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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 01 FEBRUARY 2020

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000drp6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Motherwell (m000drp8)
Episode 5

The late journalist Deborah Orr was born and bred in the Scottish steel town of Motherwell, in the west of Scotland. Growing up the product of a mixed marriage, with an English mother and a Scottish father, she was often a child on the edge of her working class community, a 'weird child', who found solace in books, nature and in her mother's company. But her mother's shadow was long and often controlling - Deborah was not always mothered well.

In her powerful and poignant memoir Deborah Orr explores the effects of her strict parenting and her own strong desire for independence and autonomy which led her to flee her roots, first to St Andrews University, with mixed results, and then to her hugely successful career as a journalist and writer in London. She also paints a vivid portrait of the place and the community around the steel works of Ravenscraig - the hub of her world in the sixties and seventies.

Deborah Orr died of cancer in the autumn of 2019, and her book is published at the end of January.

Today Grown up life and an archive in a cupboard.

The reader is Siobhan Redmond
The abridger is Julian Wilkinson
The Producers are Karen Holden and Di Speirs


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000drpb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000drpd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000drpg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000drpj)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000drpl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Rachel Mann

Good morning.

When I was a small child I was fascinated by the different shapes, sizes and feel of coins. I couldn’t grasp why some were bronze and others silver or why old pennies from pre-decimal days were so much bigger than their modern equivalent. I was also rather fond of the tiny little modern half-pence piece, perhaps because our local corner shop sold ha’penny sweets. One could get a serious haul of goodies with a handful of the tiny coins! Apparently, I was in a minority for on this in day 1984 the Chancellor announced that the half-pence piece would be withdrawn by the end of the year.

Society’s relationship with money evolves over time and the changes since the 1980s have been huge. Just as I find it hard to believe that the UK ever had a non-decimal coinage system, I imagine my grandparents would be staggered at the emergence of the cashless society. I’ve lived through so many changes but am blown away by my ability to pay for things using my fancy smart watch. Who knows where the future lies?

We live in a complex ecology of money and finance, where there are radical disparities in wealth and growing levels of unsecured debt. Whether we use cash or digital or online, money presents great opportunities to exercise personal and community responsibility as well as temptations to be selfish and greedy. Jesus reminds us that we cannot serve God and Money and If money does make the world go around, on its own it cannot make it the loving and hopeful place we need it to be.

Living God, grant me wisdom to use my financial power and opportunities responsibly and generously.

Amen


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m000dqfl)
Digital Sadness

Alice Moloney discusses how best to express negative emotions in the digital realm.

When Alice's father was diagnosed with cancer, she found herself at a loss as to how to communicate with him digitally. One solution was sending more personal objects. But Alice works in digital communication, and in this talk at the Shambala Festival she describes her journey to improve the tools available to communicate grief and sadness.

Producer: Giles Edwards


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000dxq9)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m000dqyz)
Tintagel

Helen Mark visits Tintagel in Cornwall to cross the new bridge which now links the castle to the mainland. She discovers its links with the legends of King Arthur, the way that this myth has shaped the buildings we now see in this landscape and the people who live there and finds that the real historic importance of this part of the UK is only just beginning to be understood.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000dxqc)
Farming Today This Week

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


SAT 06:57 Weather (m000dxqf)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m000dxqh)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000dxqk)
Frances Barber

Frances Barber first played rock star, screen goddess and drug addict Billie Trix 18 years ago and, along with Jonathan Harvey and the Pet Shop Boys, she is set to reprise the role in cabaret Musik.

Charlie Mackesy’s The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse began as two Instagram posts called “help” and “kind” that were shared a million times. They have been included in a book of life lessons that has become a surprise bestseller here and in the US.

Steve Smith is one of America’s most experienced astronauts. He has taken part in four missions and performed seven space walks, including five to repair the Hubble Space Telescope.

Rosie Wilby is a comedian and "love researcher" who presents The Break-Up Monologues podcast.

And Emeli Sande shares her Inheritance Tracks - Three Little Birds by Bob Marley and Elgar's Cello Concerto performed by Jacqueline Du Pre.

Producer: Laura Northedge
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m000dxqm)
Series 26

Film Special

Jay Rayner hosts a film-themed edition of the culinary panel show, with Dr Zoe Laughlin, Tim Anderson, Anna Jones and Tim Haywood.

The programme comes from the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, the set of many films, with discussion of all things film and food. Rosie Fletcher, from Den of Geek, joins the panel to discuss the importance of milkshakes in the movies and resident materials expert, Dr Zoe Laughlin, experiments with the optimum viscosity for a milkshake in order to hurl it at someone - just like Rizzo in Grease.

And as we're at the Naval College which was used in the Pirates of the Caribbean films, Jackie Christian from Doreen's Jamaican Homemade Rum Cake is also on hand to discuss the use of spirits, and rum in particular, in cooking.

Producer: Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m000dxqp)
George Parker of the Financial Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The UK has left the EU so what happens next? what is the negotiating strength of the UK and what can we expect form the hard bargaining ahead?
The editor is Marie Jessel


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000dxqr)
Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000dxqt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000dxqw)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m000drnp)
Series 101

Episode 4

Andy Zaltzman, Geoff Norcott, Suzi Ruffell and Professor Anand Menon join Nish Kumar this week.

The team marks Brexit Day with all the latest on the Big Big bongs and the story of some misplaced life-savings.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m000dxqy)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m000dxr0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000drnw)
Bell Ribiero Addy MP, Ken Clarke, Richard Holden MP, Lord Mann

Chris Mason chairs political debate from Aston Parish Church in Birmingham with Shadow Immigration Minister Bell Ribiero Addy MP, former Chancellor Ken Clarke, the conservative MP Richard Holden and the Government's independent adviser on anti semitism Lord Mann.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000dxr2)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 Drama (m0002z3z)
Bathwater

Bathwater explores poet Vicky Foster's real-life experiences of what happens when violence spills over into family life. What's the impact on a son of having a violent father he never really knew? How does society view those whose partners are violent?

'Do I walk like him? Do I talk like him? Is my body the same shape?

Written and performed by Vicky Foster
With Finlay McGuigan as Joseph

Sound score composed and played by Broken Orchestra - Pat Dooner and Carl Conway-Davis
Bathwater is a BBC Drama North production, directed by Susan Roberts


SAT 15:30 Art of Now (m000dpjh)
Filth

In the hands of artists, smog, landfill and sewage become beautiful, witty and challenging statements.

As the scale of pollution intensifies, Emma meets the artists who are finding original and compelling ways to make us understand and feel the crisis of filth.

Zack Denfeld and Cat Kramer harvest air pollution in cities around the world, whipping up egg whites on street corners. They bake them into meringues and hand them out to the public who can’t help but react to eating the city’s pollutants.

Mexican collective Tres guide Emma through their studio, piled high with collected rubbish: they’ve filled a gallery with 300,000 stinking cigarette butts, taken over the streets to preserve fossilized chewing gum and crawled for months on Australian beaches filtering through marine plastic.

Nut Brother has courted controversy with his performance of dragging 10,000 bottles of polluted water from Shaanxi to Beijing while John Sabraw wades through Ohio’s filthy streams, capturing iron oxide from unsealed mines and turning sludge into glorious paints.

Emma delves through rails of Kasia Molga’s costumes which glow red in response to carbon, she listens to an orchestra of Lucy Sabin’s breath and takes us down under the River Thames to meet her collaborator Lee Berwick: they're working on an installation about underwater sound pollution, experimenting with sounds in the Greenwich foot tunnel for an installation opening in March.

These provocative and entertaining artists discuss the relationship between art and activism, taking us beyond the facts and figures to face head on and experience the contamination we are inflicting on the planet.

Producer: Sarah Bowen


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m000dxr4)
The double discrimination faced by black parents with autistic children.

The double discrimination faced by black parents with autistic children. Damaging relationships - why do we so often repeat the same patterns of behaviour?
Forestry England's writer in residence. Plus Marion Dunn who took up boxing for fitness in her 50's. The campaign to reform the disclosure of criminal records. And Gwyneth Paltrow and her Goop Lab - why are so many of us so keen on advice and products that are not backed up by any scientific research? .

Producer Olivia Cope
Editor Beverley Purcell

Guest; Pam Aculey
Guest; Venessa Bobb
Guest; Marion Dunn
Guest; Leigh Hardy
Guest; Rachel Tynan
Guest; Zakiya McKenzie
Guest; Louise Tickle
Guest; Jenny Beck
Guest; Penny
Guest; Prof Tali Sharot
Guest; Dr Anjali Mahto
Guest; Anne-marie Lodge-


SAT 17:00 PM (m000dxr6)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Inquiry (m000dxr8)
Is Recycling Broken?

With countries shutting their doors to foreign recyclable waste and a lack of processing capacity back home, is the recycling system broken?

China used to accept 55% of the world’s plastic and paper waste. But it closed its doors in 2018. Initially other countries in South East Asia, like Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam took over China’s waste processing role. But they too are now sending much of the waste back, arguing it is contaminated and is harming their own environments.

This has created major problems for countries in the West who traditionally relied on others to process their recycling waste. In addition, there’s confusion about what households can and cannot put into their recycling bins, along with that lack of recycling capacity back home. So what is the answer to the growing mountains of what was supposed to be recyclable waste? Could Sweden, which has reduced the amount of household waste it sends to landfill to under one per cent, have an answer? It’s not one everyone agrees with.

Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Producer: John Murphy


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000dxrb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m000dxrd)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000dxrg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000dxrj)
Clara Amfo, Richard Armitage, SJI Holliday, Rufus Jones, Shovels & Rope, Daoirí Farrell, Nikki Bedi, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Richard Armitage, Clara Amfo, Rufus Jones and SJI Holliday for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Shovels & Rope and Daoirí Farrell.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m000dxrl)
Mike Pompeo

The US Secretary of State caught up in the Ukraine impeachment scandal.

Mike Pompeo has a lot on his plate. He’s at the centre of the impeachment investigation into US President Donald Trump, who’s accused of breaking the law by pressuring Ukraine's president to dig up damaging information on a political rival. He’s pressuring the UK government to look again at its decision to give Chinese company Huawei a role in its 5G mobile phone network. And he’s facing criticism for refusing an extradition request relating to the death of British teenager Harry Dunn. In the week Mike Pompeo visits both the UK and Ukraine, Edward Stourton investigates the life and record of America’s top diplomat.

Producers: Simon Maybin & Diane Richardson
Editor: Penny Murphy


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m000dxrn)
Ingmar Bergman, The Lighthouse, William Gibson, The Art, Design and future of Fungi, Art on the BBC

Ingmar Bergman's 1966 film Persona has been adapted into a stage play and it is the opening production at the newly revamped Riverside Studios in London The Lighthouse, starring Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson is a black and white film set in a claustrophobic remote isolated lighthouse where the two keepers begin to rub each other up the wrong way
William Gibson is a sci-fi writer whose latest novel Agency imagines a dystopian future world where time travel is possible but only virtually
The Art, Design and Future of Fungi is an exhibition at Somerset House in London which brings together work by artists and designers, exploring mycophilia, magic mushrooms and fungi futures
Art On The BBC is a new documentary series which delves into 60 years of arts coverage on BBC TV, exploring how TV portrayal has changed.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Meg Rosoff, Katie Puckrik and Colin Grant. The producer is Oliver Jones

Podcast Extra recommendations

Meg: Jo Jo Rabbit film and Beryl at The Arcola Theatre
Katie: Paris In The Spring CD on Ace Records
Colin: The Shadow King by Maaza Mengiste
Tom: Cheer documentary on Netflix

Photo: Beatrix Potter, Hygrophorus puniceus, pencil and watercolour, 7.10.1894, collected at Smailholm Tower, Kelso, courtesy of the Armitt Trust


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m000dxrq)
I Think I’ve Been Here Before

To mark Groundhog Day, writer Ross Sutherland explores the joy that comes from repetition. Repetition is everywhere. Repetition is persuasive. Repetition is fun. Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But since no one was listening, everything must be said again.

The music we like, the games we play - it all seems to revolve around the pleasure of repetition. After all, familiarity provides comfort.

Our jobs are loops. Our social lives are loops. Are we into infinity because we are not infinite? The loop, unlike us, never dies.

We shouldn't be afraid of saying something more than once - the deepest "aha's" spring from an encounter and then a return. A build and a release.

Yet repeating oneself is embarrassing. We call out the robotic language of diplomats, politicians and liars. Even history itself seems to endlessly loop back around, forcing each new generation to make the same mistakes as the last.

Ross Sutherland looks at the behavioural grooves that we return to, the concepts of pattern, memory and déjà vu - with contributions from Professor Catherine Loveday, Techno DJ and Rinse FM resident “Hodge”, along with comedian Glenn Moore.

Produced by Hana Walker-Brown
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Sebastian Baczkiewicz - Pilgrim (b01r11w9)
Series 4

Wedlowe Sound

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

Episode 3: Wedlowe Sound

Pilgrim must tackle an old adversary and save the community of Wedlowe Sound when it is threatened by a giant.

William Palmer ..... Paul Hilton
Wedlowe ..... Ronald Pickup
Massey ..... Paul Stonehouse
Neil ..... Will Howard
Gwen ..... Liza Sadovy
Dreamer ..... Ben Crowe
Girl ..... Agnes Bateman

Directed by Marc Beeby


SAT 21:45 Annika Stranded (b0bgpch3)
Series 4

Representation

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Since we last met her, Annika has been promoted to Chief Inspector. Her first act was - apart from choosing a new speedboat - to co-opt Mikel, her forensic photographer of choice, to accompany her. Her son Tor is about to start school.

Being Chief Inspector means a bigger case-load. What follows will test her physically and emotionally as never before.

