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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 05 OCTOBER 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0008y9h)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Margaret Thatcher: Herself Alone (m0008y7r)
Episode 5

How did Margaret Thatcher both change and divide Britain? How did her model of combative female leadership help shape the way we live now? How did the woman who won the Cold War and three general elections in succession find herself pushed out by her own MPs?

Charles Moore’s full account, based on unique access to Margaret Thatcher herself, her papers, and her closest associates, tells the story of her last period in office, her combative retirement, and the controversy that surrounded her even in death.

It includes the fall of the Berlin Wall, which she had fought for, and the rise of the modern EU that she feared. It lays bare her growing quarrels with colleagues and reveals the truth about her political assassination.

Moore’s three-part biography of one of Britain’s most important peacetime prime ministers paints an intimate political and personal portrait of the victories and defeats, and the iron will but surprising vulnerability of the woman who dominated in an age of male power.

Reader: Haydn Gwynne
Abridger: Polly Coles
Producer: Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0008y9k)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0008y9m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0008y9p)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0008y9r)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0008y9t)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with writer and blogger on mental health issues and faith, Emma Scrivener

Good morning.

My daughter has a toy dinosaur called Derek; and where she goes, he follows. She told him she loved him long before she said it to me - and he makes her feel safe – especially in new and daunting situations; like starting school.

Toddlers cling to toys to give them a sense of security, especially during times of challenge and change. Yet as adults we sometimes do the same thing. When we're overwhelmed by loss or transition; we hold onto familiar routines or habits to keep us safe.

Our need for security is one of the themes of the Old Testament book of Joshua. Israel has just lost its great leader, Moses. Now Joshua is called to take his place, right when God's people are facing their greatest challenge. Leading God’s people across the Jordan is an enormous and terrifying task. So the Lord encourages Joshua with these words, "As I was with Moses, so I will be with you; I will never leave you nor forsake you. Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” (Joshua 1:5-9)

As we step into a new week, here’s a wonderful promise to hold onto. God offers us a far greater security than grown-up toys or routines. He promises to be with us and He gives us himself.

Thank you that you are our security, whatever we face today and wherever we go. Help us to walk in your strength and to place our trust and hope, fully in you. In Jesus’ name.

Amen.


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m0008wnb)
Politics Fans

Penny Andrews argues that thinking of political supporters as fans helps explain the current state of politics.

Penny is an academic and a serial fan - covering everything from David Bowie to Ed Balls. And in this energetic and witty talk Penny argues that many of the characteristics of fandom elsewhere - a rich interest, a wish to protect the sanctity of the fandom, and a refusal to tolerate criticism - also mark politics and political fans, whatever side they're on. And that understanding politics in this way may help us understand it better.

Producer: Giles Edwards


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m00092t1)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m0008wlh)
Walking The Pipe in Shropshire

Clare Balding walks part of the Elan Valley pipeline: 73 miles of Victorian engineering running water from mid Wales into the city of Birmingham. Clare is walking with artist Kate Green who has spent the summer walking the pipe and getting to know people and places along the way. They're walking a stretch that runs around the town of Ludlow in the Welsh Marches. Joining them are Andy Holman who runs a horse rescue centre on his land which holds part of the pipelines, and Tim Hipkiss part of a group of walkers called the Laura Ashley Pate Spreaders who she encountered as they were walking the pipeline too.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m00092t3)
Four Weeks Until Brexit

With 4 weeks to go till October 31st, Charlotte Smith is joined by an expert panel to discuss how Britain's food and farming industry is preparing for Brexit. They look at the practical implications of the Prime Ministers proposals for a new Withdrawal Agreement as well as exploring the impact of a potential No Deal scenario.

On the panel:
Nick von Westenholz - Director of EU Exit and International Trade at the National Farmers' Union
Declan Billington - Chief Executive of Thompsons, Northern Ireland’s largest animal feed producer, and Vice-Chair of Northern Ireland Food and Drink
Bill Wiggin - Conservative MP, farmer and Chair of the Pasture-Fed Livestock Association

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Heather Simons


SAT 06:57 Weather (m00092t5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m00092t7)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m00092t9)
Harry Connick Jr, Andrew Ridgeley

Harry Connick Jr, was brought up by lawyers in New Orleans, but it was the music of the city that inspired him. A child prodigy playing a Beethoven concerto at nine, a disaster singing to Sinatra at 22, then Harry Met Sally happened, and It Had To Be You, made him a star. He He is now celebrating the genius of Cole Porter.

Paulette Constable grew up in Manchester, the youngest of eight children from a Windrush generation family. Following an early divorce, she became a club DJ in 1992, with residencies at The Hacienda, the Ministry of Sound, Heaven and Ibiza Rocks, but explains how family responsibility caught up with her and brought her home.

Rachael Rogan gave up a career in marketing when she was diagnosed with cancer. She describes how, following treatment and strong community support, she decided to make a radical change to her life and to follow her passion – children’s books.

Andrew Ridgeley - one half of Wham! recalls about meeting Georgios Kyiacos Panayiotou at school, discovering their shared passion for music, finding success and their enduring friendship.

Danny Wallace shares his Inheritance Tracks - Sunshine on Leith by The Proclaimers, and Live Forever by Oasis.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00092tc)
Series 26

Isle of Wight

Jay Rayner and his panel are on the Isle of Wight. Polly Russell, Tim Hayward, Paula McIntyre and Tim Anderson answer the culinary questions from the audience.

This week the panellists offer ideas for blackberries, suggest a foolproof way to flip an omelette and discuss cheese soufflé.

David Redup of Grace's bakery joins the panel with Bird's Nests for them to try.

Producer: Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

Food Consultant : Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0009cgl)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m00092tf)
The Prosecutor General

Viktor Shokin was forced out as Prosecutor General of Ukraine in 2016. Since then he's been variously portrayed as a hapless bumbler or a fearless investigator of corruption. Jonah Fisher in Kiev has been trying to track him down.

In Vanuatu, an archipelago in the Pacific, they've come up with a new way of raising government revenue - selling passports for a princely sum. But Sarah Treanor says very few of those who take up the offer are likely to set foot there.

Italy is well known for its love of cycling. The Giro d'Italia, more than 100 years old, is one of the three great European races, demanding strength and stamina. But there's another race taking place this weekend. As Dany Mitzman finds out, appetite as much as stamina is what's needed.

The former BBC correspondent Robert Elphick died recently. He reported on many historic stories none more perhaps than the crushing of the Prague Spring in 1968. We hear one of his despatches from the time.

There was bad news this week in the State of Nature report about wildlife species in Britain that are threatened with extinction. It's not purely a British problem. Phoebe Smith has been following one particular conservation project on the Arabian peninsula.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m00092th)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m00092tk)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m0008y8z)
Series 100

Episode 6

This week, guest host Andy Zaltzman is joined by Angela Barnes, Zoe Lyons, Danny Finkelstein and Lloyd Langford.

A do in Manchester and a deal in Brussels?

Writing team: Alice Fraser, Benjamin Partridge and Mike Shephard with additional material by Catherine Brinkworth and Alex Kealy.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m00092tm)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m00092tp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0008y95)
Robert Buckland MP, Nigel Farage MEP, Barry Gardiner MP, Jeanette Winterson.

Shaun Ley presents topical debate from Backwell School in Somerset with the Justice Secretary Robert Buckland, the leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage, the shadow Secretary of State for International Trade Barry Gardiner and the author Jeanette Winterson
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m00092tr)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b008nb6p)
Peter Nichols - Passion Play

Peter Nichols's acclaimed study of adultery and betrayal.

James and Eleanor are happily married, or so they think. Kate, the young widow of one of their oldest friends, makes it clear to James that she thinks him very attractive. It is an offer he finds very difficult to resist.

James ...... Nicholas Le Prevost
Eleanor ...... Joanna David
Agnes ...... Gemma Jones
Kate ...... Emily Bruni

Directed by Colin Guthrie.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m00092tt)
Toxic masculinity, Women and running, Judith Gough UK ambassador in Stockholm

Drag queen, Courtney Act - real name Shane Jenneck, Jordan Stephens from the hip hop duo ’Rizzle Kicks’, and the Chief Executive of the ‘Men and Boys Coalition’, Dan Bell discuss what the term Toxic Masculinity means to them and how it makes them feel.

Why are more women choosing running over other sports when it comes to staying fit? Dame Kelly Holmes talks about the influence of athletes like Dina Asher-Smith, Rachel Baker tells us how running helped her lose weight and Jens Jakob Andersen has researched data with the International Association of Athletics Federations.

The international bestselling novelist Johana Gustawsson’s latest book ‘Blood Song’ draws on her own experiences of IVF and her struggle to conceive. Johana and her husband Mattias tell us about finding out about his infertility and their need for a sperm donor.

Judith Gough the now UK Ambassador in Stockholm tells us about her job and her four year position in the Ukraine.

Chrisann Jerrett and Dami Makinde discuss their charity We Belong. They set it up to help young people who came to the UK as children, start the process for legal status.

We hear about the impact of so called ‘Superfans’ on female music journalists. Wanna Thompson tells us how a tweet she sent about Nicki Minaj went viral and Hannah Ewens a journalist from Vice discusses what motivates ‘superfans’.

The author Jojo Moyes talks about new novel ‘The Giver of Stars’ based on the true story of the Horseback Librarians of Kentucky.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Lucinda Montefiore


SAT 17:00 PM (m00092tw)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Inquiry (m00092ty)
Is Africa facing another debt crisis?

It’s been almost 15 years since a successful campaign to erase the crushing debts of Africa’s poorest countries. Now, debt levels are again creeping up, thanks in part to a risky mix of easy credit and easy spending. We hear from a former Liberian cabinet minister, a Mozambican anti-corruption campaigner, an expert in Chinese financial flows to the continent and the World Bank’s chief economist for Africa. With Neal Razzell.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00092v0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m00092v2)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00092v4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m00092v6)
Hanif Kureishi, Patricia Hodge, Deborah Findlay, Rhik Samadder, Leon Bosch, Skinny Pelembe, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Patricia Hodge, Hanif Kureishi, Deborah Findlay and Rhik Samadder for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Skinny Pelembe and Leon Bosch.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Profile (m00092v8)
Rudolph Giuliani

This week's Profile is the tale of two Rudys: a divisive figure fighting for his - and Donald Trump’s - political life. And a man who united his nation in its darkest hours.

Presenter: Becky Milligan
Producer: Neal Razzell


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m00092vb)
Joker, Mary Costello, A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, Dublin Murders, Into the Night: Cabarets and Clubs in Modern Art

Joker: What was it about the new DC comic-based film which helped it to win the highest prize at this year's Venice Film Festival? Starring Joaquin Phoenix, it's a dark affair but is it deserving of the plaudits and prizes?
Mary Costello's new novel "The River Capture" is set in rural Ireland where a young woman arrives and changes the life of those she meets
A revival of A Day In The Death Of Joe Egg at London's Trafalgar Studios comes shortly after the death of its author Peter Nichols.
Dublin Murders is an adaptation by Sarah Phelps of the Tana French novels for BBC TV
A new exhibition at London's Barbican Centre - Into the Night: Cabarets and Clubs in Modern Art - spans the 1880s to the 1960s, celebrating the creativity of the spaces in which artists, performers, designers, musicians and writers congregated to push the boundaries of artistic expression.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Alex Preston, Katy Puckrik and Amanda Vickery. The producer is Oliver Jones

Podcast Extras:

Katie: Twenty Thousand Hertz podcast
Alex: The poetry of Mary Oliver
Amanda: Unbelievable on Netflix
Tom: Kara Walker at Tate Modern

Main image: A Day in the Death of Joe Egg
L-R Lucy Eaton, Claire Skinner, Storme Toolis, Patricia Hodge, Toby Stephens, Clarence Smith
Photographer: Marc Brenner


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m00092vd)
Judy Garland: The Final Rainbow

Renée Zellweger introduces a programme exploring Judy Garland's last concerts at London's the Talk of The Town in 1969 - the subject of a new feature film.

