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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 28 MARCH 2020

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000gn7k)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash (m000gn5v)
Ep 5 Returning to Shore

In Lamorna Ash' evocative and vivid memoir about the Cornish fishing community of Newlyn, near Land's End, there is one last wonder on board the fishing trawler. First of all, Lamorna recounts a tragedy on the high seas which still reverberates along Cornwall's coast. Ell Potter reads.

Lamorna Ash is a writer and playwright. Dark, Salt, Clear is her first book.

Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gn7m)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gn7p)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000gn7r)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000gn7t)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gn7w)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

Sunrise always feels like a holy moment. Watching the darkness gradually transform to light. Listening as the birdsong breaks the silence. However our circumstances may change, the reliable solar cycle keeps faithfully delivering morning, noon and night.

There is a much-loved Bible verse that has brought this comfort to millions of people throughout history and across the world. It was written during a crisis and because it is set against a backdrop of disaster and tragedy its beauty shines all the brighter:

“I remember my affliction and my wandering,
the bitterness and the gall.
I well remember them,
and my soul is downcast within me.
Yet this I call to mind
and therefore I have hope:
Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed,
for his compassions never fail.
They are new every morning;
great is your faithfulness.
I say to myself, “The Lord is my portion;
therefore I will wait for him.”

As we approach Passion Sunday when Christians around the world think about the suffering of Jesus on the cross I am reminded that it is here that the true light of God’s love was revealed to our world. Jesus willingness to undertake this suffering for the sins of the world speaks of a great unconditional, unfailing, sacrificial love available to all. Because of this we need not be consumed by our fears, our circumstances or our wrongdoing, but can live in daily hope. God’s love and compassion is boundless and one day we can be with him.

Lord God, Thank you for this reminder of your unfailing love. Just as the darkest nights always give way to a new dawn so may you give us hope in the dark times. We trust in your great faithfulness.

Amen


SAT 05:45 Profile (m000gt2l)
Hania Rani

On Profile this week - it’s a personal one.

In lockdown at home because of the coronavirus, presenter Mark Coles has turned to music to help get him through the past few days…captivated by an album he bought by chance in a London record store a couple of weeks ago.

It’s called‘Esja’- the debut album from a little-known 29 year old Polish pianist, Hania Rani.

The music is sublime and minimalist…solo acoustic piano inspired in part by the mountains and countryside of Iceland where some of it was recorded.

For Mark, it’s become his sanctuary….his headspace - a much needed nightly respite from the cacophony of coronavirus news bulletins and press conferences.

But who is the mystery woman behind the music?

Producer: Smita Patel

Photo of Hania Rani by Kinga Karpati


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000gt17)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m000glnm)
Herefordshire Interfaith Group on the Malverns

Clare Balding walks across a section of The Malverns, from Hollybush car park towards British Camp, with members of the Herefordshire Interfaith Group. In a world that feels increasingly divided, this group draws together Muslims, Quakers, Buddhists, Bahá’ís, Methodists and more. It's a leisurely stroll, with many pauses to reflect and share readings on the themes of Pilgrimage and Nature. Note: when we walked this route, in early March 2020, it was affected by flooding in the lower lying sections.

In this series, Clare has walked with people and groups of many faiths and none to discover how being in the natural world can affect our inner lives.

Producer: Karen Gregor


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000gt19)
Farming Today This Week

Supermarket shelves are being stripped bare and veg box producers are seeing order numbers shoot through the roof. Meanwhile, some farmers and food producers who until recently supplied restaurants and pubs, are finding themselves with surplus stock. Charlotte Smith asks whether our famously complicated food supply chain can shift in time, to feed people, and avoid massive waste. And what will the long term impact be on the way we deliver food from farm to fork?

We answer your farming questions on everything from auction marts to TB testing.

Our Farming Today Audio Diarists give us updates from across the UK - from an rural tourism business in Scotland, to a goat farm in Northern Ireland.

What's happening with farmers' markets? Some are closed, some are going ahead...and the police are getting involved.

And, is this a silver lining? With fewer cars on the roads and aeroplanes in the skies, many of us are hearing the birds loud and clear for the first time in years. We find out what you should be listening for.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Heather Simons


SAT 06:57 Weather (m000gt1f)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m000gt1j)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000gt1n)
Sir Chris Hoy

Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles are joined by six time Olympic Champion, Sir Chris Hoy, who discusses the inspiration behind his career, retirement and writing children’s books.
Ruth Linton is a grandmother from Manchester who became a stand up comedian after being treated for a brain tumour.
Saturday Live listener and former high-flying police officer James Ellson reveals why he left the challenging streets of Moss Side to become a smallholder and writer of crime fiction and actor Mim Shaikh discusses why he joined a pilgrimage from Belgrade to Istanbul.
Plus broadcaster Johnnie Walker shares his inheritance tracks.

Producer: Steven Williams
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 The Patch (m000gt1q)
Elland

The random postcode generator takes Producer Polly Weston to Elland, Yorkshire. There's been a cinema here since pre-WWI and it still has an interval and two organists. But in 2020, the Rex faces a shock.

Elland is a historic, former millinery town, sandwiched between Halifax and Huddersfield in the Calderdale valley. Locals say the town has had a bit of a rough time - it has lost shops, its Victorian swimming pool, and suffered from being the lesser known of its neighbours along the valley. But it does have something people across Yorkshire recognise it for: The Rex.

A 300 seater cinema, which opened in 1912, and where the layout remains largely as it was on the day it opened. Polly gets drawn in by its individuality, its organists (80-year-old Mildred and 33-year-old Ben) its mugs of tea in the interval and its gingerbread men. The cinema faces a string of new challenges - the multiplexes in Huddersfield and Halifax have recently slashed their prices to compete with the Rex's £5.50 entry, while floods have been tormenting the local infrastructure. But as the days roll on, it becomes clear that something much bigger is around the corner - something which might jeopardise the annual Laurel and Hardy evening which Ben has been preparing his score for months for. Something which might jeopardise everything.

Produced/presented by Polly Weston
Exec Producer Jolyon Jenkins


SAT 11:00 Analysis (m000gcx0)
Command and Control?

When Sajid Javid resigned as Chancellor of the Exchequer in February rather than accept Boris Johnson's reported demand that he dismiss his own team of special advisers and accept a new one drawn up in 10 Downing Street, many saw the episode as a crude attempt by the Prime Minister to wrest control of economic policy from the Treasury. But would such a reform necessarily be a bad thing?

Edward Stourton considers the case for economic policy being driven from the very top of government. If decision-making, in arguably the most important government department, took place on the prime minister's terms rather than having to be negotiated with a powerful colleague leading a vast bureaucracy, would that make for quicker and more streamlined decision-making that gave clearer direction to the government overall? And has in any case the time come to clip the wings of the Treasury which too often determines policy on narrowly financial grounds rather than properly allowing for the potential benefits of government spending - and which has recently signed off such alarmingly over-budget projects as HS2 and London's Crossrail?

In seeking answers to those questions, Edward speaks to the former Chancellors, Alistair Darling and Norman Lamont; to former Chief of Staff to Tony Blair in Downing Street, Jonathan Powell; to former Treasury minister, David Gauke; and and to ex-officials, including former top Treasury civil servant, Nic Macpherson.

Producer Simon Coates


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000gt1s)
Singapore's Virus Detectives

Singapore has been praised for its management of the pandemic with border controls, testing and tracing of known carriers. But while government measures to keep the virus from spreading have so far proved effective, they have also raised questions about the invasiveness of the state says Karishma Vaswani.

Our correspondents are seeing the effect of Covid-19 worldwide with millions confined indoors but what if you have no home to go to? Michelle Quinn of Voice of America shines a spotlight on California. The Golden State may boast the world's fifth biggest economy but it has the worst homelessness problem in the country.

Zeinab Badawi mourns a doctor and family member who, like her, was born in Sudan but has spent most of his life in the UK. He was at the frontline of the National Health Service and died of the coronavirus while trying to protect others.

Damien McGuinness reflects on the mood in Berlin where the throbbing techno dance clubs have fallen silent.

Antarctica is the only continent that has not yet confirmed a case of the coronavirus. Justin Rowlatt underwent some very intensive medical checks before he was allowed to travel there. Now that he is back in the UK and like the rest of us confined to his home, he reflects on what he has learned about isolation at the icy bottom of the world.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000gv70)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000gt1x)
Assistance for the self-employed

This week the Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced the Government’s much anticipated help package for the self employed. Only about two thirds of an estimated 6m workforce will gain anything, leaving over a million people without help. We look at the package in more detail, including the changes to benefits and hear top tips for getting paid in a timely manner.

And the banks were quick to promise support for customers in need but are they actually delivering? Money Box listeners tell us their experiences.

Presenter Felicity Hannah
Reporter: Ben Carter
Researcher: Darin Graham
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (m000gn6z)
Series 56

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis get to grips with the continuing COVID-19 lock-down and disruption with sketches and guests.

With comedians Ellie Taylor, Kai Samra, and Dominic Frisby.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Jenny Laville, Robin Morgan, Hannah Fairweather and Simon Alcock.

Producer Julia McKenzie

A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m000gt1z)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m000gt21)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000gn75)
Silkie Carlo, Baroness Professor Ilora Finlay, Andy McDonald MP, Nadhim Zahawi MP

Chris Mason chairs political debate from Broadcasting House London with the Director of the pressure group Big Brother Watch Silkie Carlo, Palliative care expert Baroness Professor Ilora Finlay, the Shadow Transport Secretary Andy McDonald, and the Business Minister Nadhim Zahawi.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000gt23)
NHS and treatment of the elderly

Well if last week taught us anything, it is that there is a lot to talk about and you want the powers that be to hear you. So we have extended Any Answers once again and will be taking your calls for an hour.

Who should have priority for testing? And is enough being done to help our NHS?

Are you working in the NHS - are you getting more of what you need?

This is a v difficult question - but it was asked on Any Questions. The battle to prolong elderly lives. Is it worth it if it cripples generations to come?

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 15:00 Drama (b0bd7bm4)
To the Ends of the Earth: The Mysterious Island

by Jules Verne, dramatised by Gregory Evans.

Three very different people escape the American Civil war by stealing a balloon - which crashes near a deserted island. But perhaps it is not quite as deserted as they think it is...

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m000gt25)
Women of colour and gardening, Children, fake news and anxiety, Exercise at home

For women of colour, planting is becoming a popular way to establish ownership and celebrate cultural heritage. Aimée Grant Cumberbatch, founder of Grown, a gardening club for women of colour, and Flo Headlam, professional gardener and BBC Two’s Gardeners’ World’s first black presenter discuss.

Ten organisations across the UK including Rape Crisis and End Violence Against Women have issued a joint statement about the impact Covid-19 could have on the lives of women and children. Women's Aid, Lucy Hadley on what action they would like to see taken.

Dr Camilla Pang was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder at the age of eight. Now aged 26, and with a PhD in biochemistry, she has used her specialist scientific knowledge to identify what it really means to be human in her new book, 'Explaining Humans'.

Why do we choose the clothes we do? In her new book, ‘Dress Your Best Life’, the American fashion psychologist Dawnn Karen explains how our clothing is the ‘connective tissue’ between the physical and emotional.

How can parents help their children navigate the constant stream of information about Covid-19 online? Sonia Livingstone, professor of social psychology at the London School of Economics and an expert in digital literacy in children, and GP Dr Radha Modgil discuss.

How is Covid-19 affecting regular Woman's Hour listeners? We hear from Mercy Haruna.

Exercising when you're isolated at home. Fitness instructor Rosemary Mallace of Over Fifty Fitness and Professor Janet Lord, an expert in muscle health and immunity from the University of Birmingham, about why keeping moving is particularly important as you get older, and what you can do to exercise at home.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Dianne McGregor


SAT 17:00 PM (m000gt27)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m000glp6)
TV Streaming

There's a battle for our eyeballs in the market for video on demand. Who will win? 20 years ago Netflix was a company that rented DVDs to its customers. Now its a billon-dollar enterprise streaming its own content and movies. But new challengers are entering the market, like Disney Plus, Apple TV and the UK's Britbox. So what does it take to grab the viewers? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS

Richard Broughton, Ampere Analysis

Reemah Sakaan, Group Director ITV SVOD (Britbox)

Jane Turton, CEO, All3Media


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000gt2b)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


SAT 17:57 Weather (m000gt2d)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gt2g)
UK has the biggest daily increase of Coronavirus deaths. 260 people died in the past day taking the total to 1019.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000gt2j)
Pete Paphides, Jimmy Akingbola, Amrita Acharia, Bombay Bicycle Club, Rae Morris, Sara Cox, Nikki Bedi

Nikki Bedi and Sara Cox are joined by Amrita Acharia, Pete Paphides and Jimmy Akingbola for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Bombay Bicycle Club.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m000gt2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 19:15 The Reith Lectures (b03969vt)
Grayson Perry: Playing to the Gallery: 2013

Democracy has bad taste

In the first of four lectures, recorded in front of an audience at Tate Modern in London in 2013, the artist Grayson Perry reflects on the idea of quality and examines who and what defines what we see and value as art. He argues that there is no empirical way to judge quality in art. Instead the validation of quality rests in the hands of a tightknit group of people at the heart of the art world including curators, dealers, collectors and critics who decide in the end what ends up in galleries and museums. Often the last to have a say are the public.
Perry examines the words and language that have developed around art critique, including what he sees as the growing tendency to over-intellectualise the response to art. He analyses the art market and quotes – with some irony – an insider who says that certain colours sell better than others. He queries whether familiarity makes us like certain artworks more, and encourages the public to learn to appreciate different forms of art through exploration and open-mindedness.
Perry was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003, and is known for his ceramic works, printmaking, drawing, sculpture and tapestry as well as for his cross-dressing and alter-ego, Claire.
The lecture series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.
Producer: Jim Frank


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m000gt2q)
The End of the Thirty Year Itch

With the Crash of 2008, the free market orthodoxy that had framed British politics for thirty years hit the rocks. As the 'thirty year itch' for new thinking set in, no single leader or big idea seemed capable of shaping a new normal. We were governed by coalitions and minority governments, with four general elections and three referendums inside a decade.

Since 2008, there have been repeated attempts to reshape our politics, based on the idea of taking power away from both the free market and the centralised state, and re-empowering local communities. But these 'post-liberal' projects - the Big Society, Red Toryism and Blue Labour - failed to win the popular enthusiasm and the political leadership needed to establish a new political consensus.

In the wake of Theresa May's failure to win a majority in the 2017 election, which broke yet another attempt at a new political settlement, BBC Radio documentary-maker Phil Tinline talked to those involved in this long process for an edition of Archive on 4 called The Thirty Year Itch. And he compared their experiences with the last time British politics had been through such a long period of turmoil: the 1970s.

Then suddenly, last December, the general election delivered the first big majority for years. Was this the end of our decade of political flux?

In The End of the Thirty Year Itch, Phil updates the story, asking whether Boris Johnson’s new government, born in crisis, can really effect a radical redistribution of power to its new northern voters - and how the Covid-19 crisis might speed or slow that process.

Speakers include: Jason Cowley, Maurice Glasman, Mark Harrison, Danny Kruger, Adrian Pabst, Steve Richards, Dominic Sandbrook, David Skelton, Rachel Wolf

Producer: Phil Tinline


SAT 21:00 Day Release (b075t6kg)
Killing Time

by Peter Jukes.

Lenny Henry plays lifer Frank Watt who is coming to the end of his prison sentence.

Frank has planned a full day of activity for Geoff's first day release – but it turns out that Geoff has different plans.

Frank Watt ..... Lenny Henry
Geoff Hoagland ..... Ralph Ineson
Shudi Misir ..... Deeivya Meir
Karen Atkins ..... Adjoa Andoh
Dan Trebor ..... Ewan Bailey
Jacqui Montgomery ..... Adie Allen

Directed by Mary Peate


SAT 21:45 Annika Stranded (m0007480)
Series 5

Disclosures Part One

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Chief Inspector Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Annika is still coming to terms with the death of her friend and long-time, long suffering forensic photographer Mikel. But life goes on, and so does police work on the Oslofjord. Annika must forge a new relationship with Mikel’s young replacement, Sigrid.

Episode 7: Disclosures, Part One
When an officer from the Reindeer police appears at the door, Annika is wrong-footed by a serious blast from her past.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4 - including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m000gt2s)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m000gmgm)
Isolation

Some of the UK’s national parks saw visitor numbers soar to bank holiday levels over the weekend. The message about social distancing and self-isolation is taking time to sink in. "Life should not feel normal," said the Scottish First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon. If it does, she added, “You should ask if you are doing the right things." The public’s response to these unprecedented times has exemplified the best and the worst of humanity. What, then, does the coronavirus crisis tell us about the fundamental nature of our species? Your answer to that question will depend on whether you agree with the 17th century philosopher Thomas Hobbes that people are naturally disposed to ‘rapine and revenge’; or with the 18th century thinker Jean-Jacques Rousseau that humans are essentially good. The tussle between self-interest and altruism has been part of the human condition since we were decorating caves. Now an ever-tightening lockdown will make life-changing demands on all of us. We are social animals who evolved and adapted to survive in groups, so how well are we equipped to cope with extended periods of self-isolation? Some predict an epidemic of depression and suicides. Others argue that we are far more adept at developing our own inner life than were our ancestors in the ancient world, who saw exile as a fate worse than death. Are we right to be worried about the moral and psychological effects of a prolonged lack of human contact? Or are we more resilient than we think? With Hilda Burke, Andrew Colman, Julia Hartley-Brewer and Mark Vernon.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (m000gkvp)
Programme 11, 2020

(11/12)
Tom Sutcliffe welcomes the South of England and Midlands pairings for the last time in the current series. Victory for Marcus Berkmann and Paul Sinha of the South of England could give them an unassailable lead at this crucial stage in the season, while a win for Elizabeth-Jane Burnett and Stephen Maddock of the Midlands would secure them a solid mid-table finish.