Episode 3: Representation
A journalist is found dead in the central hall of Norway’s parliament building.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4, including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014 and 2016.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m000dxrs)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 The Fix (m000dqhf)
Debt

Debt and Poverty

This is the third series of Radio 4's programme which tries to solve some of the UK's most difficult social problems. This year, The Fix spends three episodes looking at one issue: debt. Why is it such an intractable problem in the UK, where 15% of the population have no savings at all? Presenters Matthew Taylor and Cat Drew visit the borough of Barking and Dagenham in east London, where more than one in ten people there owe money to the council.
They help implement an innovative solution to problem debt and find out from local residents whether it really works.

Contributors:
- Audie Brown
- Jeanette Taylor
- Jeanne Galioni
- Gill Wilson, Barking and Dagenham Council
- Jill Gallagher, Barking and Dagenham Council
- Mark Fowler, Barking and Dagenham Council
- Diye Wariebi, Brightsparks
- Siobhan Obliana, Brightsparks
- David Jones
- Chris Naylor, Barking and Dagenham Council

Producer: Eleanor Biggs
Senior Producer: Estelle Doyle
Editor: Penny Murphy


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (m000dq2g)
Programme 3, 2020

If you're a regulator with no real powers, a bureaucrat who's anonymous and unaccountable, or someone who's drunk - in what sense might you sympathise with Samson in Gaza?

This and other baffling puzzles await the panel in Round Britain Quiz, in which the Northern Ireland pairing of Paddy Duffy and Freya McClements meet the South of England's Paul Sinha and Marcus Berkmann for the first time this season. Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair, and will be deciding how many points to award to the teams, depending on how much help they've needed in unravelling the solutions.

There's the usual scattering of question ideas suggested by listeners to the programme, and Tom also has the answer to the teaser question he asked at the end of the previous edition.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Don't Log Off (m0002z3c)
Series 9

A Sense of Belonging

Alan Dein connects with strangers across the world, exploring the things that unite people across cultures and borders.

Today, Alan reaches out to people in Afghanistan, the Philippines, Sierra Leone and beyond - exploring what it means to belong.

He hears people yearning for a better life elsewhere - and those determined to make a go of it where they are.

Producer: Laurence Grissell



SUNDAY 02 FEBRUARY 2020

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000dxrv)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m000drmw)
Something Less Than Our Best

"It is something of a relief to come into the bar in the evenings. We are together and something less than our best is more than enough."

A funny and forlorn semi-autobiographical tale about working in a bar, by writer Max Sydney Smith, whose short tales of bar work, 'Without Seeming to Care at All', are out now with Rough Trade Books. Read by Rose Lucas, with music by Delawhere and cover photo by Anjana Menon. Produced and directed by Becky Ripley.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000dxrx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000dxrz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000dxs1)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000dxs3)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000dxs5)
All Saints and Saint Lawrence, Evesham in Worcestershire.

Bells on Sunday comes from the freestanding bell tower of the Church of All Saints and Saint Lawrence, Evesham in Worcestershire. The tower contains a fine peal of twelve bells, cast by John Taylor and Company of Loughborough, Leicestershire in 1951. Two further semitone bells were added by the same founder in 1976 and 1992. The tenor weighs thirty five and a half hundredweight and is tuned to the key of C sharp. We hear them ringing Grandsire Caters.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m000dxrl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m000dzlc)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b06lt13f)
Embarrassment

Mark Tully examines the extraordinary contradictions of embarrassment.

It's an emotion that is an invaluable teaching aid, a source of the purest and funniest entertainment, an experience capable of creating powerful bonds and of causing deep estrangement. It's also a psychological state that frequently kills us – ‘dying of embarrassment’ is all too common.

In a programme devoted to embarrassment in all its many guises, Mark investigates the emotion that makes us blush with readings from Jane Austen, T.S. Eliot and Wendell Berry and music by Puccini, Ella Fitzgerald and the French revue star Mistinguett.

The readers are Samantha Bond, Francis Cadder and Matt Addis.

Presenter: Mark Tully

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique Broadcasting Company production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m000dzlf)
New Generation Mixed Farming

John Atkinson and his partner Maria Benjamin have a mixed farm on the eastern shore of Coniston Water in the Lake District. John’s family have farmed there at Nibthwaite for six generations but to keep their farm commercially viable they’re going 'back to the future’- they’re copying the model of the old school mixed farm which was still common around 50 years ago before it became usual practice for farms to specialise and intensify. They’ve developed a portfolio of micro-businesses that capitalise on the farm’s strengths and John and Maria’s interests and skills.

Maria, a former artist and film-maker, has found a niche market for the farm’s speciality rare breed wool and is adding value to wool for other farmers; her shepherd’s bag made from twitter shepherd James Rebanks’ Herdwick wool is carrying Lauren Laverne’s David Bowie albums around. She also makes high end Jersey cow milk soap which is selling in Japan.

John loves livestock and is trying to rehabilitate rare and native breeds to show there’s still a place for them on modern commercial farms. He’s a Trustee for the Rare Breeds Survival Trust and has spent the last year rearing the seven ‘primitive’ UK breeds to produce a true comparison of the costs, the flavour and commercial potential of the meat and wool.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m000dzlh)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000dzlk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000dzlm)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000dxtm)
Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Mariella Frostrup makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust'.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust’

Registered Charity Number in England and Wales: 1133542 In Scotland: SCO41236


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000dzlp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000dzlr)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000dzlt)
The Presentation of the Child Jesus

Fr Dermot Preston SJ preaches live from St Aloysius' RC Church, Glasgow, with the Schola Cantorum of St Aloysius' College.
Director of Music: Ann Archibald. Organist: Hugh Reid.
Hymns: Praise to the Holiest in the Height (Gerontius)
Lift up your heads (Tune: C H Three)
Behold the Holy Lamb of God! (Tune: Holy Lamb)
Longing for Light (Christ be our Light)
Psalm 34: The Cry of the Poor (John Foley SJ)
Anthem: Nunc Dimittis (Geoffrey Burgon)
O Quam Tristis (Pergolesi)
Producer: Mo McCullough


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000drny)
Saving the planet - on hands and knees

"Of all the men I never wanted to grow old into", writes Howard Jacobson, "this is the man I wanted to grow into least: the prepared-for-all-eventualities shopper".

Howard describes his hours of neatly folding plastic bags on his hands and knees on his living room floor...in order to let him shop responsibly.

Gone is his old profligacy. "The wild", he says, "have become the watchful".

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thtfs)
Parrot Crossbill

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison tells the story of the parrot crossbill. The Parrot Crossbill lives only in a few native pinewoods in Scotland. When they're at the top of pine trees a view of the Parrot Crossbill is tricky, so crossbill experts use the birds' calls to tell them apart from Common and Scottish Crossbills. Parrot crossbills have a deeper call than the others.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000dzlw)
News with Paddy O'Connell including post-Brexit trade negotiations and live coffee tasting. We remember Nicholas Parsons and his love of clocks. Reviewing the Sunday news coverage: Big Issue editor Paul McNamee, pro-Brexit politician Suzanne Evans and former Radio 4 Controller Mark Damazer.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000dzly)
Writer, Simon Frith
Director, Gwenda Hughes
Editor, Jeremy Howe

David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Johnny Phillips ….. Tom Gibbons
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley
Lee Bryce ….. Ryan Early
Martyn Gibson ….. Jon Glover
Fiona ….. Adjoa Andoh
Vince Casey ….. Tony Turner
Gavin ….. Gareth Pierce
DC Tanners ….. Jane Slavin


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m000dymt)
Sonita Alleyne, Master of Jesus College, Cambridge

Sonita Alleyne is the Master of Jesus College, Cambridge, the first woman to hold the post and - more significantly - the first black master of any Oxbridge college. In her previous career in the media, she was the co-founder and former CEO of the production company Somethin’ Else.

Born in Barbados, she came to England aged three and grew up in East London, the youngest of three children. She was an able reader by the time she started primary school, and her potential was spotted at her secondary school, where she was encouraged to apply to Cambridge.

She read philosophy at Fitzwilliam College and, after a brief and unfulfilling spell selling life insurance, she followed her passion for jazz by starting to write for music magazines. In 1989 she joined the radio station Jazz FM. When she was made redundant a couple of years later, she and two former Jazz FM colleagues set up a production company they called Somethin’ Else.

Sonita stepped down as CEO in 2009 to concentrate on other boardroom roles. She served on the BBC Trust for nearly five years, sits on the board of the London Legacy Development Corporation, and founded the Yes Programme to show primary school pupils their future career options. She is a fellow of the Radio Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts.

Sonita began her ten year tenure as Master of Jesus College in October 2019. She lives in Cambridge with her partner, the screenwriter James McCarthy, and their teenage son.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000dzm0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m000dq2p)
Series 23

Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Susan Calman, Graeme Garden, Sindhu Vee and Lloyd Langford are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as superheroes, meat, names and Bob Dylan.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000dybk)
Mary Berry: A Life Through Food

Sheila Dillon speaks to a veteran of the British food scene; a writer and television presenter who has made cooking – in particular baking – accessible, and achievable, for millions: Mary Berry.

In a candid conversation over exemplary lemon drizzle cake, Mary talks us through her life through food: from the challenges of forging a culinary career as a woman and a mother in the 1960s, to learning how to handle celebrity in her seventies.

With the new series of Best Home Cook, Mary is continuing her quest to educate people of all ages about the joys of cooking. But, as Sheila discovers, this ambitious cook is also a huge advocate for women in the industry - as Mary shares tales of her own struggles to carve out a niche in the culinary world, challenging female stereotypes and sexual harassment in the kitchen…

Over the course of the programme, Sheila gets some insight into ‘the real Mary’ from her long-term collaborator and cookbook co-author Lucy Young - as the renowned TV judge discusses careers highlights to date, including Bake Off, becoming a style icon and meeting Royalty; as well as opening up about trials she has faced in her lifetime, including the tragic death of one of her children.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m000dzm3)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000dzm5)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The Purity Spiral (m000d70h)
Journalist Gavin Haynes heads into the eye of two seemingly unlikely moral storms. He discovers bitter rows over diversity and racism within the world of Young Adult literature and Instagram knitting.

You might think online knitting and teen fiction would be innocuous cosy communities formed around a shared love of craft and a good yarn. However, as Gavin reveals, both scenes have recently become embroiled in what he terms The Purity Spiral. These vicious cycles of accusation and judgement see communities engaging in moral feeding frenzies. As a result, individuals are targetted and savaged by mobs who deem them problematic.

Gavin meets Nathan Taylor, an Instagram knitting star who unwittingly triggered a race row after attempting to reach out to people of colour using the hashtag Diversknitty. Nathan watched in horror as a wave of accusations of white supremacy and Nazism flowed into his inbox. This brush with the toxicity of a Purity Spiral was so severe that Nathan was hospitalised by his husband following a suicide threat.

In Young Adult literature, Gavin discovers a scene similarly beset by ideological battles. We hear from the founder of the hashtag Own Voices which has come to symbolise books featuring minority characters written by authors from a similar racial or cultural background. We enter the world of the 'sensitivity reader' and meet author Laura Moriarty who almost had a well-reviewed book cancelled after hordes of people labelled it a 'white saviour narrative' despite the fact they'd never read it as it had yet to be published.

Writer and Presenter: Gavin Haynes
Producers: Gavin Haynes and Eve Streeter
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000drmr)
The Cotswolds

Peter Gibbs and the team are in the Cotswolds. Pippa Greenwood, Chris Beardshaw and Chris Thorogood are on hand to answer questions from the green-fingered audience.

This week, the panellists recommend what to plant in steep beds, solve a few pest-related mysteries and discuss what they'd like their gardening legacies to be.

Aside from the questions, Matthew Pottage is at RHS Wisley chatting to Environmental Scientist Tijana Blanusa about the virtues of deciduous and evergreen trees when it comes to tackling air pollution.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m000dzm7)
Sunday Omnibus - The art of helping people

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen with three conversations about the art of making lasting friendships through helping others.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Oliver: Lagos to London (m000dzm9)
Episode 3

Charles Dickens’ novel Oliver Twist is a powerful indictment of child poverty and exploitation, as relevant now as when it was written. A young orphan’s epic search for family and home lies at the heart of award-winning writer Ayeesha Menon’s radical updating of Dickens’ story to modern-day Nigeria and the refugee journey to Britain.

Directed by acclaimed theatre director Michael Buffong, this classic story is reimagined as a powerful and moving drama for today.

Episode 3:
Oli has become a hardened 20-year-old, who’s forgotten his best friend Mene and all their dreams. Saffron Hill is grooming Oli as the gang’s new leader, and persuades Bill to include him in a plan that will earn them a small fortune. But when they get to the rendezvous, Oli’s kind heart ruins the callous scheme and he pays a heavy price...

Is this the end of Oli’s last desperate hope of escape and the possibility of a new life?

Cast:
Oli - Idris Debrand
Babatunde - Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje 
Nancy - Tamara Lawrance
Bill - Fehinte Balogun
Dodger - Sylvester Akinrolabu
Miss Saffron Hill - Jocelyn Jee Esien
Blessing - Marlene Madenge
Inspector Ndbuisi - Kalungi Ssebandeke 
Charlie - Samuel Adebayo 
Auntie Rosie - Bisola Elizabeth Alabi 
Waitress - Fatima Adoum
Young Agi - Sariah Joye
Other parts played by Ali Zayn, Fabio Goutet, Ewens Abid, Makee Ogbon, Samantha Mandaza, Jayesh Fernando and Kairon Edwards

Adapted by Ayeesha Menon
Produced by Gill Parry
Directed by Michael Buffong

Music by Tunde Jegede
Sound design by David Thomas and Steve Bond
Photography by The Masons
Development concept written by Silas Parry
Cultural Advisor: Onassis Andem
Sound Interns: Makee Ogbon and Kairon Edwards
Production Interns: Samantha Mandaza and Jayesh Fernando
Production Manager: Sarah Tombling
Executive Producer: John Scott Dryden

A CONNECTfilm production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (m000dxtp)
James Meek - The People's Act of Love

Journalist James Meek talks about his novel The People's Act of Love, first published in 2005, a bold and imaginative work based in the wilds of Siberia where a strange and violent group of individuals come together with sinister results.

