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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 02 OCTOBER 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00v1whm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tzmkc)
Tolerance and Intolerance (1550 - 1700 AD)

Reformation centenary broadsheet

Neil MacGregor's world history as told through things that time has left behind. This week Neil is looking at the co-existence of faiths - peaceful or otherwise - across the globe around 400 years ago. So far he has looked at objects from India and Central America, Iran and Indonesia that embody the political consequences of belief. Today he is back in Europe, with a document that marks an anniversary and that is designed to raise morale. It's a woodblock print, a broadsheet, commissioned in Saxony in 1617 to mark a hundred years of the Protestant reformation and anti Catholic sentiment. Neil describes the broadsheet and the uncertain Protestant world that produced it. Was this the first time that an anniversary was commemorated in this way, with a kind of souvenir? The broadcaster and journalist Ian Hislop considers the broadsheet as an early equivalent to the tabloid press while the religious historian Karen Armstrong describes the reforming motivation that the broadsheet celebrates.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00v1wj0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00v1wj2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00v1wj4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00v1wjg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00v1wk3)
With the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00v1wk5)
What has the Commonwealth done for us? Listeners' views on the importance and relevance of the institution as Delhi prepares for the opening ceremony of the Commonwealth Games. Voices include the Secretary General of the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association and a Malaysian scientist now leading research on the effects of radiation at the UK's Health Protection Agency. Your News is read by the voice of Saturday teatime - James Alexander Gordon.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00v1wkk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00v1wm3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00v10mr)
Series 16

Gloucestershire - Forest of Dean

Clare Balding is in the Forest of Dean with a group who've been walking through the county of Gloucestershire for two months with donkeys. As part of the Cultural Olympiad Sarah Blowers, along with various artists, children and people who've just tagged along, set off to discover the beauty of the countryside at a slow pace, setting camp at the end of each day's walk. Everyone Clare meets as she joins them at Soudley to walk through the forest is enthusiastic about the gentle pace of life they're experiencing walking with the donkeys carrying their provisions.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00v10sn)
Farming Today This Week

Only a third of the apples in UK shops are grown here. But 'top fruit' - which is grown on trees - is well suited to the the climate. Charlotte Smith asks if more of the apples, pears plums and cherries we eat could be produced on home soil. She hears from farmers who've pioneered techniques to make fruit available the whole year round, to protect them from rain damage and to provide new varieties. She visits Hayles fruit farm near Cheltenham where orchards that were grubbed up years ago are now being replanted and asks if more . Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00v1wm5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00v10sq)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Evan Davis, including:
08:10 Lord Young outlines his aim to curb the UK's 'health and safety culture'
08:31 John Prescott on whether cutting the M4 bus lane is part of a plan to end the "war on the motorist"
08:47 London's hidden role in the US Civil War
08:52 Poet Philip Larkin's letters to his lover and confidante, Monica Jones.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00v115b)
Fi Glover is joined in the studio by the first lady of Radio 1 Annie Nightingale MBE, poet Salena Godden and the daughter of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin. There's a guerilla report from a woman who has 400 pairs of designer shoes, an interview with the milkman who threw away several paintings by LS Lowry, and former Ryder cup captain Sam Torrance shares his Inheritance Tracks.

The producer is Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00v115q)
Alaska - Zambia - Cycle path to Paris

The actress Imogen Stubbs talks to John McCarthy about why she is drawn to the Alaskan wilderness. Her experiences there with the vast distances, the extreme weather and the danger from encounters with bears contrast strongly with the relatively safe indoor life of theatre and television.

John also meets Abraham Banda, who leads walking safaris in Zambia where you can encounter danger from many animals from lions to crocodiles, and learns why the role of the guide is getting more and more professional.

And reporter and keen cyclist Stephen Mulvey tells John about a new bike trail from London to Paris which is mostly off-road and should prove very popular with the increasing numbers of cyclists making the journey for charity.

Producer Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b00v117n)
Series 3

Episode 3

Steve Punt turns super sleuth and goes in search of a most unusual royal relic: Queen Victoria's voice. He embarks on a journey to the dawn of recorded sound as he tracks down a wax cylinder which may contain the voice, the only suspected recording of Victoria in existence. Via sound archives, strong rooms, forensic audiologists, royal voice coaches, the Queen's apartments and Palace letters he pieces together the story of the lost recording of Queen Victoria and tries to get to the bottom of any message she left for her subjects.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b00v119l)
Ahead of the Conservative Party conference, John Kampfner asks what it means now to be a Tory, what defines the party & what impact sharing power with the Lib Dems is having.
The programme goes beyond Westminster to Sunderland Central and Hexham to meet new Tory voters, disappointed Tories and a new breed of young, MPs who are as much at ease connecting with their constituents via their blogs as their surgeries. How well are they going down with their more traditional supporters? And what will the North East make of the coalition government's cuts?
Producer : Rosamund Jones.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00v11ck)
A broken-hearted picture house manager tells From Our Own Correspondent how the cinema is dying a slow death in Baghdad. Also,

our reporter hears sad songs and talk of home as he joins Chinese workers on a night out in Angola.

We're fast approaching one of the major dramas in the American political cycle. The mid-term Congressional elections are now just a month away. Hundreds of House and Senate seats are being fought for all across the country. And if Barack Obama's Democrats were to do badly, his job would become even tougher than it already is. Kevin Connolly has been watching the President as he begins to square up to this new electoral challenge.

The people of Iraq haven't only been forced to endure years of dictatorship and war. They've also had to cope with economic collapse, rampant corruption and sectarian violence. Over time, almost every area of life has been degraded in some way. Popular culture has been no exception. And Gabriel Gatehouse says Iraq's troubles have been reflected in the demise of its cinemas...

South Africa has no fewer than than eleven official languages. Along with English and Afrikaans the constitution recognises all the country's major, indigenous languages....like Zulu and Xhosa. Then on top of that official list, immigrants from across Africa and the world have brought their mother tongues.... And Hamilton Wende reflects now on the country's extraordinary linguistic riches.

It's now more than two decades since Germany was re-united. For years the once formidable Berlin Wall has been no more than a tourist attraction. And the old East Germany has... officially...been consigned to history. But Steve Evans says that not far below the surface divisions linger on. And among some in the East, there's a certain nostalgia for the past....

China first reached out to Africa about six-hundred years ago. A Chinese admiral led a series of trading expeditions to the east coast. But this contact was quite brief. China soon turned its back on the world, and centuries of isolation followed.... Now though the Chinese are very much back in Africa. And Justin Rowlatt has been spending time with young entrepreneurs who see huge potential in Angola....


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00v11d8)
On Money Box today/tomorrow with Paul Lewis:

Would you pay high fees to get a tax rebate from a claims company?
Plus: cuts to a flagship welfare programme which helps people struggling with their mortgage interest payments
And: complaints about the new kid on the block - Metrobank.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00txjw3)
Sandi Toksvig presents another episode of the ever-popular topical panel show. Guests this week include Jeremy Hardy, Paul Sinha and Andy Hamilton.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00v1wmm)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00v1wmw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00txjw5)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Michael Hall School in Forest Row, East Sussex, with panellists including Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Jeremy Hunt, Jo Swinson, Liberal Democrat MP and Parliamentary private secretary to Vince Cable, Chris Bryant, a Labour MP standing for the Shadow Cabinet and Trevor Kavanagh, columnist on The Sun.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00v11t5)
Any Answers? Listeners respond to the issues raised in Any Questions? If you have a comment or question on this week's programme or would like to take part in the Any Answers? phone-in you can contact us by telephone or email. Tel: 03700 100 444 Email: any.answers@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00v11t7)
Jonathan Holloway - The Kane Conspiracy

In 1941 Orson Welles' film Citizen Kane, now regularly voted top in critics' and audience polls, picked up nine Oscar nominations and was already being spoken of as a work of genius. But there were powerful forces lobbying hard against it, not least among them William Randolph Hearst, the media mogul on whom the story is based, and FBI supremo J Edgar Hoover.

As the Oscar nominations are announced, Welles suffers an uncharacteristic attack of anxiety. And not without cause: FBI supremo J.Edgar Hoover has tasked a small-time FBI agent, Special Agent RB Wood, with making sure the film doesn't triumph at the Oscars ceremony. Hearst has banned any mention of the film across his media empire, RKO, the distributor, is looking shaky, and while the movie plays to capacity houses in art-house cinemas, no major theatres or cinema chains will take it. A chance encounter in an elevator leads to a highly charged head-to-head between Hearst and Welles when the two men lay their cards on the table. At the ceremony in February 1941 the film only wins one Oscar, and Welles' reputation in America never recovers.

Only the character of Agent Wood is imagined, although he is based on a documented but shadowy figure mentioned in the FBI archives. And it is Wood who finally confronts Welles with the uncomfortable truth about the film: in hijacking Hearst's life for Citizen Kane, Welles has replaced it with his own.

Orson Welles.........Jeff Harding
J. Edgar Hoover........Toby Jones
Herman Mankiewicz.....John Guerrasio
William Randolph Hearst...Peter Marinker
George Schaefer.......Garrick Hagon
Agent Wood..........Val Jobara
Radio Interviewer.......Paul Mundell

Written by Jonathan Holloway
Producer: Sara Davies.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b00txhfk)
Series 10

How Great Thou Art

An examination of the enduring popularity of the hymn, How Great Thou Art. Based on a Swedish poem by Carl Gustav Boberg, it was written by the British missionary Stuart Hine in 1949.

It subsequently become an Elvis Presley classic and as the country and western star , Connie Smith explains, it's the piece she always sings to close her show, the stirring lyrics and soaring melody having the ability to move and inspire audiences of all ages and backgrounds.

At the age of 101, George Beverly Shea shares his clear memories of singing it at hundreds of Billy Graham crusades.

Featuring:

Bud Boberg
Ray Bodkin
Bev Shea
Jerry Schilling
Malcolm Imhoff
David Darg

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Producer: Lucy Lunt

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00v11w3)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Presented by Jane Garvey. The women whose struggle for equal pay is told in the film Made in Dagenham, Josceline Dimbleby on spicing up cooking in the seventies, the appeal of the widower - why it's different for men, illustrator Helen Oxenbury with husband and author John Burningham on their first joint venture, viewing the body as a commodity, and music from Venezuelan pianist Gabriela Montero.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00v1wrp)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00tzlrh)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan and a panel of guests from the worlds of civil engineering, hedge funds and investment discuss the art of staying ahead of the competition.

The ruthless former chief executive of General Electric, Jack Welch, often held up as a model of business leadership, pursued a strategy to establish each of GE's businesses as either number one or number two in the market. Without this approach, he believed the company's prospects would be bleak. Some companies will do anything to be big, even if it means cutting prices and making less money. Other businesses are happy to be smaller and more profitable. Which strategy wins?

The panel also discusses corporate claptrap. Silly jargon, faddish ideas and vacuous concepts - why is the business world so keen on nonsense?

Evan is joined in the studio by Deborah Meaden, entrepreneur and business investor; Keith Clarke, chief executive of FTSE 250 civil engineering and design consultancy Atkins; Hugh Hendry, hedge fund manager and co-founder of Eclectica Asset Management.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00v1xdp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00v1xdy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00v1xhj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00v11wp)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive Anderson is joined by father and son actors Timothy and Samuel West, who perform together as father and clones in the play A Number at The Menier Chocolate Factory.

Private Eye writer and satirist Craig Brown talks about his new book, The Lost Diaries, spoof entries from from Harold Pinter, Barack Obama and Germaine Greer, to Victoria Beckham, Jeremy Clarkson and Sarah Ferguson.

One half of the Marks and Gran comedy partnership that created Birds of a Feather, Shine on Harvey Moon, The New Statesman and Goodnight Sweetheart, Maurice Gran talks about their latest show for stage, Von Ribbentrop's Watch.

6Music's Gideon Coe talks to the comedian and Grumpy Old Woman Jenny Eclair as she embarks on a mission to cheer up Britain, both with her new book and her Old Dog, New Tricks tour of the UK.

Stand out stand-up comedy from Andi Osho who explores her culture clash - living in London's East End with Nigerian roots - in her show Afroblighty.

There's live music from Irish folk songstress Heidi Talbot who performs from her hotly anticipated new album The Last Star.

And from Los Angeles - The Airborne Toxic Event - return to Loose Ends as their concert film All I Ever Wanted premieres at the Raindance Film Festival in London.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00v11yp)
Dilma Rousseff

Brazilians go to the polls this weekend, to elect a new president, replacing the charismatic Lula da Silva. And, with Dilma Rousseff far ahead in the polls, it looks like the country could get its first female leader. It's been an amazing journey for Rousseff, the daughter of a Bulgarian immigrant. In the 1960's, she joined a revolutionary urban guerrilla group after the military coup, and was imprisoned and tortured.
She is now seen as Lula's successor, nicknamed 'The Iron Lady', though there are questions about her own public charisma and in which direction she will take this booming country of 200 million people. If she wins, she could become one of the world's most powerful leaders.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00v11zt)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests writer Linda Grant, comedian Natalie Haynes and former cultural historian and writer Christopher Frayling review the week's cultural highlights including Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.

Michael Douglas returns as Gordon Gecko in Oliver Stone's sequel to his 1987 film Wall Street. Gecko's out of jail and the economy's crashing - is greed still good?

Philip Roth's novel Nemesis is set in Newark in the summer of 1944 and explores the impact of a polio epidemic on the closely knit Jewish community. Bucky Cantor is an idealistic playground superintendent who tries to manage the panic as his young charges succumb to the disease.

Sebastian Faulks's 1993 novel Birdsong sold more than 1.7 million copies in the UK alone. Now it has been adapted for the stage by Rachel Wagstaff. Trevor Nunn's production is at the Comedy Theatre in London and stars Ben Barnes and Lee Ross.

Gauguin: Maker of Myth is the first major exhibition in London to be devoted to the artist for more than 50 years. Assembling more than 100 works from public and private collections around the world, it runs at Tate Modern until January 16th 2011.

Channel 4's series The Genius of British Art comprises six individually authored films on different topics. The presenters are David Starkey, Augustus Casely-Hayford, Howard Jacobson, Jon Snow, Janet Street Porter and Sir Roy Strong. There is also an accompanying series of talks by the presenters at the National Gallery in London.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00v1294)
A Working-Class Tory Is Something To Be

David Davis MP delves into the BBC sound archive to explore the history of a crucial political group: the working-class Tories.

Ever since British mass democracy began, the working-class vote has played a crucial part in returning the Conservative Party to power.

And yet, for many years, there was barely a handful of working-class Conservative MPs in Parliament.

But the rise of the working class Tory culminated by the 1980s with the central presence in the Thatcher Cabinet of Norman Tebbit, and the introduction of such policies as council house sales.

Edward Heath, Margaret Thatcher and John Major all came from 'humble' backgrounds, in stark contrast to their aristocratic predecessors.

So where is the working-class Tory today? On the one hand, Britain appears to some a much less hierarchical society. On the other, we have our first Etonian Tory PM in almost half a century.

David Davis is a Tory from a working-class background - and is the man Cameron beat in 2005 for the Party leadership. In this programme, he explores the rise and fate of the working-class Tories, as charted in the BBC sound archive.

And he talks to former and current working-class Tory Cabinet Ministers like Lord Tebbit, Conservative Party Chairman Baroness Warsi, and Eric Pickles, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government.

He discovers why, in Oldham in 1899, one of Britain's toughest trade union leaders ran alongside Winston Churchill as a Tory candidate.

Davis listens to a rare interview with Edith Pitt, a young Birmingham woman who left school at 13, became a Conservative during the Depression of the 1930s, and went on to serve in Government.

And he explores the attitudes of senior Tories to the '30s hunger marchers - of whom his grandfather was one. And how the Depression shaped the politics of future Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, many of whose Geordie voters were working-class.

But he also examines the crucial divide at the heart of working-class Toryism. Macmillan's supporters backed him as a wealthy man who knew how to run things. But there was another kind of working-class Tory, driven more by aspiration than deference.