Tom's questions cover as wide a spectrum of knowledge as ever, from Jason and the Argonauts to Snow Patrol. As so often, some of the most ingenious ideas come from RBQ listeners whose questions have poured into the programme office in the past few months. Tom will also have the solution to the teaser he left unanswered at the end of the previous edition.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 My Modest Proposal (m0009b34)
In 1729, poet, cleric and satirist Jonathan Swift published his notorious work A Modest Proposal, suggesting the problem of poverty in Ireland could be solved simply enough - by selling the babies of the poor to the wealthy as food. Almost 300 years later, his outrageous satire still has the power to shock.

But what sort of modest proposals would today’s poets put forward? Six Irish poets make their own modest proposals to tackle some of our current social inequalities.

Jessica Traynor suggests a way of dealing with violence against women that totally fails to address the root cause of the problem. Mary O’Malley addresses us with a calm, measured delivery, which sounds eminently reasonable until her proposal on how to deal with the elderly creeps up and grabs you by the throat. Sarah Clancy wonders what all the fuss is about when a species goes extinct. Kevin Higgins helpfully outlines measures for the Minister for Housing to deal with homelessness, something which Kevin has experienced at first hand. Rita Ann Higgins despairs that people dealing with redress boards will ever be satisfied. And Nick Laird's sinister poem reflects how social media has taken over our lives.

Expect black humour, a shake of the head in recognition, and a sigh of relief that none of these proposals will ever actually be put into operation. Or will they?

The words of Jonathan Swift are read by Andrew Bennett.
Image of Jonathan Swift via Getty Images.

Producer: Julien Clancy
Executive Producer: Claire Cunningham
A Rockfinch production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 29 MARCH 2020

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000gt2v)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m000gnln)
Worth

Nikesh Patel reads Ben Hall's original story for BBC Radio 4.

It is late at night, and a young man is doing the graveyard shift in his father's convenience store. He doesn't mind working nights, but customers can often be unpredictable...

Writer: Ben Halls is the author of the acclaimed debut collection, The Quarry, based on a fictional working-class West London estate.
Reader: Nikesh Patel
Producer: Justine Willett


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gt2x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


SUN 02:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gt2z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000gt31)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000gt33)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000gt35)
The Church of All Saints, Stand in Whitefield in Greater Manchester

Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of All Saints, Stand in Whitefield in Greater Manchester. The church was designed by Sir Charles Barry who was also the Chief Architect of the Houses of Parliament. Its tower contains a complete ring of eight bells, cast by Gillett and Johnson of Croydon in 1912. The tenor weighs twenty two hundredweight and it tuned to E flat. We hear them ringing Grandsire Triples


SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (m000gmgp)
Louise Pendry - Identity and Ageing

Lent Talks is a personal perspective on an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is identity – losing and gaining identity; struggling with identity; accepting and owning identity. Psychologist Louise Pendry reflects on her previous attitude to her own ageing as a 'wilderness' period, and offers a more positive alternative.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m000gt5n)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0270kml)
Seeing God

In a programme on religious visions, Mark Tully asks whether visionaries are empowered by this intense religious experience. He looks at the Hindu phenomenon of darshan, a divine vision which is seen as a particular blessing.

Visions - personal and apparently literal encounters with the divine - are viewed differently from one faith to another. Considered by some people as an important step on the road to enlightenment, they are viewed askance by others, and with suspicion by many.

Mark examines how visions are regarded by writers ranging from the Ancient Druid Amargin to Christopher Isherwood . He plays music by Lata Mangeshakar, Ernest Bloch and Van Morrison to compare the many musical visions of the face of God.

The readers are Toby Jones and Gerard Murphy

Producer by Frank Stirling.
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b01c6s8f)
Woodcock

In this week's Living World, Miranda Krestovnikoff tracks down one of our most mysterious and elusive birds, the woodcock. This mysterious wader spends most of its life in woodland and is wonderfully patterned to blend in with dead leaves. In summer there are about 160, 000 woodcocks in the UK, but in winter their numbers are swelled to over a million by migrant birds from Scandinavia and Russia. With their long bills, woodcock probe for worms and when the soil freezes, birds are forced to move south to the British Isles.

Woodcock are nocturnal , hiding by day in dense woodland. To see one, Miranda enlists the expertise of Dr Andrew Hoodless, a woodcock biologist with the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust who's been studying the birds for 20 years to find out where they feed, how they're affected by hard weather and what type of woodlands they require in the breeding season. Producer Brett Westwood.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m000gt5s)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000gt5x)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000gt61)
Covid-19 Funerals; Charity Funding; Fuad Nahdi

As the UK adapts to the social restrictions during the Covid-19 pandemic, Edward Stourton looks at the impact it is having on grieving families at funerals.
How do you greet people in a time of social distancing? Shaunaka Rishi Das, Director of the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies, tells Edward about the Hindu greeting known as the Namaste.
Yahya Birt and the Bishop of Bradford, Toby Howarth pay tribute to the former Editor of Q News, Fuad Nahdi, who died last weekend.
And why is Brazil's President keeping Churches open when the rest of the country is shutting down? Katy Watson explains.

Producers: Amanda Hancox
Rosie Dawson


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000gt65)
in2science UK

Steph McGovern makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of In2Science UK.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘In2Science UK’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘In2Science UK’.
- You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4

Registered Charity Number: 1164821


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000gt69)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000gt6f)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000gt6k)
Reconciliation in Difficult Times

A service for Passion Sunday with Edgardo Colon-Emeric, Director of the Center for Reconciliation, Duke University, North Carolina and the Revd Canon Dr Jennifer Smith, Superintendent Minister of Wesley's Chapel, London. The service will reflect theologically on the current world situation in the context of Passion Sunday and the 40th anniversary of the martyrdom of Oscar Romero. Producer: Katharine Longworth.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000gn77)
Fighting infection with imagination

"As our physical reality is reduced down to a few rooms or a view from a window," writes Sarah Dunant, "our ability to conjure up things we're not able to experience is going to be vital to feed our imaginations."

Sarah argues that - given social distancing - imagination is going to be an exceedingly powerful inner muscle when it comes to our mental survival.
She offers us a few of her stand out images to get us started.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrc4v)
Swallow (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the swallow. A flash of blue across farmland or a stableyard and a burst of twittering can only mean one thing, the swallows are back after their long migration from South Africa. No matter how grey the April weather, the sight and sound of a swallow dispels the winter blues at a stroke. These agile migrants arrive as the insect population is beginning to increase, and they are a delight to watch as they hawk for flies in the spring sunshine.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000gt6p)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000gt6t)
Writer, Daniel Thurman
Director, Marina Caldarone
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer..... Patricia Greene
Ruth Archer .... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer.... Daisy Badger
Josh Archer .... Angus Imrie
Ben Archer..... Ben Norris
Brian Aldridge.... Charles Collingwood
Phoebe Aldridge.... Lucy Morris
Justin Elliott .... Simon Williams
Rex Fairbrother .... Nick Barber
Adam Macy .... Andrew Wincott
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Robert Snell ….. Graham Blockey
Peggy Woolley .... June Spencer
Joy Horville .... Jackie Lye
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley
Gavin Moss ..... Gareth Pierce
Blake ….. Luke MacGregor


SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m000gt6y)
Brian Cox, actor

Brian Cox CBE is a Scottish actor whose career spans almost 60 years, from his early days sweeping the stage at his local theatre in Dundee to his current Golden Globe-winning role as the media patriarch Logan Roy in the HBO series Succession. He has appeared in more than 100 films, many television series, and has won two Olivier awards for his work on stage.

Brian Cox was born in 1946, the youngest of five children, and grew up in a working-class household in Dundee. His father died of cancer when he was eight and his mother, who was receiving regular psychiatric treatment, was unable to take care of him. He moved in with his sister Betty and her family.

He left school aged 14 with no qualifications, and started out as a stage hand and stage cleaner at Dundee Rep, before winning a place at drama school. Years of theatre work followed, alongside actors such as Laurence Olivier, John Gielgud and Albert Finney. His later stage roles include acclaimed performances as King Lear at the National Theatre, and Titus Andronicus for the Royal Shakespeare Company. On film, his work includes the first screen portrayal of Hannibal Lecter - renamed Lecktor - in Manhunter, and blockbusters such as The Bourne Identity, X-Men 2, Braveheart and Troy.

He received a CBE in 2002, and lives in New York City with his second wife Nicole Ansari.

DISC ONE: Bridge Over Troubled Water by Johnny Cash
DISC TWO: Saturday Night at the Movies by The Drifters
DISC THREE: The Air That I Breathe by KD Lang
DISC FOUR: Get Back by The Beatles
DISC FIVE: La quête by Jacques Brel
DISC SIX: Both Sides Now by Joni Mitchell
DISC SEVEN: God Only Knows by The Beach Boys
DISC EIGHT: Don’t Get Me Wrong by The Pretenders

BOOK CHOICE: In Search of the Miraculous by P.D. Ouspensky
LUXURY ITEM: A sewing kit
CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: God Only Knows by The Beach Boys

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Sarah Taylor


SUN 11:45 Short Works (m000gnln)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:30 today]


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000gt72)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (m000gkw2)
Series 4

Police, Camera, Milton!

High drama in the line of duty when Milton is asked to form a Police Corruption Unit and takes it a little too literally.

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is "Help!". Each week, Milton and his trusty assistant Anton set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. Because when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners" - The Guardian.

"King of the surreal one-liners" - The Times

"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary (Bluestone 42, Miranda), and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton's Channel 4 show House Of Rooms), the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton," returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill (Spamalot, Mr. Selfridge) as the ever-faithful Anton, Josie Lawrence and Dan Tetsell (Peep Show, Upstart Crow).

With music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000gt5k)
Eating After Cancer: Can rebuilding relationships with food help cancer patients with their recovery?

One of the unexpected side-effects of dealing with cancer can be how it impacts relationships with food and eating.

The various treatments can take away both appetite, and the ability to eat and enjoy food - which has a knock-on effect on the patient's health, social life and wider wellbeing...

Sheila Dillon knows this better than most: eight years ago, she was diagnosed with a type of blood cancer called multiple myeloma, and has experienced firsthand what it's like to lose the ability to enjoy a good meal, because of illness.

This is an issue that hasn’t always been given due attention, by medics or patients – but a shift is underway: there’s growing recognition that people with cancer not only need nutritious food, but also that the pleasure of eating can actually aid their wellbeing and recovery.

Under self-isolation in the coronavirus outbreak because of her 'immuno-compromised’ status from being on maintenance chemo, Sheila delves into the stories of people recovering from or living with cancer, who have been forced to readdress their relationship with what and how they eat; as well as the researchers and cooks pioneering new, food-based solutions.

Presented by Sheila Dillon and produced in Bristol by Lucy Taylor.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m000gt78)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000gt7d)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The Ugly Truth (m000gt7j)
The value society places on physical appearance has never quite made sense to blind presenter Lyndall Bywater and yet she's intrigued to discover why it matters so much to those of us in the sighted world. How much of an advantage is it to be beautiful? And what is physical beauty anyway? 
We've heard about the gender bias, the age bias, and the racial bias but few people talk about the beauty bias and yet it's one of the very first judgements we make when we meet someone. In this programme Lyndall explores this invisible force that controls how we behave - and reveals that when it comes to physical beauty, we all unconsciously discriminate. 

Producer: Sarah Shebbeare
Researcher: Robbie Wojciechowski


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000gn6l)
North Guildford

Peter Gibbs is joined by Pippa Greenwood, Matthew Pottage and Matt Biggs in North Guildford, Surrey, in a programme recorded before the current situation with the coronavirus..

The panellists answer questions on getting Strelitzia to flower, how frequently to change the soil in large containers and planting suggestions for a narrow, shady passage by a house. They also identify some garden pests and recommend how to deal with them.

Away from the questions, Matt Biggs meets Geoff Simmons in Tooting to find out about Peter Barr - or as he's more fondly known - the Daffodil King.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m000gt7n)
Billy and John - The Way The Cookie Crumbles

Two strangers Billy and John look back over the opportunities that life gave them and the regrets, as well as what makes them tick today in their retirement.


SUN 15:00 Castle of the Hawk (m000gt7s)
Wallenstein

By Mike Walker

The epic saga of the Habsburg Dynasty continues.

It's 1618. Wallenstein is a brilliant soldier and wants a career in the army of the Holy Roman Empire. But he is a Protestant, and he just can't hold his tongue. Katherina, a widow, takes him under her wing, and with her guidance he achieves great fame and fortune. But a war wolf is hard to control. Can Katherina rein him in?

CAST

Katherina - Anamaria Marinca
Wallenstein - Richard Harrington
Ferdinand - Patrick Baladi
Tilly - Simon Armstrong
Gordon - John Dougal
Gustavus - David Menkin
Bishop - Marc Danbury
The Officer - Rhys Meredith

Directed by John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000gt7w)
Maggie O'Farrell Sophie Hannah and Reading in Isolation

Mariella talks to Maggie O'Farrell about Hamnet, her new novel exploring William Shakespeare's family in a time of pestilence. She explains why she wanted to write about the death of his son and how it may have inspired the Bard's most famous teenager.

This month's Book I'd Never Lend is chosen by crime writer Sophie Hannah

Plus the best books for "shelf-isolation" are discussed with Literary Friction's Octavia Bright and Ted Hodgkinson, Head of Literature and Spoken Word at the Southbank Centre and chair of this year's soon to be announced International Booker Prize.


SUN 16:30 Halal If You Hear Me (m000gt7y)
Poets Fatimah Asghar and Safia Elhillo explore how they’ve created a community through their collection Halal If You Hear Me - an anthology published in celebration of Muslim women, queer, trans, and gender non-conforming voices.

Fatimah Asghar had often reflected on how best to honour all her identities - queer, Kashmiri-Pakistani, American, Muslim. Safia Elhillo, a Sudanese-American Muslim, felt the same way. They met at a poetry event and became firm friends. Together, they explore how to inhabit the spaces in between their identities.

They discuss the hybrid languages their families speak - Arabic and English for Safia and Urdu-Shreiki-English for Fatimah - which they revere on the page. Fatimah adapted the South Asian poetic form the ghazal to explore notions of home, while Safia became gripped by the Egyptian singer Abdelhalim Hafez,, who assuaged her insecurities about languages and race.

They wanted to provide a platform for other Muslims grappling with intersectional identities, and so published Halal If You Hear Me. They celebrate and protect these identities, while dispelling the notion that there is only one way to be Muslim.

Producer: Eloise Stevens
Executive Producer: Anishka Sharma

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

Image credit: Mercedes Zapata.


SUN 17:00 Universal Basic Income: Alaska Style (m000gl9m)
There is growing interest in the idea of giving every member of society a Basic Income, as a way of tackling extreme poverty and the loss of jobs caused by automation.

Pilot projects have been seen across the world - from India to Finland and Namibia to Canada - and there is talk of a one possibly happening here in the UK, in the city of Hull.

So, attention is being paid to the Alaskan model. The Arctic American state has been paying out an annual dividend to every one of its permanent residents - man, woman and child - for almost 40 years. They don’t have to do anything to get the money, and they can use it in any way they like.

The money comes from the state’s Permanent Fund, which invests a substantial share of the profits of oil production for the benefit of all its citizens. As a result of this dividend, arguably a form of Basic Income, its supporters say Alaska is the least unequal state in the whole USA.

But in the last three years, Alaskan politics has been dominated by an unresolved crisis. The State government has been trying to use money earmarked for the dividend for other purposes, and many claim that this is illegal.

Mark Whitaker reports from Alaska on a unique scheme, explaining its history and discovering why it has become so controversial.

A Square Dog Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:40 Profile (m000gt2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000gt80)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000gt82)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gt84)
Government says measures unprecedented in peacetime and will have lengthy impact


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000gt86)
Sheila McClennon

Hopefully we've got some reassuring radio for you this week. There’s some vintage comedy, a charming con woman, a cellist swapping the concert hall for home and advice from a monk and an astronaut on coping with feeling cooped up.

If it’s all getting too much – we’ve rain, lots of it, splashing soothingly onto a tin roof. And Sir David Attenborough reminding us that it’s still a wonderful world.

Presenter: Sheila McClennon
Producer: Stephen Garner
Production support: Kay Whyld


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m000gt5f)
Joy returns Josh’s jacket to him while he’s on duty on in the Brookfield lambing shed. While Joy recounts her hangover from the Felpersham night out, Josh discovers a problem with a lambing ewe. Brian appears and lends Josh a hand while Joy observes. Twin lambs are successfully delivered. Impressed Brian tells Josh that Ian has to go to Ireland for his aunt’s funeral so there is now lambing work at Home Farm for him.

Robert tries to lift Lynda’s spirits but she’s tired and when another visitor arrives she wants them sent away. She changes her mind when she realises it’s Freddie. She gets tearful but then gathers herself. Freddie apologises for what he said before the explosion but Lynda has no memory of their argument. Lynda reveals Robert’s dad’s medal had always been on display, and not ‘gathering dust’ as Robert had claimed. This makes Freddie want to give it back but Lynda insists he keep it for Robert’s sake.

Freddie tries to be positive but Lynda is frustrated by the state she’s in. She feels hideous and doesn’t think she’ll be the same again. She tells Freddie how much pain she’s in and takes off her scarf to show him that her head has been shaved for skin grafts. Freddie wants to fetch Robert but Lynda doesn’t want him seeing her like this. She also doesn’t want Freddie to repeat their conversation. She tells Freddie she wishes he’d left her in Grey Gables – she’d prefer to be dead than to be in the state she’s in now.


SUN 19:15 Reluctant Persuaders (m000118z)
Series 3

Holidays Are Coming

It’s Christmas Eve, and Joe Starling (Mathew Baynton) sits alone in his favourite bar telling the barman (Mark Evans) his troubles. He’s quit his job at Hardacre’s advertising agency.

A few hours earlier on Christmas Eve and Hardacre’s are having a party. Rupert Hardacre (Nigel Havers) has pulled out all the stops to celebrate the agency’s most successful year ever. By creating a wildly popular TV ad for Walton’s department store, Hardacre’s have reached the Promised Land - the reputation of the agency is restored and their future is secured. And it’s all thanks to Joe.

Joe, Hardacre, Amanda (Josie Lawrence), and Teddy (Rasmus Hardiker) gather to celebrate their achievement, get drunk, sing some karaoke and ring in Christmas. For once, everything at Hardacre’s has gone right and everyone is happy.

So how has Joe ended up in that bar?

