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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 JULY 2020

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000ktpq)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 A Month In Siena by Hisham Matar (m000ktps)
Episode 5

When Hisham Matar was nineteen years old he came across the Sienese School of painting for the first time. In the year in which Matar's life was shattered by the disappearance of his father. the work of the great artists of Siena seemed to offer him a sense of hope. Over the years that followed, his feelings towards these paintings would deepen and, as he says, 'Siena began to occupy the sort of uneasy reverence the devout might feel towards Mecca or Rome or Jerusalem'.

A Month in Siena is the encounter, 25 years later, between the writer and the city he had worshipped from afar. It's a dazzling evocation of an extraordinary place and its effect on the writer's life. It's also an immersion in painting, a consideration of grief and a profoundly moving contemplation of the relationship between art and the human condition.

'Bewitching . . . Meditating on art, history and the relationship between them, this is both a portrait of a city and an affirmation of life's quiet dignities in the face of loss.' - The Economist, Books of the Year

In episode 5, the time has come to leave Siena, but it is not long before Hisham Matar is planning his next visit. He reflects on how this trip has changed his view on many things.

Written by Hisham Matar
Read by Khalid Abdalla
Abridged by Jill Waters and Jonquil Panting
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000ktpw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000ktpy)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000ktq0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000ktq2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000ktq4)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Canon Simon Doogan


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m000ktq6)
Change Through Engagement

Mahamed Hashi draws on his experience as a teacher, youth worker, councillor and victim of a stabbing and shooting to speak out against racist stereotyping. He explains why he thinks community outreach is a two way process: meeting people's needs but also listening to what they have to say, especially young people. Positive engagement with the police and representative bodies is the way, he believes, to change racist culture and a discriminatory status quo.
Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000l1bl)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m000kx21)
Ben Shieldaig

On the West Coast of Scotland, the village of Shieldaig nestles in the shadow of a mountain. On the steep sides of Ben Shieldaig is a very rare habitat called temperate rainforest. Under the trees the air is humid and the rocks are soft with moss.

Recently, the mountain has been bought by the Woodland Trust, which aims to cover the whole area in trees through a combination of natural regeneration and some planting.

Unable to leave her home in lockdown, Helen Mark meets locals online for a virtual tour of this magical place. She learns about the history of the village and its once isolated community, and find out what the future will hold.

Produced by Heather Simons
Image : Steve Carter


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000l1bn)
18/07/20 - Farming Today This Week: Alleged mistreatment of farm workers

A Farming Today special investigation has revealed allegations of serious underlying issues around the treatment of some farm workers, including safe working practices during the Covid pandemic. Charlotte Smith asks the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority what is being done to tackle these problems, and to two of the campaign and industry groups behind a new app developed by the Clewer Initiative, the Church of England’s initiative to combat modern slavery.

Producer: Toby Field


SAT 06:57 Weather (m000l1bq)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m000l1bs)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000l1bv)
Graeme Garden

Richard Coles and Nikki Bedi are joined by Graeme Garden - one third of the Goodies along with Bill Oddie and the late Tim Brooke-Taylor. In the classic BBC television show the trio played agents for hire and would do "anything, anywhere, anytime". Astride their trusty ‘Trandem’ – a three-seater bicycle – they tackled a giant kitten, parodied westerns with a Cornish version called “Bunfight at the OK Tea Rooms” and were chased by a giant Dougal from Magic Roundabout. Graeme also created I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue, the long-running Radio 4 show on which he is still a panellist and, with producer Jon Naismith, devised the Unbelievable Truth on Radio 4.

Jojo Moyes is a novelist and journalist. Her books include the bestsellers Me Before You, After You and Still Me and The Girl You Left Behind. Me Before You has now sold over 14 million copies worldwide and was adapted into a major film starring Sam Claflin and Emilia Clarke. JoJo’s latest novel, The Giver of Stars, is based on a mobile library service launched by Eleanor Roosevelt in the 1930s. The Pack Horse Library Project was an initiative in which female volunteers on horseback delivered paperbacks to families in rural Kentucky who did not have access to books.

Giles Clark is a conservationist who is taking on the illegal wildlife trade and helping to build a pioneering new bear sanctuary in Laos, Southeast Asia. He'll be talking about rescuing sun and moon bears and the perils of having bears about the house.

And Garry Crothers, who lost an arm in a motorbike accident, joins us to talk about his epic journey - a 4,000 mile solo voyage from the Caribbean to his home in Northern Ireland.

Presenter and author Fern Britton chooses her Inheritance Tracks - Those Lazy-Hazy-Crazy Days of Summer by Nat King Cole and (You Make Me Feel Like A) Natural Woman by Carole King.

Plus a listener says thank you to a stranger who helped her at a difficult time.

Producer: Paula McGinley
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m000l0ry)
Series 28

Home Economics: Episode Ten

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel show. Dr Zoe Laughlin, Rachel McCormack, Jordan Bourke and Tim Hayward join from their kitchens to answer questions sent in by email and social media.

This week, the panel discusses how to create the perfect pizza at home and whether any toppings are out of the question.

They also talk about re-creating the best prawn dishes served up on holiday and suggest new prawn recipes to try out at home.

Producer: Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m000l1bx)
George Parker, political editor for the Financial Times, presents this episode, in which we discuss the Huawei statement, with Laura Trott MP, Conservative and Lord Wood of Anfield, Labour peer, Scotland and devolved powers post Brexit, with Michael Russell MSP, Government messaging on Covid, with Joe Twyman, Deltapoll and Tracey Brown, SenseAboutScience, and Covid effect on the Tourism industry of the UK, with Sir Gary Streeter MP, Conservative.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000l1bz)
Can Bosnia move on from genocide?

This week, Bosnia is marking the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Srebrenica Massacre – Europe’s worst atrocity since the Second World War. Those who ordered the executions were convicted of genocide. Today Bosnia is deeply divided, impoverished, and governed by politicians who stir up the remaining ethnic enmity. Now young Bosnians are leaving in droves, says Guy De Launey.
Turkmenistan is a secretive and authoritarian state, and has not registered a single case of Covid-19. But independent media organisations, based outside the country, say their sources are reporting numerous cases of people falling ill with Covid-like symptoms. Now experts from the World Health Organisation have visited. What did they find, asks Rayhan Demytrie?
Tanzania announced that it had defeated the coronavirus last month, but it has not released full data on infections or deaths for many weeks. There was no lockdown, as the president declared that God would protect the country. But the US embassy warned that hospitals were overwhelmed. Where does that leave Tanzanians, like Sammy Awami?
Singapore pressed ahead with a general election despite the pandemic last week. The People’s Action Party has ruled for decades and won again, but with a reduced majority. The opposition Worker’s party had its best result to date. Could there be change in the air? Sharanjit Leyl visited a woman in a poorer district.
Germany already made the wearing of face-coverings in shops compulsory in April and has been seen to handle the pandemic well. Germans have adapted to having to wear masks quite creatively, with designs ranging from leopard skin to bridal lace and denim. So what style did Damien McGuinness go for in Berlin?

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producers: Arlene Gregorius and Serena Tarling


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000l1c1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000l1c3)
The latest news from the world of personal finance


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m000kvlb)
Series 20

Episode 6

If you’ve ever wondered what Michael Gove’s real job was, this episode reveals all. Plus the government’s Covid rules are clarified at last, and Laura Kuenssberg and the BBC’s North America correspondent battle it out to establish who in the world has said the stupidest thing.

Starring: Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis MacLeod, Duncan Wisbey and Debra Stephenson.

Written by Nev Fountain & Tom Jamieson, Laurence Howarth, Ed Amsden & Tom Coles, James Bugg, Simon Alcock, Cody Dahler, Edward Tew, Gareth Ceredig, Alex Hardy, Athena Kugblenu, Lewis Cook and Paige Wilson.

Producer Bill Dare
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m000l1c5)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m000l1c7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000ktp7)
Baroness Ros Altmann, Dawn Butler MP, Bobby Seagull, Dame Sara Thornton

Chris Mason presents political debate from London Broadcasting House with a panel including the pensions and social care expert Baroness Ros Altmann, Labour MP Dawn Butler, the mathematician Bobby Seagull and the Independent Anti Slavery Commissioner Dame Sara Thornton.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000l1c9)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 One to One (m000hvkr)
Personality: Katya Adler talks to Simon Hattenstone

For the second in this interview series about personality - what it is, how it's formed and how it can change - Katya Adler talks to Simon Hattenstone, features writer at The Guardian newspaper.
For over two decades, Simon has interviewed famous personalities, pulling back their masks to reveal the essence beneath - what motivates them, what drives them, what they are really like. Katya talks to Simon about how he tries to get under the skin of his interviewees, how the personalities of his interviewees change and what place there is in the interview for the personality of the person asking the questions.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair


SAT 15:00 Saturday Drama (b01mnxzn)
The Martin Beck Killings

Murder at The Savoy

The Martin Beck books were written over ten years from 1965-75 by the Swedish husband and wife team of Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö. They featured the dogged and complex figure of D.I. Martin Beck and his colleagues in the national Police Homicide Department in Stockholm, and were written to give a realistic, unsentimental portrait of Sweden at the time: a society suffering from stifling bureaucracy and the creeping corruption of a liberal society.

In Murder at the Savoy, Martin Beck and Lennart Kollberg are called to Malmö in Southern Sweden when an industrialist is shot whilst having dinner at the city's best hotel. There are people in high places who want the case cleared up quietly and quickly, but Beck refuses to give way to pressure.

Cast:
Narrators ..... Lesley Sharp and Nicholas Gleaves
Martin Beck ..... Steven Mackintosh
Lennart Kollberg ..... Neil Pearson
Gunvald Larsson ..... Ralph Ineson
Per Månsson ..... Tom Mannion
Zachrisson ..... Joe Sims
Åsa Torell ..... Clare Corbett
Malm ..... Nicholas Murchie
Edvarsson ..... Will Howard
Mats Linder ..... Paul Mundell
Charlotte Palmgren ..... Philippa Stanton
Bertil Svensson ..... Rick Warden
Sara Moberg ..... Joanna Brookes
Sister ..... Carolyn Pickles
Gun Kollberg ..... Sally Orrock
Helena Hansson ..... Hannah Wood
Broberg ..... Michael Shelford
Victor Palmgren ..... Robert Blythe

Original Music composed by Elizabeth Purnell
Directed by Sara Davies
Novels written by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö
Translated by Amy and Ken Knoespel
Dramatised for radio by Jennifer Howarth


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m000l1cc)
Karen Gibson 'Godmother of Gospel', the Price of Fast Fashion & Abuse in Gymnastics

Karen Gibson aka “Godmother of Gospel” who shot to worldwide fame in 2018 after she appeared conducting The Kingdom Choir at the Royal Wedding of Harry and Meghan – tells me about the Choir’s new single Real Love.

We hear from the writer Caitlin Moran about her new film based on her memoir How To Build A Girl.

We discuss why Black people are more likely to end up in the mental health system and be sectioned with Sophie Corlett of the charity Mind, the producer Tobi Kyeremateng, the psychotherapist Dawn Estefan and the co-director of Listen Up Research Jahnine Davis.

Housing benefit discrimination has been judged unlawful and in breach of the Equality Act. Research done by the charity Shelter shows that ‘No DSS’ policies put women and disabled people at a particular disadvantage, because they are more likely to receive housing benefit. We hear from Shelter’s solicitor Rose Arnall, and its chief executive Polly Neate.

As British Gymnastics, the UK Governing Body for the sport of gymnastics announces an independent review following concerns raised by several British athletes about a culture of mistreatment and abuse, Sarah whose four daughters trained locally in gymnastics and experienced varying degrees of abuse and Nicole Pavier, a retired member of the senior England gymnastic squad, share their stories.

And Prof Dilys Williams the Founder and Director of CSF (Centre for Sustainable Fashion and Aja Barber a personal stylist and style consultant whose work focuses on sustainability and ethics, discuss the real price of fast fashion?

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Louise Corley

Interviewed Guest: Dawn Estefan
Interviewed Guest: Toby Kyeremateng
Interviewed Guest: Janine Davis
Interviewed Guest: Sophie Corlett
Interviewed Guest: Rose Arnall
Interviewed Guest: Polly Neate
Interviewed Guest: Karen Gibson
Interviewed Guest: Nicole Pavier
Interviewed Guest: AJa Barber
Interviewed Guest: Professor Dilys Williams
Interviewed Guest: Caitlin Moran


SAT 17:00 PM (m000l1cf)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m000l1ch)
Nick Robinson gets beneath the surface in a personal and political interview


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000l1ck)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m000l1cm)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000l1cp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000l1cr)
Ian Stone, Ned Glasier, Irini Tzortzoglou, Kiri Pritchard-McLean, Arthur Smith, Samantha Crain, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Arthur Smith are joined by Ian Stone, Irini Tzortzoglou, Ned Glasier and Kiri Pritchard-McLean for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Samantha Crain and Monophonics.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m000l1ct)
Roger Stone

President Trump calls him a quality guy, others call him a dirty trickster. Mark Coles looks at the life of political strategist Roger Stone, who’s advised Republican politicians since the 1970s and proudly wears a tattoo of President Nixon on his back.

Stone was convicted of lying to congress and witness tampering in 2019 but his sentence was commuted by President Trump, days before he was due to report to prison.

This programme contains clips from Netflix Film Get Me Roger Stone. The writers are Morgan Pehme, Daniel DiMauro and Dylan Bank.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Researcher: Di Richardson


SAT 19:15 The Reith Lectures (b08tcbrp)
Hilary Mantel

The Day Is for the Living

Art can bring the dead back to life, argues the best-selling novelist Hilary Mantel, starting with the story of her own great-grandmother. "We sense the dead have a vital force still," she says. "They have something to tell us, something we need to understand. Using fiction and drama, we try to gain that understanding." She describes how and why she began to write fiction about the past, and how her view of her trade has evolved. We cannot hear or see the past, she says, but "we can listen and look".

Over this series of five lectures, Dame Hilary discusses the role that history plays in our culture. How can we understand the past, she asks, and how can we convey its nature today? Above all, she believes, we must all try to respect the past amid all its strangeness and complexity.

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at Halle St Peter's in Manchester, and is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley.
The producer is Jim Frank.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b04hmfpd)
Four Women Poets Today

In 1992, four relatively unknown poets spoke with Peggy Reynolds for BBC Radio 4 about the impact of gender and nationality on their poetry and on their sense of themselves as poets. Then, in 2014, they spoke with Peggy again.