Set in a time of great social upheaval, warfare, and terrorism, and against a stark, lawless Siberia at the end of the Russian Revolution, The People’s Act of Love portrays the fragile coexistence of a beautiful, independent mother raising her son alone, a megalomaniac Czech captain and his restless regiment, and a mystical separatist Christian sect. When a mysterious, charismatic stranger trudges into their snowy village with a frighteningly outlandish story to tell, its balance is shaken to the core.

James Naughtie presents and invited Bookclub readers join in the discussion

To take part in future Bookclubs apply at bookclub@bbc.co.uk

March's Bookclub choice : Rachel's Holiday by Marian Keyes

Presenter : James Naughtie
Producer : Dymphna Flynn


SUN 16:30 What If Our Textbooks Were Black? (m000c9mj)
Episode 2

A series celebrating Black cultural figures who should be more central to history.

Naomi Beckwith grew up on Chicago’s South Side. Unusually, her school prioritised the teaching of Black history - when she opened a textbook, she saw people who looked like her. But when she left that school, most black faces from the past disappeared.

Today, Naomi’s an international curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Her exhibitions rebalance the story of art and culture – focusing on African American cultural figures who could and should be better known.

But she argues that we need to go much further - we must reconsider our models of education. If we change our exhibitions without changing our textbooks, then nothing changes at all.

In this series, Naomi invites artists to imagine a new cultural textbook that reinstates some of those Black cultural figures who’ve been sidelined.

In episode 2, Kerry James Marshall salutes Charles White, the artist who inspired him more than any other, while the composer and drummer Mike Reed acknowledges the ground-breaking work of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians.

Produced by Natalie Moore and Steve Urquhart
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m000dpkt)
Facial Recognition

File on 4 has been tracking the roll-out of facial recognition tech across Britain’s streets, shopping centres and football grounds.
The Metropolitan Police has announced it will use live facial recognition cameras operationally for the first time on London streets. The force sees the technology as a vital tool in the fight against crime. But privacy campaigners say it's a 'serious threat to civil liberties.'

The pace is frenetic – new computer systems can watch thousands of people at once, with the most powerful able to operate at distances of over a mile.
They can do all of this in “real-time”, meaning everyone who passes by the camera can be scanned against a “watchlist” of suspects.

But technology like this means more and more innocent people are affected. Yet the public are not always explicitly warned, and neither are the regulators.

File on 4 has been given new details of a trial at Meadowhall shopping centre in South Yorkshire in which police and retailers worked together to scan millions of shoppers, looking out for three suspects and a missing person (the latter was found as a result).
It was one of several trials conducted by police and private companies, which went ahead despite requests from the Surveillance Camera Commissioner for police to ask him before implementing such schemes.

The legislation surrounding facial recognition is new and mostly untested, leading to calls for stricter, more specific laws to be passed.

Meantime, the Surveillance Camera Commissioner has called for a regime of inspections of the technology for both public and private bodies; a call backed by the veteran Conservative MP David Davis.

Facial recognition may be new, but it still begs an urgent answer to an age-old question: who watches the watchers?

Reporter: Geoff White
Producer: Helen Clifton
Editor: Carl Johnston


SUN 17:40 Profile (m000dxrl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000dzmc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000dzmf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000dzmh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000dzmk)
John Waite

In the week in which radio lost a legend with the death of Nicholas Parsons, we discover how Just a Minute nearly never happened when it was first tried out fifty three years ago.

For film fans, we’ve some historic howlers made on the silver screen; some beautiful poetry read by Simon Russel Beale. And if you’re a fan of badgers, like comedienne Holly Walsh, have we got a quiz for you. So, “set menu “ or a la carte?

Presenter: John Waite
Producer: Cecile Wright
Production support: Kay Whyld and Stephen Garner


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m000dybf)
Kirsty attempts to keep the peace and Pip reaches the end of her tether


SUN 19:15 The Skewer (m000dqhk)
Series 1

Episode 4

From the mind of Jon Holmes comes topical satire like you've never heard it before.


SUN 19:45 No One Called Her Angel (m000dzmm)
Episode 4

En route to Angel's childhood home, Lynn sees that her daughter Amber is oblivious to the tensions between the two women.
A series about perspective and truth specially written by Louise Welsh.

Read by Maryam Hamidi
Produced by Eilidh McCreadie


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m000drn4)
Coronavirus, emotions and guns

Health officials are urgently trying to contain the spread of a new coronavirus in China and beyond. We fact-check a particularly hyperbolic claim about its spread that’s been doing the rounds on social media. Elsewhere, a loyal listener has told us about a smelly statistic emanating from Radio 4. We nose around the relationship between our olfactory organs and emotions. And Bill Bryson reacts to our work answering his question about an opinion piece in The Wall Street Journal about gun ownership and homicide rates.

Producer: Neal Razzell
Presenter: Tim Harford


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000drn0)
Nicholas Parsons CBE, Mary Craig, Lord Maclennan of Rogart, Kobe Bryant

Pictured: Nicholas Parsons

Matthew Bannister on The Just A Minute host, TV presenter and actor Nicholas Parsons. Sheila Hancock and Tony Hawks pay tribute - in just a minute!

Mary Craig who wrote the best selling book "Blessings" after struggling to care for her severely disabled son.

Lord Maclennan of Rogart, formerly the MP for Caithness and Sutherland, who negotiated the merger between the SDP and the Liberal Party.

Kobe Bryant, the LA Lakers basketball star, who gave himself the nickname The Black Mamba.

Interviewed guest: Sheila Hancock
Interviewed guest: Matt Stronge
Interviewed guest: Tony Hawkes
Interviewed guest: Mark Craig
Interviewed guest: Brain Taylor
Interviewed guest: Michael Carlson
Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: Desert Island Discs, BBC Radio 4, 04/11/2007; Don't Raise The Bridge, Lower The River, Columbia Pictures Industries,1967; The Arthur Haynes Show, ATV, 1957-65; Just a Minute Series 64 Ep. 2, BBC Radio 4, 13/08/2012; Just a Minute Series 64 Ep. 3, BBC Radio 4, 20/08/2012; Sale of The Century, Anglia TV, 08/01/1972; 50 years of Just a Minute: Nicholas Parsons in Conversation with Paul Merton, Radio 4, 01/01/2018; Woman’s Hour Radio 4, 1976; The World at One, BBC Radio 4, 31/01/1988; Dear Basketball, Believe Entertainment Group Kobe Inc, 2017; LA Lakers and Minnesota Timberwolves, BBC 5 Live Extra, 04/10/2010; Toronto Raptors v LA Lakers, Kobe Bryant 81 Points Game Highlights, 2006; USA VS CHINA at the Beijing Olympics, X9Highlights, 2008; Newsbeat, BBC Radio 1, 06/08/2003; 10 o'clock news, BBC One, 05/08/2003;


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000dxqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000dxtm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m000dq2w)
Get woke or go broke?

When you buy your trainers, do you want to make a political statement? Businesses want to attract consumers by advertising their commitment to liberal causes like diversity and tackling climate change. It is a phenomenon known as woke capitalism. But is it a welcome sign that multinationals are becoming socially responsible? Or is it just the latest trick by business to persuade us to part with our cash, and a smokescreen to disguise the reluctance of many companies to pay their fair share of taxes? The Economist's Philip Coggan asks whether it's a case of getting woke or going broke.

Contributors:
Dr Eliane Glaser - author of Get Real: How to See Through the Hype, Spin and Lies in Modern Life
Dan Mobley - Corporate Relations Director, Diageo
Saker Nusseibeh - Chief Executive at Hermes Investment
Anand Giridharadas - author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World
Kris Brown - president of Brady United, a gun violence prevention organisation
Abas Mirzaei - Professor of Marketing at Macquarie Business School
Doug Stewart - Chief Executive of Green Energy UK

Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Jasper Corbett


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000dzmq)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 Radiolab (m000dzms)
Series 6

When Brains Attack

Radiolab explores strange stories of brains that lead their owners astray. With Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich.

In this episode, strange stories of brains that lead their owners astray, knock them off balance, and, sometimes, propel them to do amazing things.

We hear from a kid whose voice was disguised from himself, relive a surreal day in the life of a young researcher hijacked by her own brain, and try to keep up with an ultra-athlete who, after suffering terrible seizures, gained extraordinary abilities by removing a chunk of her brain.

Radiolab is a Peabody-award winning show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and the human experience.

Hosts Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich investigate a strange world.

From WNYC. First broadcast on public radio in the USA in 2012.



MONDAY 03 FEBRUARY 2020

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000dzmv)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m000dqgz)
Hidden gay lives

Hidden gay lives: Laurie Taylor uncovers the ‘fabuloso’ history of Polari, Britain’s secret gay language with Paul Barker, Professor of English Language at Lancaster University. He also talks to the cultural historian, James Polchin, about the ways in which 20th c American crime pages recover a little discussed history of violence against gay men, one in which they were often held responsible for their own victimisation.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000dxs5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000dzmx)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000dzmz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000dzn1)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000dzn3)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000dzn5)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Rachel Mann

Good morning.

Winter weather in the UK can be capricious. For every crisp cold day of scintillating brightness, there are dozens which are damp, dismal and grey. At its worst, February can feel like a month we just have to get through, and perhaps the best that can be said about the UK’s changeable weather is that it always gives us something to talk about.

This year, I’ve challenged myself to moan less. Indeed, I’ve decided to be on the lookout for joy. I have an ulterior motive. I’m fifty this year and I want to celebrate it positively. Being attentive to ‘joy’ rather moaning strikes me as a healthy and hopeful way to try to live. I don’t want to be like Dr Pangloss in Candide who says, ‘It’s all for the best in this the best of all possible worlds.’ I know life is hard. Rather, I sense that alertness to joy may enable me to be more open and hopeful. Joy has a power which, at its fullest, can open our eyes in to the glory of our exhausted world.

I rather like what Mark Twain says about joy: “To get the full value of joy you must have someone to divide it with.” The things which bring each of us joy will be different. For me it is always something based in relationship – with friends, family and God. It is something which is most real when shared with others. I take joy in simple things – a sunrise, singing on Sunday, or browsing a bookshop. For me, to paraphrase George Herbert, joy brings ‘heaven in ordinary.’

Lord, help us to behold the wonder of your world. Bear with us in the tough times and help us to be changed by your delight in us and our delight in you.

Amen.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000dzn7)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m000dzn9)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thvkt)
Slavonian Grebe

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison tells the story of the Slavonian grebe. In winter, Slavonian Grebes, with their vermilion eyes, bright and shiny as redcurrants, fly south from Scandinavia and Iceland to spend the winter around our coasts. Their winter plumage is black, grey and white but in spring they moult into their breeding plumage with a rich chestnut throat and belly and golden ear-tufts. A small population breed on a few Scottish Lochs where you might hear their trilling calls.


MON 06:00 Today (m000dy9p)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000dy9r)
Artistic influence: Beethoven, Rembrandt and MeToo

This year is Beethoven's 250th anniversary, and Sir Antonio Pappano is marking the occasion with a new production of Beethoven's only opera, Fidelio. He tells Andrew Marr how this work combined the composer's keen interest in politics with his bold new symphonic style. But Beethoven was never happy with the finished opera, and redrafted it many times. Pappano also tells Andrew about the enormous - and inescapable - influence Beethoven had on later generations.

Rembrandt was another artist who had an enormous influence on later generations. But a new exhibition at the Ashmolean in Oxford, curated by An Van Camp, shows the Dutch artist also redrafting and learning his craft. Young Rembrandt assembles drawings and paintings showing Rembrandt's astonishing rise, from unknown teenager to celebrity artist within a decade.

Dame Mary Beard looks at a more pervasive artistic influence in her new BBC Two series, The Shock of the Nude. Beard shows how artists from the classical era to the present day have decided what we think a body should look like and how we should respond to naked flesh. She explores what happens when the artistic traditions of the past confront the Me Too scandals and gender fluidity of the present.

Producer: Katy Hickman and Hannah Sander


MON 09:45 Surfacing (m000cn54)
Episode 1

Beneath the broad Alaskan sky, long-buried artefacts spill from the thawing tundra. In the eroding sand dunes of a Scottish island, preserved Neolithic hearths and homes are uncovered by the wind. And in a grandmother’s tenement flat, memories surface of a long-ago mining accident and a mother who was kind.

Award-winning poet Kathleen Jamie's essays reflect on time, memory and our connections to the past.

Read by Maureen Beattie
Abridged by Linda Cracknell
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000dy9w)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dy9y)
Episode 1

Two boys out sledging in their local park find the body of an old woman in the snow. Over ten episodes, we meet people she has encountered, members of her family and her friends, all of whom give us clues about what has led the woman to this place.

On our journey to understanding the woman's story, we encounter a series of relationships which combine to form a moving and entertaining account of modern life and loves.

Ryan ..... Harry Grasby
Jackson ..... Aaron Gelkoff
Mick ..... David Reed
Hayley ..... Christine Bottomley

Directed by Mary Peate
Written by Katie Hims

Playwright Katie Hims is best known for her extensive work as a radio dramatist; from adaptations of classics such as George Eliot's Middlemarch and Edna O'Brien's The Country Girls to an array of original dramas for Radio 3 and Radio 4 including Listening To The Dead, Black Dog, King David and numerous episodes of Radio 4's highly acclaimed WW1 drama Home Front.

A first class cast includes Christine Bottomley, Marcia Warren, Neil Dudgeon, Amelia Bullmore and John Rowe.