Cast:
Hardacre.............................................Nigel Havers
Joe.........................................................Mathew Baynton
Amanda...............................................Josie Lawrence
Teddy...................................................Rasmus Hardiker
Narrator..............................................Victoria Rigby
Bartender...........................................Mark Evans
Christmas Ad Voice Over.............Gordon Kennedy

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 New Irish Writing (b03y3lkb)
Serenity

A series of new readings by some of Ireland's most exciting and talented writers. Clare Dwyer-Hogg, Michèle Forbes, Paul McVeigh and Martin Meenan bring us a range of stories where human emotions are tested, and memories are forged, forgotten or found, all the while taking a humorous and poignant look at how people withdraw, connect and reconnect with one another throughout the course of their lives.

A coffee shop owner who portraits the epitome of calm and sophistication spectacularly lets her guard down in "Serenity" by Claire Dywer-Hogg. Read by Hattie Morahan. Produced by Morag Keating.

Music, Letters by Little Bear.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m000gn6q)
Feedback devotes the whole programme to putting listeners’ questions and concerns to the BBC’s Director of Radio and Education James Purnell.

He tells Roger Bolton how the Corporation is coping in the present crisis and what changes we can expect in the near future. And they go on to discuss the future strategic challenges facing the Corporation as its own financial problems increase and with the future of the licence fee itself under examination.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000gn6n)
Betty Williams, Dr Fuad Nahdi, Sol Kerzner, Kenny Rogers

Picture Betty Williams

Matthew Bannister on:
Fuad Nahdi, the journalist, commentator and campaigner named as one of the world’s 500 most influential Muslims.
Sol Kerzner, the South African businessman who made a fortune from hotels and casinos and built the controversial Sun City resort under apartheid.
Betty Williams, the office receptionist from Belfast who teamed up with Mairead Corrigan to campaign for peace and won the Nobel Peace Prize.
Kenny Rogers, one of America’s greatest country singers known for hits like “Lucille” and “Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town.”

Interviewed guest: Abdul-Rehman Malik
Interviewed guest: Bishop Toby Howarth
Interviewed guest: Paul Martin
Interviewed guest: Chris Ryder
Interviewed guest: Garth Cartwright
Interviewed guest: Bob Harris

Producer: Neil George


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000gt1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000gt65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m000gkwc)
The Roots of 'Woke' Culture

Barack Obama condemned it. Black American activists championed it. Meghan Markle brought it to the Royal Family. “Wokeness” has become a shorthand for one side of the culture wars, popularising concepts like “white privilege” and “trigger warnings” - and the idea that “language is violence”.

Journalist Helen Lewis is on a mission to uncover the roots of this social phenomenon. On her way she meets three authors who in 2017 hoaxed a series of academic journals with fake papers on dog rape, fat bodybuilding and feminist astrology. They claimed to have exposed the jargon-loving, post-modern absurdity of politically correct university departments - whose theories drive “woke” online political movements.

But is there really a link between the contemporary language of social justice warriors and the continental philosophy of the 1960s and 70s? And are critics of wokeness just reactionaries, left uneasy by a changing world?

Producer Craig Templeton Smith
Editor Jasper Corbett


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000gt89)
Carolyn Quinn's guests are the senior Conservative backbencher Robert Halfon; the Shadow Immigration Minister, Bel Ribeiro-Addy; and the Guardian's political correspondent, Kate Proctor. They discuss the latest developments over coronavirus. The programme also includes an interview with the former Business Secretary, Andrea Leadsom, about the impact of the epidemic on the economy. And the Labour grandee Dame Margaret Beckett debates Jeremy Corbyn's legacy as party leader, with his former adviser Andrew Fisher.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000glnt)
With Antonia Quirke

Screenwriter Ronan Bennett talks about the phone call that changed his whole career.

Marjane Satrapi discusses Persepolis and Radioactive.

Critics recommend films to watch while self isolating

Image: Ronan Bennett
Image credit: Colin McPherson/Corbis/via Getty Images


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0270kml)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 30 MARCH 2020

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000gt8c)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m0003jhs)
Kitsch - Cute

Cute and kitsch - Simon May, visiting professor of philosophy at King’s College London, explores cuteness and its immense hold on us, from emojis and fluffy puppies to its more uncanny, subversive expressions. Also, the changing significance of kitsch, from garden gnomes to Eurotrash. Ruth Holliday, Professor of Gender and Culture at the University of Leeds, suggests that judgements of taste have shifted ground rather than relaxed. They’re joined by the cultural critic, Peter York.

This programme was first broadcast in March 2019

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000gt35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gt8f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gt8h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:33 Shipping Forecast (m000gt8k)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gt8p)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

The last thing I look at night and the first thing I look at in the morning is often the news on my mobile phone. These days this bad habit is leading to growing insomnia and morning blues, as it sucks me into the global panic accompanying this world wide pandemic. Starting and ending the day with prayer may be a much healthier choice.

In his New Testament letter to the Philippians, the apostle Paul, familiar with crisis and tragedy, explains how we should deal with our anxieties and burdens:

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.

Then follows a beautiful promise:

And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

A peace that transcends understanding is surely what all of us need right now. While the instant access to global news means we are continually flooded with worrying information, access to God through prayer can offer us a peaceful haven even in the midst of the storm.

Many people around the UK are pausing to light a candle at 7pm as evening falls to say a prayer. Perhaps a growing number of us can find relief in this during these difficult days. Let our prayers not our phones guide our hearts, souls and minds.

Dear Loving Heavenly Father
When world events or our personal burdens distract, consume and crush us, thank you that you listen to our worries.
As we seek you first thing each morning or last thing at night
We trust your promise to transfer your peace to us.
May it become a guard to our hearts from the toxicity of anxiety.

Amen


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000gt7t)
30/03/20 For the love of trees; Newmarket races and coronavirus; Rural tourism in Angus

Charlotte Smith speaks to Darren Moorcroft from The Woodland Trust about the impact the coronavirus is having on their work and on the people who still want to visit their woods. Caroline Millar gives an update on the tourism business she runs on a farm in Angus, and Jonathan Park reports on the shutdown of Newmarket's horse racing industry.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Toby Field


MON 05:56 Weather (m000gt8r)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (m0001cy1)
Brian Briggs Shearwater Takeover

Brian Briggs, former singer, lyricist, and guitarist with the band Stornoway, takes over the Tweet of the Day output this week. Brian who has had a lifelong passion for the natural world and birding, even completed a PhD on ducks. Stornoway, who's third album Bronxie (the colloquial name for the arctic skua) finally disbanded in 2017, allowing Brian to convert his hobby and long standing love affair with birds into a career. He is now is the reserve manager of the Wetlands and Wildlife Trust's Llanelli Wetland Centre.

With a lifetime of bird knowledge, Brian recalls the other-worldly sound of Manx Shearwaters, calling from their burrows on the island of Skomer in west Wales, the largest known concentration of these birds in the world.

You can hear more from Brian in the Tweet of the Week Omnibus, available on the Radio 4 website and on BBC Sounds

Producer Andrew Dawes


MON 06:00 Today (m000gt4s)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000bvxw)
Rebuilding conservatism in changing times

Nick Timothy was once described as the ‘toxic’ power behind Theresa May’s early leadership. He talks to Amol Rajan about his experience in frontline government. In his new book, Remaking One Nation, he calls for the rebuilding of a more inclusive conservatism and the rejection of both extreme economic and cultural liberalism. As the Covid-19 pandemic forces the government to take more extreme measures, Timothy argues for a new social contract between the state, big companies and local communities.

In recent decades politicians have had to deal with what appears to be an extreme pace of change – in new technology, global markets and increased automation. The Great Acceleration, as it’s been called, has left many communities feeling left behind. But in his forthcoming book, Slowdown, Professor Danny Dorling argues that there's actually been a widespread check on growth and speed of change. He sees this as a moment of promise and a move toward stability. But that stability may be short-lived as the fall out from the coronavirus hits individuals, communities and businesses hard.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b017lt53)
Charles Dickens: A Life, by Claire Tomalin

Episode 1

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of Britain's great novelist paints a portrait of an extraordinarily complex man. Today's theme is Dickens' troubled childhood.

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of one of the nation's literary giants is broadcast to mark the 150th anniversary of his death in June 2020. Here Tomalin portrays Dickens as a writer "so charged with imaginative energy that he rendered nineteenth century England crackling, full of truth and life, with his laughter, horror and indignation - and sentimentality." The Artful Dodger, Mr Pickwick, Pip and David Copperfield are just a handful of the characters he created and who continue to endure. He was also a hard-working journalist, a philanthropist, a supporter of liberal social causes, and father of ten, and yet his genius also had a dark side which emerged with the breakdown of his marriage.

Claire Tomalin was literary editor of the The New Statesman and then the Sunday Times before becoming a full time writer. Her biographies are award winning. The Life and Death of Mary Wollstonecraft, won the Whitbread First Book Award, and Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self was Whitbread Book of the Year in 2002.

Read by Penelope Wilton
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gt4w)
Coronavirus and pregnancy, Social workers, Calamity Jane

The Royal College of Midwives says that coronavirus may mean its staff have to work elsewhere in the NHS, rather than looking after pregnant women. Dr Mary Ross Davie explains the RCM's concerns.

Social workers are trying to keep working safely and effectively despite restrictions around Covid-19. However, a survey by the British Associations of Social Workers says many haven't been given solid advice or the right personal protection equipment. Dr Ruth Allen, Chief Executive of the BASW, describes the challenges that social workers face right now.

We hear from two healthcare workers who've cared for SARS patients and Ebola patients. How did they cope during those pandemics and what can we learn from them now?

And Calamity Jane: you're probably thinking of Doris Day right now but Calamity Jane really did exist in real-life. Professor Karen R. Jones from the University of Kent tells us how an American called Martha Jane Canary was the real Calamity Jane.


MON 10:45 The Prelude, by William Wordsworth (m000gt4y)
Episode 1

William Wordsworth's autobiographical poem The Prelude is arguably the most important piece of poetic writing in our language. Recorded in Wordsworth's home in Grasmere, Cumbria, Wordsworth looks back over events in his early life.

Wordsworth believed that poetry should be written in the natural language of common speech, and in that way it was revolutionary in its time.

Parts of the poem are famous, with lines quoted often, such as the description of the young Wordsworth stealing a boat. Other parts are more introspective. The young poet leaves Grasmere to go to university in Cambridge and is homesick. Wordsworth grapples with his political feelings - travelling to France at the time of the French Revolution. He enjoys the hustle and bustle of London, and is euphoric when crossing the Alps. All the time this poem is accessible, bursting with colour and description, full of gripping storytelling.

The Prelude is read by Sir Ian McKellen, with specially composed music by John Harle performed by John Harle on saxophone and Neill MacColl on guitar.

The Prelude is directed in Manchester by Susan Roberts.


MON 11:00 Fighting Talk: How Language Can Make Us Better (m0001g8w)
When we talk about cancer it’s often hard to find the right words. As we search for the perfect thing to say, we find ourselves reaching for familiar metaphors; the inspiring people fighting or battling their cancer.

Cara Hoofe is currently in remission from Stage 4 bowel cancer, she says it would be easy for her to say she’s beaten cancer. Yet she’s still uncomfortable with the terminology. If she’s won her fight, does that mean others have lost?

In this programme Cara asks experts what impact these militaristic metaphors actually have on those living with cancer, and asks current and former patients what we should talk about when we talk about cancer


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000gt2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000gtbl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:03 Shipping Forecast (m000h8s2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


MON 12:06 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gt53)
Episode 11: Sacrifice

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

After Henry’s disastrous decision to surprise his new bride, Anne of Cleves, relations are delicate. Henry wants rid of Anne, but Cromwell fears this will mean the end of the alliance with Germany...

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


MON 12:20 You and Yours (m000gt55)
Stranded travellers, Moving relatives out of care homes, Coronavirus poems

Our reporter Melanie Abbott has the lastest on the thousands of British travellers abroad who are still trying to find a way home since the coronavirus outbreak. She speaks to people stuck on the other side of the world in South America, Australia and New Zealand.

We report on how some families have decided to move their relatives out of care homes due to the coronavirus. Many care homes are now operating restricted visitor policies which has led some people to make difficult decisions about their loved ones' care. We hear why one family decided to bring their relative home. We also talk to Martin Green, chief executive of Care England and Helen Walker, chief executive of Carers UK.

We look at why some people, including our own listeners, are turning to poetry for solace as a way of coping with life in lockdown. We speak to poet and BBC presenter, Ian McMillan, about a poem he's written to capture the national mood and why he thinks poetry can help people at the moment.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Tara Holmes


MON 12:57 Weather (m000gt57)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000gt59)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (m000gt5c)
Series 2: 50 More Things...

Vickrey Turnstile

Subways get crowded, aeroplanes over-booked and roads congested. Back in the 1950s, a future Nobel laureate suggested a solution to these problems that worked well in theory but was unpalatable to the decision-makers of the day. Was he impractical, asks Tim Harford, or was he ahead of his time?

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon


MON 14:00 The Archers (m000gt5f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 This Thing of Darkness (m000gwn0)
Part 6

Written by Anita Vettesse with monologues by Eileen Horne.

Dr Alex Bridges is an expert forensic psychiatrist, assessing and treating perpetrators of the most unthinkable crimes.
In this gripping drama, Alex charts the psychological impact of the murder of a young man on his family, and explores the long shadow of homicide through her therapy group for murderers.

Has Laura really discovered who killed her son?

Cast:
Alex … Lolita Chakrabarti
David … Robin Laing
Laura… Shauna Macdonald

Series created by Audrey Gillan, Lucia Haynes, Eileen Horne, Gaynor Macfarlane, Anita Vettesse and Kirsty Williams.

Series consultant: Dr Gwen Adshead

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane and Kirsty Williams

A BBC Scotland Production directed by Kirsty Williams


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m000gt5h)
Programme 12, 2020

(12/12)
For the final contest of the 2020 season Stuart Maconie and Adele Geras of the North of England face off against Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards for Wales, in an edition entirely consisting of listeners' question suggestions.

These two sides are rarely far from the top of the RBQ league table and a keen match is guaranteed. Tom Sutcliffe asks the questions and awards the points, deducting from a perfect 6 every time he has to nudge the panel away from a red herring, or heave a crucial clue into their field of vision. Today's outcome will decide the order in which all of the teams finish in this year's rankings.

The cryptic questions, often especially fiendish when provided by listeners, require the panel to dredge their knowledge of 1960s cinema, 15th century literature and 19th century choral music - among many other topics.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m000gt5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The City That Sings (m000gt5p)
To sing, all you need is a voice.

Makhanda is a South African city with a colonial past, a challenging present and an uncertain future. It struggles with huge issues of social inequality, crumbling infrastructure, administrative mismanagement and racial misunderstanding. For many of its residents every day is a struggle.

But it has another heritage.

It's a city rich in creative talent and is home to South Africa’s National Arts Festival. Masicule is an annual choir event, created by the Festival, with the aim of bringing people together to do the one thing that South Africans do best – sing.

Local vocalist, Nombasa Maqoko, brings you the story of Masicule 2020, a chance to hear some of its wonderful music and to discover how singing creates a brief flicker of light in Makhanda’s current darkness.

A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 PM (m000gt5y)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gt66)
One in four NHS doctors are currently unable to work as patient numbers continue to rise


MON 18:30 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (m000gt6b)
Series 4

The Art Dealer

Milton’s attempt to become an international art dealer leads to a deadly brush with danger.

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is "Help!". Each week, Milton and his trusty assistant Anton set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. Because when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners" - The Guardian.

"King of the surreal one-liners" - The Times

"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary (Bluestone 42, Miranda), and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton's Channel 4 show House Of Rooms), the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton," returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill (Spamalot, Mr. Selfridge) as the ever-faithful Anton, Josie Lawrence and Ben Willbond (Yonderland, Ghosts).

With music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000gt6g)
Lynda’s been moved out of the Burns Unit onto a ward. She’s worried about Blake, as she’s heard he’s mortified by the damage he caused and was also seriously hurt. She phones Roy and asks him to visit Blake to explain she’s forgiven him. Roy’s busy with daily management team meetings and working on the insurance claim but promises to see him later in the week.

Roy finds Josh in high spirits. He’s just heard that the police won’t be charging him.

Robert intercepts Ben and Josh on their way into visit Lynda. They want to tell her how Monty’s getting on, and have bought a bag of goodies from Jill and Ruth. Robert stalls them and says that Lynda’s busy with physiotherapy. Lynda tells Robert to put the word out that she doesn’t want visitors. Robert tells Lynda that James and Leonie will arrive at the weekend. She hopes they won’t want to see her.

As they’re leaving the hospital, Ben bumps into Chloe, the doctor he met on his birthday night out. He’s surprised to discover she’s 25. Keen to get away, Chloe suggests Ben gets back in touch when he’s had more practice. Josh finds this hilarious and pokes fun at Ben for punching above his weight. Ben warns Josh that if he doesn’t shut up, he’ll be walking home.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000gt6l)
Icelandic pianist Víkingur Ólafsson plays live from Reykjavik

Icelandic pianist Víkingur Ólafsson has a new album, Debussy – Rameau, exploring the music of two very different but complementary composers. He plays live from Reykjavik, exclusively for Front Row.

Actor Jo Hartley - best known for her roles in Shane Meadows' This is England series - discusses her new TV drama, In My Skin, which is coming to BBC Three. It's the story of a Welsh teenager - Bethan - who is dealing with mental illness, friendships and her sexuality. Her mother Trina - played by Hartley - has bipolar disorder and is sectioned in a psychiatric ward but Bethan is doing all she can to hide her mother's condition from her friends and the school authorities. The part is based on the personal experiences of Welsh writer Kayleigh Llewellyn.

Musician Mik Scarlet gives his Disabled Person’s Guide to Surviving (and Thriving) in Lockdown. He passes on his top tips and argues that, although on screen disabled people are often portrayed as weak and needing help, there is a lot the able-bodied can learn from this community who are more familiar with enforced time spent at home.