Davis discovers how Norman Tebbit, who himself grew up poor in the 1930s, considered Macmillan a failure as Prime Minister. And how, when the upwardly mobile Tebbit became a Cabinet Minister, he found Macmillan disparaging him as a Cockney interloper in the party elite.

And he rediscovers Reginald Bevins, a Liverpudlian of 'modest' background who left Labour to join the Tories and ended up in Cabinet under Macmillan. He watches an interview in which Bevins recounts his despair at the choice of the aristocratic Alec Douglas-Home as Macmillan's successor.

Two of the great comic creations of the 1960s - Albert Steptoe and Alf Garnett - were defiant working-class Tories. With historian Dominic Sandbrook, Davis watches episodes of 'Steptoe and Son' and 'Till Death Us Do Part' to unpick how the working-class Tory was seen in the age of Harold Wilson.

He explores how the appeal of Tory Enoch Powell to Labour voting dockers complicated the picture in the early 1970s. And how all this looked from Europe.

And he asks Lord Tebbit, Eric Pickles, Baroness Warsi, election expert John Curtice and former Tony Blair speech-writer Philip Collins, who comes from a family of working-class Tories, what part they think this durable tribe now plays in Cameron's Britain.

With: Philip Collins, John Curtice, Juliet Gardiner, Ross McKibbin, Eric Pickles, Martin Pugh, Dominic Sandbrook, Lord Tebbit, Baroness Warsi.

PRESENTER:
David Davis was born in 1948 to a single mother, and was brought up on a council estate in south London. He was adopted by a Polish Jewish print-worker with strong trade union links; his grandfather was a committed Communist. He attended state school and Warwick University, and was the National Chairman of the Federation of Conservative Students. He became a Tory MP in 1987, and was Shadow Home Secretary from 2003 to 2008.

PRODUCER - PHIL TINLINE.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00tx4kz)
Emile Zola - The Ladies' Delight

Episode 2

After her dismissal from The Ladies' Delight, Denise is determined to stay in Paris.

She rents a room above old Bourras' umbrella shop and quickly sets about trying to find other work. With local shops closing as The Delight expands, the task proves more difficult than she imagined.

Conclusion of Emile Zola's colourful love story - set in the hustle and excitement of the expansion of one of Paris' first department stores.

Narrator.....David Hargreaves
Denise.....Georgia King
Mouret.....Lee Williams
Bourdoncle.....Conrad Nelson
Baudu.....Nicholas Blane
Old Bourras/Baron/Vincard.....Will Tacey
Jean/Bauge.....Stephen Hoyle
Deloche/Colomban.....Michael Hugo
Mme Aurelie/Mme Baudu.....Clare Beck
Mme Desforges.....Melissa Jane Sinden
Mme Marty/Pauline.....Maeve Larkin
Clara.....Chantelle Dean
Genevieve/Margueritte/Mme Boves.....Polly Lister

Dramatised by Carine Adler.
Director: Stefan Escreet
Producer: Charlotte Riches

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00v1xht)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Bringing Up Britain (b00tyv8f)
Series 3

Episode 2

As the parenting wars escalate and politicians and childcare gurus lock horns over how best to raise our children, Mariella Frostrup and her guests debate the dilemmas of modern parenting.

In this edition they compare the experience of only children and siblings, ask how family size is changing and debate whether we're having too many children or too few. As they explore the theory of twenty-first century parenting - and the rather messier practice - Mariella and her guests share advice and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b00txgv7)
(9/12) The Welsh team of David Edwards and Myfanwy Alexander are looking for their third victory of the series, this time taking on Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney of Northern Ireland. Tom Sutcliffe puts the notoriously fiendish cryptic questions to the teams.
Producer Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00tx4p0)
Roger McGough introduces a selection of requested American poems. Peter Marinker is the reader. Poets include Wallace Stevens, Carl Sandburg, John Crowe Ransome and Delmore Schwartz. Also two new poems from Midlands veteran poet Roy Fisher.



SUNDAY 03 OCTOBER 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00v1xkp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Readings From Bath (b00hvckp)
The Successor

Pippa Haywood reads a third story recorded on stage at last year's Bath Literature Festival. An ex-wife looks on in disapproval at her husband's choice of her successor, but her criticism turns to helplessness as danger threatens. The Successor written by Rachel Fixsen.

Producers: Sue Fry/Sara Davies.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00v1xkr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00v1xkt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00v1xkw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00v1xky)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00v12tx)
The bells of St Mary the Virgin, Chislet, Kent.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00v11yp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00v1xn8)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00v12xc)
Snakes and Ladders

The writer Sarah Cuddon explores the ancient notion of Snakes and Ladders.

With reference to Salman Rushdie's 'Midnight's Children', the poetry of Dorothy Porter and the work of filmmaker Maya Deren, she examines the way the game mirrors our experience of life and our attitudes towards fate and morality. Featuring music by Radiohead, Erik Satie and Alarm Will Sound.

Producer : Alan Hall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00v12yq)
Imagine a 250 kilo stag charging at you with antlers weighing another 10 kilos. Terry Shaw, Livestock Manager at Round Green Deer Farm has had a few close shaves with the animals he says would never truly be tamed. Caz Graham travels to Barnsley to meet the team there who produce animals for the growing venison market.

The meat is now regularly stocked in supermarkets as well as farm shops and much of it comes from farmed animals, stunned and bled in abattoirs, rather than shot wild deer.

Farmer Richard Elmhirst introduced a few deer to his family's dairy farm in the 1970s. Now the cattle are gone and hundreds of hinds and stags can be seen grazing the fields instead. A specially designed abattoir has been installed and they now process thousands of animals for other deer farms.

Only half the amount of venison eaten in the UK is reared here with much of the rest coming from New Zealand. Richard says the returns on deer are more favourable than sheep or beef and is encouraging more farmers to consider deer farming as an alternative.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00v1xnb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00v1xnd)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00v12zk)
Whilst the Church of England Synod has voted in favour of the ordination of Women Bishops, there are still those traditionalists within the Church who remain opposed to the idea. Amongst them a group of Bishops who've now formed a splinter group known as the Mission Society of St. Wilfrid and St. Hilda. Edward Stourton will be speaking to one of the founders, the Right Reverend John Goddard, Bishop of Burnley about the group and what it hopes to achieve.

As the Ryder Cup Golf Tournament takes to the fairway this weekend, Kevin Bouquet looks into the background of the man responsible for setting it up, committed Christian, Samuel Ryder. Twenty five years before the famous tournament began, Ryder set up a separate annual golf competition to be played by Free Church Ministers which is played today.

Christmas may be just around the corner, but the Church of England is already focusing its mind on Easter. Concerned that the real meaning of Easter has become overshadowed, the Church has launched 'The Real Easter Egg', described as the only Egg to mention Jesus on the box. The Bishop of Manchester, the Right Reverend, Nigel McCulloch explains why he thinks this will help people focus on Easter's Christian message.

Adam Easton tells the extraordinary story of a Polish couple, Pawel and Ola Bramson, both former skin-heads who were raised as Catholics only to later discover that they had a common Jewish ancestry. Since then they've made the conversion to Orthodox Judaism.

This week the new Labour Leader Ed Miliband revealed that he doesn't believe in God. Whilst across the water, in an attempt to fight off his doubters, US President Barack Obama declared that he's a 'Christian by choice'. But do these pronouncements really make any difference to how we view our political leaders ? The Daily Mail's Political Sketchwriter, Quentin Letts and American Political Commentator Charlie Woolf discuss whether religious background matters.

The West African Federal Republic of Nigeria celebrates 50 years of independence this week. It's had a particularly turbulent political history which has also been played out in its religious differences mainly between Christians and Muslims. Trevor Barnes looks at the current state of religion in the country and how it might play a part in Nigeria's future.

This weekend the Conservatives hold their annual Conference in Birmingham and one of the key talking points will on the Big Society, an idea of the Conservatives, now adopted by the Coalition Government. We hear the views of Guardian Columnist, Polly Toynbee and Andrew Selous MP, Parliamentary Private Secretary to Ian Duncan Smith and a Trustee of the Conservative Christian Fellowship.

E-mail: sunday@bbc.co.uk

Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00v131f)
One World Action

Glenys Kinnock presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity One World Action.

Donations to One World Action should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope One World Action. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. You can also give online at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide One World Action with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 1022298.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00v1xng)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00v1xnj)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00v135w)
Let the wide earth bless the Creator

'Let the wide earth bless the Creator' - a Harvest Festival service from St Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, London reflecting on environmental and ecological issues. Led by the Revd Nicholas Holtam with Claire Foster, Chief Executive of the Ethics Academy and the Choir of St Martin-in-the-Fields directed by Andrew Earis

Organist: Martin Ford; Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00tzp7c)
Huizinga and the human cost of cuts

Lisa Jardine reflects on the upcoming government spending cuts through the prism of Dutch historian, Johan Huizinga, and argues that the human cost of the cuts must not be overlooked. She describes how Huizinga - writing in the 1940s - was concerned about an obsession with economics - where only the number counts - and says those in public life should not fall into the same trap when deciding where to cut.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00v136j)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00v136z)
For detailed synopses, see daily episodes

Written By ... Caroline Harrington
Directed By ... Julie Beckett
Editor ... Vanessa Whitburn

Kenton Archer ... Richard Attlee
David Archer ... Timothy Bentinck
Pip Archer ... Helen Monks
Nigel Pargetter ... Graham Seed
Elizabeth Pargetter ... Alison Dowling
Brian Aldridge ... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ... Angela Piper
Adam Macy ... Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane ... Kellie Bright
Alice Aldridge ... Hollie Chapman
Matt Crawford ... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy ... Sunny Ormonde
Jolene Perks ... Buffy Davis
Fallon Rogers ... Joanna Van Kampen
Kathy Perks ... Hedli Niklaus
Jamie Perks ... Dan Ciotkowksi
Christopher Carter ... Will Sanderson-Thwaite
Roy Tucker ... Ian Pepperell
Hayley Tucker ... Lorraine Coady
Phoebe Tucker ... Lucy Morris
Kirsty Miller ... Annabelle Dowler
Jazzer McCreary ... Ryan Kelly
Alan Franks ... John Telfer
Harry Mason ... Michael Shelford
Patrick Hennessy ... Joseph Kloska
Barrie Curtis ... Robin Simpson
Martyn Gibson ... Jon Glover.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00v137f)
Johnny Vegas

Kirsty Young's castaway is the entertainer Johnny Vegas.

As a stand-up comic he made his name as one of the most brilliant and unpredictable acts on the circuit. His stage persona was a belligerent drunk who would heckle his own audience. But the more successful he became, the more the similarities between his own life and his stage character seemed to blur. "I found popularity through self-destruction" he says, "and that can be quite addictive". In recent years, he has cut down on his drinking, lost weight and now got engaged - all part of a plan to ensure he reached his 40th birthday and could be a proper father to his young son. "Life's actually turned around and been very good to me," he says.

Producer: Leanne Buckle

Record: Hurt - Johnny Cash
Book: The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists.
Luxury: A Kiln.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b00txgz9)
Series 6

Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Chris Addison, Susan Calman, Rufus Hound and Armando Iannucci are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Henry Ford, Biscuits, Rain and Squirrels.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00v137p)
Sheila Dillon looks at some of the latest developments in airline food. The supply chain is beginning to open up and innovative producers from the north east of Britain have succeeded in winning contracts to supply leading airlines. One of these suppliers - 'Look What We Found' - has led the way in technology to deliver quality ambient food in a bag. They've converted this to a tray of food that can be heated and eaten during a flight. Gate Gourmet, one of the largest providers of airline catering in the world, has had its difficulties in recent years - strike action and radical restructuring. Now back on its feet it has just opened a new £10m production kitchen. Sheila Dillon visits the new facilities and sees for herself the challenges of feeding and pleasing millions of people a year consuming meals 30,000 feet up in the sky.
producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00v1xnl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00v1380)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 Africa at 50 (b00v138l)
Episode 2

At dusk in Bamako, the capital of Mali, a bugler plays and the traffic stops as soldiers lower the Malian national flag. On the monument, banners proclaim Mali's independence from France, fifty years on.

But, as Robin Denselow reports, this is a bittersweet anniversary. Mali is a vast landlocked country on the southern borders of the Sahara and is one of the tenth poorest countries in the world.

It has survived a dictatorial one party system, then corrupt army rule but today this predominantly Muslim state is praised by the west for its democracy and stability.

But Mali faces massive problems as many young and unemployed people from the country risk their lives to cross deserts and oceans, as they desperately try to leave for the west as illegal immigrants.

Robin joins world music star Rokia Traore at an outdoor concert on the banks of the River Niger, as she launches a music foundation to help young people. He meets Malians deported home from overseas, and visits a migration centre, which has been criticized as an outpost of fortress Europe.

And he discovers why farmers who've grown Mali's main cash crop, cotton, are struggling to return a profit.

Producer Liz Carney
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00pg5rd)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Chris Beardshaw, Bob Flowerdew and Bunny Guinness are guests of the Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society in Edinburgh.

Also this week, Chris Beardshaw explores the Garden Museum for artefacts and garden tool prototypes.

Including gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 A View Through a Lens (b00v13dh)
Series 2

Episode 4

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

4/5. In the footsteps of Emperors. Having learnt how to build a snow cave in which to sleep, and completed a series of training courses to equip them to survive in the hostile conditions of Antarctica, a team including wildlife cameraman, John Aitchison, fly up the coast from the American Base at McMurdo Station to a colony of birds; birds which John never imagined he would see in the flesh, birds that he has flown half way round the world to see, Emperor Penguins - the tallest and heaviest penguins of all. John is here to film the penguins entering and leaving the sea through ice holes in the frozen landscape. It sounds easy enough, but following the penguins across the frozen terrain is far from easy, as the landscape is not flat, and the skidoos are not designed to travel across the chaotic, jagged, terrain that is thrown up by the sea, wind and ice. And then, there's the weather to contend with. Fierce snow storms force John and his colleagues to take shelter in their camp for several days. With time and supplies running low, the pressure is on. After a few last minute changes to the complex slow-motion camera (involving a saw), John and the team set off. They are finally rewarded with an amazing and magical encounter: shambling penguins are transformed into beautiful divers, as they disappear into the blue, sun dappled waters beneath the ice.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00v14v4)
Goodbye to Berlin

Episode 1

Isherwood's dramatic eyewitness account of Berlin in the early 30s, the book that inspired Cabaret.

Living in Berlin as a young man, Isherwood encountered a range of vibrant characters both ordinary and extraordinary whose daily lives reflect a city and its people at a very particular time in history. He observed at first hand how ordinary people, at every level of society, became sucked into the new era of Hitler and his kind.

Recorded on location in East Berlin, this new dramatisation by Tina Pepler has a documentary feel that vividly evokes the feel of the city and the lives of its inhabitants as the Nazi party slowly gains credence and ultimate power in the early 1930s.

Christopher Isherwood is played by UK up and coming leading man James Norton in his first radio, and the Berlin inhabitants by an ensemble of excellent German actors - Leslie Malton (award winning German/American actress), Nicola Schoessler, Matthias Horn, Tilmar Kuhn and exciting newcomers Julia Reznik and Andre Kaczmarczyk.

Isherwood arrives in Berlin, and takes lodgings with Fraulein Schroder, a once well off widow, now forced to take in a motley crew of lodgers. He's enthralled by Berlin's chaotic, hedonist nightlife and the rich variety of characters he meets: Jewish department store heiress Natalia Landauer, her cousin the serious and troubled Bernhard, fantastical night club singer Sally Bowles and the freeloading Otto Nowak. But as Christopher Isherwood grows to love the city and its people he cannot ignore the growing influence of the Nazi party even in his own carefree circles.

Cast:
Christopher Isherwood ..... James Norton
Natalia Landauer ..... Nicola Schoessler
Fraulein Schroder/Sally Bowles ..... Leslie Malton
Fraulein Mayr ..... Julia Reznik
Herr Landauer ..... Matthias Horn
Bernhard Landauer ..... Andre Kaczmarczyk
Otto Nowak ..... Tilmar Kuhn

Sound design: Eloise Whitmore
Pianist: Paulette Marla Schmidt

Producer/Director: Polly Thomas
A Somethin Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b00v1511)
Roddy Doyle

James Naughtie and readers talk to the Irish writer Roddy Doyle about his Booker prize winning novel Paddy Clarke HA HA HA.