MON 11:00 The Untold (m000dyb0)
Game Over in Dover?

Grace Dent follows the story - through the autumn - of the owner of a family business at the crossroads over Brexit uncertainty. For John Shirley the stakes are high: he's put his house up for sale because he believes leaving the EU Customs Union will ruin his Dover based freight agency company.

We follow the Shirley's - who have different views about leaving the EU - through Brexit deadlines and the General Election as John works out what to do.

Producer Neil McCarthy


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000dxrj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000f00k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Second Sleep (m000dyb5)
Episode Six

“Until the close of the early modern era, Western Europeans on most evenings experienced two major intervals of sleep . . . The initial interval of slumber was usually referred to as ‘first sleep’ . . . The succeeding interval was called ‘second’ or ‘morning’ sleep . . . Both phases lasted roughly the same length of time, with individuals waking some time after midnight before returning to rest.
Roger Ekirch, At Day’s Close: A History of Nighttime “

Father Fairfax, a newly ordained priest has been sent by the Bishop of Exeter to the village of Addicott St George to bury Father Lacy who has recently died. But a mysterious figure appears at the funeral casting doubt on the accidental nature of the priest’s death.

Author Robert Harris, the master of plotting, is best known for his best-selling fiction - The Ghost Writer, An Officer and a Spy, Fatherland, Enigma and Archangel. The Second Sleep is a totally absorbing and truly surprising thriller that takes a "historical futuristic" setting to comment on the present.

Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Michael Maloney
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000dyb7)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (m000dyb9)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000dybc)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 The Disrupters (m000bvwv)
Martha Lane Fox and Brent Hoberman, founders of lastminute.com

Rohan Silva and Kamal Ahmed meet Martha Lane Fox and Brent Hoberman, founders of LastMinute.com, a company that became the poster child for the internet boom of the late 1990s.

Lastminute.com was an online travel and leisure website, took unsold inventory – flights, hotels, theatre tickets – and sold it online. Their personality, humour and guerrilla style marketing tactics disrupted the travel industry forever – and in the '90s/early 2000s, raised the profile of Martha and Brent to near-celebrity status.

However their rise was quickly and brutally followed by a fall as their share price, when they floated on the London Stock Market, crashed by 95%.

They talk to Kamal and Rohan about learning so much so young, the dangers of scaling too fast, and how you need to be careful what you wish for.

Presenters: Kamal Ahmed and Rohan Silva
Producer: Georgia Catt


MON 14:00 The Archers (m000dybf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m0001qvl)
The Hartlepool Spy

THE HARTLEPOOL SPY is a comedy-drama by Emmy-winning writer Ian Martin (THE DEATH OF STALIN, THE THICK OF IT, VEEP), with an all-star cast including Michael Palin, Jim Moir (AKA Vic Reeves), Toby Jones (DETECTORISTS), Gina McKee (BODYGUARD) and Monica Dolan (W1A, APPROPRIATE ADULT).

1804. Britain is at odds with Europe, as usual. And at war with France, again. Paranoia is at boiling point. Sensational rumours flood the country. Napoleon’s spies are everywhere.

Towns and villages along the east coast are on high alert. Ships from Bonaparte’s navy have been spotted just beyond the range of English artillery, looking for weaknesses in defence, probing for landing points. Invasion is expected any day.

When times are tough, people look for strong leadership. Alas, the people of the North Eastern fishing town of Hartlepool have a corrupt mayor, Tucker Palmer (Toby Jones) and a narcissistic vicar, Rev William Ferrier (Jim Moir). The two men can’t stand one another, each (correctly) suspecting the other of lining his pocket at the expense of the parish, and each in competition for the favour of local land-owner aristo Lady Embleton (Gina McKee).

One Sunday morning, Lady Embleton, Mayor Palmer and his formidable wife Mrs Palmer (Monica Dolan) are in the front pew as Ferrier delivers an impassioned sermon about the vain delusions of those with earthly power, when news comes from the harbour. A French ship has been spotted and it’s heading their way.

Panic. As the men of Hartlepool ready themselves for attack by getting drunk, the Mayor, the Vicar and Lady Embleton spring into action. Lady Embleton rallies the men to the harbour, Tucker buries his gold in the garden and Ferrier huddles in the church leading prayers of intercession. Suddenly, a horrible miracle. The weather changes. The French ship is caught in a savage storm – it can’t put to sea, it can’t seek refuge on an enemy shore. In the night it founders and sinks.

By daybreak it’s over, and a small fortune in salvage is washing up alongside the bodies of the French. But who will claim it? With their eyes on the loot, Ferrier, Palmer and Lady Embleton begin to draw up battle lines.

But then: a single survivor washes ashore. A monkey. And he’s not the only unexpected arrival: arriving on the fast coach from London, from an Admiralty department you’ve never heard of, waving a royal warrant: Cavendish (Michael Palin) has his own plans for Hartlepool.

And from this point, events get completely out of hand.

THE HARTLEPOOL SPY is a dark comedy on the timeless themes of xenophobia, groupthink and fake news, about the perilous mental landscape of suspended disbelief. And, through the petty bickering of a town in fear, it explores just how greedy and stupid people can really be.

Cast:
CAVENDISH – Michael Palin
REVD FERRIER – Jim Moir
MAYOR PALMER – Toby Jones
LADY EMBLETON – Gina McKee
MRS PALMER – Monica Dolan
GARVEY – Jason Forbes
Other parts played by Robin Berry and Laura Elphinstone
With Robin Berry as THE MONKEY

Written by Ian Martin
Produced by Sam Ward

A BBC Studios production.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m000dybh)
Programme 4, 2020

(4/12)
Facing Tom Sutcliffe's convoluted puzzles in today's contest are Val McDermid and Alan McCredie of Scotland, versus Freya McClements and Paddy Duffy of Northern Ireland. They have no idea what subjects may come up in the course of the quiz, but a knowledge of South American literature, folk music, television thrillers and units of currency in obscure countries may prove very helpful to them today.

Tom will be assigning points depending on the number of helpful hints he has to give them in order to arrive at the answers. As usual, there'll be a representative sample of the best question ideas received recently from Round Britain Quiz listeners.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m000dybk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Art of Survival (m000dybm)
Imagine for a moment having lost your home, becoming estranged from family, struggling with mental health or addiction issues, maybe falling foul of the law - and then consider what it would take to share your story in an art collaboration.

Among communities of homeless people, there are numerous projects that enhance the potentially redemptive qualities of art - in music-making, painting, poetry and drama.

And in Manchester, Norm, Toni, Fee, Jamie and Simon share their own stories in public installations, painted in sprawling white letters on cardboard. Their work has made an impact internationally. They have been homeless, now they are makers of art.

In this programme, they reflect on their practice - the politics of storytelling, the struggle to be heard unmediated and the courage required to face judgement.

Produced by Alia Cassam and Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m000dy6q)
Series 21

Fire

Fire!

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by comedian Ed Byrne, forensic chemist Niamh Nic Daeid and biologist Adam Rutherford, as they explore the science of fire and how it has impacted the evolution of life on earth. They also look at whether controlling fire is a uniquely human trait and how other species have evolved to use fire to their advantage.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem


MON 17:00 PM (m000dybp)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000dybt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m000dybw)
Series 23

Episode 6

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Marcus Brigstocke, Lou Sanders, Cally Beaton and Neil Delamere are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as religion, kissing, languages and the Vikings.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000dy5v)
Kate makes her presence felt and Neil questions his future


MON 19:15 Front Row (m000dyby)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dy9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 My Name Is... (m000dyc0)
Abi Blake: I survived domestic abuse and want to help others

In this edition of My Name Is, Abi examines the systems that exist when people are affected by domestic abuse and highlights examples of good practise which might help others in the future. With input from the police, the local authority, the voluntary sector and a forensic psychologist, she casts a spotlight on the issue and finds innovate ways of moving forward.

When Abi met Sebastian Swamy in 2014 she fell for the company boss, who appeared attentive, gentle and loving. But it did not take longer for a much darker side to emerge and in 2017 the violence and verbal abuse culminated in an attack that has left her scarred for life. He was later jailed for three years and four months, with Judge Steven Everett telling him he had shown horrendous behaviour towards his partner and the mother of his child:

He praised Abi for the courage shown throughout the court proceedings and pointed to the serious physical and mental consequences she still endured: "This had a hugely serious and catastrophic effect on her life. You used considerable power and there was a considerable effect. You kicked her to the floor. You stamped on her back. This was a hugely powerful stamp. When she turned over, as there was nothing else she could do, you stamped on the front of her chest. "

Abi is determined to help other women and in this programme she examines a unique police pilot which has seen services overhauled and led to more effective systems for helping victims in her area. She also volunteers at an innovative organisation offering a range of initiatives for victims and their children, who are often left very traumatised by what they witness.

In her own case she has struggled to accept the way her relationship deteriorated and the violence and control her former partner exerted. She hopes that her recordings will offer others the chance to recognise what might be happening and to know where they can go for help. Above all she wants to see system changes that help children form healthier views of behaviour in relationships and that tackle the shortfalls in the way that cases are handled in the courts.

Producer: Sue Mitchell
Studio Production: Sarah Hockley


MON 20:30 Analysis (m000dyc2)
The NHS, AI and Our Data

The NHS has a unique resource - data. David Edmonds asks whether a combination of data and Artificial Intelligence will transform the future of the NHS. The programme features among others Sir John Bell, who leads the government’s life-sciences industrial strategy and Matthew Gould chief executive of NHSx, the unit set up to lead the NHS's digital transformation. As the NHS tries to exploit its data, the programme raises the danger that data may be flogged off to the private sector at bargain basement prices.

Producer Sheila Cook
Editor Jasper Corbett


MON 21:00 The Crisis Inside (m000dpjf)
Three years before Usman Khan stabbed two young people to death on London Bridge, Ian Acheson warned that the way the justice system treated violent extremists was a shambles. He wrote a report for the then Justice Secretary, Michael Gove, which delivered 69 urgent recommendations to the Ministry of Justice. Only eight were accepted.

In this documentary, the former senior Home Office official and prison governor asks whether more could have been done to prevent Usman Khan from carrying out his murderous rampage. He explores every stage of Usman Khan's journey through the British criminal justice system, wondering what might have changed his trajectory.

Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service is something of a closed book but, drawing on the testimony of whistle-blowers, Ian Acheson digs into the causes behind the situation he first identified as a crisis in 2015. He meets former prisoners and extremists, criminal justice experts, parole officers, and a former prisons minister, most of whom are damning about a system that has been "woefully neglected”.

He asks if the quality of de-radicalisation programmes can be improved, whether it is right to separate the most dangerous terrorists from the prison population, and if it is possible in a liberal democracy to lock up dangerous terrorists and throw away the key.

This documentary will test some of Ian Acheson’s more radical ideas and ask whether we can ever eliminate the possibility that an atrocity such as that carried out by Usman Khan will happen again.

Presenter: Ian Acheson
Producer: Rachel Wright

A Novel production for BBC Radio 4


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000dy9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000dyc5)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Second Sleep (m000dyb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m000dpkc)
NHS language use

Michael Rosen talks with Sara Wilcox, NHS content designer, about how they decide which words to use on the NHS website. Consultant Dr Hugh Rayner describes his initiative to encourage consultants to write letters to their outpatient clinic patients directly and in clear language, rather than via their GP. When it comes to the NHS, communication can be a matter of life or death.
Subscribe to the Word of Mouth podcast and never miss an episode.
Producer Beth O'Dea
Related Links:
The content style guide in the NHS digital service manual: https://beta.nhs.uk/service-manual/content
The A to Z of NHS health writing: https://beta.nhs.uk/service-manual/content/a-to-z-of-NHS-health-writing
Writing outpatient letters to patients: http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/bmj.m24?ijkey=PKDrAMEdQAxS1w5&keytype=ref
Please, write to me guidance: http://www.aomrc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Please_write_to_me_Guidance_010918.pdf


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000dyc7)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 04 FEBRUARY 2020

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000dyc9)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Surfacing (m000cn54)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000dycc)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000dycf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000dych)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000dyck)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000dycm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Rachel Mann

Good morning.

Perhaps the most remarkable change in medicine in my lifetime is the survival rate for cancer. While I know only too well how cancer strikes people with ruthless indifference, it is testimony to modern medicine and charity campaigns that so many survive and thrive for years after a cancer diagnosis. The Big C continues to be a huge global killer – the World Health Organisation estimates that 1 in 6 deaths are due to cancer – but human ingenuity has met it with increasing skill.

This World Cancer Day reminds us that the work of medics, charities and governments is far from over.

Hope, of course, is found not only in science, but in people’s very human responses. For some, the ‘battle’ metaphor works and I am moved by the way some people ‘fight cancer’. Other people, of course, find that combative metaphor unhelpful, especially because not everyone ‘wins’, and find other strategies to cope. Today I think especially of my friend Alan who died last year. His cancer was ruthless and took him quickly. When we first spoke after his diagnosis, his dignity was awesome. He asked of me – a priest – one thing: to bless him. It was a request which moved me to tears.

I did my best to bless him in the name of God. I think what moved me most was Alan’s depth of trust in something bigger than him. He was realistic, and was worried for his family.. But ultimately he was determined not to be defined by illness but by blessing.

God, be with us in our triumphs and our sufferings; help us to know your presence in whatever we face. Show your love in the support we receive from others and which we offer in return.