The death of Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki has been announced. Music critic and Radio 3 presenter Tom Service considers what it was about his music, which sounded uncompromisingly modern, that also appealed to people who felt they wouldn't normally enjoy modern classical music.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Oliver Jones


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00q2psk)
About Love

The Man in a Case

In celebration of the 160th anniversary of Anton Chekhov's birth, Michael Pennington plays the great Russian writer presenting a series of his short stories on the subject of marriage, dramatised by Martyn Wade.

A repressed schoolmaster has marriage on his mind.

Chekhov ...... Michael Pennington
Belikov ...... Jasper Britton
Kovalenko ...... Nicholas Boulton
Varenka ...... Zoe Waites

Directed by Philip Franks and Jane Morgan.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:00 The Ugly Truth (m000gt7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:30 on Sunday]


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m000gln1)
Indonesia: Not cool to date

Saying no to dating is part of a growing ultraconservative social movement in Indonesia being spread through Instagram and WhatsApp. “When I look at couples, I see my old self, how I used to be affectionate in public, holding hands, hugging,” says 23-year-old Yati, “and now I think that’s disgusting.” When Yati broke up with her ex, she didn’t just swear off dating; she joined Indonesia’s anti-dating movement - Indonesia Without Dating. Its leaders say dating is expensive, gets in the way of study, and - most importantly - is against religious teaching. For Crossing Continents, Simon Maybin discovers it is part of a wider youth-led surge in conservative Islam in the world’s most populous Muslim-majority country. Opponents see the phenomenon as a backwards step for women and a threat to Indonesia’s religious pluralism.

Presenter: Simon Maybin
Producer: Josephine Casserly
Editor: Bridget Harney
Music at the end of the programme was Tubuhku Otoritasku by Tika and The Dissidents.


MON 21:00 The Cathedral Thinkers (m000gl8n)
The concept of cathedral thinking can be traced back to medieval times. Architects and stone-masons would begin construction on great cathedrals and places of worship, knowing they would never see work completed within their own lifetimes.

In our uncertain age of pandemic, global warming and exponentially accelerating technology, a new kind of cathedral thinking may be required to find solutions to some of our greatest challenges. Days after the 2019 fire at Notre Dame Cathedral, Greta Thunberg made an impassioned speech to the European Parliament where she implored leaders to tackle climate change by adopting the same long-term planning which had underpinned the original construction of Notre Dame. But in our quick-fix, sugar-rush world of market-driven economics, short-term election cycles and quarterly performance reviews, the idea of taking the long view and planning centuries - even millennia head - can seem deeply counter-cultural.

Ian Sansom meets the people daring to dream beyond their own lifespans and wonders how he might go about doing so himself. As he explores contemporary cathedral projects with the potential to shape the future of science, technology and environmental protection, Ian asks what we can learn from the original medieval cathedral thinkers and if cathedral projects are all voyages of discovery into uncharted territory.

Producer: Conor Garrett


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000bvxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000h2rz)
New plan to bring home thousands of stranded Brits

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gt53)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 23:00 Lights Out (m000gt6s)
Series 2

Into This World

Two new parents-to-be contemplate what it means to navigate the limitations of the identities their son will inherit.

The desire to protect and shelter is fraught with the anticipation that one day he will move in a world having to know in some way what it means to be racialised as black, gendered as a man and everything in between.

Featuring the voices of Kate Williams, Dean Atta and Ansel Wong.

Produced by Axel Kacoutié with Maz Ebtehaj
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 The Digital Human (m000gt5t)
Series 19

Coercion

Since Britain went into lock down, people in emotionally and physically abusive relationships are having to spend more time with their partners in a confined space. Police forces in England and Wales say they've seen a dramatic spike in reports of domestic abuse.

The Digital Human speaks with survivors of these relationships and asks them how technology extended the reach of abusers. We hear how it is used as a tool to coerce, control and manipulate, but also how it can be used by the victim for advice and support.

Producer: Kate Bissell
Researcher: Juliet Conway

Details of organisations offering information and support with domestic violence are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 888 809



TUESDAY 31 MARCH 2020

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000gt71)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b017lt53)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gt75)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gt79)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:33 Shipping Forecast (m000gt7f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gt7p)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

The last time I was in lock down was thirty years ago when the country I was living in suddenly became a war zone. Machine guns were being fired in the street outside of our home causing my wife and I to shelter at night under our kitchen table. It was in those dark and traumatic moments that we met God. Praying through the words of Psalm 46 our spirits were sustained:

God is our refuge and strength,
an ever-present help in trouble.
Therefore we will not fear, though the earth give way
and the mountains fall into the heart of the sea,
though its waters roar and foam
and the mountains quake with their surging.

A wooden table was very little protection from Kalashnikov bullets – ultimately our safety was in the hands of God. The security that God offered us on the other hand could withstand mountain-shaking earthquakes, tsunami-force waves, even suffocating global pandemics. His ever-present help in trouble promised to outlive life and death.

I find the imagery in this ancient song incredibly helpful. Even if the mountainous geographical or political contours of our planet shift, even if the solid ground beneath our feet gives way, even if we are overwhelmed by roaring waves of uncertainty, there is still a place we can run to. God’s refuge is reliable and resilient.

These ageless words calmed our spirits and strengthened our hearts thirty years ago. My prayer is that they do the same for you today.

Thank you Heavenly Father for your unshakable refuge.
We particularly pray for those who are living in insecure contexts – the homeless, the ill, the refugees and the elderly.
Thank you that you can be relied upon whatever we are facing right now.

Amen


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000h9fy)
31/03/20 Nationwide scheme to recruit British crop pickers

The National Farmers Union is having urgent talks with the DEFRA Secretary later today to discuss a nationwide scheme to recruit UK agricultural workers. We hear from an asparagus farmer who's struggling to find people to pick his crop, and from NFU Vice President, Tom Bradshaw.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (m0001h1h)
Brian Briggs and the Chaffinch Song

Former Stornoway band member Brian Briggs, returns for a second week curating the Tweet of the Day output, with a story of how the chaffinch song was the first he recognised. Brian, now a reserve manager at the Wetlands and Wildlife Trust's Llanelli Wetland Centre, remembers how his first job as an ecologist at Oxford's Wytham Woods ignited his journey into learning the language of birds throughout the seasons.

You can hear more from Brian in the Tweet of the Week Ombibus, available on the Radio 4 website and on BBC Sounds

Producer Andrew Dawes


TUE 06:00 Today (m000gtm1)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 More or Less (m000h7st)
Supermarket stockpiling, A-level results and Covid-19 gender disparity

This week, we examine criticisms of Imperial College’s epidemiologists. We ask how A-Level and GCSE grades will be allocated, given that the exams have vanished in a puff of social distancing. Adam Kucharski, author of The Rules of Contagion, tells us about the history of epidemiology. We look at the supermarkets: how are their supply chains holding up and how much stockpiling is really going on. And is coronavirus having a different impact on men than on women?


(A woman looks at the empty shelves while shopping at a Sainsbury's supermarket in Walthamstow, East London. Credit:Tolga Akmen/Getty Images)


TUE 09:30 New Storytellers (m000766g)
My Life After Grenfell

Three survivors of the Grenfell Tower fire - Alison Moses, Emma O’Connor and Antonio Roncolato - recount the hardships they have endured since that fateful night in June 2017.

Starting with memories of the disaster, the survivors then describe what has happened to them since - from being re-housed in temporary accommodation to their feelings about the immediate and long-term political responses to the fire. How do you cope with losing friends and family and still living in the charred shadow of Grenfell Tower itself?

New Storytellers presents the work of radio and audio producers new to BBC Radio 4 and this first series features the five winners of this year's Charles Parker Prize for the Best Student Radio Feature. The award is presented every year in memory of pioneering radio producer Charles Parker who produced the famous series of Radio Ballads with Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger.

My Life After Grenfell was produced by Rhys Gunter who has just graduated from the University of Westminster. The Charles Parker Award judges said, “although Grenfell is a well-known story, this chilling retelling of the fire and its aftermath brings a new authentic perspective – a very high-level achievement.”

Producer: Rhys Gunter
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b017mrbj)
Charles Dickens: A Life, by Claire Tomalin

Episode 2

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of Britain's great novelist paints a portrait of an extraordinarily complex man. Today's themes are his early successes as a writer, and new beginnings.

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of the novelist who called himself the "inimitable" is being broadcast in the 150th year since his death. Here Tomalin paints a vivid portrait of the writer at work, his extraordinary energy allowing him to write at an intense rate. His personal life required almost as much energy, a husband, a father of ten and a man who enjoyed a busy social life, with evenings spent at the theatre among friends before returning home to write.

Claire Tomalin was literary editor of the The New Statesman and then the Sunday Times before becoming a full time writer. Her biographies are award winning. The Life and Death of Mary Wollstonecraft, won the Whitbread First Book Award, and Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self was Whitbread Book of the Year in 2002.


Read by Penelope Wilton
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gtm3)
Working From Home, Domestic Violence, Useful Tech

We're being told to work from home if we can, so how's it going? What if you're sharing your home with someone else #WFH? Do you have enough space? As well as the paid work you're doing, how are the chores getting divided up? And what about looking after children in the middle of it all?

Victims of violence in the home are being reassured that there's still help available for them despite what's happening. Sarah Green from End Violence Against Women describes how dangerous the lock-down is for victims of domestic abuse.

We hear from Kate Elisabeth Russell, author of My Dark Vanessa. It's about an American teenager who's been groomed and raped by a teacher. At the time that it's happening the character thinks it's love, but realises when she's older that is was abuse.

And how we're using tech to stay in touch. Lara Lewington from BBC Click gives us some tips on Zoom, Whatsapp and Houseparty.


TUE 10:45 The Prelude, by William Wordsworth (m000gtm5)
Episode 2

William Wordsworth's autobiographical poem The Prelude is arguably the most important piece of poetic writing in our language. Recorded in Wordsworth's home in Grasmere, Cumbria, Wordsworth looks back over events in his early life.

Wordsworth believed that poetry should be written in the natural language of common speech, and in that way it was revolutionary in its time.

Parts of the poem are famous, with lines quoted often, such as the description of the young Wordsworth stealing a boat. Other parts are more introspective. The young poet leaves Grasmere to go to university in Cambridge and is homesick. Wordsworth grapples with his political feelings - travelling to France at the time of the French Revolution. He enjoys the hustle and bustle of London, and is euphoric when crossing the Alps. All the time this poem is accessible, bursting with colour and description, full of gripping storytelling.

The Prelude is read by Sir Ian McKellen, with specially composed music by John Harle performed by John Harle on saxophone and Neill MacColl on guitar.

The Prelude is directed in Manchester by Susan Roberts.


TUE 11:00 The NHS Front Line (m000h613)
Week 2 on the covid wards

Dr John Wright has been recording on the wards for BBC Radio 4 – starting on March 16th, the day the Prime Minister gave his first televised address about the danger of Covid-19. This is week two of his diaries, recorded as the number of cases starts to increase and the pressures on the frontline team intensify.

These recordings with frontline NHS staff at all levels, take you behind the scenes on the wards as they plan for what is to come and then cope as the patients arrive. They let us share in the pressures, personal and professional, and in the decisions being made in the face of this unprecedented threat.

Professor John Wright is helping Bradford Royal Infirmary to get ready for Covid-19. He’s looked after patients all over the world – cholera and HIV in Southern Africa, Ebola in Sierra Leone. He thinks it’s important we should all know what we are facing.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Sue Mitchell
Sound Production by Richard Hannaford


TUE 11:30 Eighteen (m000gtm8)
Malin Lewis and Malak Mattar

Unravelling the lives, dreams and creative worlds of six 18 to 21-year-old artists across the globe.

In today’s episode, we meet Malin Lewis (19) - a Scottish piper studying in Glasgow, whose music and creative life powerfully captures their identity as a transgender person.

Meanwhile, in Istanbul, the young Palestinian artist Malak Mattar (20) is preparing for an exhibition in Holland - and thinking about life back home on the Gaza Strip.

Producer: Steven Rajam
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000gtmd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:03 Shipping Forecast (m000h8s0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


TUE 12:06 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gtmj)
Episode 12: Renaissance

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

After Henry’s disastrous decision to surprise his new bride, Anne of Cleves, in Kent relations are delicate. Henry wants rid of Anne, but Cromwell fears this will mean the end of the alliance with Germany...

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


TUE 12:20 You and Yours (m000gtmn)
Call You and Yours: How has coronavirus affected you financially?

Call You and Yours: How has coronavirus affected you financially?

You can email us at youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Please leave us your phone number so we can get back in touch with you.

At 11am Tuesday morning you can phone 03700 100 444.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Samantha Fenwick


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000gtms)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000gtmx)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (m000gtn1)
Series 2: 50 More Things...

Glasses

How many people around the world need glasses and don’t have them? Until surprisingly recently, nobody knew. Now we have an eye-popping answer: 2.5 billion. Many of these people may not be aware that a simple pair of reading glasses could help them to see more clearly. The very first pair of spectacles was probably made in Italy in the late thirteenth century, inspired by the writings of an eleventh-century Arabic scholar. They were a godsend for ageing monks and merchants – and, as Tim Harford explains, they ended up inspiring the invention of the microscope and telescope, too.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000gt6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m000gtn5)
Settlers

Settlers by Adam Usden.

Two scientists have been in cryogenic stasis for nine hundred years along with one thousand others. They are underground waiting for a new planet to be born, then they can colonise. Nothing can go wrong, can it? A funny and touching rom-com in space.

Sam ..... Laura Aikman
Ian ..... Tom Rosenthal
Michael.... Hamish Rush
System ..... Leah Marks
Director/Producer Gary Brown.

Adam Usden is a recent winner of the prestigious Imison Award for the best new play on radio.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m000gtn9)
Series 22

Storytellers

Short documentaries about telling stories with Josie Long. A subject feedbacks back to her documentarian, a voicemail tells a story and the writer Ross Sutherland wonders how storytelling advice could save a relationship in trouble.

Nicola Talkback
Produced by Jess Shane
Music by Abby Swidler

Easiness
Featuring Ben Seretan
Produced by Alex Lewis
Originally produced for Audio Playground

Marriage Story
Featuring Ross Sutherland and Peter Saddington

Production Team: Eleanor McDowall and Alia Cassam
Produced by Andrea Rangecroft

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m000gsmd)
Plastic Burnout

Every year billions of products are sold around the world in plastic packaging. But some countries lack a waste system to collect and recycle or dispose of the rubbish. The result can be that waste is dumped, set on fire or used as an accelerant in domestic fires.

A new report by Tearfund claims to reveal the scale of the uncontrolled burning in six key countries. Tom Heap finds out what the implications of this are and asks if the product manufacturers which profit have a 'moral responsiblity' to help clear up.

Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock


TUE 16:00 Sharing the Baby (m000gtnf)
Just 3% of new parents took any shared parental leave entitlement last year. In many other countries where shared leave is offered, uptake has soared. Fi Glover examines what the policy actually offers, what the experience is like on the ground for couples and why the take-up has been so low.

Fi also discovers how financial and cultural barriers and fear of workplace discrimination are impacting on the experience of taking the leave. One dad who works as an employment lawyer for a large company explains how anxious he felt even asking to take shared leave.

Another recent study found that the majority of those benefiting from SPL are white middle-class parents who own their own homes. Has SPL in fact deepened the divide between people or can we look to a future where parental leave really is a choice?

Produced by Sarah Cuddon
A Somethin' Else production for Radio 4


TUE 16:30 PM (m000gtnl)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gtnn)
Minister says testing expansion constrained by problems accessing vital chemicals


TUE 18:30 A Normal... (m000gtnq)
Universe

Henry Normal: A Normal... Universe

"Shove up National Treasures. We need to make room for Henry Normal"
Simon O'Hagan - Radio Times

The sixth instalment in this acclaimed, occasional series in which acclaimed, occasional writer Henry Normal uses poetry, stories and comedy to tackle those subjects so big only radio can possibly contain them.

In this new episode Henry explores our relationship to the vastness of the universe throughout eternity and beyond, taking us on a curious journey of time and space with the aid of a very big microscope and some dodgy rhymes.

Henry Normal is a multi-award winning writer, producer and poet. Co-writer of award winning TV programmes such as The Royle Family, The Mrs Merton Show, Coogan’s Run and Paul Calf, and producer of, amongst many others, Oscar-Nominated Philomena, Gavin and Stacey and Alan Partridge.

He has published several volumes of poetry, including Travelling Second Class Through Hope, Staring Directly at the Eclipse, Raining Upwards and his new volume This Phantom Breath. And his memoir, A Normal Family: Everyday adventures with our autistic son.

Praise for previous episodes in this series:

"It's a rare and lovely thing: half an hour of radio that stops you short, gently demands your attention and then wipes your tears away while you have to have a little sit down"

"It's a real treat to hear a seasoned professional like Henry taking command of this evening comedy spot to deliver a show that's idiosyncratic and effortlessly funny"

"Not heard anything that jumps from hilarious to moving in such an intelligent, subtle way as Henry Normal's show"

Written and performed by Henry Normal
Production Coordinator - Beverly Tagg
Produced by Carl Cooper

This was a BBC Studios production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000gsln)
Shula invites Kirsty and Pip along to a planning meeting for the Easter festival. She’s hoping Lynda will be the guest of honour. Pip’s way too busy, but Kirsty thinks it’d be nice to do something for the village. After a successful meeting, Kirsty and Shula reflect on how the village has come together since the incident at Grey Gables. Fallon has suggested an Easter bonnet competition.

Justin wants to talk to Phoebe about income generation for the rewilding acreage. He’s found a patch of land adjoining theirs with a couple of barns for sale. He thinks the rewilders should buy them to convert into office space. They could become offices and a visitor centre in the long term, but for now they could be rented out to generate income. Justin would happily be a co-investor. Pip isn’t keen, but agrees that they will need an office and visitor centre.

While Philip’s out on a walk, Kirsty asks Gavin if he thinks she should postpone the wedding. With all the business trouble, it doesn’t feel right. Gavin counters that it’s the only thing keeping Philip going right now, she can’t take that away from him.

Gavin implores Justin to allow them to continue with their building work for BL. He doesn’t want the firm punished for Blake’s actions. Justin’s impressed by Gavin’s spirit and says they can restart their work. Justin says if one of his employees let him down that badly, they’d know a world of pain. Gavin assures Justin they’re on the same page on that front.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000gtns)
Soprano Chen Reiss, Theatre Online, National Poetry Competition

To mark Beethoven's 250th anniversary, soprano Chen Reiss has released an album of rarely performed Beethoven arias called Immortal Beloved. She joins us live from her home in Vienna, and also performs a favourite aria by Handel.