In the intervening 21 years, Carol Ann Duffy had become the first-ever woman Poet Laureate, Gillian Clarke the National Poet of Wales, Liz Lochhead the Makar or National Poet of Scotland, and, until her recent death, Eavan Boland was a highly distinguished scholar-poet dividing her year between Stanford in the USA and Dublin.

In the light of these developments - not to mention the constitutional changes and wild economic fluctuations of the last 21 years and more - when Peggy spoke with each of them in 2014, she asked them both to listen back to their previous contributions and to reflect on their creative and professional journeys and on the state of women's poetry - and poetry in general, both here and across the globe.

To mark the death of Eavan Boland, this broadcast offers another opportunity to hear four great poets in a changed and fast-changing world.

Producer Beaty Rubens.


SAT 21:00 Tracks (b07wbvmq)
Series 1: Origin

Origin: Episode Eight

The eighth episode of a nine-part conspiracy thriller, starring Romola Garai. Written by Matthew Broughton.

When the mysterious child, K, wakes from his coma, Helen discovers his identity. And after she finally tracks down the pilot of the plane that crashed, the truth of what happened to flight 259 begins to emerge.

Will Helen help K return to his family? And what secrets lie hidden in Florian’s water-damaged notebook?

Tracks: A story in nine parts about life, death and the human brain.

Helen…. Romola Garai
Freddy…. Jonathan Forbes
Man Seok ..... Paul Courtenay Hyu
Jae Sung..... Leo Wan
The Pilot….. Richard Nicholls
Kirby….. Jaimi Barbakoff
Dr Petrauskas….. Tristan Sturrock
K…… Rafay Asfi

Directed in Wales by James Robinson


SAT 21:45 Shorts (b05wny9j)
The Time Being

The Love Songs Of Foxes by Amber Lee Dodd

A woman finds there are challenges in taking in her troubled brother when he is released on parole from prison.

Amber Lee Dodd's short story read by Tracy Wiles.

Amber Lee Dodd was a writer for the young playwrights programme at Chichester Festival Theatre. Her plays have featured at the Edinburgh Fringe, New Theatre Royal and the Minerva Theatre. She is currently studying an MA in Creative Writing at Chichester University and her debut children's novel, We Are Giants, is published in spring 2016.

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News (m000l1cw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m000ktyr)
How and why we educate

Universities are counting the cost of COVID-19. They’ve lost revenue from international students, they’re struggling for investment and some of them are finding it hard to meet their pension commitments. As many as 13 of them may no longer be financially viable, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies. The question of whether or not cash-strapped universities should be bailed out is moral as well as financial. It summons conflicting arguments about the social value of these institutions and the role they have in wider education. In the 1970s and 1980s between 8% and 19% of school-leavers went on to higher education; today it’s 50%. Should we be proud that at least half our young adults are engaged in self-directed learning? Some say yes, it’s a moral achievement and well worth holding on to. Others observe that whereas we may now have more graduates than ever, never before have their qualifications been worth so little. How we view universities has implications for schools, where hitting grade targets is the de facto measure of success. The pandemic has exposed the weakness of this approach, according to its critics, because it relies too heavily on testing as an end in itself. While some decry the lockdown as a disaster for a ‘lost generation’ of young people, others see it as a once-in-a generation opportunity to re-think not just how we’re educating our children but what education should be aiming to achieve. With Nick Hillman, Sir Anthony Seldon, Niamh Sweeney and Tim Worstall.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (m000kw4n)
Series 10

University of Reading

Steve Punt hosts the funny, lively and dynamic quiz from the University of Reading.

This week's specialist subjects are linguistics, law and film and theatre Studies and the questions range from dental fricatives to Jack Reacher via a burst water pipe in Birmingham.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three undergraduates against three of their professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round, cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their professors’ awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. In addition, there are the head-to-head rounds, in which students take on their professors in their own subjects - with plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

In this series, the universities are Bournemouth, Imperial College, Reading, Durham, Ulster University and Mansfield College Oxford.

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show, is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, - not just in the humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. As well as The Now Show, he has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4 on subjects as varied as The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen and Getting The Gongs - an investigation into awards ceremonies.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 The New Japanese Poetry (m000kwwz)
Rewriting Humanity

Poet and Editor Jordan Smith uncovers the unexpected skills of global poets who worked in detention centres and prisons, helping the youth detainees within them process their experience.

American poet Seth Michelson has been working with young children in migrant detention centres, who have been separated from their families and everything they know. Across the ocean, in Japan, poet Ryo Michiko brought poetry workshops to Nara Juvenile prison which housed youth offenders who have been convicted of crimes. While the young poets they work with are processing trauma of very different circumstances, both Seth and Michiko helped the children find a voice through which to narrate and grasp their own pasts, and to find hope.

Jordan Smith brings Seth and Ryo together in conversation to share their experiences, and to hear powerful poetic works that come from unexpected voices.

All the poetry in this programme is written by the young detainees. Seth's work culminated in the poetry anthology Dreaming America. Ryo Michiko's work has resulted in three poetry books in Japanese - Chose White because the Sky Is Blue, And Kindness Flowed Out, and For a More Beautiful World. An excerpt translation is available in the Tokyo Poetry Journal volume 10.

Produced by Anishka Sharma
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 19 JULY 2020

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000l1cy)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 The Way I See It (m0009llz)
John Waters on Lee Lozano's Untitled 1963

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, continues his deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Today's edition features film director John Waters. He chooses Lee Lozano's depiction of a head of a hammer, "Untitled 1963", but what will cult film specialist and director of Pink Flamingos make of such an apparently utilitarian subject?

Producer: Tom Alban

Main Image: Lee Lozano, Untitled, 1963. Oil on canvas, two panels, 7' 10" x 8' 4" (238.8 x 254 cm). Gift of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 26.2004.a-b. © 2019 Estate of Lee Lozano


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m000kvl0)
The Fall of Man

In a new story for Radio 4 from acclaimed Irish writer, Donal Ryan, a man looks back on the lies that have shaped his life.

Reader: Liam O'Brien
Writer: Donal Ryan is the author of four novels and a short story collection. HIs fourth novel, From a Low and Quiet Sea, was longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Costa Novel Award 2018.
Producer: Justine Willett


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000l1d0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000l1d2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000l1d4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000l1d6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000l1d8)
The church of St Michael in Southampton

Bells on Sunday comes from the church of St Michael in Southampton. The church was founded in 1070 and is the oldest building still in use in the city. It has ten bells and the back eight bells were cast at the Gillett and Johnston Foundry in Croydon in 1923. The two smallest bells were cast at the John Taylor Foundry in Lougborough in 1947, using metal recovered from the bells of Holy Rood Church which was destroyed in an air raid on November 30th 1940. We hear them ringing Kent Treble Bob Royal.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m000l1ct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News (m000l1vs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01r95gy)
Into the Dark

John Agard, who has recently received the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry, offers some of his own work in a programme that reflects on the way we interpret lightness and darkness.

With reference to literature, mythology and religious thought, as well as music by Nina Simone, Johnny Cash and Richie Havens, he considers what it means to embrace the darkness.

Readers: Adjoa Andoh and Emma Fielding
Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m000l1vv)
Outback Round-Up

It's mustering season at Olga Downs cattle station in Northern Queensland. Twice a year, 2,000 head of cattle need to be rounded up across 44,000 acres in the Australian outback. It takes helicopters, light aircraft, quad bikes, motorcycles and as many jackaroos and jillaroos you can get your hands on to muster the cattle back to the yards for sorting, drafting and branding.

In the first of two programmes from Australia, Anna Jones makes the long journey to Olga Downs to live and work with the Harrington family, and witness her first ever muster. Dad, Peter, flies the plane while Mum, Carmel, and their grown-up children Emily, Grace and William cover the ground on quad bikes and motorcycles.

After the dust, heat and noise of the muster and cattle yards, Anna discovers another surprising side of Olga Downs. A pioneering electronics business - developed by William Harrington - which is bringing the internet to the outback.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m000l1vx)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000l1vz)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000l1w1)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000l1w3)
CHICKS

Comedian and actor Adrian Edmondson makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity CHICKS.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘CHICKS.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘CHICKS.
- You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4

Registered Charity Number: 1080953/SCO40536


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000l1w5)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000l1w7)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000l1w9)
A Word for All Seasons

2020 is the ‘Year of the Word’ in the Catholic Church in England and Wales – to celebrate, share and live out faith through deeper Scriptural engagement. Dioceses have taken on different projects as part of this initiative, and Sunday Worship this morning comes from the Diocese of Leeds where Priests and Parishioners have been exploring the ‘Word Unlocked’. Fr Michael Hall will lead the service, "A Word for All Seasons", to reflect on the way that "the God who speaks" meets us in all the changing circumstances of our lives, especially significant at a time when many Christians will have been turning to the Bible for comfort over the last few months. We’ll hear passages that have particular emphasis on the importance of the ‘Word’ of God.
Fr Michael Hall is Parish Priest in the West Yorkshire towns of Brighouse and Elland, and the homily will be given by Fr Henry Longbottom – the Diocese of Leeds’ newest priest who ministers in the East Leeds Parish of St John Henry Newman. Worship includes hymns and motets previously recorded in Leeds Cathedral by the Leeds Diocesan Choirs. The producer is Miriam Williamson.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000ktp9)
Legacy Bottle Opener

Will Self on why a novelty bottle opener - with little plastic seahorses floating in an acrylic handle - is his idea of a perfect inheritance.
"The security that financial inheritance may convey is merely relative - and divisive," he writes.
So, instead, Will suggests leaving behind something ordinary....and useful.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvggm)
Corn Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall begins May with the corn bunting. Corn buntings may be plain-looking birds which sing their scratchy songs from cornfields, but their private lives are a colourful affair and a single male bird may have up to 18 partners.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000l1wc)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000l1wf)
David turns detective and Harrison bares his soul

Writers, Sarah McDonald Hughes & Sarah Hehir
Director, Peter Leslie Wild
Editor, Jeremy Howe

David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer ..... Buffy Davis
Harrison Burns ..... James Cartwright


SUN 10:55 Tweet of the Day (m000l1wh)
Tweet Take 5: Great Northern Diver

The great northern diver, also called the common loon in North America, has held a fascination for many people over the years. This large black and white bird may not breed that regularly in the British Isles, but is a regular winter visitor. Impressive though this bird is on the water, it is the haunting almost unearthly call which captivates anyone who hears it. In this edition we will hear from wildlife presenter Chris Packham, wildlife artist Jane Smith and the BBC's security correspondent Frank Gardener.

Producer Andrew Dawes


SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m000l1wk)
Annie Nightingale, DJ

Annie Nightingale was BBC Radio 1’s first female presenter and is its longest-serving DJ, celebrating her 50th anniversary at the station this year.

Born and brought up in south west London, she fell in love with the romance and mystery of radio through her father’s meticulous tuning of their home set to broadcasts from exotic places like Prague and Hilversum. On leaving school at 17, she spent a year on a journalism course in central London.

After relocating to Brighton, she worked her way up through local newspapers to the national press and magazines and eventually, by the mid-1960s, to TV. She interviewed the Beatles as a young journalist, and gave early support to artists including David Bowie, Ian Dury, Eminem and Primal Scream. In 1970, she was the first woman DJ to join Radio 1 with a Sunday evening show. From 1978 to 1982, Annie was the sole female presenter on the BBC TV music show The Old Grey Whistle Test, the only woman to have held the job. Her excitement for new music and musical genres from acid house to grime, hasn’t wavered.

She currently hosts a weekly Radio 1 show called Annie Nightingale Presents… (on air on Wednesdays between 1 and 3 am) and has received countless awards from Caner of the Year to Commander of the Order of the British Empire, which she received this year for services to radio.

Annie has a son and a daughter from her first marriage. She is twice divorced and lives in London.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 11:45 Join the Dots (b0952zlf)
Series 1

Playing the Dot

Then there was a pause... Janet Ellis explores the role of the dot in early punctuation, Harold Pinter's love of the pause, and listens to the music of the dots.

The simple dot is one of the first marks man ever made. From being a word we uttered infrequently, the advent of digital has made it one we use all the time.

The dot. We wear it, listen to it, read it and gaze on it. We send it through the air and under the waves. Each programme in this series circles a different aspect of this simple mark.

Contributors include theatre director David Leveaux, writers Keith Huston and Lynne Truss, and composer Gary Yershon.

Harold Pinter extract taken from Penguin Random House audiobook Various Voices, with permission of The Harold Pinter estate.

Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Dora production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000l1wm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m000kw52)
Series 24

Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Lou Sanders, Sindhu Vee and Neil Delamere are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as guns, magic, berries and crocodiles.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000l1wp)
Food and Mood: how eating affects your mental health

One silver lining of lockdown is that it has brought talk of mental health, particularly depression, into the general conversation. And what is becoming increasingly evident is the role that food has in warding off depression and anxiety.

Professor Felice Jacka is the leading expert in the link between mental health and nutrition and is the president of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research. She discusses the wealth of research which demonstrates the link between diet and the growth of the hippocampus.

Many people found that cooking helped boost their mood in lockdown - evident from the shortages of baking ingredients on our shelves. Writer and comedian Katy Brand tells Sheila that she finds cooking gives her a sense of control and helps alleviate stress.

Kimberley Wilson is unusual among chartered psychologists because she also holds a masters degree in nutrition. When her clients come to her with depression and anxiety one of the first things she does is talk to them about what they eat. She thinks that although we have readily accepted the idea that we need to eat good food to look after other organs in our body, we are reluctant to see the connection to our brain’s health.

So if food is proved to be central to improving our mental health, how come GPs are unlikely to talk to you about it? Sheila talks to Dr Rupy Aujla, from the Doctor’s Kitchen, about why good nutrition is too often overlooked in the medical profession.

And Romy Gill discusses mental health struggles with fellow chefs Ellis Barrie and Anna Haugh. Chefs spend all day cooking for other people but all too often fail to feed themselves good food. In lockdown chefs have had a moment to reflect on the pressure of a professional kitchen and the impact this has on their mental health.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced by Emma Weatherill


SUN 12:57 Weather (m000l1wr)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000l1wt)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m000l1ww)
Capturing the nation in conversation to build a unique picture of our lives today and preserve it for future generations.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000kvky)
GQT At Home: Episode Sixteen

Peter Gibbs hosts the gardening panel show. Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and Chris Beardshaw answer the questions sent in by listeners via email and social media.

This week, the panel discusses the best ways to grow coriander at home, suggestions for a fragrance-free climbing rose and tips for growing a chamomile lawn.