In the novel ten year old Paddy rampages through the streets of suburban Dublin with a pack of like-minded boys, playing cowboys and Indians, etching their names in wet concrete and lighting fires.

To get into the character of the boy Roddy took himself into his own childhood memories. He walked round Dublin and tried to remember how the City looked from a child's eye view, and he saw things he hadn't seen since he was ten, and realised that children don't discriminate in their outlook.

In the book Doyle captures the sensations and speech patterns of a ten year old without resorting to sentimentality. This is a book that reminds you of your own childhood, the fun things, the scary, and the incomprehensible.

It's a portrayal of ordinary family life - the father learning to drive is just one comic set piece; but there's also the brutality of the school playground and the unvarnished but slow realisation that Paddy's parents' marriage is falling apart.

Roddy Doyle wrote this book when he was still a teacher and his son was newly born. He finished longer passages during the Christmas and Easter holidays when he had more time; and wrote shorter sections when his son was napping.

Roddy Doyle is known for the sharp edged street humour in previous books such as the Commitments and the Snapper, and in the programme he shows he still has that trademark Dublin wit.

James Naughtie chairs the programme.

November's Bookclub choice : 'Thomas Hardy - Time Torn Man' by Claire Tomalin

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00v157m)
Roger McGough goes through the Poetry Please requests to find poems about the things that make a house a home. Listeners suggest poetry evoking memories of home as a mercurial place of light and shade changing as we grow older. There are poems by AA Milne, UA Fanthorpe, RL Stevenson which together go beyond the mere bricks and mortar into unique places and spaces for childhood and growth, for nourishment, for bereavement and decline.


SUN 17:00 Foreign Bodies (b00txhp0)
Britain is the second largest destination in the world for international students, after the US.

They contribute £3 billion to the British economy and are a key source of revenue for UK higher education. Yet in the media foreign students seem to appear only as suspected terrorists (in the wake of the arrest of the former UCL student Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab) or as cash cows for British universities, and most recently as possible illegal immigrants.

What does it feel like to be seen as cash cow, possible illegal immigrant or possible terrorist? Are the British as hospitable as we like to think, and exactly how world class is British higher education? Why do foreign students come to study in Britain and how does the dream measure up against the reality?

This programme also explores another story: how the presence of foreign students reveals the tensions and contradictions within a UK 'national' education system now operating in a globalised world driven by market forces. If Britain thinks of foreign students as a problem, they will go elsewhere (Sweden now offers degrees in English with no fees at all for foreign students) and UK higher education will become the Bates Motel of the global education world, somewhere off the main road.

Presenter: Philip Dodd

Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00v11yp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00v1yg6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00v1yg8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00v1ygb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00v158b)
Sheila McClennon makes her selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

The challenges facing wildlife cameramen John Aitchison as he attempts to film penguins diving in the Antarctic is featured on the programme this week. There's also the tale of a dramatic plot by the FBI to sabotage Citizen Kane in 1941, and Berlin in the thirties as Christopher Isherwood meets the enigmatic Sally Bowles.

As Nigeria celebrates fifty years of Independence, one of the original colonial cadets returns to meet up with the man who became his lifelong friend. And a Scottish gamekeeper also arrives in Africa to swap jobs with a Ranger in the Kalahari desert.

The Unbelievable Truth - Radio 4
The Empire's Last Officers - Radio 4
Run Up To The Ryder Cup - Radio 4
Goodbye to Berlin - Radio 4
Gaugin: The Right To Dare - Radio 4
Radio 1 Stories - Radio 1
A View Through A Lens - Radio 4
Big Game, Little Game - Radio 4
The Kane Conspiracy - Radio 4
The Leon Russell Story - Radio 2
Great Lives - Radio 4
Yerma - Radio 3
The Alchemist Himself - Radio 4
The Danny Baker Show - Radio 5 Live

PHONE: 0370 010 0400
FAX: 0161 244 4243
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Cecile Wright.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00v15dh)
Ruth finds Kathy upset, having overheard people criticising Jamie. Josh wasn't involved in the trashing of the bird hide - in fact, he's upset that Jamie's ditched him for older mates.

Jamie's unhappy to be missing Jill's birthday lunch in Bath. He's also refusing to name names - although he is helping Robert repair the hide. Kathy's anxious as this is GCSE year for Jamie. Since Sid died, everything's going wrong. She confesses that Jamie was responsible for all the graffiti, which Sid never knew about. Kathy's determined to stay strong and impose discipline, even if Jamie resents her for it.

Kenton misses Jamie, but Shula reminds him he's not his dad. Perhaps it's time to move on. As Shula and Jill enjoy the morning service at Bath Abbey, Jill expresses how proud she is of Pip, who's managed to organise the Young Farmers dance at Brookfield. But she wonders what the future holds for Kenton. She likes having family close by, and just hopes Kenton doesn't up-sticks to go and live near Meriel.

Shula manages to steer Jill to the surprise lunch location. The big reveal doesn't go exactly as planned, but Jill's over the moon to see everyone who's gathered.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00v15dk)
In the UK, the coalition government is calling for legislation to recall MPs, who don't live up to the standards of their electorate. Recalling public officials is a familiar pastime in the United States. Over the past two years, mayors across the USA have faced more attempted recalls then ever before. Matt Frei talks to Mayor Doug Isaacson of North Pole, Alaska. Mayor Isaacson faces a recall vote next week and shares his opinion of this tool of the American democratic process.

Former correspondent and columnist Dave Kindred recalls the glory days of the local DC paper also known as The Washington Post. Matt Frei joins him for a few good stories at the after-hours hang out - the Post Pub.

Photojournalist Ruth Gruber is 99 years old and now retired, but her career was long and adventurous. Her passion for reporting even propelled her to visit Nazi-controlled Germany, though she herself is an American Jew. She recalls the highlights and high suspense of her career chasing stories and challenging expectations.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00js222)
Penelope's People

Divorcing Grandpa

In Penelope's People, a new series of specially commissioned monologues, Penelope Keith presents three very different women, coming to terms with their changing circumstances - and demonstrates her skills as a versatile character actor.

In Divorcing Grandpa by Roy Apps, Penelope Keith plays Eleanor - an upper-middle class woman whose professional husband has been sent to prison for an unspecified white-collar crime. In order to continue living in the style to which she has become accustomed (and to continue to be able to afford her darling grand-daughter's school fees) she realises that she too must break the law - and quickly discovers that she is rather good at it.

Reader: Penelope Keith

Producer: David Blount
A Pier Production for Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b00tznbk)
Gay Britain

According to recent Office for National Statistics figures the UK has fewer gay, lesbian and bisexual people living in it than we thought. But gay rights groups have questioned the number. Why is it so much lower than previous estimates? More or Less investigates.

Paying for bankers' mistakes

The Irish Central Bank has released an estimate of the total cost of bailing out its banking sector: about 45bn euros, or £39bn. We ask a favourite More or Less question: is that really a big number?

"Needless" deaths?

"More than 70 children may have died needlessly after heart surgery" claimed a recent Sunday Telegraph headline. But the story was based on research led by David Spiegelhalter, a medical statistician and no stranger to More or Less, who thinks the reporter misunderstood his numbers.

The PM 's pay

Last week we noted that the prime minister's salary has become a convenient benchmark against which other public sector workers' pay is measured. But you wanted us to go further and work out the PM's total reward. So we have.

The micromort

We examine the micromort, a cheeky little unit of risk, with Matt Parker, the "stand up mathematician". Matt's show at the Edinburgh Fringe was a raging success (which is what we'd expect of a show about maths).

Police numbers

An HMIC report in July claimed that only 11% of police officers are available to respond to incidents at any one time. Since then the number - generally summarised as 1 in 10 - has been widely quoted. The implication, it seems, is that while one officer is fighting crime, the other 9 are holed up in the police station eating donuts or form-filling. But with the help of listener Tim Treffry we examine whether that's really the conclusion we should draw.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00tzp0s)
On Last Word this week:

He starred in some of Hollywood's greatest movies, but he never won an Oscar. We reflect on the life and loves of Hollywood legend Tony Curtis.
We hear the story of the abortive coup against Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev as we remember Gennady Yanayev, the vice president who tried to topple his boss.
Also Catherine Walker, the discreet fashion designer who created spectacular dresses for Diana Princess of Wales.
Jimi Heselden, the self made businessman from Yorkshire who gave millions to charity and died whilst out riding his Segway scooter
And the self styled King of the Buskers Don Partridge who had a hit in the late sixties with the single "Rosie".


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00v11d8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00v131f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00txh29)
The Big Society

Bigging It Up

The Coalition claims its Big Society is more than a slogan and its ideas are shaping key policies. Anne McElvoy investigates the little-known genesis of David Cameron's big idea and examines what its roots reveal about how the government will go about doing less - and ensuring society does more.

Presenter Anne McElvoy
Producer Simon Coates
Editor Innes Bowen.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00v1ygl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00v15gp)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b00v15j7)
Episode 21

BBC Radio 4 brings back a much loved TV favourite - What the Papers Say. It does what it says on the tin. In each programme a leading political journalist has a wry look at how the broadsheets and red tops treat the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond. This week James Forsyth of The Spectator takes the chair and the editor is Catherine Donegan.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00txjw1)
'A Taste of Honey'

Francine Stock talks to Murray Melvin, the star of A Taste Of Honey, who reveals the real reason why he never picked up his Best Actor award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1962

Documentary maker Mark Cousins talks about The First Movie, in which he gave movie cameras to children from a war-torn village in Kurdistan so they could make their screen debuts

Director Rodrigo Cortes reveals how he managed to make a whole movie set in a coffin.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00v12xc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 04 OCTOBER 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00vcmsg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00txhtz)
Liverpool Football Club - Au Pairs

Laurie Taylor explores the different experiences of au pairs in the UK and finds that the ( predominantly ) girls view of the families they work for is not always very positive. Laurie also talks to sociologist John Williams about his new biography of Liverpool Football Club and explores not only the early history of the club in the late 19th century and its place in the rapidly expanding seaport of Liverpool, but also how it has reflected the city it inhabits and how it fits into what some call Liverpool's 'exceptionalism'.
Producer: Chris Wilson.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00v12tx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00v1yht)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00v1yml)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00v1yn9)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00v1ync)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00v1ynf)
With the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00v15m2)
Is lamb becoming a luxury item? Over the past five years the price of lamb has doubled, which has been good news for farmers but perhaps not so cheering for consumers. Its partly down to supply and demand as there are fewer sheep in Britain now. But there's also a growing export market. Around 30% of British lamb is now being exported, and around 80 per cent of it goes to France. The exchange rate means that British lamb is cheaper than French. Also on Farming Today, British egg producers are demanding EU protection so they can compete with European farmers. The British egg industry says it's invested 300 million pounds in new enriched cages which will replace battery systems when they are outlawed in 2012. But the producers of around 30% of European eggs say they won't make that deadline. British farmers argue that will put them at a huge disadvantage, because they have followed the rules. And there's still no resolution in sight to the dispute between Scottish mackerel fishermen and their Icelandic and Faroese counterparts. Aberdeenshire ports are still firmly closed to their foreign competitors' trawlers, in protest at the amount of mackerel they are catching.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Varle.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00v1ynh)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00v1mt6)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and James Naughtie, including:
07:45 Should it be harder for trade unions to take industrial action?
08:10 Chancellor George Osborne discusses the state of UK's economy
08:43 Today presenter James Naughtie takes the new driving test.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00v1mtz)
Andrew Marr talks to Jonathan Franzen, hailed as a 'Great American Novelist' for his latest book, Freedom. Amidst the backdrop of the war on terror, environmental disaster and class war, Franzen chronicles the lives, choices and compromises of one family. The playwright Shelagh Stephenson also explores family tensions in her new play, about what happens when a missing child returns home. Philosophy is under attack as advances in neuroscience question many of its assumptions, and yet Barry Smith argues that the science of the mind needs philosophers now more than ever, to make sense of its new discoveries. And Robert Douglas-Fairhurst celebrates the great Victorian journalist Henry Mayhew and his captivating portraits of life on the streets of London.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v1mvt)
Exploration, Exploitation and Enlightenment (1680 - 1820 AD)

Akan drum

Neil MacGregor's history of the world as told through things that time has left behind. Throughout this week he is examining the often troubled relationship between Europe and the rest of the world during the 18th century.

Today he tells the extraordinary story of a now fragile African drum. It was taken to America during the years of the slave trade where it came into contact with Native Americans. The drum was brought to England by Sir Hans Sloane, whose collection became the British Museum in 1753. This drum, the earliest African-American object in the Museum, is a rare surviving example of an instrument whose music was to profoundly influence American culture - bought to America on a slave ship and transported to Britain by a slave owner. The historian Anthony Appiah and the writer Bonnie Greer consider the impact of this drum.

Producer: Anthony Denselow
Music research specifically for the Akan drum: Michael Doran.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00v1mvw)
Presented by Jane Garvey. Cyndi Lauper famous for her hits 'Girls just want to have fun', 'Time after Time' and 'True Colours' talks about her life and new album of blues music . Can being wrong ever be right? Kathryn Shulz author of 'Being Wrong. Adventures in the Margin of Error', debates the issue with columnist Johann Hari. Helen Castor explores the power of the medieval queens and we look at how the family courts deal with children after divorce. The Family Justice Review has just finished it's public consultation, with their recommendations to be published next year. We consider whether claims that the current system is biased against fathers and damaging to children have any basis.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00v1nh8)
The Power of Life and Death

The Resurrection of Imelda Sharp

When a number of distinguished members of government committees are found dead in suspicious circumstances, it falls to DCI Kate Duncan of Scotland Yard's Sensitive Cases Squad to discover what the connecting factor is.

Mark Lawson's deftly plotted murder-mystery gets to grips with a major concern at the heart of our cash-strapped NHS: the post code lottery and exactly who is to be considered deserving of the most expensive life saving drugs on the market.

Kate Duncan- Haydn Gwynne
Lorenzo- Lloyd Thomas
Briggs- Chris McHallem
Hermione Sharp - Abigail McKern
Dame Imelda Sharp- Honor Blackman
Sue Wells- Abigail McGibbon
Dr Tom Cready- Nick Dunning
Dee Mortimer- Stella McCusker
Jeremy Vine- Himself

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan. Written by Mark Lawson.


MON 11:00 Brandreth's Pills (b00pdk2q)
Gyles Brandreth tells the tale of one of the most influential people you've never heard of - his great great grandfather, Benjamin. It's a story that takes us from Liverpool in the 1830s to New York, with a cast of hucksters, quacks, politicians, millionaires, and medics - not to mention the founders of tabloid journalism and mass advertising. Benjamin Brandreth set sail from Liverpool in 1835 with nothing. By the time of his death in 1887 he was a New York senator, a landowner, the owner of one of New York's biggest hotels, and one of the richest men in the country. He had invented the giant billboard, financed Gordon Bennett's yellow press and developed mass advertising. How? Brandreth's vegetable pills! They were a powerful laxative. Brandreth claimed they could cure almost anything, he spent a fortune on advertising, and people believed him.

Producer: Chris Bond.


MON 11:30 Craig Brown's Lost Diaries (b00v1nhb)
January and February

Satirist Craig Brown dips into the private lives of public figures from the 1960s to the present day.

As the New Year begins, great thinkers like Barack Obama, John Prescott and Barbara Cartland turn their thoughts to new beginnings.

Voiced by Jan Ravens, Alistair McGowan, Lewis McLeod, Ewan Bailey, Margaret Cabourn-Smith and Dolly Wells.

Written by Craig Brown.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00v1nhd)
You and Yours is 40. To mark this special Birthday Julian Worricker presents the first in a series of special programmes.

The Telephone.

In 1970 your phone was supplied by the GPO and the big news was that all domestic users would soon be able to call the USA and Australia from the comfort of their own home. Four decades ago there were 6,000 telephone exchanges connecting calls across the UK, today there are none.