Weaving together newly restored archive recordings and eye-witness accounts, we separate the woman from the myth, examine her exceptional talent, exploitation and troubled relationship with Hollywood.

Judy Garland was one of the 20th century's greatest entertainers. A living legend. But in late December 1968, embattled and in poor health, she arrived in London for a five week run at the Talk of The Town in Leicester Square, for £2,500 a week. London was her place of sanctuary, she had performed spectacular comeback concerts in the city in 1951, 1957, 1960 and 1964.

When Renée Zellweger was preparing to play Judy in a new biopic, directed by Rupert Goold, little-heard archive concert recordings and first hand accounts were key to understanding the singer's state of mind during those final performances. Judy Garland died of an accidental overdose in her Chelsea home six months later, aged 47.

Rosalyn Wilder was the young production assistant tasked with getting Judy on stage each night at the Talk of The Town. Looking back now, Rosalyn describes the stress of that responsibility, but she is also deeply sympathetic - it was clear Judy's personal life had spiralled out of control. Michael Hirst, the venue's general manager, also remembers Garland's 5 week engagement for its unpredictability.

For jazz pianist Dave Lee, now 93, his experiences working with Judy couldn't be more different. Starting in 1960, he worked with her over a six year period. The Judy Garland he encountered was bouncy, happy and fun - but with an incredible talent for picking the wrong men.

We also hear from Judy director Rupert Goold, New York composer Johnny Meyer who gave Garland shelter in the summer of 1968, film critic David Benedict, and audio engineer John Haley who has restored many rare Judy Garland recordings.

Produced by Victoria Ferran and Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time (m0007wr7)
Episode 6

Timberlake Wertenbaker’s adaptation from the French of Marcel Proust’s allegorical reflection on time, memory, art and love.

Following a strange and unsettling encounter with the Baron de Charlus, Marcel learns sad news from Swann and receives an invitation to the Princess of Guermantes’ party Later, he returns to Balbec where he bumps into Albertine Simonet and her friends, including Andree.

His affections waver between Albertine and Andree before he makes a decision.

At a soiree organised by Madame Verdurin, Marcel meets the young composer and musician, Morel, whom he recognises as the son of a former servant. Morel is unwilling to acknowledge his past as he pursues his new life as a musician and becomes closer to the influential Baron de Charlus who is a loving supporter, but the tailor, Jupien, may know more about the Baron than Madame Verdurin and her circle.

Cast:
MARCEL (narrator) ………Derek Jacobi
MARCEL ………Blake Ritson
MOTHER ………… Sylvestra le Touzel
FRANCOISE ………Susan Brown
SWANN………. Paterson Joseph
DUCHESS DE GUERMANTES (ORIANE) ……… Fenella Woolgar
MADAME VERDURIN …………Frances Barber
MONSIEUR VERDURIN …………Jeff Rawle
DUC DE GUERMANTES (BASIN) ………… Robert Glenister
BARON DE CHARLUS …………Simon Russell Beale
BRICHOT………… Hugh Ross
DOCTOR COTTARD ..... Lloyd Hutchinson
ALBERTINE ………Hattie Morahan
MOREL …………Tom Glenister
JUPIEN …………Ben Crowe
MANAGER…………Finlay Paul
SANIETTE....……. Roger Watkins
SKI…….. Nicholas Armfield
MADAME DE CAMBREMER ………… Emma Amos
LIFT BOY ………Daniel Whitlam

Translated and adapted from the French by Timberlake Wertenbaker
Produced and directed by Celia de Wolff
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Tombling
Recording and Sound Design: David Chilton and Lucinda Mason Brown
Executive Producer: Peter Hoare

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m00092vg)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0008wpr)
The Morality of Anger

The political pressure cooker is rattling, steaming and whistling. MPs on all sides are venting outrage over the language used by their opponents. It’s like a real-life Twitter. The PM’s chief adviser Dominic Cummings has said the atmosphere in the country will get ever more toxic unless the result of the referendum is delivered. Meanwhile, opposition MPs blame the current fury on what they see as the government’s pig-headed refusal to compromise. Aristotle said: “Those who do not show anger at things that ought to arouse anger are regarded as fools.” Is fierce public rhetoric at a time of political crisis justified or counter-productive? When does the healthy expression of political anger become incitement to riot or murder? Anger is often described as ‘the moral emotion' – the one most likely to affect our behaviour for better or worse. It can be constructive if it’s harnessed to redress an injustice, but what if the fight against the ‘injustice’ is driven by the destructive desire for revenge? Is there a moral distinction between anger expressed in solidarity with the oppressed and anger directed to punishing our enemies? Is it always virtuous to control our anger? George Orwell defined the English character as one of extreme gentleness, “where the bus conductors are good tempered and the policemen carry no revolvers.” Is that national character now changing? Is it too late to recover it? And should we even try?

Guests: Brendan O'Neill, Mark Vernon, Rosie Carter and Thomas Dixon.

Producer: Dan Tierney


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (m0008wtb)
Series 33

Heat 5, 2019

(5/13)
Paul Gambaccini welcomes three amateur music lovers to MediaCityUK in Salford, where their knowledge will be put to the test in the latest heat of the eclectic quiz. Verdi operas, the Halle Orchestra and a big band arrangement of a song by Genesis are just some of the topics that crop up this week. The winner today will win through to the semi-finals later in the series and stand a real chance of lifting the trophy as the 33rd BBC Counterpoint champion.

Taking part today are
Mike Harrington, a retired chemistry teacher from Rochdale
Elainne Lawrie, a solicitor from Chester
Greg Spiller, a retired software engineer from Heaton Mersey in Stockport.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Art of Now (m000765p)
An Orchestra of the Rainforest

The destruction of the rain forest has reached a critical stage – so how can the people who live there grab the attention of the world?

One community, the Wauja, who live in the Xingu reservation in Brazil, had a new idea - music.

Two years ago they invited a young UK composer, Nathaniel Mann, to collaborate with their musician, Akari. The hope was that they would eventually perform with the State Orchestra of Mato Grosso, one of the most exciting in Brazil, and also record a CD that might lead to publicity.

We follow Nathaniel as he gets to know Akari - 6 foot tall, powerfully built, and regularly decorated in dramatic body paint. Akari is also familiar with the world outside the indigenous reservation - he has a flat screen TV in his home, and a mobile phone (albeit rarely with any signal). But the music he performs is surrounded by complex traditional rituals. As Mann learns some of the history of the Wauja music, he also learns about a sacred cave, thousands of years old – The Kamkuwaka Cave - which is under threat.

Every year, the young Wauja are taken on a two day journey to visit the cave, where they are taught their creation myth, but the cave now lies outside the protection of the Xingu reservation, where developers are keen to bury it under a road carrying the spoils of Brazil’s massive agriculture industry.

Mann alerts Factum Arte in Madrid, who in the past have made 3D scans and replicas of such sites as the Egyptian tombs of Seti I, Thutmose III and Tutankhamen, and so the race to save the cave begins.

Presenter: Nathaniel Mann

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Photographs by kind permission of Jean Nunes.

About the presenter: Nathaniel Mann has no doubt of the challenges in this project - one of his former roles was as embedded composer at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford - he is well aware of cultural pitfalls - but this is a wonderful means of accessing a community under threat, and hearing some extraordinary sounds and music. Most recently he received a prestigious grant from the Arts Foundation for young composers, and he has previously appeared on BBC Radio 4 in “A Cape Sound Story”, "Dead Rats and Meat Cleavers" and "The Pigeon Whistles".

With thanks to: Renata Peppl, Irene Guame, Charlie Westgarth, Ferdinand Suamerex Smith, Adam Lowe, British Council Music, PRSF, Factum Foundation, The Arts Foundation. People Palace Projects, Mafalda, Patricia, Aristoteles, Erika, The Wauja Community, the Kuikuro community, the wider Xingu community and Funai.



SUNDAY 06 OCTOBER 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m00092vj)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0008y8l)
Meditations for a New Mother

Three guided meditations for a new mother by award-winning playwright and performer Amy Mason. Her shows include MASS, HOLLERING WOMAN CREEK and THE ISLANDERS and she is the author of a novel, The Other Ida.

‘Tonight we discovered a genius called Amy Mason….Find her. Watch her.’ Dawn O’Porter

Produced by Mair Bosworth


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00092vl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00092vn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00092vq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m00092vs)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m00092vv)
St Giles Church in Ashtead, Surrey

Bells on Sunday comes from St Giles Church in Ashtead, Surrey. There’s a long history of bell ringing at St Giles, which had a ring of six cast in 1725, made from three pre-existing bells. The current ring of eight was cast in 1873. We hear the St Giles Society of Change Ringers with part of a quarter peal of Ashtead Surprise Major.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m00092v8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m00092vx)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (m0002g33)
The Wisdom of Equality

Chair of the London Buddhist Centre Suryagupta Dharmacharini considers what is meant by the concept of equality and how to achieve it. She explores the process of confronting both internal and external biases.

Suryagupta considers her own experience of growing up as an African Caribbean girl in the UK and the sense of inferiority that often accompanied that. She turns to Buddhist teachings in an attempt to counter this state of mind, in favour of creating a more equal and loving experience. However, she remains mindful that religions can sometimes choose to focus solely on individual freedom, rather than taking a wider stance against inequality caused by society’s flaws.

Keeping socially sanctioned inequality in mind, Suryagupta looks back on a recent trip to South Africa. Although apartheid ended 25 years ago, discrimination is still rife. She argues that this disparity means a sense of freedom is absent for both white and black South Africans – armed guards and barbed wire characterising Cape Town’s rich suburbs.

Suryagupta concludes her exploration of equality by considering the importance of reflecting on biases, to actively pursue a freedom that is only reached by finding common humanity. In finding this, she explains, we can achieve a richer, truer experience of humanity.

Presenter: Suryagupta Dharmacharini
Producer: Oliver Seymour
A TBI production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 Living World (m00092vz)
Winter Ladybirds

Its autumn, the leaves are falling, the temperature dropping and as the nights lengthen, this is a time when many animals begin to slow down and prepare for the long winter months ahead. The gardener's friend, the ladybird is one such animal which in late autumn begins to move into many houses as a welcome guest. For this weeks Living World Joanna Pinnock heads to the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology in Oxfordshire where on a windy day, she joins Dr Helen Roy and PhD student Richard Comont to investigate what is happening as ladybirds come indoors.

Beginning inside Helens house Joanna notices ladybirds all around the windows. Ladybirds like pale walls, a reminder of their natural environment, rocky mountains with light coloured surfaces. But recently our native ladybirds have been joined by the harlequin ladybird, a species that is more likely to be seen in the house this year. Why this is the case remains a mystery.

There are over 40 species of ladybird in Britain, with the 7 spot the most familiar. However when they come into their dormant state, parasites and fungi begin to attack the 7 spot and other ladybirds, with the winter months being the time of greatest mortality. But new research is being carried out to see if this parasite is about to begin attacking the harlequin. Richard takes Joanna to see his experimental plots and explain why the ladybirds need a winter dormant state to survive.

