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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 SEPTEMBER 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00tq2j0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tn9vp)
The Threshold of the Modern World (1375-1550 AD)

Durer's Rhinoceros

Neil MacGregor's world history as told through things that time has left behind. This week he is exploring vigorous empires that flourished across the world 600 years ago - visiting the Inca in South America, Ming Dynasty China, and the Timurids in their capital at Samarkand and the Ottomans in Constantinople. Today he examines the fledgling empire of Portugal and describes what the European world was looking like at this time. His chosen object is one of the most enduring in art history, and one of the most duplicated - Albrecht Durer's famous print of an Indian rhino, an animal he never had never seen. The rhino was brought to Portugal in 1514 and Neil uses this classic image to examine European ambitions. Mark Pilgrim of Chester Zoo considers what it must have been like to transport such a beast and the historian Felipe Fernandez-Armesto describes the potency of the image for Europeans of the age.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00tq2n2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Shipping Forecast (b00tq2n4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00tq2n6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00tq2n8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00tq2nb)
with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


SAT 05:45 A View Through a Lens (b00h9vgy)
Series 1

Wolves

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison offers a personal view of life as he finds himself in isolated and often dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife. In this porgramme, John travels to Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming to film wolves hunting elk; something that has rarely been seen let alone filmed. It's a hugely challenging task as temperatures plummet below freezing, but the results are both exhilarating and shocking.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00tq2nd)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00tq2nl)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00trmbw)
Series 16

London - Hampstead Heath

Clare Balding takes a walk on Hampstead Heath with a group of inner city Londoners who are being encouraged to discover the green places of their city, often for the first time. The residents of the Harrow Road are mainly non white, so there has been a special drive to help them discover the joys of walking called 'It's My Country'.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00trmdp)
Farming Today This Week

£2 billion is spent each year on public sector food, but some say that goes on cheap, imported and unhealthy food. Caz Graham investigates what's being served in schools, hospitals and prisons, and hears British farmers could cash in if more of them sourced local produce.

At Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham they spend £26 per week on each patient's food and drink; they source local where they can, but it's nutrition, not the Union Jack, which is the deciding factor. Meanwhile, Nottingham City Hospital managed to save £6 million a year by sourcing fresh food locally. Schools spend £1 billion a year on their dinners, and at a Norfolk high school, Anna Hill hears how they are working with local farmers to improve what makes it to the plates.

European law bans government from a 'Buy British' policy, but farming minister Jim Paice says that DEFRA will encourage the public sector to buy local food. Sustain, which campaigns on food issues, says that doesn't go far enough, and more legislation is needed.

Presented by Caz Graham, produced by Melvin Rickarby.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00trn9n)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00trn9q)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Justin Webb, including:
08:10 Former City minister Lord Myners discusses if new rules will help prevent a future banking crisis.
08:20 Authors Philip Womack and Charlie Higson debate the trend for stars to write children's books.
08:32 Will the Pope's message about secularism reach a wider public beyond the Catholic faithful?
08:50 How the row over the deportation of Roma people from France has touched some raw nerves.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00trn9s)
Fi Glover with studio guest Noel Sharkey, Professor of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, and poet Matt Harvey.

There's an interview with His Holiness the Gyalwang Drukpa, and with the designer who brought us - among other things - the Popemobile.

Author Joanne Harris describes her Secret Life and out-going R4 Controller Mark Damazer shares his Inheritance Tracks.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00trz9m)
Family History - Paraguay

Sandi Toksvig meets two people who travelled to research their family histories. Television executive Martin Davidson knew his German grandfather must have fought in the Second World War but was shocked when he discovered him to have been a member of the SS. He went to Berlin, Prague and Prussia to try and understand what had driven him to become such an enthusiastic and unrepentant Nazi. Sports presenter Rob Curling's father was also a soldier but served with the Gurkhas during the emergency in Malaya in the fifties. He was drawn to travel to modern day Malaysia to discover more about that period of his parents' life and the country where he himself was born.

Sandi also talks to theologian and 'freelance missionary' Margaret Hebblethwaite about why she started a hotel in southern Paraguay and how she came to write the first and only English guide book dedicated to this little known country.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b00trzfl)
Series 3

Episode 1

Steve Punt turns super sleuth, once again taking possession of the keys to Radio 4's very own detective bureau, bringing mystery and intrigue back to Saturday mornings.

In the first programme, Punt looks into the phantom settlement of Argleton. Search the web for this quintessentially English placename and internet maps show that it lies just outside the town of Ormskirk in Lancashire. But when our super sleuth travels to locate it on the ground, all he finds is an empty field. It turns out that Argleton doesn't actually exist.

Punt sets out to crack the mystery of how a non-existent place can appear in online maps. From the Domesday Book to Google Headquarters, Punt's quest takes him through a thousand years of history and into the murky world of plagiarism. He questions all the key players - and as he zeroes in on the truth discovers that in the cartographic realm nothing is quite as it seems.

Also in this series, Punt travels to the Polish-Czech border to investigate one man's theory that the Nazis had developed flying saucer technology. And he scrutinises a wax cylinder which is reputed to carry the only recording of Queen Victoria's voice.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00ts07f)
Jackie Ashley of The Guardian looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

The BBC has learned that ministers are considering delaying decisions about the renewal of Britain's nuclear deterrent, possibly until after the next general election. Former Conservative Defence Secretary Sir Malcolm Rifkind and Defence Committee Labour MP Gisela Stuart discuss the potential ramfications of any deferred decision.

Harriet Harman took part in her last PMQs as acting Labour leader this week, and was praised for her stewardship of the party since Gordon Brown resigned. We speak to Ms. Harman about her time in the job and her expectations for British politics in the weeks to come.

Nick Clegg had to field hostile questions in the Commons this week over constitutional changes going through Parliament. Not only did Labour MPs give him a rough ride, Mr. Clegg also faced grillings from Conservatives on the Coalition benches. We ask Sir Menzies Campell about Lib Dem anxieties as they gather in Liverpool for their conference.

Whoever ends up leading Labour will have their work cut out from the start. The party has been through a long process to replace Gordon Brown and has large debts. We ask former Conservative Party leader Michael Howard about the crucial first few weeks after being chosen to lead a political party.

Editor: Chris Wimpress.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00ts097)
As presidential elections loom in Egypt, could political succession be a case of: like father, like son?

Signs of breakthrough in the Balkans as Serbia softens its stance on the breakaway province of Kosovo.

Why America's new breed of soldiers is studying philosophy

And a hole at the heart of Angola's capital as one of the city's best known landmarks is forced to close.

Egypt's President, Hosni Mubarak, has been centre stage - as the country hosted yet another round of Middle East peace talks. But the attention hasn't all been flattering. He's now 82 and increasingly frail - and that's led to speculation about the future - and about who might eventually succeed him.

There's talk that his son could be a possible contender. Jon Leyne has been out and about on the streets of the Egyptian capital, Cairo.

The conflict in the Middle East must rate as one of the world's more intractable. But Europe has some bitterly contested corners too. Like Kosovo.

It was caught up in the Balkan conflicts than a decade ago and later broke away from Serbia. And although about seventy countries do now recognise the territory's independence, its Serb minority still doesn't.

But could Serbia itself be starting - finally - to take a softer stance on its former province? Mark Lowen in Belgrade has been taking the temperature.

Now the news, I'm afraid, is only very occasionally cheerful. And this week, as ever, it's full of violence, with killings reported from Afghanistan to Pakistan and Iraq.

Soldiers every day are forced into the most terrible dilemmas. What counts as a legitimate target? How can civilian deaths be avoided?

Before they're sent to fight you'd of course expect the military to be trained in weaponry, in navigation, orienteering, perhaps in engineering. But as David Edmonds has been finding out, American forces are also receiving lessons in what is perhaps a surprising area ... philosophy!

Angola's long, bloody civil war finally ended eight years ago.

Since then, it's been slowly rebuilding, helped by the flow of cash from its bountiful natural resources - especially oil and diamonds.

In the capital, Luanda, whole districts are now being re-furbished. But not all the change is welcome.

Roque Santeiro is one of the capital's most famous and historic markets. Now it's being forced to close and Louise Redvers says thousands of traders are being dispersed.

On Monday world leaders gather in New York to debate world poverty - as part of a special session before the start of the United Nations General Assembly.

They'll be taking stock of promises made a decade ago - in the form of the Millennium Development Goals or MDGs.

The plan was to cut global poverty in half by twenty-fifteen. Much has been achieved since then. But there's still a long way to go.

Bridget Kendall has tracked the last ten years of debate - and the way the economic realities have slowly shifted.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00ts0ct)
On Money Box today/tomorrow with Paul Lewis:

Should the Revenue get the go ahead to deduct tax directly from our pay packets before salaries reach our bank accounts?

Plus: Customers advised by Norwich and Peterborough Building Society over high end investments want their money back.

And: record numbers of complaints about financial firms. Just why cannot disputes be solved quickly?

Producer: Lesley McAlpine.


SAT 12:30 Chain Reaction (b00tq1vw)
Series 6

Stephen Merchant interviews Jarvis Cocker

The last in the current series of the tag team talk show where last week's guest, multi award-winning co-creator of The Office and Extras, and famously tall funny man Stephen Merchant takes the microphone to interview Pulp frontman and successful solo artist, dandy Englishman Jarvis Cocker.

Stephen asks Jarvis about the perils of being a glasses wearer, his protests against pop and what really happened with that famous Michael Jackson incident.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00ts0bq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00ts0bs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00tq1vy)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical discussion from Worle Community School in Weston-super-Mare, with questions for the panel including Ben Bradshaw, Shadow Secretary of State for Culture and Rachel Johnson, Editor of The Lady; the commentator John Kampfner and the Minister for Europe David Lidington.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00ts0fz)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00ts0h9)
The White Man's Burden

A radio adaptation of Paul Theroux's stage play about the young Rudyard Kipling's humiliating final months as an American resident. The great English writer plans to settle in Vermont with his American wife, but a clash with his brother-in-law results in death threats, a court case and public scandal. Will Kipling manage to keep his head when all about are losing theirs?

Rudyard Kipling ..... Nicholas Boulton
Carrie Kipling ..... Teresa Gallagher
Beatty Balestier ..... Nathan Osgood
Mary Hackett ..... Sasha Pick
Howard/ Hitt ..... David Rintoul
Conland/ Judge Newton ..... Peter Marinker
Fitts ..... John Guerrasio

Written by Paul Theroux
Adapted and directed by Emma Harding.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b00tpqm4)
Series 10

Ma Vlast

At the core of Czech cultural identity Bedrich Smetana’s Ma Vlast.

Written in the late 19th century, it's a series of six symphonic poems. For a western audience the most popular and best loved is Vltava, a soundscape conjuring up vivid images of the river which runs through Prague.

Jan Kaplan is a Czech born film-maker who has lived in the UK since 1968. He describes the 'educational concerts' he had to attend as a young boy when - bored to tears - he would endure long performances of Smetana's music.

However, as an adult living in exile, his experience of Czech culture was tinged with a remote sense of patriotism and he grew to appreciate his national composer. When - following the 1989 Velvet revolution - he was eventually able to return home, he witnessed one of the most famous and moving performances of Ma Vlast at Smetana Hall in 1990.

Also at that concert was musicologist, Professor Jan Smaczny, who describes his memories of that evening, and explains the history and mythology portrayed in Ma Vlast.

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00ts4vs)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Presented by Jane Garvey. Natascha Kampusch on her childhood imprisonment in an Austrian basement and her escape eight years later. Why do the lives of fewer women than men seem worth writing about? Editors of the obits pages give their views. Campaigning against harassment on the streets - when comments cross the line from banter to abuse. Artistic Director Judith Jamison from America's Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre talks about her new production at Sadler's Wells in London. Pornography and the men who are taking a stand against it. Food writer Diana Henry on buying good ingredients and using them well to make seasonal soups and stocks.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00ts58b)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Ritula Shah, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00ts58d)
Flashbacks, nightmares and hallucinations.

One listener explains how a 17-day stay in intensive care haunted her long after she was discharged, and why she now wants to help other former patients.

There's song about greasy spoons. Also, will the escaped hamster turn up safely? How do pirates talk? Plus guest star Justin Webb reads Your News. With Jennifer Tracey.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00ts58g)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00ts58j)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ts58q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00ts5dw)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive is joined by best-selling author of Man and Boy Tony Parsons. His latest book 'Tony Parsons on Life, Death and Breakfast' is a collection of his outspoken essays in which he offers middle-aged advice on the dilemmas of modern life.

Who can forget Sir Humphrey and Jim Hacker? If you missed the classic TV series, you can now see Yes, Prime Minister on stage. Jonathan Lynn and Anthony Jay, the original writers of the award winning political comedy, have reunited to produce the stage version which transfers to London's West End this week.

Richard Armitage talks tattoos in his starring role as MI5 operative Lucas North. The spy thriller Spooks returns to BBC One for its ninth series on Monday night.

Nikki Bedi looks up to Mark Dolan, who met some of the world's most extraordinary people. From the hairiest man, to the woman who holds the record for the biggest enhanced breasts! Mark is 6'5"

There's comedy and teenage angst from 19 year old Scotsman Daniel Sloss.

Enchanting orchestral pop comes from Phildel who performs Disappearance of the Girl live in the studio.

And deep country folk from Louisiana's Dylan LeBlanc who plays 'Low' from his new album 'Pauper's Field'.

Producer: Cathie Mahoney.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00ts5dy)
Danny Alexander, Chief Secretary to the Treasury

Jonathan Maitland profiles Danny Alexander, Chief Secretary to the Treasury in the coalition government and Liberal Democrat who will wield the axe as the UK enters a new age of austerity. Alexander emerged from a background in communications and a short career as a politician --he was first elected to a Highlands seat in 2005 --to become Treasury Chief Secretary. It is a post that many commentators say makes Danny Alexander the third most powerful man in government, after the Prime Minister and the Chancellor of the Exchequer and ahead of his own boss the Deputy Prime Minister. So how did a man whose last job outside of politics was to run communications for the Cairngorms National Park get so far so fast? And how will he fare once the cuts he is overseeing begin to take hold? Jonathan Maitland talks to his family, his friends and political commentators about the MP from Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch & Strathspey.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00ts5f0)
Tom Sutcliffe and guests writer Miranda Sawyer, critic John Mullan and academic and critic Maria Delgado review the week's cultural highlights including Design for Living.

Initially banned in the UK, Noel Coward's play Design for Living is being revived at the Old Vic in London and stars Andrew Scott as Leo, Lisa Dillon as Gilda and Tom Burke as Otto. Set in 1930s bohemian Paris and the height of Manhattan society - the play had its origins in a real three-sided friendship between Coward, Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne.

This week's book is Charles Yu's How To Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, about a time machine repairman who accidentally shoots his future self, thereby becoming trapped in a perpetual time loop. In 2007 Charles Yu was nominated by the National Book Foundation as one of its '5 Under 35' writers to watch out for.

Bandits, Wilderness and Magic, the first major Rosa exhibition since 1973 is now open at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. One of the boldest and most powerfully inventive artists and personalities of the Italian 17th century, Salvator Rosa was a rebel, a libertine and often in very real danger from the Inquisition.

Debra Grahnik's film, Winter's Bone, which won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Festival this year, stars Jennifer Lawrence as Ree and Garret Dillahunt as Sherrif Baskin. Set in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, it tells the story of a young woman struggling to keep the family home after her father - a crystal meth dealer - mysteriously disappears.

And Julian Fellowes, Oscar-winning scriptwriter of Gosford Park, pens another period drama set in a country house - Downton Abbey, the eponymous title of ITV1's new Sunday night drama.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00ts5mm)
The Feynman Variations

Following on from his archive portrait of Carl Sagan, Physicist Brian Cox presents a tribute to Richard Feynman. Widely regarded as the finest physicist of his generation and the most influential since Einstein, Feynman did much to popularise science, through lectures, books and television, not least his dramatic revelation before the world's media at a press conference in which he demonstrated the exact cause of the Challenger Shuttle explosion in 1986.

