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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 DECEMBER 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00w7fhl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00wbp3b)
Born Brilliant: The Life of Kenneth Williams

Episode 5

Now a regular on television chat shows and Radio 4's Just a Minute, Kenneth is invited to direct Joe Orton's play, Loot.

Kenneth Williams was the stand-out comic actor of his generation. Beloved as the manic star of Carry On films and as a peerless raconteur on TV chat shows and radio comedies, he was also acclaimed for serious stage roles.

Since the publication of edited extracts from his diaries, much controversy has surrounded Williams's personal and professional lives. But journalist and author Christopher Stevens has been granted access by the estate to Williams's complete archive - the forty-three volumes of diaries and hundreds of unseen letters to and from the star.

Born Brilliant: The Life of Kenneth Williams (the first full-length authorised biography) traces the complex contradictions that characterised an extraordinary life.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Nicholas Boulton

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00w7fhn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00w7fhq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00w7fhs)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00w7fhv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00wcm9z)
With Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, Assistant Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00wcmsp)
"Can you play George Michael at a wedding?" A listener sets Kathy Clugstone and her ukulele a challenge to find out which songs count as being too religious to feature in a registry office wedding. Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey brave the snow and ice to pay homage to Leslie Nielsen. And Lyse Doucet reads Your News. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00w7fhx)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00w7fhz)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00wcmtc)
Lighthouse

In this weeks Open Country Richard Uridge visits the Norfolk Coast.Better known as an area of coastal erosion, Happisburgh is proving that community spirit is far from eroded as teams of volunteers work tirelessly to protect the local landscape and those who come to enjoy it. Navigation reform could've seen the Happisburgh lighthouse fall into disrepair but a team of volunteers campaigned to keep it working and 20 years on it's still beaming across the Norfolk high seas. In view of the red and white tower, a small porter cabin is home to 'Coast Watch' and it's revolving volunteers who daily scan the cliff tops and ocean for ramblers or ships in distress. And should the alarm be raised, the lifeboat station is on call 24 hours just as it has been for over 40 years to rescue those in need.

Produced by Nicola Humphries.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00wcq6c)
Farming Today This Week

Farmers have been contending with freezing temperatures and feet of snow which have brought with them some tough challenges. Charlotte Smith visits a Leicestershire farm which is lambing in snow to see the emergency measures they have in place to keep the lambs alive. Milk tankers have had difficulty reaching remote dairy farms and vegetables and Christmas trees have been frozen into the ground. She hears how farmers are coping with the severe snowfall.
Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00w7fj1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00wcs0h)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:
08:31 Timothy Garton Ash and Jonathan Powell on Anglo-US relations
08:55 Lord Heseltine on his new job in charge of regional regeneration
08:21 Pogues singer Shane MacGowan has teamed up with three priests on a Christmas single.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00wcs0k)
The Reverend Richard Coles with studio guest Gloria Hunniford, poet Elvis McGonagall, the man who carried the flag for England at the 1966 World Cup and a woman who discovered her father's bigamous secret; percussionist Evelyn Glennie reveals her Secret Life and Inheritance Tracks from Mary Coughlan.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00wcs0m)
Tribes, Hebrides, Visitor to Britain

John McCarthy looks at endangered peoples of the world with broadcaster and traveller Piers Gibbon who has stayed with South American tribes and studied their use of plants. This has lead him to taking part in their rituals involving poisonous frog toxins.

Closer to home, hunter-gatherer tribes first inhabited the Hebrides 10,000 years ago but have left little for archaeologists to study. Professor Steven Mithen tells John how years of going there to excavate have brought him a deep appreciation of the islands and their present day people.

What kind of appreciation do visitors have of the islands of Great Britain? John talks to Immaculate Mwaungulu from Tanzania about her impressions on her first visit to the UK - including an interesting insight into tapwater.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 The iPod Series (b00xbh46)
Samuel Pepys' Playlist

Samuel Pepys, the famous diarist, loved music. It outlasted all his other passions- even his passion for women. He left hundreds of his favourite songs, some covered in wine stains, relics of drunken musical evenings.

David Owen Norris explores the songs in the Pepys Library in Cambridge with historians Richard Luckett, Jenny Uglow and Basie Gitlin, and recreates the music he loved best. With singers Gwyneth Herbert, Thomas Guthrie and Laura Crowther.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00wcs0r)
Elinor Goodman looks behind the scenes at Westminster

This week's huge leak of US diplomatic correspondence has big implications for the business of government and diplomacy. If digital information can be leaked and spread around the world so easily, who would dare trust a secret to a computer? Here Jonathan Powell, the former Chief of Staff in Tony Blair's Downing Street, debates the impact on government with Douglas Carswell, the Conservative MP who wants a more open approach.

The leaks included an appeal from King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. He urged the United States to bomb Iran to thwart its efforts to develop a nuclear weapon. The Conservative MP, Rory Stewart, knows the region well. A former diplomat, he once walked right across it. Here, he assesses just how worried we should be.

At Westminster, the government's decision to increase tuition fees is causing agony to the Liberal Democrats. They promised to scrap the fees before the election. But their own Vince Cable, now business secretary, is promoting the rise. Here, the Conservative, Mark Field, and the Lib Dem, Don Foster, consider the demands of coalition.

There is much soul-searching too after David Cameron's abortive effort to persuade the international football authorities to allow England to stage the 2018 World Cup. Was he right to devote so much time to the bid? Would his predecessors have done so? Questions for Tessa Jowell, the former Labour culture secretary, and Ken Baker, the former Tory cabinet minister.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00wcs0t)
The great silence that is the legacy of genocide in Cambodia.

A chance to relax on the beach in war-weary Mogadishu.

Living with the aftermath of the Gulf of Mexico's oil spill disaster.

And how to endure endless thirst in one of the hottest places on the planet.

Few countries live with a darker past than Cambodia. In the late 70s, the Khmer Rouge abolished money and private property, and forced city people to labour in the fields. By the time their insane, brutal regime collapsed, more than one-and-a-half million people had died of starvation, or been worked to death, or executed... And Neil Trevithick has been trying to find out whether it'll ever be possible for Cambodians to come to terms psychologically with what they went through....

President Mubarak of Egypt promised that his country's parliamentary elections would be free and fair. But those familiar with Egyptian democracy had their doubts. And few were surprised when -- after the first round of voting -- there were reports of interference and intimidation by the security forces. One of the main opposition parties said there'd been "scandalous" vote rigging. In Cairo, John Leyne has been reflecting on the nature of politics Egyptian-style....

I was looking the other day at some old photographs of an African city. There were whitewashed mosques, and minarets, and monuments. Avenues....shaded by palm trees....ran down to a sparkling sea. And people were going about their business on peaceful, ordered streets. This was the Somali capital, Mogadishu before it descended into violence that's raged now for nearly two decades. Today it's one of the most fought-over, most battered, most dangerous cities in the world... But Andrew Harding has been spending time with Somalis who dream of....eventually.....returning Mogadishu to the gentler days of its past.

For weeks back in the summer, the world looked on aghast as oil from a ruptured well gushed into the Gulf of Mexico. We watched the slick grow and grow.... and blackened seabirds flapped about in the sludge... Eventually though, the well was capped, and the world's attention drifted away. But as Paul Adams explains, for some of those who live and work on the Gulf Coast....forgetting and moving on is not so easy...

Water is the stuff of life....but in more and more places people are struggling to get enough of it. The UN warns that water scarcity is one of the main problems lying in wait for many nations in the decades ahead. Some of the most acute shortages may well be endured on the Horn of Africa. And there....in the small, sun-blasted state of Djibouti....Pascale Harter has been talking to people who already know what it means to live with an almost constant, nagging thirst.....


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b00wcs46)
With the winter freeze continuing, Paul Lewis asks whether your insurance will cover you if you miss your flight or train, or cannot get to an airport in time because of bad weather.

And, can you get your money back if you cannot make the concert you have tickets for?

Plus: can having winter tyres fitted affect your motor insurance cover? Paul Lewis talks to the AA and the Association of British Insurers.

Contactless cards - millions of these cards, which can be used without a PIN, are being issued by Barclaycard, and MBNA will soon follow suit, but how secure are they?

And the head of an influential committee has said it is unfair that online customers get the best gas and electricity deals.

Customers on standard price plans pay on average almost £140 a year more than those on online plans, according to figures from Uswitch.

Tim Yeo MP, the chairman of the Energy and Climate Control Select Committee, tells Money Box that the elderly and the vulnerable, who may not use the internet, should still have access to the best deals.

Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b00w7f9v)
Series 32

Wiki leaks - nudge nudge, wink, wink

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis return with another episode of the topical comedy show with stand-up, skits and sketches about wiki leak revelations and the culture of the nudging, rather than nannying state. With icy weather all around us Marcus Brigstocke thinks the time is right to talk about global warming; Andi Osho says goodbye to Wagner and Mitch Benn does a music salute to his hero Brian Blessed.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00w7fj3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00w7fj5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00w7fd7)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical discussion from Gillotts School in Henley-on-Thames with questions for the panel including Theresa May, Home Secretary and writer Alain De Botton.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00wcs5h)
Any Answers? Listeners respond to the issues raised in Any Questions? If you have a comment or question on this week's programme or would like to take part in the Any Answers? phone-in you can contact us by telephone or email. Tel: 03700 100 444 Email: any.answers@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00wcsb2)
The Gambler

Fyodor Dostoevsky in 1866, in serious debt, addicted to roulette and rejected by several women, spun these sad materials into 'The Gambler', a brilliant tragicomic novella written in a feverish few weeks to stave off ruin.

Set in Roulettenburg, a fictional spa town in the Alps, the novel tells how Alexei Ivanovich, servant to a bankrupt family, falls madly in love twice- first with the lovely unobtainable Polina, then with the forbidden thrill of the Casino. As Polina demands ever more slavish and reckless obedience from him, Alexei finds liberation in his enslavement, and their relationship starts to mutate into something altogether richer and stranger.

Meanwhile a cast of villains and victims- Polina's weak, infatuated uncle 'the General', the pretty young gold-digger he falls for, and a scheming French aristocrat with designs on Polina - wait to inherit millions from her dying Granny - until the old lady herself bursts in, foul-mouthed, furious, and up for a good time. Fortunes will rise and fall, love be won and lost, hopes and dreams go up in flames, before the roulette-wheel comes to a final stop and the little silver ball makes its choice.

Major contemporary poet Glyn Maxwell (The Nerve, The Sugar Mile, Hide Now) recreates the madness and mayhem of a world enthralled by chance, sex and money, a world without values or foundations, spinning out of control.

Cast:

Alexei Ivanovich ..... Sam Crane
General Zagorski ..... Nicholas le Prevost
Granny ..... Patricia Routledge
Polina Alexandrovna ..... Siobhan Hewlett
De Grieux ..... David Westhead
Astley ..... Robert Portal
Blanche de Cominges ..... Charlotte Randle

Written by Glyn Maxwell

Director: Guy Retallack
Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00wcsb4)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Presented by Jane Garvey. Why the sherry tipple is making a comeback - and we're not talking about pouring it into the trifle. Pandas, procreation and pregnancy - we hear from one documentary-maker about China's breeding programme. The story of the mother in Pakistan facing a death sentence after conviction under controversial blasphemy laws. The influence of parents in student protests about tuition fees. What blogging can do for women in Iran. Fashion and what it says about our identity. Sex offenders and adoption - why one family law expert argues it's time for a re-think.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00wcsdj)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00wcmsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00w7fj7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00w7fj9)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00w7fjc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00wcsdl)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive is joined by American filmmaker, actor, visual artist and writer John Waters, once dubbed the 'Prince of Puke'. The Mayor of Baltimore once declared 7th February 1985 John Waters' Day'in honour of the city's most celebrated citizen - all this prior to John's breakout 1988 film Hairspray which has since been turned into a widely successful musical. John's new book, Role Models shares some of his subversive inspirations, published by Beautiful Books.

Lisa Jardine, Centenary Professor of Renaissance Studies at Queen Mary, University of London is the daughter of Jacob Bronowski, who died almost forty years ago and was renowned for his epic BBC TV series The Ascent of Man. Lisa has some surprising discoveries in her BBC Four documentary 'My Father, The Bomb and Me'.

Composer and conductor Carl Davis talks about his upcoming role conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra as they provide live accompaniment to a special screening of Charlie Chaplin's silent film The Gold Rush at London's Royal Festival Hall, performing Carl's reconstruction of the original score.

And Nikki Bedi talks to award-winning Australian comedian Tim Minchin, noted for his unique brand of musical comedy. Tim begins has a UK Arena tour 'Tim Minchin and his Orchestra' (all 55 of them), a DVD 'Ready For This' and has composed the score to the RSCs Matilda.

With music from the flamboyant Gabby Young & Other Animals.

And from San Francisco - Stephanie Finch and The Company Men perform their laidback ballad So Do I.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b00wct6j)
Series 9

Episode 6

The Galway Ghost
In the week of Ireland's bail out writer Lizzie Nunnery takes a look at how the economic dream turned sour. Declan Conway's life was good, spurred on by success he'd bought a stake in his very own horse -the Galway Ghost. Will Declan be a relic from his time or does he have a future?

Declan Conway ..... Jonathan Forbes

Producer - Pauline Harris.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00wct8d)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests novelist Deborah Moggach and writers Sarfraz Manzoor and Ekow Eshun review the cultural highlights of the week.

Les Parents Terribles was written by Jean Cocteau in 1938 during an eight day opium binge. Chris Rolls directs a new production of Jeremy Sams' translation of the play at Trafalgar Studios in London, starring Frances Barber as a pathologically possessive mother with Anthony Calf as her husband and Tom Byam Shaw as their son.

Hammad Khan's film Slackistan portrays a group of aimless, wealthy young graduates trying, without much success, to find some purpose to their lives in Islamabad. Khan says that his film rejects the stereotypical Western view of Pakistan, while also rejecting the prevailing establishment of older cultures and traditions.

Rupert Goold's 2007 production of Macbeth, starring Patrick Stewart and Kate Fleetwood, was highly acclaimed and had successful runs both in the West End and in Broadway. Goold has now adapted this production for television and filmed it in the gloomy subterranean spaces of Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire. The result, to be shown on BBC4, is a claustrophobic and visceral modern reimagining of the play.

The title of this year's GSK Contemporary exhibition at the Royal Academy is Aware: Art Fashion Identity. It examines how artists and designers use clothing as a mechanism to communicate and reveal elements of our identity and brings together work by 30 different practitioners, including specially commissioned pieces by Yinka Shonibare and Hussein Chalayan.

Simon Nye is the latest writer to take on the challenge of adapting Richmal Crompton's much-loved William stories for television. Just William on BBC1 stars Daniel Roche as the subversive schoolboy and also features Martin Jarvis - the voice behind the popular radio adaptations of the stories - as the narrator.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00wct8g)
Political Patriarchs

The influence of the political father has long been a defining aspect of politics, but how has this relationship changed actual decisions made and what impact do these ghostly forebears have on the supposedly meritocratic Westminster scene today?

David Cameron described his father, after his death this autumn, as one of the biggest influences on his politics. Ed Miliband's victory speech cited his Marxist father's influence on his thinking and determination - and David has quoted him repeatedly.

In Political Patriarchs, Westminster columnist Anne McElvoy charts some of the most influential relationships of leading politicians and their fathers, from the Chamberlain family business of Joe and Austen, to Winston Churchill shaping his ambitions according to his father Randolph - and the fathers who have shaped politics to the present day.

In it, she uses the BBC archive, surprisingly rich in this subject, and does new interviews with people like Margaret Thatcher's biographer Charles Moore about the formative influence of her father Alderman Roberts cut with her own recollections of her father as the guiding spirit of her beliefs.

She also charts the Left's intriguing attachment to its own brand of heredity in dynasties like the Foots, Benns and the Milibands.

The programme also explores the culture and psychological roots of the father-child inheritance and asks if political offspring consciously try to redress the failings of their fathers in a different context.

Producer: Rebecca Stratford.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00w6q37)
I, Claudius

Augustus

Dramatisation by Robin Brooks of Robert Graves' scandalous histories of Roman political vice.

Young Claudius grows up in the turbulent household of Augustus, the first Roman Emperor, and Livia, the wife who matched his achievements with her ambition. The Imperial Couple disregard their young grandson as they inch towards absolute power. But that won't save Claudius from heartbreak.

Claudius ..... Tom Goodman-Hill
Augustus ..... Derek Jacobi
Livia ..... Harriet Walter
Tiberius ..... Tim McInnerny
Julia ..... Alison Pettitt
Athenodorus ..... Sam Dale
Cato ..... Jude Akuwudike
Thrasyllus ..... Sean Baker
Young Claudius ..... Harvey Allpress
Young Herod ..... Felix Zadek-Ewing
Young Germanicus ..... Harry Child
Camilla ..... Lauren Mote
Young Postumus ..... Ryan Watson
Young Livilla ..... Holly Gibbs
Other parts played by Adeel Akhtar, Tony Bell, Christine Kavanagh, and Sally Orrock.

Specially composed music by David Pickvance.
Directed by Jonquil Panting.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00w7fjf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00w7ccn)
It's reported this week that scientists in America, have for the first time, managed to reverse the effects of ageing in animals. The experiment was carried out on mice at Harvard. Before the treatment their skin and other organs were equivalent to those of an 80 year old human. After the injection of a drug that switches on a key enzyme, the mice grew so many new cells that they'd almost completely rejuvenated. The results raise some difficult questions.