Producer : Andrew Dawes


SUN 06:57 Weather (m00092w1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m00092w3)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m00092w5)
Witch Map; LGBT+ Mass; Chibok Girls

An interactive map that tracks more than 3,000 Scots, mostly women, who were accused of being witches in the 16th and 17th Century has been published for the first time. Sunday hears from Professor Julian Goodare from the University of Edinburgh whose research into witchcraft in Scotland was used to build the map.

Catholic Bishop John Arnold explains why his Salford diocese will be holding a mass for LGBT+ Catholics and their family and friends.

On Saturday it will be 2000 days since 270 Nigerian school girls were kidnapped by the militant Islamist group Boko Haram. Oby Ezekwesili, co-founder of Bring Back Our Girls tells William that the world has let down the Chibok girls.

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Rajeev Gupta

Editor
Amanda Hancox


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m00092w7)
FRANK Water

Anita Rani makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of FRANK Water.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘FRANK Water’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘FRANK Water’.

Registered Charity Number: 1121273


SUN 07:57 Weather (m00092w9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m00092wc)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m00092wf)
Essential Existence

The Revd Dr Sam Wells leads a meditation on the nature of what is. "There are two kinds of things: those that abide forever; and those that don’t. The things that abide forever we call essence; the things that last for a shorter period we call existence. We human beings are in the second category. We exist: we think that because we exist we’re the heart of all things. But we forget that existence isn’t all there is." Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields, with St Martin’s Voices directed by Andrew Earis. Organist Ben Giddens. Readings: Colossians 1: 15-20 and John 1: 1-4 and 10-14. Producer: Philip Billson


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0008y97)
The happiest days of your life...

"Childhood really should be the happiest days of our children's lives," writes Michael Morpurgo. "But for so many of them today it is not".

Michael Morpurgo reflects on the damage being caused to increasing numbers of children by stress and anxiety.

He makes an impassioned plea to schools to do much more to alleviate stress.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b09h6x6h)
Mark Cocker on the Short-eared Owl

Despite having a call like an asthmatic dog, for birdwatcher and naturalist Mark Cocker, the flight of a wintering short-eared owl is one of the most beautiful sights you will ever see.

Producer Tim Dee
Photograph Steve Boddy.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m00092wh)
News with Paddy O'Connell including Brexit and mental health plus Helen Mirren on playing Queens. Reviewing the news: former Labour big wig Kezia Dugdale, Sun columnist Jane Moore and restaurateur Henry Dimbleby.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m00092wk)
Writer, Liz John
Director, Gwenda Hughes
Editor, Jeremy Howe

David Archer ….. Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Helen Archer ….. Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ….. Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Justin Elliot ….. Simon Williams
Rex Fairbrother ….. Nick Barber
Eddie Grundy ….. Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Will Grundy ….. Philip Molloy
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Hannah Riley ….. Helen Longworth
Lexi Viktorova ….. Ania Sowinski
Russ Jones ….. Andonis James Anthony
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley
Vince Casey ….. Tony Turner


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m00092wm)
Lin-Manuel Miranda, composer & lyricist

Lin-Manuel Miranda is best known as the composer, lyricist and original star of the multi-award-winning Broadway musical, Hamilton. It won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in Drama, 11 Tony Awards and Grammy for Best Musical Theatre Album. The London production won seven Olivier Awards in 2018.

Lin-Manuel was brought up in New York by his Puerto Rican parents, and his creativity and sensitivity to music began when he was a child: he performed in Gilbert and Sullivan’s Pirates of Penzance as a teenager and created films using his father’s camcorder. He attended the elite Hunter school for gifted children and spent his summer holidays in Puerto Rico with his extended family.

His first musical, In the Heights, opened on Broadway in 2008, directed by his long-time collaborator, Thomas Kail. It received four Tony Awards including Best Score as well as a Grammy Award for its Original Broadway Cast Album. Among his TV and film acting credits are Fosse/Verdon, Curb Your Enthusiasm and Mary Poppins Returns, and he is currently filming the second series of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials for the BBC. He recently collaborated with J.J. Abrams on the song Dobra Doompa, for Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens and he contributed music, lyrics and vocals to several songs in the Disney animated feature film Moana.

Lin-Manuel supported the relief efforts in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria in September 2017, performing Hamilton there and raising funds for arts and culture on the island. He co-founded the hip-hop improv group Freestyle Love Supreme in 2003 and they have just begun a debut run on Broadway.

He lives in New York City with his wife, sons and dog.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m00092wp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (m0008wtt)
Series 14

Episode 1

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Bridget Christie welcome comedian Jessica Fostekew, engineer Dr Shini Somara and TV producer Linda Agran.

This week, the Museum’s Guest Committee donate a slotted screw, Test Match Cricket and a sign telling people to Live, Love, Laugh.

The Museum’s exhibits were catalogued by Mike Shepherd, Mike Turner and Emily Jupitus of QI.

The Producers were Anne Miller and Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m00092wr)
The Return of Zing: How to Get Sour Back into Your Life.

Dan Saladino explores the taste and temptations of sourness, from our evolution to the way we cook and eat. A story of puckering pickles, science, fermentation and edible ants.

It's only in recent times that we have understood how and why we experience the sensation of sourness. The leader in the field is EMILY LIMAN, Professor of Biological Sciences at University of Southern California in the USA. She explains the recent discoveries about what happens when we put something sour in our mouths.

Forager Miles Irving takes Dan on a wild walk through a field in Kent in search of sources of sourness from insects to red berries.

Chinese food expert Fuchsia Dunlop whose new book Sichuan Cookery, focuses on the food of southern provinces explains the role of pickles and vinegars.

In the studio Mark Diacano gives a guide to bringing more sour back into your life with lessons in piccalilli making and a beginners guide to kombucha.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m00092wt)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m00092ww)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Evidently Art (m0007bk3)
There's a growing movement of artists engaging in making investigative art. These artworks use evidence and forensic testing to challenge our understanding of murders, scandals, and financial skulduggery.

The artists’ work focuses on revealing how economic, political, legal, linguistic, and cultural structures can be manipulated to benefit corporations, government agencies and law enforcement departments.

Forensic Architecture is based in Goldsmiths, University of London, and is a Turner Prize shortlisted, multi-disciplinary research group. They have been investigating the notorious murder of Halit Yozgat in Kassel, Germany. Using forensic tests based on witness statements they aimed to prove that a Secret Service agent who was in the internet cafe around the time of the murder, and who claimed that he did not witness it, may have committed perjury. 

Forensic Architecture’s tests attempted to prove whether or not the agent could have heard or seen the crime, or even smelt the gunpowder, presenting this evidence partly through a video at an art exhibition and later within the court case itself.

The realm of truth seeking has opened up, it is no longer solely the domain of institutions and states. Citizen journalism and the digital age has created a new army of investigators. While this can be dangerous when it adds to the proliferation of fake news, rigorously researched and clearly presented evidence is also emerging. Artists are using their skills for commanding a public through gallery spaces - translating complicated evidence, simply and in a visually arresting way, generating debates.

Can the way artists encode and present data inspire new investigative practices in detective work or journalism? Possibly - but considering works of art as evidence within a court case, however factually based they are, remains a challenge. The accused tend to use their association with the art world to delegitimise the hard facts and scientific tests they present.

Even so, this isn't always enough to prevent these complex art installations being accepted as new forms of evidence. Evidently Art shows that works of investigative art are making a real impact on the outcome of court cases, and pioneering new forms of visual evidence.

Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Executive Producers: Sarah Cuddon, Nick Romero
Written and Produced by Louise Morris

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0008y8j)
King's Cross Skip Garden

Kathy Clugston and the panel are in London at the King's Cross Skip Garden. James Wong, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank answer the audience's questions.

This week, the panellists help a novice gardener with what to plant on her balcony, discuss how to improve clay soil, and consider what you can grow on a yacht.

James Wong visits the Story Garden and discovers "the garden of a thousand hands". Jane Riddiford, the founding director of Global Generation, and Kiloran Benn O'Leary, the Story Garden Manager, show James around.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m00092wy)
Sunday Omnibus - Defined by Place

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen - with three conversations about how place defines us in so many different ways.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Drama (b0b6bzhc)
Wild Honey

Episode 1

David Tennant stars in Michael Frayn's brilliant adaptation of the riotous Chekhov comedy.

When Wild Honey was first produced at the National in 1984, Ian McKellan played Platonov at exactly the same age as David Tennant is now. It's a rumbustious cornucopia of characters and themes covering sexual comedy, morality, melodramatics, the state of contemporary Russia and a hint of tragedy.

The play was famously discovered in a bank vault in 1920, sixteen years after Chekhov's death - with the title page of the play missing, leading to its rather varied history of titles. The original piece was nearly six hours long and Michael Frayn has done a masterful job of turning the work into something quintessentially Checkhovian. Most critics agree that if it shows examples of Chekhov's juvenilia - it also shows clear displays of what a genius he was to become.

Platonov himself is half Hamlet, half Benedict. A sharp and witty tongue - but somehow incapable of decision. Comedic with an underpinning of the tragic.

"I love everyone - and everyone loves me. I insult them, I treat them abominably - and they love me just the same!"

Village schoolmaster Platonov has it all - wit, intelligence, a comfortable and respectable life in provincial Russia, and the attentions of four beautiful women - one of whom is his devoted wife. As summer arrives and the seasonal festivities commence, the rapidly intensifying heat makes everyone giddy with sunlight, vodka and passion.

Platonov - What's going to become of us all?
Anna - You seem just a tiny bit less married
Platonov - How are we going to survive our lives?
Anna - First of all by enjoying the fireworks.

And fireworks is what follows.....

Adapted by Michael Frayn

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (m00092x0)
Colson Whitehead - The Underground Railroad

Colson Whitehead talks about his novel The Underground Railroad with James Naughtie and readers

The novel is a devastating and imaginative account of a young slave's bid for freedom from a brutal Georgian plantation in the American South. All the slaves lead a hellish existence, but Cora has it worse than most; she is an outcast among the slaves and as she approaches womanhood is at greater risk of abuse from the owners. When Caesar, a slave recently arrived from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to escape to the North

Colson Whitehead explains how the history of the Underground Railroad is taught in American schools, although it's a metaphor for the escape networks that ran in the antebellum South, as a child he understood it was real. so in the novel the idea assumes a physical form: a dilapidated boxcar pulled along subterranean tracks by a steam locomotive, picking up fugitives wherever it can

At each stop on her journey, Cora encounters a different world, where she must overcome obstacles as she makes her way to true freedom; reflecting, Colson says, the epic journeys from Homer and also Gulliver's Travels.

And as Colson Whitehead recreates the unique terrors for black people in the pre-Civil War era, the novel weaves the saga of America, from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day

The Underground Railroad won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, a place on Obama’s summer reading list, and was included in Oprah's book club.

To take part in future Bookclubs email bookclub@bbc.co.uk

Presenter : James Naughtie
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

November's Bookclub Choice : Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen Fielding (1996)


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (m00092x2)
Owen Sheers

The Welsh poet Owen Sheers is Roger McGough's guest choosing some of his favourite poems. He has chosen work with an ecological theme, pieces which reflect his concern for the environment. Poems include The Horses by Edwin Muir, The Peace of Wild Things by Wendell Berry and a new poem by Poet Laureate Simon Armitage.