Described as the 'Mozart of physics', Feynman's amazing life and career seemingly had no end of highlights. A student at MIT and then Princeton (where he obtained an unprecedented perfect score on the entrance exam for maths and physics), he was drafted onto the Manhattan Project as a junior scientist. There his energy and talents made a significant mark on two of the project's leaders, Robert Oppenheimer and Hans Bethe. The latter would become Feynman's lifelong mentor and friend. Bethe called his student "a magician", setting him apart from other scientists as no ordinary genius. In 1965, Feynman shared a Nobel for his unique contribution to the field of Quantum Electrodynamics making him the most celebrated, influential and best known American Physicist of his generation. Something that would continue until his death from cancer in 1988.

At the same time as his scientific reputation was building, Feynman's unconventional attitude and behaviour was helping to create his reputation for eccentricity. When bored of writing equations on chalk boards or lecturing in his lab, he would go off in search of inspiration down at the local strip club, watching the go-go girls and scribbling his calculations on napkins. He played bongos and cracked safes. He was multi-disciplined before the term was even invented, allowing his curiosity to stray into biology, psychology and computing. He was playful and imaginative because he saw the value in not being solely focused on applied research. His eccentricity would at times infuriate his colleagues but it was simply a natural consequence of how he thought. From a young age, as he explains in the programme, his father instilled in him an insatiable curiosity about the world, a desire to know at a fundamental level, how it operated. It simply wasn't enough to know the name of something. His father also taught him to carry a healthy disrespect for the natural hierarchy of things. Recounting a hilarious story about his Father's dislike of the Pope, Feynman saw status and honours as little more than ephemera: "epaulets and uniforms" and his father, a uniform salesman by trade, "knew the difference between a man with the uniform on and the uniform off - it's the same man".

Though few ever understood mathematics or physics like Feynman, he truly believed that science was simply too important to be left exclusively to scientists and his energy and humour was essential in getting the public interested and inspired to find out how the world works for themselves, something that is essential today as science plays an increasingly central role in world events and everyday life.

Producer: Rami Tzabar.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00762yj)
My Family and Other Animals

Episode 2

My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell, dramatised by Janys Chambers

My Family and Other Animals is Gerald Durrell's comic gem of a book, the classic story of his upper-class English eccentric family, whose antics persist on disrupting his enthralling natural history escapades on the sunny, pre-package holiday Greek island of 1930s Corfu. Recounted with immense humour and charm, this is a wonderful account of a rare, magical childhood.
Episode 2: Gerry's animal collection increases to such an extent that the family's chaotic Christmas party gets totally out of hand.

Gerry.....Adam Usden
Adult.....GerryWill Tacey
Mother.....Celia Imrie
Larry.....Toby Jones
Margo.....Anna Kirke
Leslie.....Paul Hunter
Spiro.....Andreas Markos
Dr Androuchelli/Dr Stephanides.....Graeme Hawley
Lugaretzia.....Katia David

Directed in Manchester by Polly Thomas.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00ts5p1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Iconoclasts (b00tq7x2)
Series 3

Episode 3

Journalist and author James Bartholomew argues that the National Health Service should be abolished. "It is not one of the best health-care systems in the world - it's actually one of the worst." His views will be challenged by Dr Sam Everington (a G.P. from the East End of London), Sir Gerry Robinson (presenter of the TV series 'Can Gerry Robinson Save The NHS?') and Nick Seddon (deputy-director of the think-tank 'Reform').
The live studio discussion is chaired by Edward Stourton. Join in the debate by emailing iconoclasts@bbc.co.uk or text during the programme on 84844.
Producer: Peter Everett.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b00tppmb)
(7/12) The teams from the South of England and The Midlands clash for the second time in the current series. Rosalind Miles and Stephen Maddock of the Midlands will be hoping for sweet revenge against Fred Housego and Marcel Berlins of the South of England, who defeated them last time they met. Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00tnmlj)
Roger McGough returns with an autumn series of Poetry Please. Today poems by D H Lawrence including his great late masterpieces The Ship of Death and Bavarian Gentians, and a pair of dazzling birds - Hummingbird and Turkey Cock - read by David Bamber. Also two new poems from Midlands veteran poet Roy Fisher.



SUNDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00tqmpd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Readings From Bath (b00htmzy)
Knit One Purl One

The first of three new stories by Bath writers from the stage of last year's Literature Festival in the city is a funny and tender account of a marriage, a series of summer holidays and the importance of knitting. Knit One Purl One written by Pippa Gladhill. The reader is Pippa Haywood

Producers: Sue Fry/Sara Davies.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00ts6k2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00ts6kd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00ts6qc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00ts6qf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00ts6qh)
The bells of St Wilfred's Roman Catholic Church, York.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00ts5dy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00ts6tq)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00ts7hy)
Blame it on the Universe

Mark Tully wonders why so many people now talk about The Universe where they would once have spoken about God.

Why is The Universe a more helpful and meaningful concept for some than 'God', when they are seeking guidance, confirmation and blessing.

Where has the expression come from, and what does it actually mean?

Producer: Eley McAinsh
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00ts7nh)
Anna Varle discovers the ancient art of horse logging, using heavy horses to clear woodland. Helping clear a site in Shropshire, she finds out how horses can do what machines can't.

Horses are particularly useful when delicate environments need attention. Marton Pool in Shropshire is a protected Site of Special Scientific Interest, and 6 horses working together are needed to clear the area. Leading the team is Doug Joiner, chair of British Horse Loggers, who helps Anna take her first steps in learning a craft thought to be over 10,000 years old.

Horse Logging nearly died out in the 20th century, and by the 1980s there were only 3 full-time loggers in the UK. Now it's enjoying a renaissance, and the Forestry Commission, Natural England, and estates across the country are using teams of horses to tidy up their woodland.

Presenter: Anna Varle. Produced by Melvin Rickarby.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00ts7nk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00ts7nm)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00ts82r)
In just over 2 hours time Pope Benedict XVI will arrive at Cofton Park in Birmingham to beatify Cardinal John Henry Newman. To mark this historic occasion the Sunday programme will come live from Cofton Park where Edward Stourton will be joined by historians, bishops and catholic commentators to look back over Pope Benedict's visit to Britain and to discuss the significance of the beatification of Cardinal Newman for both Catholics and Anglicans.

E-mail: sunday@bbc.co.uk

Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ts82t)
KidsOut

John Parrott presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity KidsOut.

Donations to KidsOut should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope KidsOut. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. You can also give online at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide KidsOut with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 1075789.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00ts86y)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00ts876)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00ts87z)
In preparation for the beatification of Cardinal Newman taking place later at Cofton Park in Birmingham, thousands are already gathered on the grassy slopes near Newman's oratory church, to celebrate the life of one of the greatest English theologians of the 19th Century and prepare for the forthcoming Papal Mass. The service is led by Mike Stanley and Jo Boyce who are joined by school choirs from Coventry and Birmingham. Our worship is introduced by Bernadette Kearney. Producer: Philip Billson.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00tq1w0)
The Sistine tapestries

Five centuries after they were created, some extraordinary tapestries have been brought from the Sistine Chapel to London. The Raphael tapestries, from the series, "The Acts of the Aposles", are on loan to the Victoria and Albert Museum, to mark the Pope's visit. Lisa Jardine reflects on the significance of these works - each one slighter bigger than a double decker bus.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00ts8lk)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00ts8wc)
For detailed synopses, see daily episodes

Written by: Tim Stimpson
Directed by: Kim Greengrass
Editor: Vanessa Whitburn

Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Helen Monks
Daniel Hebden Lloyd ..... Louis Hamblett
Nigel Pargetter ..... Graham Seed
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Jolene Perks ..... Buffy Davis
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Kathy Perks ..... Hedli Niklaus
Jamie Perks ..... Dan Ciotkowski
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Clarrie Grundy ..... Rosalind Adams
William Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Nic Hanson ..... Becky Wright
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Bert Fry ..... Eric Allan
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Harry Mason ..... Michael Shelford
Martyn Gibson ..... John Glover
Andrew Eagleton ..... John Flitcroft.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b00tt3qv)
Play School

Sue MacGregor reunites people involved with classic children's TV programme Play School, which ran from 1964 to 1988.

Devised by Joy Whitby, former producer of the Listen with Mother slot on BBC Radio, the programme was a direct response to concerns about the perceived poor standard of British pre-school education.

Play School was ground-breaking in more ways than one as it accidentally became the first programme to be shown on BBC 2 after a power cut halted the opening night's programming.

Its enthusiastic presenters came from diverse backgrounds and became household names with the iconic three shaped windows, clock and toys to form an integral part of many early childhoods.

Sue is joined around the table by Joy Whitby, presenters Floella Benjamin, Brian Cant, who also fronted spin-off series Play Away, and Toni Arthur and musical director/pianist Jonathan Cohen.

The programme also features contributions from Johnny Ball and Play School historian Paul R. Jackson.

Producer: Chris Green
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00tppv4)
Series 57

Episode 7

Radio 4's long running and popular panel game hosted by Nicholas Parsons. Starring Graham Norton, Gyles Brandreth, Jenny Eclair and Paul Merton. The panellists attempt to speak on a subject given to them without repetition, hesitation or deviation. Subjects this week include 'My Inner Monologue' and 'The Person to My Left'. Tune in to hear what they make of that. Especially, Graham Norton, who hasn't got anyone sitting to his left.
Producer: Tilusha Ghelani.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00tt3rr)
Northern Ireland and "Focus on Food"

Northern Ireland's new Focus on Food policy, published earlier this summer, aims to put food at the heart of economic growth, and encourage value added, and quality, food production.

While in the South the food revolution of the past 30 years created a plethora of innovative, quality food businesses to feed a burgeoning tourism sector, in the North the food and farming industries have been more commodity focused, and have lagged behind on the quality front. The Focus on Food strategy aims to provide expertise and support to stimulate the food and farming sectors, which, after the public sector, are the single biggest employers in the region.

Sheila Dillon visits two new value-added businesses, the sorts of enterprise Focus on Food is designed to encourage: Mash Direct, selling a range of mashes and vegetable dishes fresh through the retailers and providing an economic future for the family, and Glastry Farm whose dairy herd provide the milk for their premium ice creams based around regional produce like Armagh Bramleys, and strawberries. She also talks to established artisan baker Robert Ditty. Is the government strategy enough to kick start quality food entrepreneurism in Northern Ireland? And in the era of public-sector cuts will the financial back-up be available?


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00tt3tn)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00tt3tz)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 Children of the Olympic Bid (b00tt3w2)
Series 5

Episode 2

When Sebastian Coe presented London's bid for the 2012 Games at the IOC meeting in Singapore on July 6th 2005 he was flanked on the stage by the London teenagers. They were seen as crucial in helping secure victory over Paris - representing the sporting dreams of the nation and the rich cultural, ethnic and religious mix of the capital. Since then Peter White's been following them, their families and those who train alongside them.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00tq1vp)
Anne Swithinbank, Matthew Biggs and Pippa Greenwood are in the company of local gardeners, staff and students of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in London.

Eric Robson is the chairman.

Producer : Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 A View Through a Lens (b00tt3wz)
Series 2

Episode 2

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

2/5. It's July and twelve hundred kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, on the island of Spitzbergen, wildlife cameraman, John Aitchison waits for eider ducklings to hatch. It's a cold and hostile environment, but it's where Louis Nelson chose to build his cabin and this is where John is staying. Louis is an eider farmer; he harvests the down which the female eiders pluck from their breasts to line their nests. This gathered down is used to fill eider downs. It's a form of sustainable harvesting which works for both parties. Louis protects the eiders from predators and in return only takes the surplus down which the ducks replace. Since he began this work he's attracted more birds to the colony. There are now some 3000 birds, compared to 1600 when he started. The nesting ducks are a powerful draw for other animals -like gulls and foxes which will steal the eggs, and polar bears. They are a very real threat. Louis has had to fortify the cabin against them and John's hide provides little resistance against one inquisitive visitor (fortunately when John isn't inside). Trying to film eider ducks hatch and make it to the water's edge is anything but easy as John quickly discovers, especially when there are polar bears about!

Presented by John Aitchison
Produced by Sarah Blunt.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00tt3x1)
Emile Zola - The Ladies' Delight

Episode 1

Business, ambition and fashion all collide in Emile Zola's colourful love story - set in the hustle and excitement of the expansion of one of Paris' first department stores.

Dramatised in two-parts by Carine Adler.

When innocent provincial girl Denise arrives in Paris, she quickly catches the eye of the notorious seducer of women, Octave Mouret. Despite her uncle's disapproval, Denise accepts a job at Mouret's ever expanding department store The Ladies' Delight.

Narrator.....David Hargreaves
Denise.....Georgia King
Mouret.....Lee Williams
Bourdoncle.....Conrad Nelson
Baudu.....Nicholas Blane
Old Bourras/Baron/Vincard.....Will Tacey
Jean/Bauge.....Stephen Hoyle
Deloche/Colomban.....Michael Hugo
Mme Aurelie/Mme Baudu.....Clare Beck
Mme Desforges.....Melissa Jane Sinden
Mme Marty/Pauline.....Maeve Larkin
Clara.....Chantelle Dean
Genevieve/Margueritte/Mme Boves.....Polly Lister

Director: Stefan Escreet
Producer: Charlotte Riches

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00tt3x3)
Mariella Frostrup is joined by the award-winning crime novelist Val McDermid to discuss her latest book, Trick of the Dark. McDermid is best known for her Tony Hill series of thrillers, which were adapted for television as Wire In The Blood. She talks to Mariella about her ongoing love affair with writing crime and why she invented the category of Tartan Noir to describe her books.

Also on the programme, the writer behind The No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency, Alexander McCall Smith, shares his insights into the art of writing prolifically. Mariella finds out how McCall Smith, like other prolific novelists, is able to continue producing a book a year - something many writers feel clashes with the artistry of fiction writing.

Plus, as Pakistan continues to reel from the damage created by flood waters, how are the country's writers responding? Two of Pakistan's new generation of novelists, Kamila Shamsie and Daniyal Mueenudeen, join Mariella to discuss, and to shed light on the renaissance that Pakistani writing is undergoing.

Producer: Sally Spurring.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00tt3zt)
Roger McGough presents an autumn edition focussing on Louis MacNeice and including parts of his Autumn Journal. Paul Mundell is the reader. Also two new poems by veteran Midlands poet Roy Fisher.


SUN 17:00 Pay and Tax: The Radio 4 Debate (b00tt3zw)
This debate on pay and tax rounds up a week of programmes on Radio 4 on two of the biggest topics facing the UK at the moment economically and politically.

The BBC's Political Editor Nick Robinson is joined by mobile phone entrepreneur John Caudwell, Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee, philosohy professor Jonathan Wolff, and economist Dr Andrew Lilico from the think tank Policy Exchange. They will debate whether the current pay structure is the right one, and if it isn't, what part could tax or other government intervention play in changing it. And what might the alternatives be like for our economy and our society?


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00ts5dy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00tt3zy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00tt400)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00tt402)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00tt404)
John Waite makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

John Waite turns super-sleuth for Pick of the Week on Sunday. Tracking down the tortured beginnings of the musical "Evita", and the no-less tortured home-life of that nice couple of homicidal maniacs, the Macbeths. He turns his detective skills to revealing why famous fictional detectives are murdered by their creators. And what happened to a whole town - it's there on the map, but seems to have disappeared in reality. As to how you get a tune out of a series of cats - well, that's a three pipe problem. See if John can crack it by tuning in to Pick of the Week. The game's afoot at 6.15.