Away from the questions, Kathy Clugston chats to keen amateur gardener and fellow BBC News presenter, Lukwesa Burak, and Humaira Ikram is back to give advice on planting for toddlers.

Producer - Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer - Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Way I See It (m0009r45)
Roxane Gay and Christ's Entry into Journalism

Art critic Alastair Sooke, in the company of some of the leading creatives of our age, takes us on a deep dive into the stunning works in the Museum of Modern Art's collection, whilst exploring what it really means “to see” art.

Leading cultural figures in the series include Grammy- and Emmy-award-winning Hollywood actor and comedian Steve Martin, one of the founders of minimalism – composer Steve Reich and stand-up comedian Margaret Cho. Each episode introduces us to an important art work in the collection, but asks how our own perspective affects our appreciation of the piece.

So, how does a jazz pianist see Mondrian’s Broadway Boogie Woogie? How does one of the first black women to write for Marvel comics see the difficult truths in Kara Walker’s sweeping image of African-American history? What does a top fashion designer decode from the clothes painted by an artist in Harlem in the 1930s?

This week we begin with American writer and commentator Roxane Gay, author of The New York Times best-selling essay collection Bad Feminist. She chooses a work by Kara Walker, best known for creating black-and-white silhouette works that invoke themes of African American racial identity. Roxane has selected Walker's massive 11-by-18-foot collage “Christ’s Entry into Journalism” from 2017. Riffing off “Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem,” the piece is covered with ink drawings depicting figures real and imagined, past and present, from James Brown to Martin Luther King, Jr. and Donald Trump.

Producer: Paul Kobrak

Main Image: Kara Walker, Christ's Entry into Journalism, 2017. Ink and pencil on paper, cut-and-pasted on painted paper, 140 1/2 × 196" (356.9 × 497.8 cm). Acquired through the generosity of Agnes Gund, the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Carol and Morton Rapp, Marnie Pillsbury, the Contemporary Drawing and Print Associates, and Committee on Drawings and Prints Fund, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 198.2018. © 2019 Kara Walker


SUN 15:00 Primo Levi's The Periodic Table (m000l1wy)
Mercury. Vanadium Part 2

Janet Suzman introduces a major dramatisation of Primo Levi's short stories about life, work and matter. Starring Henry Goodman, Akbar Kurtha, Erich Redman and Juliet Aubrey. Dramatised by Graham White from the translation by Raymond Rosenthal.

Mercury: 1820s - an English captain and his wife live on a remote Atlantic island with strange chemical properties.

CAST
Abrahams ..... Paul Hilton
Maggie ..... Amelia Lowdell
Hendrik ..... Nicholas Murchie
Willem ..... Leo Wan
Andrea ..... Chris Pavlo
Gaetano ..... George Watkins
Burton ..... Richard Pepple
Rebecca ..... Debra Baker
Woman ..... Katie Redford

Vanadium Part 2: In the course of his work as a chemist in a paint factory in the 1960s, Primo Levi has received a letter from one of the factory's German clients, Doktor Muller. The same Doktor Muller who had overseen Levi's work as a prisoner in the lab at Auschwitz. And now Muller wants to meet.

CAST
Older Primo ..... Henry Goodman
Cometto ..... John Rowe
Dr Muller ..... Erich Redman
Younger Primo ..... Akbar Kurtha
Lucia ..... Juliet Aubrey
Polish overseer ..... Chris Pavlo

Produced and directed by Marc Beeby and Emma Harding


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000l1x0)
Programme looking at new fiction and non-fiction books, talking to authors and publishers and unearthing lost classics


SUN 16:30 The New Japanese Poetry (m000l1x2)
Beneath and Beyond Tokyo

Poet and editor Jordan Smith follows the work of Japanese poets who are experimenting with new poetic forms in order to embed poetry into the Tokyo landscape.

Jordan meets Tokyo based poet Nagae Yuki who has taken inspiration from the genre of steric poetry to celebrate a phenomenon that is completely unique to this city. He also follows a theatrical poetry project, known as Heterotopia, which aims to preserve the historic influence that Asian immigrants have had on Tokyo. A group of Japanese poets came together to lay poems at specific landmarks around the city, creating a virtual audio tour for thousands of visitors.

Produced by Anishka Sharma.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m000kv7v)
Groomed, abused and put in prison: Rochdale’s untold story

How does an abused teenager get a criminal record while her abusers walk free? This is untold story of the Rochdale grooming scandal - how one young woman has been denied justice and how her attackers are still at large. For the very first time, 'Daisy' tells her harrowing story to File on 4. How, from the age of 12, she was groomed, raped and abused by a gang of men. The abuse led her to be involved in some criminal behaviour - but when the police investigated and she told them what was happening, she says she was ignored. She was sent to prison, where, for the first time since the abuse started, she says she felt safe. But when she was released, it started again. The police have admitted some failures but, a decade after they launched their investigation into systematic and organised abuse, Daisy and two other young women, who were also abused, are now taking civil action against Greater Manchester Police and the Crown Prosecution Service.
Producer: Sally Chesworth
Reporter: Alys Harte
Editor: Carl Johnston


SUN 17:40 Primo Levi's The Periodic Table (b07kstl4)
Carbon

Henry Goodman stars as Primo Levi in a major dramatisation of Levi's short stories about our human relationship with the chemical elements. Introduced by Janet Suzman and dramatised by Graham White from the translation by Raymond Rosenthal.

Carbon: Levi imagines the incredible, centuries-long journey of a single atom of carbon.


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000l1x5)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000l1x7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000l1x9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000l1xc)
Peter Curran

The best of BBC Radio this week.


SUN 19:00 Q & A by Vikas Swarup (b007vlry)
100,000,000 Rupees (cont)

By Ayeesha Menon, from the novel by Vikas Swarup.

Thomas is finally stumped by a question. His thoughts lead him back to his first love Nita, a young prostitute he met in Agra. When she is physically abused by one of her clients, Thomas knows what he has to do.

Thomas ...... Anand Tiwari
Prem Kumar ...... Sohrab Ardeshir
Nita ...... Radhika Apte
Neeraj ...... Jaimini Pathak
Utpal ...... Kenneth Desai

Other parts played by Rohit Malkani, Pushan Kripalani and Nadir Khan.

Directed by John Dryden


SUN 19:15 Cabin Pressure (b00lt16c)
Series 2

Ipswich

When the crew have to go on a refresher Safety & Emergency Procedures course, it spells trouble for Douglas's inner dog and Martin's inner ear. Plus Arthur gets a chance to show off his exceptional eating skills.

With special guests Phil Davis ('Vera Drake') and Alex MacQueen ('The Thick Of It').

Starring
Carolyn Knapp-Shappey ..... Stephanie Cole
1st Officer Douglas Richardson ..... Roger Allam
Capt. Martin Crieff ..... Benedict Cumberbatch
Arthur Shappey ..... John Finnemore
Mr Sargent ..... Phil Davis
Dr Peter Duncan ..... Alex MacQueen

Written by John Finnemore.

Produced & Directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Spice (m000l1xj)
The Recipe for Love

A series of five specially-commissioned tales revolving around the possibilities of the word spice.

4/5. The Recipe For Love by Agnieszka Dale. A man called Spice is becoming bored with his life - until a chance encounter changes everything.

Agnieszka Dale is a Polish-born London-based author. Her first collection, Fox Season: And Other Short Stories, was published in October 2017.

Writer: Agnieszka Dale
Reader: Jack Klaff
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m000kvl4)
Is it worth the BBC holding the Proms this year without an audience present? Controller of Radio 3 Alan Davey discusses the value of the Proms without Promenaders.

Test Match Special is back, also without crowds of spectators, and with the commentators in safety bubbles, TMS Producer Adam Mountford explains how they are muddling through, and reveals who upset the England team with their impromptu concert.

And two more listeners turn amateur reviewers of a programme on 6 Music. Will they travel outside of their comfort zones?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000kvl2)
Jack Charlton, Zindzi Mandela, Charles Webb, Ida Haendel

Pictured: Jack Charlton

Matthew Bannister on

The footballer Jack Charlton, who went from a pit village in Northumberland to become a Leeds United stalwart and member of England’s 1966 World Cup winning team – and then a successful manager of the Republic of Ireland.

Zindzi Mandela, the youngest daughter of Nelson Mandela who was an anti-apartheid activist and later South Africa’s ambassador to Denmark.

Charles Webb, the author of the novel The Graduate which became a classic film starring Dustin Hoffman. Charles was anti-materialism and gave away his royalties and even his homes.

Ida Haendel, the Polish-born violinist known for her interpretations of Walton, Britten and Sibelius, who appeared at the BBC Proms 68 times.

Interviewed guest: John Murray
Interviewed guest: Milton Nkosi
Interviewed guest: Jack Malvern
Interviewed guest: Norman Lebrecht

Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: Football Daily, 5 Live 11/07/2020; England v Scotland, BBC Sound Archive 10/04/1965; Desert Island Discs: Jack Charlton, Radio 4 20/10/1996; Ireland pays tribute to Jack Charlton, RTE Sport 11/07/2020; Sports Personality of the Year, BBC One 14/12/2008; Talk to Al Jazeera: Zindzi Mandela, Al Jazeera 18/07/2008; Zindzi Mandela reads her father’s speech in 1985, BBC News Africa 13/07/2020; Book at Bedtime: The Graduate, Radio 4 05/06/2000; Front Row, Radio 4 29/05/2007; The Graduate, directed by Mike Nichols, Lawrence Truman Productions 1967; Woman's Hour, Radio 4 22/06/2000; EBU Interval Talk: Ida Haendel, Radio 3 26/11/1973; BBC Proms, Radio 3 1994.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000l1c3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000l1w3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m000kw56)
Humans vs the Planet

As Covid-19 forced humans into lockdown, memes emerged showing the earth was healing thanks to our absence. These were false claims – but their popularity revealed how seductive the dangerous idea that ‘we are the virus’ can be.

At its most extreme, this way of thinking leads to eco-fascism, the belief the harm humans do to Earth can be reduced by cutting the number of non-white people.

But the mainstream green movement is also challenged by a less hateful form of this mentality known as ‘doomism’ – a creeping sense that humans will inevitably cause ecological disaster, that it’s too late to act and that technological solutions only offer more environmental degradation through mining and habitat loss.

What vision can environmentalists offer as an antidote to these depressing ideas? And how can green politics encourage radical thinking without opening the door to hateful ideologies?

Producer/Presenter: Lucy Proctor
Editor: Jasper Corbett


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000l1xl)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000kx23)
Christopher Nolan on Memento

With Antonia Quirke

As cinemas across the world are pinning their box-office hopes on Christopher Nolan's Tenet this summer, Antonia looks again at the director's breakthrough hit Memento, and travels back to the year 2000 when Nolan talked to Radio 4 for the first time.

Filmmaker Mark Jenkin has to wait a year to shoot his follow-up to Bait as a result of the pandemic. In the meantime, he has dreamt up a new movie and is recording an audio diary of the film-making process. This week, he is grappling with a story that exists across various dimensions of time

Composer Neil Brand continues his series of rejected scores with the very public controversy that surrounded the release of 1984 in 1984.

While many cinemas are still closed, drive-ins have become extremely popular. Antonia experiences one for herself, armed with a bucket of popcorn.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01r95gy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 20 JULY 2020

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000l1xn)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m000ktyc)
Ignorance

Strategic ignorance and knowledge resistance: Laurie Taylor talks to Mikael Klintman, Professor of Sociology at the University of Lund, Sweden about our capacity for resisting insights from others. At all levels of society, he argues, our world is becoming increasingly dominated by an inability, even refusal, to engage with others' ideas. It does not bode well either for democracy or for science. They're joined by Linsey McGoey, Professor of Sociology at the University at Essex, whose new study explores the use of deliberate and wilful ignorance by elites in pursuit of the retention of power - from News International's hacking scandal to the fire at Grenfell Tower.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000l1d8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000l1xq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000l1xs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000l1xv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000l1xx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000l1xz)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Canon Simon Doogan


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000l1y1)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m000l1y3)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tt1kv)
Yellowhammer

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the yellowhammer. The yellowhammer is a member of the bunting family and its name comes from "ammer" the German for bunting. It's one of the few British birds to have its song transcribed into words and seems to be saying ..a little bit of bread and no cheese".


MON 06:00 Today (m000l1zq)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 How to Play (m000l1zs)
Bruch's Violin Concerto No 1 with Nicola Benedetti

We eavesdrop on rehearsals as the violinist Nicola Benedetti and the Aurora Orchestra prepare for a performance of Bruch’s 1st Violin Concerto. Aurora’s conductor Nicholas Collon and orchestral players give us their insiders' perspective on this celebrated music and show how they work together to make it come alive in the concert hall.

Produced by Rosie Boulton for BBC Wales


MON 09:30 Legacy of War (m000l1zv)
Episode 7

Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.


MON 09:45 Girl Taken (m00055n1)
1. The Smuggler

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned-good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straightforward, story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life-changing, mind-changing events. Girl Taken is a 10-part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000l1zz)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 The Debrief (m000l205)
Episode One

By Katherine Jakeways

On their journey home, Hannah and Mark dissect the events of a family meal, at which a potentially life-changing announcement was made.

The debrief is a common phenomenon – that moment when you leave a social event, climb into the car, or the taxi, or onto the bus and start to gossip with your partner about the evening's events. Hannah and Mark love a debrief, and in each episode of this new five-part series, we find them in the aftermath of an event with lots to get their teeth into. Writer Katherine Jakeways has been described by the Radio Times as ‘the next Victoria Wood’. Of her Radio 4 series ‘Where this Service will…’ the Guardian said “Jakeway's writing was sublime. The punchlines, the pacing, the humanity.”

Hannah ….. Rebecca Humphries
Mark ….. Tom Basden
Finn ….. Milo Robinson
Poppy …. Juno Robinson

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


MON 11:00 Walks Like a Duck (m000l29v)
How do others see me?

My name is Louise. I’m a mum to Jacob, wife to Mark, and therapist and friend to many. I also live with a degenerative, muscle wasting disease - a type of Muscular Dystrophy.

A few years ago, my hospital consultant asked a medical student to describe my condition. “Well,” he said, “she walks like a duck.” After a stunned pause, my husband and I howled with laughter. While I doubt the hapless student received the same reaction from the horrified neurologist, his clumsy response provided the perfect title for this documentary series.

The premise is clear. I don’t see myself as a person with a disability, yet that’s what I am. I don’t spend much of my life thinking about disability, yet my mind is filled with it 24/7. I wouldn’t choose to listen to a programme about disability, yet that’s what I was desperate to make!