No one would argue that we should work on drugs that alleviate the problems of old age, but should we actively try to extend life itself? In the UK by 2031, more than a fifth of the population will be over 65 and the fastest growing population will be those aged 85 and over. It's not just a question of the cost, but how we value the old in society. Despite plans for legislation, allegations of ageism are common place. Are we stuck with an out of date attitude to the old that has too often resulted in them being shuffled off in to age reservations as soon as they hit three score years and ten? Has our culture, which so values youthfulness come to terms with the improvements to the physical and mental capabilities of the elderly? Or are the old themselves partly to blame? Desperately clinging on to their youth with pills, potions and plastic surgery. Is the search for eternal youth hubris, or a natural part of the human condition? If we assist in extending life, will that inevitably mean assistance ending? When it comes to age, when is enough enough?

The Moral Maze chaired by Michael Buerk with Melanie Phillips, Kenan Malik, Matthew Taylor and Claire Fox.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00w7854)
(6/17)
Four more contestants join Russell Davies in Manchester for the latest heat in the long-established general knowledge contest. This week they are from Swansea, Manchester, Northwich in Cheshire and Middle Rasen in Lincolnshire. The winner goes through to the 2011 semi-finals, with a chance of being named the 58th annual Brain of Britain.
Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 David Walliams on Philip Larkin (b00w6q44)
Actor David Walliams is a great admirer of Philip Larkin's poetry, and to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of the poet's death he talks to former Poet Laureate Andrew Motion, who wrote a widely acclaimed biography of Larkin, about why he finds this poetry so appealing. Walliams chooses a selection of the poems he likes best, some well-known and some far less so, to explore the central themes that recur throughout Larkin's work. It's a fascinating three-way meeting of minds: the actor, the biographer and the poet they both admire.

The poems are read by Philip Larkin, Tom Courtenay and Patrick Romer.



SUNDAY 05 DECEMBER 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00wbt8x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b00chy5k)
Urban Welsh

Sorry for the Loss

Sorry For The Loss by Bridget Keehan.
The prison chaplain has some news for one of the inmates. This story was a winner in the Rhys Davies Short Story Competition. Read by Eve Myles.

Produced by Kate McAll
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00wbt91)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00wbt94)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00wbt97)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00wbt99)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00wctnf)
The bells of St David's, Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire.


SUN 05:45 The Joy of Ceps (b00wgpyj)
They grow like...mushrooms, so why is there so little known about Britain's fungal world? Expert mycologist Alan Bennell of the Royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh reveals all.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00wbt9d)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00wdcmf)
The Poetry of Healing

Kenneth Steven selects poems by Edwin Muir, Robert Frost, WB Yeats and others to explore the idea of why people are drawn to poetry at moments of crisis.

With readings by Emma Fielding and Jonathan Keeble and musical extracts from Handel's Saul, Mozart's Piano Sonata in D (K.448) and the African-American spiritual 'There is a balm in Gilead'.

Producer: Alan Hall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b00wdcq1)
Winter Ravens

13/18. The raven is both agile and majestic in flight but shrouded in mystery, superstition and folk law. How was it that our biggest member of the crow family, a bird once protected as an important scavenger in ancient times, was then persecuted almost to extinction in the British Isles, with less that 1000 pairs clinging onto a precarious future in few remote hills in upland Britain?

In this week's Living World, Lionel Kelleway travels to a remote part of Shropshire where thankfully the raven is making a remarkable comeback. Here on the Stiperstones National Nature Reserve he meets up with Leo Smith and Tom Wall from the Shropshire Raven Study Group, a group who have been studying these magnificent birds for nearly 20 years, and who have recorded the changes in the fortunes for these huge members of the crow family.

As they walk to an old raven nest in wet woodland, Lionel encounters many ravens on the wing. A raven's nest is easy to spot by its size, similar to that of an eagle, beautifully illustrating how easy it was to persecute these birds in the past.

But the tide has turned and now Shropshire is home to a remarkable wildlife spectacle, a raven roost. Travelling to a private mixed woodland Lionel is chorused by over 60 ravens wheeling and displaying in the gathering dusk. Remarkably, even in early November, the spectacular barrel rolls and shadow flight ravens are noted for when pairing up, is taking place. Nature on the wing at its very best.

Presented by Lionel Kelleway
Produced by Andrew Dawes.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00wbt9h)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00wbt9l)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00wdcq3)
William Crawley with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, familiar and unfamiliar.

Six months ago nine Turkish activists were killed attempting to break the Israeli blockade of Gaza when their ship was boarded in international waters by Israeli commandos. The wave of international condemnation which followed led Israel to announce an easing of the blockade, but this week 22 aid and development agencies issued a report saying this had made little difference on the ground. William speaks to Hanan Elmasu from Christian Aid and Israeli government spokesman Mark Regev who says the reports findings are politically biased.

A new campaign in Australia is hoping to make Euthanasia legal. Phil Mercer reports from Sydney.

It's the story of the Birth of Jesus in 140 characters - we look at the Natwivity and ask if it will catch on. Huw Tyler of Share Creative joins William in the studio.

This week saw the launch of the I'm Not Ashamed campaign which said that Christians were being marginalised in the UK. Some members of the campign even said they were being persecuted. But is this really the case. Bishop Nick Baines gives us his views.

40 years on from the first Disability Act have attitudes changed for the better towards people with disabilities ? Are there still big improvements to be made ? William talks to the Chairman of Leonard Cheshire Disability, Ilyas Khan.

This week sees the launch of the centenary year for East London Mosque. It started of as a prayer room for Muslim citizens of the British Empire who were visiting the capital. Now it has a purpose built centre which does lots of interfaith work. But it's not without controversy and critics say that there are hardline elements within. Trevor Barnes reports.

Calls for Pakistan's blasphemy law to be abolished have been renewed after a Christian woman was sentenced to death following a squabble with villagers. Campaigners say that the law is used to target minority faiths in Pakistan. William speaks to Bishop Michael Nazir-Ali.

E-mail: sunday@bbc.co.uk

Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Christmas Appeal (b00wdcq5)
St Martin-in-the-Fields Christmas Appeal

To give to this years appeal call: 0800 082 82 84. Or donate online via the Radio 4 website. Or send cheques payable to St Martin-in-the-Fields Christmas Appeal, Trafalgar Square, London, WC2N 4JJ

For over 80 years Radio 4 listeners have supported the work of St Martin-in-the-Fields in Trafalgar Square, last year this appeal raised a record £900,000. The money helps homeless people who receive shelter, food, help and advice at the Connection at St Martins and it maintains a special Vicar's Relief fund which makes thousands of one off grants to people in need across the UK. Like the family in Manchester who took their child to their GP and later that day found themselves in a hospital 50 miles away, their child having been diagnosed with leukemia. They couldn't afford money for transport so the social worker at Manchester Children's Hospital applied to the Vicar's Relief Fund for help.

This year you can get a very personal view of life on the streets thanks to a photography project, which has encouraged homeless clients to take pictures of their world. Ben Richardson who runs the group says: "homelessness is a very lonely situation" looking at the photographs he says "I realised that I work with homeless people but I don't live in their world and that's the gift of these photos for me and others." You can see an audio slideshow of the photos on the Radio 4 website.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00wbt9n)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00wbt9q)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00wdctd)
Justice for City People

The Bishop of Sheffield, Dr Steven Croft preaches for the second of our series of services for Advent which visits 4 cities across the nations of the United Kingdom exploring the meaning of the incarnation in daily city life. From St Mary's Church, Bramall Lane, Sheffield. Readings: Isaiah 11:1-10; Matthew 3:1-12. Leader: Canon Julian Sullivan; Music Director: Yo Tozer-Loft. Producer: Simon Vivian.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00w7fd9)
Living Forever

Joan Bakewell reflects on the ageing process and the efforts by scientists to reverse it and she considers the attractions and the drawbacks of adding many more years to the human span.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00wdctg)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 09:45 Radio 4 Christmas Appeal (b00wgst4)
Received with Thanks

To give to this year's appeal call: 0800 082 82 84. Or donate online via the Radio 4 website. Or send cheques payable to St Martin-in-the-Fields Christmas Appeal, Trafalgar Square, London, WC2N 4JJ

"It's very easy to fall into the gutter, very difficult to climb out" Alf Welton has spent many years on the streets, for him St Martin's is a lifeline "without it I'm not sure I would have survived". For over 80 years Radio 4 listeners have supported the work of St Martin-in-the-Fields in Trafalgar Square, last year this appeal raised a record £900,000. The money helps homeless people who receive shelter, food, help and advice at the Connection at St Martins and it maintains a special fund which makes thousands of one off grants to people in need across the UK. One 81 year old listener tells how she first heard the appeal on the radio when she was 16 years old. She gave her pocket money 2/6 and has continued to give ever since: "they spoke about homelessness and it touched a spot".
This year you can get a very personal view of life on the streets thanks to a photography project, which has encouraged homeless clients to take pictures of their world. Ben Richardson who runs the group says: "homelessness is a very lonely situation" looking at the photographs that have come he says "I realised that I work with homeless people but I don't live in their world and that's the gift of these photos for me and others."
One of the photographers is a young man called Jamie Winter. He has alienated himself from the world for several years, often silent, sleeping rough. His revealing photographs combine words and pictures. You can see an audio slideshow of his work on the Radio 4 website..the last photo reads: 'I'm still here'.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00wdctj)
For detailed synopses, see daily episodes

Written by: Caroline Harrington
Directed by: Rosemary Watts
Editor: Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Nigel Pargetter ..... Graham Seed
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Tony Archer ..... Colin Skipp
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Kate Madikane ..... Kellie Bright
Jolene Perks ..... Buffy Davis
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Kathy Perks ..... Hedli Niklaus
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
William Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Phoebe Tucker ..... Lucy Morris
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Lewis Carmichael ..... Robert Lister
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Alan Franks ..... John Telfer
Amy Franks ..... Vinette Robinson
Harry Mason ..... Michael Shelford.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00wdctl)
Frances Wood

Kirsty Young's castaway is the writer and historian Frances Wood.

As head of the Chinese collection at the British Library she is the gatekeeper to some of the rarest printed texts in the world. Her life has been immersed in the language and culture of the Far East and, along the way, she's spent time learning how to throw hand-grenades, plant rice in the paddy-fields and bundle Chinese cabbages.

She was in China in the final months of Mao Zedong's regime and remembers being aware of the sense of national unease: "There were the bodies that floated down the Pearl River to Hong Kong - you did get a real sense of foreboding. You did know that the whole country was on edge."

Producer: Leanne Buckle

Record: Don Carlos
Book: A copy of Chinese dictionary Cihai, (which means Sea of Words) from the 1930s
Luxury: The War Memorial outside Euston Station.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00w78h2)
Series 58

Episode 4

The grandaddy of all panel games with Nicholas Parsons in the chair. This week Paul Merton, Sheila Hancock and Ian MacMillan are panellists. This week the programme is a guest of the British Library as part of its Evolving English Exhibition.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00wdctn)
Street Food and Takeaways

From Caribbean to Thai and Vietnamese - Simon Parkes looks at the latest trends in British street food and takeaway meals. And we hear from some of the finalists in the BBC Radio 4 Food and Farming Awards.

Producer: Elaine Lester.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00wbt9t)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00wdctq)
A look at events around the world.


SUN 13:30 The Long Walk (b00wdcts)
Later this year, the celebrated Australian director Peter Weir will release his latest film. Titled "The Way Back" it is based on a book which has puzzled the world for 50 years. In 1956, a Polish officer called Slavomir Rawicz caused a sensation with "The Long Walk," his account of a his dramatic escape from the Soviet Gulag and a 4000-mile trek on foot to India. The book was a bestseller and has remained in print for over half a century. Rawicz describes how he his fellow escapees slogged across the Siberian tundra, traversed the Gobi Desert and scaled the Himalayas. Along the way they faced hunger, exhaustion, disease and even a couple of yetis. A thrilling story: but was it true? Many have doubted whether this extraordinary tale can really have happened. Four years ago, Tim Whewell investigated for a Radio 4 documentary and discovered evidence that decisively proved whether Rawicz really made his amazing journey. Now there's further evidence which adds another twist to the tale - including a meeting with the man who might really have made this epic trek. This updated version of the programme proves once again that truth is truly stranger than fiction.

Producer: Hugh Levinson.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00w7f89)
Anne Swithinbank's garden, Devon

Bob Flowerdew, Matthew Biggs and Eric Robson pay fellow panellist Anne Swithinbank a visit at her home in Devon. Here they answer some of the questions sent into the programme.

Also, part one in a two-part series on growing houseplants, presented by houseplant expert, Anne Swithinbank.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 In The Footsteps of Giants (b00rzvfp)
Hugh Pennington on Joseph Lister

As part of series of passionate encounters between scientists past and present, bacteriologist Hugh Pennington- an expert on E Coli outbreaks- looks back at his hero and fellow scientist Joseph Lister.

Lister has affected Hugh's life, and not just as he has been awarded the Lister Medal of the Society of Chemical Industry. As a pioneer of sterilisation, Lister banished bugs from the operating theatre. As an expert on E Coli outbreaks, Hugh Pennington has spent decades trying to discover where the bugs got back into food that should have been safe.

Hugh looks back upon the life of Joseph Lister and explores the connections between the great man and himself.

The producer is Lucy Adam.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00wdcy0)
I, Claudius

Tiberius

Dramatisation by Robin Brooks of Robert Graves' classic Roman histories.

Growing up amid the intrigues of the Imperial family, Claudius learns his grandmother Livia's true ambition - and finds himself and his brother Germanicus in danger.

Claudius ..... Tom Goodman-Hill
Augustus ..... Derek Jacobi
Livia ..... Harriet Walter
Tiberius ..... Tim McInnerny
Pollio ..... Trevor Peacock
Germanicus ..... Joseph Kloska
Agrippina ..... Hattie Morahan
Sejanus ..... Sam Dale
Herod Agrippa ..... Zubin Varla
Postumus ..... Henry Devas
Livilla ..... Leah Brotherhead
Cassius Chaerea ..... Jude Akuwudike
Pomponius ..... Sean Baker
Antonia ..... Christine Kavanagh
Castor ..... Iain Batchelor
Piso ..... Tony Bell
Pallas ..... Lloyd Thomas
Young Caligula ..... James Warner

Specially composed music by David Pickvance.
Directed by Jonquil Panting.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b00wdcy2)
Sarah Hall - The Carhullan Army

James Naughtie and readers talk to Sarah Hall about her novel The Carhullan Army, recorded at the Chapter and Verse Literature Festival in Liverpool.

Sarah Hall is being tipped as one of the most interesting up and coming novelists of her generation. By the age of thirty-five she had already been shortlisted for the Man Booker prize.

The chosen book in this month's programme is The Carhullan Army, her tale about a flooded post-apocalyptic Britain, and how a group of women are living on the outside of a harsh new regime.

Sarah Hall is preoccupied by the recent crises of the damaging floods of Cumbrian towns and she'll be talking about how she's used these events in her writing - and how her native landscape inspires her.

January's Bookclub title:
The Mighty Walzer by Howard Jacobson

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Adventures in Poetry (b00wdcy4)
Series 11

Not Waving but Drowning

"Adventures in Poetry" returns to unpack a new series of classic poems whose lines or images have entered our national consciousness.

This week, presenter Peggy Reynolds asks what it is about Stevie Smith's poem "Not Waving but Drowning" which has kept it relevant since 1957. The phrase itself turns up endlessly in newspapers, both red-tops and broadsheets, and is particularly loved by writers on sports pages - not, you might think, the obvious place to look for soul-searching poetry. But underneath the snappy economy of the first line runs a complex and universal emotional truth, examined here by a Samaritan, a sports writer and Stevie Smith's biographer.

Produced by Christine Hall.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00w7bv7)
Europe's Missing Millions

Europe's Missing Millions

Over the last seven years, the European Union has paid out billions of Euros in grants designed to revitalise Europe's poorest regions.

But an investigation for File on 4 has revealed the extent to which these payments are open to widespread fraud, abuse and mismanagement.

Angus Stickler tracks how money has gone astray across the 27 member states and asks why funding continues in regions with proven records of corruption and fraud. Throughout the EU there is evidence that money has been wasted or even stolen. In Southern Italy, money has gone to Mafia-controlled construction companies and bogus energy projects. Across the EU expensive projects lie unused and unfit for purpose, despite receiving funding of millions of Euros.

The EU has created its own anti-fraud agency, OLAF, to stop these abuses, but are critics right when they claim it's underfunded and ineffective?

File on 4/Bureau of Investigative Journalism co-production.

Producer: Gail Champion
Editor: David Ross.


SUN 17:40 Radio 4 Christmas Appeal (b00wgst4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00wbt9w)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00wbt9y)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00wbtb1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00wddhc)
Russell Davies makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

Have we got eccentrics for you - well Russell Davies has, in Pick of the Week, where you'll hear the most powerful rant ever delivered on behalf of mushrooms, a Carouser of the Week where there should have been a Composer, and Kathy Clugston playing ukulele and kazoo in a Register Office. Not to mention David Walliams and Kenneth Williams, a giant synthesizer called Tonto, both Stevie Smith and David Cameron not waving but drowning, and the completely unbearable, utterly unavoidable.weather.

Adventures in Poetry - Radio 4
Today in Parliament - Radio 4
David Walliams on Philip Larkin - Radio 4
Born Brilliant - Radio 4
Brubeck at 90 - Radio 4
Composer of the Week - Radio 3
I, Claudius - Radio 4
Today - Radio 4
Political Patriarchs - Radio 4
Blue Eyed Boy - Radio 4
The Joy of Ceps - Radio 4
BBC Weather reporting
Stevie's Wonder Men - Radio 4
Performance on 3 - Radio 3

PHONE: 0370 010 0400
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Cecile Wright.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00wddmm)
After a few tons of best hay were taken from Brookfield yard in broad daylight, David tells Eddie he's arranging an NFU meeting to warn people. David fears the burglars may strike again.