To celebrate the programme's 40th anniversary You and Yours explores the direction of a revolution which means phones are now mobile mini-computers and which has given rise to two modern pet hates - the call centre and the automated switchboard.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00v2xnq)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00v1nhg)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Round Britain Quiz (b00v1nhj)
(10/12) The teams from the North of England and the South of England return for a revenge fixture, in the game of fiendish connections and lateral thinking. The questionmaster is Tom Sutcliffe.
Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00v15dh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00dzmcf)
Mandrake

Irene, an old woman threatens her new neighbour with a scythe when he suggests cutting down a tree which is on his land.

Irene claims that her husband is buried under the tree- "to cut the branches would be to cut his limbs." But the tree is around a hundred years old.

Ruth, a social worker is called in to assess Irene's mental health and ability to look after herself. But as she gets to know Irene she is drawn into a strange and magical tale that will change her life forever.

Written and directed by Anita Sullivan
Music by Sara Harrison

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00v1294)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 At War with Wellington Docudrama (b00d1x77)
Travel

Peter and Dan Snow introduce letters and diaries of the soldiers who fought the Peninsula campaign against Napoleon's forces in Spain and Portugal.

Delving into the archives of the Royal Greenjackets Museum, we discover how Wellington's men travelled, from their voyages to Portugal to their long forced marches. They suffered in the heat and shivered in the rain, and we hear the songs and military airs that kept them inspired to fight for King and country.

The part of the Duke of Wellington is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, the other members of the cast are Neil Dudgeon, David Holt, Frank Stirling and David Westhead.

Producer: Alyn Shipton
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00v137p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00v1nhl)
Islam in America

Ernie Rea is joined by three guests who discuss how their own religious tradition affects their values and outlook on the world, often revealing hidden and contradictory truths.

In this programme Ernie Rea and his guests explore the history and place of Islam in America, following recent tensions over plans to build an Islamic cultural centre close to Ground Zero in New York. Confusion over whether the building will be a mosque or a community centre have fuelled suspicions over the motivation of those behind the plans and given rise to a wave of Islamophobia across the USA. In the countdown to the mid-term elections in November, is such anti-Muslim rhetoric politically motivated or are Americans having a long overdue conversation about the place of Islam in their society?

Joining Ernie to discuss this are Robert Salaam a former US Marine who converted to Islam and is now the editor of The American Muslim: Dr Hussein Rashid, Lecturer at Hofstra University in New York and associate editor of Religion Dispatches; and Daniel Pipes Director of the Middle East Forum in Philadelphia.

The middle interview comes from Pamela Geller, editor of the blog, AtlasShrugs.com and author of "The Post-American Presidency: The Obama Administration's War on America."

Producer: Karen Maurice.


MON 17:00 PM (b00v1nhn)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, with Eddie Mair.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00v2xp9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b00v1nhq)
Series 6

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Henning Wehn and Graeme Garden are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Cake, Shoes, Nudity and Walt Disney.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00v1nhs)
Jazzer's sporting a black eye - his girlfriend's husband came home unexpectedly, and he spent last night at Joe and Eddie's campsite. Tom reluctantly agrees to put Jazzer up for a couple of nights. Overjoyed, Jazzer assures Tom he'll be the model guest. The Grundys' turkeys never seem to shut up and he's not the outdoor type.

Robert tells Lynda that Jill had a marvellous birthday lunch. Lynda muses that they must visit Bath again themselves soon. She gets a little irritated when conversation turns to the peregrine platform and how it's going to work. She asks if Robert shouldn't be on his way to Borchester by now. Robert says he's picking up Jamie in an hour to buy materials to repair the damaged hide.

At the timber merchants sulky Jamie is less than enthusiastic about their mission. Robert takes every opportunity to involve him in the work when they get to the hide, to little avail. Eventually Robert gets Jamie to open up a little by talking about Sid and cricket, and Lucy's new baby, Sydney. But when Robert mentions Kenton Jamie's nonchalant. Robert's not fooled. He observes to Lynda that Jamie's acting tough, but he thinks that inside he's hurting like hell.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00v1nj5)
Turner Prize 2010 contenders; Gary Shteyngart

With Kirsty Lang.
David Tennant stars in Single Father, a TV drama about a newly-widowed man coping with raising four young children. Sarah Crompton reviews.

The War Horse Puppeteers Basil Jones and Adrian Kohler are now collaborating with director Neil Bartlett on a gay love story. They discuss Or You Could Kiss Me, now showing at The National Theatre.

Rachel Campbell-Johnston assesses the Turner Prize 2010 Exhibition.
American Jewish writer Gary Shteyngart has drawn on his Russian roots in his prize winning first novel The Russian Debutante's Handbook, his satire Absurdistan and again in his new book Super Sad True Love Story. This is set in a future where America is collapsing, communication is via computer devices and books are reviled by all but the central character.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


MON 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v1mvt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


MON 20:00 Sex, Porn and Teenagers (b00v1nkx)
"Shag bands" are thin coloured rubber bracelets, indicating how far the wearer will go sexually if the band is broken.

Purple for a kiss or yellow for a hug may seem comparatively harmless but some of the other colours such as black for full intercourse or blue for oral sex ring alarm bells.

A Wakefield MP recently campaigned to stop shops selling them after complaints from parents including a mother who innocently bought some for her 6-year old's party bag. Elsewhere schools have banned "shag bands" after finding pupils wearing them.

Part of playground culture, they're often worn innocently or in a show of bravado but there is a darker side where early sexual exploration strays into the easily accessible world of internet porn. Where children once passed notes, they now use their mobile phones to share explicit images and there's peer pressure through social networking sites.

Presenter Miranda Sawyer, herself a mother, investigates whether society and parents are aware of just what their children are getting up to and asks how concerned should we be about the sexualisation of children in media, advertising and fashion such as sale of padded bras for pre-pubescent girls or sexual references on T shirts for primary-aged kids.

Even though teenage pregnancy rates are falling, Britain still has the highest rate in Western Europe. As many as 1 in 4 teenagers have underage sex with anecdotal evidence of sexual experimentation including anal sex to avoid pregnancy. However sex education is improving in schools and access to contraception and STI screening has never been better.

But there are concerns that unlike the 'dirty mags' of their parent's day, teenagers now access porn which can be addictive, desensitising and threatening to healthy relationships in the future.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00v1nlk)
Whatever Happened to the Sisterhood?

Women will be hit disproportionately by the Budget cuts already announced by the government: A new study suggests that they will shoulder nearly three quarters of the burden, because they rely more on the state for benefits and are more likely to work in the public sector than men.

The state has reduced women's dependency on men, only to install itself as the new patriarch. If the state shrinks, it will be women who will feel the difference

Is this what generations of feminists have fought for? Where is the sisterhood now, marching on the treasury?
Jo Fidgen goes in search of modern feminism in the rubble of the economy and asks whether being a woman is no longer a political state.


MON 21:00 Material World (b00txj8l)
Quentin Cooper presents the week's digest of science in and behind the headlines. In this edition: the latest planet capable of supporting life; how the World Wide Web unveils the laws of our collective behaviour; 'dry water' - a powder that's 95% H2O; and the discovery of Francis Crick's lost correspondence, revealing the fractious exchanges between the rival parties hunting the structure of DNA.

The producer is Roland Pease.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00v1mtz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00v2xqx)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00v1np8)
George Osborne signals big reforms to welfare at the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham.

NATO attacked in Pakistan at a key border crossing.

Controversial Dutch politician, Geert Wilders, on trial for inciting racial hatred.

With Ritula Shah in Birmingham and Felicity Evans in London.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00v1npb)
Rebecca Hunt - Mr Chartwell

Episode 1

Written by Rebecca Hunt.

Set across five days in July 1964 we follow the bizarrely intertwined lives of Sir Winston Churchill, Esther Hammerhans and the unwelcome visitor they both share.

July 1964, and the day looms when Winston Churchill must leave Parliament. Meanwhile Esther, a library clerk, has her own black date in the diary. She also has an unusual visitor.

The reader is Miriam Margolyes.

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Great Unanswered Questions (b00v1nq7)
Series 2

Episode 3

After cremation, will a 20 stone person fit into a cremation jar?

What age does the average couple cease to have sex?

And, does each of us have the potential to be a bright sparkling diamond?

Comedian Colin Murphy and his two resident nerds Dr David Booth and Matthew Collins try to answer the unanswerable.

With comedian Adam Bloom.

Producer: Jackie Hamilton.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2010.


MON 23:30 Mitch Benn's Wondrous Stories (b00n52l1)
Armed with little more than a harpsichord and a copy of The Hobbit, musician and comedian Mitch Benn fearlessly uncovers the myths and legends of the symphonic concept album.

Meeting some of the leading artists and fans of the genre, including Rick Wakeman, Jeff Wayne, David Bedford, Brian Blessed and Stuart Maconie, he battles capes and keyboard solos to rediscover the wondrous stories behind these epic musical extravaganzas.

From Rick Wakeman's 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' to Jeff Wayne's 'The War of the Worlds', musicians in the seventies somehow decided that it was a good idea to retell classic tales in the form of symphonic concept albums.

Classical music met rock to spawn towering monuments to pretension and excess: gigantic gatefold covers, sleeve notes longer than a 19th century novel, and - surely its defining feature- portentous narration delivered by some of our finest thesps.

For a generation of acned youth weaned on Tolkien and Moorcock, these epic compositions were masterpieces, a symphonic escape from dreary mid-70's discontent and economic gloom. They sold millions, but until recently, languished forgotten in the vinyl collections of middle-aged men, gathering dust in the post-punk apocalypse. But with The War of the Worlds now filling stadiums world wide thirty years on, and Rick Wakeman's two tudor-tastic Six Wives of Henry VIII concerts selling out at Hampton Court last year, can Mitch be discovering a symphonic rock renaissance?

Produced by Jackie Curthoys and Dave Dodd
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 05 OCTOBER 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00vcmsv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v1mvt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00v2xsn)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00v2xt3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00v2xt5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00v2xt7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00v2xvq)
With the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00v1phk)
Anna Hill hears calls for ducks to be vaccinated against salmonella. Currently there is no legislation, despite duck eggs being implicated in a death from salmonella earlier this year. A visit to a Norfolk duck egg farm illustrates measures which can be taken to combat the disease.

Farm buildings which collapsed under heavy snow last winter could once again be under threat. Jonathan Powell from Positive Weather Solutions correctly predicted last year's terrible winter, and has forecast this coming winter will be equally harsh. He tells Farming Today that Scotland will be particularly affected.

The five most threatened bumblebees in England have made an unprecedented comeback, apparently down to environmental work by farmers in Kent. The RSPB and Natural England now plan to import the short haired bumble bee from New Zealand and reintroduce it.

Presented by Anna Hill, produced by Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00v1phm)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Justin Webb, featuring:
07:52 Is the UK prepared for a cyberwar?
08:10 Prime Minister David Cameron outlines his plans for Britain's future
08:35 Film critic Derek Malcolm remembers the late Sir Norman Wisdom.


TUE 09:00 The Brown Years (b00v1php)
Episode 3

Steve Richards tells the inside story of Gordon Brown's time as prime minister, based on revealing interviews with his close colleagues.

Interviewees include former ministers Peter Mandelson, Ed Balls, Harriet Harman, Jack Straw, Douglas Alexander, Alan Johnson, Hazel Blears, Peter Hain and Shriti Vadera; and several former Downing St insiders including those responsible for policy, political strategy and polling.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


TUE 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v2y7d)
Exploration, Exploitation and Enlightenment (1680 - 1820 AD)

Hawaiian feather helmet

This week Neil MacGregor's history of the world is telling the story of European encounters across the globe during the 18th century.

Today he finds out what happened to Captain Cook as he was mapping and collecting in the Pacific. Neil tells the story through a chieftain's helmet made from a myriad of colourful bird feathers that was given to Cook when he landed in Hawaii in 1778. This is not a story with a happy ending. The anthropologist Nicholas Thomas and the Hawaiian academics Marques Hanalei Marzan, Kyle Nakanelua and Kaholokula help describe Cook's impact in the Pacific and the meaning of the feathered helmet.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00v1phr)
Presented by Jane Garvey. Legendary American jazz singer Sheila Jordan, who is in her eighties, talks about life on the road and performs in the studio. The CPS is considering whether to prosecute two campaigners for their graphic protest against abortion. When it comes to peaceful protest - what is publically acceptable? Yewande Akinola is an engineer taking part in the Channel Four series "Titanic: The Mission" that's rebuilding parts of the original ship. She talks to Jane about traditional construction techniques and her interest in low energy consumption buildings. And the joys and pitfalls of keeping urban chickens.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00v2y85)
The Power of Life and Death

A Pill For Everything

When a number of distinguished members of government committees are found dead in suspicious circumstances, it falls to DCI Kate Duncan to discover what the connecting factor is.

A series of anonymous letters suggested that Dame Imelda Sharpe might have been murdered. An exhumation of the body revealed the presence of a prescription drug not mentioned in her medical records.

Mark Lawson's deftly plotted murder-mystery gets to grips with a major concern at the heart of our cash-strapped NHS: the post code lottery and exactly who is to be considered deserving of the most expensive life saving drugs on the market.

Kate Duncan-Haydn Gwynne
Lorenzo-Lloyd Thomas
Briggs-Chris McHallem
Hermione Sharp -Abigail McKern
Dame Imelda Sharp-Honor Blackman
Sue Wells-Abigail McGibbon
Dr Tom Cready-Nick Dunning
Dee Mortimer-Stella McCusker
Jeremy Vine-Himself

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan.
Written by Mark Lawson.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b00v1pht)
Series 1

Episode 23

23/40. We go in search of fungi this week with expert Lynne Boddy. We have previously reported the importance of microbes in Saving Species. "It's the little things that run the world" Aaron Bernstein from Harvard University told us. Fungi belong to that group of little things - but some fungi are not so little. One type forms the largest terrestrial living organism on earth with its matrix of underground roots [hyphae] spreading across an area the size of a football pitch. We're in a west Wales woodland looking for the wonderful fruiting bodies, at the time of year when the otherwise hidden fungi emerges from the ground with their beautiful, odd, weird and strangely shaped and coloured mushrooms. And they have as many intriguing common names as they are varied in appearance.

We discover the crucial role fungi have in keeping woodlands alive.

We're also back in Africa with a report from Tessa McGregor about the successful conservation of the Grevy's Zebra in the Samburu National Park in Kenya.

Presented by Brett Westwood
Produced by Sheena Duncan
Series Editor Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Never Before in the History of Motion Pictures... (b00rkm42)
With the help of Michael Winner, actress Adjoah Andoh - and those both currently and formerly responsible for bringing us the hyperbole and bombast we've come to expect from film advertising - writer Patrick Humphries takes an affectionate look at the story of the movie trailer.

He charts its beginnings from simple cinema slide into the high octane technological wizardry we're used to today.

Central to the story in the UK is Esther Harris who dominated British trailer making for over 50 years beginning in the 1920s. We hear from this 'Queen of Trailers', herself in a never before broadcast interview. This wonderfully eccentric 90 year old explains over a cup of tea how her extraordinary career began and the problems she encountered with censors and occasionally directors including Michael Winner who she recalls told her, "you're a bloody nuisance you know but you've got style!"

Passionate trailer lover Michael Winner talks about Esther and that relentlessly thorny issue, censorship and we find out about his own personal trailer favourites.

With king size thrills and breathtaking suspense, this is a never before heard tribute to a unique aspect of the film industry; and of course, perhaps to no ones surprise, it features a very gravelly voice....

Producer: Katrina Fallon

A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in March 2010.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00v1pj0)
When children are used as weapons in divorce battles, how much damage is being done? England's most senior family court judge has accused divorcing couples - and well-educated parents in particular - of using their children to try to score points in their personal disputes. Sir Nicholas Wall said parents who separate "rarely behave reasonably", use their children as both "the battlefield" and "the ammunition" and simply don't realise how much damage they're inflicting on them. He believes things would improve if the family justice system was less adversarial and discouraged parents to fight. What's your experience of divorce? Were your children used to get back at the other parent? If your parents divorced, what was it like for you? Did one parent bad-mouth the other? Or were they able to hold it together - for the sake of the children? You can share your views with Julian Worricker by emailing youandyours@bbc.co.uk or call 08700 100 444. (Lines open at 10am on the day).