Producer: Maggie Ayre


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0008y55)
Families versus the state: An unfair fight?

Julie Montacute-Carter (pictured left) was found drowned in a lake after suffering from depression for many years. But when it came to the inquest into her death it fell to her daughter Becky Montacute to represent the family at the start of the inquest process - and then find and fund a lawyer herself. All because the family could not get Legal Aid. The mental health trust responsible for Julie's care however was able to spend tens of thousands of pounds in legal representation. Critics call this an 'inequality of arms' and there are concerns vital lessons aren't being learned because many families can't afford to pay for legal representation to challenge state bodies like the NHS, the police and the prison service.

Reporter: Hayley Hassall
Producer: Mick Tucker
Development Producer: Oliver Newlan
Editor: Carl Johnston


SUN 17:40 Profile (m00092v8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00092x4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m00092x6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00092x8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m00092xb)
Kate Fox

We go over the rainbow with Judy Garland in her toughest times and fly with the imagination of childish superheroes and the poem of pigeons. There’s beat boxing, bee waggling and trouser-less dreams.

How real and fictional people talk and don’t talk about everything from death to twitching and babies are recurring themes, alongside the art and song of the moon, and the cultural legacy of Muslim Spain, plus there's verse and chapter on the idea of home.

Producer: Cecile Wright


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m00092xd)
Ian’s concerns come to the forefront and Elizabeth has a brainwave.


SUN 19:15 Stand-Up Specials (m00092xg)
Ashley Blaker's Goyish Guide to Judaism - 2

Ashley Blaker, Britain's only ultra-Orthodox stand up comedian, returns with an insider's view of his religion. Following the success of his first guide, this is another a whistle-stop tour of Jewish life and, in particular, a very rare glimpse into the normally inaccessible world of strict Orthodox Judaism.

Ashley is already a well-known name in the Jewish community, having undertaken a number of critically acclaimed UK tours as well as performing sell-out shows in Israel, South Africa, Canada and very recently in New York. The Jewish press has described him as "the haredi Michael McIntyre".

As well as being a popular and experienced live performer, Ashley is also a comedy writer and producer for radio and TV. He was responsible for unleashing Little Britain on an unsuspecting nation on Radio 4. But, being a strict orthodox Jew, he is surely the only person who works in TV without actually owning one.

The Jerusalem Post recently described Ashley as "a walking contradiction".

The Times of Israel pointed out the astonishment his appearance can provoke: "The astonishment, of course, is that with Blaker, what you see is what you get: a skinny bearded man wearing a black suit and kippah, and sporting peyot and tzitzit of the strictly Orthodox community to which he now belongs. But this is not a uniform which he dons only for his interfaces with Jewish audiences. No, he wears this in his day job too."

Written and Presented by Ashley Blaker
Special appearance: Jon Culshaw as Jeremy Corbyn
Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Stillicide (m00092xj)
Episode 9: Sound

James Cosmo continues Cynan Jones' powerful series set in the tangible near future - a future a little, but not quite like our own.

Water is commodified and the Water Train that feeds the city is increasingly at risk of sabotage. And now ice bergs are set to be towed to a huge ice dock outside the capital city.

Today: out in frozen waters, a group of men in small boats are on the hunt ....

Reader: James Cosmo
Writer: Cynan Jones
Producer: Justine Willett
Music: Original music by Kirsten Morrison


SUN 20:00 More or Less (m0008y8q)
New hospitals promised, Aid to Ukraine, Bacon sandwiches

Dissecting the government’s hospitals announcement, President Trump’s Ukraine claims, and mixed messages about eating processed meat.

Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, has announced a plan to build 40 new hospitals in England – echoed by Boris Johnson in his conference speech this week. But media reports have been confused. How much will it all cost and when will these hospitals be built?

Amidst the impeachment controversy in the US, President Trump and the EU have been trading claims about who gives most to Ukraine, the country at the centre of the scandal. We weigh in.

And bacon sandwich-lovers have been left befuddled by a new report that suggests it’s okay to eat them after all. We explore the conflicting advice and find a philosophical answer.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Simon Maybin
Editor: Richard Vadon


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0008y8n)
Jessye Norman, Peter Sissons, Al Alvarez, Marita Lorenz

Pictured: Jessye Norman

Julian Worricker on:

The multiple award-winning American soprano, Jessye Norman, whose performances wowed audiences around the world....

Peter Sissons, the acclaimed television journalist, who moved from ITN to the BBC to present Question Time and the main evening news....

The author, Al Alvarez, poetry editor of the Observer newspaper, and renowned poker player....

And Marita Lorenz, who survived Bergen-Belsen as a child, and went on to become a spy involved in a near-assassination of Fidel Castro....

Interviewed guest: Sir Clive Gillinson CBE
Interviewed guest: Norman Lebrecht
Interviewed guest: Iain Dale
Interviewed guest: Alexandra Pringle
Interviewed guest: Michael Carlson

Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: International Profile, Radio 4 29/07/1988; Jessye Norman Interview, Radio 3 06/08/2000; CD Review, Radio 3 23/08/2014; ITN News 21/11/84; Question Time, BBC One 09/12/1993; BBC News, BBC One 30/03/2002; Desert Island Discs, Radio 4 19/03/2000; The World Of Books, Radio 4 25/05/1978; Timewatch, BBC Two 07/10/1992; Geraldo Rivera interviews Marita Lorenz, 23 Sep 2013; Archive Hour: Something Is Terribly Wrong, Radio 4 22/11/2003.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m00092tk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m00092w7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0008wv1)
Whiteness

For many white people their race is not part of their identity. Race, racial inequality and racism are things that people of colour are expected to talk about and organise around. Not anymore.

Anti-racist activists and academics are now urging white people to recognise that they are just as racialised as minorities. The way to successfully tackle structural racism, they say, is to get white people to start taking responsibility for the racially unjust status quo.

Bristol-based journalist Neil Maggs, who is white, takes a deep dive into the canon of books, Instagram challenges and workshops that seek to educate people like him on their white privilege and internalised white supremacy. He gets advice from anti-racism trainer Robin DiAngelo, learns about the growing field of whiteness studies in the UK, and visits the white working class estate of Hartcliffe to see how these ideas play out there.

He also talks to Eric Kaufmann about the inevitable decline of white majorities by the end of the century and how to prevent white people falling for far-right conspiracy theories about being wiped out.

Presenter: Neil Maggs
Producer: Lucy Proctor


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m00092xm)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m0008wlp)
Walter Murch on Apocalypse Now

With Antonia Quirke

Editor Walter Murch takes Antonia on a journey to the heart of Apocalypse Now

Linda Grant pitches a memoir about the Beat Generation as a a suitable case for the movie treatment. Industry insiders Clare Binns, Lizzie Francke and Rowan Woods deliver their verdict in another edition of Pitch Battle


SUN 23:30 Hearing Homelessness (m0007bjl)
Hugh Huddy meets people who are street homeless in Cardiff and experiences with them what they hear at night and what it means to them.

In 3D sound, we hear the auditory environment at night from a homeless person's perspective: the relentless, monotonous backdrop of traffic noise, the sense of threat and chaos as revellers pass by, the relief of hearing the first train of the day and the dawn chorus break as you’ve made it through another night.

Hugh is a sound artist who lost his sight in his twenties and uses sounds to navigate the world and map out a picture in his mind of what is around him. He extrapolates the layers of a soundscape and interprets its depths.

The programme is made using binaural recording, which allows the listener to hear the world through someone else’s ears, as though the sound is coming from beyond their head. They're placed in a location through sound, and through this immersion they come away with a very personal understanding of what life is like for someone living a very different life to them, right under their nose.



MONDAY 07 OCTOBER 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m00092xp)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m0008wpf)
Land and territory

Land Struggles: From Bolivia to Britain, the way that land is owned and controlled is central to many contemporary inequalities and political battles. Laurie Taylor talks to Brett Christophers, Professor in the Department of Social and Economic Geography at Uppsala University, Sweden, about ‘the new enclosure’, a UK study into the appropriation of public land by the private sector – an astonishing two million hectares worth £400 billion – in recent decades. This ownership now forms the largest component of wealth in Britain and is the largest privatisation of a public resource in European history. Also, Penelope Anthias, Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at University of Durham, describes the lives of indigenous people in Bolivia as they struggle to regain ancestral territory after a century of colonialism and state backed dispossession.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m00092vv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00092xr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00092xt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00092xw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m00092xy)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00092y0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with writer and blogger on mental health issues and faith, Emma Scrivener.

Good Morning

Research from the national charity Mind, says that one in four people in the UK will have a mental health illness at some point. I’m one of these statistics; which means that I often have to rely on others. This is far from easy. I never want to be a burden and I feel terrible when others have to step in. Yet St Paul encourages members of the Galatian church both to be carried and to carry other people. He writes, “Carry each other’s burdens and in this way you will fulfil the law of Christ,” God has made us to depend upon one another. That’s the shape of loving community.

When Jesus told the story of the Good Samaritan he gave his hearers a powerful image of carrying and being carried. In this classic parable, a traveller is beaten, stripped of his clothing and robbed. First a priest and then a teacher of the law, pass him by. Finally a Samaritan appears. Jews and Samaritans were enemies, but the Good Samaritan “came to where the traveller was, saw him and had compassion on him”. The despised Samaritan shows what it is to love – he does this by drawing near (instead of walking past); by seeing pain (instead of closing his eyes to it), and by showing compassion (instead of withdrawing).

Like the injured man in this story, we rely on the kindness of a God who carries our burdens. Only then are we called to “go and do likewise”, in his strength.

Lord Jesus, thank you for being our Good Samaritan. Please give us the courage to ask for help when we’re struggling and help us to carry others in your strength.

Amen.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m00092y2)
UK wine, Dartmoor ponies, Farming protestors

Farming Today can exclusively reveal a new type of grape which experts say could be 'game changing’ for the UK wine industry. Charlotte hears from the scientist who is behind this new variety. This year 21 Dartmoor ponies have died and there have been 140 accidents involving the animals. Local school children have been helping wildlife officers get a safety message across to drivers by designing a poster which is going on display across the moor. And Charlotte asks a Welsh farmer why he and others have spent the weekend driving a pink tractor to London.

Presented by Charlotte Smith

Produced by Alun Beach.


MON 05:56 Weather (m00092y4)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09k0p9b)
Doug Allan on the Emperor Penguin

In the first of five recollections about his encounters with birds in Antarctica, wildlife cameraman Doug Allan recalls hearing a Emperor Penguin chick for the first time.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Christopher Michel.


MON 06:00 Today (m000935n)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000935s)
Lenny Henry

Lenny Henry was 16 when he first appeared on television making people laugh in the 1970s. He tells Kirsty Wark about coming of age in the spotlight at a time of casual chauvinism and blatant racism, all while under his Jamaican mother’s strict instruction to integrate.

The novelist Tessa McWatt knows only too well the complexity of fitting in. Born in Guyana, raised in Canada and working in Britain, McWatt explores themes of the outsider in society and conflicting ideas of belonging.

The writer and former sportsman Matthew Syed encourages breaking free of the echo chambers that surround us, to develop an ‘outsider mindset’. Cognitive diversity, he argues in his latest book, is the answer to many of the world’s most challenging problems.

And the social psychologist Keon West explains the research being done to reduce bias between different groups of people. He argues that mandatory unconscious bias training is not only pointless - but possibly detrimental.