As cars keep arriving for "Deck The Hall", Nigel and Elizabeth are in a festive mood. The carriage rides are a success, unlike Joe's cart-rides in the village. He and Bartleby only have two takers all day.

Eddie's done sterling work on the car-park and is rewarded with free ice-skating. When Clarrie arrives, Eddie persuades her to join him on the rink. After initial nerves, Clarrie thoroughly enjoys herself and Elizabeth and Nigel grab ten minutes to join them. It's all very romantic.

Back home, Joe laments on his miserable day, while Clarrie enthuses over the fun she had skating. Joe's already busy planning his next money-making venture - selling Kissing Boughs and mistletoe. As they walk down the slippery path, Clarrie takes a tumble. Fortunately, Kathy's there to whisk her to hospital but the diagnosis is grim. Clarrie's broken her wrist and will be in plaster for six weeks. How's she going to manage? There's Christmas shopping, the dinner to cook, the house to clean - and the turkeys to pluck!


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00wddng)
Matt Frei examines the big cities and small towns of the United States. Sir Harold Evans, former editor of the Sunday Times, reflects on the ways that America transforms with time; award-winning actor Robert Duvall explains the understated charms of some of the USA's most enduring locations - its small towns; and Christian Lander, creator of the website, 'Stuff White People Like', talks about his newest book, Whiter Shades of Pale," a tour of America's most liberal, white, cities.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00c83jm)
SOS: Save Our Souls

The Fishwife's Lament

Short stories to mark the 100th anniversary of the international distress call.

An elderly fish-gutter spins an unconvincing yarn in Stuart MacBride's darkly humorous tale of murder, deception and ice cream.

Read by Lisa Gardner.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00w7f74)
The BBC is the subject of its own news bulletins yet again. Roger speaks to the BBC's deputy director of news to find out how BBC radio reacts to stories about the Corporation.

After a tense week in the Dontenville household, Radio 4 nut Heather and her Radio 1 loving stepdaughter Jenni reveal how they got on after a week of listening to each other's stations.

The BBC Trust is looking for new members for its Regional Audience Councils - it could be you!

Email the team: feedback@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00w7f8k)
On Last Word this week:

The Very Reverend Colin Slee, Dean of Southwark and outspoken supporter of women bishops and gay clergy.
We have a tribute from his friend the Archbishop of Canterbury.
Also Leslie Nielson, deadpan comic star of Airplane and The Naked Gun,
Sir Maurice Wilkes, who built one of the world's first working computers,
Peter Christopherson who designed album covers for bands like Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin and was a member of the performance art group Throbbing Gristle
And feminist art critic Rozsika Parker who also trained as a psychotherapist.


SUN 21:02 Money Box (b00wcs46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:27 Radio 4 Christmas Appeal (b00wdcq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00w7dyx)
Operation Robot

The revolution in the operating theatre is only just beginning, but robotic surgery could change the way we think about healthcare ... and the way surgeons work. Peter Day looks at what surgeons are able to achieve with robots now and at the proto-types for healthcare in the future. He asks how significant these advances could be for health in Britain and for British business and hears from the robot pioneers: surgeons, engineers and business people.
Producer : Caroline Bayley.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00wbtb3)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00wddr5)
Liberal Democrat MP Stephen Williams tells Mark D'Arcy how the party will vote in this week's debate on proposed increases in tuition fees at English universities.

Janan Ganesh of the Economist comments on the tuition fees vote and previews the week's other big political stories.

Conservative MP Mark Field and Labour MP Lisa Nandy take part in a live discussion.

Professor Michael Kenny of Sheffield University on the rise of Englishness in the politics of the UK.

Programme Editor: Terry Dignan.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b00wddry)
Episode 30

BBC Radio 4 brings back a much loved TV favourite - What the Papers Say. It does what it says on the tin. In each programme a leading political journalist has a wry look at how the broadsheets and red tops treat the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond. This week Sam Leith takes the chair and the editor is Catherine Donegan.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00w7f9j)
Award winning composer Sir Richard Rodney Bennett discusses his career in films, from Murder On The Orient Express to Far From The Madding Crowd

Francine Stock meets Gareth Edwards, the director of a new science fiction movie called Monsters, who created the special effects on his laptop in his bedroom.

Nikki Bedi meets the member of Chorley Community Cinema who dons fancy dress for each screening, a trend that's catching on around the country

Chilean drama, The Maid, is reviewed and given marks out of a hundred by some members of The Abergavenny Film Society.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00wdcmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 06 DECEMBER 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00wbtb6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00w7c91)
Politically connected firms - Gangs and Territory

Professor Laurie Taylor explores the connections between politics and business with economist Mara Faccio, who talks about her new research into the subject. Laurie also talks to criminologist Judith Aldridge and discusses her research about how territory influences youth gangs. They are joined by Peter Squires from Brighton University.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00wctnf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtb8)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00wbtbc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtbf)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00wbtbj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00wddv1)
With Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, Assistant Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00wdf3y)
Farmers cope with roofs collapsing under the sheer weight of snow. Charlotte Smith hears one dairy farmer's narrow escape after 40cm of snow fell on his barn roof.

Farming Today visits the frozen Moray Firth where shooters are being told to rest their guns to protect birds struggling to stay alive in the cold.

And the worlds hottest chilli has been created, not in India, or South America, but in a greenhouse in Cumbria. Its creator warns that it will be sold with a health disclaimer.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Melvin Rickarby.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00wbtbl)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00wdf40)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Evan Davis, including:
07:49 Lord Ashdown analyses the Lib Dem split on tuition fees
08:10 Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt on super-fast broadband
08:18 Is the English language being mutilated by the recent trend to turn nouns into verbs?


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00wdf42)
Andrew Marr talks to the choreographer Matthew Bourne about his vision for Cinderella, while the dance critic, Jennifer Homans sounds the death knell for ballet in her history of the art form. David Aaronovitch also asks whether Freud has had his heyday, in his examination of the continuing significance of the father of psycho-analysis, while the psychotherapist, Jane Haynes, celebrates the enduring appeal and relevance of Proust.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00wdf44)
Bettany Hughes - The Hemlock Cup: Socrates, Athens and the Search for the Good Life

Episode 1

Written by Bettany Hughes. We think the way we do because Socrates thought the way he did. His aphorism 'The unexamined life is not worth living' may have originated twenty-five centuries ago, but it is a founding principle of modern life.

Socrates lived in a city that nurtured the key ingredients of contemporary civilisation - democracy, liberty, science, drama, rational thought- yet, as he wrote nothing in his lifetime, he himself is an enigmatic figure. "The Hemlock Cup" tells his story, setting him in the context of the Eastern Mediterranean that was his home, and dealing with him as he himself dealt with the world.

Socrates was a soldier, a lover, a man of the people. He philosophised neither in grand educational establishments nor the courts of kings but in the squares and public arenas of Golden Age Athens. He lived through an age of extraordinary materialism, in which a democratic culture turned to the glorification of its own city; when war was declared under the banner of democracy; and, when tolerance turned into intimidation on streets once populated by the likes of Euripides, Sophocles and Pericles.

For seventy years he was a vigorous citizen of one of the greatest capitals on earth, but then his beloved Athens turned on him, condemning him to death by poison. Socrates' pursuit of personal liberty is a vibrant story that Athens did not want us to hear. But Bettany Hughes has painstakingly pieced together Socrates' life, following in his footsteps across Greece and Asia Minor, and examining the new archaeological discoveries that shed light on his world. "The Hemlock Cup" relates a story that is as relevant now as it has ever been.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Reader: Bettany Hughes

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00wdf46)
Presented by Jane Garvey. Burlesque: is it the acceptable face of stripping? An art form? Or simply exploitation? Pegged to a Time Out Magazine debate we talk to Opehlia Bitz and the academic Julia Long. Only 16% of UK businesses are owned by women so are women-only investment networks the answer to releasing funds for female entrepreneurs? Jane talks to Sally Goodsell of Finances SouthEast and Julie Meyer founder of Ariadne Capital and dragon on BBC's Online Dragon's Den. And we have the latest news on Hormone Replacement Therapy and hear about the female boxers training for the 2012 Olympics.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wdf48)
Elizabeth Gaskell - Wives and Daughters

Episode 6

Episode Six

It's the day of the Easter Charity Ball and Cynthia receives a gift from a mysterious admirer. Hyacinth see the dance as an opportunity to introduce her daughter to a number of possible suitors. Elizabeth Gaskell's classic novel of everyday provincial life in the 1820s is dramatised by Theresa Heskins.

Lily Gaskell . . . . . Deborah McAndrew
Molly Gibson . . . . . Emerald O'Hanrahan
Dr Gibson . . . . . Jamie Newall
Roger Hamley . . . . . Gunnar Cauthery
Cynthia . . . . . Maya Barcot
Hyacinth . . . . . Julia Hills
Lady Harriett . . . . . Cathy Sara
Dorothy Browning . . . . . Marian Kemmer
Phoebe Browning . . . . . Susan Jeffrey
Mr Preston . . . . . Timothy Watson

Produced and Directed by Peter Leslie Wild

Notes

Wives and Daughters was written in the 1860s and serialised in the Cornhill Magazine. It is set in the 1820s and deals to a large extent with the position of women in Society. Elizabeth Gaskell left it unfinished, so any dramatiser of the novel is faced with guessing the intended outcome of the story.

Theresa Heskins previously adapted Lady Audley's Secret for the Woman's Hour serial, and has adapted Bleak House and Great Expectations for the New Vic Theatre, North Staffordshire, where she is Artistic Director.


MON 11:00 Heel, Toe, Step Together (b00wdf4b)
Heel, Toe, Step Together tells the story of two people who met at an east London market one day and the unlikely friendship that blossomed through dance.

Bob Hill, 86, has been dancing on and off since he was 16 and won many competitions with his late wife Iris Hill, who he lived with in Hackney. Katie Burningham, 28, is a radio producer and self-confessed bad dancer. Bob and Katie met by chance one day, shortly after Bob's wife Iris had died, and, three years later, Katie is still having dance lessons with Bob.

This programme brings together recordings of their dancing and explores why it is that Bob, and Katie, need to dance. Touching on themes of loss, loneliness, love and affection, Heel, Toe, Step Together reveals how, through music and movement, friendship can bridge generations.

Heel, Toe, Step Together was produced as part of the European Broadcasting Union's Master School on Radio Features, with the creative advice of Edwin Brys.

Producer: Katie Burningham
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b00wdf4d)
Murder in the Title

Episode 3

By Jeremy Front
Based on the novel by Simon Brett

Charles is appearing in 'The Message is Murder', a terrible play; so bad that someone wants to kill off the cast.

Directed by Sally Avens

As ever, Charles is his own worst enemy, a louche lush who can resist anything except temptation especially in the form of women and alcohol. His intentions may be good but somehow the results always go wrong

He's been out of work so long now he feels he may never get a job and he's driving Frances his semi-ex-wife mad. So when he's offered a small role in an awful play up in Rugland she nearly pushes him out the door.

The production is as creaky as anything Charles has ever appeared in but the next play the theatre is scheduled to do is much more controversial. Soon a protest group has formed calling for a 'Porn Free Rugland'. And nasty accidents begin to befall members of the cast and crew.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00wdf4g)
Consumer News with Julian Worricker.

As the Paralympics celebrates its 50th Birthday, we find out why some organisers and athletes say it needs a revamp before the London Games in 2012.

We look at plans for the Food Standards Agency to pass on the full cost of inspections of slaughter houses to the meat industry. What will it mean for both for their business and will it have any impact on the customer ?

And as we mark the International Day of Disabled people Peter White begins a series looking at the little things that can make your day if you have a disability.


MON 12:53 Moments of Genius (b00wlbhy)
Series 2

Venki Ramakrishnan

Nobel laureate Venki Ramakrishnan describes the moment Crick and Watson discovered how the DNA double helix could carry information from one generation to the next.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00wbtbp)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00wdf4j)
National and international news.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00wdf4l)
(7/17) Russell Davies welcomes four contestants to the BBC Radio Theatre in London, for the seventh heat in the current series of the evergreen general knowledge quiz. This week's competitors come from South Wales and the South East of England. As always, there's an opportunity for a listener to outwit them, in 'Beat the Brains'.
Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00wddmm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00wdf9c)
Series 3

Bird in Hand

by Nick Warburton. Warwick is out on the Fen, taking in the atmosphere, when he thinks he spots a rare bird. Keen bird-watcher Megan tells him she'd pay considerable sums to see it. So Warwick offers her bed and breakfast and a guaranteed sighting of the bird.

Warwick Hedges...Trevor Peacock
Jack...Sam Dale
Marcia...Kate Buffery
Samuel...John Rowe
Zofia...Helen Longworth
Megan...Claire Rushbrook

Directed by Claire Grove

Trevor Peacock stars as inspirational chef Warwick Hedges - Mr Toad meets King Lear - who runs an idiosyncratic restaurant in the Cambridgeshire Fens. His son Jack works alongside his father, which makes him permanently anxious, and they are helped by Zofia the Polish waitress and Samuel the odd-job man "who crawled out of the slime with the eels". There are giant helpings of delicious wit, and wisdom from writer Nick Warburton in the third series of this popular comedy drama.

Trevor Peacock is best known as the bumbling Jim Trott in The Vicar of Dibley. At 79 he is still at the top of his game appearing in Much Ado About Nothing at the National Theatre, as Stephen Fry's father in the TV series Kingdom and in two previous series of On Mardle Fen.

Nick Warburton recent radio work includes an adaptation of The Snow Goose and Not Bobby, a comedy about a rabbit that learns to write. His series Witness dramatising St Luke's Gospel went out to great acclaim in Dec 2007 on R4.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00wct8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 More Than A Game (b00pktv2)
The Fight

Professor Anthony King reports on one of the most famous matches in boxing history, the rematch in 1938 at Yankee Stadium in New York, between the Brown Bomber, Joe Louis of the United States and Max Schmeling of Germany. Two years earlier in 1936, in the same stadium , Schmeling , to everyone's astonishment, had knocked out Louis in the 12th round. For Adolf Hitler and his propaganda chief, Josef Goebbels, it was a triumph of white over black. By 1938, the rematch had taken on even greater value, for the Germans, for the Jews, and for black and white Americans. On the night of the fight, millions of people around the world, many with little previous interest in boxing, were glued to their radios. In the U.S. , 64 per cent of all Americans who owned a radio, tuned in. The match lasted less than a round, Schmeling was sensationally knocked out. But after the war, it was Schmeling who prospered. He helped Louis financially and was a pallbearer at the Brown Bomber's funeral.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00wdctn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b00wdfd4)
Series 3

Philosophy

Physicist Brian Cox and comedian Robin Ince are joined by special guests Alexei Sayle and philosopher Julian Baggini to discuss Stephen Hawking's recent comment that "philosophy is dead". Does the progress of science mean the need for disciplines such as philosophy and even religion are negated as we understand more and more about how the world works. Or are there some things, such as human consciousness, that science will never be able to fully explain.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 16:55 Moments of Genius (b00wq9qn)
Series 2

Sir Martin Evans

Nobel laureate Professor Sir Martin Evans describes the moment scientists worked out how the DNA code was read, in a chaotic lab in the attic of the Pasteur Institute in Paris. A moment of genius that launched modern biology.


MON 17:00 PM (b00wdffm)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00wbtbr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00wdffp)
Series 58

Episode 5

Nicholas Parsons chairs the grandaddy of all panel games with Paul Merton, Sue Perkins, Julian Clary and Kevin Eldon as the panellists. The aim of the game is to speak on a subject without hesitation, repetition or deviation. Much, much harder than it sounds...

On today's show Julian Clary talks about Building Bridges, Paul Merton reveals all about his Relationship with the Chairman, Kevin Eldon reels off Seven Ways to Say Goodbye and Sue Perkins dazzles on the subject of Dostoyevsky.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00wdfhr)
Clarrie feels useless with her broken wrist, so Pat drops by to cheer her up. She reassures Clarrie not to worry about the dairy and encourages her to treat the injury as an excuse for a little home holiday. Eddie later finds Clarrie putting out scraps for the birds. She mentions that Nic and the kids dropped by and she really enjoyed the company. Clarrie reminds Eddie they'll need to get some help plucking the turkeys. Eddie says it's all in hand.

Grateful Helen treats hard working Kirsty to dinner, and they both enjoy a sumptuous venison dish. Becoming more relaxed, Helen opens up. She's determined to take care of herself and the baby and not stress about her diet and exercise regime.

Despite Pat's reassurance, she and Tony are feeling the strain of Clarrie's absence at the dairy. They need a replacement - pronto. They discuss last Sunday's lunch with Kathy and Jamie, and Tony can't hide his satisfaction that Kathy won't be over again this evening. He makes sure that next Sunday they'll be alone, however, as that'll be their 36th wedding anniversary. A visiting Helen's very welcome, though, and Pat's delighted when asked to come to antenatal class next week.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00wdfht)
Catherine Tate returns to the National Theatre

Catherine Tate talks about returning to the National Theatre, where she is starring in Alan Ayckbourn's Season's Greetings, playing the mother of a family at a less than happy festive gathering.

Sofia Coppola became the 3rd woman ever to be nominated for the best director Oscar for Lost in Translation in 2003. Her new film, Somewhere, stars Stephen Dorff as a decadent film actor whose lifestyle is disrupted by the arrival of his eleven year old daughter. Matt Thorne reviews.