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00v2yxq)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00v1pk7)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Soul Music (b00v1pk9)
Series 10

The Emperor

Beethoven's fifth and final piano concerto, The Emperor is majestic and moving in equal measure.

Richard McMahon plays extracts and discusses the virtuosic it demands.

Australian film producer, Hal McElroy, talks about using the Adagio (the second movement) to illustrate the classic 1970s film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

That was where Andrew Law – who was Chaplain at Malvern College - first heard the piece. He describes the Adagio as being 'one of those pieces of art which it is worth being alive to have heard'.

Concert pianist, James Rhodes, describes how The Emperor was central to his childhood and his developing love of Beethoven's piano music.

Music teacher and singer, Prue Hawthorne, recalls how her father (an amateur clarinetist) labouriously transcribed by hand the horn and clarinet sections of the first movement so they could play along with the record in their living room.

Also contributing is the renowned Beethoven biographer, John Suchet.

Concert pianist Richard McMahon has now retired as a teacher at the Royal Welsh School of Music and Drama.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Producer: Karen Gregor

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2010.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00v1nhs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00v1q3z)
Matt Hartley - The Pursuit

By Matt Hartley.

When a road accident ends in tragedy, the police officer involved sets out to discover who was to blame. But is he prepared to accept the findings?

Paul . . . . . Don Gilet
Clare . . . . . Claire Price
Simon . . . . . Adeel Akhtar
Cormac . . . . . Sean Baker
Alison . . . . . Sally Orrock
Thomas . . . . . Rielly Newbold

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00v1q41)
Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

A new acquisition by the British Library appears to show plans for an invasion of England and its overseas territories by the French during, and after, the Seven Years War. Or does it? Vanessa asks whether these plans were ever likely to be put into action is this new manuscript evidence of eighteenth century French deception?

A diary found by a listener in Norwich tells us more about the activities of the River Emergency Service on the River Thames during the Second World War, in particular how it ferried in nurses and other emergency workers into London's Docklands during the Blitz.

Another diary that a listener came across in the Lincolnshire Archives, shines a light on the new, professional world of midwifery in the late eighteenth century. The diarist is a Matthew Flinders, one of the growing numbers of men who took over this traditionally female role in the 150 years up until the beginning of the twentieth century.

And, in Paris, Dr John Mullen needs listeners help in researching the British music hall during the First World War.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Contact:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Presenter: Vanessa Collingridge
Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00v2z35)
Three Short Stories by E Nesbit

Her Marriage Lines

She is known now, almost exclusively, as a children's writer - the author of The Railway Children. But E. Nesbit was more than that: a pioneer Socialist, a campaigner for Women's Rights and a passionate social reformer. She was also a prolific poet and author of adult fiction.

The stories in this series are taken from 'In Homespun', a collection that was originally published in 1896, and are set in the villages of South Kent and East Sussex that Nesbit knew well. Told in the first person, by a variety of strong, women characters- the sort of character E. Nesbit specialized in - looking back on their earlier lives. Their voices are robust and distinct.

Here, by turns, are danger, comedy and romance. At stake? Marriage and money. Deft and atmospheric writing from a master story teller.

Her Marriage Lines is a wonderfully comic detective story cum romance. Harry, the son of the house, wants to marry Poll, but the delightfully wicked old housekeeper has other ideas. When the Old Man dies unexpectedly, poison is suspected. But there is a surprising twist in the tale.

Reader: Jenny Agutter
Abridged by Roy Apps

Producer/Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 At War with Wellington Docudrama (b00d1znp)
Food and Entertainment

Peter and Dan Snow continue their investigation into the experiences of the army that marched with Wellington in Spain and Portugal in 1808.

We find out what the soldiers ate and drank, and what they did for entertainment. From the groaning tables of winter quarters to the arduous rations of the road, we travel from the formal dances for officers and men to the honorary bullfights staged for Wellington.

The part of the Duke of Wellington is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, the other members of the cast are Neil Dudgeon, David Holt, Frank Stirling and David Westhead.

Producer: Alyn Shipton
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Tracing Your Roots (b00v1q43)
Series 5

Caribbean Roots

October is Black History Month and this week Tracing Your Roots hears from listeners with family ties to the Caribbean. We follow Monica Brown, whose family come from Jamaica, as she makes an emotional trip to Zanzibar, visiting the underground chamber where slaves - including, she believes, her ancestors - were kept in horrific conditions before being sold. She wants to know more about her east African heritage.

Rosemarie Barnes also has slavery on her family tree, or so she thinks. Her great great great grandfather (who lived in Essex in the mid-nineteenth century) shares the name of a man who appears on the Jamaican slave register. Were they one and the same person? And if so, how did Edward Andrews get to England?

Soldiers from the Caribbean played their part in World War One, but how were they treated in comparison with their white counterparts? And were false promises made to them to induce them to head for Europe? Valerie Vaughan-Dick and Sheena Simpson ask what their ancestors did in the war, and what greeted them on their return home.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00v1q45)
Shirley Williams and Sathnam Sanghera

Sue MacGregor and her guests - veteran politician Baroness Shirley Williams and writer Sathnam Sanghera - discuss favourite books by Khaled Hosseini, Giles Smith and Michael Ondaatje.

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Publisher: Bloomsbury

Lost in Music by Giles Smith
Publisher: Picador

The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje
Publisher: Bloomsbury

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2010.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00v2z82)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00v2z8s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Write Stuff (b00v1qkl)
Series 14

PG Wodehouse

More literary challenges will be set as another series of The Write Stuff starts, seeing the return of host, James Walton, along with novelists, John Walsh and Sebastian Faulks as team captains.

Each episode features an "Author of the Week" whose life and work provide a focus for the questions as well as the basis for the pastiches at the end of the show. This series the following writers will be "Authors of the Week":

- Episode 1: P.G. Wodehouse
- Episode 2: Tennessee Williams
- Episode 3: Marcel Proust
- Episode 4: The Beats (Kerouac, Ginsberg, Burroughs)
- Episode 5: Stephenie Meyer (author of the Twilight series)
- Episode 6: Edgar Allan Poe

As ever, the team captains will be joined by guest panellists from the literary world and this series the guests will include best-selling crime writer, Mark Billingham; Horrid Henry author, Francesca Simon; poet, Ian McMillan; children's author, Sue Limb and journalist and broadcaster, Francis Wheen.

The guest panellists for Episode 1 will be Francis Wheen and Ian McMillan and the show will finish, as ever, with each panellist reading out a pastiche of the "Author of the Week"'s work - this week they imagine how Wodehouse might have tackled historical fiction.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00v1qkn)
Kate's invited Phoebe over for a family Sunday lunch, but Jennifer and Brian have made plans. Kate's annoyed that she has to let Phoebe down. She complains that in South Africa grandparents drop everything for family. Adam distracts Kate by discussing her university course. Having covered some common interests, Adam invites Kate and Phoebe over to his on Sunday instead.

Later, Jennifer shows Kate photos of the repaired hide. Kate feels for Jamie - he's just a troubled teenager. Jennifer mentions that Amy got a 2:1 degree, and outlines what's next for her midwifery career. Kate reckons she'd be of use in the developing world.

Martyn Gibson's still against Brian's idea of a separate company - and particularly any Amside involvement. Brian's certain that Lilian will be easy to handle, however, emphasising that they'll be keeping Borchester Land at the centre of local farm commerce. Andrew chips in that this plan will keep Matt in check and they may be able to freeze Lilian out on the new board. They vote in favour.

Adam and Brian drink to the new company. Adam reminds Brian to phone Matt with the good news. But Brian feels like letting Matt sweat it out for a bit.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00v2z8v)
Russell Brand and Jo Brand; Wall Street review.

The second instalment of Russell Brand's autobiography, Booky Wook 2, charts the comedian's rise from crack addict to Hollywood star. He discusses overcoming his addictions to sex and drugs, meeting his fiance - the singer Katy Perry - and the infamous voicemails he left for Andrew Sachs.

Michael Douglas returns to his Oscar-winning role as the financial titan Gordon Gekko. Ruth Lea, former chief UK economist for Lehman Brothers, reviews the sequel to Wall Street, and considers how both Gekko and the financial world have changed since 1987, when the original film was released.

Comedian Jo Brand discusses her new memoir Can't Stand Up for Sitting Down, and examines how to construct the perfect joke.

Producer Jack Soper.


TUE 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v2y7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00v1qkq)
Afghanistan: Enemies Within

The planned withdrawal of British and other foreign troops from Afghanistan relies on the Afghan army and police to take over security duties.
Since 2002, the USA has spent $27bn - over half of its total reconstruction fund - training and equipping Afghan forces. The aim is to build up an army of 171,600 people and a police force of 134,000 by October 2011.
The Afghan President Hamid Karzai wants national forces to be in complete control of the country by 2014.
But these targets, and the loyalty of some personnel, are called into question by recent killings carried out by members of the Afghan security forces:
*20 July 2010: two US weapons trainers were shot dead by an Afghan soldier
*13 July 2010: three British soldiers were attacked by an Afghan soldier who shot one dead in his bed and fired a rocket-propelled grenade which killed two others
*3 November 2009: three British soldiers and two members of the Royal Military Police were shot dead by an Afghan policeman.
An investigation published in June 2010 by the US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction found that officials had often overstated the readiness of Afghan forces, rating some units as first class when they were incapable of fighting the Taliban on their own. It also reported high levels of desertion, corruption and drug abuse.
Gerry Northam asks if the transition to Afghan control is really on track.

Producer: David Lewis Editor: David Ross.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00v1qks)
The European Commission has proposed new rules that would force bus operators to provide on-board automated announcements for the benefit of the blind. Norman Baker, the UK Transport Minister, explains why he will be resisting any new regulation from Brussels. Peter White is joined by Emily Brothers, president of the National Federation of the Blind, John Major of the Confederation of Passenger Transport UK, and Peter Barker, Professor of the Inclusive Environment at Reading University.


TUE 21:00 The Secret Science of Pee (b00txhvf)
A research team at an Edinburgh University think they've cracked the answer to providing renewable, commercially viable and environmentally friendly energy from it; harvesting the multitude of medically powerful ingredients it holds could become big business; an innovative Danish company has found a way to turn it into plastics; NASA have even found a novel way of cooking with it in space!

The scientific applications for this wonder substance seem almost to be without end - and the good news doesn't end there. Not only is it free but we humans alone make enough of it every year to replace the entire contents of Loch Lomond - picture a million Olympic sized swimming pools full to brimming and you're getting close - so what's the downside? Attitude. More specifically, ours. Why? Well, because this amber nectar, miracle-working wonder stuff is urine - and we go squeamish at its mere mention, an attitude that has blinded us to its astonishing versatility and potential.

In The Secret Science of Pee Sally Magnusson provides a truly surprising and enlightening look at some of the more extraordinary and innovative contemporary scientific applications for urine; asks why we've become so uncomfortable with even talking about this casually despised blood product when it has been an essential part of life for centuries; and considers the shocking environmental cost (the UK uses 65,000 gigajoules a day to pump, stir, heat and aerate our urine - that's about a quarter of the output of the country's largest coal-fired power station) of flushing away such an abundant and abundantly useful substance.

Flushing the toilet will never be the same again.


TUE 21:30 The Brown Years (b00v1php)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00v2zbx)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00v1qkv)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis. With Robin Lustig.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00v2zbz)
Rebecca Hunt - Mr Chartwell

Episode 2

Written by Rebecca Hunt.

Set across five days in July 1964 we follow the bizarrely intertwined lives of Sir Winston Churchill, Esther Hammerhans and the unwelcome visitor they both share.

July 1964, and the day looms when Winston Churchill must leave Parliament. Meanwhile Esther, a library clerk, has her own black date in the diary. She also has an unusual visitor.

The reader is Miriam Margolyes.

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Shappi Talk (b00lk2zh)
Series 1

Unconventional Parents

Comedy series in which Shappi Khorsandi examines what it is like growing up in multi-cultural families.

Joining Shappi will be comedian John Gordillo who shares his memories of growing up in a Spanish family with a very forceful father. Shappi also chats with another 'related' guest- and also to Lenny Henry 'on location' to talk about his family.

There'll also be a chance for Shappi to chat with the audience and there'll be a song from Hils Barker.

Producer: Paul Russell
An Open Mike Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00v1qkx)
The return of the House of Lords from its summer break sees ministers challenged over their plans for reforms to the benefits system. Peers also question the Government over moves to phase out funding for speed cameras and debate the role of charities. Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 06 OCTOBER 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00vcmt5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v2y7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00v2zgm)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00v2zgp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00v2zgr)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00v2zh0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00v3k27)
With the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00v1qlp)
Egg producers hope bigger cages for their hens will change the image of the industry. Farming Today meets a farmer who says that many battery hens are healthier and happier than those allowed access to the outdoors. Farming Today meets a forager in Richmond in Yorkshire making a living from the fruits of the hedgerows and we hear that worms are in need of a PR make-over!
Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


WED 06:00 PM (b00v1qlr)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00v1qlt)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Segun Lee-French, Ray and Vi Donovan, Mary Coughlan and Simon Winchester.

Segun Lee-French is a Nigerian/Mancunian a singer, poet, composer, playwright and film-maker. His latest work is an autobiographical play 'Palm wine and stout' which tells of his journey, with his mother, to a small Nigerian village to meet his dad who he'd only met once before. 'Palm wine and stout' is on tour.

Ray and Vi Donovan's son Christopher was murdered in 2001. Since then they have done voluntary work visiting prisons to make offenders more aware of their effects on victims, through a programme called The Sycamore project, run by Prison Fellowship. They are among the curators of 'Art by Offenders', an exhibition organised by the Koestler Trust, in which people whose lives have been changed by crime curate art works by prisoners. Art by Offenders is on Spirit Level, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre.

Mary Coughlan is the Galway born singer renowned for her ability to inhabit each song with a voice of lived experience. Since she rose to international fame in 1985 with her seminal album 'Tired and Emotional' she has battled with addiction, problems in her personal life and career ups and downs. But she's now back with a new single 'Your Angel' and an autobiography, 'Bloody Mary' published by Hatchette Books.

Simon Winchester OBE studied geology before becoming a journalist and writer. As a reporter he covered events from Bloody Sunday to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the Falklands war. In his latest book, 'Atlantic' he tells the story of this great ocean from its birth to its eventual extinction millions of years in the future. "Atlantic: a vast ocean of a million stories" is published by Harper Press. He'll also be appearing at the Cheltenham Literary Festival.


WED 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v3kg5)
Exploration, Exploitation and Enlightenment (1680 - 1820 AD)

North American buckskin map

The history of humanity - as told through one hundred objects from the British Museum in London - is once again in North America. This week Neil MacGregor, the museum's director, is looking at Europe's engagement with the rest of the world in the 18th century.

Today he tells the story of a map, roughly drawn on deer skin, that was used as the British negotiated for land in the area between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi. It was probably drawn up by a Native American around 1774. Neil looks at how the French and the British were in conflict in the region, and examines the different attitudes to land and living between Europeans and Native Americans. Martin Lewis, an expert on maps from this region, and the historian David Edmunds describe the map and the clash of cultures that was played out within its boundaries.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00v1qlw)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Arlene Phillips, best known for her work on BBC's Strictly Come Dancing talks about her life career and new project the musical Flashdance. Vaginal atrophy is a distressing condition that affects up to fifty percent of women after the menopause. We hear from one sufferer and talk to Dr David Sturdee, Consultant Gynaecologist and President of the International Menopause Society about possible treatments. And following the news this week that the Coalition Government is to cut child benefit for those with incomes over £44,000 we consider whether the move is tough but unfair on many families. We hear from listeners and talk to Justine Roberts from Mumsnet and Dr Samantha Callan from the right leaning think tank the Centre for Social Justice.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00v3ky6)
The Power of Life and Death

The Red Triangle

When a number of distinguished members of government committees are found dead in suspicious circumstances, it falls to DCI Kate Duncan to discover what the connecting factor is.