Amen.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000dycp)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlvz1)
Madagascar Harrier-hawk

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the Madagascan Harrier-hawk from Madagascar. Among the branches of a Madagascan forest, there's a flutter of wings and a flash of double-jointed feet. The Madagascan harrier-hawk is a striking bird, uniform grey above and finely-barred beneath with black wing-tips and a white-banded black tail. There's a patch of sulphurous skin around its bill and eyes: and its long legs are also bright yellow. Those long legs help the harrier-hawk hunt for food that's beyond the reach of most other birds of prey. Using its wings for balance and twisting its flexibly-jointed legs at seemingly impossible angles, the harrier-hawk inserts its talons into tiny holes, relying on its sense of touch to locate its prey. Madagascar harrier-hawks do hunt more conventionally by gliding over the forest, seizing small birds, reptiles and mammals such as the Verreaux's sifaka.


TUE 06:00 Today (m000dy4b)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m000dy4f)
2019 Nobel Prize winner for Physiology or Medicine, Sir Peter Ratcliffe

Sir Peter Ratcliffe, Director of Clinical Research at the Francis Crick Institute, as well as Director of Oxford University’s Target Discovery Institute – has dedicated his life to understanding the body’s molecular-level response to low oxygen levels, or ‘hypoxia’. He received the 2019 Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine, along with two Americans, William Kaelin of Harvard and Gregg Semenza of Johns Hopkins, for successfully tackling one of physiology’s greatest puzzles - how our bodies sense and adapt so quickly to a lack of oxygen, at high altitude for example, or during sudden exercise.

He talks to Jim about how his early medical career led him into a deeply unfashionable area of medicine that would solve how and why our bodies are so clever at being able to fine tune themselves to keep functioning under a range of conditions. His early ground breaking discoveries may have been initially turned down by a major scientific journal, but he would go on to pave the way for promising new strategies to fight anaemia and many other challenging diseases, most notably cancer.

Producer Adrian Washbourne


TUE 09:30 One to One (m000dy4k)
The Value of Idling – Verity Sharp meets Tim Parks

What happens when you become obsessed by words? What happens when this obsession becomes so severe that your life becomes a frenzied narrative filling your every waking moment ? How do you escape? Verity Sharp meets Tim Parks who shares his experiences of a painful chronic condition brought about by a constant mental and physical tension, related to his work as a writer. When doctors couldn’t explain his symptoms, he was forced to look elsewhere. He didn’t give up writing. He has learned to be idle. Producer Sarah Blunt.


TUE 09:45 Surfacing (m000cmyq)
Episode 2

Beneath the broad Alaskan sky, long-buried artefacts spill from the thawing tundra. In the eroding sand dunes of a Scottish island, preserved Neolithic hearths and homes are uncovered by the wind. And in a grandmother’s tenement flat, memories surface of a long-ago mining accident and a mother who was kind.

Award-winning poet Kathleen Jamie's essays reflect on time, memory and our connections to the past.

Read by Maureen Beattie
Abridged by Linda Cracknell
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000dy4p)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dy4t)
Episode 2

A woman's body is found in the snow. Over ten episodes we find out what led her there. In this episode, Marion has gone missing from her residential care home.

Kadija ..... Nahel Tzegai
Pat ..... Heather Craney
Rose ..... Jessica Turner
Frank ..... Neil McCaul

Directed by Mary Peate
Written by Katie Hims


TUE 11:00 Code Red (m000dy4y)
Eddie was set to become another statistic, another teenager killed by rising levels of knife crime.

But Eddie’s life was saved by the new field of trauma science. It is revolutionising the way people are treated after shootings, traffic accidents or any injury that causes catastrophic bleeding.

The doctors that pioneered the work call it Code Red. Your chances of surviving major bleeding are now higher than ever before.

So what changed? Quite simply trauma medicine has been turned on its head. Before 2007, doctors would have treated Eddie’s catastrophic bleeding by trying to replace the fluid leaking out of his stab wounds. Salty water, called saline, and just one component of our blood – the oxygen carrying red blood cells – would be put back into Eddie’s body - in what's called a massive transfusion.

It seemed like a good idea. Keep the blood pressure up, keep oxygen moving round the body and keep the patient alive. But that’s not what happened - around half of people died on the operating table. The principles were wrong. They were damaging the body’s natural way of stemming blood loss – clotting.

It was around 2003 that the ideas behind the Code Red protocol started to take shape. The poster child of the new field of trauma science was revealing the vital role of clotting. Karim Brohi, Professor of Trauma Sciences at Queen Mary, University of London, discovered that major trauma could disrupt the blood’s ability to clot within minutes of the injury, and patients affected were more likely to die. What's more, saline was diluting the blood and making the bleeding worse.

Over a decade ago, the Royal London Hospital decided to do something radical. It introduced Code Red, also known as damage control resuscitation,and shifted the focus from blood pressure to blood clotting - get blood products into patients to get on top of any abnormalities there first.

Making that happen took a huge culture shift. This is not a normal research environment. There’s no time to ponder, patients are hovering between life and death; and every second counts. But now the innovation has been accepted across the NHS, and recent research reveals a massive drop in the death rate of patients with catastrophic bleeding.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


TUE 11:30 Art of Now (m000dy52)
Recovery

A studio in London where survivors of torture are using art to help with their recovery.

Located in Finsbury Park, the charity 'Freedom from Torture' helps survivors of torture rebuild their lives.

On Thursday afternoons the art studio at Freedom from Torture opens to clients undergoing therapy to create art and express themselves.

Ronce was a political prisoner in the Democratic Republic of Congo and fled to the UK. As an asylum seeker in the UK he is unable to work. His art keeps him going.

Neil McCarthy talks to Ronce and other survivors at the art studio to hear how these sessions are helping them leave a traumatic past behind.

Producer Neil McCarthy


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000dy56)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Second Sleep (m000dy5b)
Episode Seven

“Until the close of the early modern era, Western Europeans on most evenings experienced two major intervals of sleep . . . The initial interval of slumber was usually referred to as ‘first sleep’ . . . The succeeding interval was called ‘second’ or ‘morning’ sleep . . . Both phases lasted roughly the same length of time, with individuals waking some time after midnight before returning to rest.
Roger Ekirch, At Day’s Close: A History of Nighttime. “

Father Fairfax, a newly ordained priest has been sent by the Bishop of Exeter to the village of Addicott St George to bury Father Lacy who has recently died. But a mysterious figure appears at the funeral casting doubt on the accidental nature of the priest’s death.

Author Robert Harris, the master of plotting, is best known for his best-selling fiction - The Ghost Writer, An Officer and a Spy, Fatherland, Enigma and Archangel. The Second Sleep is a totally absorbing and truly surprising thriller that takes a "historical futuristic" setting to comment on the present.

Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Michael Maloney
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000dy5g)
Call You and Yours

News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000dy5l)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000dy5q)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 The Disrupters (m000bx1w)
Co-founder of LinkedIn, Reid Hoffman

In 2002, Reid Hoffman co-founded LinkedIn, a professional networking site that was acquired by Microsoft in 2016 for $26.2 billion, making him one of Silicon Valley's most famous, and most successful, entrepreneurs.

But his first business, SocialNet, hadn't worked out. He talks to Kamal Ahmed and Rohan Silva about how to know when to quit, why he thinks his philosophy degree is more valuable than an MBA, and why successful entrepreneurs need a thirst for infinite learning.

Presenters: Kamal Ahmed and Rohan Silva
Producer: Georgia Catt


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000dy5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m0001137)
Talk to Me: HP Lovecraft

By Sara Davies and Abigail Youngman.

The strangest story of all HP Lovecraft's 'weird tales' isn't fiction at all: it's true. It concerns his marriage to Sonia Greene, a successful businesswoman whose family had fled Ukraine to make a life in the United States.

The story is revealed through interviews with Lovecraft and his friends and family by producer Mary Ward-Lowery.

Howard Phillips Lovecraft's horror fiction has achieved cult status in recent decades, but was admired only by a small circle of friends in his lifetime. Lovecraft's eminent New England family indulged his genius, his eccentricities and his prejudices. He favoured human contact by letter, rarely left his home, and even then, only at night, delighting to walk streets empty of people. He preferred the company of men and hated foreigners and Jews: the ‘mongrel hordes’ of New York were anathema to him.

But his relationship with Sonia Greene transcended these prejudices, for a while at least. She swept Lovecraft up in her enthusiasm for his work and her romantic ideas about the man himself, rationalising his beliefs in pursuit of her own beautiful, idealised creation, a fiction of a husband. To the shock and dismay of his family, they married and moved into Sonia’s New York apartment, where she planned to create him anew, as a glittering literary success. But it seems the horrors that make Lovecraft’s fiction so skin-crawlingly effective were not simply a product of his imagination: they have their origins in a terrible family secret.

Bad blood will out.

HP Lovecraft...John MacKay
Sonia Greene...Tracy Wiles
Samuel Loveman...Carl Prekopp
Lilian Clarke...Sarah Parks
Florence Greene...Martha Godber

Music by Tom Constantine
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m000dxqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Making History (m000dy5z)
London versus the Rest?

Tom Holland and Iszi Lawrence explore historical connections to today's big issues.

Recent political convulsions have revealed a rift between the UK's capital and its regions. So this week Tom and Iszi consider other moments in history when London has been out of sync with the rest of the country - from the Romans to the 1700s. Examining how John Bull came into being and looking at the particular history of Northumbria, they look at the relationship between London and the rest of the UK.

Presenters: Tom Holland and Iszi Lawrence
Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m000dy62)
Real Talk

Michael Rosen talks to conversation analyst Elizabeth Stokoe about the science of talk. Why infinitesimal pauses and saying hello matter, and the choice of 'speak' over 'talk' can save lives. Where does comedy get it right, and where does artificial intelligence get it wrong? Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m000dy64)
Syima Aslam & Stig Abell

Syima Aslam, co-founder of the Bradford Literature Festival, and journalist Stig Abell, editor of the TLS, are part of the expert panel that chose the BBC’s 100 Novels That Shaped Our World. They join presenter Harriett Gilbert to pluck their own favourites from the list. Syima's is Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by J. K. Rowling, Stig's is Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and presenter Harriett Gilbert gives Orlando by Virginia Woolf an airing. And for some reason this turns out to be the first time that these three stone cold classics have been chosen on A Good Read.
Producer Beth O'Dea
join us on instagram @agoodreadbbc


TUE 17:00 PM (m000dy66)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000dy68)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Phil Wang: Wangsplaining (m00057qs)
The UK is more divided than ever, and no one seems able to agree on anything. What does it mean to be British? To be a man? To be white or “of colour”, gay or straight, young or old, or none of the above? It seems we can’t see the woods for the trees.

What’s needed is a little outside perspective. Enter: Phil Wang – a caustic British-Malaysian comedian who grew up on the island of Borneo. A centrist with a heart; an artist with an engineering degree.

In this pilot episode, Phil turns his attention to the British Empire - was British colonialism really one big crime? Modern liberalism would say so, but Phil’s Dad sure misses those prompt British buses – “I wish they’d come take us over again. Maybe I’d get to work on time!”

Written by and starring Phil Wang

Original music by Fauxe

Produced and edited by Matt Stronge

Wangsplaining is a BBC Studios production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000dy6b)
Lynda goes into battle and Neil reaches a decision


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000dy6d)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dy4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m000dy6g)
Sewage Sludge

For decades sewage sludge from waste treatment works has been used as a fertiliser on agricultural land. But File on 4 hears serious concerns over whether it could pose a risk to human health and whether tougher regulation is needed.

The practice is perfectly legal. Treated sewage known as 'sludge' or 'biosolids' provides a rich and cost-effective source of nutrients for soil which is then used to grow crops. The process saves more than three and a half million tonnes of human waste going into landfill or being incinerated.

But reporter Claire Bolderson hears from scientists worried about the chemicals, plastics and medicines that could be damaging soil and making their way into the food chain. And she investigates the process of regulating the treatment, storage and use of sludge, amid claims from experts that rules are outdated and oversight lacking.

Recycling sewage as fertiliser fits today’s environmental agenda for waste. But do we know enough about what the potential impact of the practice might be in the future?

Reporter: Claire Bolderson
Producer: Ben Robinson
Editor: Carl Johnston


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000dy6j)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m000dy6l)
James Gallagher demystifies health issues, separating fact from fiction and brings clarity to conflicting health advice, with the help of regular contributor GP Margaret McCartney


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m000dy4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000dy6n)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 The Second Sleep (m000dy5b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m000dy6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000dy6s)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 05 FEBRUARY 2020

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000dy6v)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Surfacing (m000cmyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000dy6x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000dy6z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000dy71)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000dy73)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000dy75)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Rachel Mann

Good morning.

There is an old religious fable about a hardworking farmer who is blessed with a visit from God and offered three wishes as a sign of good fortune. The wishes come with one simple condition: Whatever he wishes for, God will bless his neighbour with double. The farmer accepts God’s gracious offer and asks for one hundred cattle. When God provides them, he is delighted until he sees the two hundred cattle God has given to the farmer’s neighbour.

Nonetheless, the farmer moves on to his second wish. He asks for one hundred acres of land, and again is thrilled until he sees that God has given his neighbour two hundred acres. Rather than feeling joy at his good fortune, the farmer could not control his jealousy that his neighbour had received double what he had. So, he presented God with his third and final wish: that he be blinded in one eye. And God wept.

It can be difficult to be pleased for others’ good fortune. In our envy, we may even wish them ill. Crucially, when we are envious, we can fail to see the blessings we’ve received and be thankful for them. Instead, like the farmer in the story, we can concentrate too jealously on other’s blessings, not our own.

The Book of Proverbs says, ‘A sound heart is life to the body, but envy is rottenness to the bones.’ I’m prone to envy, but I find the way to cultivate a ‘sound heart’ is to be thankful for the grace in my life. It’s a small gesture but it helps me live more generously in the world.

Gracious God, help me to be thankful for the good things I receive and lead me to delight in the blessings and achievements given to others.