Producer: Katy Hickman

Picture credit: © ITV / Rex / Shutterstock


MON 09:45 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m000935x)
Episode 1

Bill Bryson reads from his fascinating, witty and often surprising journey around the human body. He begins with possibly our most mysterious organ, the brain.

The award-winning author of A Short History of Nearly Everything and the bestselling Notes from a Small Island has for decades entertained and educated readers on both sides of the Atlantic, and around the world.

The Body: A Guide for Occupants confirms Bryson as a true polymath. In it, he answers questions such as how much would it cost to make a human and why our faces have evolved their peculiar shape, as well as exploring the mysteries that continue to elude scientists today.

Read by Bill Bryson
Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Ciaran Bermingham


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0009361)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 The Citadel (m0009365)
Series 6

Episode 1

The Citadel written by Christopher Reason. Based on the novel by A J Cronin.
Ep 1. Return of the medical drama set in the 1920s before the NHS. Dr Andrew Manson and his wife Christine are expecting a big event.

MANSON....... George Blagden
DENNY...... Julian Lewis Jones
CHRISTINE.... Catrin Stewart
ANGHARAD... Jeanette Percival
Director Gary Brown
Producers Pauline Harris and Gary Brown


MON 11:00 David Cannadine: On Crossing the Religious Divide (m0007479)
Whether it's accounts of pagans and Christians, Christians and Muslims or Catholics and Protestants, history has been efficient in relating the details of religious wars, conflicts and periods of intolerance. Professor David Cannadine argues that, dangerously, these accounts omit peaceful times and assume erroneously that religious identity is solely dominant in people's lives.

Sampling periods from the Roman Empire through medieval Spain and Reformation Europe to the Northern Ireland of our own times, he suggests that people's lives and nations are not divided by religion in the ways that history may imply.

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m00092v6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000936c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Confession (m000936j)
Episode One

The new novel by Jessie Burton, the bestselling author of The Miniaturist and The Muse.

Rose Simmons is adrift in her mid-thirties and still trying to decide what to do with her life. Her own mother disappeared when she was a baby and she's never known the truth of what happened to her.

When she learns that the last person to see her was Constance Holden, a reclusive novelist who withdrew from public life at the peak of her fame, Rose is drawn to the door of Connie's imposing house in search of a confession . . .

Read by Rachel Shelley and Katherine Press
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Mair Bosworth

Photo Credit: Lara Downie


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000936n)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (m000936s)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m000936x)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 The Art of Innovation (m0009371)
Art as Protest

Sir Ian Blatchford, Director of the Science Museum Group, and the Science Museum’s Head of Collections, Dr Tilly Blyth, continue their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other from the Enlightenment to dark matter.

They focus on the anarchic and furious response to the devastation and trauma of the First World War by the 20th century’s most extreme art movement - Dada. It used noise, cut ups and chaos to feign the irrational and repudiate mechanised warfare.

As Ian reveals, the outrage at the senseless slaughter led many Dadaists to opt for violent and fragmented depictions of a mechanised society, expressed potently in the work of Berlin based Dadaist Otto Dix. His Card Players in which disfigured war veterans have their limbs replaced with contorted versions of prosthetic limbs, amounts to one of the most significant anti-war works by a German artist.

With an urgent need to turn around the ailing post war German economy, new efficient instruments of work for the many physically injured war veterans became a priority. As artificial limbs held in the Science Museum Group’s collection reveal, new multifunctional arms and legs literally plugged a worker into his work station like a semi optimised new part, leading many to question whether technological advance was a confinement, or a truly liberating force.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Photograph (C) Scottish National Gallery


MON 14:00 The Archers (m00092xd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b098jrzw)
One Horizon

By Jeremy Hylton Davies.

Gwyn and Paul take on the epic Marathon des Sables - 150 miles across the Moroccan Sahara. Starring Mark Lewis Jones and Richard Harrington.

Gwyn's life was in in pieces until he met Paul. Paul invited him to do something he hadn't done for years - run. And, from that first time around the park, throwing up and thinking he'd never go further, Gwyn slowly began to overcome his demons. Now he's reached the hardest race of them all... 150 miles across the Sahara, in scorching temperatures. But the greatest challenge in the desert... is himself

Jeremy Hylton Davies is a regular writer on BBC One's Doctors. One Horizon is his first play for radio. In it he draws heavily on the experience of its stars - real-life ultra-marathon runners, Mark Lewis Jones (Game of Thrones) and Richard Harrington (Hinterland). Together they ran in the Marathon des Sables themselves in 2014.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (m0009375)
Series 33

Heat 6, 2019

(6/13)
Who wrote the libretto for Mozart's The Magic Flute? And who wrote the lyrics for Fats Waller's songs Ain't Misbehavin' and Honeysuckle Rose?

If our competitors today know the answers to these questions they'll be off to a good start in the latest contest to find the musical mastermind of 2019. Today's sixth heat comes from the Radio Theatre in central London, and a place in the semi-finals awaits the winner. Paul Gambaccini asks the questions, and they include specialist questions on a musical topic which the contenders will have to choose on the spot, with no prior warning and no chance to bone up.

Taking part today are
Paul Holmes, a design consultancy director from Exeter
Roseanne Jardine, a teacher from Lyme Regis in Dorset
Stephen Smith, a clinical psychologist from Eastleigh in Hampshire.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m00092wr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 I Was... (m000937c)
I Was Stanley Kubrick's Assistant

Anthony Frewin worked closely with Stanley Kubrick for many years as his assistant. He found himself charged with a number of duties, two of which were tracking down somebody impersonating the legendary director.
 
As Kubrick's unofficial sleuth, he outed two impersonators - one who even managed to get money from producers for a movie about Kubrick.

Anthony later wrote a script about the story which turned into a movie starring John Malkovich, entitled Colour Me Kubrick, which was never released in the UK.

Another Kubrick pretender convinced two TV Times reporters that he was Kubrick, and gave them an interview. The magazine printed the interview in good faith, thinking it was the director. Anthony intercepted both and, after Kubrick's death, went on to become a successful novelist and wrote the screenplay for the 2017 film Anthropoid about a wartime underground plot to kill a senior Nazi.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Produced by Nick Romero

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m000937h)
Series 20

Anniversary of the Periodic Table

The Periodic Table

How well do you know your Fe from your Cu, and what the heck is Np?? Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by comedian Katy Brand, Prof Polly Arnold and Prof Andrea Sella to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Dmitri Mendeleev's great achievement. They find out how scientists first realised that the elements that form the ingredients that make up our planet , are able to be organised in such a logical and ordered way, and whether its still a useful tool today. They also discover why one of the guests has been called the Free Solo equivalent of chemists because of the skill and danger involved in their work.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem


MON 17:00 PM (m000937m)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000937r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (m000937w)
Series 14

Episode 2

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Bridget Christie welcome comedian Sarah Kendall, botanist James Wong and bioscience entrepreneur Sir Chris Evans.

This week, the Museum’s Guest Committee donate a ship in a bottle, a terrarium and a cabbage.

The Museum’s exhibits were catalogued by Mike Shepherd, Mike Turner and Emily Jupitus of QI.

The Producers were Anne Miller and Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (m000936y)
Emma is on a mission and Toby has a delicate question to ask


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0009380)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 The Citadel (m0009365)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Shappi Khorsandi Gets Organised (m0009384)
Shappi Khorsandi’s life is disorganised. A single mother of two and a stand-up comedian and writer, Shappi is busy. She doesn’t know what money is coming into or out of her account, her love of charity shopping is getting out of control, her prized family photographs are shoved in a box in the back of the wardrobe, and the clutter is overwhelming. She's tried the famous Marie Kondo method of tidying up, but it hasn't helped a bit. She hates being disorganised. She wants to do something about it!

Should Shappi just learn to embrace the chaos? Or can professional help put her life in order?

Produced by Amy Wheel for BBC Cymru Wales


MON 20:30 Analysis (m0009388)
The Problem with Boys

The data is indisputable: in developed countries boys now lag behind girls in several significant areas of education.

For years, women lagged behind men in educational attainment. More boys went to university, and twice as many men as women got degrees in 1960. Forty years later and, fifty seven percent of university students are women. By almost any measure of school related performance girls are doing better than boys.

Everyone agrees there is a problem but there is little consensus over what is causing it. Are boys doing worse or girls doing better? Is the education system biased against boys? Are boys just wired differently when it comes to learning?

The roots of the new gender gap are complex and nuanced, but if we can't agree on what's causing it, how can we solve it? In the meantime more and more boys will fall behind.

In this Analysis on The Problem with Boys, BBC journalist and father of three boys, David Grossman, looks at the evidence and tries to find a way forward.

Producer: Gemma Newby
Editor: Jasper Corbett


MON 21:00 Degrees of Love (m0008y48)
On the eve of packing for university, 18-year-old Anoushka talks to fellow students and parents about whether it's best to leave long-term lovers behind, or to try to weave them into the fabric of a new start on campus?

As Fresher’s Week kicks off across the country, Anoushka and her friends talk at length about how difficult it might be to keep relationships from their schooldays going once they begin at Uni. It's a difficult decision, especially when parents and even university officials are offering contradictory advice! She's sceptical that school romances can last, but some of those she’s closest to are adamant they can navigate the pitfalls of being on different campuses and will stay together throughout.

Anoushka's parents are keen for her to throw herself into her new opportunities without worrying about a boyfriend. Some of her friends are guided by parents who themselves weathered college separation and believe it's possible to make anything work if you work at it! An online search points her towards older students keen to help others making the difficult decisions they once grappled with. There’s information on everything, from dealing with fears about cheating lovers to how often you should meet up to keep romance alive!

It’s an issue being played out in homes across the country as difficult decisions are made by new students. On the eve of transmission Anoushka will be starting in Manchester and preparing for the fun to come. It’s a journey Anna Michaux has already made, and when she did she and her boyfriend in London committed to staying together. They managed to do just that for the first two years and she tells Anoushka that far from giving up on new opportunities, the experience helped her appreciate university much more.

“If you can live apart for up to three years, that’s pretty impressive. It shows that you can trust each other and that you care enough about the person to take five-hour coaches every month. If that isn’t love, I don’t know what is!” And Anna isn’t sad that she gave up a lot to try and make things work: “It’s a strange situation when you start at college and there’s this focus on young people and being at Uni with lots of partners. That wasn’t ever part of why I went and I never felt like I was missing out.”


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000935s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000938g)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Confession (m000936j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Have You Heard George's Podcast? (p07mk8gp)
Have You Heard George's Podcast?

2. Popcorn

George explores the roles of family and formal education in the lives of marginalised young people. With more elaborate scene-setting, his lyrical stream of consciousness flows over a soundscape that is increasingly cinematic and journalistic. The Poet argues that inner city music acts as a pressure valve for voiceless young people who face systemic disadvantage. Expanding on the points of the previous episode, he advocates for youth having space to "speak their truth," and for listeners to take consideration of the problematic realities behind this art.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000987h)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 08 OCTOBER 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000938l)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m000935x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000938q)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000938v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000938z)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0009393)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0009397)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with writer and blogger on mental health issues and faith, Emma Scrivener.

Good morning.

I recently read a newspaper article claiming that three in four mental illnesses start in childhood . This was my experience. I was just thirteen when I developed anorexia; and it almost killed me. Recovery has been a long process, but it started when I realised that I didn’t need to be perfect. Instead, I can come to God, exactly as I am.