With arts organisations scrambling to reproduce their output online, we discuss the dilemmas of streaming works intended to be experienced communally. Academic Kirsty Sedgman, who specialises in audience research, and theatre critic Alice Saville, Editor of Exeunt Magazine, consider the consequences for artists and their audiences.

Susannah Hart has won the National Poetry Competition for her poem Reading the Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy, which draws from her experiences as a school governor - the poem is her reaction to how we support and look after children at risk.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Timothy Prosser
Engineer: John Boland

Image: Chen Reiss
Photo Credit: Paul Marc Mitchell


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00q3f31)
About Love

The Black Monk

In celebration of the 160th anniversary of Anton Chekhov's birth, Michael Pennington plays the great Russian writer presenting a series of his short stories on the subject of marriage, dramatised by Martyn Wade.

A haunting story of love, obsession and the supernatural.

Chekhov ...... Michael Pennington
The Black Monk ...... Jasper Britton
Kovrin ...... Nicholas Boulton
Tanya ...... Zoe Waites Yegor ...... Philip Voss

Directed by Philip Franks and Jane Morgan.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 20:00 Hidden Children of the Church (m000gtnw)
For decades, the Catholic Church rarely acknowledged the fact that supposedly ‘celibate’ priests were fathering children. The scale and impact of these secretive births is only now coming to light. The Vatican has admitted for the first time that there could be as many as 10 thousand children of Catholic priests living around the world. Many of them – now adults – describe childhoods separated from their fathers; shrouded in secrecy and shame. Three of them – Vincent Doyle, Michael McGuirk and Sarah Thomas – tell their stories.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000gtny)
Coronavirus and Blind Isolation

Coronavirus lockdown measures pose many problems for blind and visually impaired people. Will services become more stretched as hospitals and social care come under more pressure? How do you navigate shops which are occasionally bare when it comes to essentials? We hear the concerns of listeners - as Cathy Yelf of The Macular Society has definite advice for people with the condition - to not skip on your crucial, sight saving injections for fear of having to stay indoors.

And a calming piece of relief from Coronavirus - we want to hear about the blind people of history who have led fascinating lives and intrigued you. We've already heard about Nicholas Saunderson, the blind boy from Barnsley who rose to the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics at Cambridge. That story has reminded one listener of a blind bell ringer who enchanted the people of Cambridge - and made a bit of money in the process. Tell us about your favourite historic blind figures at intouch@bbc.co.uk

Presented by Peter White
Produced by Kevin Core


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m000gzth)
Inside Health: The Virus

Dispatches from University Hospital Southampton; Covid-19 and loss of smell; intensive care access; coronavirus home care

When hospitals are full of patients, they're said to be "hot". The coronavirus crisis will push up the temperature of hospitals across the UK and in the first in a special series of weekly dispatches from the medical front line, producer Erika Wright will be taking the temperature of University Hospital Southampton - or The General - in Hampshire (which services almost two million people in the south of England) as they cope with the influx of Covid-19 patients. In this first dispatch, Erika talks to the Divisional Director for Medicine, Dr Trevor Smith, who says as patients have been moved out of this large teaching hospital to make space for coronavirus patients, the hospital's current temperature reading is "cold", but all staff know that this will soon change.

This virus is deeply frightening for everybody, but often for older people and those with underlying health conditions it is even worse. The fear is that if hospitals are overflowing, then crude cut-offs by, for example, age, might determine who does or doesn't, get a a bed in intensive care. But Dr Mark Roberts, consultant in acute and geriatric medicine and chair of the British Geriatric Society in Northern Ireland, tells Claudia that health care professionals don't and wouldn't make such arbitrary decisions based on age. Instead, he says, decisions about access to intensive care beds (or in-patient care) will continue to be made at the bedside, with compassion, and with a focus on who has the greatest capacity to benefit.

Some people have already decided that they won't go to hospital if NHS services are overwhelmed but they do want reassurance that they would get urgent care at home should they become seriously ill. Retired GP Dr Lyn Jenkins has written to the Prime Minister calling for this to be addressed as a priority. He's in good health, only 69 years old, but believes that he has a moral obligation not to use up scarce hospital resources if critical care beds can be given to younger people. For those who need it, he wants a quick response team to bring pain relief and supplementary oxygen and importantly, the presence of another person, a carer, so people who were very sick wouldn't be alone.

GP and Inside Health regular Dr Margaret McCartney talks to Claudia about supplies of personal protective equipment and whether long-promised supplies are finally arriving and she delves into the evidence to find out whether the loss of a sense of smell or taste could be a symptom of coronavirus. Listener Rachel says she can't smell cheese, garlic or lavender oil and she's worried that she could have the virus.

Producer: Fiona Hill


TUE 21:30 More or Less (m000h7st)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gtp0)
Government under pressure over lack of testing for coronavirus

A technician holds a tray of patient swabs during the testing process for possible coronavirus infection at the IFLb medical lab in Berlin
(Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)


TUE 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gtmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 23:00 Stand-Up Specials (m000gtp2)
Geoff Norcott: Hates Being Told What To Do

The return of the award-winning comedian Geoff Norcott - this time to explain the origins of his right-leaning political ideology.

Geoff hates being told what to do - especially when he considers it's the state interfering with his and everyone else's lifestyle. With the help of writer Chris Snowden, he doesn't hold back in saying where he thinks it's all gone too far and why the State should butt out.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:30 The Digital Human (m0002rkd)
Series 16

Snake Oil

The internet began as a way for academics and researchers to share information and collaborate on projects - it was a boon for scientific discovery.

But despite there being more scientific information online than ever, in the modern day the power of the internet has completely flipped. Verified science and medicine are crowded out by a plethora of misinformation and snake oil salesmen. From the relatively harmless quackery such as infrared light treatments or ‘wellness’ focused diets, to conspiracy theories around vaccinations that are influencing political policy, and have resulted in outbreaks of dangerous, preventable diseases across the world - what is happening online is having a tangible impact across the globe.

Aleks Krotoski explores how the infrastructure of the internet allows medical misinformation to thrive, finds out how people can be drawn into communities centred around medical misinformation and conspiracy theory, and how both scientists and every day internet users can redress the balance online.



WEDNESDAY 01 APRIL 2020

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000gtp6)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b017mrbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gtp8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gtpb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:33 Shipping Forecast (m000gtpd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gtpj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

Surprise home-schooling is definitely a challenging experience, but I am already seeing some surprise benefits in our own family. Fresh enthusiasm to exercising thanks to a YouTube personal trainer. A daily moment of delight that comes from checking the progress of green shoots on a carrot top experiment. The privilege of eating all of our meals together.

Yesterday scrap books arrived in the post which inspired a flurry of creativity. The excitement of unexplored territory and the smell of fresh pages waiting to be filled reminded me of a new start that was once offered in the Bible.

To an elderly and important religious leader called Nicodemus Jesus said:
“Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again.”

Jesus offered this older man with all his achievements and accolades the opportunity to totally restart his life. We are not told whether he took up the invitation. Perhaps the offer is more attractive to those who are feeling insignificant and unaccomplished, or to those of us reflecting during this lockdown on the brokenness, chaos and dysfunction of our lives.

Jesus’ offer still stands: not just the chance to turn over a new page or start a new chapter but begin a brand-new life. The possibility of a fresh, clean start to all of us even in the middle of a lockdown fills me with great hope.

Lord God
Whoever we are or are not, whatever we have done, or not done, whatever we have said or left unsaid,
You offer us the opportunity to begin a new life with you.
May we reflect on this invitation and accept the fresh start you offer.

Amen


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000gtpl)
01/04/20 Social distancing in horticulture, Coronavirus lockdown on a goat farm, Jobs in arboriculture

The coronavirus crisis has brought a double-whammy for growers in the horticulture sector. Travel restrictions mean it's harder for their usual workforce to come to the UK for the picking season, and at the same time keeping pickers two metres apart is not easy. Anna Hill finds out about new measures being introduced on some farms, to keep staff safe.

A goat farmer in Northern Ireland sends us his audio diary of life under lockdown on the farm.

Continuing a week-long look at trees, we hear about careers in arboriculture.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (m000gtpn)
The Vernal Jape

Today the call of the vernal jape is seldom heard in the British countryside as Kate Humble recounts for Tweet of the Day. This now rare migrant was once thought frequent enough to be referenced by Shakespeare in Henry VII as the 'fair pollo on his nest of reeds'. The vernal jape has never knowingly bred in Britain. But, during the mating season the male will discard its normally flamboyant plumage and adopt the most perfect camouflage: with the most successful males being completely invisible to females. In modern times this charismatic bird can occasionally be heard in the estuarine reed-beds of Hertfordshire and Northampton or less frequently the highlands of Essex.

Producer Bolondok Napja.


WED 06:00 Today (m000gskl)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 The Global Philosopher (m000h63r)
Pandemic ethics

In the face of the virus sweeping the world, Michael Sandel of Harvard University debates pandemic ethics. He’s joined by participants from over a dozen countries. Is it wrong to stockpile? Should governments use surveillance to make sure people stay in their homes? And if hospitals are overwhelmed and can’t treat everybody, how should they make the agonising decision about who should live, and who should be allowed to die?

Producer: David Edmonds
Research: Louise Coletta
Editor: Hugh Levinson


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b017mv1k)
Charles Dickens: A Life, by Claire Tomalin

Episode 3

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of Britain's great novelist paints a portrait of an extraordinarily complex man. Today the novelist is well received in America.

Marking the 150th anniversary of Charles Dickens death, Radio 4 is broadcasting Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of the literary giant who called himself the "inimitable". Here Tomalin has created a vivid and evocative portrait of one of the nation's best loved writers. The characters Dickens created are instantly recognisable, from David Copperfield, to Mr Micawber and Nicholas Nickleby. His literary output was phenomenal. He was also the father of ten, and a supporter of various social causes, all evident in his novels. He was also a deeply complex man and a dark side accompanied his genius.

Claire Tomalin was literary editor of the The New Statesman and then the Sunday Times before becoming a full time writer. Her biographies are award winning. The Life and Death of Mary Wollstonecraft, won the Whitbread First Book Award, and Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self was Whitbread Book of the Year in 2002.

Read by Penelope Wilton
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gsky)
Women's Football, Covid-19 - Impact on Children, The Lives of Houses, Loneliness and Isolation

All professional and grassroots football matches across the country have been suspended due to the COVID-19 outbreak. As the men’s teams are forced from the pitch and income falls away what will happen to the women’s teams they supported? Jen O'Neill, editor of shekicks.net and Kerys Harrop, Captain of Birmingham City Ladies, discuss the issues.

The Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, told Woman’s Hour at the start of the year that the system of support for the most vulnerable children was under strain. The Covid 19 crisis has put additional pressures on that system, with many vulnerable children now out of school and many of their services closed. She says that she’s especially concerned about one million children who were at risk -living in households which are not stable, where there might be domestic violence, drug or alcohol addiction, financial hardship and severe mental health issues. She explains what these children need now.

The Lives of Houses – a collection of essays which asks what a house can tell us about the person who lived there. Hermione Lee describes why we are so fascinated by the homes of the famous and often long dead.

And, as the word home takes on a new significance in this lockdown – how hard is isolation if you live alone and how can you avoid suffering from loneliness? Jenni speaks to Kate Shurety the executive Director of the Campaign to End Loneliness and Rosie Weatherley from the mental health charity Mind.


WED 10:41 The Prelude, by William Wordsworth (m000gsl0)
Episode 3

William Wordsworth's autobiographical poem The Prelude is arguably the most important piece of poetic writing in our language. Recorded in Wordsworth's home in Grasmere, Cumbria, Wordsworth looks back over events in his early life.

Wordsworth believed that poetry should be written in the natural language of common speech, and in that way it was revolutionary in its time.

Parts of the poem are famous, with lines quoted often, such as the description of the young Wordsworth stealing a boat. Other parts are more introspective. The young poet leaves Grasmere to go to university in Cambridge and is homesick. Wordsworth grapples with his political feelings - travelling to France at the time of the French Revolution. He enjoys the hustle and bustle of London, and is euphoric when crossing the Alps. All the time this poem is accessible, bursting with colour and description, full of gripping storytelling.

The Prelude is read by Sir Ian McKellen, with specially composed music by John Harle performed by John Harle on saxophone and Neill MacColl on guitar.

The Prelude is directed in Manchester by Susan Roberts.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m000gsl3)
Phyliss and Freda - Trains and Tears

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends and WWII evacuees, reflecting on the pain of their childhood experience and wondering how their mothers could have chosen to send them away.


WED 11:00 Don't Log Off (m000h9hc)
Series 11

Anticipation

Across every continent, people are trying to make sense of a new world – one that happens mostly behind closed doors and often alone. Alan Dein connects with seven individuals whose lives have shifted under the coronavirus pandemic as they nervously anticipate what will come next in an uncertain future.

In Tehran, Golnar, an Iranian who describes herself as ‘global traveller’ is inside her apartment – all future trips postponed. Across the town is the hostel she set up with a friend. Forced to close in the city’s lockdown it is now serving a crucial role.

Dhaka is one of the most densely populated city’s on earth. As the pandemic takes hold, entrepreneur Fahad worries for the successful delivery business he has spent years building up and the future for his parents he shares a home with.

Not everyone is inside. In Greece, Ibrahim is homeless, sheltering in an abandoned building. His friend Mikki is self-isolating and cannot help him.

Plus stories from Amsterdam, Hong Kong and Sudan of isolation and expectation.


WED 11:30 Plum House (m000gsl5)
Series 3

1. Better the Devil

The third series of Plum House returns, with the eccentric team who run the museum putting manager Tom on leave to recover from his heart ache over former colleague Emma. Little do they know however what's in store for them as Head Office send over Roger, the trouble shooter's trouble shooter, to act as a new broom and bring Plum House into line.

Plum House features Simon Callow, Jane Horrocks, Miles Jupp, Pearce Quigley and Tom Bell.
Guest starring this week; Pip Torrens, Alex Lowe
Written by Ben Cottam and Paul McKenna
Directed by Paul Schlesinger
Produced by Claire Broughton

It is a BBC Studios Production for Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000gsl8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:03 Shipping Forecast (m000h8lg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


WED 12:06 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gslb)
Episode 13: Downfall

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

June 1540: Cromwell’s close relationship with Henry has been under pressure as the king’s dissatisfaction with his marriage grows. And still Henry’s cousin Reginald Pole is at large in Europe, plotting against the king. Cromwell begins to fear for his future...

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


WED 12:20 You and Yours (m000gsld)
Warehouse Workers, Food Parcels and DIY Haircuts

Warehouse workers at one of the UK's biggest retailers have told us that government rules around social distancing are being flouted and they don't feel safe. Lots of companies have shifted their entire operations online since the government ordered non-essential stores to close. Others have chosen to close altogether to protect workers in warehouses and distribution centres.

Around 1.5 million people in the UK have been designated as vulnerable and eligible for food parcels and deliveries of essential goods as the pandemic continues. We've been contacted by listeners who say that after an initial text message, they haven't heard anything more from the government. There's supposed to be a multi-agency network of help but are people slipping through the net?

And with hairdressers closed many are reaching for the scissors and attempting to cut their own hair at home. We get some expert tips from a stylist who's doing online tutorials - what could possibly go wrong?!


WED 12:57 Weather (m000gslg)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000gslj)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (m000gsll)
Series 2: 50 More Things...

Wedgwood

Josiah Wedgwood was a man of many talents – potter, chemist, pioneering accountant. But perhaps his most remarkable achievement was solving a problem it took another two centuries for a Nobel Prize-winning economist even to identify. That problem was how to make wealthy clients pay a premium for your goods, then add to your profits by selling them more cheaply to the mass market. Tim Harford explains how Wedgwood’s 18th century pottery was a precursor to the “trickle-down” theory of fashion that still shapes the economy today.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000gsln)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000gslq)
My Little Eye

My Little Eye: Brought to Book

By Richard Stoneman.
Bob Trench is charged by the Prime Minister to track down and confront a bitter former soldier who served in Northern Ireland during the Troubles. Now she will stop at nothing to publish the truth as she recalls it and Bob faces a dangerous confrontation.

Cast:
Bob Trench ... Pip Torrens
Julia Hapsgood/Karen Price ... Monica Dolan
Prime Minister ... Siobhán Redmond
Dave Sefton ... Samuel Anderson
Tony Havers ... Jonathan Cullen

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan
Produced by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000gsls)
Covid19 - Will insurance cover it?

Wedding plans in ruins, holidays cancelled, business on hold and landlords unable to rent out their properties.

This is exactly the kind of unexpected scenario we buy insurance policies for, but are they written to cover once in a century events like the coronavirus outbreak?

Our panel of experts answer your questions on insurance policies and claims.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m000gzth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 The Media Show (m000gslx)
Keep Calm and Put Radio On

Radio stations have reported a huge surge in listeners since the start of the lock-down. Amol Rajan meets three presenters now helping to calm the nation.

Guests: Simon Mayo of Scala Radio, Linda McDermott of BBC Radio Merseyside, and Iain Lee of talkRADIO.

Producer: Richard Hooper


WED 16:30 PM (m000gslz)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gsm1)
The government reveals more than 2,000 NHS England staff have been tested for coronavirus out of a total of 1.3 million who work for the health service.


WED 18:30 The Wilsons Save the World (b09f39tt)
Series 1

Holiday

A brand new sitcom for BBC Radio 4 written by Marcus Brigstocke and Sarah Morgan and starring Marcus Brigstocke as Mike and Kerry Godliman as his wife Max.

Michael and Maxine Wilson and their teenage daughters, Lola and Cat (plus their bearded dragon Chomsky, and about 150,000 bees) have resolved to live a cleaner, greener, serener life. This is a show about living ethically... whatever that means. Millions of people try every day to make 'good' choices and do the 'right thing', be ethical, charitable and community minded. It's hard. Most of us live with hypocrisy and failure all the time but keep on trying. The Wilsons, good folk that they are, are trying about 20% harder and learning to live with about 19% more failure. They are not giving up.