Amen.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000dy77)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sttd3)
Wedge-tailed Shearwater

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the wedge-tailed shearwater of the Indian and Pacific oceans. Wedge-tailed shearwaters are large sepia brown seabirds with long wings and streamlined bodies. They feed mainly on fish and squid which they scoop from the surface or catch by diving. While the parents are careering over the open seas, their solitary chick squats alone in its island burrow. The return of the adults means a welcome feast for the chick. Its reward is a mouthful of warm and waxy stomach oil, the digested remains of the adults prey. It may sound revolting to us, but this oil is rich in energy and allows the chick to grow even bigger than its parents before losing weight again prior to its first flight, which happens a few weeks after the adult birds have abandoned it to its fate.


WED 06:00 Today (m000f05v)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 In Wordsworth's Footsteps (m000f061)
2 Bliss Was It In That Dawn

William Wordsworth was not only one of the greatest English poets but also a creative radical, and - at least in his student days - a political one too. 250 years after his birth in 1770, Professor Jonathan Bate travels in his footsteps to reveal the true story of the making of the poet.

1.Bliss Was It In That Dawn

Jonathan travels from Westminster Bridge to Paris and Calais as he relates the powerful and poignant story of Wordsworth's visit to Paris on the first anniversary of the French Revolution and in its aftermath. Alongside vivid recreations of Wordsworth's initial excitement about the possibility for real change, Jonathan also tells of his love affair with a royalist sympathiser, the birth of their illegitimate child, and Wordsworth's shift from radical politics to radical poetry in his later years.

With contributions from historian Professor Lynn Hunt, leading British poet Alice Oswald and writer and broadcaster Melvyn Bragg.

Featuring Simon Russell Beale as Wordsworth and music specially composed by Emily Levy. Also with Laura Christy as Dorothy Wordsworth and viola playing by Aby Vulliamy.

Professor Sir Jonathan Bate is a British academic, novelist and broadcaster, and the author of a forthcoming biography of Wordsworth

Producer: Beaty Rubens


WED 09:30 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (m000dyqn)
Series 15

The Golden Secret

"How do you make gold?" asks curious listener, Paul Ruddick.

Inspired by the promise of riches, Hannah and Adam embark on a mission to discover the origin of gold. It's a tale that takes them from the clandestine codes of Aristotle to the alchemy of Isaac Newton, alongside materials scientist Mark Miodownik.

They boldly go into the cosmos with astronomers Lucie Green and Andrew Pontzen, to learn what happens in the most exotic areas of space. By the end one thing is for sure - you'll never look at your gold jewellery in quite the same way again.

Presenters: Hannah Fry, Adam Rutherford
Producer: Michelle Martin


WED 09:45 Surfacing (m000cp1r)
Episode 3

Beneath the broad Alaskan sky, long-buried artefacts spill from the thawing tundra. In the eroding sand dunes of a Scottish island, preserved Neolithic hearths and homes are uncovered by the wind. And in a grandmother’s tenement flat, memories surface of a long-ago mining accident and a mother who was kind.

Award-winning poet Kathleen Jamie's essays reflect on time, memory and our connections to the past. She travels to Westray, one of the Orkney Islands, to work on an archaeological dig.

Read by Maureen Beattie
Abridged by Linda Cracknell
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000f06c)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 24 Kildare Road (m000f06h)
Episode 3

Two boys out sledging in their local park discover the body of an old woman in the snow. Over ten episodes we find out what led her there. On her way to Bridlington by train, Marion meets Zoe who is on a romantic mission.

Marion ..... Marcia Warren
Zoe ..... Amanda Wilkin
Eve ..... Sinead MacInnes
Bloke ..... Ian Conningham
Eli ..... Greg Jones

Directed by Mary Peate
Written by Katie Hims


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m000f06m)
John and Matt - It's Not Very Emotionally Nourishing

Friends and fellow comedians on the ups and downs of being a part of the comedy community. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 What Does Boris Johnson Really Think? (m000f12b)
What does Boris Johnson really think? Is there an overall philosophy or ideology which explains the prime minister's politics and indicates how he is likely to govern the country? Nick Robinson explores this question in conversation with friends, colleagues and close observers of Boris Johnson during his path to Downing Street.

We examine Mr Johnson's thinking on key domestic themes such as economic policy, regional devolution, infrastructure and the role of the state. We explore his own claim that he is a "Brexity Hezza" and a "One Nation" Conservative.

Critics have accused Mr Johnson of stoking racial prejudice and division in his use of language. We ask former colleagues, friends and observers about the truth of his views on race and immigration.

What does Boris Johnson really think about foreign affairs? We explore this question in relation to key policy dilemmas such as the UK's future relationship with the US and the crisis in the Middle East. We try to unpick the prime minister's views on Brexit and the EU, tracing the story back to his early days as a reporter in Brussels.

Can a coherent narrative be detected in Mr Johnson's political journey, or is he a chameleon, adapting to his environment in the pursuit of power?

Producer: Leala Padmanabhan


WED 11:30 Conversations from a Long Marriage (m000f06s)
Series 1

Episode 3 - Lean on Me

Joanna Lumley and Roger Allam play a couple who have been married ‘for ever’. Children of the Sixties, they’re still free spirits, drawn together by their passion for music and each other. Their warm and witty conversations dance around everyday chores and appointments as well as dealing with problems within long-held friendships, and tackling their own frustrations with each other. But underlying it all is their enduring love for each other and their desire to keep the passion alive.

Joanna’s nursing skills are found wanting after Roger’s knee op.

Written for Joanna Lumley and Roger Allam by award-winning comedy writer and journalist Jan Etherington, who’s been married for 35 years to Gavin Petrie, with whom she created many hit radio and TV series (Second Thoughts, Next of Kin, Faith in the Future, The Change). Conversations from a Long Marriage is her first solo narrative comedy series.

Produced by Claire Jones
A BBC Studios production


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000f0n6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Second Sleep (m000f071)
Episode Eight

“Until the close of the early modern era, Western Europeans on most evenings experienced two major intervals of sleep . . . The initial interval of slumber was usually referred to as ‘first sleep’ . . . The succeeding interval was called ‘second’ or ‘morning’ sleep . . . Both phases lasted roughly the same length of time, with individuals waking some time after midnight before returning to rest.
Roger Ekirch, At Day’s Close: A History of Nighttime."

Father Fairfax, a newly ordained priest has been sent by the Bishop of Exeter to the village of Addicott St George to bury Father Lacy who has recently died. But a mysterious figure appears at the funeral casting doubt on the accidental nature of the priest’s death.

Author Robert Harris, the master of plotting, is best known for his best-selling fiction - The Ghost Writer, An Officer and a Spy, Fatherland, Enigma and Archangel. The Second Sleep is a totally absorbing and truly surprising thriller that takes a "historical futuristic" setting to comment on the present.

Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Michael Maloney
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000f074)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m000f076)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000f078)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 The Disrupters (m000cc70)
Sir James Dyson, founder of Dyson

Sir James Dyson took four years of working alone and 5,127 prototypes to get to his first cyclone vacuum cleaner. Today his company is worth over $5bn.

The Disrupters comes out of the studio and into a semi-anecoic chamber in Dyson's offices in Malmesbury to speak to Britain's foremost pioneer and inventor about his career.

He talks about how the death of his father at a young age made him want to be self-sufficient and independent, why trying something new, even at the risk of failure is so important, and how his desire to make things has never left him.

Presenters: Kamal Ahmed and Rohan Silva
Producer: Georgia Catt


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000dy6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000f134)
The Disappearance of Mr Chan

Hong Kong writer Mr Chan fails to arrive at Heathrow. His daughter Poppy sets out to find him. But her mother begs her to come home and keep her company. She’s scared.

Poppy enlists the help of ex-boyfriend Jason, who’s an online journalist. They fly out to Hong Kong determined to research and write a story that will help get her father released, but Poppy’s mother Ada is certain the best way to help is to comply with the authorities by staying silent.

Set against the backdrop of student protests at the newly proposed Extradition Bill, this is a story of a clash between generations about the best way to deal with political disturbance. It’s also a story about fear, courage and determination.

The author is Simon Wu, who was born in Hong Kong and writes for theatre, radio and film. His plays have been performed in Hong Kong and in London, and showcased at the Soho Theatre, Greenwich Theatre, Oval House, Tara Arts and the Decibel Festival.

Director David Tse has worked in theatre for many years as an actor, writer and director. He co-founded and ran Yellow Earth Theatre for over a decade and Chinese Arts Space, creating platforms for hundreds of British Chinese / East Asian artists and young performers. The Disappearance of Mr Chan is the second drama he has directed for Radio 4.

Cast:
Poppy – Jennifer Leong
Jason – Jeremy Ang Jones
Mr Chan and Uncle – Jamie Zubairi
Mrs Chan and Auntie – Liz Sutherland-Lim
Vicky and Security Officer – Michelle Yim

Writer: Simon Wu
Director: David Tse
Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jeremy Mortimer
Sound Designer: Eloise Whitmore

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000f07d)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m000dy6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m000f07g)
New research on how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000f07j)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m000f07l)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000f07q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Alex Edelman's Peer Group (m000f07s)
Series 3

Cool

Award-winning comedian Alex Edelman discusses the concept of "cool" and what it means today. With help from his "peer group" at the University of West London, Alex examines what is cool, how to be cool, and why it's still important today.

Alex Edelman's Peer Group is written and performed by Alex Edelman, with additional material from Alfie Brown, Rebecca Nicholson, David Burstein, Catherine Brinkworth and Kat Sadler.

It was produced by Sam Michell.

It is a BBC Studios Production.


WED 19:00 The Archers (m000dxtf)
Lee has a confession to make and Freddie makes a fool of himself


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000f07w)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m000f080)
Combative, provocative and engaging live debate examining the moral issues behind one of the week's news stories. #moralmaze


WED 20:45 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (m000dyqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Out of the Ordinary (b09qhsc4)
Series 6

The Queen's Enemies

Across Britain, thousands of people have stopped paying council tax, water rates and speeding fines. They think they have the law on their side, thanks to the 1215 Magna Carta treaty between King John and the Barons. They argue that the present Queen has breached her obligations under the treaty and so has in effect deposed herself and even become a traitor. As a result, all laws passed by parliament are invalid, the courts are shams, and government officials are imposters. Instead, they swear an oath of allegiance to a group of members of the House of Lords.

The rebels meet in a Facebook group with 13,000 members. In truth, few people join the group because of an interest in constitutional history - most arrive there because they are in a desperate financial or legal situation, feel that the system is stacked against them, and are looking for a way out. The group offers a system to deal with the authorities that - if used effectively - will supposedly get them off your back.

For nearly a year, Jolyon Jenkins followed the group's members, even signing an oath himself. But does the system work? Over the months, members of the group become increasingly frustrated at the authorities' refusal to take their arguments seriously. The frustration eventually leads to a secret plan to seize a crown building, as they believe Magna Carta entitles them to.

Presenter/Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


WED 21:30 In Wordsworth's Footsteps (m000f061)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000f084)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 The Second Sleep (m000f071)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 The Skewer (m000f088)
Series 1

Episode 5

From the mind of Jon Holmes comes topical satire like you've never heard it before.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000f08d)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 06 FEBRUARY 2020

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000f08j)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Surfacing (m000cp1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000f08n)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000f08s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000f08x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000f091)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000f095)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Rachel Mann

Good morning.

Since the accession to the throne of our Sovereign, Her Majesty the Queen on this day in 1952, Britain has changed hugely. For good or ill, our society has come to prefer personal choice and informality over duty and deference.

Recently, there’s been a lot in the media about the rivalries between the post-war Baby Boomer generation and so-called Millennials, those who have come of age since the Millennium. According to this media narrative, Boomers are selfish and individualistic, while Millennials are flakey and judgmental.

I don’t buy either of these parodies. I’m especially grateful for the clear-sightedness of the millennial generation. I value the urgency of younger people’s views on everything from the environment to sexuality to gender. Indeed, I’ve never forgotten the time I was asked to explain the Church of England’s views on same-sex marriage to a group of sixth-formers. For them it was a no-brainer: they thought that justice required that what is offered to straight people should equally be offered to gay people. I was booed when I said I thought it would take years for the Church of England to offer equal marriage.

I don’t think these young people were being unrealistic or pampered. They were taking their ethical responsibilities seriously. When Christians say that God is love, younger generations want to hold us to account. If I were to give some push-back – as a priest from another generation – it would be to encourage the young to find in ‘compromise’ not so much failure as the suppleness that’s required get change done.

Merciful God, help us to see your face in other people and lead us from judging others; help strangers to become friends, that your world may be shaped by hope and love.

Amen.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000f097)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sv1s1)
Greater Rhea

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the greater rhea roaming the South American pampas. Greater rheas are the largest birds in South America and look like small brown ostriches. They're flightless, but can avoid danger by sprinting away on sturdy legs reaching speeds of up to 60 kilometres per hour. Gauchos, the horsemen of the pampas, used to hunt them on horseback using a bolas; a well-aimed bolas would wrap around the rhea's legs or neck and bring it down in a tangle of feathers and limbs. In the breeding season males call loudly to proclaim territories, and to woo potential mates the male runs around erratically, spreading his wings and booming. He mates with several females who lay their eggs in the same nest. Then the females depart to mate with another male leaving the first male to incubate the clutch and rear the huge brood of chicks on his own.


THU 06:00 Today (m000dxsp)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m000dxsr)
George Sand

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the works and life of one of the most popular writers in Europe in C19th, Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin (1804-1876) who wrote under the name George Sand. When she she wrote her first novel under that name, she referred to herself as a man. This was in Indiana (1832), which had the main character breaking away from her unhappy marriage. It made an immediate impact as it overturned the social conventions of the time and it drew on her own early marriage to an older man, Casimir Dudevant. Once Sand's identity was widely known, her works became extremely popular in French and in translation, particularly her rural novels, outselling Hugo and Balzac in Britain, perhaps buoyed by an interest in her personal life as well as by her ideas on the rights and education of women and strength of her writing.