It’s because living a life full of dependency and loss, my voice - and the voices of others like me - are so often silenced, so feared is the mirror of human weakness that others see reflected in our bodies.

A year in the making, the audio recordings in this series skip from the micro - the exhaustion caused by picking up a box of dropped crackers (when my day’s energy must be meticulously budgeted) - to the macro, such as asking questions about our collective, fearful disregard towards the chronically ill.

Amid all of this, are the real, raw and sometimes amusing sounds of my daily routine - I do live with an 8 year old, after all! - and some personal reflections on the acute emotional and physical pain caused by my diagnosis. I've tried to be absolutely honest in a way that has occasionally been exposing for me, to tell you what my life is like living with a disability.

Episode 3: How Do Others See Me?
I haven’t always used a wheelchair, and I used to dance. In my student days, I lived on the fourth floor and backpacked round India. I wonder – now that my body is so much weaker and people watch me becoming increasingly dependent – how do I seem to them? I know how I feel when I see other people struggle. It’s hard to watch. At the time, it was a huge deal for me -using a stick, then a crutch, then a wheelchair, walker and scooter, feeling my identity in the eyes of others change and morph. In this episode I ask people who have known me the longest, and those I have only known for a little while, to be honest about how they see me.

Presented by Louise Halling, with thanks to her husband Mark and her son Jacob
Produced by Catherine Carr and Jo Rowntree
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4
Photo © Muscular Dystrophy UK/Chris O’Donovan


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000l1cr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000l29y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l20c)
Episode 6

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. She holds close to her the advice that her mother shared before she died: an education is the only way to get a “louding voice”— and the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni's father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

The author Abi Daré grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. She studied law at the University of Wolverhamton and received an MSc from Glasgow Caledonian University in International Project Management. She also has an MA in Creative Writing from Birkbeck, University of London. She began writing the novel after a conversation with her 8yr old daughter about how there were girls her age in Nigeria who had to do housework for a living.

In Episode 6, life in the home of Big Madam and her lecherous husband Big Daddy is fraught with fear and tension.

The Girl with the Louding Voice
Written by Abi Daré
Read by Ronkẹ Adékọluẹ́jọ́
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
The Waters Company for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000l2b0)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


MON 12:57 Weather (m000l2b2)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000l2b4)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 The Punch (m000l2b6)
Nothing Was The Same Again

Aged 18, Jacob Dunne threw a single punch in a drunken brawl outside a pub in Nottingham. His victim, James Hodgkinson, died in hospital nine days later and Jacob was convicted of manslaughter.

Now 27, Jacob has a young family and has just completed a degree, but it was only after taking part in restorative justice that he began to turn his life around. Meeting face-to-face with James' parents had a profound impact on both Jacob and the Hodgkinsons, and the resulting relationship has changed Jacob’s life in unexpected ways.

With his heart set on a career helping others, Jacob wants to understand his own transformation from angry teenager to a responsible father and respected member of the community. He has travelled the country giving speeches and workshops to students, prisoners, prison officers, hospital staff, educators and young offenders. In February, he gave the keynote speech at a graduation ceremony for trainee prison officers.

In this five part series, he retraces the key moments in his life since he threw the punch. It isn’t a straightforward story of rehabilitation but a complicated, often painful journey. Recording himself at home during lockdown, Jacob makes contact with his former parole officer, a prison officer, mentors, and others who have benefited from similar face-to-face confrontations.

In this first episode, he revisits the worst night of his life, with the victim’s parents Joan and David.

Produced by Kim Normanton and Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


MON 14:00 Yarmouk (m000l2b8)
Syrian Spring

In Damascus, during 2011, a group of friends must decide whether to join the uprising as the Arab Spring reaches Syria. Hope for change is tempered by the strictly controlled day-to-day reality of life in Syria under Bashar al Assad.

Yarmouk Camp is the area of Damascus known for its Palestinian population. It was first established as an unofficial refugee camp for those fleeing Palestine but went on to become a thriving multi-cultural part of the Syrian capital.

This three-part drama tells the story of the Syrian uprising and how it turned into a civil war. Writer Ghassan Zakarya lived through the uprising before being forced to leave, claiming asylum in France. The production was recorded in London with a Syrian and Palestinian cast, some of whom were established actors in Syria before fleeing the war, arriving in the UK as refugees after often perilous journeys.

Yarmouk takes us inside an extraordinary story, giving an authentic and personal view of the catastrophic events that have taken place there. Not only do we see the effect on normal people but also the consequences for the very identity of Syria as a country.

Cast:
Hatem ..... Osama el Azzeh
Salma ..... Sofia Asir
Khaled ..... Ammar Haj Ahmad
Rania ..... Arwa Omaren
Nasser ..... Nayef Rashed
Omar ..... Zaydun Khalaf
News Announcer ..... Alia Alzougbi
General Command Officer ..... Joe Haddad

Written by Ghassan Zakarya

Music, Rihab Azar
Sound Design, Alisdair McGregor
Producer and Director, Boz Temple-Morris

A Holy Mountain production for BBC Radio 4


MON 14:45 Museum of Lost Objects (b071v594)
Tell Qarqur, Hama Province

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

As archaeological sites go, Tell Qarqur isn’t the most glamorous, but this mound in Syria is unique. It’s in the Orontes Valley in the west of the country and it contains 10,000 years of continuous human occupation. It is a goldmine of information for studying the movements of long history in a single place. In 2011, Tell Qarqur was occupied by the Assad military and since then, the whole area - the province of Hama and neighbouring regions - has been on the frontline of the war and many local residents forced to flee. Jesse Casana, the archaeologist who ran the excavation at Tell Qarqur, talks about monitoring the destruction of his site from space using satellite archaeology, and the Syrian villagers who worked with him now living as refugees.

This episode was first broadcast on 2 March, 2016

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Tell Qarqur
Credit: Jesse Casana


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m000l2bc)
Series 10

Durham University

Steve Punt hosts the funny, lively and dynamic quiz from Durham University.

This week's specialist subjects are classics, education and modern British history and the questions take us from Rwanda to Finland to South Korea to Sainsbury's. And we solve the mystery of how the infant Hermes stole Apollo’s cattle.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three undergraduates against three of their professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round, cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their professors’ awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. In addition, there are the head-to-head rounds, in which students take on their professors in their own subjects - with plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

In this series, the universities are Bournemouth, Imperial College, Reading, Durham, Ulster University and Mansfield College Oxford.

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show, is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, - not just in the humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. As well as The Now Show, he has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4 on subjects as varied as The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen and Getting The Gongs - an investigation into awards ceremonies.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m000l1wp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Simon Schama: The Great Gallery Tours (m000l2bg)
The Rijksmuseum

Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals are the artsts at the centre of Sir Simon Schama's tour of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. It's a place he knows well, having written extensively about Dutch history and about his great hero, Rembrandt.

So we are treated to Simon's vibrant take on The Nightwatch - the most justifiably famous group portrait and priniciple treasure of the museum. We have wonderful accounts too of Vermeer's Woman Reading a Letter and a Frans Hals' sexy marriage portrait.

There's also a fabulous still life that means you'll never look at asparagus in the same way again.

With the help of Museum Director Taco Dibbits, Simon sets the Rijksmuseum in context. It is more than a gallery. It is an account of the Dutch past and a 'temple of national identity' - it is where the Dutch go to remember who they were and still are. Duiring lockdown, it was voted the place that Dutch people most missed visiting.

You can find the names of the paintings and a link to the gallery on the Great Gallery Tours programme website.

Written and Presented by Sir Simon Schama
Produced by Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (p08gcgky)
Series 22

Space Archaeology

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by comedian and writer Sara Pascoe, biological anthropologist Alice Roberts and space archaeologist Sarah Parcak. They look at how archaeology today looks far more Star Wars than Indiana Jones, as an archaeologist's list of kit can now include satellites and lasers. They discover how searching for clues from space has led to the discovery of several ancient lost Egyptian cities and how the study of ancient DNA and artefacts reveals our similarities, not differences, with our ancient forebears.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem


MON 17:00 PM (m000l2bj)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000l2bl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m000l2bn)
Series 24

Episode 6

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Lucy Porter, Sean Lock, Zoe Lyons and Jack Dee are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as poison, heavy metal, painters and winter sports.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000l0rt)
Chris finds himself in trouble and Emma has a brainwave


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000l203)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 The Debrief (m000l205)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Deported (m0002z9d)
What’s it like to be deported or forcibly removed from the UK? Recorded over the past year, these are the stories of three people sent to Nigeria, a country they left many years ago, and what happens to them once they arrive.

Fola was training to be a nurse and married to a British citizen, but when the marriage broke down her right to remain was stopped. After thirteen years in the UK, she was removed to Nigeria. Is she able start a new business there after so many years away?

Shams was born in Nigeria and came to the UK when he was ten years old to join his family. He went to school in England but, after serving a prison sentence, was deported to Lagos as a foreign national. Can Shams stay in contact with his young son and daughter in England and earn a living in an unfamiliar city where unemployment is high?

Jessica came to the UK as a student and lived in Scotland. When she was unable to extend her visa, she was forcibly removed to Lagos after thirteen years living in the UK. With £10 cash on her when she arrived in Lagos, and all her belongings still in Glasgow, can Jessica, who has a serious health condition, build a new life in Nigeria?

Producer: Jo Wheeler
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Analysis (m000l207)
Behavioural Science and the Pandemic

There were two narratives that emerged in the week before we locked down on 23rd March that could go some way to explaining why the UK was relatively slow to lockdown. One was the idea of “herd immunity” - that the virus was always going to spread throughout the population to some extent, and that should be allowed to happen to build up immunity.

That theory may have been based on a misunderstanding of how this particular virus behaved.

The second narrative was based on the idea of “behavioural fatigue”. This centred around the notion that the public will only tolerate a lockdown for so long so it was crucial to wait for the right moment to initiate it. Go too soon, and you might find that people would not comply later on.

It turns out that this theory was also wrong. And based on a fundamental misunderstanding of human behaviour.

Despite photos of packed parks, crammed beaches and VE day conga lines, on the whole the British public complied beyond most people’s expectations.

So what informed the government’s decision making?In this programme we ask, what is “behavioural fatigue”, where did it come from, how much influence did it have on the UK’s late lockdown, and where does Nudge theory fit into the narrative?

Presenter: Sonia Sodha
Producer: Gemma Newby
Editor: Jasper Corbett


MON 21:00 The Political School (m000kv6v)
Episode 1

Have you ever thought that our whole political system needs radical change?

That in the face of complex global challenges - a pandemic, for example - the British state is a lumbering beast still using the technology of the 20th century, if not the 19th? That our politicians aren’t as well equipped for their jobs as they could be?

In this three-part series, author and broadcaster Timandra Harkness examines whether there's truth in these ideas and how our political system can change for the better.

In this first episode, Timandra looks at the role forecasting, statistics and probability play in government. It’s ironic that nobody saw the coronavirus crisis coming. Because plenty of people saw it coming. A pandemic was top of the UK government risk register, and still it seemed to take everyone by surprise. Suddenly we’re all living in a world of mathematical models, projected curves and logarithmic scales.

Are politicians equipped to use the data they have? Or is it time to send them back to the classroom for extra Maths?

Presenter: Timandra Harkness
Producer: Ant Adeane
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


MON 21:30 How to Play (m000l1zs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000l209)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l20c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m000kv7l)
The Language of the Pandemic

Professor Tanya Byron sitting in for Michael Rosen examines the language of Covid-19 with author Mark Honigsbaum. Since the outbreak of coronavirus we have had to adopt a new way of talking about life during a pandemic. We've been 'shielding' and 'socially distancing'. Some of us have been 'furloughed'. We've been dismayed by the irresponsible behaviour of 'covidiots' and tried to avoid too much 'doom scrolling'. But has communication about the virus been clear and effective enough? Medical historian Mark Honigsbaum in his book The Pandemic Century - 100 years of Panic, Hysteria and Hubris - argues that words matter and that we should learn the lessons of previous pandemics from Spanish Flu to Ebola.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000l20f)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 21 JULY 2020

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000l20h)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 Girl Taken (m00055n1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000l20k)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000l20m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000l20p)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000l20r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000l20t)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Canon Simon Doogan


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000l20w)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvnnw)
Sandwich Tern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the sandwich tern. Sandwich terns are the UK's largest breeding terns and have shaggy black crests and a black bill with a yellow tip. They live in colonies on shingle or sandy beaches and were first described from birds seen in Sandwich in the 1780s by William Boys, a Kentish surgeon.


TUE 06:00 Today (m000l0qv)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Positive Thinking (m000l0qz)
The Employment Conundrum

Sangita Myska takes a deep dive into some of the biggest problems facing Britain today - and meets the people whose big ideas might solve them.

This week, as Britain stares down the barrel of a historic unemployment crisis, it’s time to figure out how to make work work.

From Germany, there’s an old idea that’s worked for centuries - but never been tried here - that brings the heavy hand of the state and a sense of communal sacrifice to bear in staving off layoffs.

But are we thinking about this all wrong? Sangita also explores the possibility that what we need to be more worried about is how mass unemployment creates a labour market that exploits workers and pays poverty wages - something a new generation of tech savvy collectives have a plan to prevent.

Presenter: Sangita Myska
Producers: Tara Holmes and Robert Nicholson
Executive Producer: David Prest

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:30 Behind the Buzzwords (m000l0r1)
Disruptors

David Cannadine tells the story behind the buzzword Disruptors, which is actually an abbreviation of the original phrase Disruptive Technologies.

This stems from an academic article, written in 1995, by two Harvard Business School Professors, Joseph Bower and Clayton Christensen, in which they explained why big, successful, companies often lose out to new start-ups. David speaks to Joseph Bower about concept at the heart of this theory.

Clayton Christensen further evolved the concept into ‘disruptive innovation’ in his best-selling book The Innovator's Dilemma, published in 1997. It became the handbook of generations of entrepreneurs and disruptive innovation has since been called the “most influential business idea of the 21st century”. It could be said that Silicon Valley was built on the concept of disruptive innovation - the vision of disrupting traditional industry with new tech start-ups, perhaps built out of the back of a garage, lies at its very foundations.

With the digital age came a new work culture - disruptive start-ups, led by ambitious young disruptors, introduced a new way of doing business and making money. But as with all Buzzwords, once the word gets buzzy, it can loose its original meaning, and in this case it was used to describe anything new and all entrepreneurs became disruptors.