American satirist, "Weird Al" Yankovic, talks about his parodies of popular music releases and videos. Since his first aired comedy song in 1976, he has sold twelve million albums, more than any comedy act in history.

Nica Burns, president of the Society of West End Theatres, discusses the implications of the VAT rate, rise due in January, for theatre producers and performers.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wdf48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Things We Forgot to Remember (b00wdfhw)
Series 6

The Great Depression in the USA

Michael Portillo revisits landmark moments in history, asking whether our popular memory of the past conceals forgotten truths. In this edition, Michael looks back at the Great Depression and compares the myths and reality of 1930s America.

Producer: Julia Johnson.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00w7cmh)
Georgian fir cones

The Christmas tree industry is worth almost a billion pounds a year in Europe alone. Most of the ones around us now, covered in baubles and tinsel didn't start life in the UK or even Scandinavia, but in one small village, in the mountains of Georgia close to the border with Russia. Angus Crawford travels to the small town of Ambrolauri in the shadow of the Caucasus mountains. There men risk their lives climbing the big firs to harvest the seeds of Abies Nordmanniana, the Nordman pine. More than forty million are sold in Europe every year. The harvesters are paid little and many are given no safety equipment. If they fall they may be injured or killed. The pine cones they gather are sold abroad and it's foreign companies that make profits from growing and selling the crop. Meanwhile Georgia's villages are dying. Families can't make enough money from farming and move away. Most of those who remain have to live on less than three pounds a day. But things are changing. One Danish firm is working with local people to put more of the profits from the business back into their hands. They pay their workers above the market rate, process the seed locally and for every tree sold abroad money is sent back for development projects. There's talk of starting nurseries near Ambrolauri to feed growing markets in Eastern Europe and bring more foreign capital into the country. Money that Georgia desperately needs. Its economy is still only 60% of what it was in Soviet times, and it now imports eighty per cent of its food. The rusting hulks of abandoned factories litter the countryside. But now some Georgians are asking if the pine cone trade can provide a model of how to breathe new life into their country's crumbling economy.


MON 21:00 Material World (b00w7dlf)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. He talks to the scientists who are publishing their research in peer reviewed journals, and he discusses how that research is scrutinised and used by the scientific community, the media and the public. The programme also reflects how science affects our daily lives; from predicting natural disasters to the latest advances in cutting edge science like nanotechnology and stem cell research.
Producer: Roland Pease.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00wdf42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00wbtbv)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00wdfj0)
Iran returns to the nuclear negotiating table - why does it want to talk?

Is it counter-productive for the authorities to chase after Julian Assange?

What hope for climate change talks in Cancun?

With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal (b00wdflk)
A Tricky Case

In her latest novel, The Betrayal, Helen Dunmore returns to the Soviet Union, and to the city of Leningrad whose history she so powerfully evoked in her best-seller The Siege. Now, a decade later, starvation and bitter cold have been replaced with fear and suspicion, as the people of Leningrad do their best to keep their heads down and their lives unremarkable in an era of accusations, arrests and the midnight knock at the door.

Anna and Andrei have survived the siege, married and together have brought up Anna's brother Kolya. They want their lives to be ordinary - but when the son of a senior secret police official is admitted to the hospital where Andrei is a paediatrican, Andrei finds himself outmanoeuvred by the more politically astute and face to face with a man who has the power to destroy him and his family.

Helen Dunmore's evocative portrait of one couple living in the shadow of Stalin conveys both the sense of all pervading menace, from neighbours, from colleagues, from the state, and the struggle to remain humane and true in the face of it. As the net tightens around Andrei and his life becomes the stuff of nightmares, she also tells a compelling and page-turning tale.

Helen Dunmore is a novelist and short story writer whose many works include 'A Spell of Winter', winner of the Orange Prize and 'The Siege' which was shortlisted for the Whitbread Novel of the Year and the Orange Prize and has sold over 100,000 copies.

The Reader is Sara Kestelman, who also read The Siege in 2001 for Book at Bedtime.
The abridger is Sally Marmion and the producer is Di Speirs.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b00w7cww)
My Own Private Utopia

How, and where, and with whom, do you want to lead your life ? Most of us don't ask ourselves this very often, preferring instead to slide along, taking what may be acceptable and conventional as enough. But what if you do pursue an answer, as one of our guests, Tobias Jones, is trying to do, in a ten acre wood?

The full title of Thomas More's work Utopia included the words, "A truly golden little book, no less beneficial than entertaining, of a republic's best state ...." But has Utopia ever been achieved ? Rob Penn and Amanda Mitchison think definitely not. The problem is the presence of other people, and so a private Utopia is the best that can ever be achieved. Rob Penn, presenter of a recent tv documentary about building the perfect bike, outlines very clearly what it means to him.

But Tobias Jones, author of the Dark Heart of Italy and Utopian Dreams, argues very clearly that the woodland life he is now establishing with his family and guests should not be so easily dismissed. As Kurt Vonnegut said, "Human beings will be happier not when they cure cancer or get to Mars ... but when they find ways to inhabit primitive communities again."

Dominic Arkwright presents. The producer is Miles Warde.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00wdflm)
Sean Curran reports on the day's news from Parliament.
Today Home Office Minister face questions about the impact of spending cuts on Policing.

Also on the programme,
The Treasury Committee hears from the head of the newly created Office for Budget Responsibility - the OBR - which provides the government with its economic forecasts.



TUESDAY 07 DECEMBER 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00wbtbx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00wdf44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtc0)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00wbtc2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtc5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00wbtc7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00wdfrr)
With Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, Assistant Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00wdfrt)
A new study claims the annual cost of UK food would increase by 70 billion pounds if no pesticides were used. Anna Hill discusses the report, commissioned by farm chemical manufacturers, with its author Sean Rickard and Phil Stocker from the Soil Association. A Sheffield dairy farmer argues the snow has exposed flaws in the way milk is transported from farm to supermarket. Plus, Mistletoe's uncertain future. And, how bugs are being kept snug in snowy Norfolk.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00wdgcs)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb, including:
07:50 Can a daily aspirin reduce the risk of dying from cancer?
08:10 Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke outlines proposals which would result in fewer people going to prison 08:43 As Cheryl Cole seems set to launch a TV career stateside, how do US audiences cope with British accents?


TUE 09:00 Taking a Stand (b00wdgcv)
Fergal Keane talks to Jean-Robert Cadet. Born in Haiti, Jean-Robert became a domestic slave when his mother died. He was four years old. On the island they are called 'Restavecs', children given board and lodging in exchange for unpaid work around the home. There are estimated to be over a quarter of a million Restavecs in Haiti. And the number has almost certainly swelled with the children left orphaned by the earthquake earlier this year. Jean-Robert Cadet tells Fergal Keane about how his early experience as a slave has affected his life and why he is putting pressure on the Haitian government to make the practice unacceptable.


TUE 09:30 I'm A Celebrity, Get Me Into Here (b00wdgcx)
Episode 3

When Spitting Image came to an end, Roger Law decided it was time for a fresh start. Having made one attempt to emigrate to Australia in the 1960s, thwarted by the cultural attaché who told him that it was 'a one way ticket to hell' , Ten years ago, Roger decided to give it a second shot. He's now living in Bondi Beach concentrating on in-depth surfing, and he's never looked back.

Roger is not the only one and in this series he meets up with other new Australians. This week he continues his down under probe and meets the artists, critics and gallery owners who have found fresh inspiration in a new land.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00wgz8w)
Bettany Hughes - The Hemlock Cup: Socrates, Athens and the Search for the Good Life

Episode 2

Written by Bettany Hughes.

Socrates lived in a city that nurtured the key ingredients of contemporary civilisation - democracy, liberty, science, drama, rational thought- yet, as he wrote nothing in his lifetime, he himself is an enigmatic figure. "The Hemlock Cup" tells his story, setting him in the context of the Eastern Mediterranean that was his home, and dealing with him as he himself dealt with the world.

The young Socrates listens to the great thinkers of Athens and begins to form his own philosophical thoughts on life.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Reader: Bettany Hughes

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00wlddm)
Presented by Jane Garvey. On today's programme, can you keep a secret? Jane discusses the role secrets play in our personal lives. Every year Ryanair produces a raunchy festive calendar. Is it a sexist publicity stunt or a good way to raise money for charity? Michael O' Leary CEO of Ryanair and Mary Honeyball MEP join the debate. A new study has shown that maternal obesity increases the risk of complications during pregnancy, so how can the issues best be addressed. And can there be two high-powered jobs in one family?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh00g)
Elizabeth Gaskell - Wives and Daughters

Episode 7

Epsiode Seven

Roger Hamley makes two important decisions, and Molly is obliged to keep yet more secrets. Meanwhile, Hyacinth incurs the wrath of her husband with a breach of professional etiquette. Elizabeth Gaskell's classic novel of everyday provincial life in the 1820s is dramatised by Theresa Heskins.

Lily Gaskell . . . . . Deborah McAndrew
Molly Gibson . . . . . Emerald O'Hanrahan
Dr Gibson . . . . . Jamie Newall
Roger Hamley . . . . . Gunnar Cauthery
Cynthia . . . . . Maya Barcot
Hyacinth . . . . . Julia Hills
Lady Harriett . . . . . Cathy Sara
Dorothy Browning . . . . . Marian Kemmer
Phoebe Browning . . . . . Susan Jeffrey
Mr Preston . . . . . Timothy Watson

Produced and Directed by Peter Leslie Wild

Notes

Wives and Daughters was written in the 1860s and serialised in the Cornhill Magazine. It is set in the 1820s and deals to a large extent with the position of women in Society. Elizabeth Gaskell left it unfinished, so any dramatiser of the novel is faced with guessing the intended outcome of the story.

Theresa Heskins previously adapted Lady Audley's Secret for the Woman's Hour serial, and has adapted Bleak House and Great Expectations for the New Vic Theatre, North Staffordshire, where she is Artistic Director.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b00wdgmn)
Series 1

Episode 32

32/40. This is a special programme in front of an audience from the 100 Foot Washes in Norfolk. This wonderland of a wetland is refuge to 3000 Bewick's Swans and 700 Whooper Swans during the winter. The Bewicks have migrated from Arctic Russia and the Whoopers from their Arctic breeding grounds in Iceland. The programme is being recorded at the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust's bird Observatory at their Welney Centre. We'll guarantee sound, drama and enlightening conversation from our invited panel and an audience all in the company of these birds that have been said to "carry winter on their wings". Many would say they love swans, but are the wetlands on which they reside in winter or nest in summer revered to the same extent? Do wetlands have a bad image of "swamps and smelly mud" rather than places of beauty? Does it help they are branded places "rich in biodiversity" and perform "essential ecological services" - do we need to like wetlands to appreciate their value to wildlife and us - do they need to be re-branded? All questions for the panel and audience.

Presented by Brett Westwood
Produced by Sheena Duncan
Series Editor Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 3D In Perspective (b00wdgmq)
Bringing together the science of 3D TV with a wide-ranging history of art and entertainment, Andrew Collins examines our centuries-old fascination with representing the world that exists in three visual dimensions. In modern 3D entertainment, today's technologists are fighting the same battles with geometry, depth of field, light and texture as 15th Century painters. Award-winning visual effects supervisor, Paddy Eason discusses the debt that 3D imaging owes to its painterly predecessors.

At The National Gallery, art historian Professor David Ekserdjian explains how, from the changing shape of a canvas to the arrival of oil paint, the architects and artists of the Renaissance, challenged our notions of reality. Andrew enters a world of optical illusion, trawling piles of perspective pictures and stereo photographs at The Bill Douglas Centre for The History of Cinema and Popular Culture. Lecturer in Victorian Studies, John Plunkett explains, the appeal of 18th and 19th century optical or 'philosophical' toys, made possible by good lenses and mirrors. Often dismissed as novelty, they emerged from groundbreaking research on the physiology of vision.

The history of 3D is littered with failed technologies, including 3D films that predate cinema sound. Professor Neil Dodgson from The Computer Laboratory in Cambridge is a 3D expert. He outlines the obstacles, in particular the poorly paid projectionist and ultimately the limitations of human vision. Neuroscientist Dr Sue Barry, understands the visceral appeal of 3D. Aged 50, she experienced her first thrilling sense of 3D immersion after years of being 'stereoblind' and suggests why we are so preoccupied with experiencing virtual 3D space.

Producer: Tamsin Hughes

A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in December 2010.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00wdgms)
The White Paper proposes the creation of a new Public Health Service to spearhead national strategies which will help support people in maintaining their health. This will be mainly at community level through local councils, whilst keeping a firm grip on national public health issues such as flu pandemics.

Central to the proposed changes is the Governments commitment to tackle the causes of premature death and ill health. Under these new plans, local authorities will work on 'health improvement strategies' and be asked to target money where it is most needed in the community. It is also proposed that GP's will be rewarded for taking up public health issues such as obesity and smoking with their patients. In addition to this GP consortia will be represented on health and wellbeing boards created at local authority level.

There will be five Public Health Responsibility Deal networks, involving charities and industry, alcohol, physical activity, health at work and behaviour change.

Will it encourage people to lead healthier lives?

Are we more likely to respond favourably to further rules and regulations - such as the ban on smoking in public places - or would a clear 'nudge' in the right direction actually be more effective? And what's the difference between a 'nudge' and a 'push'?

An opportunity to contribute your views to the programme. Call 03700 100 444 (lines open at 10am on the day) or email youandyours@bbc.co.uk.


TUE 12:53 Moments of Genius (b00wq9r7)
Series 2

Barry Marshall

Nobel Laureate Professor Barry Marshall describes the moment Kary Mullis worked out how to make millions of copies of DNA, a technique that launched bio-technology.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00wbtcb)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00wdgr3)
National and international news.


TUE 13:30 Vital Mental Medicine: Shackleton's Banjo (b00wdgr5)
As his ship was sinking through the Antarctic pack-ice, Ernest Shackleton allowed each member of his expedition to take 2lbs of possessions with them as they abandoned ship. One exception was made; Shackleton saved Leonard Hussey's banjo saying, "We must have that banjo. It's vital mental medicine."

So it proved; when Shackleton set off in a small boat to sail to South Georgia to get help, he left behind on Elephant Island twenty-two men. They lived for months under an upturned boat and some old sails. Every Saturday the banjo-playing meteorologist mounted a concert. He composed songs and whenever they caught a seal to eat brought out his banjo. He played, the men sang - and anger and depression were kept at bay.

Leonard Hussey survived, as did his banjo, now in the National Maritime Museum, its skin marked with a dozen signatures of members of the failed expedition to the South Pole.

Tim van Eyken is best known as a squeeze-box player and singer - he was the Song Man in 'War Horse' at the National Theatre. But he also plays the banjo. Tim explores the character of Hussey and the role he and his banjo played in saving the sanity of the explorers. He plays some of his songs - sadly not on Hussey's banjo, which is too fragile, but on his own, made by Pete Stanley, who sheds some light on the original instrument.

Tim also hears from Pieter van der Merwe of the National Maritime Museum about the importance of music in expeditions and, thanks to some remarkable archive recordings, Hussey himself. He plays the tune Shackleton asked for the night he died. Hussey reveals, too, that his banjo had seen action in warmer climes, "having among other things been played to an audience of cannibals in Africa."

Producer: Julian May.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00wdfhr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00wgqpk)
Eight Feet High and Rising

By Ali Taylor.

Giant. Upstairs. Ten quid a look. A touchingly real and comically disingenuous story about the awkwardness of being misshapen, and the misery of not fitting in.

Liam ..... James Alexandrou
Ethel ..... Candassaie Liburd
Pat ..... Marcella Riordan
Sarah-Jane ..... Julia Deakin
Diane ..... Sophie Pemberton
Sandra ..... Manjeet Mann
Teacher ..... Inam Mirza
Crowd ..... Members of the National Youth Theatre

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

With James Alexandrou. Best known for playing Martin Fowler in EastEnders, James has since appeared in the play The Homecoming opposite Harold Pinter for BBC Radio 3, and worked with the RSC and Globe Theatres.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00wdgsf)
We are all urged to put our empty cans, wrappers and bottles in the recycling box, but is what is the real cost of this process and is it a sensible use of resources? Electric cars are advertised as costing just pence to run, a fraction of the cost of a tank of petrol. But does this reflect the true cost of running these vehicles? Should we be more concerned about the release of vast quantities of methane as the frozen tundra thaws and is a cement that absorbs more carbon dioxide than it takes to produce too good to be true? And do calculations of global warming take into consideration the recent, unusually cold long clear nights

Answering the questions today are Human Geographer Professor Sue Buckingham of Brunel University; Mike Hulme, Professor of Climate Change at the University of East Anglia and Professor Philip Stott an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Contact:

Home Planet
BBC Radio 4
PO Box 3096
Brighton
BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel
Producer: Toby Murcott
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00wdgsh)
Danish Noir

Last Train to Helsingor

In these three specially-commissioned tales by Heidi Amsinck, Denmark is a place of twilight and shadows: a mysterious place where strange and often dark things happen. In 'Last Train to Helsingor' Henrik Borg has done well for himself; he drive a Mercedes to and from work though prefers the train from Copenhagen to Helsingor, because it is predictable.

But things start to go wrong when Borg falls asleep, and wakes up in a mysterious, deserted railway siding.

Heidi Amsinck, a writer and journalist born in Copenhagen, has covered Britain for the Danish press since 1992. Heidi has written numerous short stories including The Chanterelles of Ostvig (2008), Conning Mrs Vinterberg (2007) and Detained (2005), all of which were produced by Sweet Talk for BBC Radio 4.