In this episode Max needs a holiday and so does Mike but what's the right choice ethically? As they balance the appeal of hot sun versus a carbon-neutral campsite Cat has her own agenda and Lola wrestles with the rights and wrongs of charity.

Producer...Julia McKenzie
Production Coordinator...Tamara Shilham
A BBC Studios Production.


WED 19:00 The Archers (m000gsm3)
Brian wants to check in on Josh. He suggests to Adam that since Josh isn’t going to be charged, they should keep him in mind for tractor work. Later, Brian finds an exhausted Adam dozing over the accounts. But he’s had some good news; Xander’s new birth certificate with Ian’s name on it has arrived. Brian reports that Josh is concerned about the number of lame ewes. He thinks they need to get the vet in pronto.

Fallon wonders whether Keira might like to enter the Easter bonnet competition. She’s been trying to drum up interest with local school children at the bus stop, but hasn’t had much interest. Emma thinks that parents always end up doing the children’s craft projects for them anyway. Fallon decides on a new approach: the grown-ups make the bonnets and the kids judge.

Elizabeth can tell that Freddie’s finding it hard staying at Lower Loxley with no work on. She suggests they go out and have some fun. After lunch at the Tearoom, Freddie is ready to go home. Elizabeth wonders if he should speak to someone about his traumatic ordeal at Grey Gables. Freddie wants to put it all behind him. He can see his mum’s point, but compared with what Lynda’s been through, his experience is nothing.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000gsm5)
The Dramatist James Graham

This edition of Front Row is devoted to one of the most exciting playwrights to emerge this century. James Graham is only 37 but has already become a foremost chronicler of modern Britain on stage and screen. He is known for taking on the big issues of the day – Brexit, privacy online, parliamentary democracy, fake news - whilst enabling his audience to see things from the points of view of those involved. In This House the whip's office, more than the chamber of the House of Commons, is where power plays. His controversial television play Brexit: The Uncivil War, set in the offices of the Vote Leave campaign, brought our attention to the critical role played by Dominic Cummings, now the Prime Minister’s chief adviser. At Easter ITV will broadcast his adaptation of his play – Quiz – about the coughing controversy and the major accused of cheating on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. It is about truth, fact and power - the power of television.

Graham's work in the theatre is often interactive: in Privacy audience members were asked to keep their phones on and information gathered from them became part of the drama. The final performance of The Vote, set in a polling station, was live-streamed from one as it closed on the night of the general election of 2015. In Quiz the audience became the trial jury. Graham talks about the importance of the live, communal aspect of theatre, and, too, how television can be an arena where millions can consider the complex challenges of our times.

In a wide ranging, richly illustrated interview James Graham tells Kirsty Lang about the crucial role of drama in explaining power and politics, in learning about how our society works, and the importance of being even-handed.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Julian May


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00q3f33)
About Love

The Huntsman

In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Anton Chekhov's birth, Michael Pennington plays the great Russian writer presenting a series of his short stories on the subject of marriage, dramatised by Martyn Wade.

A haunting tale of unrequited love.

Chekhov ...... Michael Pennington
Count Sergei ...... Nicholas Boulton
Pelageya ...... Zoe Waites Yegor
Vlasych ...... Jasper Britton

Directed by Philip Franks and Jane Morgan.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:00 Fallout (m000gztl)
The Role of the State

Mary Ann Sieghart and a panel of experts discuss the possible long-term impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the role and image of the state and politics.

What will the huge expansion in the role of government - from employing much of the private sector, to insuring businesses against losses and taking on powers to order us all to stay at home - mean for our relationship with government once it's all over? Will there be resentment, or gratitude? Will it forever change how we think about the government's role in the economy, or make us more likely to accept state surveillance in future? And what of ideology and political leadership? Can politicians persuade us to trust them again?

Producer: Giles Edwards


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (m000gsmb)
Tim Lott - Identity and Parenthood

Lent Talks is a personal perspective on an aspect of the story leading up to Easter. This year’s theme is identity – losing and gaining identity; struggling with identity; accepting and owning identity. Writer Tim Lott reflects on the sacrifices of parenthood through the eyes of Mary, and the impact of fatherhood on his identity.

Producer: Dan Tierney.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m000gsmd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m000gslx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gsmg)
World Health Organisation “deeply concerned” about global rates of infection

In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gslb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 23:00 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (m000gsmj)
Series 5

Bunny

By Tim Key

Comedy. Tim Key broadcasts live from deep within Skuzzler’s Bell, a cave network in Austria. It’s the sight of an infamous expedition made some 40-odd years ago by Tim’s father. But the water’s rising, there’s no obvious means to escape and in the darkness, someone is waiting to take revenge. With Tom Basden, Katy Wix and Karl Johnson.

Key…. Tim Key
Lord…. Tom Basden
Megan…. Katy Wix
Bunny…. Karl Johnson

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


WED 23:30 The Digital Human (b08q4cm1)
Series 11

Silence

Aleks goes in search of silence. In our digital world has silence become harder to find, or are we looking for it in all the wrong places?

Leif Haugen is a Fire watcher who spends six months of a year stationed at Toma lookout, on a mountain in Montana. He says only fire watchers who are at peace with themselves are able to stick it out. Living in silence makes you look inwards at who you really are. Silence is the absence of something but the presence of everything.

Isobel Anderson suffers from tinnitus and at its peak felt like she was being tortured or stalked. The culprit wasn't an external sound that she could switch off; it was inside her brain. Her mind tuned into the inner electrical currents and motions that we all experience but hers never fade away. She knows there’s no such thing as silence but what she misses is being able to control her sound environment.

Jessica Vitak is a writer who lives in London and uses technology to control her sound environment. She wears noise cancelling headphones to drown out the distractions of the city but she admits it does make her shut down a little.

Dr Helen Lees is an Associate Research fellow at York St John University and she argues that being distracted by our screens means we miss out on the silent experience between people, the language of silence spoken.

Produced by Kate Bissell.



THURSDAY 02 APRIL 2020

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000gsmn)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b017mv1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gsmq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gsms)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:33 Shipping Forecast (m000gsmv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gsmz)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning.

It turns out a crisis can bring out the best in people. Behind terrible news headlines, we have seen people making great sacrifices on behalf of others. Frontline NHS staff, generous neighbours, an army of community volunteers: it seems many are willing to put themselves at risk to serve their compatriots.

Paradoxically a crisis can also bring out the worst in people. We have seen the temptation to hoard for ourselves, to rebel against public guidelines, or even worse to see the suffering of the vulnerable as collateral damage.

It has been said that a crisis doesn’t change us - it reveals us. We see who we really are in these challenging circumstances. But what if we don’t like what we see?

Let’s take hope from the most famous verse in the Bible:

“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life”

I have always taken this verse for granted but the more I reflect on it the more radical it is. Jesus lays down his life for the entire world without assessing their worthiness or demanding the recipient be good or deserving. Controversially God’s love is offered to both hoarders and donors, to the greedy and the generous, to NHS workers and to lockdown breakers. But once we have received the love of God it transforms us into the people that God made us to be and actually the people we long to be. In these days of great change we are called to show the same unconditional love of God to all around us.

Loving Lord
Thank you that your grace extends to all;
that we can all find forgiveness when we ask.
Have mercy on us and on those around us

Amen


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000gsn1)
02/04/20 Abattoirs and coronavirus, Commerical forestry, Audio diary from Archdeacon of Cardigan

The coronavirus crisis is having a big impact on meat producers and abattoirs. The market for high-end cuts of meat has fallen sharply with the closure of restaurants and hotels, while family celebrations for Easter and Eid, which would have boosted sales of joints of meat, are likely to be put on hold this year. Meanwhile, measures to keep abattoir workers safe from coronavirus infection are not straightforward. Sybil Ruscoe asks the Association of British Meat Processors what effect it's all having.

Continuing Farming Today's week-long look at trees, we hear from Confor - the organisation which represents forestry and the wood-producing sector. After all the optimisim of tree-planting promises during the general election last year, how is commercial forestry faring now?

And we hear the audio diary of the Archdeacon of Cardigan, as she tries to look after her flock during the coronavirus lockdown.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produed by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zqzsv)
Curlew (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the curlew. The haunting song of the curlew instantly summons the spirit of wild places. By April, most curlews have left their winter refuge on estuaries and marshes and have returned to their territories on moorland or upland pastures. Wherever they breed you'll hear the male birds singing and displaying. It's often called the bubbling song.


THU 06:00 Today (m000gvbq)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b084zk6z)
The Gin Craze

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the craze for gin in Britain in the mid-18th century and the attempts to control it. With the arrival of William of Orange, it became an act of loyalty to drink Protestant, Dutch gin rather than Catholic brandy, and changes in tariffs made everyday beer less affordable. Within a short time, production increased and large sections of the population that had rarely or never drunk spirits before were consuming two pints of gin a week. As Hogarth indicated in his print 'Beer Street and Gin Lane' (1751) in support of the Gin Act, the damage was severe, and addiction to gin was blamed for much of the crime in cities such as London.

With

Angela McShane
Research Fellow in History at the Victoria and Albert Museum and University of Sheffield

Judith Hawley
Professor of 18th century literature at Royal Holloway, University of London

Emma Major
Senior Lecturer in English at the University of York

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b017mvx0)
Charles Dickens: A Life, by Claire Tomalin

Episode 4

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of one of Britain's literary giants paints a portrait of an extraordinarily complex man. Today a theatrical performance changes the course of his life.

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of one of the nation's literary giants is broadcast to mark the 150th anniversary of his death in June 2020. Here Tomalin portrays Dickens as a complex man, a writer who created characters who continue to endure in the popular imagination from the The Artful Dodger, Mr Pickwick, Pip and David Copperfield. He was also a ferociously hard-working writer, a philanthropist, a supporter of liberal social causes, and father of ten, and yet his genius also had a dark side.

Claire Tomalin was literary editor of the The New Statesman and then the Sunday Times before becoming a full time writer. Her biographies are award winning. The Life and Death of Mary Wollstonecraft, won the Whitbread First Book Award, and Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self was Whitbread Book of the Year in 2002.

Read by Penelope Wilton
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gvbz)
Women in detention; Kayleigh Llewellyn; Regula Ysewijn; Corona diary – Angela Crawford

With the government announcement that low risk, pregnant women prisoners, and those in mother and baby units are to be released we hear from Dr Kate Paradine, Chief Executive of Women in Prison and Natasha Walter, Director of Women for Refugee Women. They discuss their concerns and reveal the fears of women in Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre, where a COVID 19 case has already been confirmed.

Coronavirus has finally reached the Outer Hebrides. So for our second instalment of the Woman’s Hour Corona Diaries, Jenni speaks to Angela Crawford from the Isle of Lewis. How is this news affecting island life? What does social distancing look like in one of the more remote parts of the UK? And how do people feel about supplies and medical care away from the mainland?

Kayleigh Llewyellyn is the writer and creator of a new BBC comedy drama series In My Skin. Based on her own story of her childhood years in Wales, it follows 16 year Bethan as she negotiates her school life, sexuality, and hiding her mother’s mental illness from her friends and teachers. She’s also one of the writers on the fourth series of Killing Eve. She joins Jenni to discuss.

Regula Ysewijn’s new book ‘Oats in the North, Wheat from the South’ is a love letter in recipes to the history and heritage of British baking culture. Each of the recipes are accompanied by stories of landscape, legends and traditions of Great Britain. Regula joins Jenni to talk about how the diverse climate of the British Isles influenced the growth of cereal crops and the development of a rich regional baking identity.

Presenter - Jenni Murray
Producer – Sarah Crawley
Guest - Dr Kate Paradine
Guest - Natasha Walter
Guest - Angela Crawford
Guest - Kayleigh Llewyellyn
Guest - Regula Ysewijn


THU 10:45 The Prelude, by William Wordsworth (m000gvc1)
Episode 4

William Wordsworth's autobiographical poem The Prelude is arguably the most important piece of poetic writing in our language. Recorded in Wordsworth's home in Grasmere, Cumbria, Wordsworth looks back over events in his early life.

Wordsworth believed that poetry should be written in the natural language of common speech, and in that way it was revolutionary in its time.

Parts of the poem are famous, with lines quoted often, such as the description of the young Wordsworth stealing a boat. Other parts are more introspective. The young poet leaves Grasmere to go to university in Cambridge and is homesick. Wordsworth grapples with his political feelings - travelling to France at the time of the French Revolution. He enjoys the hustle and bustle of London, and is euphoric when crossing the Alps. All the time this poem is accessible, bursting with colour and description, full of gripping storytelling.

The Prelude is read by Sir Ian McKellen, with specially composed music by John Harle performed by John Harle on saxophone and Neill MacColl on guitar.

The Prelude is directed in Manchester by Susan Roberts.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m000gvc3)
The Man Who Died for Trees

Romania's forests are the Amazon of Europe - with large wilderness areas under constant pressure from loggers. For years, corrupt authorities turned a blind eye to illegal felling. But now a series of killings in the woods has intensified demands across the continent to end the destruction. Six rangers - who defend forests from illegal cutting – have been killed in as many years. Two died in the space of just a few weeks late last year. The latest victim, Liviu Pop, father of three young girls, was shot as he confronted men he thought were stealing timber. But the men weren’t arrested. They say the ranger shot himself. And in the remote region of Maramures, where many people are involved in logging, that version is widely believed. Locals are afraid to talk about what happened. Is the lucrative logging business protected by powerful interests who turn a blind eye to murder? And are rangers sometimes complicit in the rape of the forest? For Crossing Continents, Tim Whewell tries to find out exactly how a young man employed to protect nature met his death. And he asks how Romania can save its wilderness when more than half the trees cut down are felled illegally?

Reporter: Tim Whewell
Editor: Bridget Harney


THU 11:30 Art of Now (m000gd7k)
Christchurch

One year since the Christchurch Mosque attacks, New Zealand’s creatives discuss how their work in poetry, music and art can provide relief and healing to a nation in the wake of one of their darkest days.

New Zealand’s 2017 Poet Laureate, Selina Tusitala Marsh, reflects on her poem Christchurch Mosque Shootings.

Janneth Gil, a Christchurch-based photographer and fine artist, discusses her project Darkness into Light.

Viv Kepes, a Christchurch-based painter, discusses her painted series - working title Bouquet - as part of the umbrella project Darkness into Light.

Mohamed Hassan, slam poet champion and award-winning journalist, discusses the sketches of a poem written in the months since the attack.

Dr Charles Te Ahukaramū Royal, a New Zealand Māori musician, academic and Māori-music revivalist, discusses his composition, Ra Te Rongo Kino, for kapa haka and orchestra which was composed in response to the Christchurch Mosque shootings. The piece was performed by the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra with Taniwha Ventures on the 29th June 2019 at the Auckland Town Hall.

Producer: Claire Crofton
Executive Producer: Anishka Sharma

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

Image Credit: Janneth Gil - Widow in prayer - A martyr's absence gives way to his eternal presence. Al Noor Mosque, Christchurch, New Zealand.


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000gvc5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:03 Shipping Forecast (m000h8zz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


THU 12:06 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gvc7)
Episode 14: Betrayal

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

June 1540: Cromwell has been arrested and is in the Tower. Betrayed by most of his old colleagues, all he can do now is wait to hear who else has turned against him. Is there a way to regain Henry's favour?

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


THU 12:20 You and Yours (m000gvc9)
Universal Credit Confusion; Tourism Slow-down; Viral Videos

We'll investigate how the Universal Credit system is coping under the strain of thousands of new cases.
There have been delays on the phone lines and in processing applications. We've asked the Department for Work and Pensions for the latest and we'll have some advice for claimants from the charity Turn2Us.

We look at how the virus is affecting seaside towns that rely on tourism to survive. After a trying winter how will the lockdown affect their trade?

Plus comedian Dom Joly on all those funny videos that are going viral online. You can find everything from funny sketches, to dance routines, and music parodies about Covid-19, but why are they so popular right now?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jess Quayle


THU 12:57 Weather (m000gvcc)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000gvcf)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (m000gvch)
Series 2: 50 More Things...

SWIFT

From blocked vacuum tubes to mistyped telegrams, sending sensitive financial information is no easy matter. SWIFT – the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication – has solved some of the key problems. But, asks Tim Harford, has it created a new one?

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon


THU 14:00 The Archers (m000gsm3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m00017qr)
Stories from Hay el Matar

Us and Them

Drama from Syria telling stories of contemporary life in Damascus.

As the Government are scouring the community to find recruits for military service, Wajd is returning home to sell her late mother's apartment. She is quickly embroiled in conflict as her presence in the neighbourhood has dramatic and unexpected consequences. She's a former opposition activist, but it’s her pro-Government friend Mandour who offers the help she needs.

Stories From Hay El Matar is a uniquely authentic drama series that takes place in a fictional suburb of Damascus. It is made by a team of Syrian and Lebanese artists working with British director Boz Temple-Morris, and is recorded in Beirut, Lebanon.

Each story in the series takes place at the same point in time, exploring a different part of the community. They are adapted from the Arabic language radio drama, Hay El Matar, produced by BBC Media Action, which provides a balanced and authentic depiction of everyday events for people inside Syria. It ran for one season of 150 episodes between 2016 and 2017and aimed to humanise opposing groups by countering stereotypes and providing balanced and authentic depictions of the various groups and situations across Syrian society. It included detailed consideration of issues such as early marriage and radicalisation as well as many issues around day to day living.

Stories from Hay El Matar is written in Arabic by Syrian writer Hozan Akko, and adapted into English by actor and dramatist Raffi Feghali. It offers a rare glimpse of how normal life is lived in Syria through these extraordinary times and features a cast of actors from Syria and Lebanon, many of whom are themselves living through the kinds of events depicted in the drama.

Cast:
Wajd Yara Bou Nassar
Mandour Elie Youssef
Kevork Raffi Feghali
Assaf Oussama el Ali
Abou Jameel Marcel Bou Chakra
Jack Alhasan Yousseff
Amer Adeeb Razzouk
Toufik Saseen Kawzally
Souad Maya Harb
Hadeel Nesrine Abi Samra,
And Ghali Hussam Sharwany

Studio recording Karim Beidoun, Guerilla Studios
Spot effects Layal Salman
Sound editing Alisdair McGregor
Music Ziad Ahmadiye
Adaptation Raffi Feghali
Writer Hozan Akko
Producer and Director Boz Temple-Morris

A Holy Mountain production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Open Country (m000gvck)
Closed Country: Helen Glover in her Buckinghamshire back garden.