The Strongest Girl in the World - Radio 4
Operation Pedro Pan - World Service
Talking To My Dad - Radio 4
Dan Box - BBC Radio Shropshire
Great Lives - Radio 4
PM - Radio 4
The Essay - Radio 3
The Musical - Radio 2
The Stanley Baxter Playhouse - Radio 4
Seeking The Endgame - World Service
Character Assassins - Radio 4
Punt PI - Radio 4
Pythonesque - Radio 4
Newshour - World Service

PHONE: 0370 010 0400
FAX: 0161 244 4243
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Cecile Wright.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00tt421)
Kathy's unamused by Kenton's apparent bragging to Jamie about his arrest. She admits to Clarrie they haven't discussed it properly - in fact, she's asked Kenton to move out. Nigel goes some way to explaining Kenton's actions, imploring a softening Kathy to give Kenton another chance.

Joe's dressed up for the flower and produce judging and his 89th birthday. Will is disgruntled to realise that Nic's work at the pub may hold her up for Joe's birthday tea. As he learns about Emma's sickness, Clarrie thinks on her feet to find a plausible reason.

At the show, thirsty Joe distracts wine judge Nigel, jokingly warning Nigel not to drink too much and end up back in jail. As a vegetable judge Joe has been fastidious, hinting that Bert may be disappointed. Jim's outraged to discover he's been disqualified. He apparently broke the rules by tying his onions together with twine.

Surprised and victorious Bert praises open minded Joe, who almost rumbles himself by admitting he saw Bert buying the same twine. Joe vows to come back as a competitor next year and give them both a run for their money - all this authority's not what it's cracked up to be.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00tt423)
Presenter Matt Frei talks to David Plouffe. After managing Barak Obama's successful campaign for President, David Plouffe is back to work pushing for "change", but this time the White House is hoping he can put his 2008 magic to work for the Democratic Party's midterm election campaign.

In 1962 the Mormon Tabernacle Choir demonstrated a new style of international diplomacy when it reached across the Iron Curtain to perform the world's first international satellite television broadcast in front of Mount Rushmore. Two members of the choir recall what it was like to send music across enemy lines and reflect on the changes they thought might be possible.

Matt Frei talks to Noam Chomsky. Over 40 years, he's explored ideas of war, conspiracy, conservation and communication. Americana asks him how his ideas have changed over time and how Americans may continue to transform in the future.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00j4d54)
In Her Element

A Horizontal View

A series in which three women writers describe their personal connection with the Welsh landscape and how their encounter with nature has shaped their lives.
Patricia Barrie recalls the view from her bedroom window when she was confined to bed as a child with a serious illness. Read by Sharon Morgan.

Producer : Kate McAll
Director : Nigel Lewis.


SUN 20:00 The Pope's Visit 2010: Highlights of the Beatification (b00tt425)
As the final major event of the Pope's historic visit to the UK one of the most distinguised English Catholics of the 19th century, Cardinal Newman, was declared "Blessed" at a major open air ceremony in Birmingham's Cofton Park near to Newman's home and oratory church.

According to the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales and the Bishops' Conference of Scotland, Newman's search for truth, his commitment to education and his moderation in debate all point to a man of faith in God, who cared for people and refused to pursue arguments without touching hearts.

As this visit draws to its conclusion, Edward Stourton presents the Highlights of this Beatification, commentating on the ceremony and explaining the process of making a saint. In particular, he discusses Newman's own journey towards sainthood.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00tq1vr)
John Wilson presents Radio 4's obituary programme, analysing and reflecting on the lives of people who have recently died. This week: Lord Bingham, who rose to become the most senior and most respected judge in Britain. A former Master of the Rolls and Lord Chief Justice, Lord Bingham was a proud defender of individual liberty and human rights. Lord David Owen is among those paying tribute. We also hear about the heroism and bravery of wartime secret agent Eileen Nearne; the free-wheeling life of traveller and counter-cultural leader Sid Rawle; French new wave auteur Claude Chabrol and how Vladimir Raitz invented the package holiday 60 years ago.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00ts0ct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ts82t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00tq11k)
After The Crunch

Peter Day is on quest to the North East to find out how businesses are doing in a part of the country where many publically funded jobs have been created in the past decade - jobs that are now under threat as the country waits to hear how and where the big planned government spending cuts will bite.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00tt42w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00tt42y)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b00tt441)
Episode 19

BBC Radio 4 brings back a much loved TV favourite - What the Papers Say. It does what it says on the tin. In each programme a leading political journalist has a wry look at how the broadsheets and red tops treat the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond. This week Kevin Maguire of The Daily Mirror takes the chair and the editor is Catherine Donegan.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00tq1vt)
Francine Stock talks to Stephen Woolley, producer of The Crying Game and Mona Lisa on the set of his latest drama, Made In Dagenham, which was inspired by an edition of the Radio 4 programme The Reunion.

Director Debra Granik takes us on a virtual tour of the Ozark Mountains in the American heartland, the setting for her new film, Winter's Bone.

And there's news of an unofficial national sport that once swept the nation - Spot Sam Kydd, a popular game featuring one of Britain's best loved character actors.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00ts7hy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00tqn35)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00tpv86)
Eavesdropping - CCTV in schools

From Hitchcock's 'Rear Window' to Facebook and Twitter, from Soviet Spies to Parisian cafes, eavesdropping is a universal phenomenon. John Locke, who has provided the first serious and systematic study of the behaviour, tells Laurie that it is a practice which extends into the animal kingdom and brings advantages to birds and chimpanzees. An attempt to understand the lives of others can help one live better oneself but despite the fact that it has shaped human history and culture, listening in to what others are saying continues to have a very bad name.
Also on the programme Emmeline Taylor presents her research on CCTV in schools and the impact on privacy.
Producer: Chris Wilson.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00ts6qh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00tqn5d)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00tqntx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00tqnxx)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00tqp2g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00tqpl6)
with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00tt465)
Hundreds of farmers stand to lose land for the proposed high-speed rail link between Birmingham and London. Caz Graham hears why they feel the compensation is not enough and some want it stopped altogether.

Farming Today visits the forager who gathers sloes for gin-making and we revisit the turkey farm where the birds are piling on the pounds for Christmas.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00tt467)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00tt469)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Justin Webb at the Lib Dem conference, including:
07:50 Has English cricket been tarnished by the Pakistan tour?
08:10 The Lib Dem conference gets underway with relative calm on the subject of coalition.
08:30 Education secretary Michael Gove on why rich, thick kids do better in life than poor, clever ones.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00tt49v)
In the first programme of a new series of Start the Week the former MP Lord Hattersley charts the life and politics of David Lloyd George, the Prime Minister responsible for the creation of the welfare state, and a working class man who came to understand the pitfalls of a coalition government. Andrew Marr looks back to the 1980s with the writer Andy McSmith who argues this was the conflict decade, defined by strikes, war and riots. And the philosopher Mary Midgley also criticises the individualism of the time, maintaining that Darwin's 'survival of the fittest' was never a creed in which to live one's life. The Irish-American community in New York is the setting for Richard Bean's new play, in which he uncovers the plots and deals that lead to the American funding of the IRA.


MON 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt49x)
The First Global Economy (1450 - 1600 AD)

The mechanical galleon

Neil MacGregor's world history as told through things. This week he is exploring the impact of Western European travel, trade and conquest between 1450 and 1600. He kicks off with an exquisite miniature version of the sort of high tech vessel that was to take Europeans right around the world. Today's object is a small clockwork version of the type of galleon that the Spanish sent against England in the Armada and that they sent across the high seas. This one was made for a grand dinner table - it could move, make music, tell the time and fire tiny cannons. Neil discusses the significance of this new breed of sailing ships and describes the political state that this galleon symbolises - the Holy Roman Empire. The marine archaeologist Christopher Dobbs compares the tiny galleon to the Mary Rose in Portsmouth and the historian Lisa Jardine considers the European fascination with mechanics and technology throughout the 16th Century.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00tt4lp)
Presented by Jane Garvey. The UK Human Trafficking Centre is campaigning to raise awareness of British children who suffer sexual exploitation through grooming and internal trafficking. A young woman tells Jane how she was groomed from the age of twelve. Bella Pollen talks about her new novel "The Summer of the Bear" set in the Outer Hebrides. And cosmetics - the new generation of foundations comes under scrutiny. How do you apply them and do they work?


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00tt4lr)
Hysteria

Episode 1

By Steve Chambers

Against the background of rising hysteria in the Middlesbrough community over the murders of prostitutes, Denise's dreams of a happy second marriage, even a family (at 40), are challenged as circumstantial evidence seems to point the finger at husband Phil.

We've all done things in the past that we'd prefer to keep under wraps.

How much do you tell your new partner if you're trying to make a good impression?

Can one small lie unravel a marriage?

Denise .... Christine Kavanagh
Phil .... Michael Hodgson
Kath .... Celia Hewitt
Sheree .... Colleen Prendergast
Jimmy .... Sean Baker
John .... Jude Akuwudike
Nurse .... Sally Orrock
Policemen .... Michael Shelford & Tony Bell

Director: David Hunter

The issues raised in the drama are entirely complementary to Woman's Hour. Developed at the Bore Place workshop with the aim of telling a contemporary story with a small cast and making full use of the 5-part structure this serial addresses not only the fragile dynamics of a marriage but also the rather taboo subject of men paying for sex and how a community can so easily be whipped into a suspicious frenzy.

Steve Chambers has written extensively for film, TV, theatre and radio. His radio credits include 'Scandinavian Dreams' and 'The Ice Factory' both for Radio 3. Other original work includes 'The Coup' and two series of 'Victoria Station' for Radio 4. Radio adaptations include 'Waterland', 'The Grapes of Wrath', 'Sister Carrie' and 'The Pledge' for Radio 4. His dramatisation of James Ellroy's autobiography 'My Dark Places' starred Toby Stephens and was broadcast by BBC World Service to coincide with the inauguration of Barack Obama.


MON 11:00 Reversing the Brain Drain (b00tw2lj)
David Kirk is a man with a passion for Northern Ireland and its potential to have a bright, tech-led future. A mover and shaker in Silicon Valley, his roots lie far from the Californian soil - Kirk was born in a terraced house in east Belfast in the 1950s. His parents moved out before the Troubles hit and just recently he's begun to reconnect with the country of his birth. David Kirk has now decided to invest his time and money in entrepreneurs in Northern Ireland and he says there's no reason why the local expertise shouldn't produce the next Google. In Reversing the Brain Drain Declan Curry charts David Kirk's progress as he coaches the next generation of business leaders.


MON 11:30 HR (b00tt4lt)
Series 2

Remodelling

Sam, fearing the sense of purposelessness that often hits retirees, decides to redecorate his house. But, his housemate Peter worries, has he some darker purpose in mind?

Nigel Williams' comedy drama series charting the misfortunes of a middle-aged HR officer and his trouble-making colleague.

Peter ..... Jonathan Pryce
Sam ..... Nicholas Le Prevost
Nigel ..... Tony Bell

Director: Peter Kavanagh.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00ttlrc)
Consumer Affairs with Julian Worricker.

Air and ground heat pumps, increasingly popular devices that produce hot water using renewable energy have failed the UK's largest field test in four out of five cases. Why did so many UK suppliers not meet EU standards and what can be done about it?

A web based estate agent has launched a home sale product which he claims undercuts High Street rivals by 90% - what's the catch?

A Cumbrian academy, which replaced three schools last year in need of improvement and investment, has recorded worst results than the schools it replaced.

Rob Penn does not do things by halves. In 1994 he cycled around the globe and now he's completed another bicycle based quest - a year long search for components and craftsmen to build the best bike in the world.

And is the end of the road fast approaching for the independent petrol station?


MON 12:57 Weather (b00tqrmz)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00trk4z)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Round Britain Quiz (b00tt4lw)
(8/12) Tom Sutcliffe chairs a return match between Michael Schmidt and Adele Geras of the North of England, playing Alan Taylor and Michael Alexander of Scotland. Tom also has the answer to the cliffhanger question from last week.
Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00tt421)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00tt4ly)
The Last Tudor

A reality show contestant decides that he has a greater claim to the throne than the current Royal Family. This improvised drama, told in a documentary format, charts his rise and fall, in a satire on celebrity, delusion and spin.

The story is based on a true story of Anthony Hall, a former policeman who in 1931 started to give public speeches claiming that he was the descendant of an illegitimate son of Henry VIII and therefore the last Tudor. Documents released by the National Archives show that his threats to the Royal Family started to alarm the police and Home Office, and that George V lobbied to have him quietly declared insane and put away without trial.

The drama supposes that Anthony Hall's great grandson, a local government employee at Bristol City Council, discovers his family history and decides to exploit the royal claim as part of his bid to win a television talent show called the Fame Factor. This central character, called Murray Gray, dresses up as Henry VIII to raise money for charitable causes, and seeks pop stardom to escape his boring job dealing with parking fines.

Initially the case of Murray Gray is simply one story in a history documentary about royal pretenders, but as Murray's gets more and more successful in the Fame Factor, events, and the documentary, spiral out of control.

The "documentary" is presented by real life presenter and producer Jolyon Jenkins, who also devised the drama with Abigail Youngman. Murray Gray is played by Jonathan Alden and his girlfriend Chantelle by Nadia Williams. Murray's PR agent Memphis Garfield is played by real life music promoter Conal Dodds.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00ts5mm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Key Matters (b00tt535)
Series 2

A Major

Ivan Hewett talks to pianist and conductor Jonathan Cohen about the key of A Major, a key often associated with optimism and even ecstasy.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00tt3rr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00tt537)
The Charedi (ultra orthodox) Jewish communities

In Beyond Belief, Ernie Rea and his guests explore the place of faith in our complex world.

Ernie is joined by three guests who discuss how their own religious tradition affects their values and outlook on the world, often revealing hidden and contradictory truths.

In this programme, Ernie and his guests explore the beliefs, practices and lifestyles of the fastest growing group within Britain's Jewish community - Ultra Orthodox or Charedi Jews.

Much of its rapid growth is down to a high birth rate - they average around seven children per family - but they are also attracting members from other Jewish communities. In Israel they play a key role in electoral politics. But what is their impact in this country? What do they believe? How do they practice? And how do they interact with those who sit outside their community?

Joining Ernie to discuss Charedi Jewry is Rabbi Avraham Printer, Principal of the Yesodey Hatorah Senior School for Girls, Mrs Henya Myer, a member of the Hasidic Congregation in Manchester, and Rabbi Dan Cohn-Sherbok, Professor of Judaism at the University of Wales, Lampeter who belongs to the Reform Movement of Judaism.

The middle interview is with Hillel Athias Robias, now a Liberal Rabbi in London but once Rabbi to a Haredi Congregation.

Producer: Karen Maurice.


MON 17:00 PM (b00trk51)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00trkrw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00tt56z)
Radio 4's long running and popular panel game hosted by Nicholas Parsons. The panellists attempt to speak for a minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation. This week they are Paul merton, Tony Hawks, Ross Noble and Sheila Hancock. Subjects include 'The Joke Book' and 'Learning to Play Golf'. It seems Paul Merton has taken up golf recently and Ross Noble is not very happy about it. Last in the current series.

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00tt571)
Jennifer's talk of Kate's university course gets Kirsty thinking about a return to education herself. Meanwhile, Helen is rushing about - much to Jennifer's concern.

At Jaxx, Helen reveals to Kirsty that her triple test results show there's a low probability of the baby having Down's Syndrome. Helen's made a new resolution to stop worrying about what she can't control. Kenton is in party mood, getting friendly with an attractive thirty-something. This leaves Helen and Kirsty speculating on his relationship with Kathy.

Kenton tells Kirsty about his cunning plan to distract Elizabeth, in order to allow Nigel to set up his special anniversary surprise. It involves roping in an old mate, Barrie, to play a prospective client for Lizzie to meet.