Written by Heidi Amsinck
Read by Tim McInnerny

Producer: Ros Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 More Than A Game (b00pr52g)
Revolution, the Melbourne Olympics and Water Polo

Professor Anthony King reports on the brutally suppressed revolution against Soviet rule in Hungary; the Melbourne Olympics of 1956 and the most infamous water polo match in history. For a time in '56 it looked as though the popular uprising in Budapest against Soviet rule might succeed, but it wasn't long before the Soviet tanks rolled back in. But at the same time, the Hungarian team had been able to set out for the Olympics in Melbourne. It wasn't until they reached Darwin that they learned that the uprising had been put down. The water polo team were the reigning Olympic champions and determined to defend the title. In the semi-finals, they were drawn against the Soviet Union. The game turned into a bloodbath, it became known as the "blood in the water" match, but the Hungarians won and did eventually retain their Olympic title.


TUE 16:00 Anatomy Of... (b00rxj4x)
Mental Illness

From the makers of the Sony award-winning Anatomy of a Car Crash, the series that dissects those often neglected everyday dramas that change ordinary lives forever.

The story of Angela, who was sectioned under the Mental Health Act. In 2005, Angela was busy and successful, working for an NHS Trust as well as running three parenting groups. As she pushed herself harder and harder, though, her behaviour started to become increasingly bizarre, leading family and colleagues to worry about her mental health. Following a psychotic episode at home, Angela was sectioned and admitted to hospital.

The programme traces Angela's experiences, speaking to her family and friends about the impact of late onset bipolar disorder on their lives. Those who cared for her in hospital recall Angela's slow path to recovery.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00wdgxd)
Series 23

Malcolm McLaren

Matthew Parris presents the life of the great rock and roll swindler, Malcolm McLaren, who died earlier this year.

'I've been called many things,' McLaren wrote as advance publicity for his one man show, 'a charlatan, a con man, or the culprit responsible for turning popular culture into nothing more than a cheap marketing gimmick. This is my chance to prove these accusations are true.'

The man behind the Sex Pistols and Duck Rock is nominated by public relations expert Mark Borkowski, author of The Fame Formula, and a man who knew him well. What intrigues Borkowski is not just the success, but the myths that have evolved around this highly manipulative man. Matthew Parris is more sceptical, as is Chris Salewicz. As a journalist for NME between 1974-1981, Salewicz watched McLaren rewrite the rules of management. He also introduced the Sex Pistols to the man from EMI who then signed them up. An intriguing programme about fame, the media, and why the truth should not be confused with an easily believable myth.

The producer is Miles Warde.

Future subjects in the series include Samuel Beckett, Nye Bevan, and JB Priestley who is nominated by Barry Cryer.


TUE 16:55 Moments of Genius (b00wq9r9)
Series 2

Sir Harry Kroto

Nobel laureate Harry Kroto describes his favourite moment in the history of science: the moment Robert Hooke described how springs behave. A moment that, he believes, launched modern science.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00wdh4k)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00wbtcf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Odd Half Hour (b00wdh4m)
Series 2

Episode 4

A right-wing intervention and must-have board games.

Comedy sketch show looking at modern life's tribulations.

Starring Kevin Bishop, Stephen K Amos, Doon Mackichan, Justin Edwards and Jessica Ransom.

Written by Madeleine Brettingham, Jason Hazeley, Justin Edwards, Joel Morris, Steve Dawson, Andrew Dawson, Timothy Inman, Mike Wozniak, Henry Paker, Jane Lamacraft, James Kettle and Dale Shaw.

Producer: Simon Mayhew-Archer

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2010.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00wdh4p)
At the Lower Loxley ice rink, Jill's concerned about Freddie's continuing extra tuition. Elizabeth explains it's to catch up with Lily and make sure he also gets into the Cathedral School. Jill makes her disapproval clear. If Freddie has to be pushed so hard then their chosen school probably isn't right for him. She suggests both children could both go to Borchester Green if Elizabeth is worried about them being split up. Elizabeth reminds Jill about Freddie and Lily's birthday on Sunday. There'll be a skating party with winter barbecue.

Jazzer catches Harry practicing his lines and gets a mild ticking off over his friend Jackie using Harry's hair drier the last time she stayed over. Fallon calls to remind Harry about tonight's rehearsal. There, they playfully mock each other until Jazzer embarrasses Harry by reminding him about his big upcoming kiss with 'Alice'. Jazzer selflessly volunteers himself for this. Fallon seems disappointed when for a moment it looks like they won't get to practice their scene. They do though, and Fallon encourages an uncharacteristically nervous and fluffy Harry as they go in for the big kiss. Nigel notices how they both commit to it, and afterwards quizzes Harry. Harry plays down their relationship though. He admits he likes Fallon, but they're just good pals.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00wdh4r)
Harry Hill and Launch of the Cultural Olympiad 2012

Mark Lawson reports on the artists taking part in the Cultural Olympiad, as he speaks to director Ruth Mackenzie at the 2012 launch.

BAFTA and Perrier award-winning comic Harry Hill discusses his unique take on the celebrity memoir, his ongoing primetime success with ITV's TV Burp and his new album on which he performs a duet with Bruce Forsyth.

Richard Cork reviews three novels set in the art world: An Object of Beauty by Steve Martin, Gallery Girl by Wendy Holden, and Playing the Game by Barbara Taylor Bradford.

Producer: Claire Bartleet.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh00g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 A Level Playing Field for the Paralympics (b00wdh4t)
The Beijing Paralympics in 2008 brought the full glories of disabled sport to a worldwide audience and set up a host of expectations for 2012 . But behind the scenes of triumph, longstanding controversies were raging which have dogged many Paralympic Games over the decades. In this programme, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Paralympics, Peter White explores the issues behind the Games and asks what changes are being made to improve conditions for athletes in time for London 2012.

One of these controversies centres on the classification of disabled athletes, a system which uses medical evidence, examination and in-competition appraisals to try to ensure parity of ability. However, over the years, the process, which divides the athletes into many, often confusing sub-groups has become fraught with problems and anomalies. In 2008, the British competitor Rebecca Chinn had a silver medal taken away after being judged to have been put in the wrong category.

Another issue which has dogged the Paralympics recently has been whether to include athletes with learning disabilities. Although they had previously taken part in many events, they were ejected from the Paralympics after the Sydney Games in 2000, when fit Spanish athletes pretended to have learning difficulties and won gold. London's bid contained plans to include them again, and in this programme, we follow the new testing methods which have been developed to bring these athletes back in 2012.

The programme also explores the deep-rooted tension within the Paralympics - are they the home of quasi-professionalism with big money tie-ins, or should they retain the school sports day tradition from which they emerged, of gentle encouragement and the odd race rerun when something goes wrong?

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Paralympics, Peter White explores the preparations for the next games and investigates past and potential inconsistencies underlying them. He hears the athletes' stories and draws on archive from the past to contextualise today's debates and look forward to 2012.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00wdh88)
We hear from Sense the deafblind charity about the government's announcement that it's to hold a Public Consultation on Disability Living Allowance reform.
Stoke City Council plans to cut its funding for the RNIBs Talking Book service to save money. What will it mean for the people who use the service and will other Councils cut the service too.
And the new music website which aims to provide a wide range of music in Braille for blind musicians - everything from classical pieces to music from the popular American TV musical drama Glee.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b00wdh8b)
Wiring the Brain

Portraits of the Mind
Portraits of the Mind, is a collection of images visualizing the brain from antiquity through to the present day.

How to map the brain.

The Human Connectome Project is a major new project which will map how different areas of the brain connect to each other and help understand what makes us human.
Others say we would learn more about our minds by looking at the minute detail, at how brain cells communicate with each other within individual circuits. Gero Miesenbork the Wayneflete Professor of Physiology at Oxford University and Tim Behrens from the Human Connectome Project explain what each of these approaches can tell us about human behaviour.

Online Psychological Support for Cancer

There are 7 Maggie's Centres around the country providing a sanctuary for people with cancer, or those caring for someone with cancer. But not everyone can travel to a centre, perhaps because of distance, health reasons or work. For those people there is now a new online service which provides not only support but crucially a clinical psychologist takes part in every session.


TUE 21:30 Taking a Stand (b00wdgcv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00wbtch)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00wdh8d)
Ireland prepares for the toughest budget in its history.

Why are tigers so severely under threat?

Does Oxbridge need to do more to attract black students?

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal (b00wgzr2)
A Diagnosis

In her novel, The Betrayal, Helen Dunmore returns to the Soviet Union, and to the city of Leningrad whose history she so powerfully evoked in her best-seller The Siege. Now, a decade later, starvation and bitter cold have been replaced with fear and suspicion, as the people of Leningrad do their best to keep their heads down and their lives unremarkable in an era of accusations, arrests and the midnight knock at the door.

In today's episode: It is 1952, Leningrad and Andrei and Anna are just trying to live ordinary lives. But when the son of the feared secret police official, Vulkov, is admitted into his hospital, Andrei finds himself, against his better judgement, manoeuvred into seeing him. Now he is faced with a vulnerable patient and a worrying diagnosis.

The Reader is Sara Kestelman, the abridger is Sally Marmion and the producer is Di Speirs.


TUE 23:00 The Phone (b00wdh8g)
The Patient

A series of late night thrillers, each connected by a mysterious mobile phone.

In Simon Passmore's drama, a doctor's night-time calls are sent off course when she starts receiving messages from a former patient.

Cast:

Kate . . . . . Lucy Akhurst
Craig . . . . . Philip Jackson
The Patient . . . . . Sally Orrock
The Man . . . . . Sean Baker
Radio Control . . . . . Claire Harry

Sound Design by Peter Ringrose.
Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00wdh8j)
The Justice Secretary promises to to end the "remorseless rise" in prisoner numbers by tackling the causes of reoffending. Unveiling a green paper on changes to sentencing policy, Ken Clarke says his emphasis will be to make prisons in England and Wales more purposeful and toughen up community sentences.
MPs debate plans to hold a referendum before any future transfer of powers to the European Union. And the bosses of the main energy companies warn MPs that gas and electricity prices could rise by a quarter over the next decade. Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 08 DECEMBER 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00wbtcl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00wgz8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtcn)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00wbtcr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtct)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00wbtcx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00wdh9p)
With Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, Assistant Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00wdhb0)
Anna Hill finds out how people and animals are coping in the freezing British countryside. We hear from a Scottish farmer snow ploughing paths through his fields so his sheep don't suffocate, a Norfolk free range egg producer with six inch thick ice on his lane, and a plumber who's digging his way through snow to remote farms and houses in Scotland. In Devon, a wildlife expert explains how the way farmers look after hedgerows can help our smallest mammals through the winter. Also, why a heavy crop of acorns in the New Forest has had fatal consequences.
Presenter: Anna Hill
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


WED 06:00 Today (b00wdhb6)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb, including:
07:50 How do you stimulate private funding of the arts?
08:10 Alex Salmond on leaked US cables which say Britain feared a harsh response from Libya if the Lockerbie bomber died in jail.
08:40 Historian Simon Schama on how to put history at the centre of English education.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00wdhbq)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Klaus Kruse, Bryn Terfel, Sir Patrick Stewart and Becky Unthank.

Klaus Kruse is a German director, scenographer, performer and poet. His research into audience/performance spatial relationships and the effecting potential of space within a theatrical experience led him to co-found 'Living Structures'. 'Cart Macabre' is their newest work and two years in the making, part theatre, part installation, it is on at The Old Vic Tunnels, described as "a nightmare fairground ride through a dreamlike landscape".

Bryn Terfel is the Welsh bass-baritone who rose to prominence when he won the Lieder Prize in the 1989 Cardiff Singer of the World Competition. Now considered as one of the world's greatest living opera singers, his new album 'Carols and Christmas Songs' is released on Deutsche Grammophon and the new single 'White Christmas' is hotly tipped as the Christmas No. 1.

Sir Patrick Stewart is the acclaimed actor, known for successfully bridging the gap between the theatrical world of the Shakespearean stage and contemporary film and television. He is about to bring 'Macbeth' to BBC 4, recreating the role he originally played when it was staged by the Chichester Festival Theatre, then in the West End and on Broadway, directed by Rupert Goold.

Becky is one of the Unthank Sisters; highly acclaimed Northumbrian folk singers and clog dancers and the lead vocalists in "The Unthanks" band. This year they took a journey around England to experience living folk dance traditions in action. Along the way they discovered the most surprising dances, ceremonies and rituals. 'Still Folk Dancing...After All These Years' is on BBC 4.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00wgzdr)
Bettany Hughes - The Hemlock Cup: Socrates, Athens and the Search for the Good Life

Episode 3

Written by Bettany Hughes.

Socrates lived in a city that nurtured the key ingredients of contemporary civilisation - democracy, liberty, science, drama, rational thought- yet, as he wrote nothing in his lifetime, he himself is an enigmatic figure. "The Hemlock Cup" tells his story, setting him in the context of the Eastern Mediterranean that was his home, and dealing with him as he himself dealt with the world.

War engulfed much of Socrates' life. Now a young man, he must take up his sword and fight for his beloved Athens.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Reader: Bettany Hughes

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00wdhd5)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Will the government's proposal for the reform of university funding in England disproportionately affect women? Wrens on Subs - should women serve on Royal Naval submarines? Chinese Robes exhibition at the V&A Museum. Latest advice on how to bath babies and children with eczema.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh00v)
Elizabeth Gaskell - Wives and Daughters

Episode 8

Episode Eight

With Roger away in Africa, Hyacinth and Cynthia take a trip to London for a few days. Molly relishes the time alone with her father, but the town gossips are whispering about the mysterious Mr Preston and an unidentified young lady. Elizabeth Gaskell's classic novel of everyday provincial life in the 1820s is dramatised by Theresa Heskins.

Lily Gaskell . . . . . Deborah McAndrew
Molly Gibson . . . . . Emerald O'Hanrahan
Dr Gibson . . . . . Jamie Newall
Roger Hamley . . . . . Gunnar Cauthery
Cynthia . . . . . Maya Barcot
Hyacinth . . . . . Julia Hills
Lady Harriett . . . . . Cathy Sara
Dorothy Browning . . . . . Marian Kemmer
Phoebe Browning . . . . . Susan Jeffrey
Mr Preston . . . . . Timothy Watson

Produced and Directed by Peter Leslie Wild

Notes

Wives and Daughters was written in the 1860s and serialised in the Cornhill Magazine. It is set in the 1820s and deals to a large extent with the position of women in Society. Elizabeth Gaskell left it unfinished, so any dramatiser of the novel is faced with guessing the intended outcome of the story.

Theresa Heskins previously adapted Lady Audley's Secret for the Woman's Hour serial, and has adapted Bleak House and Great Expectations for the New Vic Theatre, North Staffordshire, where she is Artistic Director.


WED 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b00wdhd7)
Series 6

The Battle of Trevalga

Alan Dein visits the tiny Cornish village of Trevalga, recently put up for sale by Marlborough College.

The village of Trevalga sits on the north Cornish coast between the tourist magnets of Boscastle and Tintagel. It has no pub, no shops and no second homes. Virtually every villager pays rent, and homes are permanently occupied.

For the last fifty years, the villagers of Trevalga have paid rents to their landlord; a trust set up by the former owner of the village, Gerald Curgenven. In his will, Curgenven stipulated that the village be preserved and maintained by a trust, with any monies from rents left over to go to his former school, Marlborough College in Wiltshire.

Earlier this year, the college took legal advice which convinced them that the trust was invalid, and that they were actually the outright owners of the village and wider estate of Trevalga. They decided to sell and, as properties were measured and glossy brochures produced, Trevalgans reeled as their cosy existence was threatened for the first time in living memory.

The villagers organised, and sought their own legal advice, which flatly contradicted that given to the College. They were told that the trust was indeed valid, and that the village was not Marlborough's to sell.

Until the question of ownership is resolved, the future of this tiny, fragile community remains unclear. Alan meets the tenant farmers, artists, childminders and gravediggers of Trevalga, trying to plan for an uncertain future.

Producer : John Byrne.


WED 11:30 Hazelbeach (b00wdhfb)
Series 3

Episode 4

In which Ronnie decides to become a psychic vet, while Nick explores the joys of the sink plunger.

Part 3 of 4
By Caroline and David Stafford

Ronnie Hazelbeach ..... Jamie Foreman
Nick ..... Paul Bazely
Chloe ..... Claire Harry
Andrea ..... Joanna Monro
Policeman ..... Lloyd Thomas

Directed by Marc Beeby.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00wdhpv)
Poet Benjamin Zephaniah and author of the Maisy Mouse books Lucy Cousins look into the children's book market. We road test some of the latest offerings with some school children. With rising production costs and one book retailing at an eye-watering £24.99, does the market have a future? After falling out of favour in the 1990s, why is children's poetry now regaining popularity? We hear about the growing market in smartphone apps for children. And deaf comedian Steve Day tells us about the little differences that would make his life so much easier.


WED 12:53 Moments of Genius (b00wq9rp)
Series 2

Elizabeth Blackburn

Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn describes the moment Edward Jenner proved the principle of vaccination, saving milions of lives worldwide ever since.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00wbtcz)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00wdhpx)
National and international news.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00wdhpz)
Last week, Andrew Jennings drew praise and criticism for his Panorama report on FIFA. This week, in his first broadcast interview after the programme, he calls UK sports news journalists "the worst in the world" for not trying to beat him to his story. Mihir Bose, former BBC sports editor and Ashling O'Connor of The Times respond to his claim and discuss the challenges of covering sport off the pitch.

On Monday, Jeremy Hunt announced further funding to help bring superfast broadband to every community in the UK. Stephen Carter had the role of encouraging the spread of broadband in the UK when he headed Ofcom and as Labour minister. What does he think of the state of broadband in the UK and the government's ambitions?