We were going to kick off this series with Helen Glover exploring Newlyn in Cornwall: on an RNLI lifeboat, and with open-water swimmers... However, at the last minute, Covid19 stymied our plans. Instead of the wild open countryside of Cornwall, she's reporting from the confines of her back garden, on the River Thames, in Buckinghamshire. Luckily, she's married to the naturalist Steve Backshall, so she has access to a ready-made expert who helps to explain the wildlife in their midst.

Producer: Karen Gregor


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000gt65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m000gt7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 BBC Inside Science (m000gvcp)
Coronavirus: Models & being ‘led by the science’; Mars500 isolation tips; Kids’ science - singing glasses

Marnie Chesterton reveals how important the models and graphs are in informing government strategies for the Covid-19 pandemic. Christl Donnelly, Professor of Statistical Epidemiology at Imperial College London and Professor of Applied Statistics at the University of Oxford, and Dr Kit Yates, Senior Lecturer in Mathematical Biology at the University of Bath and author of 'The Maths of Life and Death', explain what epidemiological models can and can’t tell us about the progression of the disease, infection rates and death rates, and how testing will provide the essential data to make these models more accurate. They also give their take on the current inundation of social media with graphs and infographics created by non-epidemiologists - the ‘epidemic of armchair epidemiologists’.

The European Space Agency’s Diego Urbina was one of the Mars500 participants. He spent 520 days in a human mission to Mars, shut up in a fake spacecraft with his fellow astronauts. So who better to get tips for home isolation from?

Are you stuck in with the kids and want to try some science experiments that you can do at home? The Royal Institution is about to launch ExpeRimental Live - a live stream of home science experiments, designed to educate, entertain and inform your children with some cheap and easy science. And its existing ExpeRimental series of short films for parents are already available online. They were produced and directed by science teacher and writer Alom Shaha, who helps BBC Inside Science producer Jennifer Whyntie to have a go at making singing wine glasses with her children.

Producers - Fiona Roberts and Jennifer Whyntie


THU 16:30 PM (m000gvcr)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gvct)
The health secretary, Matt Hancock, says he wants to see 100,000 coronavirus tests a day by the end of April.


THU 18:30 Ability (b0b0v537)
Series 1

Episode 1

Matt is 25. He has cerebral palsy and can only speak via an app on his iPad. Everyone who cares about Matt knows that this isn't the defining thing about him. He is funny and clever and "up for stuff" - partly because he is keen to show that there's nothing he can't do, but also because, if he's honest, he's aware that he's less likely than other people to get the blame.

Now Matt's left home for the first time and moved in to share a flat with his best mate, Jess. But when Bob (Allan Mustafa) shows up as the new carer, the fun really starts. Bob is new to the job and, although willing, domestic duties are not really his forte. He's better at selling weed and dealing in knocked off iPads.

But he likes Matt and treats him like a real person. So, as far as Matt is concerned, Bob is here to stay.

Ability is the semi-autobiographical co-creation of Lee Ridley, otherwise known as Lost Voice Guy. Like his sitcom creation, Lee has cerebral palsy and can only speak via an app. Lost Voice Guy is - probably - the first stand up comedian to use a communication aid. He won the BBC New Comedy Award in 2014, has done three full Edinburgh shows and been tour support for Ross Noble, Patrick Kielty and Jason Cook. Lee has previously worked for Sunderland City Council's communications team, and the BBC in Newcastle and London as well, as various local newspapers.

Katherine Jakeways is the co-creator and co-writer of Ability. Katherine is a multi-award nominated writer. She has written North by Northamptonshire, Guilt Trip and All Those Women for BBC Radio 4 as well as numerous radio plays. She has also written for Crackanory and The Tracey Ullman Show for TV along with a BBC 1 pilot, Carol and Vinney.

A Funny Bones production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000gvcw)
Kate asks Fallon if she can set up a massage chair at the Easter festival. Later, she goes to visit Lynda in hospital. Lynda’s pleased to see her. Robert is aghast to see that Kate’s painted Lynda’s toenails, considering how sensitive Lynda’s skin is. How dare she inflict herself on Lynda? Kate leaves in a hurry, before Lynda can explain she wanted her there. Robert runs after Kate and apologises for being over-protective. Lynda hopes Robert’s ashamed of himself for treating her like a baby. Robert realises he got things very wrong today.

Johnny invites Freddie for a drink at The Bull. Unenthusiastic Freddie agrees, if only to shut Johnny up. Johnny tries to discuss The Bull’s name change with Freddie, but he doesn’t want to talk. He bats off Fallon’s praise about him being a hero and declines her offer of a drink. Freddie finally admits he wishes he hadn’t visited Lynda, she was in so much pain and as for the things she was saying… Freddie leaves and goes to visit Robert. He returns Robert’s medal. He’d feel like a fraud if he kept it. He feels he doesn’t deserve anything.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000gvcy)
Dua Lipa, Sara Collins, Edinburgh festivals cancelled, Molly O’Cathain

Dua Lipa shares the inspiration behind her new album Future Nostalgia, what it's been like releasing an album under quarantine.

As the Edinburgh Festivals are cancelled this year, Joyce McMillan of The Scotsman discusses what this means for theatre, comedy and the arts, and for the city itself.

Set and costume designer Molly O’Cathain, on lockdown at home with her parents in Dublin, has combined her love of art and skill as a production designer to recreate famous painting of couples using her parents as models. She tells John how she's been doing it.

Sara Collins won the 2019 Costa First Novel Award for The Confessions of Frannie Langton. In the latest in our J’Accuse series, she takes on what she sees as the segregation of publishing and the expectations on writers of colour to “tackle” the subject of race.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Hannah Robins


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00q3f35)
About Love

The Lady with the Little Dog

In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Anton Chekhov's birth, Michael Pennington plays the great Russian writer presenting a series of his short stories on the subject of marriage, dramatised by Martyn Wade.

A beautiful tale of love and betrayal.

Chekhov ...... Michael Pennington
Anna ...... Zoe Waites
Gurov ...... Jasper Britten

Directed by Philip Franks and Jane Morgan.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m000gvd1)
Coronavirus: What next?

Why have some countries run mass-testing operations when others, including the UK, have not?

David Aaronovitch examines how South Korea and Germany have approached the coronavirus pandemic and what they have learned from the data they've gathered.

He also looks at how the hunt for a vaccine is progressing and who is in the race, as well as the role existing anti-viral drugs might play in reducing the threat posed by Covid-19.

Contributors:

Professor Devi Sridhar, Chair of Global Public Health, University of Edinburgh

Dr Jerome Kim, Director General of the International Vaccine Institute

Dr Philipp Zanger, Head of the Institute of Hygiene, Infection Control and Prevention at the Rhineland-Palatinate Agency for Consumer and Public
Protection

Professor Adrian Hill, Director of the Jenner Institute

Professor Johan Neyts, virologist, University of Leuven, Belgium.

Producers: Kirsteen Knight, Darin Graham & Rosamund Jones
Editor: Jasper Corbett


THU 20:30 In Business (m000gvd3)
Supply Chains vs Covid-19

Ruth Alexander examines whether the complex global web of supply chains can hold up under the enormous pressure of the coronavirus pandemic.

Looking further into the future, she and Jonty Bloom ask whether this global shock has shown that the days of the speedy delivery of a huge choice of cheap goods from all over the world is over.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producers: Caroline Bayley and Lizzy McNeill


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000gvcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b084zk6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gvd6)
UK announces plans to significantly increase tests for coronavirus

UK announces plans to significantly increase tests for coronavirus. (Photo: Health Secretary Matt Hancock at a media briefing in Downing Street. Credit: PA)


THU 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gvc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 23:00 Now Wash Your Hands (m000h901)
Episode 1

Comedy corona-cast as Jon Holmes, Jake Yapp, Salma Shah and Natt Tapley drop in on isolated home-bound guests.


THU 23:30 Out Loud (m000bcmx)
Exploring Bradford’s emerging spoken-word counter culture, journalist, writer and artist Kirran Shah enters the intimate spaces where local people share their life stories.

She’s on a journey back to her home town, seeking to discover if there’s a way she can belong in Bradford. Her first few visits to some of these pop-up club nights are terrifying. Can she dare to take her turn at the open mic?

Smartphones are switched off, the lights are dimmed and the performances begin. Poetry, rap, song and stories - all are welcome, truthfulness is appreciated. People are applauded for courage, self-expression and for making real-life connections. It's the antithesis to online messaging.

Slowly and gradually, Kirran discovers a thriving, inclusive community that is a celebration of human connection. It’s very different from the Bradford she remembers.

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4



FRIDAY 03 APRIL 2020

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000gvd8)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b017mvx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000gvdb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000gvdd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:33 Shipping Forecast (m000gvdg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000gvdl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Krish Kandiah

Good morning

Over the last few weeks I have become acutely aware of surfaces I touch routinely in the course of a day. The handles of shopping baskets, door handles, letterboxes, payment touch pads – have become sources of worry. The coronavirus pandemic is changing our relationship with hygiene. Now whenever a family member sneezes in my home, there follows a chorus of “wash your hands” instead of a “bless you”. I am beginning to see just how difficult life always is for my son and others living with OCD.

There is danger without – but there is also danger within. Shakespeare understood this when he has Lady Macbeth scrub her hands in a vain attempt to expunge a blot of guilt from her conscience. No matter how hard she washed the stain remained. No amount of soap or anti-bacterial gel would purge her soul. King David, after he had abused his position and power with terrible consequence, longed to be clean too – he prayed to God for help to be purified from the wickedness he knew came from inside him.

“Cleanse me with hyssop, and I shall be clean;
Wash me and I shall be whiter than snow.

What a relief that someone can indeed cleanse those hard-to-reach parts of our inner lives. We do not need to be fearful that our hearts are polluted or infected beyond help. In the sight of God we are acceptable, welcome, made perfect. This spiritual and moral deep clean is available to all of us whatever our challenges and struggles.

Lord of all forgiveness,
Cleanse us from the inside out
Give us an unblemished heart through your sacrifice for us
Purify our thoughts and deeds, our motivations and our desires.

Amen


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000gvdn)
03/04/20: Spring drilling, Growing demand for veg boxes, Ash dieback

After months of wet weather, the recently sunshine means lots of farmers are out in the fields, desperately trying to catch up on planting crops. But is it worth it? Sybil Ruscoe speaks to one farmer who has decided not to plant food crops this spring.

As the impacts of coronavirus continue to be felt in rural communities across the UK, we hear from a mixed organic farm in Oxfordshire which has seen a surge in veg box orders.

And it may have slipped out of the headlines, but ash dieback is still a live issue, with millions of trees being felled. We visit a site on the Salisbury Plain where trees are being removed.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe
Produced by Heather Simons


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (m0000r6c)
Tom Bailey Tweet Displacement

Theatre maker artist Tom Bailey, the parallels between human migration and bird migration are different, yet strangely possess many cross-overs.

Tom has chosen five episodes from the Tweet of the Day archive which you can hear all this week. In addition you can hear more from Tom and his artistic work Zugunruhe, an ornithology term for 'migratory restlessness in birds', in the Tweet of the Week podcast, available on the Radio 4 website as a download.

You can read more about Zugunruhe and Tom's other projects on the website: http://www.mechanimal.co.uk/

Podcast Producer: Elliott Prince
Producer: Andrew Dawes


FRI 06:00 Today (m000gvlr)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000gt6y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b017mwz2)
Charles Dickens: A Life, by Claire Tomalin

Episode 5

Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography of one of Britain's best loved novelists paints a portrait of a brilliant writer and a complex man. Today's themes are adulation and farewells.

Claire Tomalin's well-received biography of one of the nation's literary giants is broadcast to mark the 150th anniversary of his death in June 2020. Here Tomalin evocatively portrays Dickens as a writer charged with tremendous imagination and energy, enabling him to create characters who continue to endure in our popular culture from The Artful Dodger, Mr Pickwick, Pip and David Copperfield. He was also a hard-working journalist, a philanthropist, a supporter of social causes, and father of ten, and yet his genius also had a dark side.

Claire Tomalin was literary editor of the The New Statesman and then the Sunday Times before becoming a full time writer. Her biographies are award winning. The Life and Death of Mary Wollstonecraft, won the Whitbread First Book Award, and Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self was Whitbread Book of the Year in 2002.

Read by Penelope Wilton
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

Read by Penelope Wilton
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000gvlt)
Care workers and COVID-19; Silent Solutions; Anne Scott-James; Corona diary – Pauline

The Government has issued new guidelines on the personal protective equipment that should be used by those on the NHS frontline. It has also said that it is important for social care staff to feel safe, and that the new guidance will give them information and reassurance. But how do the army of women working to provide care in care homes and care to vulnerable adults in their own homes feel?

You may have heard us on Tuesday talk about the sad expectation that violence within the home is likely to increase because of our current lock-down.
One way of alerting emergency services that you're in trouble is by using the code 55 on the phone. Lucy Hadley from Women's Aid explains how it works.

In 1953 pioneering journalist Anne Scott-James started to write a weekly column for the Sunday Express newspaper. 'The Anne Scott-James Page' set the bar for a new way of writing. She perfected the art of the short, sharp column - filled with her views on men, children, fashion, beauty and anything else that took her fancy. Anne’s daughter, the writer Clare Hastings, provides an insight into the first female star of London's Fleet Street.

In today’s Woman's Hour Corona Diaries, we hear from Pauline in Morecambe. She tells Jane how if you live alone but aren’t classified as vulnerable, it’s easy to slip through the net when you need a helping hand.

Is isolation the perfect time to experiment with your hair? Or a reason to leave well alone until it’s in the hands of a professional? We discuss DIY hair care - the Dos and the definitely DON'Ts. Tanya Harrison is the founder of Harrison Hair Studio in Liverpool. She’s set up a virtual hair clinic for her clients and tells us what kind of questions they’ve had and shares some tips if you’re eager to have a go yourself.

Presenter – Jane Garvey
Producer – Sarah Crawley
Guest – Margaret Hodge MP
Guest – Christina McAnea
Guest - Lucy Hadley
Guest – Pauline Vaughan
Guest – Tanya Harrison
Guest – Clare Hastings


FRI 10:45 The Prelude, by William Wordsworth (m000gvlw)
Episode 5

William Wordsworth's autobiographical poem The Prelude is arguably the most important piece of poetic writing in our language. Recorded in Wordsworth's home in Grasmere, Cumbria, Wordsworth looks back over events in his early life.

Wordsworth believed that poetry should be written in the natural language of common speech, and in that way it was revolutionary in its time.

Parts of the poem are famous, with lines quoted often, such as the description of the young Wordsworth stealing a boat. Other parts are more introspective. The young poet leaves Grasmere to go to university in Cambridge and is homesick. Wordsworth grapples with his political feelings - travelling to France at the time of the French Revolution. He enjoys the hustle and bustle of London, and is euphoric when crossing the Alps. All the time this poem is accessible, bursting with colour and description, full of gripping storytelling.

The Prelude is read by Sir Ian McKellen, with specially composed music by John Harle performed by John Harle on saxophone and Neill MacColl on guitar.

The Prelude is directed in Manchester by Susan Roberts.


FRI 11:00 Life on Lockdown (m000h25n)
Cathy FitzGerald hears stories from around the globe about life on lockdown. How are people making sense of this strange new world?

Presented and Produced: Cathy FitzGerald
Exec Producer: Sarah Cuddon
Original Music: Tom Rosenthal
Contributions from: Orla O'Neill, Marcus Goodyear, Redzi and Maya Bernard, Leona Fensome, Mark Thomas, Miranda Sawyer, Suzie McCarthy, Jonathan Zenti and Robin Miniter.
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:30 It's a Fair Cop (m000gvly)
Series 5

Babysitter

How many times have you been filmed without your knowledge today? PC Alfie Moore takes us through a real life case of invasion of privacy and consent.

Written and presented by Alfie Moore
Script Editor: Will Ing
Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000gvm0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:03 Shipping Forecast (m000h8s4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


FRI 12:06 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gvm2)
Episode 15: Ghosts

Anton Lesser continues the long-awaited finale to Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning Thomas Cromwell series.

Cromwell waits in the Bell Tower, convinced that there will be no reprieve, and concerned only about the future of his family and household. Sensing that he his end will come soon, he thinks back over his life, and the ghosts of his past

Writer: Hilary Mantel
Reader: Anton Lesser
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 12:20 You and Yours (m000gvm4)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000gvm6)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000gvm8)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (m000gvmb)
Series 2: 50 More Things...

Fundraising Appeal

Charity has become big business. One recent study estimates that the British give about as much to charity as they spend on beer. The modern, professional approach to fundraising dates back to an American called Charles Sumner Ward, who worked for the YMCA in the early 1900s. Tim Harford explains how economists now study what are the most effective techniques to elicit donations – should charities put more energy into doing the most good they can with the money they raise, or employing attractive young women to knock on doors?

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editor: Richard Vadon


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000gvcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m000gvmd)
Eavesdropper

Claire is a dedicated and highly successful secret agent, charged with the surveillance of potential terrorists. Her work is challenging but dangerous and, on a mission, she ignores instructions - with almost fatal consequences.

Suffering acute acoustic trauma, she is fitted with a new hearing device which she is promised will prevent her from becoming permanently deaf. But, just before she returns to work, she finds her hearing has become so vivid that she is increasingly aware of unusual sounds - and sometimes a voice instructing her what to do.

The stress of this leads to serious consequences in both her professional and private life, as her husband finds it even more difficult to cope with the demands her job puts on their relationship. His pleas for her to take things more easily are ignored and her life becomes increasingly difficult on all levels.

Cast includes Lydia Leonard [Gentleman Jack], Lee Ingleby [Line of Duty, The A Word], David Rintoul [The Crown] and Anton Lesser [The Trial of Christine Keeler, The Crown].