Jennifer has a proposition for Roy. Kate's due to arrive on Thursday, and Jennifer suggests that Phoebe comes to stay with her and Kate for a week. That way, Phoebe will also be there for Kate's birthday on Thursday week. Hayley's against the idea, but Roy's keen to get off on the right foot with Kate and show willing. Jennifer's thrilled when they agree, but Hayley doesn't trust Kate to keep to Phoebe's routines. If she wants to be a parent, she has to start acting like one.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00trldj)
Herb Alpert; John Pawson; The Town film review

Trumpeter Herb Alpert made his mark with the distinctive Tijuana Brass, and as a musician has sold 72 million albums worldwide including the classic songs The Lonely Bull, A Taste of Honey and Whipped Cream. As he releases a double CD - The Essential Herb Alpert - he reflects on his long career, founding the A&M record label and why he decided it was time to sell.

John Pawson discusses designing a minimalist monastery, failing to finish his architecture exams and his family connection with the Mercury Prize winning band The xx. An exhibition of his work opens at the Design Museum this week.

Ben Affleck stars alongside Rebecca Hall, Pete Postelthwaite and John Hamm (of Mad Men fame) in The Town, a crime thriller which Affleck directed and co-wrote based on Chuck Hogan's novel Prince of Thieves. Dreda Say Mitchell reviews.

Should musicians have to pay for a seat for their instruments on airlines? Stephen McNamara - Head of Communications Ryanair and Deborah Annetts - Chief Executive Incorporated Society of Musicians discuss whether there should be a standard airline policy on the check-in of musical instruments.

Producer: Robyn Read.


MON 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt49x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


MON 20:00 Exit Strategy: Choosing a Time to Die (b00tt573)
The debate over whether we should legalise assisted suicide is not going away.

But whilst we flounder over the grey areas of the British legal system, a radical Australian doctor has found a loophole.

Because physically helping someone to die is illegal, he is providing information to paying participants on how to die peacefully and painlessly kill themselves.

Dr Nitschke runs Exit International; an organisation that distributes information on end-of-life methods. Banned from holding seminars in his own country, he is taking his workshops on the road.

Reporter Jenny Cuffe visits an Exit International workshop. She talks to the people present about their reasons for attending and investigates whether Exit is acting in the interests of humanity, or irresponsibly by offering dangerous information without safeguards.

Has Exit recognised a real concern amongst Britain's ageing population who worry about ending their days dependent on others?

Jenny will find out whether those shouting the loudest really represent the feelings of the wider population.

Talking with geriatricians, psychologists, campaigners and elderly people she explores society's last great taboo: death. She asks why so many people approaching old age are scared of dying.

Are they being failed by our care system? Are advances in medicine extending quantity but not quality of life? Or is even discussing assisted suicide for the elderly symptomatic of an ageist society that undervalues the old?

Should the 'I want' generation be able to make the choice of when we die and have the right to plan our own Exit Strategy?

Producer: Gemma Newby
An All Out Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00tt575)
What's Wrong with Child Labour?

What is childhood for?

It is commonly seen as a time for play and learning, but should employment play a more important part?

Fran Abrams examines the subject of children at work in the UK, and asks why it is a phenomenon so little talked about.

She traces the history of child labour in this country, and explores modern-day notions of the 'priceless child' who ought to be immersed in education and shielded from harsh economic reality.

In protecting our children, she asks, are we causing them harm? And might the youth of Britain benefit from a revival of child labour?


MON 21:00 Material World (b00tq11f)
So You Want to Be a Scientist - the final

Four amateur scientists have turned their ideas into experiments this year. They were selected from 1,300 ideas sent in from around the UK, and this week they present their results in front of a live audience at the British Science Festival in Birmingham.

But who will be selected as the BBC's Amateur Scientist of the Year? The finalists are:

Ruth Brooks, 69, retired tutor from Devon
"What is the homing distance of the Garden Snail that decimates my plants? How far away do I have to dump them before they find their way back to my garden?"

Sam O'kell, 35, croupier from Manchester
"I believe the greatest crowd density at a music gig is not at the front, next to the barriers, but three rows back from the front. I would test this by wearing a pressure sensing vest beneath normal clothes, and take readings at different locations in the crowd."

Nina Jones, 17, A-level student from Milton Keynes
"What makes up a typical Facebook profile picture? Adults seem to choose pictures showing an event in their lives - their wedding, or their children - whereas teenagers seem to show themselves having a good time. Through investigation, I will test these predictions."

John Rowlands, 41, aerial photographer from Anglesey
"To investigate the frequency and brightness of noctilucent clouds. They are believed to be linked to climate change, as there are no records of sighting pre-1850s. I will look at planetary waves, huge oscillations in the earth's upper atmosphere, and find out if they influence when noctilucent clouds occur."

On the judging panel:
- Prof Tanya Byron, Clinical Psychologist and broadcaster
- Mark Henderson, Science Editor of The Times
- Prof Trevor Cox, Acoustic Engineer, EPSRC Media Fellow

Presenter: Quentin Cooper
Producer: Michelle Martin.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00tt49v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00trlmd)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00trlmg)
As Nick Clegg delivers his keynote speech, we report live from the Lib Dem conference in Liverpool. Are the rank and file happy to be in coalition with the Conservatives?

World leaders gather in New York to review the Millennium Development Goals. What will it take to get them back on track?

And the Mayor of Moscow is under fire from the Kremlin. Will he stay or will he go?

With David Eades in London and Robin Lustig in Liverpool.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00tt577)
Rosamund Lupton - Sister

Episode 1

When Beatrice hears that her younger sister, Tess, is missing, she leaves her job in New York and returns home to London on the first available flight. Having already lost her little brother, who died of Cystic Fibrosis as a child, Bee cannot bear the thought of losing her sister. When she tells the police that Tess had been getting nuisance calls, and that she was pregnant by a lecturer at her college who hadn't wanted her to have the baby, the police decide to do a reconstruction of Tess's last known movements.

This is Rosamund Lupton's first novel, a tense psychological thriller that explores the powerful bond between sisters that endures beyond death. The abridger is Lauris Morgan Griffiths and the reader is Hattie Morahan.

Producers: Sara Davies and Christine Hall.


MON 23:00 Great Unanswered Questions (b00tw1fc)
Series 2

Episode 1

Who are the most intelligent - rocket scientists or brain surgeons?

Which wakes up first - you or your eyes?

Northern Irish comedian Colin Murphy and his two resident nerds Dr David Booth and Matthew Collins try to answer the unanswerable.

With Dara O'Briain.

Producer: Jackie Hamilton.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


MON 23:30 Uncool Britannia (b00sh3pm)
The Pakamac Years

Steve Punt presents a new three part history of the Britain that's ubiquitous yet unashamedly uncool. Steve argues the nation's recent past has been hijacked by the fashionistas and that it's time to celebrate the past as it really was - deeply unhip. Forget the Rolling Stones, Mary Quant and the Aston Martin, what Britons really love is a nice melody, a sensible coat and a reliable motor...

Steve re-imagines the 50s and 60s as the Pakamac Years. He argues that it wasn't beatniks that epitomised the spirit of the era - but the foldaway mac. The Pakamac flew off the shelves in their tens of thousands as Britons rejoiced in the sheer novelty and practicality of a plastic raincoat which you could pop in your handbag. Steve also considers the importance of anoraks, cagoules, parkas and snorkels as emblems of uncool Britain.

Producer: Laurence Grissell
(repeat).



TUESDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00tqmx0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt49x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00tqn5h)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00tqnt9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00tqnxl)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00tqp22)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00tqpkr)
with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00tt59h)
Anna Hill hears all New Zealand lamb and beef is halal, but isn't labelled as such. Farming Today visits a halal abattoir and hears from the campaign group VIVA who want the law changed. The import group, Beef and Lamb New Zealand, explain that New Zealand meat has been halal for decades.

The Welsh Assembly Government have published new plans to trap and kill badgers in an attempt to halt the spread of bovine TB. The previous plan was rejected by judges after an appeal by The Badger Trust. Rural Affairs minister Elin Jones explains why she believes this new plan won't be rejected.

And Anna Hill visits ancient woodland in Norfolk to see whether Autumn has been affected by this years' peculiar weather.

Presenter: Anna Hill Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00tt47j)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie, and Justin Webb at the Lib Dem conference, including:
07:48 Imran Khan discusses the state of Pakistani cricket
08:10 Nick Clegg defends his economic policies
08:48 How British POWs saved an escaped concentration camp prisoner.


TUE 09:00 The Brown Years (b00tt59k)
Episode 1

Steve Richards tells the inside story of Gordon Brown's time as prime minister, based on revealing interviews with his close colleagues.

Interviewees include former ministers Peter Mandelson, Ed Balls, Harriet Harman, Jack Straw, Douglas Alexander, Alan Johnson, Hazel Blears, Peter Hain and Shriti Vadera; and several former Downing St insiders including those responsible for policy, political strategy and polling.


TUE 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt59m)
The First Global Economy (1450 - 1600 AD)

Benin plaque - the Oba with Europeans

This week Neil MacGregor's history of the world is exploring the impact of the great European age of expansion and discovery during the 15th and 16th Centuries. In the last programme he described the technology that allowed Europeans to sail around the world in great galleons, the "space ships of their age". Today he looks at what happens when Europeans started trading in West Africa and first came upon the ancient culture of Benin in present day Nigeria. Neil describes the world of this hugely successful warrior kingdom and the culture that produced such exquisite artwork. He also describes what happened when the British raided Benin at the end of the 19th Century and the effect that these brass portraits first had when they arrived in London. The artist Sokari Douglas Camp reflects on the sculptures as art while the Nigerian poet and playwright Wole Soyinka reacts to the violent history of Benin and the loss of part of their great heritage.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00tt59p)
Presented by Jane Garvey. Today, Indian cookery queen Madhur Jaffrey talks about easy curries and cooks prawns with garlic & chillies. It has been suggested that long summer holidays disadvantage poorer children, so should we move to a five-term year? Internationally acclaimed model Karen Elson released her first album this summer. She talks to Jane about her new musical career and sings live. And thinning hair - what are the causes and how can it best be dealt with.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00tt59r)
Hysteria

Episode 2

By Steve Chambers

Denise is frantic because husband Phil has been at the police station all night.

Denise .... Christine Kavanagh
Phil .... Michael Hodgson
Kath .... Celia Hewitt
Sheree .... Colleen Prendergast
Jimmy .... Sean Baker
John .... Jude Akuwudike
Nurse .... Sally Orrock
Policemen .... Michael Shelford & Tony Bell

Director: David Hunter.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b00tt5cs)
Series 1

Episode 21

21/40. Saba Douglas-Hamilton reports from Samburu national park in Kenya where she and her family have studied the elephants and lions for decades. Saba sees pressures from all directions impacting on the wildlife. In her first report we hear about the effects of severe flooding after a period of sustained drought on the savannah and we get an insight into the elephants within the national park.

We hear from Mark Brazil on Tyuleniy Island (in the sea of Okhotsk off the coast of Russia) and his close encounters with Stellers Sea Lions.

And in the UK, culm grassland making a return - the preferred habitat of the Marsh Fritillary.

Presented by Brett Westwood
Produced by Sheena Duncan
Series Editor Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Who Was Joyce Hatto? (b00tt6f6)
In June 2006, the death was announced of the pianist Joyce Hatto. She was heralded as a great lost genius of classical music- a reclusive woman who almost never performed in public, but who in later life had created sublime recordings in private.

A few months later it emerged that those recordings were fake- lifted from other performers and tweaked in the studio - which leaves a question hanging.

Biographer Anne Sebba sets out to discover: 'Who was Joyce Hatto?'

'In the final few years of her life, she released a huge range of CD recordings which swamped the market and were praised to the hilt by a select band of reviewers,' says Anne, 'I remember thinking, Where had this amazing talent been all these years'?

Then, after a pile of glowing obituaries, which told of her four decade battle with cancer, these recordings of the pianist Joyce Hatto were branded as fake - copies of commercial recordings made by other artists, - not by Joyce at all.

Joyce's husband, William Barrington Coupe, the sound engineer for her recordings, said that he alone was to blame for the deception- acting purely out of love, and replacing passages of his wife's playing with other artists.

But behind the final deception, there is an intriguing story of an incredibly talented pianist marred by ill-health.

The conductor George Hurst talks about working with Joyce in the early 1960s. The novelist Rose Tremain recalls Joyce as an inspirational piano teacher. The critic Lewis Foreman remembers an extraordinary performance at Guildford.

Producer: David Prest

A Whistledown Production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00tt5hq)
Call You and Yours with Julian Worricker. What will it take to make you happy? A new study says that 50,000 pounds is the amount of money you need to buy happiness. But is money enough? How much is a happy workforce worth to the economy? Depression is a major cause of absenteeism from work - in a climate of cuts and strikes will this get worse? The US has the pursuit of happiness enshrined in the constitution - is this a sensible approach? Whose responsilbiity is it to make us happy? is it ours alone or should the government do its bit? With jobs under threat, public services being cut and the unions calling for civil unrest how will the morale of the UK hold up? Call You and Yours - a political, social, economic and environmental look at the state of happiness. Your thoughts in advance via the phone or email will be very welcome.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00tqrm8)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00trjxx)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Soul Music (b00tt5hs)
Series 10

Faure Requiem

"He wanted it to be something that's consoling and helpful. It's the end of their lives where they can rest in peace."

World renowned choral conductor Sir David Willcocks, shares his personal reflections on the Faure Requiem alongside those for whom the music has comforted and inspired.

Known for its peaceful and hopeful nature the Faure Requiem has been called 'The lullaby of death'. Whilst Gabriel Faure himself never spoke directly about what inspired his interpretation of the Requiem, author and biographer Jessica Duchen has speculated that it may have been born out of his experience as a soldier during the Franco-Prussian war.

Featuring personal stories of conflict and deliverance shared from across the decades. Reaching from the beaches of Normandy to the plains of Afghanistan and into the skies of Salisbury.

Faure composed the first version of the work, which he called "un petit Requiem" with five movements, of which the Pie Jesu and In Paradisum have become arguably the most popular.

"Everything I managed to entertain by way of religious illusion I put into my Requiem, which moreover is dominated from beginning to end by a very human feeling of faith in eternal rest."

Featuring:

David Willcocks
Jessica Duchen
Christina Schmid
Paul Hawkins
Ross Mallock

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Producer: Nicola Humphries

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00tt571)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00tt5hv)
Pilgrim, series 2

Hope Springs

by Sebastian Baczkiewicz. Pilgrim is the most reluctant father of the bride. He struggles to balance the prospect of being the quarry in a savage hunt forever and a day with seeing his daughter Doris condemned to an eternity married to Puck.

Cast
William Palmer ..... Paul Hilton
Dexter ..... Lloyd Thomas
Hilda ..... Anna Wing
Doris ..... Judy Parfitt
Puck ..... Jamie Foreman
Mr Hazelbury ..... Sean Baker
Mrs Marsden ..... Leah Brotherhead
Legend ..... Agnes Bateman

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00tt5hx)
Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today, 'hard graft'- how labour camps were used to deal with unemployment in the 1930s; how walking became a Victorian entertainment; and celebrating our oldest cinema.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 The Revenge of the First King of Mars (b00tt5hz)
Fear and Dread

Dave Lamb reads the story of the first manned space mission to the red planet.

Unfortunately, the extreme isolation of space has a negative affect on the sanity of the commander, the King of Mars, who has discovered that monkeys have already colonised Mars underground, creating a well-ordered and tranquil society.

Our hero now takes on the monkey kingdom and their ruler, the rather aggressive Roger.

Read by Dave Lamb
Written by Nick Walker

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 Key Matters (b00tt5j1)
Series 2

C Sharp

Ivan Hewett talks with pianist Kenneth Hamilton about the key of C sharp in an attempt to discover why this key is so obscure and treacherous for performers.


TUE 16:00 Tracing Your Roots (b00tt5k8)
Series 5

Tracing Rootless Ancestors

Tracing the roots of rootless ancestors might seem an impossible task, yet in this second programme of the series, Sally Magnusson and Nick Barratt attempt to do just that.