An autopsy has revealed that Dame Imelda Sharp may have been killed by an experimental drug which she had not been prescribed. Now toxic levels of another unprescribed drug have been found in the body of a second patient of the same GP, Dr Tom Cready. DI Kate Duncan of Scotland Yard's Sensitive Cases Squad is investigating.

Mark Lawson's deftly plotted murder-mystery gets to grips with a major concern at the heart of our cash-strapped NHS: the post code lottery and exactly who is to be considered deserving of the most expensive life saving drugs on the market.

Kate Duncan - Haydn Gwynne
Lorenzo - Lloyd Thomas
Briggs - Chris McHallem
Hermione Sharp - Abigail McKern
Dame Imelda Sharp - Honor Blackman
Sue Wells - Abigail McGibbon
Dr Tom Cready - Nick Dunning
Dee Mortimer - Stella McCusker
Jeremy Vine - Himself

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan.
Written by Mark Lawson.


WED 11:00 Parting Shots (b00v1qly)
Series 2

Cold Warriors and the perils of forecasting

Matthew Parris opens classified Foreign Office files to discover valedictory despatches from behind the Iron Curtain. British diplomats used the traditional last telegram home from a foreign post to recount the strains of life under Communism - and its occasional upsides.

The programme reveals landmark despatches from Britain's last ambassadors to the Soviet Union, released for the first time under Freedom of Information, as well as a wealth of earlier material from the depths of the Cold War.

This episode also looks at the perils of forecasting; the valedictory was a place where ambassadors would chance their arm with predictions about the direction of future events abroad.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.


WED 11:30 The Secret World (b0125n5t)
Series 2

Episode 1

From Al Pacino to Keith Harris and Orville, Jon Culshaw and friends probe the private lives of the famous. From July 2010.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00v3l19)
Consumer affairs with Winifred Robinson.
The dramatic drop in the cost of GPS technology has led to insurance companies re-launching products tied to drivers' behaviour which can be checked online. I-Kube, aimed at teenagers, offers up to half price premiums if the youngsters agree not to drive between 11.00pm and 05.00am. Insurance watchers say more and more bespoke insurance policies will come on the market in the coming years priced on a motorist's proven behaviour.

A warning from the National Association of Estate Agents about an organisation requesting up front fees when they buy a house from you.

The Duke of Devonshire is holding an attic sale this week. A rather unusual one being that thousands of items stored around the Chatsworth House stately home are being auctioned under a giant marquee in the grounds. The Duke tells us why he is selling so many pieces of his family's history.

Generous subsidy for owners, no tax on selling timber; is it any wonder our wooodland is booming. The demand for wood and the desire to 'green' the the land have come together to boost Britain's tree cover to its greatest for nearly three hundred years.

And can there ever be peace between motorists and cyclists on our roads?


WED 12:57 Weather (b00v3l2s)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00v1qnh)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00v1qnk)
Last week the Radio Times accidentally released the names of the final twelve X Factor contestants before the programmes were broadcast, so confirming the names that had been circulating on the internet since early September. It was reported that Simon Cowell was "very, very disappointed" by the mistake but it is unlikely he would have been disappointed with the huge viewing figures that followed. How far can broadcasters control the leaks and rumours, to boost interest while not spoiling viewers' enjoyment? That's the discussion between David Liddiment, former director of ITV, Emma Cox of The Sun and Lisa McGarry of Unrealitytv.com.

TalkSport's head of programmes Moz Dee talks about taking on Russell Brand for his first weekly radio programmes since he left Radio 2 over "Sachsgate". He also tells how he secured the radio rights for the Rugby World Cup from under the nose of the BBC.

And Chris Wheal tells Steve what it was like to receive press attention when his nephew was killed by a fall this summer. Even though he made it clear that the family only wanted to speak through him, journalist after journalist contacted his sister, which made her feel threatened and harassed. He has been helping the Press Complaints Commission find ways to prevent this happening to others.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00v1qkn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Stone (b00v1qnm)
Series 2

Collateral Damage

Series created by Danny Brocklehurst. Written by Martin Jameson.

DCI John Stone is forced to open up an investigation into the death of Gary Taylor, a veteran of the Iraq War suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The theory that he died from a self-inflicted drug overdose is turned on it's head when one of his ex-army mates accuses Gary's grieving widow of having murdered him.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00v1qnp)
Paul Lewis and expert panel take your questions on benefits.

A big shake up on welfare reform is on the way in a bid to cut the yearly bill of £192 billion.

Are you or your partner higher rate taxpayers and unsure about the changes to child benefit?

Or perhaps you'd like more detail on the cap to be brought in on benefit claims overall?

If you have a question: ring the Money Box Live team on 03 700 100 444. The lines are open at 13:30 tomorrow/today.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00v39mh)
Three Short Stories by E Nesbit

The Bristol Bowl

Jane's aunt is a real ogre to work for, but Jane is after her money, so she puts up with it.

Everything is going to plan, until the day Jane smashes The Bristol Bowl- aunt's prize bit of porcelain. That disaster takes her on her first trip to London and a very surprising offer of marriage.

Reader: Jenny Agutter
Abridged by Roy Apps

Producer/Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 At War with Wellington Docudrama (b00d1znr)
Spoils of War

Everybody knows the phrase "the spoils of war", but what does it really mean?

Peter and Dan Snow introduce more of the experiences of Wellington's army in the Iberian Peninsula 200 years ago, and pull no punches in describing looting, pillaging and worse, as the French, Spanish and English armies clashed in some of the most famous battles in history.

The part of the Duke of Wellington is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, the other members of the cast are Neil Dudgeon, David Holt, Frank Stirling and David Westhead.

Producer: Alyn Shipton
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00v1qrz)
Drugs trial calamity - McCarthy stigma

Professor Laurie Taylor looks at new research dealing with the McCarthy period in US History when actors and artists found themselves unable to work having been denounced or charged for having associations with communism. The stigma and the effect of the accusations is examined by Elizabeth Pontikes, author of 'Stained Red' and she discusses her detailed analysis of the work prospects of those associated with black listed actors and film workers in the US film Industry from 1945 to 1960. Laurie also talks to Professor Adam Hedgecoe about his sociological research into a drug trial that went disastrously wrong.
Producer: Chris Wilson.


WED 16:30 The Secret Science of Pee (b00txhvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00v1qs1)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00v3m7c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Maltby Collection (b00xmvwb)
Series 2

Episode 5

The museum staff pitch their ideas for a special exhibition. Stars Geoffrey Palmer and Julian Rhind-Tutt. From June 2008.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00v1qs3)
It's starters for ten at the Bull pub quiz and Jazzer is full of bright ideas.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00v3mb1)
Alan Sugar, Don Bachardy on Christopher Isherwood

With Mark Lawson.

American painter Don Bachardy remembers his partner the writer Christopher Isherwood, and meetings with Beckett, Brando and Bacon. A new volume of Isherwood's Diaries edited by Katherine Bucknell details life in the sixties and the impact of Cold War anxiety, the space race, Vietnam and the Summer of Love.

Increasingly, ideas conceived for the internet are providing material for traditional media. With writer and TV producer Dan Hine, Emily Bell, Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, and comedian Olly Mann, whose podcasts have been developed into a book, Mark Lawson discusses the ever evolving relationship between old and new media.

Tonight sees the return of The Apprentice. As the high-profile programme reaches its sixth series, Lord Sugar - who's just published his autobiography - discusses the nuts and bolts of the show, from selecting candidates to what happens to the losers after the cameras stop filming.



Producer Gavin Heard.


WED 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v3kg5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


WED 20:00 Bringing Up Britain (b00v1qtl)
Series 3

Episode 3

Mariella and her guests share their thoughts this week on the best way of breaking bad news to children. If you have to tell your kids that you're separating how honest should you be with them? Do we tell our children too much, even treat them as "best friends" at times to the detriment of their emotional well-being? When it comes to bad news in the media - should we let them see everything or should we censor what they hear and see?

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


WED 20:45 Le News, C'est Moi (b00v6l8x)
For generations, while the scandal-hungry British press have happily ferreted around the bedroom antics of their politicians, France has proudly boasted higher standards. Politicians' private lives were private - and the President in particular was a remote and austere figure. Now the BBC's former Paris correspondent Emma Jane Kirby explains how the traditional relationship between French politicians and the press is changing dramatically under President Sarkozy.

"President Bling Bling" as he's been dubbed is like no previous French President. His new approach made him - initially at least - the darling of the media. His glamorous marriage to model-turned-singer Carla Bruni turned politics into a celebrity show. His willingness to appear on TV at the drop of a hat is legendary. And dutifully ticking the gender equality box, Sarkozy's first cabinet was stocked with photogenic female ministers - irresistible to TV editors.

But these tactics have created a backlash. With far greater transparency, the traditional reverence which reined in the French press for most of the duration of the Vth Republic has gone. Nicolas Sarkozy has changed France's press for ever.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00v1qtn)
Plastic Pollution

What's happening in the Gulf of Mexico is quite literally a drop in the ocean compared to the growing plastic pollution further out in the Pacific and now found closer to home in the North Atlantic. Thirteen years after the world woke up to the threat from plastic polluting our seas and CTE's award-winning expose of the potential threat to our food, we reveal how far from winning the war on plastic pollution it's actually getting worse.

Along British beaches UFO's - unidentified floating objects are appearing in larger quantities than ever before. The Marine Conservation Society recently reported that the amount of plastic on our beaches has more than doubled in the last 15 years and more and more of it ends up inside or wrapped around our wildlife. Nobody knows what these oddly shaped bits of plastic are or where they have come from but there are increasingly urgent attempts to find out how much of it might be out there and what we can do to stop it.

The Pacific Gyre, a vortex of floating plastic already twice the size of France, is well documented but Gyres in the North and South Atlantic, The Indian Ocean and a further Pacific patch whilst long suspected have only just been discovered. Anna Cumming of the 5 Gyres Project discovered the North Atlantic Gyre in February and the Project is about to sail for the Southern Atlantic.

High profile campaigners like David de Rothschild, who sailed to the Pacific Gyre on a boat made of plastic bottles called The Plastiki, have told us about the sheer horror and size of the rubbish patch, now Costing the Earth looks at what can be done about it. The Plastiki boat has been made using a revolutionary new plastic which is completely recyclable, a new plant in Ireland plans to turn plastic waste into fuel and there is even a new plastic being made from algae.

The University of Sheffield are also researching the use of microbes to break down the plastics already in the sea. Prevention would be the key but with the gyres themselves only the tip of the problem and 70% of the plastic we allow into the sea sinking to the sea-bed a solution to disperse these giant rubbish islands is essential.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00v1qlt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00v3mdg)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00v1qvt)
David Cameron sets out his vision for the Big Society
What lies behind recent Republican unrest in Northern Ireland?
The civilian trial of a former Guantanamo inmate is postponed over torture claims.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00v4m08)
Rebecca Hunt - Mr Chartwell

Episode 3

Written by Rebecca Hunt.

Wednesday 22nd July has been a long day for Esther, and it is still not over - Mr Chartwell has promised to tell her more about himself and just what the nature of his work is.

The reader is Miriam Margolyes.

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Ida Barr: Artificial Hip Hop (b00v1qvw)
Choice

Ida Barr is a music hall singer who has embraced hip hop and rap, reflecting the cultural diversity of London's East End, where she has been living in retirement for several decades.

With her genuine love of talking to people, Ida sets out investigate a new topic in each episode, creating a unique brand of music-hall, hip-hop fusion with beat boxer Shlomo.

Ida’s subject this time is "Choice".

Written by and starring Christopher Green as Ida Barr.

Producer: Claire Grove

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


WED 23:15 A Series of Psychotic Episodes (b00v1qvy)
Episode 2

Slightly skewed sketch comedy from comedian Miriam Elia.

Edward the Hamster makes a friend, and Sweep has an interesting story about his life before he met Sooty.

Written by Miriam Elia & Ezra Elia

Featuring the voices of:
Rachel Atkins
Miriam Elia
Pippa Evans
Geoff McGivern
David Reed
Dan Tetsell

Script edited by Jon Hunter

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00v77rh)
Sean Curran and team with all the latest news from the House of Lords, including: peers discuss the state of the economy, and debate legislation on the freezing of terrorist assets. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



THURSDAY 07 OCTOBER 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00vcn5x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v3kg5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00v3mwy)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00v3mxg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00v3wcw)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00v3wcy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00v3wds)
With the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00v1qy6)
The UK's first solar farm has been given approval. Hundreds of other potential sites have been identified by developers - many of them on existing farms. Charlotte Smith hears how the creation of green energy could leave fields covered in blue solar panels.

The ban on basic battery cages for laying hens in 2012 has led many farmers to convert to free-range rather than choose the 'enriched cages'. Now existing free-range egg producers say their price has tumbled due to an over supply.

Food prices are now rising at their fastest rate for 15 months. The National Farmers Union says producing more food in the UK would help contain future rises but 'smart thinking' is needed to do that.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


THU 06:00 Today (b00v1qy8)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00v1qyb)
The Spanish Armada

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Spanish Armada. On May 28th, 1588, a fleet of a hundred and fifty-one Spanish ships set out from Lisbon, bound for England. Its mission was to transport a huge invasion force across the Channel: the Spanish King, Philip II, was determined to remove Elizabeth from the throne and return the English to the Catholic fold. Two months later the mighty Spanish Armada was sighted off the coast of Cornwall. Bad weather, poor planning and spirited English resistance defeated the Spaniards: after a brief battle the remnants of their fleet fled. This tale of religious dispute, shifting political alliance and naval supremacy has entered our folklore - although some historians argue it changed nothing.With:Diane PurkissFellow and Tutor at Keble College, OxfordMia Rodriguez-SalgadoProfessor in International History at the London School of EconomicsNicholas RodgerSenior Research Fellow at All Souls College at the University of OxfordProducer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v3x6v)
Exploration, Exploitation and Enlightenment (1680 - 1820 AD)

Australian bark shield

The history of humanity as told through one hundred objects from the British Museum in London. This week Neil MacGregor, the Director of the Museum, is looking at Europe's engagement with the rest of the world during the 18th Century.

Today he is with an object "freighted with layers of history, legend, global politics and race relations". It is an aboriginal shield from Australia, originally owned by one of the men to first set eyes on Europeans as they descended on Botany Bay nearly 250 years ago. This remarkably well-preserved object was brought to England by the explorer Captain Cook. What can this object tell us about the early encounter between two such different cultures? Phil Gordon, the aboriginal Heritage Officer at the Australian Museum in Sydney, and the historian Maria Nugent help tell the story.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00v1qz7)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Ingrid Betancourt spent 6 years as a hostage in the Columbian jungle, she talks to Jenni about her ordeal. The Women's National Commission is under threat. Sarah Veale, a WNC Commissioner and Jill Kirby, Director of the Centre for Policy Studies, discuss its future. And Marina and the Diamonds play live.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00v3xx7)
The Power of Life and Death

Nice Distinctions

When a number of distinguished members of government committees are found dead in suspicious circumstances, it falls to DCI Kate Duncan to discover what the connecting factor is.

Two elderly female patients of Dr Tom Cready - a GP - have been found to have died from experimental drugs which they had not been prescribed. The doctor was a critic of the NHS's prescription policy and it has emerged that the two dead women served on drug-licensing committees. DCI Kate Duncan is urgently returning to interview Dr Cready.

Mark Lawson's deftly plotted murder-mystery gets to grips with a major concern at the heart of our cash-strapped NHS: the post code lottery and exactly who is to be considered deserving of the most expensive life saving drugs on the market.

Kate Duncan - Haydn Gwynne
Lorenzo - Lloyd Thomas
Briggs - Chris McHallem
Hermione Sharp - Abigail McKern
Dame Imelda Sharp - Honor Blackman
Sue Wells - Abigail McGibbon
Dr Tom Cready - Nick Dunning
Dee Mortimer - Stella McCusker
Jeremy Vine - Himself

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan.
Written by Mark Lawson.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00v1qz9)
How bandits and insurgents are gradually tightening their hold on the roads of Afghanistan.