And, as ITV marks 50 years of Coronation Street, former producer and ITV executive David Liddiment looks at how the soap has shaped what we watch on TV today.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00wdh4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00wdhq1)
Anita Sullivan - Selfless

Drew is brought into A&E by a car-driver who saw him come off his motorbike. He is concussed and has broken his ankle. But that's not all. Drew can't remember who he is or where he lives. He isn't carrying a phone and all he has in his wallet is a bank-card and a video-shop membership. The hospital will only discharge Andrew if he is watched for the next 24 hours. Owen, the driver, offers to put him up for the night. Owen is the perfect host and the flat is beautiful but it is on the third floor and the injured Andrew starts to feel trapped. The only thing he can remember is a phone number and a name - Elspeth.

Anita Sullivan's play is a psychological thriller locked in a claustrophobic space.

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00wdhq3)
On Money Box Live with Vincent Duggleby - an expert panel will take your questions on banking.

Get advice on issues like overdraft charges, choosing an ISA, or looking at the safety of your savings in the current economic climate. You may want to know more about the increased compensation limit for deposits which comes into force from 31 December.

Or perhaps you're wondering about online or telephone banking, or need some advice about handling a dispute?

Whatever your banking question, phone lines open at 1.30 this afternoon and the number to call is 03700 100 444. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher. The programme starts after the three o'clock news. That number again 03700 100 444.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00wk7vq)
Danish Noir

The Light from Dead Stars

In these three specially-commissioned tales by Heidi Amsinck, Denmark is a place of twilight and shadows: a mysterious place where strange and often dark things happen. In 'Last Train to Helsingor' Henrik Borg has done well for himself; he drive a Mercedes to and from work though prefers the train from Copenhagen to Helsingor, because it is predictable.

But things start to go wrong when Borg falls asleep, and wakes up in a mysterious, deserted railway siding.

Heidi Amsinck, a writer and journalist born in Copenhagen, has covered Britain for the Danish press since 1992. Heidi has written numerous short stories including The Chanterelles of Ostvig (2008), Conning Mrs Vinterberg (2007) and Detained (2005), all of which were produced by Sweet Talk for BBC Radio 4.

Written by Heidi Amsinck
Read by Tim McInnerny

Producer: Ros Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 More Than A Game (b00pxr8k)
The Football War

Professor Anthony King tells the story of politically-significant sporting events.

In 1969, Honduras and El Salvador played each other in a series of qualifying matches for the 1970 World Cup in Mexico. Both were absolutely determined to win, so much so that shortly after the final whistle of the final match, they went to war. It only lasted four days but thousands were killed and thousands more displaced. Was it really all about football?


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00wdjd2)
Cuban Cure - Moral Panics

With the huge investment needed and patents which have the potential to generate a lot of money, biochemistry is perhaps the most capitalistic strain of science. How did Cuba - a socialist, embargoed, isolated, developing world country - manage to become one of the world's leaders in genetic modification and bioscience? Laurie talks to Simon Reid Henry, Lecturer in Geography at Queen Mary London about his new book The Cuban Cure; Reason and Resistance in Global Science.
Also on the programme - 'moral panics'. The phrase was first defined by Stan Cohen in an analysis of the reaction to Mods and Rockers fighting on Britain's beaches. Since then it has been used many times by social scientists to describe media reaction to everything from dangerous dogs to binge drinking, but how useful is the term? Does it falsely imply that there is no underlying reason for social concern? Laurie discusses the uses and abuses of the notion of moral panic with Chas Critcher, Emeritus Professor of Communications at Sheffield Hallam University and Jewel Thomas, Post Graduate Researcher, Oxford University.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 All in the Mind (b00wdh8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:55 Moments of Genius (b00wlbhy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:53 on Monday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00wdjd4)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00wbtd2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack (b00wdjff)
Series 1

Episode 3

Peter Andre is revealed as the most dangerous man on Earth.

Multi-paced, one woman Fast Show showcasing the exceptional talent of Lucy Montgomery.

With Philip Pope, Sally Grace, Waen Shepherd and Natalie Walter.

Written by Lucy Montgomery with additional material by Steven Burge, Jon Hunter and Joe Wilkinson.

Music by Philip Pope

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2010.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00wdjfh)
Clarrie's facing six more weeks in plaster. Eddie's here to help, but she complains he's out working all the time. Clarrie reminds Eddie to be back home in time to make the Christmas lights tonight. Joe's forced to cook his own tea. He fancies a pie, so Clarrie shows him how to make it himself, much to Eddie's amusement.

At the German market, Phoebe's excited about her Christmas wish list. However, she's sad that Kate won't be with her on Christmas Day. Phoebe tells Nic about Kate going back to Johannesburg next week, for a month. They're having a special early Christmas on Friday. Kate feels guilty when Nic gets her talking about the holidays.

Eddie asks reluctant Will to take on all of the turkey plucking, to help Clarrie. Will stipulates it'll have to be on a day they're not shooting. Eddie also convinces Ed to do the killing. At the Green, Clarrie tells Will how pleased she is to have both her boys there to help for Christmas. Thrown, Will back tracks, but Eddie, Nic and Clarrie persuade him to see sense. Nic even volunteers herself to help with the turkeys.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00wdjfk)
Derek Jacobi's Lear; Lenny Henry on tour.

After saying for many years he felt too young, Derek Jacobi has now taken on the role of King Lear at the tiny venue of the Donmar Theatre. Andrew Dickson reviews.

Comedian and actor Lenny Henry discusses returning to comedy from Shakespeare for his new stand-up tour, being single, and how Paul Daniels introduced him to the unforgiving comedy of Richard Pryor.

As the bookies prepare the odds on the likely Christmas number one, Front Row's Juke Box Jury, David Hepworth and Rosie Swash, listen to a sackful of this year's festive releases, and deliver their verdict: hit or miss.

Producer: Philippa Ritchie.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh00v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00wdjgj)
The government has announced that it's going ahead with legislation that will allow employers to select workers on the basis of their sex, race or disability. It's argued the new law is needed because despite years of anti-discrimination laws there are still invisible barriers in the workplace for some groups in society. The government call it "positive action" - if two people going for the same job are equally qualified it will enable firms to chose women, ethnic minorities or disabled if they feel those groups are under represented in their business. Although, if you're the person who doesn't get the job it may feel more like positive discrimination.

How far should we go in tackling inequalities in the work place? Combating prejudice is the key to an equitable society, so isn't it time we took it seriously, from the boardroom to the building site? If the law hasn't worked up to now, why not quotas? But are we in danger of sacrificing one set of prejudices for another? What becomes of the principle of meritocracy, where you get on on the basis of your skills and not on your sex or race? Does this legislation encourage identity politics and blur the line between equality of opportunity and equality of outcome? Are we really all born equal? Or is inequality a vital part of the human condition that encourages competition and motivates people to strive to better themselves? Or is this the thinly veiled prejudice of vested interests that is always trotted out to defend the indefensible?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Claire Fox, Melanie Philips and Matthew Taylor.


WED 20:45 Blond on Britain (b00wgqjb)
The Monarchy

Some of the ancient institutions of Britain - the monarchy, the House of Lords and the Church of England are often derided as archaic, outmoded and out of touch with the contemporary world. The leading political thinker Phillip Blond makes a powerful case for their continuing significance. In this authored piece he defends the monarchy.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b00wdjgl)
Epigenetics

Adam Rutherford asks how much of our lives' experiences, such as diet and pollution, is passed onto our children, as well as our genes. These changes are called epigenetic.

Throughout our lives our genes become changed by the environment - by things such as our diet, radiation, pollution and smoking. These events have consequences for our health. The view from classical genetics was that we don't pass on any of these defects onto our children. When we reproduce, the genes in our eggs and sperm are wiped clean.

In the 1980s there was the realisation that a child's genes are not always stripped of the experiences of its parents. In other words, what parents do in their lives can be passed onto their offspring. In the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the amount of research into what's called epigenetic inheritance. This year scientists have announced that work in rodents has shown that poor diet and parental neglect can be seen in the genes of their offspring. Another piece of research in rats, published in Nature, demonstrated that if fathers had a high fat diet, their daughters can develop a form of diabetes, even though they themselves weren't overweight or eating a high fat diet. This means that the fathers' sperm had been irrevocably altered by what they had been eating.

And there are some studies in humans that suggest that epigenetic effects are at work. These are retrospective studies, as it is impossible to control the lives of people in same way as researchers can with laboratory rodents.

Researchers have been following the outcome of the women who were pregnant during the prolonged famine in Holland at the end of the Second World War. Girls born to these women have been found to have twice the usual risk of developing schizophrenia. The lack of food produced changes in the mothers' DNA which could have caused changes in the brain of the daughters.

Producer: Deborah Cohen.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00wdhbq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00wbtd5)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00wdjjv)
What the Higher Education funding plans will mean for the New Universities and their students.

The Private sector boldly goes into space with the Falcon 9

Credit card companies are under cyber attack from Wikileaks supporters

with Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal (b00wgzrr)
The Best Chance of Survival

As the doctor in charge of Gorya's case, it falls to Andrei to tell his father, Vulkov, what the boy's best, indeed only, chance of survival is. The stakes are raised even higher as the two men meet.

Helen Dunmore's sequel to 'The Siege' read by Sara Kestelman.

Set ten years on, the starvation and bitter cold of the war years of Leningrad have been replaced with fear and suspicion. City residents do their best to keep their heads down and their lives unremarkable in an era of accusations, arrests and the midnight knock at the door.

Helen Dunmore (1952-2017) was the writer of 12 novels and 10 poetry collections winning several accolades for her work.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Producer: Di Speirs

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


WED 23:00 Bespoken Word (b00wdjjx)
Bespoken Word, Radio 4's performance poetry series, this week comes from the Cheltenham Literature Festival, and features a special guest appearance by Fran Landesman, funky octogenarian, poet and lyric writer for some of the greats of popular music.

Fran Landesman was born in 1927 in New York City. She was married to the late Jay Landesman, publisher of the Beat Generation poets. They ran the "Crystal Palace" club, a very successful St Louis performance venue.

During this time she started writing lyrics. One of her best known was "Spring Can Really Hang You up the Most". and during her career artists for whom she wrote lyrics include Alec Wilder, Steve Allen, Tommy Wolf, George Shearing, Richard Rodney Bennett, and Dudley Moore. She has published several volumes of poetry. In 1996 the BBC received a number of complaints when Landesman appeared on Desert Island Discs and requested a supply of marijuana as her luxury item.

Also on the bill is performance poet - David J.

Producer: Graham Frost
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00wdjjz)
Sean Curran and the BBC's team of parliamentary journalists bring you all the news from Westminster. There were angry exchanges during PMQs over university tuition fees.



THURSDAY 09 DECEMBER 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00wbtd7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00wgzdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtd9)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00wbtdd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtdg)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00wbtdj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00wdjl6)
With Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, Assistant Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00wdjl8)
Animal welfare groups say they're apalled that meat and milk from the offspring of cloned animals can be sold in shops without being labelled as such. The Food Standards Agency board says there are no health risk to humans but animal welfare groups say consumers will be unknowingly supporting cloning which they say is cruel and causes suffering to animals.

The RSPCA tell Anna about their planned emergency rescue of 4000 sheep standed on the moorlands of Northumberland - made inaccessible in waist-deep snow - without access to food.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


THU 06:00 Today (b00wdjlb)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and Justin Webb, including:
08:10 Which Lib Dems will rebel over tuition fees?
08:15 Online activist group Anonymous on the Wikileaks cyber revenge attack on Mastercard and Visa.
08:30 Evan Davis goes up the Shard, the UK's tallest skyscraper.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00wdjr8)
Thomas Edison

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the innovations and influence of Thomas Edison, one of the architects of the modern age.Edison is popularly remembered as the man who made cheap electric light possible. Born in 1847, he began his career working in the new industry of telegraphy, and while still in his early twenties made major improvements to the technology of the telegraph. Not long afterwards he invented a new type of microphone which was used in telephones for almost a century. In the space of three productive years, Edison developed the phonograph and the first commercially viable light bulb and power distribution system. Many more inventions were to follow: he also played a part in the birth of cinema in the 1890s. When he died in 1931 he had patented no fewer than 1093 devices - the most prolific inventor in history. As the creator of the world's first industrial research laboratory he forever changed the way in which innovation took place.With:Simon SchafferProfessor of the History of Science, University of CambridgeKathleen BurkProfessor of History, University College LondonIwan MorusReader in History, University of AberystwythProducer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00wgzmb)
Bettany Hughes - The Hemlock Cup: Socrates, Athens and the Search for the Good Life

Episode 4

Written by Bettany Hughes.

Socrates lived in a city that nurtured the key ingredients of contemporary civilisation - democracy, liberty, science, drama, rational thought- yet, as he wrote nothing in his lifetime, he himself is an enigmatic figure. "The Hemlock Cup" tells his story, setting him in the context of the Eastern Mediterranean that was his home, and dealing with him as he himself dealt with the world.

Socrates debates with the young men of Athens, suggesting that their future may lie in a simpler life of good.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Reader: Bettany Hughes

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00wdjrb)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Lung cancer is a disease that's traditionally associated with male smokers, so why are rates rising among women while decreasing in men? The life of pioneering anti-apartheid activist Ruth First through the eyes of her daughter Gillian Slovo on the eve of the re-publication of her mother's account of that time. From mistresses to divers and 'dippers', we take a tour of Brighton and visit the haunts of some of its most notable women in the seaside town's Regency period. According to the latest figures, the pay gap between men and women has shrunk to its smallest in 13 years. A cause for celebration? Not so, says Fawcett which is calling for urgent action to speed up progress.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh01l)
Elizabeth Gaskell - Wives and Daughters

Episode 9

Molly discovers some shocking news when she finds Cynthia talking to someone in the woods. Burdened with yet another secret, she undertakes to help her step-sister with her problem, but she may have bitten off more than she can chew. Elizabeth Gaskell's classic novel of everyday provincial life in the 1820s is dramatised by Theresa Heskins.

Lily Gaskell . . . . . Deborah McAndrew
Molly Gibson . . . . . Emerald O'Hanrahan
Dr Gibson . . . . . Jamie Newall
Roger Hamley . . . . . Gunnar Cauthery
Cynthia . . . . . Maya Barcot
Hyacinth . . . . . Julia Hills
Lady Harriett . . . . . Cathy Sara
Dorothy Browning . . . . . Marian Kemmer
Phoebe Browning . . . . . Susan Jeffrey
Mr Preston . . . . . Timothy Watson

Produced and Directed by Peter Leslie Wild

Notes

Wives and Daughters was written in the 1860s and serialised in the Cornhill Magazine. It is set in the 1820s and deals to a large extent with the position of women in Society. Elizabeth Gaskell left it unfinished, so any dramatiser of the novel is faced with guessing the intended outcome of the story.

Theresa Heskins previously adapted Lady Audley's Secret for the Woman's Hour serial, and has adapted Bleak House and Great Expectations for the New Vic Theatre, North Staffordshire, where she is Artistic Director.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b00wdjrd)
Nichi Vendola

Rosie Goldsmith profiles Nichi Vendola, the governor of Puglia and the hope for the Italian left. Can this gay, Catholic poet and environmentalist challenge Silvio Berlusconi?
Producer: Helen Grady.


THU 11:30 The Eskimos and the Mushroom Cloud (b00wdjrg)
Lesley Riddoch tells the story of the clash between Unilateralists and the US Navy at the Holy Loch and the music it produced.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00wdjrj)
A former executive of Ikea reveals his truth about the flat-pack giant.

Why the meat industry says proposed changes to inspections at UK abattoirs could cost it dear.

Award winning garden designer Chris Beardshaw on how the shorter days mean more time in the garden.

And as part of our continuing series, wheelchair basketball player and medal-winning Paralympian Ade Adepitan tells us what makes his day.


THU 12:53 Moments of Genius (b00wq9qn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:55 on Monday]


THU 12:57 Weather (b00wbtdl)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00wdjrl)
National and international news.


THU 13:30 Liu Xiaobo: 'I Have No Enemies' (b00x8hpg)
As Oslo prepares to host the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony tomorrow night, this year's winner, the Chinese author and human rights activist Liu Xiaobo will not be collecting his award. His absence at the ceremony will be marked by an empty chair. A powerful image which, says the Nobel Committee, makes this year's Peace Prize even more significant.

Liu Xiaobo is an academic who has spent the last twenty-five years writing about Chinese society and calling for non-violent change in China. Despite having written 11 books and over 900 articles, and been imprisoned four times, he was not widely known - until October 8th 2010 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Featuring exclusive interviews with Liu Xiaobo's friends, colleagues and fellow campaigners, this documentary presented by Carrie Gracie the BBC's former Beijing correspondent, offers a unique insight into the man the Norwegian Nobel Committee call, "a symbol for all human rights activists in China". She follows his journey from pugnacious teenager to rational intellectual, and reveals why the Chinese government consider him such a threat that they have banned his writing and sentenced him to eleven years in prison.

Since the Peace Prize announcement, many of those closest to Liu Xiaobo have been placed under house arrest or put under surveillance by the Chinese authorities. Despite the restrictions the programme includes revelatory interviews with Zhou Duo, Liu's friend with whom he went on hunger strike at Tiananmen Square during the 1989 protests, Mo Shaoping, his lawyer, and Professor Xu Youyu, a signatory of Charter 08, the manifesto that landed Liu Xiaobo in jail. There is also a rare interview with poet, Liao Yiwu, who helps get under the skin of this year's Peace Prize Laureate, explaining the thinking and the motivation of the man behind the award. As well as exploring Liu Xiaobo's personal journey, Lu Xiaobo: "I Have No Enemies" looks at the wider picture for dissidents inside China, hearing from others who have suffered censorship and abuse because they are not free to express their views on the Chinese government.