Today, the use of this buzzword has ranged beyond the field of business, and is even to be found in the world of politics, but how appropriate is the use of this buzzword in the political sphere?

With Joseph Bower, Mark Casson, Ellen Manning and Ashleigh Hinde

Researcher: Joe Christmas

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4

The series is made in collaboration with The British Academy.


TUE 09:45 Girl Taken (m000ghxx)
2. The Arrest

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straight forward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000l0r5)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 The Debrief (m000l0r7)
Episode Two

By Katherine Jakeways

After a rare drunken night out on the town, Hannah and Mark clamber into a taxi and dissect the evening’s events.

The debrief is a common phenomenon – that moment when you leave a social event, climb into the car, or the taxi, or onto the bus and start to gossip with your partner about the evening's events. Hannah and Mark love a debrief, and in each episode of this new five-part series, we find them in the aftermath of an event with lots to get their teeth into.

Writer Katherine Jakeways has been described by the Radio Times as ‘the next Victoria Wood’. Of her Radio 4 series ‘Where this Service will…’ the Guardian said “Jakeway's writing was sublime. The punchlines, the pacing, the humanity.”

Hannah …. Rebecca Humphries
Mark ….. Tom Basden

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


TUE 11:00 The Political School (m000l0r9)
Episode 2

Have you ever thought that our whole political system needs radical change? That in the face of complex global challenges - a pandemic, for example - the British state is a lumbering beast still using the technology of the 20th century - if not the 19th? That our politicians aren’t as well equipped for their jobs as they could be?

In this three-part series, author and broadcaster Timandra Harkness examines whether there's truth in these ideas - and how our political system can change for the better.

In the second episode, we look at what happens in a crisis - how it can force governments to experiment and innovate, and allow them to do things that in normal times they'd never get away with.

A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:30 Archiving Black America (m000l0rc)
"We are our history," said James Baldwin. But how history is remembered depends on what materials survive, and who deems those materials worthy of preserving.

Maya Millett - a writer, editor and founder of Race Women, an archive project dedicated to honouring early Black American feminists - speaks to the archivists who are working to ensure the voices and stories of African-Americans are not forgotten.

As racism and violence against African-Americans continues, collecting, cataloguing, and preserving the truth has never been so vital in preventing the distortion of history. The historical record has the power to preserve legacies and shape identities - but it doesn’t write itself. History is an activity, and what makes it into the archives depends on the actions people take now.

With contributions from musician Rhiannon Giddens; Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Director, Kevin Young; Julieanna Richardson, founder of The HistoryMakers (the largest collection of African-American first-person video oral history testimonies in the world); contemporary art curator Kimberly Drew (aka museummammy); and Fisk University Special Collections Librarian, DeLisa Minor Harris.

Presenter: Maya Millett
Producer: Sasha Edye-Lindner
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000l2jz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l0rh)
Episode 7

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. She holds close to her the advice that her mother shared before she died: an education is the only way to get a “louding voice”— and the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni's father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

The author Abi Daré grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. She studied law at the University of Wolverhamton and received an MSc from Glasgow Caledonian University in International Project Management. She also has an MA in Creative Writing from Birkbeck, University of London. She began writing the novel after a conversation with her 8yr old daughter about how there were girls her age in Nigeria who had to do housework for a living.

In Episode 7, Big Madam travels abroad, giving Adunni the chance to put some plans into action.

Written by Abi Daré
Read by Ronkẹ Adékọluẹ́jọ́
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000l0rk)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000l0rm)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000l0rp)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 The Punch (m000l0rr)
Unanswered Questions

Aged 18, Jacob Dunne threw a single punch in a drunken brawl outside a pub in Nottingham. His victim, James Hodgkinson, died in hospital nine days later and Jacob was convicted of manslaughter.

Now 27, Jacob has a young family and has just completed a degree, but it was only after taking part in restorative justice that he began to turn his life around. Meeting face-to-face with James' parents had a profound impact on both Jacob and the Hodgkinsons, and the resulting relationship has changed Jacob’s life in unexpected ways.

With his heart set on a career helping others, Jacob wants to understand his own transformation from angry teenager to a responsible father and respected member of the community. He has travelled the country giving speeches and workshops to students, prisoners, prison officers, hospital staff, educators and young offenders. In February, he gave the keynote speech at a graduation ceremony for trainee prison officers.

In this five part series, he retraces the key moments in his life since he threw the punch. It isn’t a straightforward story of rehabilitation but a complicated, often painful journey. Recording himself at home during lockdown, Jacob makes contact with his former parole officer, a prison officer, mentors, and others who have benefited from similar face-to-face confrontations.

In this second episode, Jacob looks at his experience in prison and his state of mind after his release, speaking to his former parole officer Wendy and the victim’s parents Joan and David.

Produced by Kim Normanton and Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000l0rt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Yarmouk (m000l0rw)
Uprising

Hatem was among the young people in Syria who joined the protests to help bring about a better future but who soon find themselves, gun in hand, fighting in a war. His friends try to dissuade him. All of them must find a way to live through the extraordinary turmoil of an uprising that is turning into a civil war.

Set in Yarmouk Camp, an area of Damascus initially established as a Palestinian refugee camp but which, by the start of the Syrian uprising in 2011, is a thriving multi-cultural part of the city.

In this second of three episodes we see escalating violence as the Government crack down on any dissent and the Free Syrian Army is established in response.

Writer Ghassan Zakarya lived through the uprising before being forced to leave, claiming asylum in France. The production was recorded in London with a Syrian and Palestinian cast, some of whom were established actors in Syria before fleeing the war, arriving here as refugees after perilous journeys.

Yarmouk takes us inside an extraordinary story, giving an authentic and personal view of the catastrophic events that have taken place there - not only do we see the effect on normal people but also the consequences for the very identity of Syria as a country.

Cast:
Hatem ..... Osama el Azzeh
Salma ..... Sofia Asir
Khaled ..... Ammar Haj Ahmad
Rania ..... Arwa Omaren
Nasser ..... Nayef Rashed
Fatima ..... Alia Alzougbi
Masoud ..... Joe Haddad
Omar ..... Zaydun Khalaf
Checkpoint Commander ..... Baraa Halabieh
Other parts played by members of the cast

Written by Ghassan Zakarya

Music, Rihab Azar
Sound Design, Alisdair McGregor
Producer and Director, Boz Temple-Morris

A Holy Mountain production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m000l0ry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 James Veitch's Contractual Obligation (m000jsyr)
Time Travel

James Veitch hopes to fix things with his ex-girlfriend by attempting time travel, with the help of former Doctor Who Sylvester McCoy. New series.

Comedian James Veitch bumbles his way through more factual investigations in an attempt to secure a regular slot on Radio 4.

He opens the series by attempting to reverse a recent split with his ex-girlfriend. The answer: time travel. First though he must get to grips with the fundamentals of quantum mechanics.

Producer: Laurence Grissell


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m000l0s0)
The language of power and inequality in education and leadership

Teacher and writer Jeffrey Boakye, sitting in for Michael Rosen, talks with charity strategist, writer and educator Iesha Small. It's an exploration of the language of power and inequality in modern education and leadership, examining the insidious ways in which 'marginalised' groups are viewed. They also look at the ways in which words that are seemingly innocuous and commonly used in schools conceal deep social inequities..
Producer Beth O'Dea
More about Jeffrey Boakye:
Jeffrey Boakye is an author, commentator, writer and English teacher. He has a particular interest in issues surrounding education, race and popular culture.
Jeffrey, originally from Brixton in London, has taught English to 11- to 18-year-olds since 2007.  He began teaching in West London, moved to East London where he was Head of English, and then moved on to Yorkshire where he now lives with his wife and two sons.
Jeffrey started writing his first book, Hold Tight, in 2015 when cradling his first born son in the early hours. Hold Tight was published in 2017 and is recognised as one of the first seminal books on grime music. He started writing his second book, Black, Listed, when cradling his second born son in the early hours. Published in 2019, Black, Listed was praised by David Lammy MP as ‘a book that gives a voice to those whose experience is persistently defined, refined and denied by others’. Jeffrey’s third book, What is Masculinity?, a book for children on masculinity, broke with tradition and was not written when cradling a newborn son.
You can listen to Jeffrey Boakye's conversation with Michael Rosen on Word of Mouth here:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0004l93
Iesha Small is a writer, speaker and charity strategist passionate about creating a fairer society.
Iesha is Head of Strategy and Policy at the youth charity YHA. She has 15 years’ experience in the education sector as a teacher, governor and Innovation Lead at the Centre for Education and Youth think tank. She is passionate about using storytelling alongside research to create positive change and is the author of The Unexpected Leader.
She has written about education and society for The Guardian, been a columnist for Schools Week and contributed to books covering education, mental health, and gender identity. She splits her working week between YHA, leadership development and storytelling. Her clients have included Chartered College of Teaching, The National Theatre, Teach First and BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m000l0s2)
Sarah Keyworth & Lissa Evans

Comedian Sarah Keyworth and author Lissa Evans talk about books they love with Harriett Gilbert. Sarah chooses Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed, Lissa picks Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks and Harriett shines a light on Lady into Fox by David Garnett.
Producer: Becky Ripley
Comment on instagram: @agoodreadbbc


TUE 17:00 PM (m000l0s4)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000l0s8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Meet David Sedaris (b08x9f9t)
Series 6

Of Mice and Men; A Can of Worms

The globetrotting, trash-picking, aisle-rolling storyteller with more words of wit and wisdom. This week, urban myths, the truth and what it means to be called a liar in Of Mice and Men. Also, A Can of Worms, a story about overheard conversations and the right way to eat pie.

With sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, David Sedaris has become one of America's pre-eminent humour writers. The great skill with which he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness proves that he is a master of satire and one of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today.

David Sedaris's first book, Barrel Fever (1994), which included The SantaLand Diaries. was a critical and commercial success, as were his follow-up efforts, Naked (1997), Holidays on Ice (1997) and Me Talk Pretty One Day (2000). He became known for his bitingly funny recollections of his youth, family life and travels, making semi-celebrities out of his parents and siblings.

David Sedaris has been nominated for three Grammy Awards for Best Spoken Word and Best Comedy Album. A feature film adaptation of his story C.O.G. was released after a premier at the Sundance Film Festival (2013). He has been a contributor to BBC Radio 4 since 1996.

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000l0jt)
Alice’s big decision causes ructions and Brian has concerns


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000l0sb)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 The Debrief (m000l0r7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Mohammed and the Market (m000l6tb)
Islam and the financial crisis of 2008 are two of the most hotly debated topics of the past decade - but they aren’t usually mentioned in the same sentence. The legacy of one man brings them together - The Prophet Mohammed. He was an entrepreneur and trader, as well as the founder of one of the world’s great religions.

Kamal Ahmed, the BBC’s former economics editor, discovers how money has been closely entwined with the religious teachings of Islam right from its inception. At a time when we face multiple challenges to our economies and to our personal finances, he asks what lessons the West can draw from this.

Kamal Ahmed is with a curator in the British Museum examining a coin. It’s from the 8th century AD and looks like an Islamic dinar. It bears the inscription “There is no God but Allah alone”. But it was minted by the Christian King Offa of Mercia, the most powerful kingdom of Anglo Saxon England, and his head is on the coin. The British Museum medieval coin expert Gareth Williams tells Kamal how this came about.

Roll forward a millennium and Britons continue to seek to connect with Islamic finance. In 2013 the then Prime Minister, David Cameron, announced the government’s first sukuk, or sharia-compliant bond issue. His aim, he said, was to make the UK a centre of Islamic finance.

Kamal decides to find out more about the links between Islam and the West when it comes to market economics. Along the way, he discovers intriguing connections between the founding fathers of market economics and the ideas of medieval Islamic financial scholars.

The journey of discovery begins in 6th-century Mecca. We discover that Mohammed himself was a successful merchant, as was his wife Khadija bint Khuwaylid, and that ideas about the place of trade and commerce were embedded in his religious teachings. As Kamal finds out, “ money” and “wealth” weren’t the dirty words that they are in some of the Christian teaching of the New Testament. Unlike other religious leaders, such as Jesus and the Buddha, the Prophet was a rich man. In some accounts, one of the richest in the land. Not surprisingly then, the Prophet had many things to say about the right way of shaping commercial life. His instructions on how to conduct business, from the need to have accurate scales, to the prohibition of interest, are enshrined in the Qur’an and the Hadiths, the record of the traditions or sayings of the Prophet.

These writings form part of an unknown aspect of Sharia Law. To many non-Muslims, the word “sharia” represents something that they have no connection with. But what Sharia Law has to say about trade is far from unfamiliar – in fact, it lies at the root of our own ideas of market economics. We might have heard that interest, or usury, is banned under Islam, but probably less well-known is the debt that our financial system owes to Islamic scholars writing several centuries before their Enlightenment counterparts.

Kamal discovers that some of the most famous ideas of modern economics - such as Adam Smith’s theory on the division of labour or, more recently, Arthur Laffer’s curve - had already been expressed hundreds of years earlier by medieval Islamic thinkers such as Ibn Khaldoun. Kamal explores these connections and tries to find out how the ideas travelled from medieval Islam into the head of the father of capitalism, Adam Smith.

Kamal ends his journey by bringing the story up to date. In addition to David Cameron and George Osborne’s issuing of an Islamic bond, Sharia-compliant products are available on some high streets too for punters looking for a mortgage or a savings plan.

Kamal meets Islamic finance experts who argue that these centuries-old sharia principles of finance make for a much more stable system. Why? Because, advocates of Islamic finance claim, it is not based on high-risk debt, but on risk-sharing.

But it’s not as straightforward as that. Many argue there are serious drawbacks to the risk sharing idea - it generates greater inequality. Islamic finance lowers risk by lending only to the rich.

So, does the story of our debt to Islamic financial ideas offer any lessons to a capitalist system still trying to find its way after the crisis of 2008? Has the answer to our modern economic malaise been hiding in plain sight?

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000l0sd)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m000l0k0)
A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.


TUE 21:30 Positive Thinking (m000l0qz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000l0sg)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l0rh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (p08gcgky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000l0sk)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 22 JULY 2020

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000l0sm)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 Girl Taken (m000ghxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000l0sp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000l0sr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000l0st)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000l0sw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000l0sy)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Canon Simon Doogan


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000l0t0)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvryl)
Common Buzzard

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the common buzzard. Common buzzards are stocky birds of prey which often soar on upturned wings. In Scotland they're sometimes called the tourists' eagle because of many golden eagles claimed by hopeful visitors. Common buzzards are increasing their range and numbers and range in the UK and their soaring flight over their territories is now a regular sight nearly everywhere.