Cast:
CLAIRE ..... Lydia Leonard
PAUL ..... Lee Ingleby
VOICE ..... Anton Lesser
MIKE ..... David Rintoul
GRETA ..... Amaka Okafor
VALTERI ..... Stephen Critchlow
NURSE ..... Rachel Atkins
VOICES ..... David Holt
RECEPTIONIST ..... Beth Eyre

Author: Jeremy Raison
Director: Cherry Cookson

A Rockethouse Production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000gvmg)
GQT At Home: Episode One

Kathy Clugston is joined by Matthew Wilson, Anne Swithenbank and Matthew Pottage to host GQT from the comfort of their own homes, answering questions sent in by the audience.

This week, the panellists suggest ways to entertain children in the garden, advise on re-planting a terrarium, and discuss the best vegetables to grow in a garden.

Away from the questions - and before the current coronavirus restrictions came into being - Peter Gibbs went to meet Lawrence Shaw, Archeological Officer for the New Forest National Park Authority, who shows him some of the tree graffiti to be found in the forest.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000gvmj)
Take Me Home

An original short work specially commissioned by BBC Radio 4 from the author Louise Kennedy. Read by Cathy White (Nurses, Vikings.)

Writer
Louise Kennedy grew up in Holywood, Northern Ireland. Her short stories have been published in journals including The Stinging Fly, The Tangerine, The Lonely Crowd and Banshee. Her work has won the Ambit Short Fiction (2015), Wasifiri New Writing (2015), John O’Connor (2016) and Listowel Los-Gatos (2016) prizes and was short-listed for the 2019 Sunday Times Audible Short Story Award. She is a PhD candidate at the Seamus Heaney Centre, Queens University Belfast. She lives in Sligo with her husband and two teenage children.

Writer ..... Louise Kennedy
Reader ..... Cathy White
Producer ..... Michael Shannon


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000gvml)
Albert Uderzo, Valerie Pettit OBE, Reverend Joseph Lowery, Julie Felix

Pictured: Albert Uderzo

Matthew Bannister on

Valerie Pettit OBE, the senior MI6 officer in charge of the daring operation to get Soviet double agent Oleg Gordievsky out of Russia after his cover was blown.

Albert Uderzo – the French cartoonist who created Asterix the Gaul.

Reverend Joseph Lowery – the leading American civil rights activist who worked alongside Martin Luther King in the campaign for black equality.

Julie Felix – the American-born singer who became known as the first lady of British folk.

Interviewed guest: Ben Macintyre
Interviewed guest: Agnes Poirier
Interviewed guest: Dr Paul Smith
Interviewed guest: Henrietta Giles
Interviewed guest: Fran Collier

Producer: Neil George


FRI 16:30 PM (m000gvms)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000gvmv)
The health secretary, Matt Hancock, calls on the UK to remain "disciplined" and maintain social distancing despite forecasts of warm weather this weekend.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (m000gvmx)
Series 56

Episode 5

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis get to grips with the continuing COVID-19 lock-down and disruption with sketches and guests.

With comedians Geoff Norcott and Robin Morgan plus music from Tim Sutton and Sooz Kempner. Additional voices from Luke Kempner and Gemma Arrowsmith.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Mike Shepherd, Laura Major, Donald Alexander and Charlie Dinkin.

Producer Adnan Ahmed
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 Front Row (m000gvn1)
Miles Davis's Bitches Brew, Gaming, Cressida Cowell in the Culture Clinic

Miles Davis released his seminal album Bitches Brew 50 years ago this week. Saxophonist Soweto Kinch and Michael Carlson consider the impact of the double album, and discuss the recent documentary Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool.

What video games should we play while we’re self-isolating? Video games expert, journalist and broadcaster Jordan Erica Webber gives us her top picks and tips for first-time gamers. And as even the World Health Organisation recommends 'playing active video games' during lockdown, we look at the mental and physical health benefits of gaming.

This week The Front Row Culture Clinic is looking at how to keep children entertained and educated whilst under lockdown, with portrait painter Lorna May Wadsworth who is launching a painting competition for the under 12s - the winner will have their painting hung in a prestigious London gallery. Children's Laureate Cressida Cowell, who is reading a chapter of How To Train Your Dragon every day from her garden shed with Book Trust Home Time, considers how to keep house-bound kids happy and motivated.

As the Scottish Ensemble string orchestra celebrate their 50th anniversary this year, concert violinists Jonathan and Clio Morton from the Ensemble perform two short inventions by Bach, live from their home.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Jerome Weatherald


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00q3f37)
About Love

Rothschild's Violin

In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Anton Chekhov's birth, Michael Pennington plays the great Russian writer presenting a series of his short stories on the subject of marriage, dramatised by Martyn Wade.

A story of regret about a coffin maker whose wife of 50 years is taken seriously ill.

Chekhov ...... Michael Pennington
Maxim Nikolayevich ...... Nicholas Boulton
Rothschild ...... Jasper Britton
Yakov ...... Philip Voss Marfa ...... Zoe Waites

Directed by Philip Franks and Jane Morgan.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000gvn4)
Ian Blackford MP, Lara McNeill, Dr Tom Wingfield and Helen Whately MP

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from London Broadcasting House with the leader of the SNP at Westminster Ian Blackford MP, Lara McNeill who is a newly qualified doctor and member of Labour's NEC, Dr Tom Wingfield from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the Minister for Care in the Department for Health and Social Care Helen Whately MP.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000gvn6)
Seven Degrees of Solitude

"Having been alone in the apartment now for almost three weeks," writes Adam Gopnik in New York, "I have become aware of the countless fine shades of solitude".

Adam describes the daily roller coaster ride of anxiety and normalcy - from the solitude of morning coffee with the dog to the solitude of the Manhattan street late at night.

With each day that passes, he finds that "the hues and shades of solitude are defining themselves, with a distinction that gives at least a shape, and sometimes the hint of a meaning, to our time inside".

Producer: Adele Armstrong


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b0855vzd)
Instant History

The word "archive" conjures up images of dusty shelves and gradual, patient accumulation of historical material. But what if an archive could be created in a matter of hours - an instant history?

Oral history projects abound across the country but, at the University of Hertfordshire, the exercise has been dramatically condensed to create so-called instant histories on subjects including supporters of Stevenage Football Club and memories of British migrants to the Antipodes.

The instant history concept has been developed at the university by the likes of Professor Owen Davies, Dr Anne Murphy and Visiting Research Fellow Andrew Green, who presents this Archive on 4.

Across a single weekend at the end of October, the members of the university’s oral history team tackled a project on retirement in 2016. They spread out far and wide to interview people from many walks of life who have either just retired or are about to cease full-time employment. Interviews took place as far afield as Llandudno, Scunthorpe, Ipswich and Cheltenham with interviewees from nursing, the steel industry, firefighting, City finance, carpentry and international engineering, teaching and supermarket management.

A first-class cricketer talked about what it means to retire in his thirties. The founder of an addiction treatment centre spoke movingly of the scale of the crisis she addressed in her career.

This programme features choice extracts from the newly created archive. Andrew Green explains the processes involved in enabling a stranger to tell their story, and examines the potential conflict between academic history and the subjective narration of personal stories, opinions and feelings in an oral history.

Produced by Andrew Green
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000gvn8)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel (m000gvm2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m000gtnj)
Nazir Afzal & Maggie Gee

Nazir Afzal prosecuted dozens of men responsible for grooming young girls during his time as head of the CPS in the North West of England. His role was dramatised in BBC1's harrowing Three Girls series which told the story of three teenage girls who were abused by a gang of Asian men. He is a strong advocate for women and his choice of book reflects this. It's the late journalist Sue Lloyd Roberts' The War on Women.
Novelist Maggie Gee has written many books including My Driver, My Cleaner and The Flood. She has chosen The First Breath by Olivia Gordon which she describes as a rather neglected book on the lives of pre-term babies, their parents and the doctors and nurses in a premature babies unit. She calls it "riveting, touching and informative."
Harriett's choice is Waiting for the Barbarians by JM Coetzee, the story of a magistrate in an unnamed colonial town on the edge of the British Empire where the indigenous people are referred to as 'barbarians'.
These books provoke some very interesting discussion. Tell us what you think on @agoodreadbbc

THE WAR ON WOMEN By Sue Lloyd Roberts
THE FIRST BREATH by Olivia Gordon
WAITING FOR THE BARBARIANS by JM Coetzee

Producer: Maggie Ayre


FRI 23:25 The Book of Polyamory (m000gkw9)
Since its first publication 20 years ago, The Ethical Slut has informed and changed opinions about non-monogamous lifestyles. Comedian Sophie Duker traces its journey in challenging perceptions of polyamory and follows one specific copy that has travelled the world while being shared among enthusiastic readers.

Hearing modern stories of love and polyamory, Sophie questions opinions of openness and sees first hand the struggles and complications that non-monogamous groups face. She asks if society is yet ready for complete acceptance of their lifestyle.

Producer: Simon Jarvis and Lauren Armstrong Carter
Executive Producer: Anishka Sharma

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m000gvnc)
Harry and Clive - Men of War

Fi Glover introduces two Jerseymen who joined up in World War II, recalling their return to the island in 1946, and how their experience of war changed them forever. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00q2psk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00q3f31)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00q3f33)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00q3f35)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00q3f37)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 13:45 MON (m000gt5c)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 13:45 TUE (m000gtn1)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 13:45 WED (m000gsll)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 13:45 THU (m000gvch)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 13:45 FRI (m000gvmb)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m000gtnj)

A Normal... 18:30 TUE (m000gtnq)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000gn77)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000gvn6)

Ability 18:30 THU (b0b0v537)

Analysis 11:00 SAT (m000gcx0)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m000gkwc)

Annika Stranded 21:45 SAT (m0007480)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m000gt23)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000gn75)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000gvn4)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m000gt2q)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (b0855vzd)

Art of Now 11:30 THU (m000gd7k)

BBC Inside Science 16:00 THU (m000gvcp)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000gvcp)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m000gt35)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m000gt35)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b017lt53)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b017lt53)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b017mrbj)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b017mrbj)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b017mv1k)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b017mv1k)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b017mvx0)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b017mvx0)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b017mwz2)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000gt6p)

Castle of the Hawk 15:00 SUN (m000gt7s)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (m000gsmd)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m000gsmd)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m000gln1)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m000gvc3)

Dark, Salt, Clear: Life in a Cornish Fishing Town, by Lamorna Ash 00:30 SAT (m000gn5v)

Day Release 21:00 SAT (b075t6kg)

Desert Island Discs 11:00 SUN (m000gt6y)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000gt6y)

Don't Log Off 11:00 WED (m000h9hc)

Drama 15:00 SAT (b0bd7bm4)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m000gtn5)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000gslq)

Drama 14:15 THU (m00017qr)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m000gvmd)

Eighteen 11:30 TUE (m000gtm8)

Fallout 20:00 WED (m000gztl)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m000gt19)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000gt7t)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000h9fy)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000gtpl)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000gsn1)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000gvdn)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m000gn6q)

Fighting Talk: How Language Can Make Us Better 11:00 MON (m0001g8w)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m000gt1s)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000gt6l)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000gtns)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000gsm5)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000gvcy)

Front Row 19:00 FRI (m000gvn1)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000gn6l)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000gvmg)

Halal If You Hear Me 16:30 SUN (m000gt7y)

Hidden Children of the Church 20:00 TUE (m000gtnw)

In Business 20:30 THU (m000gvd3)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b084zk6z)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b084zk6z)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000gtny)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m000gzth)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m000gzth)

It's a Fair Cop 11:30 FRI (m000gvly)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m000gn6n)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000gvml)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (m000gmgp)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (m000gsmb)

Life on Lockdown 11:00 FRI (m000h25n)

Lights Out 23:00 MON (m000gt6s)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b01c6s8f)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m000gt2j)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m000gt2j)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000gn7k)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m000gt2v)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m000gt8c)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000gt71)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000gtp6)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000gsmn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000gvd8)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m000gt1x)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m000gt1x)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000gsls)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m000gmgm)

More or Less 09:00 TUE (m000h7st)

More or Less 21:30 TUE (m000h7st)

My Modest Proposal 23:30 SAT (m0009b34)

New Irish Writing 19:45 SUN (b03y3lkb)

New Storytellers 09:30 TUE (m000766g)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000gn7t)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m000gt33)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m000gt5n)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m000gv70)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000gt72)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000gtbl)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000gtmd)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000gsl8)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000gvc5)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000gvm0)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m000gt17)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m000gt5x)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000gt6f)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m000gt2s)

News 13:00 SAT (m000gt21)

Now Wash Your Hands 23:00 THU (m000h901)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m000gt7w)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m000gt7w)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m000gvck)

Out Loud 23:30 THU (m000bcmx)

PM 17:00 SAT (m000gt27)

PM 16:30 MON (m000gt5y)

PM 16:30 TUE (m000gtnl)

PM 16:30 WED (m000gslz)

PM 16:30 THU (m000gvcr)

PM 16:30 FRI (m000gvms)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000gt86)

Plum House 11:30 WED (m000gsl5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000gn7w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000gt8p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m000gt7p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000gtpj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000gsmz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000gvdl)

Profile 05:45 SAT (m000gt2l)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m000gt2l)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m000gt2l)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000gt65)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000gt65)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000gt65)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m000glnm)

Reluctant Persuaders 19:15 SUN (m000118z)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (m000gkvp)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (m000gt5h)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m000gt1n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m000gn7p)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 02:00 SUN (m000gt2z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000gt8h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000gt79)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000gtpb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000gsms)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000gvdd)

Sharing the Baby 16:00 TUE (m000gtnf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m000gn7m)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000gn7r)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m000gt2b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m000gt2x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m000gt31)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000gt80)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m000gt8f)

Shipping Forecast 05:33 MON (m000gt8k)

Shipping Forecast 12:03 MON (m000h8s2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000gt75)

Shipping Forecast 05:33 TUE (m000gt7f)

Shipping Forecast 12:03 TUE (m000h8s0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000gtp8)

Shipping Forecast 05:33 WED (m000gtpd)

Shipping Forecast 12:03 WED (m000h8lg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000gsmq)

Shipping Forecast 05:33 THU (m000gsmv)

Shipping Forecast 12:03 THU (m000h8zz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000gvdb)

Shipping Forecast 05:33 FRI (m000gvdg)

Shipping Forecast 12:03 FRI (m000h8s4)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m000gtn9)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m000gnln)

Short Works 11:45 SUN (m000gnln)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000gvmj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m000gt2g)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m000gt84)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000gt66)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000gtnn)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m000gsm1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000gvct)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000gvmv)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0270kml)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0270kml)

Stand-Up Specials 23:00 TUE (m000gtp2)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m000bvxw)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m000bvxw)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000gt6k)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m000gt61)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 12:04 SUN (m000gkw2)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 18:30 MON (m000gt6b)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000gt6t)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m000gt5f)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m000gt5f)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000gt6g)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000gt6g)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000gsln)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000gsln)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m000gsm3)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m000gsm3)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000gvcw)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000gvcw)

The Book of Polyamory 23:25 FRI (m000gkw9)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m000glp6)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m000gvd1)

The Cathedral Thinkers 21:00 MON (m000gl8n)

The City That Sings 16:00 MON (m000gt5p)

The Digital Human 23:30 MON (m000gt5t)

The Digital Human 23:30 TUE (m0002rkd)

The Digital Human 23:30 WED (b08q4cm1)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m000glnt)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m000gt5k)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m000gt5k)

The Global Philosopher 09:00 WED (m000h63r)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m000gt7n)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m000gsl3)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m000gvnc)

The Media Show 16:00 WED (m000gslx)

The Media Show 21:30 WED (m000gslx)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:06 MON (m000gt53)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 MON (m000gt53)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:06 TUE (m000gtmj)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 TUE (m000gtmj)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:06 WED (m000gslb)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 WED (m000gslb)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:06 THU (m000gvc7)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 THU (m000gvc7)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 12:06 FRI (m000gvm2)

The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel 22:45 FRI (m000gvm2)

The NHS Front Line 11:00 TUE (m000h613)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (m000gn6z)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (m000gvmx)

The Patch 10:30 SAT (m000gt1q)

The Prelude, by William Wordsworth 10:45 MON (m000gt4y)

The Prelude, by William Wordsworth 10:45 TUE (m000gtm5)

The Prelude, by William Wordsworth 10:41 WED (m000gsl0)

The Prelude, by William Wordsworth 10:45 THU (m000gvc1)

The Prelude, by William Wordsworth 10:45 FRI (m000gvlw)

The Reith Lectures 19:15 SAT (b03969vt)

The Ugly Truth 13:30 SUN (m000gt7j)

The Ugly Truth 20:00 MON (m000gt7j)

The Wilsons Save the World 18:30 WED (b09f39tt)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m000gt7d)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000h2rz)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m000gtp0)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m000gsmg)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000gvd6)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m000gvn8)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m0003jhs)

This Thing of Darkness 14:15 MON (m000gwn0)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:00 WED (m000gsmj)

Today 07:00 SAT (m000gt1j)

Today 06:00 MON (m000gt4s)

Today 06:00 TUE (m000gtm1)

Today 06:00 WED (m000gskl)

Today 06:00 THU (m000gvbq)

Today 06:00 FRI (m000gvlr)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zrc4v)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (m0001cy1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (m0001h1h)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (m000gtpn)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03zqzsv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (m0000r6c)

Universal Basic Income: Alaska Style 17:00 SUN (m000gl9m)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m000gt1f)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m000gt1z)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m000gt2d)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m000gt5s)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m000gt69)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m000gt78)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m000gt82)

Weather 05:56 MON (m000gt8r)

Weather 12:57 MON (m000gt57)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m000gtms)

Weather 12:57 WED (m000gslg)

Weather 12:57 THU (m000gvcc)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m000gvm6)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m000gt89)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m000gt25)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m000gt4w)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m000gtm3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m000gsky)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m000gvbz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m000gvlt)

World at One 13:00 MON (m000gt59)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m000gtmx)

World at One 13:00 WED (m000gslj)

World at One 13:00 THU (m000gvcf)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m000gvm8)

You and Yours 12:20 MON (m000gt55)

You and Yours 12:20 TUE (m000gtmn)

You and Yours 12:20 WED (m000gsld)

You and Yours 12:20 THU (m000gvc9)

You and Yours 12:20 FRI (m000gvm4)