Producers : Melissa Fitzgerald and Claudine Parrish
A Blakeway Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00wdjfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00ft64r)
The People's Princess

By Shelagh Stephenson.

Facing financial ruin, George, Prince of Wales was obliged to marry his first cousin Princess Caroline of Brunswick. But if he had been expecting a docile partner with whom he could maintain appearances, George had seriously underestimated his wife-to-be.

George IV ...... Alex Jennings
Caroline of Brunswick ...... Rebecca Saire
Henry Brougham ...... Julian Rhind Tutt
Lord Sidmouth ...... Chris McHallem
Lord Liverpool ...... Richard Howard
Sir Robert Gifford ...... Mark Lambert
Lady Jersey ...... Jill Cardo
Mr Majoucci ...... Nial Cusack

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00wcmtc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Christmas Appeal (b00wdcq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00wk7vx)
Danish Noir

The Wailing Girl

In these three specially-commissioned tales by Heidi Amsinck, Denmark is a place of twilight and shadows: a mysterious place where strange and often dark things happen. In 'Last Train to Helsingor' Henrik Borg has done well for himself; he drive a Mercedes to and from work though prefers the train from Copenhagen to Helsingor, because it is predictable.

But things start to go wrong when Borg falls asleep, and wakes up in a mysterious, deserted railway siding.

Heidi Amsinck, a writer and journalist born in Copenhagen, has covered Britain for the Danish press since 1992. Heidi has written numerous short stories including The Chanterelles of Ostvig (2008), Conning Mrs Vinterberg (2007) and Detained (2005), all of which were produced by Sweet Talk for BBC Radio 4.

Written by Heidi Amsinck
Read by Tim McInnerny

Producer: Ros Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 Radio 4 Christmas Appeal (b00wgst4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 Bookclub (b00wdcy2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00wdjvf)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. In the programme this week he discusses the new government proposals to include fewer science voices on the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs. Getting into space is still proving harder than it looks, Quentin looks back on recent mishaps in man's attempts to conquer space. Also in the programme, will we soon be sequencing our own genomes in our own homes?

Producer: Roland Pease.


THU 16:55 Moments of Genius (b00wq9r7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:53 on Tuesday]


THU 17:00 PM (b00wdjvh)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news. Including at 5.57pm Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00wbtdp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Bleak Expectations (b00wdjvk)
Series 4

A Now Tricky Life Woefully Miseried Up

Pip and Harry have escaped the exploding desert island, but Harry has been transformed into a dinosaur.

Now they must catch Mister Benevolent and prevent him taking over the world, but the trail has lead them to France. Here they must face unimaginable horrors including a bacon free breakfast and a deadly confrontation in a cheese mine.

But there is a glimmer of hope in the form of The Scarlet Pimple.

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ..... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ..... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ..... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ..... James Bachman
Grimpunch ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ..... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ..... Susy Kane
Reverend Godly Fecund ..... David Mitchell
Frenchman ..... Mark Evans

Producer Gareth Edwards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2010.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00wdjvm)
Ed's not in the mood to talk turkeys with Jazzer, so Jazzer teases 'Hot Lips' Harry the panto idol instead. Jazzer invites Ed round to the flat for a few beers, but he's after a favour in return. Ed helps Jazzer lug a second hand fridge into the living room. Jazzer needs more beer storage, and decides to test it out on a few more mates, much to Harry's chagrin.

During another driving lesson, Pip and David discuss University options. Pip feels Ruth doesn't want her to go to Felpersham, but David says they're both behind her. Pip's also now ready to book her driving test.

Ed presents Ruth with a small bag of hay, which Eddie nabbed from a dealer he didn't trust. Could it be from their stolen bales? Pip takes an interest and eventually discovers it contains twelve species, which all match the ones in their own wet grassland. David calls the dealer, posing as a prospective buyer. After a grilling, the dealer becomes defensive, then aggressive and finally hangs up. David's got his man, but they realise there's nothing they can do about it. Still, David speculates, he won't be troubling anyone else locally.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00wdjvw)
New Christmas Shows and Olympic Poetry

With Kirsty Lang. William Sieghart, the founder of National Poetry Day, explains his new project Winning Words, which will see lines of poetry inscribed on walls within the 2012 Olympic park.

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Enuf is a series of 20 poems by Ntozake Shange, which was initially staged as a play in America in 1975. It's now been turned into a film starring Whoopi Goldberg, Janet Jackson, and Thandie Newton.
Writer Bernadine Evaristo reviews.

Amidst numerous Pantomimes and festive favourites, there are two new shows for Christmas in Bristol and Liverpool. The children's classic Swallows and Amazons has been adapted for television, cinema and radio and has now been turned into a stage musical. So does Arthur Ransome's tale of a summer of sailing and camping sink or float in its latest incarnation? The novelist Helen Dunmore gives us her view from the crows nest at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre. In Liverpool, a new play from the award-winning comic theatre company Peepolykus, No Wise Men, is story that sets out to capture the essence of Christmas in the 21st century. Christmas cracker or plum duff? The writer Nicholas Royle gives us his verdict.

British film producer Jeremy Thomas, whose films include The Last Emperor, Sexy Beast and Crash, has just been given an Academy Tribute in celebration of his 3-decade career. He discusses achieving the tricky balance between artistic integrity and commercial success and what it was like working with great directors including Bernardo Bertulucci, Nicolas Roeg and David Cronenberg.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh01l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00wdjyd)
Phil Woolas Loses his Seat

In the first ruling of its kind for 99 years, the former Immigration Minister and Labour MP, Phil Woolas was last month stripped of his Oldham East and Saddleworth seat. He was found guilty by a special election court of having knowingly lied about his Liberal Democrat opponent, Elwyn Watkins. Mr Woolas has also been accused of exploiting racial tensions in an area which saw riots in the run up to the General Election in 2001. The Report investigates what really went on during the campaign and looks at the role of the politics of race in this most tightly fought of contests.

And reporter Simon Cox asks how unique the circumstances of the Oldham East election were. Phil Woolas was found guilty of making claims about his opponent's personal character or conduct that he knew to be untrue. But candidates can use many other tricks to deceive voters that are within the rules. The Report asks whether the law that was used to strip the former Oldham East MP of his seat has kept up with the reality of modern electioneering.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00wdjyg)
Bitter Pills

Britain's pharmaceutical companies have invested hundreds of millions of pounds in a search for new drugs and treatments which has not delivered the breakthroughs that were promised when the money was spent. It is a problem for the whole global industry, too. Peter Day talks to GlaxoSmithKline CEO Andrew Witty about the ways he is changing the company's quest for drug discovery and discusses the way ahead for big pharma.
Producer : Sandra Kanthal.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b00wdgmn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00wdjr8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00wbtds)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00wdjz7)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis.

Parliament votes on university tuition fees - we look at the political fall out.

New recordings of the Nixon presidency are released.

And we look ahead to the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony tomorrow.

The World Tonight with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal (b00wgztk)
You Can Be a Doctor Anywhere

Although Volkov's son has been discharged from hospital, Anna and Andrei know they've done the unthinkable and come to the notice of someone powerful enough to destroy their lives.

They must leave nothing to chance, but how far can they escape?

Helen Dunmore's sequel to 'The Siege' read by Sara Kestelman.

Set ten years on, the starvation and bitter cold of the war years of Leningrad have been replaced with fear and suspicion. City residents do their best to keep their heads down and their lives unremarkable in an era of accusations, arrests and the midnight knock at the door.

Helen Dunmore (1952-2017) was the writer of 12 novels and 10 poetry collections winning several accolades for her work.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Producer: Di Speirs

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


THU 23:00 Elvenquest (b00wdjz9)
Series 2

Episode 4

The search for the Sword of Asnagar is put on hold when Vidar is summoned home by his father.

Meanwhile Lord Darkness also returns home from his Necromancer's convention, proud holder of the 'Medal of Chang', the prize for being 'Necromancer's Necromancer'. However, it turns out that Lord Darkness may not have won it entirely fairly, so he sets about trying to cover his tracks.

The fates of Lord Darkness and the Questers are drawn together when they both end up having to cross the Gorge of Doom. But first they must pass the mysterious Bridge Keeper who controls the only passage across. And he charges a heavy price...

Fantasy-based sitcom set in Lower Earth written by Anil Gupta and Richard Pinto.

Sam …. Stephen Mangan
Lord Darkness …. Alistair McGowan
The Bridge Keeper …. Gus Brown
Dean/Kreech …. Kevin Eldon
Vidar …. Darren Boyd
Amis – The Chosen One …. Dave Lamb
Penthiselea …. Sophie Winkleman

Producer: Sam Michell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2010.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00wdjzp)
Alicia McCarthy and the BBC's parliamentary team bring all the news from Westminster.



FRIDAY 10 DECEMBER 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00wbtdv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00wgzmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtdy)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00wbtf0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00wbtf2)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00wbtf4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00wdk0n)
With Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, Assistant Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00wdk0q)
Caz Graham hears it could be the end of the road for misleading food labels. At the moment, Danish bacon and Thai chicken is sometimes labelled as British if it is processed in the UK. But EU Ministers have voted to ensure pork, sheep, goat and poultry must carry country of origin labels. Which, the consumer magazine, say the vote is a victory for British farmers.

Cloned meat will soon be on our tables, according to Professor Keith Campbell, who cloned Dolly the Sheep. He tells Farming Today the meat is safe to eat, and that advances in cloning science mean animal welfare concerns are no greater than for other modern methods of reproduction.

Farming Today hears the tough economic climate has led to a marked increase in both rustling and poaching. Wildlife Crime Officers right across the country say deer poaching is now becoming big business, and a visit to Cumbria reveals hundreds of ewes and lambs have been stolen in several separate incidents.

And as the ice and snow begins to thaw in some parts of the UK, concerns have been raised that salt found in water after the thaw could be dangerous for wildlife. A roadside walk with David Harpley from Cumbria Wildlife Trust reveals verges are now providing habitats for species which normally live in salt marshes.

Presented by Caz Graham, produced by Melvin Rickarby.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00wdk0s)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Justin Webb, including:
08:10 Boris Johnson on the student riots in Central London.
08:15 Vince Cable on tuition fee policy, politics and protests.
08:25 Can poetry inspire British Olympians?


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00wdctl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00wgznx)
Bettany Hughes - The Hemlock Cup: Socrates, Athens and the Search for the Good Life

Episode 5

Written by Bettany Hughes.

Socrates lived in a city that nurtured the key ingredients of contemporary civilisation - democracy, liberty, science, drama, rational thought- yet, as he wrote nothing in his lifetime, he himself is an enigmatic figure. "The Hemlock Cup" tells his story, setting him in the context of the Eastern Mediterranean that was his home, and dealing with him as he himself dealt with the world.

The Spartans break down Athenian walls and Socrates is barred from associating with the city's youth. His card is marked.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Reader: Bettany Hughes

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00wdk2v)
Presented by Jenni Murray.

Fresh from the Jungle, Gillian McKeith will talk to Jenni about her experience!

Why are so many straight women gay icons? Martin Shingler of the University of Sunderland and Freya Jarman Ivens from the University of Liverpool share their insights.

Last week, Ségolène Royal, the French Socialist Party's candidate in the 2007 Presidential election, announced her intention to stand again to be the Party's presidential candidate in 2012, and in so doing is said to have broken the Party's unity pact. But why has she chosen to declare her intention to stand now? And how ready is France for a woman in the Elysée Palace? Jenni is joined by with Bénédicte Paviot, UK correspondent of France 24, and academic Dr Rainbow Murray from Queen Mary, University of London.

And the lodger is back - according to research, not since the Sixties, have so many households taken in a lodger as a means of helping to make ends meet. Equally, the structure of the housing market means the demand and price to rent is fetching the highest prices for years. But is getting a lodger always a smooth solution to straitened times? And what are the rules for peaceful co-existence under the same roof? Jenni is joined by actor John Bramwell who has lived in digs all over the country and by poet, Linda Chase, who is also a landlady.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh02h)
Elizabeth Gaskell - Wives and Daughters

Episode 10

Episode Six

It's the day of the Easter Charity Ball and Cynthia receives a gift from a mysterious admirer. Hyacinth see the dance as an opportunity to introduce her daughter to a number of possible suitors. Elizabeth Gaskell's classic novel of everyday provincial life in the 1820s is dramatised by Theresa Heskins.

Lily Gaskell . . . . . Deborah McAndrew
Molly Gibson . . . . . Emerald O'Hanrahan
Dr Gibson . . . . . Jamie Newall
Roger Hamley . . . . . Gunnar Cauthery
Cynthia . . . . . Maya Barcot
Hyacinth . . . . . Julia Hills
Lady Harriett . . . . . Cathy Sara
Dorothy Browning . . . . . Marian Kemmer
Phoebe Browning . . . . . Susan Jeffrey
Mr Preston . . . . . Timothy Watson

Produced and Directed by Peter Leslie Wild

Notes

Wives and Daughters was written in the 1860s and serialised in the Cornhill Magazine. It is set in the 1820s and deals to a large extent with the position of women in Society. Elizabeth Gaskell left it unfinished, so any dramatiser of the novel is faced with guessing the intended outcome of the story.

Theresa Heskins previously adapted Lady Audley's Secret for the Woman's Hour serial, and has adapted Bleak House and Great Expectations for the New Vic Theatre, North Staffordshire, where she is Artistic Director.


FRI 11:00 A Brave Medical Life: The Founder of Homeopathy (b00wdk90)
This programme marks the two hundredth anniversary of the publication of homeopathy's founding text 'Samuel Hahnemann's Organon of Rational Medicine'.

It recognises that homeopathy remains deeply controversial, and that while some in Britain are convinced of its benefits there are many who argue that it is scientifically invalid and should not continue to be recognised by the NHS. This is not intended as an intervention in that debate. It is a historical programme locating the development of Hahnemann's thinking within the context of late eighteenth and early nineteenth century medicine.

It's been said that Hahnemann would be more famous than he is if he had not developed homeopathy; that this has meant he's come to be seen either as a saint or a charlatan. He was neither. He was first and foremost a critic of what he saw as the cruel, ineffective and unscientific treatments that he was trained to deliver- bleedings, purges, and huge doses of mercury.

He renounced being a doctor for a time because he felt he did more harm than good. What was to become homeopathy developed from his insistence that medicines be tested before they were used, and even its opponents recognise Hahnemann's significance in the history of pharmacology and therapeutics.

We examine his arguments and those of his opponents. But the programme also questions how useful the distinction between 'mainstream' and 'alternative' is for understanding the history of western medicine.

We interview leading medical historians in both the UK and Germany; and actors bring to life the medical conflicts of Hahnemann's own time.

Written and presented by Mark Whitaker

Producer: Mark Whitaker.


FRI 11:30 Electric Ink (b01jrt6d)
Series 2

Episode 2

By Alistair Beaton and Tom Mitchelson.

A comic satire set in the struggling world of newspapers. Maddox refuses to give up a source. Could he really face prison.

Maddox ..... John Sessions
Oliver ..... Alex Jennings
Freddy ..... Stephen Wight
Carol ..... Polly Frame
Masha ..... Debbie Chazen
Policeman ..... Henry Devas
Warder ..... Adeel Akhtar
Producer ..... Sally Avens

Alistair Beaton and Tom Mitchelson's satire is set in the world of modern newspapers.

A group of dysfunctional journalists attempt to cover major news stories at the same time as grappling with the demands of working in a multi-platform environment, watching circulation figures plummet and the recession causing half the workforce to be laid off.

At the heart of the comedy is the relationship between Maddox Bradley, a journalist who mourns the day of proper investigative journalism, and Freddy, the online editor who will regurgitate a press release quite happily and call it a story. But they have a grudging respect for the each other as Freddy helps Maddox stay afloat in the world of Twitter, Facebook and podcasting and Maddox shows Freddy how to sniff out the real story. Both are at the mercy of Oliver, the pragmatic editor more concerned with keeping his job, and Carol, the news editor who believes that circulation will increase if they run pieces on Big Mac eating orang-utans and 'intelligent' skunks rather than Maddox's moral crusading diatribes. And only Masha, the Russian head of online communities, who wants to give away all their content because that is true democracy, knows Freddy's secret; that he's a posh boy from Eton rather than a hypercool kid from the street; well that's what Freddy thinks anyway.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00wdkf5)
A special performance of the Lion King was put on at the Lyceum theatre in London to mark the 1,500th captioned performance. 'Stagetext' started offering captioned performances, just like subtitles, ten years ago. Our reporter Catherine Carr went along to see - and read the show.

All this week as part of a series of programmes to mark the International Day of Disabled People we've being asking 'What makes your day?' Today our series continues with Comedian Liz Carr.


FRI 12:53 Moments of Genius (b00wq9r9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:55 on Tuesday]


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00wbtf7)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00wdkf7)
National and international news.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00wdkf9)
We look at the numbers behind the increase in the cap on undergraduate tuition fees in England. Are the changes fair and progressive? Are they dropping future students into a deep hole of debt? Or are they both?

Do traffic lights do more harm than good? That's the suspicion of one listener with a professional interest - he's a London bus driver. As ever, we look for the evidence.

Wikileaks revealed last week that Britain and the US are concerned about the security of Pakistan's nuclear arsenal. And this week Iran claimed that it is now self-sufficient in the production of uranium - a necessary material for any aspiring nuclear nation. But how worried should we be? The physicist Richard A Muller gives us the numbers.