WED 06:00 Today (m000l0hx)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Soul Music (m000l0j1)
Pavane Pour Une Infante Défunte by Maurice Ravel

Ravel's beautiful Pavane For A Dead Princess touches many people. While it is not actually about a dead princess it does evoke a sense loss. For Carla van Raay it symbolises the loss of innocence she experienced after sexual abuse as a child which led her to make some difficult life choices. Deal Hudson played it to prisoners in Atlanta and was moved by their reaction. At an academy for troubled teenagers in California the Pavane had a similar effect. Genevieve Monneris comes from the town where Ravel was born on the border with Spain. Her film Henri and Pat tells the story of three French airman who were stationed in York during World War Two. Just days before Henri's plane was shot down the three young men went to a concert of Ravel's music in York. So the piece has a strong emotional meaning for Genevieve whose own father was also stationed with the RAF in York. Professor Barbara Kelly of the Royal Northern College of Music explains the background to the Pavane's composition and why it appeals to the emotions in such a powerful way. Although it was written at the end of the 19th century it became more widely known in the 1920s. That was when a young woman called Lucia Joyce daughter of James Joyce danced to it with her avant garde dance group . The writer Annabel Abbs tells Lucia's tragic story of how her life ended in a mental asylum and how she almost became the imaginary 'dead princess'.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m000l0j3)
Ending Ageism

Carl Honoré believes we're all missing out by stereotyping older people as "over the hill". He argues for recognition of the positive sides of ageing, and thinks everyone would benefit from more inter-generational mixing.
Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook


WED 09:45 Girl Taken (m000gj7t)
3. The Trial

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straight forward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000l0j7)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:45 The Debrief (m000l0j9)
Episode Three

By Katherine Jakeways

Driving back from a family barbecue Hannah and Mark dissect events, when four-year-old Finn forces them to take an emergency detour.

The debrief is a common phenomenon – that moment when you leave a social event, climb into the car, or the taxi, or onto the bus and start to gossip with your partner about the evening's events. Hannah and Mark love a debrief, and in each episode of this new five-part series, we find them in the aftermath of an event with lots to get their teeth into.

Writer Katherine Jakeways has been described by the Radio Times as ‘the next Victoria Wood’. Of her Radio 4 series ‘Where this Service will…’ the Guardian said “Jakeway's writing was sublime. The punchlines, the pacing, the humanity.”

Hannah …. Rebecca Humphries
Mark ….. Tom Basden
Finn ….. Milo Robinson
Poppy …. Juno Robinson

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


WED 11:00 The Deported (m0002z9d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Your Call (m000l1db)
Comedy about a father and daughter supporting each other during Lockdown.

Once Anwen Evans has decided to stay in her flat rather than return home to join her father, John Evans, for Lockdown, they keep in regular contact by phone. As we listen in on their calls, we hear them preparing to let go of the past and embrace the future.

'Your Call' was made through May 2020. All four collaborators live separately in different parts of UK - London, Cambridge, Leeds and Edinburgh. And they still haven't met.

Written & Performed by Shôn & Josie Dale Jones
Music by John Biddle
Produced by Laurence Cook


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000l2tm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l0jg)
Episode 8

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. She holds close to her the advice that her mother shared before she died: an education is the only way to get a “louding voice”— and the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni's father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

The author Abi Daré grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. She studied law at the University of Wolverhamton and received an MSc from Glasgow Caledonian University in International Project Management. She also has an MA in Creative Writing from Birkbeck, University of London. She began writing the novel after a conversation with her 8yr old daughter about how there were girls her age in Nigeria who had to do housework for a living.

In Episode 8, Adunni helps her new friend and mentor at the market.

Written by Abi Daré
Read by Ronkẹ Adékọluẹ́jọ́
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000l0jj)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


WED 12:57 Weather (m000l0jl)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000l0jn)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 The Punch (m000l0jq)
Face To Face

Aged 18, Jacob Dunne threw a single punch in a drunken brawl outside a pub in Nottingham. His victim, James Hodgkinson, died in hospital nine days later and Jacob was convicted of manslaughter.

Now 27, Jacob has a young family and has just completed a degree, but it was only after taking part in restorative justice that he began to turn his life around. Meeting face-to-face with James' parents had a profound impact on both Jacob and the Hodgkinsons, and the resulting relationship has changed Jacob’s life in unexpected ways.

With his heart set on a career helping others, Jacob wants to understand his own transformation from angry teenager to a responsible father and respected member of the community. He has travelled the country giving speeches and workshops to students, prisoners, prison officers, hospital staff, educators and young offenders. In February, he gave the keynote speech at a graduation ceremony for trainee prison officers.

In this five part series, he retraces the key moments in his life since he threw the punch. It isn’t a straightforward story of rehabilitation but a complicated, often painful journey. Recording himself at home during lockdown, Jacob makes contact with his former parole officer, a prison officer, mentors, and others who have benefited from similar face-to-face confrontations.

In this third episode, Jacob explores the impact of bringing victim and perpetrator face-to-face through restorative justice - with Nicola Bankcroft from Remedi, Gary Chamberlain, and Joan and David Hodgkinson.

Produced by Kim Normanton and Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000l0jt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Yarmouk (m000l0jw)
War

The people of Yarmouk are stuck as the Government bombardment intensifies and ISIS also attempt to seize control. Hatem and his Free Syrian Army unit must fight to regain control as civilians begin to lose all hope for the survival of their community.

This is the concluding episode of the story of the Syrian uprising, seen from the perspective of young people living in Yarmouk, a predominantly Palestinian area of Damascus.

Writer Ghassan Zakarya lived through the uprising before being forced to leave, claiming asylum in France. The production was recorded in London with a Syrian and Palestinian cast, some of whom were established actors in Syria before fleeing the war, arriving here as refugees after perilous journeys.

Yarmouk takes us inside an extraordinary story, giving an authentic and personal view of the catastrophic events that have taken place there - not only do we see the effect on normal people but also the consequences for the very identity of Syria as a country.

Cast:
Hatem ..... Osama el Azzeh
Salma ..... Sofia Asir
Khaled ..... Ammar Haj Ahmad
Rania ..... Arwa Omaren
Nasser ..... Nayef Rashed
Fatima ..... Alia Alzougbi
Omar ..... Zaydun Khalaf
Masoud ..... Joe Haddad
Checkpoint Commander ..... Baraa Halabieh
Other parts played by members of the cast

Written by Ghassan Zakarya

Music, Rihab Azar
Sound Design, Alisdair McGregor
Producer and Director, Boz Temple-Morris

A Holy Mountain production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000l0jy)
Paul Lewis and a panel of guests answer calls on personal finance.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m000l0k0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m0000mrl)
Push Buttons

Push Buttons: Laurie Taylor explores the pleasure, panic and the politics of pushing. The touch of a finger can summon a taxi, turn on a TV, call for an elevator or 'like' a Facebook post. But are buttons simply neutral and natural mechanisms which ease our daily lives? He's joined by Rachel Plotnick, Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at Indiana University, Steven Connor, Professor of English at the University of Cambridge and Barbara Speed, the opinion editor at the i newspaper.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000l0k2)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world


WED 17:00 PM (m000l0k4)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000l0k8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Women Talking About Cars (b084xr59)
Series 1

Sarah Millican

Victoria Coren Mitchell interviews some of the country's most remarkable women about their lives via the cars they have known. This week Sarah Millican reminisces about her Dad's long lost Granada and describes a traffic jam that lead to some desperate measures...
With car descriptions read by Josette Simon.


WED 19:00 The Archers (m000l0kb)
Ed’s past returns to haunt him and events spiral out of control for Chris


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000l0kd)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 The Debrief (m000l0j9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m000l0kg)
Combative, provocative and engaging live debate examining the moral issues behind one of the week's news stories. #moralmaze


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m000l0j3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Soul Music (m000l0j1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m000l0k2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000l0kj)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l0jg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Things My Mother Never Told Me (... About Lockdown) (m000l0kl)
Guz Khan

In the first episode of a new series, comedian Sindhu Vee invites guests to talk about their mothers. Guest across the series include Mae Martin, Guz Khan, Tom Allen and Jayde Adams.

Lockdown is making us think a lot more about family, and for many people the parent-child relationship has been flipped. With the older generation more vulnerable to Coronavirus, middle-aged children are now worrying about where their parents are, and if they're behaving responsibly. We're telling them not to stay out late, to stay away from friends (especially those bad influences who won't wear masks), and to eat their vegetables.

Sindhu Vee and her guests take a look at that bond, and ask whether the things their mothers taught them have set them up to cope with a global pandemic.

This week, "Man Like Mobeen" star Guz Khan shares anecdotes about growing up with a strong matriarch, and what it's like to live next door to her now.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd
A BBC Studios Production


WED 23:15 The Damien Slash Mixtape (m0001rjw)
Series 2

Episode 3

Multi-character YouTube star Damien Slash makes the move from online to Radio 4, in this new fast-paced, one-man sketch comedy show. From the surreal to the satirical, from the zeitgeist to the absurd, Damien serves up a range of high octane characters, all from his own voice. Adverts, actors, hipsters, trolls - no aspect of modern life is left un-skewered.

Written by and starring Damien Slash (aka Daniel Barker).
Guest starring Natasia Demetriou
Production coordinated by Hayley Sterling
Produced by Matt Stronge
A BBC Studios production.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000l1dd)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.



THURSDAY 23 JULY 2020

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000l0kp)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 Girl Taken (m000gj7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000l0kr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000l0kt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000l0kw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000l0ky)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000l0l0)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Canon Simon Doogan


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000l0l2)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvys6)
Osprey

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the osprey. Ospreys are fish-eaters and the sight of one of these majestic birds plunging feet first to catch its prey is a sight to cherish. The return of the ospreys is one of the great UK conservation stories. After extinction through egg-collecting and shooting in the 19th and early 20th centuries, birds returned in the 1950s and have responded well to protection.


THU 06:00 Today (m000l25d)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 The Long View (m000l25g)
Presidential Elections & Racial Turmoil

Jonathan Freedland takes the long view of presidential elections fought against a backdrop of racial turmoil, comparing 2020 with 1968, the year when Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.

In 1968, Richard Nixon adopted a 'law and order' strategy to win over the so-called 'silent majority' in the face of escalating unrest. Donald Trump has adopted the same language in 2020 following outrage provoked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The law and order approach worked for Nixon in 1968 - will it work for President Trump this November?

Readings are performed by Clarke Peters who stars in the latest Spike Lee film, Da 5 Bloods and who played detective Lester Freamon in the hit TV show The Wire.

Jonathan is also joined by Dr Peniel Joseph, who holds a joint professorship at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the History Department at The University of Texas at Austin; Asma Khalid, political correspondent for NPR and co-host of The NPR Politics Podcast; and Corrin Rankin, founder of the Legacy Republican Alliance.

Producer: Laurence Grissell


THU 09:30 James Burke's Web of Knowledge (m000256b)
James Burke has spent his career as a broadcaster and writer in the field of science and technology 'joining up the dots'. Now he uses the information he has gleaned over many years to create a 'Knowledge Web', revealing how the most unexpected connections can be made across history. What he can show us is that change doesn't happen in predictable straight lines, and he has some surprises in store.


THU 09:45 Girl Taken (m000gj9f)
4. A Missing Girl

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straight forward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000l25j)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 The Debrief (m000l25l)
Episode Four

By Katherine Jakeways

Hannah and Mark ruthlessly review four-year-old Finn’s school play on the way home, when Grandad Graham inadvertently reveals a secret arrangement.

The debrief is a common phenomenon – that moment when you leave a social event, climb into the car, or the taxi, or onto the bus and start to gossip with your partner about the evening's events. Hannah and Mark love a debrief, and in each episode of this new five-part series, we find them in the aftermath of an event with lots to get their teeth into.

Writer Katherine Jakeways has been described by the Radio Times as ‘the next Victoria Wood’. Of her Radio 4 series ‘Where this Service will…’ the Guardian said “Jakeway's writing was sublime. The punchlines, the pacing, the humanity.”

Hannah …. Rebecca Humphries
Mark ….. Tom Basden
Graham …. Michael Bertenshaw

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m000l25n)
The Many Colours of Raqqa

The amazing story of Abood Hamam, a photographer who has worked under every regime – and survived – throughout the Syrian civil war. At the start of the uprising he was head of photography for the state news agency, SANA, employed to take official shots of Asma Assad and her children. Later he defected and returned to his home town, Raqqa, to work first under the FSA, then al-Nusra, and finally IS. Unlike almost all other news photographers, Abood didn’t flee when IS took over. For that reason, and because of his family connections in the city, Da’esh trusted him and he was able to continue working, filming IS parades and the imposition of their grip on the city. Those pictures he shared under a pseudonym , Nur Fourat (“Light of the Euphrates”) – supplying some to Reuters and other international agencies.

In the final stages of the battle to liberate Raqqa, Abood moved to Idlib, but returned shortly after the SDF take-over. Passionate about photography and about his home city, he spent his days walking its shattered streets with his camera. “I feel like the guardian of the city,” he says. “ I know every street, I notice every building being renovated or pulled down, I detect every citizen returning,” He shares his pictures on two Facebook sites, Abood Without Borders and Raqqa Pictures. The second of those in particular concentrates on images of everyday life as the city slowly comes back to life, the spots of colour in an otherwise grey and beige landscape – a bridal shop, a family picnicking by the river. Increasingly this – and not the news – is what Abood himself cares most about.

Reporter: Tim Whewell
Producer: Mohamad Chreyteh
Editor: Bridget Harney


THU 11:30 The Susurrations of Trees (m000b6sm)
"To dwellers in a wood almost every species of tree has its voice as well as its feature. At the passing of the breeze the fir-trees sob and moan no less distinctly than they rock; the holly whistles as it battles with itself; the ash hisses amid its quiverings; the beech rustles while its flat boughs rise and fall..." That's the opening of Thomas Hardy's novel, 'Under the Greenwood Tree'.

Producer Julian May and Bob Gilbert, author of 'Ghost Trees' (about the trees of East London, the poplars of Poplar and beyond), are fascinated by the rustles of leaves in the breeze. They capture the distinctive susurrations of several species: quivering poplars, aspens that sound like rain, rattling London planes, whispering elms (there are still elms, they spring up, but the beetles bringing Dutch elm disease get them before they can mature) the hiss of the ash, whooshing pines and the strangely silent yew. They test Hardy's contention with Matthew Steinman and Ian Rogers, arboriculturalists who care for the trees of the Royal Parks.