Mark Lorch is descended from a troupe of German Jewish acrobats, at one time the highest-paid circus act in the world. Mark wants to know more about their service in World War One and to fill in other gaps in his ancestors' lives. For a glimpse into the world of the circus and of the Lorch family, Sally visits the theatre archive of London's Victoria and Albert Museum.

Theresa Mitchell has asked for expert advice on how to explore her family's Romany heritage. Census records have told her that her family gave up their itinerant lifestyle at around the turn of the 20th century, but what happened next?

And Carol Hudson's mother came from a community who spent their summers in tents and their winters in caves in the west of Scotland. She never saw them again after leaving at the age of 14 to become a farm labourer, and World War Two brought her a marriage and a complete change of lifestyle. What, though, happened to the brothers and sisters she left behind? Nick has checked the archives and has the answers for Carol.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00tt5kn)
Series 22

Michel de Montaigne

Michel de Montaigne is one of the most influential writers of the French Renaissance. He is known for popularising the essay as a literary genre and became famous for his ability to fuse intellectual speculation with casual anecdotes and autobiography. Montaigne's work continues to influence writers to this day.

Championing his life is the surgeon, scientist, broadcaster and politician Professor Robert Winston and providing expert witness is the writer Sarah Bakewell, whose recent biography, How to Live: A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer, was recently published to great acclaim.

Producer: Paul Dodgson.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00trk53)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00trkfm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Listen Against (b00tt5mb)
Series 3

Episode 3

The programme that looks back at a week's worth of radio and TV that never happened.

Michael Burke becomes trapped in the Moral Maze, and Any Answers gets a game show makeover.

Presented by Alice Arnold and Jon Holmes.

Producers: Sam Bryant & Jon Holmes.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00tt5md)
Brian tries to smooth the feathers of the BL board, who are outraged at Matt's demands. They vote against offering Lilian a seat on the board, and decide to offer Matt cash only. Brian's gambling on the hope that Matt's bluffing. He later confides in Martyn Gibson that he's not sure Matt will go for it. It might be time to consider an alternative development project.

Nic chats to distracted Brian about Kate's imminent arrival, but he seems more focused on discussing wild partridge with Will. Disappointed there hasn't been a bigger rise in numbers, Brian promptly joins Will on the buggy to put down some feed and press him further on ideas.

Harry's pleased with the progress of the "We Love The Bull" campaign. Nic's keen to stay on at the pub this evening for the ideas meeting, but a slightly tetchy Will says he needs her at home. Will remarks to Nic that she's been mentioning Harry's name a lot recently. She realises he's jealous and can't believe it. Becoming emotional, Nic points out that she's not Emma. He should stop being paranoid that she's going to cheat on him.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00trlbp)
The Inbetweeners; Simon Stephens on his play Punk Rock

BAFTA award-winning sitcom The Inbetweeners follows four sixth-form friends attempting to navigate the minefield of suburban Comprehensive education, with their hormones at full blast. Co-creator Damon Beesley reveals the sources of the horrible embarrassments suffered by the hapless males at the heart of his show.

Playwright Simon Stephens discusses his play Punk Rock which features young actors playing bored and violent A-Level students preparing for their mock exams.

Confucius and True Legend - two very different Chinese films - are released in Britain this week: Confucius stars Chow Yun-fat as the Chinese philosopher. The director of photography, Peter Pau won an Oscar for his work on Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. True Legend is a martial-arts extravaganza which features the first 3D kung fu sequences in a Chinese film. Shirong Chen, China editor of the BBC's Chinese Service reviews them.

The sculptor Peter Randall-Page talks about managing his artistic career as he unveils a sculpture commissioned by the Art Fund to mark the bicentenary of Dulwich Picture Gallery in 2011.

Producer: Gavin Heard.


TUE 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt59m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Nuclear Waste (b00tt5mg)
Communities across the UK are being asked to volunteer to host permanent deep storage of the country's most dangerous radioactive waste.
Tonnes of higher level nuclear waste are currently stored at Sellafield in Cumbria, but government policy - in line with international scientific consensus - is to find permanent storage, deep underground in a geological repository.
But so far, only communities around Sellafield have said they might be interested, and if they have second thoughts, or if the geology of the area is found to be unsuitable, then it's back to square one.
As one of the pioneers of nuclear power, Britain has a mountain of historic waste to deal with, but despite the scale of the UK problem, other countries are already decades ahead in identifying and developing storage sites hundreds of metres down into the rock.
BBC Environment Correspondent, Richard Black, visits the Onkalo site in Finland, where the world's first geological repository, 420 metres underground, is due to open for business in ten years time. He finds out why the Finns were so enthusiastic about volunteering, even competing, to host this nuclear waste store and considers how the same process, to identify a site here in the UK, could unfold over the next crucial 12 months.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00tt5p3)
Vodafone respond to criticism that some users of their Wayfinder Access software have been left out of pocket. Caroline Dewing of the company answers points from Neil Barnfather of Talk Nav. The Austrian border guard who invented an alternative tactile reading system so that he could read in the dark. And Alexia Sloane, the ten year old Braille writing competition winner, tells Peter White of her plans for the future.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00tt5p5)
Consent for Blood Transfusion

We take it for granted that blood will be available if we need an emergency transfusion. Mark Porter discovers how the transfusion services ensure the safe and timely provision of blood and its components. He finds out how the preparation of blood is being made more efficiently.

An alternative to receiving blood from a donor is for the patient to use their own. This is called cell salvage. Blood is collected during an operation, cleaned and then returned to the patient. Mark Porter talks to doctors and patients about the benefits of cell salvage.

Producer: Erika Wright.


TUE 21:30 The Brown Years (b00tt59k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00trljr)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00trlmj)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis.

A report on the global impact of dementia says the costs associated with the illness will reach an estimated six-hundred-billion dollars this year. We look at the costs, research and strategies for dealing with this growing health problem.

The Chief Secretary to the Treasury joins us from the Liberal Democrats conference in Liverpool.

Women who've fled from North Korea tell us that people are starving in the streets there.

The World Tonight with David Eades in London, and Robin Lustig in Liverpool.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00tt5pt)
Rosamund Lupton - Sister

Episode 2

Beatrice Hemming has returned from the US because her younger sister Tess has gone missing from her home in London. The two have always been very close and the abruptness of her disappearance, without a word to her beloved sister, makes Beatrice believe something terrible must have happened to Tess. Could it have been linked to Tess's pregnancy by her college lecturer? Beatrice quickly becomes heavily involved, taking part in a police reconstruction and meeting one of Tess's new friends. Then she hears two momentous pieces of news about Tess.

The abridger is Lauris Morgan Griffiths and the reader is Hattie Morahan.
Producers: Sara Davies and Christine Hall.


TUE 23:00 Nick Mohammed in Bits (b00tt5pw)
Mr Swallow

Nick Mohammed (Reggie Perrin, I'm Sorry I've Got No Head) stars as lifestyle guru Mr Swallow as he presents his memory technique to a live studio audience.

Bits showcases the best of Nick Mohammed's idiosyncratic characters in a series of one off comic plays.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


TUE 23:30 Uncool Britannia (b00skpbn)
The James Last Years

Steve Punt continues his three part history of the Britain that's ubiquitous yet unashamedly uncool. Steve argues the nation's recent past has been hijacked by the fashionistas and that it's time to celebrate the past as it really was - deeply unhip. Forget the Rolling Stones, Mary Quant and the Aston Martin, what Britons really love is a nice melody, a sensible coat and a reliable motor...

Steve makes an assault on Punk, claiming it was James Last and his orchestra rather than Sid Vicious and his safety pins who embodied the 70s. Between the mid-60s and the mid-80s, Last racked up 52 hit albums - coming second only to Elvis. Whilst the Punks may have packed out a few obscure venues, James Last was selling out the Royal Albert Hall. Steve attempts to get to the bottom of how this German band-leader won over legions of Brits with his easy-listening tunes and why the maestro of the middle-of-the-road has never received credit for his chart-topping success.

Producer: Laurence Grissell
(repeat).



WEDNESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00tqmx2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt59m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00tqn37)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00tqntc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00tqnxn)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00tqp25)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00tqpkt)
with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00tt5r7)
A flagship agricultural show is folding due a lack of funds. AgriLive Smithfield - which attracted thousands of visitors - was jointly run by the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) at Stoneleigh which also ran the Royal Show before it closed. Anna Hill asks what went wrong and if other events could also finish.

A farmer who plans to increase his dairy herd to 1000 cows faces opposition from animal rights groups but he argues it's the only way to secure a future in the industry.

A cold Winter and dry Spring have made for a high quality hop harvest. Farming Today visits a farm supplying micro-breweries with their key ingredient.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


WED 06:00 Today (b00tt47l)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Justin Webb at the Lib Dem conference, including:
07:30 What should change in our criminal justice system?
07:40 Vince Cable explains why he plans to shine a light on the "murky world of corporate behaviour".
08:20 Ingrid Betancourt reflects on the bitter lessons from her time as a captive of Farc rebels.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00tt5r9)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Philip Townsend, Alexei Sayle, Tony Fitzjohn and Harriet Mead.

Philip Townsend is the celebrated sixties photographer who was renowned for taking the Rolling Stones' first ever photo shoot. In a new exhibition at The Lowry, over sixty images documenting the people, the style and the musical revolution of that decade will be on show, many for the first time including Grace Kelly, Twiggy, The Beatles and private fashion shows at Mary Quant's HQ. Mister Sixties: Philip Townsend's Portraits of a Decade is at The Lowry, Salford Quays.

Alexei Sayle is the writer and stand-up comedian who was a central part of the alternative comedy circuit and a star of shows such as The Young Ones. In his newly published memoir he tells of his growing up in Stalinist household in the 1950s and 60s in Liverpool and how it made him want to leave home and become a stand up comic. Stalin At My Homework is pubished by Hodder.

Tony Fitzjohn was George Adamson's assistant at Kenya's Kora National Reserve for over eighteen years where they re-introduced lions back into the wild. He now runs the Mkomazi National Park in Tanzania and is one of the world's leading field experts on the relationship between man and African wildlife. His book Born Wild is published by Viking.

Harriet Mead is a wildlife artist and the first woman to be elected President of the Society of Wildlife Artists in its 48-year history and the youngest. Working mainly in steel, she uses found objects to construct sculptures of the wildlife around her, using a MIG welder that she describes as a "sewing machine with sparks". The international wildlife exhibition, The Natural Eye, is at the Mall Galleries in London.


WED 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt5tr)
The First Global Economy (1450 - 1600 AD)

Double-headed serpent

The history of humanity - as told through one hundred objects from the British Museum in London - is back in South America. This week Neil MacGregor, the museum's director, is with objects from around the world between 1450 and 1600. This is the time of huge European expansion thanks to the new developments in ship building. Today he is with an object made by the Aztecs of present day Mexico. He describes the Aztec world and the Spanish conquest of this culture, through a double-headed serpent made from tiny pieces of turquoise - one of the stars of the British Museum. The Aztec specialist Adriane Diaz Enciso discusses the role of the snake in Aztec belief while the conservator Rebecca Stacey describes the scientific detective work that the object has prompted.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00tt5b8)
Presented by Jenni Murray. The author of "Eat Pray Love", Elizabeth Gilbert, talks to Jenni about being played by Julia Roberts in the movie of her book; and the stress of trying to follow up such a phenomenal success. In the UK an estimated 24,000 girls under the age of 15 are at risk of female genital mutilation (FGM). We hear about a group of schoolgirls from ethnic minority communities in Bristol have made a documentary drama to highlight the practice of FGM. And to mark its centenary, Jenni discusses the women chain makers' strike of 1910 and its leader, Mary MacArthur.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00tt5bq)
Hysteria

Episode 3

By Steve Chambers

Denise has now been asked to go to the police station to answer questions.

Denise .... Christine Kavanagh
Phil .... Michael Hodgson
Kath .... Celia Hewitt
Sheree .... Colleen Prendergast
Jimmy .... Sean Baker
John .... Jude Akuwudike
Nurse .... Sally Orrock
Policemen .... Michael Shelford & Tony Bell

Director: David Hunter.


WED 11:00 The Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia: The Story of Tito (b00s6rx4)
Episode 2

Martin Bell traces the story of Tito, the fall of Yugoslavia and the crisis in Bosnia.

15 years after the international community stepped in to end the war in Bosnia, Martin Bell heads to Sarajevo to find out whether the old arguments that made talks between communities break down in 1990 are rearing their heads two decades later. Nationalist arguments, playing on ethnic identities and old fears, have returned in a country that is more separated and segregated than ever.

Examining the Dayton Peace Agreement Martin asks whether it was successful in rebuilding post-war Bosnia or whether it remains part of the reason Bosnia is still struggling. He explores whether foreign interference, in enforcing a share of power amongst multiple agencies has stalled any meaningful progress, and what can be done to stop Bosnia collapsing back into a state of civil war, as some fear. Should the international community step away and risk creating a black hole in Europe or do they continue to intervene to ensure violence is abated and peace remains, even if it is manufactured by outsiders?

Returning to Sarajevo, the place where he was shot and injured, Martin explores what has changed and what has remained the same since the war in the early nineties, talking with Bosnian Serb, Muslim and Croats about their hopes and fears for Bosnia's future.

Martin also meets with Bosnia's current High Representative, and its most famous former High Representative, Paddy Ashdown, to find out what role the International Community can play in securing a safer future for Bosnia and for all of the Balkans.

The producer is Gemma Newby. This is an All Out production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Mum's on the Run (b00tt5vn)
Episode 5

Battling lippy kids, annoying neighbours and a jazz playing ex-husband means Jen's failing to be the yummy mummy she longs to be.

The desire to impress Mr Rigby and silence nagging children persuades Jen to attempt some charitable work. But a botched attempt to give blood and a disastrous baking error lead only to further humiliation.

Mum's on the Run is a modern-day twist on the single-family situation. It follows the hectic life ("What life?") of single mum, Jen.

Jen ..... Ronni Ancona
Mr. Rigby ..... John Gordon Sinclair
Shelley ..... Alexis Zegerman
Felicity ..... Amy Dabrowa
Toby ..... Alexander Heath
Chugger ..... Lloyd Thomas
Nurse/David's Mum ..... Sally Orrock

Writer: Alexis Zegerman

Producer: Dawn Ellis

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00tt5vq)
Parents whose children are taken to school by cab, may be asked to contribute to the costs or find other ways of getting them there - including car shares.

David Cameron's vision for the Big Society includes making it easier for charities to bid to run public services and for people to set up charities. But the Charity Commission is warning charity trustees are 'making too many basic mistakes' and failing to inform them when serious problems occur.

As the government seeks your views on the future of the water industry, we delve through the Parliamentary archive to find out which arguments dominated the debate when the industry was first privatised.

And we examine the latest technology designed to get rid of fat - would you consider freezing off parts of your body to get the perfect shape? And what's the science behind Coolsculpting?


WED 12:57 Weather (b00tqrn1)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00trjxz)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00tt5w9)
A story has leaked this morning that the BBC is to allow the National Audit Office to look at its accounts - an idea proposed by the three main parties before the election. An announcement is expected from Don Foster at the Lib Dem conference in Liverpool. When the idea was first raised, there were concerns that government inspection of the BBC books could compromise its independence. Media commentator Dan Sabbagh of Beehive City looks at the potential points of conflict.

In Prospect magazine tomorrow, Peter Kellner writes on his research that shows a marked drop in the public trust in journalists in the last 5 years while trust in politicians has apparently increased. He discusses this with Elinor Goodman, former political editor at Channel 4 news. Elinor Goodman is at the Lib Dem conference and comments on the change in the level of media interest this year.