As with many other mental health conditions, it’s often a case of two steps forward and one step back. My illness was so serious that there was doubt I would ever recover – let alone have children of my own. My faith has been central to the progress I’ve made but it’s far from a quick fix. I’ve had to learn the truth reflected in the words of my favourite hymn, by Charlotte Elliot. Perhaps you know it:

"Just as I am, though tossed about
with many a conflict, many a doubt,
fightings within and fears without,
O Lamb of God, I come".

My life today is so much better than it might have been – but I’m far from fixed. I still know fightings within and fear without; but I don’t have carry them alone. The hymn describes Jesus as the Lamb of God because, as the great sacrifice, he takes on all our sicknesses and infirmities. I’m a work in progress, but in my weakness, I can come to Him.

Lord God, thank you that we can come to you, just as we are. Please give us courage and strength for whatever battles we may face. In the name of Jesus.

Amen.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000939b)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09k6gl1)
Doug Allan on the Snow Petrel

In the second of five recollections about his encounters with birds in Antarctica, wildlife cameraman Doug Allan recalls ringing Snow Petrels with mixed feelings.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Doug Allan.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0009359)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m000935c)
Anne Magurran on how to measure biodiversity

Anne Magurran started her career as an ecologist counting moths in an ancient woodland in northern Ireland in the 1970s, when the study of biological diversity was a very young science. Later she studied piranas in a flooded forest in the Amazon. Turning descriptions of the natural world into meaningful statistics is a challenge and Anne has pioneered the measurement of bio-diversity. It’s like an optical illusion, she says. The more you think about bio-diversity the more difficult it is to define. After a bout of meningitis in 2007, she set up BioTime, a global open access database to monitor changes in bio-diversity over time and is concerned about ‘the shopping mall effect’. Just as high streets are losing their distinctive shops and becoming dominated by the same chain stores, so biological communities in different parts of the world that once looked very different are now starting to look the same.


TUE 09:30 One to One (m00095bq)
Benjamin Zephaniah meets Terri Clothier

Terri Clothier discusses how her husband’s fertility problems affected her and their relationship. When Terri married Richard (who we heard from in the previous programme ) she knew she wanted a family. They both did. Terri imagined life with two children. But this hasn’t happened. They were unaware that Richard had a fertility problem. Whilst friends and family were starting their own families Richard and Terri felt alone and isolated. A feeling they describe as grieving. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Support Organisations

Fertility Network UK offers information, advice and support for anyone suffering from infertility related problems.
http://fertilitynetworkuk.org

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority is the UK's independent regulator overseeing the use of gametes and embryos in fertility treatment and research. The website offers details of licensed fertility clinics across the UK.
www.hfea.gov.uk

NHS Fertility
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/infertility/causes/


TUE 09:45 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m000935f)
Episode 2

Bill Bryson reads from his fascinating, witty and often surprising journey around the human body. Today, he looks at the head and the reason for our facial expressions.

The award-winning author of A Short History of Nearly Everything and the bestselling Notes from a Small Island has for decades entertained and educated readers on both sides of the Atlantic, and around the world.

The Body: A Guide for Occupants confirms Bryson as a true polymath. In it, he answers questions such as how much would it cost to make a human and why our faces have evolved their peculiar shape, as well as exploring the mysteries that continue to elude scientists today.

Read by Bill Bryson
Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Ciaran Bermingham


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000935j)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 The Citadel (m000935m)
Series 6

Episode 2

The Citadel by Christopher Reason based on the novel by A J Cronin
Ep 2. Christine is ill. Manson and Denny are very concerned

MANSON .....George Blagden
DENNY..... Julian Lewis Jones
CHRISTINE.... Catrin Stewart
CERYS..... Jeanette Percival
Director Gary Brown
Producers Pauline Harris and Gary Brown


TUE 11:00 Leaks, Tweets and Modern Diplomacy (m000935w)
Was the recent resignation of Britain's ambassador to Washington a sign that traditional diplomacy has had its day?

BBC Diplomatic Correspondent James Landale goes behind the curtain of a secret world to discover what skills and abilities today's diplomats need to survive. He learns how they deal with the revolutions in knowledge, politics and security that now make their jobs harder than ever.

In the age of global mass communication and the exposure of countless state secrets, how do diplomats do their job? Their work has always relied on special access to hidden corners but suddenly in an age when Presidents can message each other directly on WhatsApp and Tweet their thoughts direct to millions, what value do the armies of discreet and subtle emissaries really bring to the perilous business of international rivalry and conflict, peace-building and trade?

Former Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt leads a cast of senior political and diplomatic figures who explain to James how they've wrestled with the tensions engulfing diplomacy today. They reveal how they try to meet the challenges of social media, data breaches, info hacks and instant global communication.

Presenter: James Landale
Producer: Jonathan Brunert


TUE 11:30 Mary Portas: On Style (m0009360)
Episode 4

A four-part series on style with Mary Portas.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0009364)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Confession (m0009368)
Episode Two

The new novel by Jessie Burton, the bestselling author of The Miniaturist and The Muse.

Rose Simmons is adrift in her mid-thirties and still trying to decide what to do with her life. Her own mother disappeared when she was a baby and she's never known the truth of what happened to her.

When she learns that the last person to see her was Constance Holden, a reclusive novelist who withdrew from public life at the peak of her fame, Rose is drawn to the door of Connie's imposing house in search of a confession...

Read by Rachel Shelley and Katherine Press
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Mair Bosworth

Photo Credit: Lara Downie


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000936g)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000936k)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000936p)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 The Art of Innovation (m000936t)
Humans in the Industrial Machine

Sir Ian Blatchford and Dr Tilly Blyth continue their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other, focussing on anxieties of production control in the industrial age.

LS Lowry’s A Manufacturing Town, along with his many other Lowryscapes, are famously ambiguous in his desire to put the Manchester industrial scene on the map. But the repetition, routine and the gaze of the factory clock is hard to escape.

Tilly examines an early 19th century attempt at production control – the Park Green silk mill clock, one of whose two clock dials dictated the worker’s working hours by being directly tied to the line shaft of the mill’s water wheel – offering relentless, structured repetitive control, much as Lowry’s painting reflects.

But rather than pressing workers from behind, could industrial efficiency be improved by easing difficulties which might confront them? Tilly examines the impact of early psychological recruitment tests that were gaining traction at the time Lowry began his famous Lowryscapes. The tests may have acknowledged that humans weren’t machines, but the ultimate goal was improved productivity.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Photograph (C) The Science Museum Group


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000936y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b0939gly)
A Question of Judgement

A school on a council estate has been devastated by a gas explosion. The announcement that retired judge Sir Stephen Colefax is to chair the ensuing public inquiry is greeted with anger and dismay. Can a man from his privileged background have any true understanding of the community so tragically affected? By Ryan Craig.

Directed by Peter Kavanagh.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00092tc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m0009372)
Carbon Free Islands

Orkney's strong winds and powerful tides have attracted renewable energy pioneers for decades. For much of the year the islands produce more energy than they can use. Turbines are shut down and green energy goes to waste. The UK government has spotted an opportunity, funding the REFLEX project which aims to use that excess energy to develop new ways to power a community.

Tom Heap visits Orkney to see how hydrogen storage, huge batteries and electric ferries and cars can be lashed together with clever software to remove fossil fuels from an entire energy system.

Producer: Alasdair Cross


TUE 16:00 Out of Office (m0003zyk)
Episode 2

Ruth Barnes continues her series exploring the changing world of work.

Not only is the nature of work changing, so too are the places where work is done. The traditional office is increasingly giving way to co-working spaces. All over the country, these new short term, flexible spaces are gaining ground. They are often decorated in a modern style without the dreary partitions and grey photocopiers associated with the traditional office, and offer a whole lifestyle - not just healthy food in on-site cafes, but yoga and free prosecco, classes for personal and professional improvement, even a summer camp.

But what's the cost?

The alternative, working from home, has its downsides too, as Ruth discovers. People can feel lonely and undervalued.

For some, such as social and health workers, the move is to "agile working", which often means there's no office at all - just work from the car.

We may hate the office - its appearance and its associated culture - but has it yet been bettered?

Producers: Susan Marling and Elizabeth Burke
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m0009376)
Edith Bowman and Harry Baker

Edith Bowman, DJ and radio presenter joins poet Harry Baker to talk about the books they love with presenter Harriett Gilbert. They are: The Cost of Living by Deborah Levy, Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid and A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman.
Follow us on instagram and share your thoughts on books: @agoodreadbbc
Producer: Becky Ripley


TUE 17:00 PM (m000937b)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000937g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Clare in the Community (m000937l)
Series 12

Questions, Questions

Clare's got tickets to 'Any Questions' This is going to be the best night of her life, even is she does have to take Mrs Singh. Elsewhere, Brian's gone back to Men's Group and discovered there's been some developments.

Starring Sally Phillips as, Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

We join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life. In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios production

CAST
Clare.....SALLY PHILLIPS
Brian.....ALEX LOWE
Nina Conti / Monkey.....NINA CONTI
Jonathan Dimbleby.....RICHARD LUMSDEN
Mrs Singh..... NINA WADIA
Keith....ANDREW WINCOTT
Joan ..... SARAH THOM
Ursula.....REBECCA ROOT
Hayden.....GEORGE FOURACRES
Shaznay......JENNY BEDE
Jenny Murray.....JENNY MURRAY


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000937q)
Ed manages to strike a deal and there’s a final goodbye for Roy


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000937v)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 The Citadel (m000935m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m000937z)
Can sex offenders and violent criminals be rehabilitated in prison?

The decision to scrap the Sex Offender Treatment Programme raised major concerns about the rehabilitation of prisoners and the impact on victims. The scheme was replaced five years after initial research suggested it wasn’t working - and might even increase the risk of re-offending. There are now calls to ensure that other courses, including those which cater for violent offenders, are properly evaluated.

Campaigners claim the system for assessing the effectiveness of such programmes is too secretive and needs to be made more open. Some experts believe there’s been an over-reliance on treatment schemes as a way of calculating the risks posed by prisoners. Victims say some prisoners are playing the system – accessing programmes to convince the authorities they’re safe to be released. Former inmates say education and training are more likely to stop offenders returning to a life of crime, while there’s emerging evidence that providing newly-released prisoners with support in the community is the key.

Reporter Danny Shaw
Producer Nicola Dowling
Editor Carl Johnston

Photo credit; Motortion\Getty


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0009383)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0009387)
Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, separating fact from fiction and bringing clarity to conflicting health advice, with the help of regular contributor GP Margaret McCartney


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m000935c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000938c)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 The Confession (m0009368)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m000937h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000986g)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 09 OCTOBER 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000938h)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m000935f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000938m)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000938r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000938w)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0009390)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0009394)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with writer and blogger on mental health issues and faith, Emma Scrivener.

Good morning.

Mental health struggles affect everyone, yet they are often shrouded in secrecy and shame. In the UK the biggest cause of death for men under 35 is taking their own lives. However, according to national charity Safeline, men are far less likely than women to seek psychological support. In our Instagram culture, we can look great on the outside, when inside we’re feeling very different.

In a way this is the theme of my small son’s favourite book. It’s a story called 'That's not my tractor' and it goes like this, 'That's not my tractor; its engine is too bumpy. Its trailer is too rough. Its funnel is too smooth. ' The last page reads: 'THAT'S my tractor – it's headlights are so shiny'. It’s a preschool book and we laugh at it together. But I wonder if I'm telling myself a similar story. Mine's called, 'That's not my God'.