They are intrigued by the words coined for these sounds - the learned - psithurism- from the Greek meaning whispering, to the local - 'hooi' the New Forest word for wind in the trees. The poet Alison Brackenbury reveals how John Clare, especially, has conjured them in language with vibrant dialect words, brustling, for instance. They explore the way writers such as Hardy, Edward Thomas, Francis Kilvert have responded to these sounds.

Musicians too have been inspired, there's Liszt's 'Forest Murmurs'; Iris Dement sings 'Whispering Pines'. There is new music composed especially for the programme by Lisa Knapp who incorporates the sounds of leaves in her violin piece.

Presenter: Bob Gilbert
Producer: Julian May


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000l25q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l25s)
Episode 9

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. She holds close to her the advice that her mother shared before she died: an education is the only way to get a “louding voice”— and the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni's father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

The author Abi Daré grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. She studied law at the University of Wolverhamton and received an MSc from Glasgow Caledonian University in International Project Management. She also has an MA in Creative Writing from Birkbeck, University of London. She began writing the novel after a conversation with her 8yr old daughter about how there were girls her age in Nigeria who had to do housework for a living.

In Episode 9, Miss Tia hopes to start a family.

Written by Abi Daré
Read by Ronkẹ Adékọluẹ́jọ́
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000l25v)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


THU 12:57 Weather (m000l25x)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000l25z)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 The Punch (m000l261)
Compass of Shame

Aged 18, Jacob Dunne threw a single punch in a drunken brawl outside a pub in Nottingham. His victim, James Hodgkinson, died in hospital nine days later and Jacob was convicted of manslaughter.

Now 27, Jacob has a young family and has just completed a degree, but it was only after taking part in restorative justice that he began to turn his life around. Meeting face-to-face with James' parents had a profound impact on both Jacob and the Hodgkinsons, and the resulting relationship has changed Jacob’s life in unexpected ways.

With his heart set on a career helping others, Jacob wants to understand his own transformation from angry teenager to a responsible father and respected member of the community. He has travelled the country giving speeches and workshops to students, prisoners, prison officers, hospital staff, educators and young offenders. In February, he gave the keynote speech at a graduation ceremony for trainee prison officers.

In this five part series, he retraces the key moments in his life since he threw the punch. It isn’t a straightforward story of rehabilitation but a complicated, often painful journey. Recording himself at home during lockdown, Jacob makes contact with his former parole officer, a prison officer, mentors, and others who have benefited from similar face-to-face confrontations.

In this fourth episode, Jacob looks at how shame has both helped and hindered his life post prison, speaking to Sandra Barefoot from The Forgiveness Project, Joan Scourfield, and David Hodgkinson.

Produced by Kim Normanton and Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


THU 14:00 The Archers (m000l0kb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b0bbr3zl)
Rhoda and Pete Get Back On the Scene

Recently-widowed Rhoda and Pete are determined never again to commit to a life-partner. Their children, Mari and Seb, have other ideas and set up a date between the two wilful oddballs. Are they courting disaster?

Written by Ross Dunsmore
Percussion by Laurence South and Buster Birch
Directed by Peter Kavanagh

First-time writer for radio Ross Dunsmore's play 'Milk' headlined the Traverse Theatre's season for the 2014 Edinburgh Festival.
'Rhoda and Pete... ' looks at the communication problems faced by young people today in their search for love.


THU 15:00 Open Country (m000l263)
Dawn Walk

It’s just before dawn in late May when we join wildlife cameraman John Aitchison as he steps out of his home to be greeted by a rich chorus of birdsong before strolling across his garden towards the woodland and then the shoreline beyond at the start of this coastal walk near his home in West Scotland. As John approaches the shore he spies one of his regular neighbours; an otter, scouring the weed near the edge of the shoreline for food. The otter is not alone, John also spots a roe deer swimming near the far shore, as well as a group of Canada geese which are wary of the otter and keep their distance. In a shelter belt of trees, John pauses to enjoy the songs of a song thrush and a willow warbler; one a resident bird here all year round the other a summer visitor from Sub-Saharan Africa. Further along the shoreline, John passes a stunning bed of flag irises; vivid yellow against a green background. Out at sea a group of porpoises dive for fish. As the sun breaks through the skyline there’s another wonderful surprise when a white tailed eagle appears; a huge bird with a 6 foot wingspan which lands briefly on a rock in the shallows. As he approaches the end of his walk, John makes a discovery near the water’s edge, is serenaded by skylarks and has a surprising close encounter with a very special mammal. Producer Sarah Blunt


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000l1w3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m000l1x0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m000l265)
Film programme looking at the latest cinema releases, DVDs and films on TV


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m000l267)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world


THU 17:00 PM (m000l269)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000l26c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 ReincarNathan (m000l26f)
Series 2

Beaver

Nathan Blakely was a popstar. But he was useless, died, and was reincarnated. The comedy about Nathan’s adventures in the afterlife returns for a second series with Daniel Rigby and Diane Morgan, and guest-starring Sally Phillips.

In episode 3, Nathan is brought back to life as a beaver in Sweden. He meets fellow beaver Elsa (Sally Phillips) and together they try to build an ambitious lodge to shelter the community over winter. Unfortunately, Nathan is useless at DIY and ends up cutting corners – with fatal results. Will he ever learn to do the right thing and make it back to human again?

Cast:
Diane Morgan - Jenny
Daniel Rigby - Nathan
Freya Parker – Sven, Sven’s Wife
Sally Phillips – Elsa, Beaver Union Rep

Writers: Tom Craine and Henry Paker
Music composed by Phil Lepherd

Producer: Harriet Jaine

Studio Production: Jerry Peal

A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000l26h)
Emma and Ed face a dilemma and Alice is not happy

Writers, Caroline Harrington & Tim Stimpson
Director, Kim Greengrass
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Chris Carter ..... Wilf Scolding
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000l26k)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 The Debrief (m000l25l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m000l26m)
David Aaronovitch and guests present in-depth explainers on major news stories.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m000l26p)
Produced in association with The Open University


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000l267)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 The Long View (m000l25g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000l26r)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l25s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Rewinder (m000jnrl)
Keith, Haircuts and Doors to Manual.

Greg James, host of the Radio 1 Breakfast Show and self-confessed proud radio nerd, rummages through the BBC's vast archives of audio, video and documents, using current stories and listener suggestions as a springboard into the vaults.

Greg takes off into the skies on an archive aviation trail following a listener's request for material documenting the halcyon days of passenger flight. His search leads him from pioneering aviator Amy Johnson to Concorde. Cruising at 35,000 feet, Greg finds recordings of the first commercial jet to cross the Atlantic in 1958. One of the passengers won his seat on board by writing a celebratory slogan, which a fellow passenger uses as inspiration for a song he composes mid-flight.

Later archive features the British Concorde test pilot Brian Trubshaw - known as Trubby. Against the backdrop of Anglo-French rivalry and various controversies surrounding the development of the supersonic airliner, Trubshaw represented the human face behind the technology. He was even name-checked in a Monty Python sketch featuring the new Anglo-French Flying Sheep.

Greg also tracks down recordings of the legendary Who drummer Keith Moon, following a listener request to hear the musician's Radio 1 comedy shows from the early 1970s.

With the nation's hairdressers and barbers all currently unable to work, the vexing issue of lockdown locks prompts Greg to search for coverage of the hair issue of the 1960s - men with long hair. He discovers how follically endowed males were seen as a threat to civilised society and finds archive of a 17-year-old Davy Jones - later better known as David Bowie - talking about his campaign group to protect long-haired men.

Producer: Paula McGinley


THU 23:30 Things That Made the Modern Economy (m0008j73)
Series 2

Postage Stamp

Rowland Hill was annoyed with Great Britain’s expensive and inefficient postal service, so he decided to invent a better system. His ideas proved so popular, the government agreed to put him in charge. Hill made senders, not recipients, pay for postage. And he sold stamps for an affordable sum, convinced that more people would use the postal service if it were cheaper. He was right: in 1840, as Tim Harford explains, the first year of “penny post”, the number of letters sent more than doubled – with consequences that still hold lessons for today.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon


THU 23:45 Today in Parliament (m000l6x5)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament.



FRIDAY 24 JULY 2020

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000l26t)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 Girl Taken (m000gj9f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000l26w)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000l26y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000l270)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000l272)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000l274)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Canon Simon Doogan


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000l276)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tw750)
House Martin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the house martin.

House martins are often confused with swallows , but look shorter-tailed and lack the rusty throats. They're compact birds which build their with pellets of mud under our eaves and although they're so familiar to us in summer, we still can't be certain where they spend the winter. Ornithologists believe that they may spend our winter catching insects high over African rainforests.


FRI 06:00 Today (m000l2cc)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000l1wk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Girl Taken (m000gj88)
5. Dangerous Journeys

BBC journalist Sue Mitchell and ex-soldier-turned- good-Samaritan Rob Lawrie thought they were involved in the heart-breaking, but straight forward story of an Afghan father and his motherless daughter as they struggled to get to Britain. The following four years saw Sue and Rob fall into a web of lies and life changing, mind changing events. Girl Taken is a 10 part hunt - across closed borders and broken promises - for the truth and to find a little girl, taken.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production and Sound Design: Richard Hannaford


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000l2ch)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 The Debrief (m000l2cp)
Episode Five

By Katherine Jakeways

In the aftermath of Hannah’s 40th birthday party, Hannah and Mark assess the carnage, huddled up high in the family treehouse.

The debrief is a common phenomenon – that moment when you leave a social event, climb into the car, or the taxi, or onto the bus and start to gossip with your partner about the evening's events. Hannah and Mark love a debrief, and in each episode of this new five-part series, we find them in the aftermath of an event with lots to get their teeth into.

Writer Katherine Jakeways has been described by the Radio Times as ‘the next Victoria Wood’. Of her Radio 4 series ‘Where this Service will…’ the Guardian said “Jakeway's writing was sublime. The punchlines, the pacing, the humanity.”

Hannah …. Rebecca Humphries
Mark ….. Tom Basden
Finn ….. Milo Robinson
Poppy …. Juno Robinson

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


FRI 11:00 Mapping the Future (m000kgt8)
Author Jerry Brotton navigates the transformation from paper to digital mapping, from print to pixels, asks what is being gained and lost and in whose interests the evolution serves.

The world is changing faster than ever before and, to understand it, we are using maps more than at any time in our history. As the paper map gradually disappears, its replacement - online geospatial mapping applications - are at the forefront of our everyday lives and they're doing far more than just getting us from A to B.

Maps no longer represent reality, virtual mapping techniques are now making reality. Space and geography, rather than time and history, have become the dominant model of interpreting our interconnected global world. From tracking pandemics and visualising capital flows to how we manage Big Data or our online searches to find the nearest takeaway, maps are now key to how we process and organise modern life.

Jerry Brotton explores the quiet digital revolution that has happened over the last 25 years and which changed maps forever. He meets a new breed of mapmaker, no longer cartographers but ‘geospatial technicians’ who work for multinational corporations like Google and Apple. Nearly half of all online searches contain a geographical element, leading companies like Google to build mapping applications that now reach billions of users. Today, we use maps based on our online searches without thinking. And yet online maps are not peer-reviewed. Traditional cartographers argue they are an extension of the global organisations whose commercial interests they serve. Are we in danger of surrendering our cartographic reality to multinational corporations? And are we being mapped in turn by the new technology?

Jerry discovers the world of ‘counter-mapping’ - mapping activists using open access data and guerrilla cartography, pushing back and offering different ways of applying maps to address some of our more pressing political and environmental problems.

Contributors include Google spatial technologist Ed Parsons, author Shoshana Zuboff, AI and map specialist Simon Greenman, former head of maps at the British Library Peter Barber, Bloomberg MapLab editor Laura Bliss, Ordnance Survey's Chief Geospatial Officer David Henderson, co-founder of the Counter Cartographies Collective Craig Dalton and map-making artist Stephen Walter.

Presenter: Jerry Brotton
Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:30 Relativity (m000l2qt)
Series 3

Episode 2

The third series of Richard Herring’s comedy drama builds on the warm, lively characters and sharply observed family dynamics of previous series.

His affectionate observation of inter-generational misunderstanding, sibling sparring and the ties that bind will resonate with anyone who has ever gone back to live at home, after the age of 40.

Amid the comedy, Richard broaches some more serious highs and lows of family life. In this series, he focuses on the roller coaster ride of first time parenting, how to maintain a long standing marriage and brass rubbing.

Richard Herring is a comedian, writer, blogger and podcaster and the world's premier semi-professional self-playing snooker player.

Episode 2
Jane leaves husband Pete and goes to stay with her parents, throwing Ken and Margaret’s weekly milk order into chaos. Pete struggles to hold the fort at home, but fails to notice 17 year old Holly going off to join Extinction Rebellion. Ian and Chloe are still just trying to get baby Don to stop crying.

Cast:
Margaret…………….Alison Steadman
Ken……………..Phil Davis
Jane…………….Fenella Woolgar
Ian……………….Richard Herring
Chloe…………..Emily Berrington
Pete………………..Gordon Kennedy
Holly………………...Tia Bannon
Mark………………Fred Haig
Nick………………..Harrison Knights

Written by Richard Herring
Sound design by Eloise Whitmore
Producer: Polly Thomas
Executive Producers: Jon Thoday and Richard Allen Turner.
An Avalon Television production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000l2qw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l3lm)
Episode 10

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. She holds close to her the advice that her mother shared before she died: an education is the only way to get a “louding voice”— and the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni's father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

The author Abi Daré grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. She studied law at the University of Wolverhamton and received an MSc from Glasgow Caledonian University in International Project Management. She also has an MA in Creative Writing from Birkbeck, University of London. She began writing the novel after a conversation with her 8yr old daughter about how there were girls her age in Nigeria who had to do housework for a living.

In Episode 10, Adunni might at last be able to find her Louding Voice.

Written by Abi Daré
Read by Ronkẹ Adékọluẹ́jọ́
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000l2qy)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000l2r0)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000l2r2)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The Punch (m000l2r4)
New Beginnings

Aged 18, Jacob Dunne threw a single punch in a drunken brawl outside a pub in Nottingham. His victim, James Hodgkinson, died in hospital nine days later and Jacob was convicted of manslaughter.

Now 27, Jacob has a young family and has just completed a degree, but it was only after taking part in restorative justice that he began to turn his life around. Meeting face-to-face with James' parents had a profound impact on both Jacob and the Hodgkinsons, and the resulting relationship has changed Jacob’s life in unexpected ways.