And in a wide ranging interview, Lord Puttnam discusses the possible impact of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp's planned buy out of BSkyB, executive pay at the BBC and Channel 4 and the government's closure of the UK Film Council.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00tt5md)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00tt5wc)
For Ever England

by Tom Green

Now living abroad, Steve discovers his estranged son Matt has been killed serving in Afghanistan. He returns to England anxious to do the right thing. But how do you begin to grieve for a child you never really knew?

Steve ..... Gerard Horan
Amber ..... Claire Harry
Holly ..... Tracie Bennett
Karla ..... Alison Pettitt
Jason ..... Carl Rice

Directed by Toby Swift.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00tt5wm)
This afternoon's Money Box Live will answer your questions about 'Power of Attorney', appointing someone to manage your affairs, when you can no longer make decisions for yourself.

In England, Wales and Scotland you can appoint an attorney to look after your financial affairs or your health and welfare, or both.

When should you consider setting up a power or attorney, how do you go about it and what will it cost?

Whether you're taking on the responsibility of looking after a relative or concerned about your own circumstances, Paul Lewis and guests will be ready to offer advice.

Phone lines open at 1.30 this afternoon and the number to call is 03700 100 444. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher. The programme starts after the three o'clock news. That number again 03700 100 444.


WED 15:30 The Revenge of the First King of Mars (b00tt60f)
The Prodigal Dog

Marooned on Phobos, the first King of Mars is in desperate straits. Tied up to crew member Chen, and running short of oxygen, he finds salvation from an unlikely source.

Read by Dave Lamb
Written by Nick Walker

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 Key Matters (b00tt5jf)
Series 2

E Minor

In this second series of Key Matters, presenter Ivan Hewett explores the question of why certain musical keys have become associated with particular moods. For example, why is A major almost always employed by composers to write optimistic, even ecstatic music? And how has E minor become the key of choice for portraying menace and tragedy?

Cellist and composer Philip Sheppard defines the qualities of E minor on Wednesday with music ranging from Brahms, Elgar and Shotakovich to The Clash.

Produced in Birmingham by Rosie Boulton.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00tt60h)
Secrets of Capitalism - Religion and Science

The United States does not have the highest living standard in the world - The washing machine has changed the world more than the internet - People in poor countries are more entrepreneurial than people in rich countries: Three contentions from the economist Ha-Joon Chang as he joins Laurie Taylor and tries to dispel what he sees as the myths and prejudices of free-market capitalism. He claims that we labour under the misconception that financial markets become more efficient, when the opposite is true and his analysis suggests that by breaking free of its free-market ideology, capitalism can be vastly improved.
Producer: Chris Wilson.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00tt5p5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00trk55)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00trkfp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Maltby Collection (b00xn9fp)
Series 2

Episode 3

Will the museum's first ever Sunday opening run smoothly? Stars Julian Rhind-Tutt and Geoffrey Palmer. From June 2008.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00tt60k)
Kenton spends some quality time with Jamie, but Jamie's disappointed when Kenton's reluctant to come home and play his new computer games with him. After inviting Jamie over to Jaxx instead, Kenton quickly backtracks when he bumps into Holly - the woman he flirted with at Jaxx on Monday.

Pip's busy organising the venue at Brookfield for the upcoming barn dance. David reminds Pip to get going with her driving lessons, surprising her by offering to pay for the first few.

Meanwhile, Jamie tries to persuade his mate Marty to buy vodka. Jamie's keen to get down to the hide to drink it, but Marty's reluctant. At Brookfield, David and Ruth discuss Lynda's upset during the council meeting, over the kids holding parties at the new bird hide.

Jaxx customer Holly presses Kenton over his relationship with Kathy and Jamie over a cocktail, which later turns into a late night back at her place...


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00trlbr)
Julia Roberts; Mark Ronson; Diaghilev's legacy

Actress Julia Roberts discusses her role in new film Eat Pray Love, based on the best-selling book about self-discovery by Elizabeth Gilbert.

Leading choreographers Javier de Frutos, Richard Alston and Shobana Jeyasingh examine the legacy of Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes in the light of a major new exhibition.

Music producer Mark Ronson talks about his new album Record Collection, the experience of working with Amy Winehouse, and how Quincy Jones and Phil Spector inspire his studio outfits.

Matt Thorne reviews new reality-documentary hybrid Seven Days, following the lives of carefully-selected real characters living in West London.

Producer: Jack Soper.


WED 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt59m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 20:00 Bringing Up Britain (b00tt626)
Series 3

Episode 1

As the parenting wars escalate and politicians and childcare gurus lock horns over how best to raise our children, Mariella Frostrup and her guests debate the dilemmas of modern parenting. Issues up for discussion in this third series of Radio 4's parenting programme, include the experience of growing up an only child, how best to break bad news and the hard choices at the heart of the care system. As they explore the theory of twenty-first century parenting - and the rather messier practice - Mariella and her guests share advice and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.

producer: Julia Johnson.


WED 20:45 Gift Horses and Gaffes (b00tt64s)
Ben Macintyre casts an eye over the presents given and received by our governments and asks whether it's really worth the bother.

The awkward giving of gifts that the recipient doesn't know what they are for, the painstaking selection of bespoke gifts that are discovered to be culturally insensitive, the issue of what to do with all the ruddy things: Ben hears of the trials of making that right selection.

Produced by Lucy Adam.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00tt64v)
The Revenge of the Stairs

Often take the stairs in a modern building? Thought not.

If you've ever opted to avoid the lift in a plush pad, you've probably wandered miles of corridor only to be confronted with a fire escape sign giving a sneaking suspicion that the moment you push that door, alarms will scream, firefighters will swoop and you'll be scorned as some Luddite freak.

In a public building it's simpler: stairs stink of stale beer and fresh urine. The lift wins every time.

But now there's a fightback. New York City's bosses have declared stair-climbing as key to their citizens' survival. In fact, they've sent 'Active Design Guidelines' to architects and city planners, pushing them to build more exercise into their grand plans. The logic is obvious but radical.

New York City's early skyscrapers did so much to relegate steps and elevate the elevator. The rationale of our built environment has always been convenience. Yet, the health and design chiefs of NYC want more walking and cycling alongside renewed mastery of the stairs - they want getting around to take more effort, to be harder. The city bosses come equipped with a persuasive historical parallel. In the 19th century, the big city killer was infectious disease like cholera and TB and we 'designed out' the danger through better buildings and clean water systems. The threats now are obesity, diabetes and heart trouble resulting, at least partly, from our slobby lifestyles.

Can we take a lead from New York and re-design our own cities to improve the health of everyone who lives and works there? Tom Heap travels from the Bronx to the Mile End Road to find out.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00tt5r9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00trljt)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00trlml)
Who will win control of the Arctic?
Life for young Muslims living in America
More violence in Kashmir.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00tt66z)
Rosamund Lupton - Sister

Episode 3

Beatrice has discovered that her little sister Tess and her unborn baby were involved in a gene trial because of their family history of Cystic Fibrosis. With Tess still missing, she gets the news that Tess had already had the baby before her disappearance, but that the child died. Bee is distraught to think that Tess hadn't told her, and her suspicions increase that there is something sinister behind Tess's disappearance. An unsettling encounter with Tess' friend Simon, who claims to have been in love with her, only heightens her anxiety, and then she hears the dreadful news that Tess has been found dead in the snow outside a toilet block in a London park. Now, Beatrice must identify her sister's body and embark on her own hunt for Tess's murderer.

The reader is Hattie Morahan and the book is abridged by Lauris Morgan Griffiths.
Producers: Sara Davies and Christine Hall.


WED 23:00 Continuity (b00tt684)
Episode 6

A Continuity Announcer's booth can be a lonely place - especially on the late shift, when you've barely seen your wife and children for a week. Still, this Radio 4 Continuity Announcer is nothing, if not a consummate professional and he's not going to let his own insignificant little problems get in the way of your listening pleasure. Especially when there are so many exciting programmes coming up in the next week, which he's got to tell you about. At least some of them are exciting. Some of them aren't quite his cup of tea, if he's honest, but that's not really the point, is it? They may be right up your street. It's not really his place to express an opinion. Even if it is tempting. This may be a come-down from heady days spent announcing on the Today programme, but he's got a job to do. Though sometimes it is rather difficult to concentrate .....

Alistair McGowan stars in a subversive sitcom about a Continuity Announcer brooding on the escalating disasters of his private and professional life; at the same time as attempting to give us a preview of the programmes on offer in the coming week on Radio 4. Or what might be Radio 4 in a parallel universe. Trails for 'The Ethical Enigma', 'Britain's Favourite Sound' and 'The History of Britain One Year at a Time' are just some of the strange delights on offer in the world of this 'radio professional', who harbours a slightly inappropriate relationship with his audience.

Written by Hugh Rycroft a stalwart of 'The News Quiz' and co-creator of 'Parliamentary Questions' and 'Life, Death and Sex with Mike and Sue', the series also features the voices of Lewis Macleod, Sally Grace, Charlotte Page and David Holt.

Produced by David Spicer and Frank Stirling.
A Unique Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else (b00tt68z)
Series 1

Relationships and Family

Andrew Lawrence addresses the expectation upon us all that we should settle down, get married and have children and the general burdens of family life.

Last of a four part mini-series of short comedic monologues taking a light-hearted look at various aspects of conventional living and the pressure we feel to conform to social norms and ideals.

From the Edinburgh Comedy Festival.

Written by Andrew Lawrence.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2010.


WED 23:30 Uncool Britannia (b00sn4rd)
The Austin Montego Years

Steve Punt concludes his three part history of the Britain that's ubiquitous yet unashamedly uncool. Steve argues the nation's recent past has been hijacked by the fashionistas and that it's time to celebrate the past as it really was - deeply unhip.

Today Steve takes to the road, remembering the Austin Maestro & Montego which were unveiled with great fanfare in the early 80s. Steve takes a drive in a Montego with motoring journalist Quentin Willson and attempts to get to grips with why history has been so unkind to these two sensible but unstylish motors. He hears from the voice behind the cars' celebrated speech synthesiser, Nicolette McKenzie, and hears from dealers, designers and marketing men involved in the car's launch.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.



THURSDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00tqmx4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt5tr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00tqn39)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00tqntf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00tqnxq)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00tqp27)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00tqpkw)
with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00tt6b0)
UK food exports are at their highest ever level as they approach the £10 billion mark and UK farmers are cashing in on this market. Antibiotic use in farming could be creating superbugs according to the Soil Association, but one farmer claims farmers are not using excessive amounts on their livestock and Sarah Falkingham joins a Yorkshire farmer as she prepares the soil for next year's crops.
Presenter: Anna Hill, Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


THU 06:00 Today (b00tt47n)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and Sarah Montague, including:
07:30 As universities face spending cuts, will top researchers leave the country?
08:10 The Chief Inspector of Constabulary explains his concern that the police are "retreating from the streets". 08:30 Is it getting harder to make new groundbreaking scientific discoveries?


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00tt6b2)
Imaginary Numbers

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss imaginary numbers. In the sixteenth century, a group of mathematicians in Bologna found a solution to a problem that had puzzled generations before them: a completely new kind of number. For more than a century this discovery was greeted with such scepticism that the great French thinker Rene Descartes dismissed it as an "imaginary" number.The name stuck - but so did the numbers. Long dismissed as useless or even fictitious, the imaginary number i and its properties were first explored seriously in the eighteenth century. Today the imaginary numbers are in daily use by engineers, and are vital to our understanding of phenomena including electricity and radio waves. With Marcus du SautoyProfessor of Mathematics at Oxford University Ian StewartEmeritus Professor of Mathematics at the University of WarwickCaroline SeriesProfessor of Mathematics at the University of WarwickProducer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt6d9)
The First Global Economy (1450 - 1600 AD)

Kakiemon elephants

The history of humanity as told through one hundred objects from the British Museum in London is this week exploring the world at the time of European discovery - between 1450 and 1600. Today Neil MacGregor is with a pair of white elephants, the size of small dogs. They come from Japan, are made of fine porcelain and take Neil on a journey that connects Japan to Korea and China and to a growing trade network in Western Europe. How did the great skill of porcelain production spread across the Far East? Why elephants? And how did these objects become so desirable to the European elite? He discovers the specific technique of this porcelain style (and traces it to a Japanese potter called Kakiemon) and follows other examples of this same pottery to an English country house. Miranda Rock describes the Kakiemon collection at Burghley House, the present day Kakiemon potter discusses his work and the Korean porcelain expert Gina Ha-Gorian explains how the detailed technology for porcelain production spread.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00tt5bb)
Presented by Jenni Murray. The new Labour leader will be revealed this Saturday. How can he or she best reach out to women? Can too much care undermine autonomy in the elderly? Nonagenarian Diana Athill joins Jenni to discuss the issues. And student confidentiality. If a young person is at risk, should their families be informed?


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00tt5bs)
Hysteria

Episode 4

By Steve Chambers

There's been another prostitute murdered and Denise doesn't know whether there is any trust left in their marriage.

Denise .... Christine Kavanagh
Phil .... Michael Hodgson
Kath .... Celia Hewitt
Sheree .... Colleen Prendergast
Jimmy .... Sean Baker
John .... Jude Akuwudike
Nurse .... Sally Orrock
Policemen .... Michael Shelford & Tony Bell

Director: David Hunter.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00tt6f4)
The young generation that is Afghanistan's hope of a better future.

We board a train at dawn, and follow Chinese traders into the depths of Africa.

A correspondent decides to leave journalism, and become a priest.

And in Kenya, a black mamba snake bite brings a brush with death....

There's no shortage of bad news from Afghanistan. We often hear of mounting violence and corruption. But the picture is not relentlessly bleak. Last weekend's parliamentary elections were far from perfect. But millions of Afghans did participate -- casting their ballots despite Taleban threats of violence. And Lyse Doucet saw some hope for Afghan democracy in the number of young people who were ready to get involved....

The collapse of Communism utterly transformed Russia. It's become a very much more open place in countless ways.... But all the same...even now....it retains a rather enigmatic quality. It's not always easy to read. Outsiders watch and wonder....and sometimes worry....about just where the country might be heading. And that is exactly what Steve Rosenberg has begun to try to figure out on his return to Moscow as a correspondent....

As never before in its history, China is now reaching out into the world. It has to. It needs to secure vast amounts of raw materials to fuel the boom that is transforming its economy. And in its search for resources in Africa, China's helped to revive one of the old colonial trade routes into the heart of the continent....Justin Rowlatt has just travelled up it, and seen what the coming of the Chinese might mean for Africa's people....

Eventually, all reporting careers come to an end. And I've watched BBC colleagues move on to all sorts of new lives. But I can't remember anyone taking the path that Christopher Landau has chosen. He's leaving us to become a priest. And as his time as a religious affairs correspondent draws to a close, he's been reflecting on the tensions between his personal faith, and his journalistic pursuit of the truth...

It's not surprising that snakes have few friends. In many of us they provoke almost irrational levels of fear. But actually, few of them are really dangerous. Lots are harmless, and they all have a part to play in the natural world.... In Kenya, Annie Caulfield came across a man who's dedicated his life to defending snakes, and persuading people to try to think of them a little more kindly....


THU 11:30 Not Fade Away (b00tt5cv)
How do you end a piece of music? For 500 years pieces always had a clear ending. But in the 20th Century music often ended with a fade out instead. Stuart Maconie looks at how and why this change came about.

Pop songs often fade but classical music nearly always has a very clear ending, often a climax with all the performers playing a rousing cadence which almost guaranteed applause.

An early exception is Haydn's Farewell Symphony of 1772 which ends with the players leaving the stage one by one, until there are only two players left. Haydn wrote it as a hint that the players needed a break.

Holst's Planets Suite (written 1914 -16) ends with a chorus of women's voices sound fading into nothing - perhaps the first true example of a fade in music.

At the same time, recording technology was developing and fades could be created by moving away from the recording horn. And record companies began imposing endings for commercial reasons or to fit it onto a side of a 78 record, sometimes with quite brutal results.

With the advent of modern recording techniques it became easy to create a fade electrically and from the 1950s onwards this became commonplace.