My expectations of God make him far too small...
He’s perfect (so maybe he disapproves of my mess).
He’s strong (so maybe he hates my weakness).
He’s all-powerful (so surely he’s too busy for me and my struggles).

These are my fears. But thankfully, that’s not the God that millions know and love. The God of the Bible is perfect – so he’s perfect in compassion. He’s strong – so he fights for the weak. He’s powerful – and He’s powerfully loving. He doesn’t ask us to fix ourselves before coming to Him. Instead He says; come to me in all your brokenness; and I will make you whole.

Loving Father: Remind us today who you are; that we may know your peace. We pray this through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Amen.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0009398)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09k6q40)
Doug Allan on the Snowy Sheathbill

In the third of five recollections about his encounters with birds in Antarctica, wildlife cameraman Doug Allan recalls watching an opportunistic Snowy Sheathbill taking advantage of a young Adelie Penguins to get an easy meal.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Murray Foubister.


WED 06:00 Today (m00094hd)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (m00094hg)
Tracy Chevalier meets Edmund de Waal

The writer Tracy Chevalier meets the ceramicist Edmund de Waal. Tracy Chevalier has written eight novels including the international best-seller Girl with a Pearl Earring. Her latest book 'A Single Thread' is set in Winchester Cathedral. Edmund de Waal is a ceramicist and author. His book 'The Hare with Amber Eyes' is a family biography about the loss and survival of art objects through time. His porcelain installations often respond to history, museum collections and archives.

Producer: Clare Walker


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m00094hj)
Working Class Women

Rachael Gibbons discusses class, social mobility and Imposter Syndrome.

In a talk recorded at the Green Man Festival in mid-Wales, Rachael discusses her experiences as a working-class woman. She asks what social mobility means when you find it difficult to fit in at grammar school or university, while at home your friends do different things and you're no longer part of their circle. She tells stories about her imposter syndrome, and how she overcame it. But at the heart of her talk is another syndrome - the so-called 'Jonah Complex', where you're afraid of your own success. Rachael recognises this not just in herself, but in many of her working class friends, she reveals: a fear that success will alienate you from what and who you know and love.

Producer: Giles Edwards


WED 09:45 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m00094hl)
Episode 3

Bill Bryson reads from his fascinating, witty and often surprising journey around the human body. Today he delves down further, through the mouth and into the throat.

The award-winning author of A Short History of Nearly Everything and the bestselling Notes from a Small Island has for decades entertained and educated readers on both sides of the Atlantic, and around the world.

The Body: A Guide for Occupants confirms Bryson as a true polymath. In it, he answers questions such as how much would it cost to make a human and why our faces have evolved their peculiar shape, as well as exploring the mysteries that continue to elude scientists today.

Read by Bill Bryson
Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Ciaran Bermingham


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00094hn)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 The Citadel (m00094hq)
Series 6

Episode 3

The Citadel by Christopher Reason. Based on the novel by A J Cronin.
A brutal solution has been applied to Christine's situation. Manson and Denny are appalled. Meanwhile Manson finds out about Cerys's family situation.

MANSON......... George Blagden
DENNY....... Julian Lewis Jones
CHRISTINE........ Catrin Stewart
CERYS/MYFANWY........ Jeanette Percival
PRITCHARD............Stephen Marzella
Rev James...............John Branwell

Director/Gary Brown
Producers Pauline Harris and Gary Brown.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m00094hs)
Jane and Angie - Getting Back in the Sea

Friends and sea swimmers talk about the therapeutic effects of swimming in the sea. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 Shappi Khorsandi Gets Organised (m0009384)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 God's Work (m00094hv)
Investigative journalist Lucy Cooper has spent ten years making award-winning podcasts and documentaries such as Big Ring - A Circus Exposé, Chicken Alcatraz - A Long Walk to Freedom and Fat Dog - Body Shaming at Crufts. Now, she's turning her attention to the Church of England.

Having been flag bearer for her local Brownies at Sunday service in 1990, she revisits the religion of her youth. But in the intervening years, the world has changed and we’re living in less innocent, more narcissistic times. And so Lucy poses the question - in a world of bum implants and super yachts, is there room for God anymore?

Following three vicars in their everyday lives working in parishes in the north east of England, Lucy is on a mission to find out, over the course of a year, what keeps them working for the man upstairs (God).

Featuring Rowan Atkinson, Louise Ford, Vicky Elliott, Mike Wozniak, and Rudolph Walker.

Written by Louise Ford and Yasmine Akram.

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m00094ms)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Confession (m00094j0)
Episode 3

The new novel by Jessie Burton, the bestselling author of The Miniaturist and The Muse.

Rose Simmons is adrift in her mid-thirties and still trying to decide what to do with her life. Her own mother disappeared when she was a baby and she's never known the truth of what happened to her.

When she learns that the last person to see her was Constance Holden, a reclusive novelist who withdrew from public life at the peak of her fame, Rose is drawn to the door of Connie's imposing house in search of a confession . . .

Read by Rachel Shelley and Katherine Press
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Mair Bosworth

Photo Credit: Lara Downie


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m00094j2)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m00094j4)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m00094j6)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 The Art of Innovation (m00094j8)
Forms of Knowledge

Sir Ian Blatchford and Dr Tilly Blyth continue their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other. They focus on a unique encounter between 20th century artists and their discovery of a collection of 19th century mathematical models, once used to illustrate a new world of complex spherical geometry.

As Tilly reveals these “ruled surface” stringed models, now held in the Science Museum Group collection, as well as being educational tools had their own aesthetic appeal. For the Constructivist artists, such as Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth, they were inspiration for new imaginative and abstract sculptural creativity.

As Ian illustrates, with a visit to Hepworth’s 20 ft Winged Figure in central London, this abstract art that embraced new forms, materials and ways of constructing, became highly symbolic of the functional value for art in society. There was a strong desire for a new sense of certainty and common currency in both science and art, during the turmoil of the interwar period.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Photograph by Oli Scarff/Getty Images


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000937q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Brief Lives - Series 11 (m00094jb)
Episode 4

Brief Lives by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly
Frank and Sarah's friend enlist their help on a case in Morecambe.

FRANK David Schofield
SARAH Kathryn Hunt
ISABEL Danielle Henry
REECE David Judge
DC EVANS David Corden
JASMINE Sade Malone
CAITLIN Anna Jobarteh

Director/Producer Gary Brown


WED 15:00 Money Box (m00094jd)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0009387)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m00094jg)
New research on how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m00094jj)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m00094jl)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00094jq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Quanderhorn Xperimentations (b0bbp001)
Series 1

Fear! Terror! Gut-wrenching Horror! Arg Arg. Please!

It's 1952, as usual.

Having fired the Dangerous Giant Space Laser at the alien vessel containing his crew, Quanderhorn (James Fleet) creates "improved" duplicates of them all as replacements.

Meanwhile the originals - having luckily escaped the blast by triggering the Mercurian metadrive thanks to an astonishingly angry outburst from Guuuurk (Kevin Eldon) - find themselves marooned in a strange forest which the Martian deduces is somewhere in the Crab Nebula.

The professor receives a dire warning from his future self, as an ancient alien ziggurat emerges at Piccadilly Circus Tube Station - just by the chocolate machine. He hastens to London to investigate with his new assistants.

Our heroes are slightly surprised when a number 43 bus to Highgate Woods arrives unexpectedly and they race to Piccadilly Circus to confront the professor and their doppelgangers.

But Prime Minister Churchill (John Sessions) has plans of his own to deal with Quanderhorn, and summons up his crack Lab Busting bomber squadron.

The Quanderhorn Xperimentations - an adventure beyond human understanding.

Cast:
Professor Quanderhorn- James Fleet
Brian Nylon- Ryan Sampson
Dr Gemini Janussen- Cassie Layton
Guuurk- Kevin Eldon
Troy Quanderhorn- Freddie Fox
Winston Churchill/Jenkins- John Sessions
Synthetic Voice Rachel Atkins

Created and written by Rob Grant and Andrew Marshall
Directed by Andrew Marshall
Music by Peter Brewis
Engineered, Edited and Sound designed by Alistair McGregor
Production Manager: Sarah Tombling
Produced by Rob Grant and Gordon Kennedy
Recorded at The Soundhouse Studios

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m00094js)
Kirsty finds herself out in the cold and Lilian is still suffering the consequences


WED 19:15 Front Row (m00094jv)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 The Citadel (m00094hq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m00094jx)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Anne McElvoy, Tim Stanley and Nazir Afzal . #moralmaze


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m00094hj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m0009372)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Only Artists (m00094hg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m00094jz)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 The Confession (m00094j0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Charlotte and Lillian (m00094k1)
Series 2

The Game

Charlotte (Helen Monks) and Lillian (Miriam Margolyes) are back, spending time together as part of a Befriend the Elderly scheme. They may bicker about everything from signs of dementia to the appeal of Harry Styles, but underneath it’s clear they are two kindred spirits. Two selfish, self-absorbed spirits, but ones who mirror and rely on each other nonetheless.

Very nearly 30, Charlotte is still living at home with her parents and chronically unable to figure out what to do with her life. Beneath her attempt at do-gooding is barely disguised despair. She's terrified she is no good. Useless. Unlovable. She looks to Lillian to provide some meaning to her life - if she can help to improve Lillian’s life somehow, she’d feel a lot better about her own. And there’s all the kudos and social media likes that come with charity work - not to mention the lure of Lillian's large spare room.

Lillian meanwhile is still her ebullient self, but her facade hides a nagging fear of what's to come - her body is giving up on her. Lillian's motto is still “Keep Buggering On” – aka keep getting at Charlotte – but increasingly, she’s forced to wonder why. She masks all this by doubling down and manipulating Charlotte into carrying out all her menial tasks. If Charlotte won’t do them, there are plenty of other volunteers who will.

Charlotte has met a new man, prompting Lillian to offer up her best dating advice. Things may have changed since Lillian’s day, but some of her suggestions contain hard-won, ageless wisdom. The trouble is, Charlotte can't tell which ones – and Lillian may not have her best interests at heart.

Charlotte: Helen Monks
Lillian: Miriam Margolyes
Written by: Kat Sommers and Holly Walsh
Producer: Lucy Armitage
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 Bunk Bed (b03zr0w2)
Series 1

Episode 2

Everyone craves a place where their mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air. Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, your tired mind can wander. This is the nearest faraway place for Patrick Marber and Peter Curran.

Here they endeavour to get the heart of things in an entertainingly vague and indirect way. This is not the place for typical male banter.

From under the bed clothes they play each other music from The Residents and Gerry Rafferty, archive of JG Ballard and Virginia Woolf. Life, death, work and family are their slightly warped conversational currency.

Writers/Performers:

PETER CURRAN is a publisher, writer and documentary maker. A former carpenter, his work ranges from directing films about culture in Africa, America and Brazil to writing and presenting numerous Arts and culture programmes for both radio and television.

PATRICK MARBER co-wrote and performed in On The Hour and Knowing Me, Knowing You..with Alan Partridge. His plays include Dealer's Choice, After Miss Julie, Closer and Don Juan in Soho. Marber also wrote the Oscar-nominated screenplay for the film Notes on a Scandal.
Writers/Performers:

Producer: Peter Curran.


WED 23:30 The Digital Human (m0006134)
Series 17

Obsession

Zachary, Stina and Andrea do not suffer from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder but they all became stuck in obsessional loops after being triggered by an event in their lives which left them looking for answers. Their obsessions left them all with compulsions to watch and research others online, to seek the certainty they craved to stop the hurt they felt,. But Andrea learnt that "You'll never find the answers you're looking for, but end up chipping away at yourself." For her she believed her obsession and compulsion became a form of self harm.