With his heart set on a career helping others, Jacob wants to understand his own transformation from angry teenager to a responsible father and respected member of the community. He has travelled the country giving speeches and workshops to students, prisoners, prison officers, hospital staff, educators and young offenders. In February, he gave the keynote speech at a graduation ceremony for trainee prison officers.

In this five part series, he retraces the key moments in his life since he threw the punch. It isn’t a straightforward story of rehabilitation but a complicated, often painful journey. Recording himself at home during lockdown, Jacob makes contact with his former parole officer, a prison officer, mentors, and others who have benefited from similar face-to-face confrontations.

In this final episode, Jacob thinks about his future and the career paths which might be open to him. He speaks to his former parole officer Wendy Flewitt, Inspector Andy Bridgewater (Head of the West Midland's Police Football Unit), and asks Joan and David the hardest question of all.

Produced by Kim Normanton and Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000l26h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m000l2r6)
What He Would Have Wanted

What He Would Have Wanted. New drama from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000l2r8)
GQT At Home: Episode Seventeen

Kathy Clugston hosts this week's horticultural panel show. Matt Biggs, Matthew Pottage and Pippa Greenwood answer listeners' gardening questions sent in via email and social media.

Producer - Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer - Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000l2rb)
Heart Skips

By Divya Ghelani. Leicester, 1989 and Pramila’s training for a charity skipathon does not run entirely smoothly.

Divya Ghelani was born in Gujarat and grew up in Loughborough, Leicestershire. She holds an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia and an MPhil in Literary Studies from the University of Hong Kong. She lives between Berlin and the UK where she has published short stories and judged story and flash fiction competitions. She is working on her first novel.

Writer: Divya Ghelani
Reader: Indira Varma
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000l2rd)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m000l2rg)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience


FRI 17:00 PM (m000l2rj)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000l2rl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Summer Comedy Festival (m000l2rn)
Episode 1

Expect a summer festival with a difference as some of the nation's favourite comics turn curators and host a virtual festival featuring their favourite performers from the worlds of comedy, literature and spoken word. They'll be in control of everything (even the weather) as we're taken along for the ride to not only hear some great performances but also to get an insight into the cultural radars of our celebrity hosts.

In episode 1, Miles Jupp is our host as he takes us around his bespoke festival site to meet Val McDermid in the literary tent, Abandoman on the music stage and TMS' very own Alison Mitchell in the Cricket Tent (of course there's a cricket tent, it's Miles Jupp we're talking about). Paul Sinha also attempts to run a quiz in the Trivia Tent and stand-up legend Simon Munnery entertains from a field.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow
Sound: Chris McLean
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 Front Row (m000l2cm)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 The Debrief (m000l2cp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000l2cr)
Linda Yueh

Chris Mason presents political debate from London Broadcasting House with a panel including the economist Linda Yueh.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000l2ct)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b01f1nf9)
More Than Just Whale Music

Since Irving Teibel created his Environments label in the US in the late 1960s, recorded natural sound has been a commercial proposition, sought by city-dwellers to re-kindle elemental connections. And his recordings of rain falling in pine forests or sleepy lagoons, thunderstorms, waves crashing and birds singing were deemed significant enough for NASA to send into space on Voyager in 1977. A decade later in the UK, Duncan Macdonald launched WildSounds - initially to teach people to distinguish different birdsongs, but soon adding 'atmospheres' from the Amazon or the African veldt.

Christine Finn explores the appeal of recorded natural sound and how it's been manipulated by musicians since the first live broadcast of birdsong in 1924, when the cellist Beatrice Harrison duetted with a nightingale in her garden. When sound engineer Quentin Howard was launching Classic FM in 1992, he used a loop of birdsong recorded in his garden. Radio Birdsong drew appreciative comments from listeners who claimed it relaxed them. Psychologist Eleanor Ratcliffe is investigating why natural sounds hold this appeal.

Finn explores the boundaries between natural sound and ambient music, and hears from musician Kit Watkins how living in the mountains of Virginia caused him to use the natural sounds around him in his compositions; she meets Matthew Herbert, whose album One Pig uses natural sound of a different kind to trace the life of a pig, from birth to plate.

Finn discovers there's a lot more to recorded natural sound than just whale music, but also finds that whale music, far from simply wafting among New Age crystals, played a major role in launching the conservation movement of the 70s.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000l2cw)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré (m000l3lm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m000l0s2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Things That Made the Modern Economy (m0008jds)
Series 2

RFID

At the beginning of the Cold War, musical inventor Leon Theremin managed to bug the US embassy in Moscow. The ingenious device he used is a predecessor of a humble technology that surrounds us every day: the Radio-Frequency Identification tag. Tim Harford asks if RFID is introducing an 'internet of things'. Or are its glory days behind it?

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon


FRI 23:45 Today in Parliament (m000l2cy)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m000l0s2)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m000l0s2)

A Month In Siena by Hisham Matar 00:30 SAT (m000ktps)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000ktp9)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000l2ct)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m000kw56)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m000l207)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m000l1c9)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000ktp7)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000l2cr)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b04hmfpd)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (b01f1nf9)

Archiving Black America 11:30 TUE (m000l0rc)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m000l267)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000l267)

Behind the Buzzwords 09:30 TUE (m000l0r1)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m000l1d8)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m000l1d8)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000l1wc)

Cabin Pressure 19:15 SUN (b00lt16c)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m000l25n)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m000kvlb)

Desert Island Discs 11:00 SUN (m000l1wk)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000l1wk)

Drama 14:15 THU (b0bbr3zl)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m000l2r6)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m000l1bn)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000l1y1)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000l20w)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000l0t0)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000l0l2)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000l276)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m000kvl4)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m000l2rg)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m000kv7v)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m000ktq6)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m000l0j3)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m000l0j3)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m000l1bz)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000l203)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000l0sb)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000l0kd)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000l26k)

Front Row 19:00 FRI (m000l2cm)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000kvky)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000l2r8)

Girl Taken 09:45 MON (m00055n1)

Girl Taken 00:30 TUE (m00055n1)

Girl Taken 09:45 TUE (m000ghxx)

Girl Taken 00:30 WED (m000ghxx)

Girl Taken 09:45 WED (m000gj7t)

Girl Taken 00:30 THU (m000gj7t)

Girl Taken 09:45 THU (m000gj9f)

Girl Taken 00:30 FRI (m000gj9f)

Girl Taken 09:45 FRI (m000gj88)

How to Play 09:00 MON (m000l1zs)

How to Play 21:30 MON (m000l1zs)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000l0sd)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m000l0k0)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m000l0k0)

James Burke's Web of Knowledge 09:30 THU (m000256b)

James Veitch's Contractual Obligation 15:30 TUE (m000jsyr)

Join the Dots 11:45 SUN (b0952zlf)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m000kvl2)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000l2rd)

Legacy of War 09:30 MON (m000l1zv)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m000l1cr)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m000l1cr)

Mapping the Future 11:00 FRI (m000kgt8)

Meet David Sedaris 18:30 TUE (b08x9f9t)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000ktpq)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m000l1cy)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m000l1xn)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000l20h)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000l0sm)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000l0kp)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000l26t)

Mohammed and the Market 20:00 TUE (m000l6tb)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m000l1c3)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m000l1c3)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000l0jy)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m000ktyr)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m000l0kg)

Museum of Lost Objects 14:45 MON (b071v594)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000ktq2)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m000l1d6)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m000l1xx)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m000l20r)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m000l0sw)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000l0ky)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000l272)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m000l1c1)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000l1wm)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000l29y)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000l2jz)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000l2tm)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000l25q)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000l2qw)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m000l1bl)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m000l1vz)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000l1w7)

News 13:00 SAT (m000l1c7)

News 22:00 SAT (m000l1cw)

News 06:00 SUN (m000l1vs)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m000l1vv)

One to One 14:45 SAT (m000hvkr)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m000l1x0)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m000l1x0)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m000kx21)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m000l263)

PM 17:00 SAT (m000l1cf)

PM 17:00 MON (m000l2bj)

PM 17:00 TUE (m000l0s4)

PM 17:00 WED (m000l0k4)

PM 17:00 THU (m000l269)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000l2rj)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000l1xc)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 17:30 SAT (m000l1ch)

Positive Thinking 09:00 TUE (m000l0qz)

Positive Thinking 21:30 TUE (m000l0qz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000ktq4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000l1xz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m000l20t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000l0sy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000l0l0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000l274)

Primo Levi's The Periodic Table 15:00 SUN (m000l1wy)

Primo Levi's The Periodic Table 17:40 SUN (b07kstl4)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m000l1ct)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m000l1ct)

Q & A by Vikas Swarup 19:00 SUN (b007vlry)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000l1w3)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000l1w3)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000l1w3)

ReincarNathan 18:30 THU (m000l26f)

Relativity 11:30 FRI (m000l2qt)

Rewinder 23:00 THU (m000jnrl)

Saturday Drama 15:00 SAT (b01mnxzn)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m000l1bv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m000ktpy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m000l1d2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000l1xs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000l20m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000l0sr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000l0kt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000l26y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m000ktpw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000ktq0)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m000l1ck)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m000l1d0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m000l1d4)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000l1x5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m000l1xq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m000l1xv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000l20k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000l20p)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000l0sp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000l0st)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000l0kr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m000l0kw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000l26w)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m000l270)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m000kvl0)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000l2rb)

Shorts 21:45 SAT (b05wny9j)

Simon Schama: The Great Gallery Tours 16:00 MON (m000l2bg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m000l1cp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m000l1x9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000l2bl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000l0s8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m000l0k8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000l26c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000l2rl)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b01r95gy)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b01r95gy)

Soul Music 09:00 WED (m000l0j1)

Soul Music 21:00 WED (m000l0j1)

Spice 19:45 SUN (m000l1xj)

Summer Comedy Festival 18:30 FRI (m000l2rn)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000l1w9)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m000l1w1)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (m000kw4n)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (m000l2bc)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000l1wf)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000l0rt)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000l0rt)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000l0jt)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000l0jt)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m000l0kb)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m000l0kb)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000l26h)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000l26h)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m000l26p)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m000l26m)

The Damien Slash Mixtape 23:15 WED (m0001rjw)

The Debrief 10:45 MON (m000l205)

The Debrief 19:45 MON (m000l205)

The Debrief 10:45 TUE (m000l0r7)

The Debrief 19:45 TUE (m000l0r7)

The Debrief 10:45 WED (m000l0j9)

The Debrief 19:45 WED (m000l0j9)

The Debrief 10:45 THU (m000l25l)

The Debrief 19:45 THU (m000l25l)

The Debrief 10:45 FRI (m000l2cp)

The Debrief 19:45 FRI (m000l2cp)

The Deported 20:00 MON (m0002z9d)

The Deported 11:00 WED (m0002z9d)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m000kx23)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m000l265)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m000l1wp)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m000l1wp)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 12:04 MON (m000l20c)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 22:45 MON (m000l20c)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 12:04 TUE (m000l0rh)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 22:45 TUE (m000l0rh)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 12:04 WED (m000l0jg)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 22:45 WED (m000l0jg)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 12:04 THU (m000l25s)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 22:45 THU (m000l25s)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 12:04 FRI (m000l3lm)

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré 22:45 FRI (m000l3lm)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (p08gcgky)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (p08gcgky)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m000l0ry)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m000l0ry)

The Listening Project 13:30 SUN (m000l1ww)

The Long View 09:00 THU (m000l25g)

The Long View 21:30 THU (m000l25g)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m000l0k2)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m000l0k2)

The New Japanese Poetry 23:30 SAT (m000kwwz)

The New Japanese Poetry 16:30 SUN (m000l1x2)

The Political School 21:00 MON (m000kv6v)

The Political School 11:00 TUE (m000l0r9)

The Punch 13:45 MON (m000l2b6)

The Punch 13:45 TUE (m000l0rr)

The Punch 13:45 WED (m000l0jq)

The Punch 13:45 THU (m000l261)

The Punch 13:45 FRI (m000l2r4)

The Reith Lectures 19:15 SAT (b08tcbrp)

The Susurrations of Trees 11:30 THU (m000b6sm)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m000kw52)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m000l2bn)

The Way I See It 00:15 SUN (m0009llz)

The Way I See It 14:45 SUN (m0009r45)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m000l1bx)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m000l1wt)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000l209)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m000l0sg)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m000l0kj)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000l26r)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m000l2cw)

Things My Mother Never Told Me (... About Lockdown) 23:00 WED (m000l0kl)

Things That Made the Modern Economy 23:30 THU (m0008j73)

Things That Made the Modern Economy 23:30 FRI (m0008jds)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m000ktyc)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m0000mrl)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m000l20f)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m000l0sk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m000l1dd)

Today in Parliament 23:45 THU (m000l6x5)

Today in Parliament 23:45 FRI (m000l2cy)

Today 07:00 SAT (m000l1bs)

Today 06:00 MON (m000l1zq)

Today 06:00 TUE (m000l0qv)

Today 06:00 WED (m000l0hx)

Today 06:00 THU (m000l25d)

Today 06:00 FRI (m000l2cc)

Tracks 21:00 SAT (b07wbvmq)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b02tvggm)

Tweet of the Day 10:55 SUN (m000l1wh)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b02tt1kv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b02tvnnw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b02tvryl)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b02tvys6)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b02tw750)

Walks Like a Duck 11:00 MON (m000l29v)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m000l1bq)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m000l1c5)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m000l1cm)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m000l1vx)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m000l1w5)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m000l1wr)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m000l1x7)

Weather 05:56 MON (m000l1y3)

Weather 12:57 MON (m000l2b2)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m000l0rm)

Weather 12:57 WED (m000l0jl)

Weather 12:57 THU (m000l25x)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m000l2r0)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m000l1xl)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m000l1cc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m000l1zz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m000l0r5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m000l0j7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m000l25j)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m000l2ch)

Women Talking About Cars 18:30 WED (b084xr59)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m000kv7l)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m000l0s0)

World at One 13:00 MON (m000l2b4)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m000l0rp)

World at One 13:00 WED (m000l0jn)

World at One 13:00 THU (m000l25z)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m000l2r2)

Yarmouk 14:00 MON (m000l2b8)

Yarmouk 14:15 TUE (m000l0rw)

Yarmouk 14:15 WED (m000l0jw)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m000l2b0)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m000l0rk)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m000l0jj)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m000l25v)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m000l2qy)

Your Call 11:30 WED (m000l1db)