But it was in the 1960s when the fade came into its own, particularly with the iconic 2 minute fade of Hey Jude.

So has the fade out simply become a lazy way to end a song? And what happens when that song is played live and a fade isn't possible?

Stuart Maconie draws from his own experience as a dj and we also hear from Stephen Johnson presenter of BBC Radio 3's Discovering Music, Jacob Smith Lecturer in Film and Television Studies and remastering engineer Roger Beardsley. And Martyn Ware of Heaven 17 talks about ending songs live that faded out in the studio versions.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00tt6f8)
We speak to Energy and Climate Change Minister at the opening of the world's biggest off-shore wind farm, 12km off the coast of Kent.

As tens of thousand of undergraduates prepare to start their university courses Winifred Robinson interviews the boss of the Student Loans Company. After last year's problems, will students get their money on time?

What do lipreading and cake icing have in common? Lessons for both are classed as 'leisure' courses, as opposed to 'essential'. The RNID says as a result they're costing too much, people can't afford them, and they should be reclassified as essential, to stop them disappearing altogether.

And the BBC's Local Government Correspondent has the latest on what council cuts could mean to you.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00tqrmc)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00trjy1)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00tt64v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00tt60k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00tt6fs)
Andrew Doyle - The Second Mr Bailey

John is a young gay man living in Edinburgh in 1967. Homosexuality is about to be legalised in England, but not in Scotland. When John takes up lodgings with the enigmatic Mrs Margaret Bailey, he begins to experience what life as a conventional straight man could be like. But Margaret is no ordinary house-wife; she's slowly turning John into a replica of her husband. And John's beginning to like it.

Haunting drama by Andrew Doyle.

Cast:

Young John...... Sam Swann
Older John ...... Richard Greenwood
Brian................ Owen Whitelaw
Margaret..... Gerda Stevenson
Hilary........ Gabriel Quigley
Policeman...... James Bryce

Producer: Kirsty Williams
Director: Bruce Young.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b00trmbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ts82t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 The Revenge of the First King of Mars (b00tt6h6)
Saint Crispin's Day

The self-styled First King Of Mars, abandoned by his last crew member, and friendless except for a mechanized dog, prepares a doomsday scenario for the monkeys on Mars.

Read by Dave Lamb
Written by Nick Walker

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 Key Matters (b00tt5jh)
Series 2

F Major

Ivan Hewett explores the question of why certain musical keys have become associated with particular moods. For example, why is A major almost always employed by composers to write optimistic, even ecstatic music? And how has E minor become the key of choice for portraying menace and tragedy?

In this programme, French horn player ,Roger Montgomery explains why F major is traditionally associated with pastoral and hunting sounds.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00tt3x3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00tt6h8)
Gene therapy. 20 years after the first trial, Quentin asks whether it will eventually make it into conventional medicine, and why it's taking so long.

Forensic archaeology in the search for the 'disappeared' from Northern Ireland's troubles. Last weekend, Charlie Armstrong, a victim of the IRA, was at last given a proper burial. John McIlwaine explains how geophysics helped trace his hidden remains.

And British geology in your pocket. To mark its 175th anniversary, the British Geological Survey crams its entire geological map of the British Isles into a smartphone app for all to use.

Producer: Roland Pease.


THU 17:00 PM (b00trk57)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00trkfr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Clare in the Community (b00j0h07)
Series 5

It's Good to Talk

An old university friend visits Clare and has a confession to make. Whilst at work Clare has to deal with Tibetan Singing Bowls and a team leader seeking brutal and honest feedback.

Sally Phillips plays Clare Barker the social worker with all the politically correct jargon but none of the practical solutions.

Clare ..... Sally Phillips
Brian ..... Alex Lowe
Helen ..... Liza Tarbuck
Ray ..... Richard Lumsden
Megan/Nali ..... Nina Conti
Irene ..... Ellen Thomas
Simon ..... Andrew Wincott
Michael ..... Chris Pavlo
Carol ..... Donnla Hughes

Written By Harry Venning And David Ramsden

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00tt6hb)
Kate finally arrives at Heathrow to meet Brian, and Jennifer's organised a welcome home party. Kate's looking forward to meeting the new Mrs Carter. They chat about Jennifer getting used to her new in-laws.

As she unpacks, Kate reveals she's bought a vuvuzela each for Phoebe and Ruairi. Brian gives it a go
and, much to everyone's surprise, manages to make a sound! But the best present is saved for Kate when Jennifer announces that Phoebe will be staying for the whole week. They've managed to convince Roy and Hayley.

Kenton makes a crashing arrival during breakfast time at Lower Loxley, much to Elizabeth's dismay. Nigel tries to smooth things over by offering coffee and painkillers, but is shocked to hear of Kenton's one night stand. Nigel warns him off his late night drinking, especially when the children are around in the morning.

Later, Nigel lets slip to Elizabeth the truth about Kenton's antics. She fumes - how could he do this to Kathy?


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00trlbt)
Michael Gambon and Robert Wyatt

Sir Michael Gambon returns to the stage this week in Krapp's Last Tape by Samuel Beckett. He talks to John Wilson about his memories of Beckett, how he deals with first night nerves and his approach to the Harry Potter films.

Part of the Whitworth Gallery in Manchester is now filled with real trees, chopped down and installed to form an indoor forest. It's the work of artist Olafur Eliasson, best known for his giant sun at the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern. John reports on how the trees reached the gallery.

Musician Robert Wyatt discusses his new album, For The Ghosts Within, which draws on classic jazz tunes, and considers how a serious accident affected his musical career.

Producer: Rebecca Nicholson.


THU 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt6d9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00tt6j5)
Taxman troubles

As millions of Britons receive letters telling them they've paid either too much or too little tax in recent years, Simon Cox investigates what's gone wrong at Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs, and reveals how the back log means there is a tax write-off still to come.

According to the Government, a new computer system has, for the first time, been able to reconcile the ordinary citizen's tax affairs and give an accurate estimate of what he or she owes the state. But is that the whole story?

With the testimony of insiders, The Report paints a picture of chaos, staff shortages and crisis management. It examines how delays in the complex IT project led to almost four billion pounds of miscalculations on tax owed to the Exchequer. And Simon Cox reveals that amongst a backlog of 15 million open cases from over 2 years ago, 1.5 billion pounds of underpayment by taxpayers is about to be written off because of fears of legal action.

Producer: Rob Cave.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00tt6kj)
The view from the top of business. Presented by Evan Davis, The Bottom Line cuts through confusion, statistics and spin to present a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running leading and emerging companies.

Evan Davis is joined by a panel of chief executives to discuss the US economy. There was concern over the summer that the world's economic powerhouse could be about to enter a double-dip recession, dragging rest of the world down with it. Those fears might may have now subsided, so how is the US economy actually faring? And can the rest of the world thrive without a booming America? The panel also discusses sponsorship - how companies decide which events to back, and how much to spend.

Evan is joined in the studio by Nani Beccalli-Falco, President and Chief Executive of GE International; Trevor Matthews, Chief Executive of Friends Provident; Mike Lynch, founder and Chief Executive of Autonomy.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b00tt5cs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00tt6b2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00trljw)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00trlmn)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis.

Indian government ministers hold an emergency meeting to discuss the crisis surrounding facilities for next month's Commonwealth Games.

We have a report from Iraq about what American troops have been doing since combat operations officially ended.

And how to deal with addictions.

The World Tonight with David Eades.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00tt671)
Rosamund Lupton - Sister

Episode 4

Rosamund Lupton's first novel is a gripping psychological thriller about the bonds between two sisters. After Bee has identified the body of her sister, Tess, she returns to Tess' flat to find Emilio Codi, the lecturer who Tess said was the father of her stillborn child, trying to remove his paintings from the flat. When the post mortem results come through, the police are convinced that Tess must have taken her own life and that she had been suffering from post-natal psychosis. Bee refuses to accept the diagnosis, and remains adamant that someone must have killed her. Feeling isolated in her grief, and unable to persuade anyone to trust her instincts about Tess' death, Bee determines to find out the truth.

The reader is Hattie Morahan, the abridger Lauris Morgan Griffiths.
Producers: Sara Davies and Christine Hall.


THU 23:00 That Mitchell and Webb Sound (b00mk7rn)
Series 4

Episode 4

A plea for donations to Britain's only balloon-animal sanctuary, a wooden boy who's a bit annoying - and what to do at work if you suspect you have a decadent colleague.

Sketch show starring David Mitchell and Robert Webb.

With Olivia Colman,Sarah Hadland and James Bachman.

Producer Gareth Edwards

Firs broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2009.


THU 23:30 Last Orders (b00qpslw)
Episode 1

A celebration of the pub landlord and landlady.

With pubs disappearing at the rate of more than three a day , signalling one of the most rapid cultural shifts of recent times, half a dozen landlords and landladies reflect on life as a licensee and explore what we're in danger of losing besides the beer and the buildings.
This rueful view from behind the bar includes reflections on the qualities of a good landlord or landlady; their role as community confessional and settler of tap room fights, dispenser of best bitter and pearls of wisdom.

We hear from old hands like Barbara, an ex-Bunny girl who runs the Grapes in London's Limehouse; Tetley Dave who fought a battle to keep the Shoulder of Mutton from closing in Castleford; Maureen from the Waggon and Horses at Langsett who's famous for her pies ; ex miner Dennis from Barnsley, whose concern is health and safety; stand-up comedian Toby- who recalls lining up six pints apiece for the miners coming off shift at his auntie's pub in a Yorkshire pit village ; and former Cambridge academic Tim, who's taken early retirement to open his first pub in York - the Pheonix- just as many others are shutting up shop.

How have these landlords and landladies kept their marriages together , living and working on the premises? How much of a tempatation was it to hit the top shelf and go for the optics after a hard day's graft behind the bar? Why do they think the pub can teach the next generation how to hold their drink .And how do they handle an objectionable customer without starting a wild-west barroom brawl?

Producer Lindsay Leonard.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.



FRIDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00tqmx6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt6d9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00tqn3c)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00tqnth)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00tqnxs)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00tqp29)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00tqpky)
with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00tt6m8)
Developments could be built in rural areas without planning permission, even if a quarter of villagers don't want them. Caz Graham talks to housing minister Grant Shapps, who says his aim is not to set villagers at war with each other, but to simplify the planning process.

Goose is a traditional autumn meal, and this year seems to be back in vogue. Farming Today visits a goose farm in Cumbria to see why pubs and restaurants are taking record orders for the birds. And this autumn there's food for free, if you know where to look. Anna Varle discovers the secrets of foraging, in the forests of Devon.

And new research from the Met Office predicts long hot summers and extended heatwaves for the UK, allowing farmers to grow new, Mediterranean crops on their land.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00tt47q)
Morning news and current affairs with John Humphrys and James Naughtie, including:
07:30 What happens if you cancel a quango?
08:10 Communities Secretary Eric Pickles on the decision not to revaluate council tax bands.
08:20 Who should the public trust to get the weather forecast right?


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b00tt3qv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt6ms)
The First Global Economy (1450 - 1600 AD)

Pieces of eight

Neil MacGregor's world history as told through things that time has left behind. This week he is exploring the world between 1450 and 1600 - looking at what was happening in South America, Africa and Japan at the time of the great European age of discovery. He has looked at the new ocean going galleons that were being built in Europe at this time and today he describes the money that was being used to fuel the great new trade routes of the period. He is with pieces of eight, little silver coins that by 1600 could have been used in many countries around the world. Neil describes Spain's dominance in South America and their discovery of a silver mountain in Potosi in present day Bolivia. He describes the process by which pieces of eight turned into the first truly global money. The Bolivian former head of a UNESCO project in Potosi describes the conditions for workers there today and the financial historian William Bernstein looks at how these rough silver coins were to shift the entire balance of world commerce.

Producer: Anthony Denselow.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00tt5bd)
Move over Rover. Jenni Murray takes a look at the rise of the rabbit - now the UK's third most popular house pet. Should medicines be tested specifically for their safety and effectiveness on women? Plus, 'Women in Miniature' portraits of 19th century Indian and British women.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00tt5bv)
Hysteria

Episode 5

By Steve Chambers

Phil is in custody and Denise has to watch their flat being forensically taken apart.

Denise .... Christine Kavanagh
Phil .... Michael Hodgson
Kath .... Celia Hewitt
Sheree .... Colleen Prendergast
Jimmy .... Sean Baker
John .... Jude Akuwudike
Nurse .... Sally Orrock
Policemen .... Michael Shelford & Tony Bell

Director: David Hunter.


FRI 11:00 Black History Month & The Usual Suspects (b00tt6pv)
Recalling her own experience as the only black kid in her Newport classroom in the eighties Josie d'Arby looks at the introduction of Black History Month into British schools and asks whether it has been a help or hindrance to the way children understand the past and to how black people relate to the way history is taught in our classrooms. Has the focus of BHM changed much over 23 years? Why is there an emphasis on American figures like Martin Luther King and Muhammed Ali? And what about other groups who feel marginalised by not having time dedicated to them?
Speaking with teachers, pupils, parents, politicians and academics, Josie finds out what Black History Month means and meets some unlikely critics and supporters.

Producer Rachael Kiddey.


FRI 11:30 The Stanley Baxter Playhouse (b00tt6px)
Series 4

The German Pilot

Stanley Baxter and Rona Munro have been collaborating for some years now on the stories in The Stanley Baxter Playhouse; last year listeners were full of praise for Stanley's performance in Rona's Playhouse story -The Man In the Garden.

This story is a wartime romance set in rural Scotland in the second world war.

Friedrich is a German pilot whose plane is shot down over a remote rural area in the west of Scotland. He is a prisoner of war, and initially local feelings against him are vitriolic; but he, like everyone in the community in which he finds himself, is a cattle farmer, and as his English improves, he forms strong bonds with his captors, and forges an unlikely friendship which, many years later, brings him back to Scotland.

Cast:
Fred ... Stanley Baxter
Friedrich ... Sam Peter Jackson
Beth ... Vicki Liddelle
George ... John Ramage

Stanley, a past master in accents and impersonation, plays the older Friedrich, looking back over sixty years to tell the story. John Ramage and Vicki Liddelle play the other parts, with Sam Peter Jackson, [son of the composer Mick Jackson who wrote the disco hit 'Blame It On The Boogie'] who was brought up in Germany and is completely bi lingual, playing the young German pilot.

Rona Munro is one of Scotland's most highly regarded playwrights, with award winning films [Ken Loach's Lady Bird Lady Bird] and television dramas [Rehab] and her Edinburgh International Festival success The Last Witch to her credit.

Producer: Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00tt6pz)
The changing face of school sports as government figures show a rise in activities like cheerleading and yoga while traditional team games decline.

There's another victory for campaigners who stop developers in their tracks by getting sites classed as village greens. But it means Bristol might lose a new football stadium and hundreds of jobs.

Also on today's programme: Peter White hears how online bookies are being blamed for cuts to horse racing fixtures and talks about the future of TV.

And, how much is the British fashion industry worth to our economy?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00tqrmg)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00trjy3)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00tt6r6)
Tim Harford and the More or Less team examine more numbers in the news.

This week:

Claiming benefits has been described by the Chancellor as - for some - a "lifestyle choice". What does the evidence tell us about how incentives work in the welfare system?;

The numbers of some of Britain's best-loved birds are declining. Fast. Many think cats are to blame. Are they right?;

Why the Prime Minister's salary has become a convenient unit of measurement;

And we bring you the results of our mathematical attempt to level the playing field at this year's Great North Run half marathon.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00tt6hb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00tt6r8)
David Nobbs - We Happened to Be Passing

It is a quiet Saturday morning in the Hinchcliffe home. Tony and Sal, tired after a week of work, have time on their hands. But not for each other. Middle aged and middle class - they haven't had kids and they still feel that emotional vacuum.