A growing army of pensioners poses increasing problems for China.

Subtle tensions beneath the surface in the new, united Germany.

And remembering much better days among the fishermen of the Irish Sea.

It's now nine years since the West launched its war in Afghanistan. And today the fighting often seems as fierce as ever. The number of dead soldiers, guerrillas and civilians continues to rise relentlessly. So is there any scope for optimism? Or is Afghanistan destined for even worse to come...? Ian Pannel is as well placed as anyone to answer those questions. He's been based in Kabul for the past two years, and as his assignment there draws to a close he's been reflecting on the changes he's seen...

All over the world we're tending to live longer than we used to. Better diets and health care are improving life spans all the time. It's one of the great triumphs of modern civilisation. But the greying of the population is also bringing huge challenges in many places. And Martin Patience says China is starting to feel the strain....

In these autumn days back in 1989 extraordinary tensions were building in East Germany. Soon they would sweep away the Berlin Wall. And with it went the GDR...the German Democratic Republic...as East Germany was officially known. It was quickly joined with the West. And today Germany is very firmly politically and economically united. But as Farhana Dawood has been finding out, in the minds of some in the East, a sense of the old division remains...

South Africa's Apartheid government was constantly confronted by a troublesome priest. Desmond Tutu used to tell the regime that its racism defied the will of God. For that reason, he said, it could never succeed... And since the collapse of Apartheid Archbishop Tutu's continued to speak his mind powerfully on the world's problems. But from today, which marks his 79th birthday, he plans to take more of a back seat. He's scaling back his public appearances. And Allan Little looks back now on the Archbishop's remarkable career....

Not so long ago there were thriving fishing communities all round Britain's coast. Harbours were crowded with working boats, and their crews made a hard, dangerous living at sea. But there were too many fishermen, and eventually there weren't enough fish. Nowadays the industry is a shadow of what it once was. But as Christine Finn explains, at its height the great hunt for herring shaped the lives of countless families..including her own.


THU 11:30 The Lennon Visitors (b00v1qzc)
Every year, around 8,000 people from 50 countries pay homage to John Lennon at his childhood home, Mendips. But who are these visitors and what do they seek from an ordinary suburban semi in Liverpool?

Comedian, Alexei Sayle, took the National Trust tour in 2009 and was so taken with its 1950s charm and with the spirit of it, that he's gone back; this time meeting custodian, Colin Hall and finding out what it's like to live in one of the most famous houses in Liverpool.

He also talks to some of those who visited the house when John Lennon lived there - John's cousin Mike; Colin Hanton, the drummer in John Lennon's band, the Quarrymen; and Freda Kelly, the Beatles' Club Secretary. And of course just a few of those 8000 visitors.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2010 to mark Lennon's 70th birthday


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00v3ynd)
Consumer affairs with Winifred Robinson. Ten councils have been told to improve asbestos management in their schools or face the legal consequences. This is a result of survey carried out by the Health and Safety Executive in 152 local authorities.

One area which is proving robust in the recession is the sale of baby products. We examine how the market has changed and the increasing competition among retailers to secure a place in this market.

Research indicates that almost half of the UK's leading brands are sending out unwanted emails to people and failing to follow best practice guidelines.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00v3yng)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00v1r8v)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00v1qtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00v1qs3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Peter Tinniswood (b00v1r9k)
Visitors

Peter Tinniswoood's final play, written just before his death in 2003, is an elegiac drama on the shortness of life and the frailty of love.

Shacklock ..... Roy Hudd
Stella ..... Emma Fielding

Music ..... David Chilton
Abridger ..... Liz Goulding
Producer ..... Gordon House

Shortly before he died, Peter Tinniswood - one of Radio Drama's iconic dramatists - wrote Visitors. Set on a misty Thames embankment over the course of several evenings, the play recounts the meetings of two hospital "visitors", Shacklock and the much younger Stella, whose relationship - strange, erotic and yet seemingly entirely innocent, is the bedrock of this hauntingly sad and beautiful drama about the shortness of life and the frailty of love. We are in archetypal Tinniswood territory, where nothing is straightforward, where words take on a surreal existence of their own (the visitors' respective patients live in "Indifferent Ward" and "Terrified Ward") and where the quiet beauty of much of the descriptions is undercut by recurring echoes of loss, transience and death. Our two characters' lives, like Vladimir and Estragon, while providing much humour and no little sexual frisson, are essentially brief and unfulfilling.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b00v10mr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00v131f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00v39s8)
Three Short Stories by E Nesbit

Grandsire Triples

Kate's 'intended' comes back from learning farming, a Catholic.

Kate is torn between duty and love, a conflict that is dramatically resolved when the two lovers inadvertently get locked in the bell tower, during a Grandsire Triple peal ("there's five thousand and fifty changes to 'em, and it's a matter of three hours!') groans Kate.

Reader: Jenny Agutter
Abridged by Roy Apps

Producer/Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 At War with Wellington Docudrama (b00d1znt)
Retinue

When an army went to war in the Napoleonic era, it wasn't just a question of soldiers on the march. In this episode we delve into the letters and diaries of the Royal Greenjackets Museum, Peter and Dan Snow discover who else accompanied the redcoats as they fought in Portugal and Spain.

From the loyal women who drew lots to accompany their husbands into battle to the children carried through all kinds of terrain and conditions, we discover all about the retinue that had to be fed and watered whenever an army took to the road.

The part of the Duke of Wellington is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, the other members of the cast are Neil Dudgeon, David Holt, Frank Stirling and David Westhead

Producer: Alyn Shipton
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Bookclub (b00v1511)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00v1rbd)
With a new batch of Nobel Prizes in Medicine, Chemistry and Physics announced this week, Quentin Cooper assesses the new Laureates' impact on science.

Producer: Roland Pease.


THU 17:00 PM (b00v1rbg)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00v3yt7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Clare in the Community (b00j72sb)
Series 5

The 1864 Mining Disaster

Clare organises a charity benefit in a bid to keep the Family Centre open. The benefit will showcase the talents of her colleagues - and Ray's folk songs.

It's the end of the series for Clare in the Community and, possibly, the end of the Sparrowhawk Family Centre.

Sally Phillips plays social worker Clare Barker who has entered a caring profession so that she can sort out other peoples' problems rather than deal with her own.

Clare ..... Sally Phillips
Brian ..... Alex Lowe
Helen ..... Liza Tarbuck
Ray ..... Richard Lumsden
Megan/Nali ..... Nina Conti
Irene ..... Ellen Thomas
Simon ..... Andrew Wincott

Written By Harry Venning And David Ramsden

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00v1rbj)
At Grey Gables, Ian hopes bookings will soon pick up soon. Meanwhile, Roy gets an urgent call from Hayley, who has discovered a letter from Phoebe's school regarding her absence last Thursday. Hayley marches round to Home Farm to have it out with Kate. She stresses to casual Kate that they all need to pull together. Kate reluctantly agrees to cooperate.

Meanwhile, busy Roy needs someone to watch Phoebe. Adam reminds him that Peggy's keen to see her great-granddaughter. Ian pops round to ask Peggy, who's finding out all about Kate's university course.

Peggy takes Phoebe to see the ducks, and tells stories of what Kate got up to as a youngster, with cousins Helen and Brenda. Peggy recalls when Kate wrote to an American soldier Peggy knew from the war, pretending to be her. Kate's letters resulted in the GI showing up in Ambridge - but Peggy was married by then. Phoebe tells Peggy about Kate taking her out of school last week. Peggy promptly goes to see Kate, suggesting she apologises to Roy and Hayley. Kate's stunned when Peggy accuses her of being a part-time mother.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00v3ywn)
Aaron Sorkin, Nobel Prize for Literature, Rory Kinnear.

With Mark Lawson, including an interview with Aaron Sorkin, creator of White House drama The West Wing, who has scripted The Social Network, a film about the founders of Facebook.

After Tennant, Law and Simm, actor Rory Kinnear is the latest actor to take on the part of Hamlet. He discusses his leading role in the National Theatre's new production.

And we reflect on the announcement that this year's Nobel Prize for literature has been awarded to Mario Vargas Llosa.

Producer Jack Soper.


THU 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v3x6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00v1rfz)
Policing Anti-Social Behaviour

There were an estimated 12 million incidents of anti-social behaviour in England and Wales last year but only about a quarter were reported to the police. Recent research published by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary suggests that in some areas those calls have not been taken seriously enough, with the emphasis on more 'serious' crime.

We hear from those on the receiving end of anti-social behaviour, the victims who become prisoners in their own homes and those trying to stop it. Some express frustration with the lack of police action. To get an insight into the challenges of juggling resources and meeting the public expectations we visit three forces in the North of England: Greater Manchester who have been criticised for their approach to anti social behaviour, Lancashire who have been held up as a model force, and Merseyside who have just announced they are going to scrap their anti social behaviour Task Force.

The Chief Inspector of Constabulary in England and Wales, Sir Denis O'Connor has said that it's time to 'reclaim some neighbourhoods'. He warned chief constables to think carefully before making cuts as they could tip some areas into a spiral of economic and social decline, and said that what's needed are feet on the street.

As forces brace themselves for large spending cuts, Jane Dodge looks at the criticism targeted at forces and asks whether the policing of anti-social behaviour will suffer.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00v1rg1)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan and a panel of guests from the worlds of advertising, branding and lifestyle management discuss viral videos, social networking and some of the other methods companies now employ to reach out to their customers.

The panel also discusses positive thinking. Is better to be optimistic in business, or realistic?

Evan is joined in the studio by Alex Cheatle, chief executive of the lifestyle management company Ten Group; Jasmine Montgomery, co-founder of branding consultancy Seven Brands; Robin Wight, president of communications group Engine.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b00v1pht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00v1qyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00v3yx4)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00v1rg3)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis.

What is the future of pension provision in Britain?

Robin Lustig joins us from Colombia where he's been looking at counter insurgency measures

We''ll hear a Vivaldi flute concerto which has been missing for 300 years.

The World Tonight with Brian Hanrahan in London and Robin Lustig in Colombia.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00v4m0x)
Rebecca Hunt - Mr Chartwell

Episode 4

Written by Rebecca Hunt.

Having agreed that Black Pat aka Mr Chartwell can stay over for a night, Esther is not sure what to expect in the morning.

The reader is Miriam Margolyes.

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 That Mitchell and Webb Sound (b00mwm67)
Series 4

Episode 6

Revealing the new yoghurt for women, and introducing Britain's top police tortoise.

Sketch show starring David Mitchell and Robert Webb.

With Olivia Colman, Sarah Hadland and James Bachman.

Producer Gareth Edwards

Firs broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2009.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00v3yxg)
Rachel Byrne reports on the days events in the House of Lords.



FRIDAY 08 OCTOBER 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00vcn65)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v3x6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00v3zdn)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00v3zdx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00v4ky6)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00v4ky8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00v4kyb)
With the Rev. Dr. Craig Gardiner.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00v1rgp)
Reform of the Common Agricultural Policy will not signal a massive overhaul of the policy according to leaks from Brussels as the future of farming is debated in Europe. The National Farmers Union want more emphasis placed on productivity of farming, the Country Land and Business Association want more environmental measures, and economist Sean Rickard wants it scrapped full stop.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00v1rgr)
Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v78zw)
The 100th Object

Neil MacGregor and the British Museum have chosen the final object for A History of the World in 100 Objects. Radio 4 will reveal it to the nation on 14th October. Before that announcement, Evan Davis has been to the museum to see what objects were considered for the short list to be the 100th, and from which the final object was selected. Can something made in 2010 really speak to future generations of the challenges and ingenuity of our time? Evan Davis finds out.


FRI 09:05 Desert Island Discs (b00v137f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v4l55)
Exploration, Exploitation and Enlightenment (1680 - 1820 AD)

Jade bi

Neil MacGregor's world history told through the things that time has left behind. Throughout this week, Neil has been looking at Europe's discoveries around the world and its engagement with different cultures during the 18th century - the European Enlightenment project.

Today he describes what was happening in China during this period, as the country was experiencing its own Enlightenment under the Qianlong Emperor. He tells the story through a jade ring (called a Bi) that was probably made around 1500 BC and then written over during the Qing dynasty. What does this prehistoric piece of jade tell us about life in 18th century China? The historian Jonathan Spence and the poet Yang Lian find meaning in this intriguing object.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00v1rh6)
Presented by Jenni Murray. David Tennant joins Jenni to talk about playing a bereaved dad in the new drama, 'Single Father'. The results of the Shadow Cabinet elections will be known late on Thursday. We assess how women have fared, who's in and who's out and what does it mean for female representation in politics? Plus -the US Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin made much of her love of hunting. So why are more women taking up the sport. We report from America's neighbour, Canada, where women are being encouraged to hunt bear. Plus - why does the north west have the highest number of forced marriages outside London?


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00v4ldy)
The Power of Life and Death

A Death for a Death

When a number of distinguished members of government committees are found dead in suspicious circumstances, it falls to DCI Kate Duncan to discover what the connecting factor is.

An autopsy has revealed that Dame Imelda Sharp may have been killed by an experimental drug which she had not been prescribed. Now toxic levels of another unprescribed drug have been found in the body of a second patient of the same GP, Dr Tom Cready. DI Kate Duncan of Scotland Yard's Sensitive Cases Squad is investigating.

Mark Lawson's deftly plotted murder-mystery gets to grips with a major concern at the heart of our cash-strapped NHS: the post code lottery and exactly who is to be considered deserving of the most expensive life saving drugs on the market.

Kate Duncan - Haydn Gwynne
Lorenzo - Lloyd Thomas
Briggs - Chris McHallem
Hermione Sharp - Abigail McKern
Dame Imelda Sharp - Honor Blackman
Sue Wells - Abigail McGibbon
Dr Tom Cready - Nick Dunning
Dee Mortimer - Stella McCusker
Jeremy Vine - Himself

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan.
Written by Mark Lawson.


FRI 11:00 Big Game, Little Game (b00v1rh8)
Episode 2

In the second of two programmes, Mark Stephen charts a unique swap involving two gamekeepers - one from the Kalahari, the other from the Angus Glens.

Gamekeeper Andy Malcolm is swapping 40,000 acres of heather moorland high in the Angus Glens for a reserve on the edge of the Kalahari in South Africa. The game warden from there will travel to Scotland in a unique swap documented for BBC Radio 4.

The programmes offer the very different perspectives of Scottish gamekeeper Andy Malcolm and his South African counterpart Dylan Smith. Both men track their experiences in the form of audio diaries and in reflections to presenter Mark Stephen who is alongside them in this job exchange. How they deal with issues ranging from land conservation to animal welfare and how far experiences in their own landscapes can translate into ideas for their new ones, is at the heart of the recordings.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.


FRI 11:30 Psmith in the City by PG Wodehouse (b00dgjw3)
First Steps in a Business Career

Mike's future looks gloomy when he's forced to give up his dreams of university and work in a bank. But help is at hand...

PG Wodehouse’s comic adventures of the extraordinary Psmith and his friend Mike in the world of Edwardian finance.

Dramatised by Marcy Kahan

PG Wodehouse ..... Simon Williams
Psmith ..... Nick Caldecott
Mike Jackson ..... Inam Mirza
John Bickersdyke ..... Stephen Critchlow
Mr Rossiter/Mr Jackson ..... Chris Pavlo
Mr Waller ..... Jonathan Tafler
Bannister ..... Robert Lonsdale

Producer: Abigail le Fleming

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2008.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00v4lf0)
We'll get the latest on the problems now facing thousands of customers of foreign exchange operator Crown Currency, which collapsed this week, and ask how it made it to the top of Best Buy lists...

And since the failure of travel company Goldtrail three months ago, we explain why only ten per cent of eleven thousand compensation claims have been resolved.

We'll be asking what 'inclusive pricing' really means when you book a flight.

And why a high street store opening at a tourist hotspot is causing controversy.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00v4lf2)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00v1rhb)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00v1rjw)
Roger Bolton hears what your ideas for what you would do if you were the new controller of Radio 4. He assesses how wrangles between the BBC and its staff over pensions will affect programme budgets.