David Lammy - a Labour MP who was Minister of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills in the last government - published an article in the Guardian on this week in which he included a statistic that caught everyone's imagination: "Just one British black Caribbean student was admitted to Oxford last year," he wrote. We check his sums.

Those of you who followed the World Cup might recall Paul the Octopus, who alerted us all to the miraculous and potentially world-transforming technology of using zoo animals to forecast the results of sporting contests. Paul sadly passed away in October but we remained curious about the phenomenon. So we asked Jack, a Newcastle-based monkey, to forecast the results of the Ashes.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00wdjvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00wdkfd)
Guy Meredith - Sky High

43'59"
SKY HIGH
The clock is ticking away in this cat and mouse game of twists, turns and subterfuge by Guy Meredith.

It is the early hours of a new day and in a tall office block in London there is a woman working. She thinks she is alone but then she hears the lift doors open ....

Emma...................Claire Harry
Mark.....................Chris Pavlo
Charlie...................Lloyd Thomas

Directed by Tracey Neale

A tall office block. Way below a police siren; passing above a helicopter. Emma hammers with frustration at a computer. Whatever she's trying to do, it isn't working. Suddenly, a noise behind her - a Security Guard. Is everything ok? It's the early hours of a new day, no-one else is in the building. He's made her jump and she's spilt her coffee. All's fine and he leaves her alone once more. A little while later another coffee is spilt as another man bursts in. How did he get in? What does he want? The two are connected and as the tale unfolds we discover why he is there and what is going on. But are things quite what they seem?

As we listen to the action the clock is ticking away in real time. Emma needs to unravel a mystery code in the computer and she hasn't got much time. Will Mark agree to help her or is he more interested in revenge? He used to work there and would like to settle a score or two. Can Emma trust him and will she find the code in time? The tension mounts as the minutes tick by ...

The Writer
Guy Meredith writes for radio, TV and the stage. He has had over 25 plays broadcast on Radio 3 & 4. Including, "The Surprise Symphony", "La Peste" and "Run, Man, Run". He has written all of the "Daunt and Dervish" that have been broadcast on Radio 4. For TV he has written "Ruth Rendell Mysteries", "Heartbeat" and "The Bill".


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00wdkfg)
RHS Conference Centre, London

Eric Robson chairs a horticultural discussion at the RHS Conference Centre in London. The panel this week are Christine Walkden, Chris Beardshaw and Bunny Guinness.

This programme replaces the Northumberland show advertised, which had to be cancelled due to severe weather conditions.

Producer: Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Make 'Em Laugh (b00rdyg9)
When was the last time you heard a politician being funny - intentionally, that is? Mandy Baker guides comedian Marcus Brigstocke through some of the best and worst efforts by our elected representatives to deliver a witty speech, who explains how they could have done it so much better.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00wdl79)
On Last Word this week:
Sir Peter Wakefield, British diplomat in Cairo during the Suez crisis and in Libya during the coup which brought Colonel Gaddafi to power.
Bill White, who studied human skeletons to reveal our history, and kept hundreds of bones in his garage
TV comedy producer and director Douglas Argent who brought us classics like "The Liver Birds" and "Till Death Us Do Part". Warren Mitchell pays tribute.
Samuel Cohen who invented the neutron bomb, which he described as a "sane and moral weapon".
And Peter Hofmann, the German tenor who made his name as a sexy Siegmund in Wagner's Ring, but made his money by covering easy listening standards.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00wdl7c)
The creators of Airplane, Jerry and David Zucker, discuss the comedy's 30 year legacy and its star Leslie Nielsen

Ex-Bond villain Matthieu Amalric reveals some of 007's secrets

The Film Programme continues its series on the quiet revolution in community cinemas, talking to local film heroes and taking an audio 'snapshot' of some of the most lively and memorable places to watch film around the country.


FRI 16:55 Moments of Genius (b00wq9rp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:53 on Wednesday]


FRI 17:00 PM (b00wdl7f)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news. Including at 5.57pm Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00wbtfc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b00wdl7h)
Series 32

Tuition fees and Today tongue-twisters

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis take a topical trip around tuition fees and Today tongue-twisters. Musical Mitch Benn sees the world through Lennon's eyes; German stand-up Henning Wehn probes our World Cup hypocrisy; John Finnemore wonders at the sexual magnetism of a certain Lib Dem MP and Laura Shavin reveals what every woman wants for Christmas.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00wdl7k)
Vicky overhears Pat and Jennifer discussing Pat's heavy workload, due to Clarrie's broken wrist. Later she approaches Pat to ask if she could work at the dairy. Pat tells her it's quite a specialised job which would require training but agrees to show her around. Vicky's chuffed when Pat agrees to take her on.

Preparations are underway at Home Farm for Phoebe's 'early Christmas' there. Brian worries how Ruairi's going to react when he sees how many presents Kate's bought for Phoebe. He also tells Jennifer he thinks Kate's trying to buy off her guilty conscience. When Jennifer asks Kate if she's told Phoebe about staying on longer in South Africa, Kate side-steps the answer. Phoebe's delighted with all her presents - particularly the laptop, saying it's been such a great party. When Phoebe suggests they have a belated New Year's Eve party when Kate's back - Kate, prompted by Jennifer, confesses that she's had to change her plans and will be staying in South Africa for an extra couple of weeks. Phoebe tries to hide her upset saying it's time to go home. When Jennifer suggests comforting her, Kate says Phoebe just needs a bit of space - she'll be fine.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00wdl7m)
Matilda - the musical; Phil Oakey of the Human League

The RSC has adapted Roald Dahl's Matilda as a musical, directed by Matthew Warchus, with songs by Tim Minchin and choreography by Peter Darling (Billy Elliot). Will Dahl's classic children's book be enhanced or drowned by the musical treatment? Sarah Crompton reviews.

Enemies of the People, a documentary already nominated for an Oscar next year, talks to the perpetrators of the genocide carried out in Cambodia in the 1970s by the Khmer Rouge. The film's director Rob Lemkin describes the journey he took with his fellow director, a Cambodian journalist whose father and siblings were killed by Pol Pot's regime, to understand what lay behind the mass killings.

The synth dance pop group The Human League have just recorded their first new album in almost a decade, to be released next year. Their lead singer Phil Oakey looks back at the early 1980s and their album Dare - with its international hit Don't You Want Me, which he is reported not to have wanted to release as a single, feeling it was a filler and the weakest track on the album.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00wh02h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00wdl7p)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical discussion from The Queen Katherine School in Kendal with questions for the panel including Rory Stewart, Conservative MP, Andy Burnham, Shadow Secretary of State for Education, Laurie Pennie, columnist and writer Harry Mount.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00wdl7r)
Extreme Food

Joan Bakewell reflects on our current obsession with ever more elaborate food and cookery, from peculiar crisp flavours to the outpourings of celebrity chefs. Have we forgotten, she wonders, that food is essentially nourishment and an "excuse for conviviality."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00wdl7t)
God's President: Mugabe of Zimbabwe

Kwame Kwei-Armah's drama tells the story of the tense negotiations around the Lancaster House Conference, and the road to Zimbabwe's Independence.

On 4th March 1980 the Shona majority in Rhodesia was decisive in electing Robert Mugabe to head the first post-independence government as Prime Minister. Six weeks later, on April 18th, Zimbabwe celebrated its first Independence Day.

On the 21st December 1979, following three months of talks, the Lancaster House Agreement finally brought independence to Rhodesia following Ian Smith's Unilateral Declaration of Independence in 1965.

Margaret Thatcher's government had invited Bishop Muzorewa and Ian Smith, and the leaders of the Patriotic Front, led by Joshua Nkomo and Robert Mugabe to participate in a Constitutional Conference at Lancaster House in London, to be chaired by the foreign secretary, Lord Carrington.

The purpose of the Conference was to discuss and reach agreement on the terms of an Independence Constitution, and to ensure that elections should be supervised under British authority to enable Rhodesia to proceed to legal independence and the parties to settle their differences by political means.

Robert Mugabe .... Lucian Msamati
Edgar Tekere ..... Danny Sapani
Bishop Muzorewa ..... Chuk Iwuji
Lord Carrington ..... Richard Cordery
Robin Renwick ..... Tony Bell
Joshua Nkomo ..... Jude Akuwudike
Ian Smith ..... William Gaminara
Sir Shridath Ramphal ..... Kwame Kwei-Armah
Kenneth Kaunda ..... Ben Onwukwe
Bob Marley ..... Lloyd Thomas
With Sean Baker, David Seddon, Alison Pettit

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00wbtff)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00wdl7w)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis.


FRI 22:45 Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal (b00wgzvb)
We Always Find Them Out

There are rumours about Gorya's health. As Anna and Andrei are given a warning to try to get out of Leningrad, is it already too late to escape the tightening noose?

Helen Dunmore's sequel to 'The Siege' read by Sara Kestelman.

Set ten years on, the starvation and bitter cold of the war years of Leningrad have been replaced with fear and suspicion. City residents do their best to keep their heads down and their lives unremarkable in an era of accusations, arrests and the midnight knock at the door.

Helen Dunmore (1952-2017) was the writer of 12 novels and 10 poetry collections winning several accolades for her work.

Abridged by Sally Marmion
Producer: Di Speirs

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00wdgxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00wdl7y)
The latest events at Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00wdf48)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00wdf48)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00wh00g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00wh00g)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00wh00v)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00wh00v)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00wh01l)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00wh01l)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00wh02h)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00wh02h)

3D In Perspective 11:30 TUE (b00wdgmq)

A Brave Medical Life: The Founder of Homeopathy 11:00 FRI (b00wdk90)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 MON (b00wdf4d)

A Level Playing Field for the Paralympics 20:00 TUE (b00wdh4t)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00w7fd9)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00wdl7r)

Adventures in Poetry 16:30 SUN (b00wdcy4)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b00chy5k)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00c83jm)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00wdgsh)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00wk7vq)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00wk7vx)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b00wdh8b)

All in the Mind 16:30 WED (b00wdh8b)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00wddng)

Anatomy Of... 16:00 TUE (b00rxj4x)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00wcs5h)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00w7fd7)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00wdl7p)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00wct8g)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00wct8g)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00wctnf)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00wctnf)

Bespoken Word 23:00 WED (b00wdjjx)

Bleak Expectations 18:30 THU (b00wdjvk)

Blond on Britain 20:45 WED (b00wgqjb)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00wbp3b)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00wdf44)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00wdf44)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00wgz8w)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00wgz8w)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00wgzdr)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00wgzdr)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00wgzmb)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00wgzmb)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00wgznx)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b00wdcy2)

Bookclub 16:00 THU (b00wdcy2)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00w7854)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00wdf4l)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00wdctg)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00w6q37)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00wdcy0)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00w7cmh)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b00wdjrd)

David Walliams on Philip Larkin 23:30 SAT (b00w6q44)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00wdctl)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00wdctl)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00wdf9c)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00wgqpk)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00wdhq1)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00ft64r)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00wdkfd)

Electric Ink 11:30 FRI (b01jrt6d)

Elvenquest 23:00 THU (b00wdjz9)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00wcs0m)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00wcq6c)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00wdf3y)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00wdfrt)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00wdhb0)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00wdjl8)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00wdk0q)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00w7f74)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00w7bv7)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00wdl7t)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b00wct6j)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00wcs0t)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00wdfht)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00wdh4r)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00wdjfk)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00wdjvw)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00wdl7m)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b00wdjgl)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00w7f89)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00wdkfg)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00wdgxd)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00wdgxd)

Hazelbeach 11:30 WED (b00wdhfb)

Heel, Toe, Step Together 11:00 MON (b00wdf4b)

Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal 22:45 MON (b00wdflk)

Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal 22:45 TUE (b00wgzr2)

Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal 22:45 WED (b00wgzrr)

Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal 22:45 THU (b00wgztk)

Helen Dunmore - The Betrayal 22:45 FRI (b00wgzvb)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00wdgsf)

I'm A Celebrity, Get Me Into Here 09:30 TUE (b00wdgcx)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00w7dyx)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00wdjyg)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00wdjr8)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00wdjr8)

In The Footsteps of Giants 14:45 SUN (b00rzvfp)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00wdh88)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00w78h2)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00wdffp)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00w7f8k)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00wdl79)

Liu Xiaobo: 'I Have No Enemies' 13:30 THU (b00x8hpg)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 WED (b00wdhd7)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b00wdcq1)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00wcsdl)

Lucy Montgomery's Variety Pack 18:30 WED (b00wdjff)

Make 'Em Laugh 15:45 FRI (b00rdyg9)

Material World 21:00 MON (b00w7dlf)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00wdjvf)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00w7fhl)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00wbt8x)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00wbtb6)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00wbtbx)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00wbtcl)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00wbtd7)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00wbtdv)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00wdhbq)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00wdhbq)

Moments of Genius 12:53 MON (b00wlbhy)

Moments of Genius 16:55 MON (b00wq9qn)

Moments of Genius 12:53 TUE (b00wq9r7)

Moments of Genius 16:55 TUE (b00wq9r9)

Moments of Genius 12:53 WED (b00wq9rp)

Moments of Genius 16:55 WED (b00wlbhy)

Moments of Genius 12:53 THU (b00wq9qn)

Moments of Genius 16:55 THU (b00wq9r7)

Moments of Genius 12:53 FRI (b00wq9r9)

Moments of Genius 16:55 FRI (b00wq9rp)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00wdhq3)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b00wcs46)

Money Box 21:02 SUN (b00wcs46)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00w7ccn)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00wdjgj)

More Than A Game 15:45 MON (b00pktv2)

More Than A Game 15:45 TUE (b00pr52g)

More Than A Game 15:45 WED (b00pxr8k)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00wdkf9)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00w7fhv)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00wbt99)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00wbtbj)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00wbtc7)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00wbtcx)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00wbtdj)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00wbtf4)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00wbt9d)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00w7fhx)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00wbt9l)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00wbt9q)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00w7fjf)

News 13:00 SAT (b00w7fj5)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b00w7cww)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00wcmtc)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00wcmtc)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00wcsdj)

PM 17:00 MON (b00wdffm)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00wdh4k)

PM 17:00 WED (b00wdjd4)

PM 17:00 THU (b00wdjvh)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00wdl7f)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00wddhc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00wcm9z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00wddv1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00wdfrr)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00wdh9p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00wdjl6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00wdk0n)

Radio 4 Christmas Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00wdcq5)

Radio 4 Christmas Appeal 09:45 SUN (b00wgst4)

Radio 4 Christmas Appeal 17:40 SUN (b00wgst4)

Radio 4 Christmas Appeal 21:27 SUN (b00wdcq5)

Radio 4 Christmas Appeal 15:27 THU (b00wdcq5)

Radio 4 Christmas Appeal 15:45 THU (b00wgst4)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00wcsb2)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00wcs0k)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00wct8d)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b00wdgmn)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b00wdgmn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00w7fhq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00wbt94)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00wbtbc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00wbtc2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00wbtcr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00wbtdd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00wbtf0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00w7fhn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00w7fhs)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00w7fj7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00wbt91)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00wbt97)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00wbt9w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00wbtb8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00wbtbf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00wbtc0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00wbtc5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00wbtcn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00wbtct)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00wbtd9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00wbtdg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00wbtdy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00wbtf2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00w7fjc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00wbtb1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00wbtbr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00wbtcf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00wbtd2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00wbtdp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00wbtfc)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00wdcmf)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00wdcmf)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00wdf42)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00wdf42)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00wdctd)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00wdcq3)

Taking a Stand 09:00 TUE (b00wdgcv)

Taking a Stand 21:30 TUE (b00wdgcv)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00wdctj)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00wddmm)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00wddmm)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00wdfhr)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00wdfhr)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00wdh4p)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00wdh4p)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00wdjfh)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00wdjfh)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00wdjvm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00wdjvm)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00wdl7k)

The Eskimos and the Mushroom Cloud 11:30 THU (b00wdjrg)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00w7f9j)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00wdl7c)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00wdctn)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00wdctn)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b00wdfd4)

The Joy of Ceps 05:45 SUN (b00wgpyj)

The Long Walk 13:30 SUN (b00wdcts)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00wdhpz)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b00w7f9v)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b00wdl7h)

The Odd Half Hour 18:30 TUE (b00wdh4m)

The Phone 23:00 TUE (b00wdh8g)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00wdjyd)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00wcs0r)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00wdctq)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00wdfj0)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00wdh8d)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00wdjjv)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00wdjz7)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00wdl7w)

The iPod Series 10:30 SAT (b00xbh46)

Things We Forgot to Remember 20:00 MON (b00wdfhw)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00w7c91)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00wdjd2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00wdflm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00wdh8j)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00wdjjz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00wdjzp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00wdl7y)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00wcs0h)

Today 06:00 MON (b00wdf40)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00wdgcs)

Today 06:00 WED (b00wdhb6)

Today 06:00 THU (b00wdjlb)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00wdk0s)

Vital Mental Medicine: Shackleton's Banjo 13:30 TUE (b00wdgr5)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00w7fhz)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00w7fj1)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00w7fj3)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00w7fj9)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00wbt9h)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00wbt9n)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00wbt9t)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00wbt9y)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00wbtb3)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00wbtbl)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00wbtbp)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00wbtbv)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00wbtcb)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00wbtch)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00wbtcz)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00wbtd5)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00wbtdl)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00wbtds)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00wbtf7)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00wbtff)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00wddr5)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b00wddry)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00wcsb4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00wdf46)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00wlddm)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00wdhd5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00wdjrb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00wdk2v)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00wdf4j)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00wdgr3)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00wdhpx)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00wdjrl)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00wdkf7)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00wdf4g)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00wdgms)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00wdhpv)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00wdjrj)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00wdkf5)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00wcmsp)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00wcmsp)