The doorbell rings. It is an American couple - Monty and Janey - a rather loud duo they stayed with in Delaware years ago. They said "If ever you happened to be passing...". Well, the Americans are passing and they have no hotel booked. To Tony's horror Sal invites them to stay. Well, it's only polite isn't it?

Once Monty and Janey are settled the doorbell goes again. It is Jan and Hilda, the Flemish Belgian couple from Bruges. They kindly helped when Janey had a migraine in Bruges. Even fed them some waterzooi (flemish stew). In gratitude Sal and Tony said - "If ever you happened to be passing."

Then the doorbell goes again - it is Pierre and Colette, French Belgians who helped them in Namur when Sal was sick over a Saab because she had eaten some cloying Flemish stew. In gratitude they said - "If ever you happened to be passing."

So - polite Tony and Sal have a house full. The Americans are loud and pompous and the Belgians loathe each other. But when Colette and Jan find themselves drawn to one another, the ensuing, messy crisis precipitates a reassessment of all the couples' pattern of a behaviour.

A wonderfully perceptive comedy of manners and international relations by David Nobbs - writer of 'The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin' and 'A Bit of a Do'

Directed by Gary Brown.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00tt6vv)
Eric Robson and panel are guests of Henleaze Garden Club in Bristol.

Pippa Greenwood revisits Jennie Eastman and mother Kay in their Portishead garden. Part of the 'Listeners' Gardens' series.

The producer is Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Key Matters (b00tt5jk)
Series 2

D Major

Ivan Hewett explores the question of why certain musical keys have become associated with particular moods. For example, why is A major almost always employed by composers to write optimistic, even ecstatic music? And how has E minor become the key of choice for portraying menace and tragedy?

In this programme Ivan talks with violinist, Daniel Hope about the majesty and glory of D major.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00tt6vx)
On Last Word this week:

Barbel Bohley, the East german artist who was one of the leaders of the protests that brought down the Berlin Wall.
The composer Geoffrey Burgon who wrote the memorable TV theme for Brideshead Revisited and the score for the Monty Python film "Life of Brian". Terry Jones pays tribute.
The lesbian feminist campaigner Jill Johnston who took part in the notorious discussion of women's rights at the Manhattan Town Hall in the 1970s.
The MI6 Agent John McGlashan who was involved in a plot to assassinate Egypt's President Nasser with a box of poisoned chocolates.
And the publisher Tom Guinzberg who launched the careers of many influential writers - and fell out with his friend Jackie Kennedy Onassis over a Jeffrey Archer novel.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00tt6vz)
Francine Stock talks to Ben Affleck about his new feature The Town, which he has written, directed and starred in. He reveals why he rang other actor/directors like Sean Penn and Warren Beatty for advice.

Francine launches our search for community cinemas and film societies around the country, and visits two of the oldest cinemas in the country - The Phoenix in East Finchley and The Duke Of York's in Brighton which both celebrated their 100th anniversary this week.

Colin Shindler reports from September 1960 and reveals what was showing at the local Gaumonts 50 years ago.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00trk59)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00trkft)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00tt6w1)
Series 72

Episode 1

Sandi Toksvig presents another episode of the ever-popular topical panel show. Guests this week include Jeremy Hardy, Sue Perkins and Andy Hamilton.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00tt6w3)
Hayley grumbles to Fallon about Kate's return. Now that Phoebe's out the way, she's using her spare time to deliver posters for Neil, about providing a platform on the church tower for the peregrines.

Kathy pops over to see Jolene to congratulate her on news of Lucy's baby - Sydney Gemmell.
Kathy's surprised to hear from Jolene that Jamie had been spending time with Kenton. Jolene suggests Kenton must be making an effort. Maybe things aren't as bad as Kathy thinks.

As Fallon helps Harry with furnishing his new flat, they discuss plans to refresh the Bull. When they return, even Jolene seems to warm to the idea of a Jim's new quiz night, a revised menu and Bert's donation of flowers. She's proud that they're all as passionate about the pub as Sid was.

Kathy corners Elizabeth for lunch. She confides she's thinking of giving it another shot with Kenton. But Elizabeth can't lie to a friend and knows her brother won't change. There's something Kathy should know. Kathy doesn't react well to news of Kenton's late night antics.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00trlbw)
Julian Fellowes, Hugh Bonneville and Colm Toibin

With Kirsty Lang.

Julian Fellowes won an Oscar for his screenplay for the film Gosford Park. His latest creation - TV drama series Downton Abbey - follows the lives of the Crawley family and their servants in the years immediately before the First World War. He and his star, Hugh Bonneville - who plays the Earl of Grantham - talk to Kirsty Lang about the drama and also a previous collaboration, the film From Time To Time.

Oscar winning costume designer Sandy Powell discusses dress for dance with Caro Harkness, Head of Wardrobe at Scottish Ballet and Dance Critic Judith Mackrell.

Colm Toibin won the Costa novel of the Year award for his last book Brooklyn. He discusses his new collection of short stories, The Empty Family.

Producer: Samantha Psyk.


FRI 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00tt6ms)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00tt6wr)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical discussion from Loreto College in Manchester, with questions for the panel including Chris Huhne, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change; Douglas Alexander, co-chair of David Miliband's campaign for the Labour leadership and Shadow Secretary of State for International Development; Will Straw, editor of Left Foot Forward; and Amanda Platell, broadcaster and columnist.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00tt6y9)
Cakes and coupons

Lisa Jardine reveals her inner conflict between two passions inherited from her mother, who recently passed away. On the one hand is a carefulness about money which leads Lisa to a perpetual search for a bargain. On the other is a wild extravagance in baking, creating rich, multi-layered cakes, stacked high with lashings of butter icing.
Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 15 Minute Drama (b00tt6yc)
Hysteria

Omnibus

HYSTERIA by Steve Chambers - Omnibus edition of the Woman's Hour Serial.

Against the background of rising hysteria in the Middlesborough community over the murders of prostitutes, Denise's dreams of a happy second marriage, even a family (at 40), are challenged as circumstantial evidence seems to point the finger at husband Phil.

We've all done things in the past that we'd prefer to keep under wraps.

How much do you tell your new partner if you're trying to make a good impression?

Can one small lie unravel a marriage?

Denise .... Christine Kavanagh
Phil .... Michael Hodgson
Kath .... Celia Hewitt
Sheree .... Colleen Prendergast
Jimmy .... Sean Baker
John .... Jude Akuwudike
Nurse .... Sally Orrock
Policemen .... Michael Shelford & Tony Bell

Director: David Hunter

The issues raised in the drama are entirely complementary to Woman's Hour. Developed at the Bore Place workshop with the aim of telling a contemporary story with a small cast and making full use of the 5-part structure this serial addresses not only the fragile dynamics of a marriage but also the rather taboo subject of men paying for sex and how a community can so easily be whipped into a suspicious frenzy.

Steve Chambers has written extensively for film, TV, theatre and radio. His radio credits include 'Scandinavian Dreams' and 'The Ice Factory' both for Radio 3. Other original work includes 'The Coup' and two series of 'Victoria Station' for Radio 4. Radio adaptations include 'Waterland', 'The Grapes of Wrath', 'Sister Carrie' and 'The Pledge' for Radio 4. His dramatisation of James Ellroy's autobiography 'My Dark Places' starred Toby Stephens and was broadcast by BBC World Service to coincide with the inauguration of Barack Obama.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00trljy)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00trlmq)
Radio 4's daily evening news and current affairs programme bringing you global news and analysis.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00tt673)
Rosamund Lupton - Sister

Episode 5

Bee's struggle to persuade the police that her sister Tess didn't commit suicide continues as she goes to meet the psychiatrist who saw Tess shortly before her death. Bee discovers that he changed his diagnosis of post-natal depression to one of psychosis, but only after he learnt of her death. But Bee's efforts to convince him that Tess wouldn't have taken her own life meet with a professional stonewall. Bee also learns, from Tess' phone bill, that Tess had tried to call her in the States fifteen times in the twenty-four hours before she died, and her guilt over Tess' death increases with the knowledge that she had failed Tess in her time of need. Spurred on by this, she visits Tess's fellow student Simon in his flat, and there makes a sinister discovery.

The abridger is Lauris Morgan Griffiths, the reader is Hattie Morahan.
Producers: Sara Davies and Christine Hall.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00tt5kn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Last Orders (b00qx1m5)
Episode 2

Conclusion of a two-part celebration of the pub landlord and landlady.

With pubs disappearing at the rate of more than three a day, signalling one of the most rapid cultural shifts of recent times, half a dozen landlords and landladies reflect on life as a licensee and explore what we're in danger of losing besides the beer and the buildings.

This rueful view from behind the bar includes reflections on the qualities of a good landlord or landlady; their role as community confessional and settler of tap room fights, dispenser of best bitter and pearls of wisdom.

We hear from old hands like Barbara, an ex-Bunny girl who runs the Grapes in London's Limehouse; Tetley Dave who fought a battle to keep the Shoulder of Mutton from closing in Castleford; Maureen from the Waggon and Horses at Langsett who's famous for her pies; ex miner Dennis from Barnsley, whose bête noir is health and safety; stand-up comedian Toby- who recalls lining up six pints apiece for the miners coming off shift at his auntie's pub in a Yorkshire pit village; and former Cambridge academic Tim, who's taken early retirement to open his first pub in York - the Phoenix- just as many others are shutting up shop.

How have these landlords and landladies kept their marriages together , living and working on the premises? How much of a tempatation was it to hit the top shelf and go for the optics after a hard day's graft behind the bar? Why do they think the pub can teach the next generation how to hold their drink. And how do they handle an objectionable customer without starting a wild-west barroom brawl?

Producer Lindsay Leonard.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00tt4lr)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00tt59r)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00tt5bq)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00tt5bs)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00tt5bv)

15 Minute Drama 21:00 FRI (b00tt6yc)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 SAT (b00tn9vp)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 MON (b00tt49x)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 MON (b00tt49x)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 TUE (b00tt49x)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 TUE (b00tt59m)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 TUE (b00tt59m)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 WED (b00tt59m)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 WED (b00tt5tr)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 WED (b00tt59m)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 THU (b00tt5tr)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 THU (b00tt6d9)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 THU (b00tt6d9)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 FRI (b00tt6d9)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 FRI (b00tt6ms)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 FRI (b00tt6ms)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00tq1w0)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00tt6y9)

A View Through a Lens 05:45 SAT (b00h9vgy)

A View Through a Lens 14:45 SUN (b00tt3wz)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00j4d54)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00tt423)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00tt575)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00ts0fz)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00tq1vy)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00tt6wr)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00ts5mm)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00ts5mm)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00ts6qh)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00ts6qh)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00tt537)

Black History Month & The Usual Suspects 11:00 FRI (b00tt6pv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00tt577)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00tt5pt)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00tt66z)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00tt671)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00tt673)

Bringing Up Britain 20:00 WED (b00tt626)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00ts8lk)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00tt5p5)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00tt5p5)

Chain Reaction 12:30 SAT (b00tq1vw)

Children of the Olympic Bid 13:30 SUN (b00tt3w2)

Clare in the Community 18:30 THU (b00j0h07)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00762yj)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00tt3x1)

Continuity 23:00 WED (b00tt684)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b00tt64v)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00tt64v)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00tt4ly)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00tt5hv)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00tt5wc)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00tt6fs)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00tt6r8)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00trz9m)

Exit Strategy: Choosing a Time to Die 20:00 MON (b00tt573)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00trmdp)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00tt465)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00tt59h)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00tt5r7)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00tt6b0)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00tt6m8)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00ts097)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00tt6f4)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00trldj)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00trlbp)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00trlbr)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00trlbt)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00trlbw)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00tq1vp)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00tt6vv)

Gift Horses and Gaffes 20:45 WED (b00tt64s)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00tt5kn)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00tt5kn)

Great Unanswered Questions 23:00 MON (b00tw1fc)

HR 11:30 MON (b00tt4lt)

Iconoclasts 22:15 SAT (b00tq7x2)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00tq11k)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00tt6b2)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00tt6b2)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00tt5p3)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00tppv4)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00tt56z)

Key Matters 15:45 MON (b00tt535)

Key Matters 15:45 TUE (b00tt5j1)

Key Matters 15:45 WED (b00tt5jf)

Key Matters 15:45 THU (b00tt5jh)

Key Matters 15:45 FRI (b00tt5jk)

Last Orders 23:30 THU (b00qpslw)

Last Orders 23:30 FRI (b00qx1m5)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00tq1vr)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00tt6vx)

Listen Against 18:30 TUE (b00tt5mb)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00ts5dw)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00tt5hx)

Material World 21:00 MON (b00tq11f)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00tt6h8)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00tq2j0)

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Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00tt5wm)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00ts0ct)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00ts0ct)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00tt6r6)

Mum's on the Run 11:30 WED (b00tt5vn)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00tq2n8)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00ts6qf)

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News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00ts6tq)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00tq2nd)

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News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00ts5p1)

News 13:00 SAT (b00ts0bs)

Nick Mohammed in Bits 23:00 TUE (b00tt5pw)

Not Fade Away 11:30 THU (b00tt5cv)

Nuclear Waste 20:00 TUE (b00tt5mg)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00ts7nh)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00tt3x3)

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Pay and Tax: The Radio 4 Debate 17:00 SUN (b00tt3zw)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00tt404)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00tnmlj)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00tt3zt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00tq2nb)

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Profile 19:00 SAT (b00ts5dy)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00ts5dy)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00ts5dy)

Punt PI 10:30 SAT (b00trzfl)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00ts82t)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00ts82t)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00ts82t)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b00trmbw)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b00trmbw)

Readings From Bath 00:30 SUN (b00htmzy)

Reversing the Brain Drain 11:00 MON (b00tw2lj)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b00tppmb)

Round Britain Quiz 13:30 MON (b00tt4lw)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00ts0h9)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00trn9s)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00ts5f0)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b00tt5cs)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b00tt5cs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00ts6kd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00tqntx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00tqnt9)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00tq2n2)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00ts58q)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00ts7hy)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00ts7hy)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b00tpqm4)

Soul Music 13:30 TUE (b00tt5hs)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00tt49v)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00tt49v)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00ts87z)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00ts82r)

That Mitchell and Webb Sound 23:00 THU (b00mk7rn)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00ts8wc)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00tt421)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00tt421)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00tt571)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00tt571)

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The Archers 19:00 WED (b00tt60k)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (b00tt6hb)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00tt6hb)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00tt6w3)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00tt6kj)

The Brown Years 09:00 TUE (b00tt59k)

The Brown Years 21:30 TUE (b00tt59k)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00tq1vt)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00tt6vz)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00tt3rr)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00tt3rr)

The Maltby Collection 18:30 WED (b00xn9fp)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00tt5w9)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00tt6w1)

The Pope's Visit 2010: Highlights of the Beatification 20:00 SUN (b00tt425)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00tt6j5)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b00tt3qv)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b00tt3qv)

The Revenge of the First King of Mars 15:30 TUE (b00tt5hz)

The Revenge of the First King of Mars 15:30 WED (b00tt60f)

The Revenge of the First King of Mars 15:30 THU (b00tt6h6)

The Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia: The Story of Tito 11:00 WED (b00s6rx4)

The Stanley Baxter Playhouse 11:30 FRI (b00tt6px)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00ts07f)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00tt3tz)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00trlmg)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00trlmj)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00trlml)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00trlmn)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00trlmq)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00tpv86)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00tt60h)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00trn9q)

Today 06:00 MON (b00tt469)

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Tracing Your Roots 16:00 TUE (b00tt5k8)

Uncool Britannia 23:30 MON (b00sh3pm)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00tt42y)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b00tt441)

What to Do If You're Not Like Everybody Else 23:15 WED (b00tt68z)

Who Was Joyce Hatto? 11:30 TUE (b00tt6f6)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00ts4vs)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00tt4lp)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b00trk4z)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00ttlrc)

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iPM 17:30 SAT (b00ts58d)