And comedy writer Jon Holmes treads the fine line between brilliant comedy and bad taste in response to your praise and criticism of his show "Listen Against".

Email: feedback@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00v1rbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00v1rlh)
Emma Smith - Maidens' Trip

By Emma Smith. Dramatised for radio by David Ashton (writer of the popular Radio 4 detective series McLevy).

First published in 1948, this adaptation of Emma Smith's fictionalised memoir opens in 1943 and relates the adventures of three eighteen-year-old girls who'd signed on with the Grand Union Canal Carrying Company to replace workers drafted overseas.

Quite literally thrown in at the deep end Emma, Charity and Nanette embark on their maiden voyage - carrying steel north by canal from London to Birmingham - surmounting the dangerous, back-breaking work thanks largely to an endearing mix of youthful bravado and blissful ignorance. Steering their way through the 'other world' of the boat people, the girls, often out of their depth, face up to an assortment of challenges with courage and good cheer.

Cast:
Tilly.......... Greta Scacchi
Emma...... Emily Wachter
Charity..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Nanette.... Georgia Groome
Wilfred..... Rufus Wright
Mr Silver... Sean Baker
Eli Silver... Lloyd Thomas

Director.... Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00v1rlk)
Eric Robson chairs this programme from Blenhiem Palace, Oxfordshire. He is joined by panellists Christine Walkden, Anne Swithinbank and Matthew Biggs.

Emma Morris from our Listeners' Gardens series is at the Malvern Autumn Show, where she is advised on the do's and don't's of plant shopping.

Produced by Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 At War with Wellington Docudrama (b00d1znw)
Medicine

It wasn't good news if you were injured in battle 200 years ago. Men were as likely to die from the ministrations of the doctors as from their wounds during the Portuguese and Spanish campaigns against Napoleon.

Concluding their look at the letters and diaries of the soldiers and men who fought alongside Wellington, Peter and Dan Snow find out what happened to the wounded, and how they were looked after during a five year conflict in which thousands of soldiers were seriously injured.

The part of the Duke of Wellington is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, the other members of the cast are Neil Dudgeon, David Holt, Frank Stirling and David Westhead.

Producer: Alyn Shipton
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00v1rm4)
On Last Word this week:
Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Robert Mark who cleaned up widespread corruption among the forces detectives
Sir Norman Wisdom - whose performances as a lovable underdog stemmed from rejection and poverty in his childhood
The influential moral philosopher Philippa Foot who put her principles into action by working for Oxfam
Mahinder Singh Pujji - who was thought to be the last remaining Sikh and Indian fighter pilot from the second world war
And Gloria Stuart, the Hollywood actress who was nominated for an Oscar for playing a one hundred year old survivor in "Titanic".


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00v1rm6)
Francine Stock talks to Oliver Stone about his return to Wall Street for his credit-crunch sequel, Money Never Sleeps.

Rhys Ifans reveals why he was worried about ruining the life of his friend Howard Marks by starring in a film of his life

Tim Hetherington, the director of Restrepo, discusses his fly-on-the-wall documentary about American soldiers in Afghanistan

Critic Pasquale Iannone surveys two new films about Italian politics, past and present.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00v1rmx)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00v4llf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00v1rmz)
Series 72

Episode 3

Sandi Toksvig presents another episode of the ever-popular topical panel show. Guests this week include Jeremy Hardy, Sue Perkins and Andy Hamilton.

Produced by Sam Bryant.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00v1rn1)
Pip has booked her theory test, but more pressing is tonight's barn dance. She's working through her final checklist, getting the venue ready at Brookfield. Pip asks David to make sure Josh is kept away tonight.

At the dance, Izzy has her eye on a couple of guys, but Pip's strictly off men. Pip bumps into her friend Matthew, who Izzy's instantly keen to know more about. Meanwhile, Jamie and Marty sneak in. After downing drinks, Jamie bumps into Izzy but is unapologetic. Matthew confronts the boys and aggressive Jamie spills Izzy's drink all over her, with Marty following up with an insult. As Matthew warns the boys to get lost and becomes more physical, Jamie becomes hysterical, yelling that Matthew's not his dad. Pip arrives on the scene but quickly heads off to get David.

David takes Jamie home to a shocked Kathy. Refusing to apologise, Jamie heads to bed. Back at home, David and Ruth reflect on the evening. Pip didn't deserve this after all the work she's put into the dance. She's worried she'll have to step down from her post as assistant social secretary. They also speculate that Jamie is changing rapidly - and not for the better.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00v4lsn)
Martin Shaw; Iraq on film; big band Loose Tubes

With Kirsty Lang.

Actor Martin Shaw made his name playing Ray Doyle in crime-action TV drama The Professionals, and more recently has starred as the title characters in Judge John Deed and Inspector George Gently. This year he has returned to the stage to revisit a play he appeared in nearly thirty years ago - The Country Girl, by Clifford Odets. He talks to Kirsty Lang about his performance in the play as washed-up, alcoholic actor Frank Elgin.

In July 2002, First Lieutenant Mike Scotti volunteered to extend his service with the American Marine Corps, and six months later was part of the front-line of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Mike took his own mini DV-camera with him. The resulting footage has now been turned into a documentary, putting the viewer in the boots of a Marine on active service. Mike talks about the experience, and explains how he managed to film whilst being a professional soldier in the line of fire.

Loose Tubes, a young and irreverent big band, found themselves among the stars of the British jazz scene in the 1980s. The 21-piece collective graduated from shows in pubs to playing at the BBC Proms and on Terry Wogan's TV show - in the same week. The band broke up in 1990, and their music has been elusive ever since, but now a recording of one of their final performances has just been released. Band members Django Bates, Iain Ballamy and Ashley Slater look back at life in Loose Tubes.

Producer Samantha Psyk.


FRI 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00v4l55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00v1rq5)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical discussion from City of London Academy, in Southwark, London with questions for the panel including Iain Duncan-Smith, Secretary of State for Work & Pensions, Caroline Flint, Labour MP, David Starkey, historian and Claire Fox, director of the Institute of Ideas.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00v1rq7)
Student Psyche

Sarah Dunant reflects on the character of the new generation of students. Will they swap apathy for political activism once the cuts in higher education and the expected hike in tuition fees are revealed and how are they dealing with the emotional challenge of growing up?
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 15 Minute Drama (b00v1rq9)
The Power of Life and Death

Omnibus

When a number of distinguished members of government committees are found dead in suspicious circumstances, it falls to DCI Kate Duncan of Scotland Yard's Sensitive Cases Squad to discover what the connecting factor is.

Mark Lawson's deftly plotted murder-mystery gets to grips with a major concern at the heart of our cash-strapped NHS: the post code lottery and exactly who is to be considered deserving of the most expensive life saving drugs on the market.

Kate Duncan- Haydn Gwynne
Lorenzo- Lloyd Thomas
Briggs- Chris McHallem
Hermione Sharp - Abigail McKern
Dame Imelda Sharp- Honor Blackman
Sue Wells- Abigail McGibbon
Dr Tom Cready- Nick Dunning
Dee Mortimer- Stella McCusker
Jeremy Vine- Himself

Written by Mark Lawson.
The Power of Life and Death was directed in Belfast by Eoin O'Callaghan.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00v4lsq)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00v1rqc)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis.

Ed Miliband announces the line up of his Shadow cabinet - what does it say about the direction of the Labour Party?

We report from Colombia on the fight against drug cartels - are there any lessons for Mexico and its counter-narcotics campaign?

A jailed Chinese dissident is awarded the Nobel peace prize, drawing fierce criticism from the authorities in Beijing.

And the toxic sludge in Hungary claims another victim as the authorities announce they've managed to bring the situation under control.

The World Tonight with Felicity Evans.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00v4m42)
Rebecca Hunt - Mr Chartwell

Episode 5

Written by Rebecca Hunt

The weekend is approaching, together with the imminent anniversary of Esther's husband's death. But an unexpected task is set for Esther by her boss at the Westminster Library.

The reader is Miriam Margolyes.

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00v1q45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Shelved (b00p7g8b)
Shaun Ley recounts how the political circumstances of the late 1970s resulted in three of the most popular TV series' of the time - Dr Who, Secret Army and The Professionals - each having at least one episode scrapped after filming. Interviewees include the then Dr Who, Tom Baker.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00v1nh8)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00v2y85)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00v3ky6)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00v3xx7)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00v4ldy)

15 Minute Drama 21:00 FRI (b00v1rq9)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00v1q45)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00v1q45)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 SAT (b00tzmkc)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 MON (b00v1mvt)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 MON (b00v1mvt)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 TUE (b00v1mvt)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 TUE (b00v2y7d)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 TUE (b00v2y7d)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 WED (b00v2y7d)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 WED (b00v3kg5)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 WED (b00v3kg5)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 THU (b00v3kg5)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 THU (b00v3x6v)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 THU (b00v3x6v)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 FRI (b00v3x6v)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:00 FRI (b00v78zw)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 FRI (b00v4l55)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 FRI (b00v4l55)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00tzp7c)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00v1rq7)

A Series of Psychotic Episodes 23:15 WED (b00v1qvy)

A View Through a Lens 14:45 SUN (b00v13dh)

Africa at 50 13:30 SUN (b00v138l)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00js222)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00v2z35)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00v39mh)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00v39s8)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00v15dk)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00txh29)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00v1nlk)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00v11t5)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00txjw5)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00v1rq5)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00v1294)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00v1294)

At War with Wellington Docudrama 15:45 MON (b00d1x77)

At War with Wellington Docudrama 15:45 TUE (b00d1znp)

At War with Wellington Docudrama 15:45 WED (b00d1znr)

At War with Wellington Docudrama 15:45 THU (b00d1znt)

At War with Wellington Docudrama 15:45 FRI (b00d1znw)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00v12tx)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00v12tx)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00v1nhl)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00v119l)

Big Game, Little Game 11:00 FRI (b00v1rh8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00v1npb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00v2zbz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00v4m08)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00v4m0x)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00v4m42)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b00v1511)

Bookclub 16:00 THU (b00v1511)

Brandreth's Pills 11:00 MON (b00pdk2q)

Bringing Up Britain 22:15 SAT (b00tyv8f)

Bringing Up Britain 20:00 WED (b00v1qtl)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00v136j)

Clare in the Community 18:30 THU (b00j72sb)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00tx4kz)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00v14v4)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b00v1qtn)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00v1qtn)

Craig Brown's Lost Diaries 11:30 MON (b00v1nhb)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00v137f)

Desert Island Discs 09:05 FRI (b00v137f)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00dzmcf)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00v1q3z)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00v1rlh)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00v115q)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00v10sn)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00v15m2)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00v1phk)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00v1qlp)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00v1qy6)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00v1rgp)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00v1rjw)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00v1qkq)

Foreign Bodies 17:00 SUN (b00txhp0)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00v11ck)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00v1qz9)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00v1nj5)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00v2z8v)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00v3mb1)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00v3ywn)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00v4lsn)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00pg5rd)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00v1rlk)

Great Unanswered Questions 23:00 MON (b00v1nq7)

Ida Barr: Artificial Hip Hop 23:00 WED (b00v1qvw)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00v1qyb)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00v1qyb)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00v1qks)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00tzp0s)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00v1rm4)

Le News, C'est Moi 20:45 WED (b00v6l8x)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00v11wp)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00v1q41)

Material World 21:00 MON (b00txj8l)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00v1rbd)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00v1whm)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00v1xkp)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00vcmsg)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00vcmsv)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00vcmt5)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00vcn5x)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00vcn65)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00v1qlt)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00v1qlt)

Mitch Benn's Wondrous Stories 23:30 MON (b00n52l1)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00v1qnp)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00v11d8)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00v11d8)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b00tznbk)

Never Before in the History of Motion Pictures... 11:30 TUE (b00rkm42)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00v1wjg)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00v1xky)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00v1ync)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00v2xt7)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00v2zh0)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00v3wcy)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00v4ky8)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00v1xn8)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00v1wkk)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00v1xnd)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00v1xnj)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00v1xht)

News 13:00 SAT (b00v1wmw)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00v12yq)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00v1wrp)

PM 17:00 MON (b00v1nhn)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00v2z82)

PM 06:00 WED (b00v1qlr)

PM 17:00 WED (b00v1qs1)

PM 17:00 THU (b00v1rbg)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00v1rmx)

Parting Shots 11:00 WED (b00v1qly)

Peter Tinniswood 14:15 THU (b00v1r9k)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00v158b)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00tx4p0)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00v157m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00v1wk3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00v1ynf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00v2xvq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00v3k27)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00v3wds)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00v4kyb)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00v11yp)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00v11yp)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00v11yp)

Psmith in the City by PG Wodehouse 11:30 FRI (b00dgjw3)

Punt PI 10:30 SAT (b00v117n)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00v131f)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00v131f)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00v131f)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b00v10mr)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b00v10mr)

Readings From Bath 00:30 SUN (b00hvckp)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b00txgv7)

Round Britain Quiz 13:30 MON (b00v1nhj)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00v11t7)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00v115b)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00v11zt)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b00v1pht)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b00v1pht)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00v1wj2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00v1xkt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00v1yml)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00v2xt3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00v2zgp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00v3mxg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00v3zdx)

Sex, Porn and Teenagers 20:00 MON (b00v1nkx)

Shappi Talk 23:00 TUE (b00lk2zh)

Shelved 23:30 FRI (b00p7g8b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00v1wj0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00v1wj4)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00v1xdp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00v1xkr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00v1xkw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00v1yg6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00v1yht)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00v1yn9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00v2xsn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00v2xt5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00v2zgm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00v2zgr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00v3mwy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00v3wcw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00v3zdn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00v4ky6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00v1xhj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00v1ygb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00v2xp9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00v2z8s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00v3m7c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00v3yt7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00v4llf)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00v12xc)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00v12xc)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b00txhfk)

Soul Music 13:30 TUE (b00v1pk9)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00v1mtz)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00v1mtz)

Stone 14:15 WED (b00v1qnm)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00v135w)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00v12zk)

That Mitchell and Webb Sound 23:00 THU (b00mwm67)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00v136z)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00v15dh)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00v15dh)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00v1nhs)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00v1nhs)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00v1qkn)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00v1qkn)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00v1qs3)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00v1qs3)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00v1rbj)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00v1rbj)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00v1rn1)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00tzlrh)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00v1rg1)

The Brown Years 09:00 TUE (b00v1php)

The Brown Years 21:30 TUE (b00v1php)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00txjw1)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00v1rm6)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00v137p)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00v137p)

The Lennon Visitors 11:30 THU (b00v1qzc)

The Maltby Collection 18:30 WED (b00xmvwb)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00v1qnk)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00txjw3)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00v1rmz)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00v1rfz)

The Secret Science of Pee 21:00 TUE (b00txhvf)

The Secret Science of Pee 16:30 WED (b00txhvf)

The Secret World 11:30 WED (b0125n5t)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b00txgz9)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b00v1nhq)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00v1380)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00v1np8)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00v1qkv)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00v1qvt)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00v1rg3)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00v1rqc)

The Write Stuff 18:30 TUE (b00v1qkl)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00txhtz)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00v1qrz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00v1qkx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00v77rh)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00v3yxg)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00v10sq)

Today 06:00 MON (b00v1mt6)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00v1phm)

Today 06:00 THU (b00v1qy8)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00v1rgr)

Tracing Your Roots 16:00 TUE (b00v1q43)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00v1wm3)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00v1wm5)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00v1wmm)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00v1xdy)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00v1xnb)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00v1xng)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00v1xnl)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00v1yg8)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00v1ygl)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00v1ynh)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00v2xnq)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00v2xqx)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00v2yxq)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00v2zbx)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00v3l2s)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00v3mdg)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00v3yng)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00v3yx4)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00v4lf2)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00v4lsq)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00v15gp)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b00v15j7)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00v11w3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00v1mvw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00v1phr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00v1qlw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00v1qz7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00v1rh6)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00v1nhg)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00v1pk7)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00v1qnh)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00v1r8v)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00v1rhb)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00v1nhd)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00v1pj0)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00v3l19)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00v3ynd)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00v4lf0)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00v1wk5)