With

Belinda Jack

Angela Ryan

And

Nigel Harkness

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Surfacing (m000cl5z)
Episode 4

Beneath the broad Alaskan sky, long-buried artefacts spill from the thawing tundra. In the eroding sand dunes of a Scottish island, preserved Neolithic hearths and homes are uncovered by the wind. And in a grandmother’s tenement flat, memories surface of a long-ago mining accident and a mother who was kind.

Nostalgia for the past competes with modern day comforts as poet Kathleen Jamie joins an archaeological dig on Westray.

Read by Maureen Beattie
Abridged by Linda Cracknell
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000dxst)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dxsw)
Episode 4

Two boys out sledging in their local park discover the body of an old woman in the snow. Over ten episodes we find out what led her there. In this episode, Marion arrives in Bridlington and makes her way to 24 Kildare Road.

Marion ..... Marcia Warren
Ben ..... Greg Jones
Taxi Driver ..... Neil McCaul
Shirley ..... Heather Craney

Directed by Mary Peate
Written by Katie Hims


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m000dxsz)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 Remembering Tryweryn (m000dxt1)
Guto Harri explores the meaning of two Welsh words daubed on a crumbling stone wall in West Wales, and explores their 50 year journey through Welsh writing and music.

The graffiti on that half collapsed wall, 'Cofiwch Dryweryn' ('Remember Tryweryn'), encapsulates the recent history of the country for many people. They're a memorial to a flooded village: Capel Celyn.

For Wales, the drowning of that village to create a reservoir providing water to Liverpool in the 1960s was a cultural tipping point as well as political one. The words on the memorial have come to symbolise the colonisation and exploitation of Wales by the English.

But why does that one event over any other still have such resonance today?

Hearing from writers, poets, academics and art critics, Guto looks to understand how two words have come to shape Wales today, and how they're used to stir nationalist sentiments.

Produced by Glyn Tansley


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000dxt3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Second Sleep (m000dxt5)
Episode Nine

“Until the close of the early modern era, Western Europeans on most evenings experienced two major intervals of sleep . . . The initial interval of slumber was usually referred to as ‘first sleep’ . . . The succeeding interval was called ‘second’ or ‘morning’ sleep . . . Both phases lasted roughly the same length of time, with individuals waking some time after midnight before returning to rest.
Roger Ekirch, At Day’s Close: A History of Nighttime .“

Father Fairfax, a newly ordained priest has been sent by the Bishop of Exeter to the village of Addicott St George to bury Father Lacy who has recently died. But a mysterious figure appears at the funeral casting doubt on the accidental nature of the priest’s death.

Author Robert Harris, the master of plotting, is best known for his best-selling fiction - The Ghost Writer, An Officer and a Spy, Fatherland, Enigma and Archangel. The Second Sleep is a totally absorbing and truly surprising thriller that takes a "historical futuristic" setting to comment on the present.

Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Michael Maloney
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000dxt7)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m000dxt9)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000dxtc)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 The Disrupters (m000cc1g)
Temie Giwa-Tubosun, Founder of LifeBank

At 30 weeks into her pregnancy, Temie Giwa-Tubsoun was in America when she was rushed to the hospital for an emergency C-section. Had she been in Nigeria, she realised she would probably have died.

In response to the shortage of blood supplies in Lagos, Temie founded LifeBank, a business enterprise working to improve access to blood transfusions in Nigeria which has today saved over 6,936 lives.

Presenters: Kamal Ahmed and Rohan Silva
Producer: Georgia Catt


THU 14:00 The Archers (m000dxtf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m000dxth)
Maynard

Cain murdered Abel. Marcus just wants younger brother Maynard under his thumb. But Maynard - with help from his girlfriend Jules - is determined to turn his life around and escape a life of crime.

Son of a devout mother who was loved by all, Maynard turns his back on his tearaway past and sets out to make his mum proud. Just weeks after her untimely death in a suspected arson attack, Maynard begins refurbishing the Brixton community café she ran so successfully. Everyone is invited to her memorial service in the café but, before Maynard can finish, thugs come and destroy all his work.

Will he and Jules have to borrow money from drug-dealing Marcus to get the place up and running?

Fraser Ayres who wrote the drama and plays Maynard is co-founder of Triforce Creative Network and Dandi which encourages diversity in the media industries. Fraser is currently the lead writer on Idris Elba’s In the Long Run for Sky.

Director Kathy Burke is an actor, writer and director in theatre, television and film. Maynard is her directorial debut for BBC Radio 4.

Cast:
Maynard – Fraser Ayres
Marcus – Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
Auntie P – Ellen Thomas
Sister Magdelene/Petra – Chizzy Akudolu
Jules – Kellie Shirley
Mama – Martina Laird

Writer: Fraser Ayres
Director: Kathy Burke
Executive Director: Jeremy Mortimer
Sound Designer: Eloise Whitmore

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Open Country (m000dxtk)
Halsway Manor

Helen Mark heads to the Quantock Hills to visit the national centre for folk arts and meet some of the people taking part in a 'Winter Warmer' celebration of music and dance. She meets musician Becki Driscoll whose track 'Cold Light' was composed in the summer house at the Manor, and asks Chief Executive Crispian Cook about the history of this residential haven for folk arts. Helen catches Moira Gutteridge for a chat just as she's about to lead a walk, and high on top of the Quantocks she speaks to Philip Comer, Chair of the 'Friends of the Quantocks' about the area, the grazing rights on common land and why it's not a good idea to feed the wild ponies. Roger and Nanette Phipps tell Helen why the spot for the Maypole is currently taken up with flower bulbs, and how according to local legend dragons may still lurk in the surrounding hills. There's also time for a spot of sword-dancing which is not as easy as it's made to look.

The music is performed by Becki Driscoll, Ted Morse, Peter and Moira Gutteridge and Mary Rhodes.

Producer: Toby Field


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000dxtm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (m000dxtp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m000dxtr)
The latest releases, the hottest stars and the leading directors, plus news and insights from the film world.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m000dxtt)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m000dxtw)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000dxty)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Elephant in the Room (m0007679)
Episode 6

Sarah Millican hosts a new panel show using surveys to discover who is the most Average Jolene, and who is the most Maverick Matilda. This week's sparkling panel features Zoe Lyons, Kerry Godliman, Lou Conran and Jason Cook.

Surveys on subjects including childhood, daily rituals and favourite cheese are the basis for Sarah's questions to the panellists, discovering who is the closest to, and furthest from, the average. Surprising quirks, hilarious insights and unexpected anecdotes are revealed along the way.

The winner will be the most average. But joint winner will be the most different, the furthest from the norm.

A little bit like a dinner party, but one where you know all of the spoons.

A Chopsy production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000dxv1)
There’s more bad news at Brookfield and Jill attempts to rally the family


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000dxv3)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dxsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m000dxv5)
Combining original insights into major news stories with topical investigations.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m000dxv7)
Synthetic Biology

Synthetic Biology is a process that allows the re-engineering of cells in everything from humans to plants and even mosquitoes. It allows scientists to manipulate DNA to make nature do things it wouldn't naturally, for example mosquitoes that don't pass on malaria. But it has applications in healthcare, agriculture and could even stop our reliance on oil. This is why the UK government is investing heavily in the science as they believe it could be worth around 400 billion. Evan Davis and guests discuss the business of Synthetic Biology.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000dxtt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m000dxsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000dxvb)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 The Second Sleep (m000dxt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Relativity (m00025f9)
Series 2

Episode 4

Drawing on his own family, the second series of Richard Herring’s comedy drama, Relativity, builds on the warm, lively characters and family dynamics of the first series. His affectionate observation of inter-generational misunderstanding, sibling sparring and the ties that bind will resonate with anyone who has ever argued with their dad about who the current Pope is.

Amid the comedy, Richard broaches some more serious highs and lows of family life.

Richard Herring is a comedian, writer, blogger and podcaster and the world's premier semi-professional self-playing snooker player.

Episode 4:
Ken turns to his grandchildren for help with his technological challenges, while Chloe goes into early labour as Ian frets about his bag for life going to waste.

Cast:
Margaret…………….Alison Steadman
Ken……………..Phil Davis
Jane…………….Fenella Woolgar
Ian……………….Richard Herring
Chloe…………..Emily Berrington
Pete………………..Gordon Kennedy
Holly………………...Tia Bannon
Mark………………Fred Haig
Nick………………..Harrison Knights
Billy………………..Danny Kirrane

Written by Richard Herring
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore

Produced by Polly Thomas
Executive Producers: Jon Thoday and Richard Allen Turner

An Avalon Television production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000dxvd)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 07 FEBRUARY 2020

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000dxvg)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Surfacing (m000cl5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000dxvj)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000dxvl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000dxvn)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000dxvq)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000dxvs)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Dr Rachel Mann

Good morning.

I suspect there are few of us who enjoy waiting. A few years ago I was very ill, and spent a lot of time in hospital waiting rooms. The NHS were great, but having to sit in neon-lit waiting rooms for hours often felt like purgatory. Sometimes waiting drives us to rage. Consider the time we’ve all wasted waiting for parcels that never come or trying to get through to consumer helplines. It’s hardly surprising that waiting around is not high on most people’s bucket lists.

Perhaps one reason waiting is challenging is because it places us in the hands of others. When we wait for the bus or tram or tube we are not in control. Others are. And even if we decide to jump into our cars as a way of regaining control, the first traffic jam or traffic lights give the lie to our fantasies of being in charge.

I think it’s impossible to avoid times of waiting. There will always be delays and frustrations. All of us have to find strategies to cope with this. For some it will be mindfulness or taking a deep breath. Others will feel the need to rage and argue, though I’ve never seen that bear much fruit.

One approach I’m trying to practice is to see waiting as a kind of gift. For if waiting does entail accepting we are in other people’s hands, that can be a prompt for us to wish them well; to remember that the person driving the bus or answering the phone is an actual human being. It might even be a prompt for a prayer of blessing.

Gracious God, whatever we face this day, help us to recognize the absolute value of other people; that we might be respected as such ourselves.

Amen.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000dxvv)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04svjxg)
Atlantic (Island) Canary

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the Atlantic canary singing in the Tenerife treetops. The ancestor of our cage-bird canaries is the Island or Atlantic Canary, a finch which is native to the Azores, Madeira and Canary Islands which include Tenerife. The Canary Islands were named by early travellers "the islands of dogs from 'canis', the Latin for dogs, because of the many large dogs reputedly found there. And so the common and popular song-bird which is now a symbol of the islands became known as the canary. Unlike their domestic siblings, wild Island canaries are streaky, greenish yellow finches: males have golden- yellow foreheads, females a head of more subtle ash-grey tone. But it's the song, a pulsating series of vibrant whistles, trills and tinkling sounds; that has made the canary so popular. They were almost compulsory in Victorian and Edwardian parlours; a far cry from the sunny palm -fringed beaches of the Atlantic islands.


FRI 06:00 Today (m000dymp)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000dymt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Surfacing (m000clcf)
Episode 5

Beneath the broad Alaskan sky, long-buried artefacts spill from the thawing tundra. In the eroding sand dunes of a Scottish island, preserved Neolithic hearths and homes are uncovered by the wind. And in a grandmother’s tenement flat, memories surface of a long-ago mining accident and a mother who was kind.

In the last of the extracts from Kathleen Jamie's collection of essays, the poet draws together her reflections on nature, memory and family.

Read by Maureen Beattie
Abridged by Linda Cracknell
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000dymy)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dyn2)
Episode 5

A woman's body is found in the snow. Over ten episodes we discover what led her there. Today, paramedics Ozzy and Ned wait for a call out on a snowy January day.

Ozzy ..... Ikky Elyas
Ned ..... Will Kirk
Call Handler ..... Scarlett Courtney
Jackson ..... Aaron Gelkoff
Hayley ..... Christine Bottomley
Ryan ..... Harry Grasby
Marion ..... Marcia Warren

Directed by Mary Peate
Written by Katie Hims


FRI 11:00 And the Academy Award Goes To... (m000dyn6)
Series 9

Chicago

It was a heady combination of the seedy side of a city, jazz and murder, and memorable performances from Catherine Zeta-Jones, Renee Zellweger and Richard Gere that scooped the musical film "Chicago" 6 Academy Awards., including one for Best Picture. The 2002 movie was based on the 1975 stage musical created by Bob Fosse, but the story of murderesses Velma Kelly and Roxie Hart had been told in several forms before that. The first was in 1926 by Chicago Tribune reporter Maurine Dallas Watkins, based on two actual 1924 murder cases.

Paul Gambaccini traces the origin of the film and hears why it triumphed so spectacularly at the Oscars. There are contributions from the film's Musical Supervisor Maureen Crowe who recalls the way the music was recorded and put together in London, Toronto and Los Angeles and how difficult it was to get the opening horn lick in the first few bars just right.
We also hear from film critics Toby Miller and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and there are interviews recorded at the time of the film's release with starring actor Richard Gere and director Rob Marshall.

Producer: Emma Kingsley


FRI 11:30 Napoleon Moon (m000dynd)
Britain of the future is a confusing and silly place: the Britannia Archipelago is a flooded sprawl of walkways drenched in chemical-rain; homeless robots living abandoned in shop doorways; oligarchs partying in their zero-gravity masquerades as the workers sleep soundly in their cars, which circle the swirling maelstrom of bio-gak that was once our sky. In this dystopian cityscape, one man with a large and fragile ego, is about to fall from the very highest pedestal, only to land on someone else's feet. His name is Napoleon Moon.

