budget Call 12:00 THU (b00zq50q)

Cadbury Kraft: A Year On 11:00 MON (b00zlfh7)

Churchill's Other Lives 15:45 MON (b00zlcpw)

Churchill's Other Lives 15:45 TUE (b00zlk0h)

Churchill's Other Lives 15:45 WED (b00zllkb)

Churchill's Other Lives 15:45 THU (b00zllm4)

Churchill's Other Lives 15:45 FRI (b00zllpz)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00zl943)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b00zphnr)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b00zq2kc)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 08:50 SUN (b00zf648)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 10:45 FRI (b00lcmcq)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 20:50 FRI (b00zm4j4)

Document 20:00 MON (b00zlfkt)

Down the Line 18:30 TUE (b00zlhhz)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00zlfhh)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00zlk09)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00h369x)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00zm484)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00zgwhv)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00zgwhn)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00zlcnz)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00zlhhd)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00zllq3)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00zllqw)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00zllpx)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00zf5sw)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00zm482)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00zf202)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00zlkpz)

For One Night Only 10:30 SAT (b00zh1d6)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00znyh8)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00zh55r)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00zm88q)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00zlkqm)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00zm0mh)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00zm322)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00zm4j2)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00zf5sy)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00zllrd)

Genius Unrecognised 14:45 SUN (b00zl941)

Helen Keen's It Is Rocket Science 23:00 WED (b00zm0mp)

House Beautiful 11:30 THU (b00zm1l1)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00zm1ks)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00zm1ks)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00zlkq1)

It's My Story 16:30 MON (b00xpng0)

It's Your Round 23:00 THU (b00zm32d)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00zf9tf)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00zlfkp)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00zfmw0)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00zm4jz)

Laura Solon - Talking and Not Talking 23:00 TUE (b00nvwg8)

Lent Talks 00:30 SUN (b00zf34g)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b00zllkj)

Letters to the Arab World Omnibus 20:00 SAT (b00zmzxv)

Letters to the Arab World 00:30 SAT (b00zn0wl)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b01fd2tq)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00zhd1p)

Make Perhaps This Out Sense Of Can You 16:30 SUN (b00zlbl5)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00zlk0c)

Material World 21:00 MON (b00zf4j5)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00zm31w)

McLevy 14:15 WED (b00zm08b)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00zf67c)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00zjcmk)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00zlby0)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00zlhh0)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00zlljy)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00zlllr)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00zllmq)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00zm07w)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00zm07w)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00zm868)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00zhc3p)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00zhc3p)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00zf34d)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00zf67m)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00zjcmt)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00zlby8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00zlhh8)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00zllk6)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00zllm0)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00zllmz)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00zjcmw)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00zf67r)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00zjcn0)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00zjcn4)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00zf688)

News 13:00 SAT (b00zf680)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00zjcx3)

On the Ropes 09:00 TUE (b00zlhhg)

On the Ropes 21:30 TUE (b00zlhhg)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00zlbl3)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00zlbl3)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00zgwhl)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00zgwhl)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00zhc9q)

PM 17:00 MON (b00zm4wc)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00zlkqy)

PM 17:00 WED (b00zm52w)

PM 17:00 THU (b00zm629)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00zm6g6)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00zlbl7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00zf67p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00zlcnx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00zlhhb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00zm07t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00zm1kq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00zm3hn)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00zhd1t)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00zhd1t)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00zhd1t)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00zjcx7)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00zjcx7)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00zjcx7)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00zhc3t)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00zgwhs)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00zhd1w)

Science Betrayed 21:00 THU (b00zm328)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00zf67h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00zjcmp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00zlby4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00zlhh4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00zllk2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00zlllw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00zllmv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00zf67f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00zf67k)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00zf682)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00zjcmm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00zjcmr)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00zjcn8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00zlby2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00zlby6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00zlhh2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00zlhh6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00zllk0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00zllk4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00zlllt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00zllly)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00zllms)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00zllmx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00zf686)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00zjcnd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00zlbyg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00zlhhx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00zllkd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00zllm6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00zlln3)

So Wrong It's Right 18:30 THU (b00zm31y)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00zjcx1)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00zjcx1)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b00zdl20)

Soul Music 13:30 TUE (b00zlk07)

Spread a Little Happiness 11:30 FRI (b00zm3hz)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00zlcp3)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00zlcp3)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00zjcx9)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00zjcx5)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b00zdh7m)

The 3rd Degree 13:30 MON (b00zlfhf)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00zl4dn)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00zlbl9)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00zlbl9)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00zlfkr)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00zlfkr)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00zlknj)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00zlknj)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00zm0mf)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00zm0mf)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00zm320)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00zm320)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00zm4j0)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00zfmqn)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00zm326)

The Company of Poets 23:30 SAT (b00zd92g)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00zf5t0)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00zm4hw)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00zl4ds)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00zl4ds)

The Herschel Space Telescope 21:00 TUE (b00nycw3)

The Ladies 23:15 WED (b00t7fyq)

The Media Show 13:30 THU (b00zm088)

The Narrowcasters 09:30 TUE (b00zlhhj)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b00zf5t4)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b00zm4hy)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00zm324)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b00zl4dq)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b00zl4dq)

The Search for Growth 11:00 TUE (b00zlhhs)

The Story of Economics 16:30 WED (b00zm0hy)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00zh55p)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00zl4dv)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00zlgdn)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00zlkq3)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00zm87p)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00zm87k)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00zm87m)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00zfkfn)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00zm871)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00zlgdv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00zlkqp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00zm0mr)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00zm32g)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00zm4j8)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00zgwhq)

Today 06:00 MON (b00zlcp1)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00zm4wy)

Today 06:00 WED (b00zm4zd)

Today 06:00 THU (b00zm54w)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00zm4jx)

Tracing Your Roots 13:30 SUN (b00zl4dx)

Turf Wars 11:30 WED (b00zm084)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b00zllkg)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00zf67t)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00zf67w)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00zf67y)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00zf684)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00zjcmy)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b00zjcn2)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00zjcn6)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00zjcnb)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00zlbyb)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00zlbyd)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00zlbyj)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00zlhhv)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00zlhj1)

Weather 13:57 WED (b00zllk8)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00zllkl)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00zllm2)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00zllm8)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00zlln1)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00zlln7)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00zlblf)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b00zlblh)

What's in a Meme? 11:30 TUE (b00zlk03)

While the Boys Are Away 11:00 WED (b00zp5w7)

With Great Pleasure 23:00 MON (b00zlgds)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00zhc9n)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00zlfh3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00zlhhn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00zm080)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00zm1kx)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00zm3hs)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b00zlknd)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00zm85p)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00zm859)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00zm85f)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00zm85h)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00zlfhc)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00zlk05)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00zm3j1)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00zfmy9)