Napoleon Moon...Paterson Joseph
Cash...Kemah Bob
All other roles played by Emma Dennis-Edwards and David Reed

Writer, David Reed
Producer, Julia McKenzie
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000dynj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Second Sleep (m000dynn)
Episode Ten

“Until the close of the early modern era, Western Europeans on most evenings experienced two major intervals of sleep . . . The initial interval of slumber was usually referred to as ‘first sleep’ . . . The succeeding interval was called ‘second’ or ‘morning’ sleep . . . Both phases lasted roughly the same length of time, with individuals waking some time after midnight before returning to rest.
Roger Ekirch, At Day’s Close: A History of Nighttime.“

Father Fairfax, a newly ordained priest has been sent by the Bishop of Exeter to the village of Addicott St George to bury Father Lacy who has recently died. But a mysterious figure appears at the funeral casting doubt on the accidental nature of the priest’s death.

Author Robert Harris, the master of plotting, is best known for his best-selling fiction - The Ghost Writer, An Officer and a Spy, Fatherland, Enigma and Archangel. The Second Sleep is a totally absorbing and truly surprising thriller that takes a "historical futuristic" setting to comment on the present.

Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Michael Maloney
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000dyns)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000dynx)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000dyp1)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The Disrupters (m000c8r4)
John and Irene Hays

John and Irene Hays hit the headlines last year when they bought 555 Thomas Cook stores last year, protecting the jobs of more than 2,000 employees.

John started his travel agent, 'Hay's Travel' forty years ago in the back of his mother's shop. He and his wife Irene have steered the company through recessions, the internet revolution, and snobbery from other parts of the industry. They tell Kamal and Rohan how they did it and what they learnt along the way.

Presenters: Kamal Ahmed and Rohan Silva
Producer: Georgia Catt


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000dxv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m000dyp5)
Wheatish

Sabina contemplates becoming a single mother, despite what her community might think. But there are more than a few hurdles to overcome before she embarks on the first stage. For British Asian women of a certain generation, life can be complicated – even more so if you are Muslim, single and heading into your 40s. Sabina wonders what went wrong. A failed marriage? Compromised fertility? Or perhaps she’s just too choosy? She confides in her best friend Amber that she’s planning to freeze her eggs, just in case. Amber is anxious - what will your mum think? And when she mentions single motherhood to Nadeem on a first date, he is surprisingly judgemental. Sabina realises she’s going to have to work out what she wants and make her own choices, not simply go along with what everyone else wants. Wheatish is a story about a woman facing up to her own desires, her life and her mother.

The author Yasmeen Khan is an award-winning broadcaster and writer. She has made documentaries for Radio 4 and has written for theatre - including Break The Floorboards (Rifco/Watford Palace), Twelve (Kali Theatre) and Don't You Know Who I Am? (The Pleasance). She is currently writing for EastEnders.

Director Aisha Khan is an experienced theatre director and dramaturge. Currently Co-Artistic Director of Freedom Studios in Bradford, she has directed When I Say I Love You by Pete Bowker (Slung Low Shorts) and Beep (Northern Bullets). Wheatish is her directorial debut for Radio 4.

Cast:
Sabina – Mina Anwar
Amber – Nadia Emam
Sarah – Jeanette Percival
Mum – Rani Moorthy
Nadeem – Esh Alladi

Writer: Yasmeen Khan
Director: Aisha Khan
Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jeremy Mortimer
Sound Designer: Eloise Whitmore

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000dyp7)
Dumfries & Galloway

Kathy Clugston and the panel are in Dumfries and Galloway. James Wong, Matthew Wilson and Christine Walkden answer questions from the audience.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000dyp9)
From Fact to Fiction

An original short story inspired by this week's news.
A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000dypc)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m000dypf)
Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m000dyph)
Jason and Talia - Girls think I sound like a posh old man

Friends and fellow students, both with cerebral palsy and using voice communication devices to speak, talk about the dating scene at college. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m000dypk)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000dypm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m000dypp)
Series 101

Episode 5

Andrew Maxwell, Zoe Lyons, Daily Telegraph journalist Michael Deacon and stand-up comedian Sophie Duker join Nish this week.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m000dypr)
Writer, Liz John
Director, Jeremy Howe
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Jolene Archer ….. Buffy Davis
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Rex Fairbrother ….. Nick Barber
Bert Fry ….. Eric Allan
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Johnny Phillips ….. Tom Gibbons
Hannah Riley ….. Helen Longworth
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Jakob Hakansson ….. Paul Venables
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley
Lee Bryce ….. Ryan Early
Gavin ….. Gareth Pierce


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m000dypt)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 24 Kildare Road (m000dyn2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000dypw)
John Denham, Bob Seeley MP, Camilla Tominey

Chris Mason presents political debate from Winchester University with a panel including the Conservative MP Bob Seeley, Professor John Denham from the Centre for English Idenity and Politics and Camilla Tominey.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000dypy)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception (m000dyq0)
Omnibus

Omnibus edition. "All warfare is based on deception", wrote ancient Chinese philosopher and military strategist Sun Tzu. It may have been written five centuries before the birth of Christ, but his handbook The Art of War is as relevant now as it ever was. Historian Ben Macintyre presents a guide to guile and ruse in warfare, from the Old Testament to modern times.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000dyq2)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Second Sleep (m000dynn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m000dy64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000dyq4)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m000dyq6)
Olivia and Dee - I'm super-proud now

Mother and daughter talk about their close relationship through the prism of tattoos. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

24 Kildare Road 10:45 MON (m000dy9y)

24 Kildare Road 19:45 MON (m000dy9y)

24 Kildare Road 10:45 TUE (m000dy4t)

24 Kildare Road 19:45 TUE (m000dy4t)

24 Kildare Road 10:41 WED (m000f06h)

24 Kildare Road 10:45 THU (m000dxsw)

24 Kildare Road 19:45 THU (m000dxsw)

24 Kildare Road 10:45 FRI (m000dyn2)

24 Kildare Road 19:45 FRI (m000dyn2)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m000dy64)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m000dy64)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000drny)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m000dypy)

Alex Edelman's Peer Group 18:30 WED (m000f07s)

All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception 21:00 FRI (m000dyq0)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m000dq2w)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m000dyc2)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 11:00 FRI (m000dyn6)

Annika Stranded 21:45 SAT (b0bgpch3)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m000dxr2)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000drnw)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000dypw)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m000dxrq)

Art of Now 15:30 SAT (m000dpjh)

Art of Now 11:30 TUE (m000dy52)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m000dxtt)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m000dxtt)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m000dxs5)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m000dxs5)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (m000dxtp)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (m000dxtp)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000dzlw)

Code Red 11:00 TUE (m000dy4y)

Conversations from a Long Marriage 11:30 WED (m000f06s)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m000dymt)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000dymt)

Don't Log Off 23:30 SAT (m0002z3c)

Drama 14:45 SAT (m0002z3z)

Drama 14:15 MON (m0001qvl)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m0001137)

Drama 14:15 WED (m000f134)

Drama 14:15 THU (m000dxth)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m000dyp5)

Elephant in the Room 18:30 THU (m0007679)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m000dxqc)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000dzn7)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000dycp)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000dy77)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000f097)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m000dxvv)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m000dpkt)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m000dy6g)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m000dqfl)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m000dxqr)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m000dxsz)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m000dyby)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000dy6d)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000f07w)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000dxv3)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m000dypt)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000drmr)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000dyp7)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m000dxsr)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m000dxsr)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000dy6j)

In Wordsworth's Footsteps 09:00 WED (m000f061)

In Wordsworth's Footsteps 21:30 WED (m000f061)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m000dy6l)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m000dy6l)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m000drn0)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000dypc)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m000dxrj)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m000dxrj)

Making History 15:30 TUE (m000dy5z)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000drp6)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m000dxrv)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m000dzmv)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000dyc9)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000dy6v)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m000f08j)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m000dxvg)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m000dxqw)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m000dxqw)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000f07d)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m000f080)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m000drn4)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (m000dypf)

Motherwell 00:30 SAT (m000drp8)

My Name Is... 20:00 MON (m000dyc0)

Napoleon Moon 11:30 FRI (m000dynd)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000drpj)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m000dxs3)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m000dzn3)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m000dyck)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m000dy73)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000f091)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000dxvq)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m000dzlc)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m000dxqt)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000dzm0)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000f00k)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000dy56)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000f0n6)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000dxt3)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000dynj)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m000dxq9)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m000dzlk)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000dzlr)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m000dxrs)

News 13:00 SAT (m000dxr0)

No One Called Her Angel 19:45 SUN (m000dzmm)

Oliver: Lagos to London 15:00 SUN (m000dzm9)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m000dzlf)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m000dy4k)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m000dqyz)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m000dxtk)

Out of the Ordinary 21:00 WED (b09qhsc4)

PM 17:00 SAT (m000dxr6)

PM 17:00 MON (m000dybp)

PM 17:00 TUE (m000dy66)

PM 17:00 WED (m000f07l)

PM 17:00 THU (m000dxtw)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000dypk)

Phil Wang: Wangsplaining 18:30 TUE (m00057qs)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000dzmk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000drpl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000dzn5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m000dycm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000dy75)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000f095)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000dxvs)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m000dxrl)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m000dxrl)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m000dxrl)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000dxtm)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000dxtm)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000dxtm)

Radiolab 23:00 SUN (m000dzms)

Relativity 23:00 THU (m00025f9)

Remembering Tryweryn 11:30 THU (m000dxt1)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (m000dq2g)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (m000dybh)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m000dxqk)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m000dxrn)

Sebastian Baczkiewicz - Pilgrim 21:00 SAT (b01r11w9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m000drpd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m000dxrz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000dzmz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000dycf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000dy6z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m000f08s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000dxvl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m000drpb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000drpg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m000dxrb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m000dxrx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m000dxs1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000dzmc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m000dzmx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m000dzn1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000dycc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000dych)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000dy6x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000dy71)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m000f08n)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m000f08x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000dxvj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m000dxvn)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m000drmw)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000dyp9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m000dxrg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m000dzmh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000dybt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000dy68)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m000f07q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000dxty)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000dypm)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b06lt13f)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m000dy9r)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m000dy9r)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000dzlt)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m000dzlm)

Surfacing 09:45 MON (m000cn54)

Surfacing 00:30 TUE (m000cn54)

Surfacing 09:45 TUE (m000cmyq)

Surfacing 00:30 WED (m000cmyq)

Surfacing 09:45 WED (m000cp1r)

Surfacing 00:30 THU (m000cp1r)

Surfacing 09:45 THU (m000cl5z)

Surfacing 00:30 FRI (m000cl5z)

Surfacing 09:45 FRI (m000clcf)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000dzly)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m000dybf)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m000dybf)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000dy5v)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000dy5v)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000dy6b)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000dy6b)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m000dxtf)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m000dxtf)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000dxv1)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000dxv1)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m000dypr)

The Art of Survival 16:00 MON (m000dybm)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m000dxv7)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m000dxv5)

The Crisis Inside 21:00 MON (m000dpjf)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 09:30 WED (m000dyqn)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 20:45 WED (m000dyqn)

The Disrupters 13:45 MON (m000bvwv)

The Disrupters 13:45 TUE (m000bx1w)

The Disrupters 13:45 WED (m000cc70)

The Disrupters 13:45 THU (m000cc1g)

The Disrupters 13:45 FRI (m000c8r4)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m000dxtr)

The Fix 22:15 SAT (m000dqhf)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m000dybk)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m000dybk)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (m000dy6q)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (m000dy6q)

The Inquiry 17:30 SAT (m000dxr8)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m000dxqm)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m000dxqm)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m000dy4f)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m000dy4f)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m000dzm7)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m000f06m)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m000dyph)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m000dyq6)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m000f07j)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (m000drnp)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m000dypp)

The Purity Spiral 13:30 SUN (m000d70h)

The Second Sleep 12:04 MON (m000dyb5)

The Second Sleep 22:45 MON (m000dyb5)

The Second Sleep 12:04 TUE (m000dy5b)

The Second Sleep 22:45 TUE (m000dy5b)

The Second Sleep 12:04 WED (m000f071)

The Second Sleep 22:45 WED (m000f071)

The Second Sleep 12:04 THU (m000dxt5)

The Second Sleep 22:45 THU (m000dxt5)

The Second Sleep 12:04 FRI (m000dynn)

The Second Sleep 22:45 FRI (m000dynn)

The Skewer 19:15 SUN (m000dqhk)

The Skewer 23:00 WED (m000f088)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m000dq2p)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m000dybw)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m000dyb0)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m000dxqp)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m000dzm5)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000dyc5)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m000dy6n)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m000f084)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000dxvb)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m000dyq2)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m000dqgz)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m000f07g)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m000dyc7)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m000dy6s)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m000f08d)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m000dxvd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m000dyq4)

Today 07:00 SAT (m000dxqh)

Today 06:00 MON (m000dy9p)

Today 06:00 TUE (m000dy4b)

Today 06:00 WED (m000f05v)

Today 06:00 THU (m000dxsp)

Today 06:00 FRI (m000dymp)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03thtfs)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03thvkt)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04mlvz1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04sttd3)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04sv1s1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04svjxg)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m000dxqf)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m000dxqy)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m000dxrd)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m000dzlh)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m000dzlp)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m000dzm3)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m000dzmf)

Weather 05:56 MON (m000dzn9)

Weather 12:57 MON (m000dyb9)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m000dy5l)

Weather 12:57 WED (m000f076)

Weather 12:57 THU (m000dxt9)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m000dynx)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m000dzmq)

What Does Boris Johnson Really Think? 11:00 WED (m000f12b)

What If Our Textbooks Were Black? 16:30 SUN (m000c9mj)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m000dxr4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m000dy9w)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m000dy4p)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m000f06c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m000dxst)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m000dymy)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m000dpkc)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m000dy62)

World at One 13:00 MON (m000dybc)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m000dy5q)

World at One 13:00 WED (m000f078)

World at One 13:00 THU (m000dxtc)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m000dyp1)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m000dyb7)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m000dy5g)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m000f074)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m000dxt7)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m000dyns)