Emma Stone is the Director of the National Centre for Cyberstalking Research at the University of Bedfordshire who explains how being engaged in a repetitive behaviour such as online stalking, in which the only reward is getting to look at someone online without getting any reciprocal energy back is not something that is going to raise your self-esteem. From her experience Andrea learnt that once you take something from online to offline you really are deciding who you are going to be and Zach discovered that if you really want to know who you are look at yourself online when no one is watching.

Francesca Cwynar who suffers from Pure O, a form of Obsessive - Compulsive Disorder shares how invisible her obsessive intrusive thoughts are and how she thinks social media mimics the intrusive thoughts people with Pure O experience.

Producer: Kate Bissell
Researcher: Laurence Cook

With thanks to Clea Skopeliti for consultation on OCD research.



THURSDAY 10 OCTOBER 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m00094k4)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m00094hl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00094k6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00094k8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00094kb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m00094kd)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00094kg)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with writer and blogger on mental health issues and faith, Emma Scrivener.

Good Morning.

For many people autumn is the best season packed with bonfires, falling leaves, and cosy evenings in. Yet for others, as the days darken, so do their thoughts. At this time of year, GP surgeries are filled with the sounds of sneezing; and our mental health can suffer along with our bodies, perhaps something to bear in mind on this World Mental Health Day.

In the Gospels, Jesus describes himself as a doctor for the sick. No-one goes to the doctor saying “I’m feeling great, just thought I’d let you know.” In the same way, Jesus does not direct his message to good folks in good health. He comes for ordinary, messed-up people, with all sorts of struggles: including mental illness.
When we’re struggling, it’s tempting to withdraw from others. All of us need community for our health and well-being and church is not a place for those who are perfect or problem free. Instead, it should be a hospital for the sick.

So when we’re weak in body or spirit, we can encourage others with these words from Psalm 34:
‘The LORD is close to the broken-hearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit.’
This verse reminds me that faith does not shield us from suffering. However, it points us to a Doctor who draws near to us in our pain. The Lord Jesus is a God who understands what it is to be weak and sad, lonely and frightened. He meets us even in the darkest places.

Dear Lord Jesus, we bring before you those with physical and mental illness. Thank you that, whatever our struggles, we can come to you. Thank you that you promise to care for us, just as a Doctor cares for the sick.

Amen.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m00094kj)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09k894d)
Doug Allan on the Wandering Albatross

In the fourth of five recollections about his encounters with birds in Antarctica, wildlife cameraman Doug Allan recalls his excitement at lying under the outstretched wings of a Wandering Albatross.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Richard Witham.


THU 06:00 Today (m00094kl)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m00094kn)
Rousseau on Education

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) on the education of children, as set out in his novel or treatise Emile, published in 1762. He held that children are born with natural goodness, which he sought to protect as they developed, allowing each to form their own conclusions from experience, avoiding the domineering influence of others. In particular, he was keen to stop infants forming the view that human relations were based on domination and subordination. Rousseau viewed Emile as his most imporant work, and it became very influential. It was also banned and burned, and Rousseau was attacked for not following these principles with his own children, who he abandoned, and for proposing a subordinate role for women in this scheme.

The image above is of Emile playing with a mask on his mother's lap, from a Milanese edition published in 1805.

With

Richard Whatmore

Caroline Warman

and

Denis McManus

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m00094kq)
Episode 4

Bill Bryson reads from his fascinating, witty and often surprising journey around the human body. His anatomical adventure continues today in the dissecting room.

The award-winning author of A Short History of Nearly Everything and the bestselling Notes from a Small Island has for decades entertained and educated readers on both sides of the Atlantic, and around the world.

The Body: A Guide for Occupants confirms Bryson as a true polymath. In it, he answers questions such as how much would it cost to make a human and why our faces have evolved their peculiar shape, as well as exploring the mysteries that continue to elude scientists today.

Read by Bill Bryson
Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Ciaran Bermingham


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00094ks)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 The Citadel (m00094kv)
Series 6

Episode 4

The Citadel by Christopher Reason based on the novel by A J Cronin.
Denny and Manson bring Christine back home.
Denny........................Julian Lewis Jones
Manson......................George Blagden
Pritchard....................Stephen Marzella
Director/Gary Brown
Producers Pauline Harris and Gary Brown.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m00094kx)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 Tales from the Stave (m00094kz)
Max Bruch's Violin Concerto

Clemency Burton Hill is the new presenter of Tales from the Stave which begins its latest run in The Morgan Library in New York City. A violinist herself, Clemency explores one of the library's most valuable manuscripts, the Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 26 by Max Bruch. With her is the internationally acclaimed Violinist Joshua Bell and the music scholar Michael Beckerman of New York University, along with the Morgan's head of Music Manuscripts Fran Barulich.

The Bruch is often coupled with the Mendelssohn concerto as the two stalwarts of the 19th century Violin repertoire.
As well as telling the story of Bruch's working relationship with the celebrated violinist Joseph Joachim and the detailed striving towards perfection of a composer still uncertain of his powers, Clemency also discovers the sorry tale of Bruch's attempts, later in his life, to sell the manuscript with the help of two American sisters who effectively defrauded him.
Joshua Bell has been playing the piece since he was eleven years old and he's fascinated to see evidence of Bruch's corrections and additions in this late stage of the pieces development. There are several examples of the composer taking advice from Joachim while seeking to perfect his first solo work for the Violin. By contrast, the glorious second movement Adagio appears almost pristine, suggesting that this was the essence of Bruch who was later to be frustrated by the astonishing success of his first Concerto and the limited impact of the rest of his output.

Producer: Tom Alban


THU 12:00 News Summary (m00094l1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Confession (m00094l3)
Episode 4

The new novel by Jessie Burton, the bestselling author of The Miniaturist and The Muse.

Rose Simmons is adrift in her mid-thirties and still trying to decide what to do with her life. Her own mother disappeared when she was a baby and she's never known the truth of what happened to her.

When she learns that the last person to see her was Constance Holden, a reclusive novelist who withdrew from public life at the peak of her fame, Rose is drawn to the door of Connie's imposing house in search of a confession . . .

Read by Rachel Shelley and Katherine Press
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Mair Bosworth

Photo Credit: Lara Downie


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m00094l5)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m00094l7)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m00094l9)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 The Art of Innovation (m00094lc)
Supersonic

Sir Ian Blatchford and Dr Tilly Blyth continue their series exploring how art and science have inspired each other. They focus on one of the earliest artistic attempts to convey the science and dreams of breaking the sound barrier.

As Ian reveals, transport artist Roy Nockolds’ Supersonic was one of the first abstract images to be commissioned by the aviation industry. It’s an insider’s view of the otherwise secretive post-war research into supersonic test flying that was taking place at the Royal Aeronautical Establishment in Farnborough.

The ultimate challenge of being able to handle a supersonic plane at all speeds was largely met by refining the aircraft wings. As Tilly illustrates, a scale model used to test the effects of wind speeds is held in the Science Museum Group’s collection and is testament to the technological endeavour that would lead to a new era of supersonic travel, and the most iconic aircraft design of the post war period – Concorde.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Photograph (C) The Science Museum Group


THU 14:00 The Archers (m00094js)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b09b0wb8)
The Lambeth Waltz

By Daniel Thurman.

A comedy featuring Rosemary Brown the psychic dinner lady from Balham to whom some of history's greatest composers dictated new music from beyond the grave.

Director: David Hunter.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (m0009996)
Beeley Edge with David Blunkett

David Blunkett takes Clare Balding for a walk across Beeley Edge in the Peak District. Joining them are his wife, Margaret, and his guide dog, Barley. Despite being blind from birth, Lord Blunkett has always been a keen rambler and is President of his local Ramblers group.

En route they encounter half a dozen cattle, which have to be navigated carefully as David once had three ribs broken by a cow which, he recalls, came towards him with a 'primeval bellow' and knocked him over. They also pass the lakes that supply the extraordinary gardens at Chatsworth House, including the Emperor Fountain built to impress a visiting Russian Czar... who didn't turn up.

Scroll down to 'related links' for information about the local area.

Location Producer: Tom Bonnett
Producer: Karen Gregor


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m00092w7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (m00092x0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m00094lf)
The latest releases, the hottest stars and the leading directors, plus news and insights from the film world.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m00094lh)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m00094lk)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00094lm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Alone (m00094lp)
Series 2

Episode 1: A Cry For No Help

Written by Moray Hunter and starring Angus Deayton. A sitcom about five single, middle aged neighbours living in flats in a converted house in North London - with Abigail Cruttenden, Pearce Quigley, Kate Isitt and Bennett Arron.

Mitch (Angus Deayton) is a widower and part-time therapist, looking to put his life back together now that he is single and living with Will (Pearce Quigley), his younger, more volatile and unhappily divorced half-brother. Elsewhere in the building is schoolteacher Ellie (Abigail Cruttenden) who is shy, nervous and holds a secret candle for Mitch. Overly honest, frustrated actress Louisa (Kate Isitt), and socially inept IT nerd Morris (Bennett Arron) complete the line-up of mis-matched neighbours.

In this series opener, A Cry For No Help, Mitch is desperate to have his wedding anniversary pass unnoticed to avoid any awkwardness in the house. Unfortunately, Will lets the anniversary cat out of the bag and Mitch, who is endeavouring to find someone to hold on to his spare keys, encounters very strange reactions to this seemingly simple request.

Cast:
Mitch - Angus Deayton
Will - Pearce Quigley
Ellie - Abigail Cruttenden
Louisa - Kate Isitt
Morris - Bennett Arron

Written and created by Moray Hunter
Directed by Moray Hunter and Gordon Kennedy
Sound Engineer and Editor: Jerry Peal
Production Manager: Sarah Tombling
Based on an original idea developed in association with Dandy Productions
Recorded live at RADA Studios London

Produced by Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m00094ls)
Eddie bids a sad farewell and Ruairi reveals his true feelings.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m00094lv)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 The Citadel (m00094kv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m00094lx)
David Aaronovitch and a panel of experts and insiders present in-depth explainers on big issues in the news.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m0009998)
Cryptocurrencies

Will Facebook's launch of its own cryptocurrency be a game changer? What will this mean for established currencies and the global banking system? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS

Jutta Steiner, Chief Executive Officer, Parity Technologies

Dr. Catherine Mulligan, Chief Technology Officer of Gov Tech Labs and Data Net at University College, London

Barbara Mellish, Chief Executive Officer, Centre for Citizenship, Enterprise and Government

Presenter: Evan Davis

Producer: Julie Ball


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m00094lh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m00094kn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m00094m0)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 The Confession (m00094l3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Agendum (m00094m2)
Series 2

Meltdown

A current affairs parody and stupidly feasible visit to the 24-hour Hall Of Opinion Mirrors. Because there are two stories to every story.

Hosted and anchored by host and anchor Alexandra Palisades and created by Joel Morris and Jason Hazeley.

With Carrie Quinlan as Alexandra Palisades and, at the very least, the voices of:

Justin Edwards
Melanie Hudson
Kath Hughes
Simon Kane
Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong
Jess Robinson
Luke Sumner
Tony Way

Written by Joel Morris and Jason Hazeley

Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 The Digital Human (m00066yy)
Series 17

Cameo

Social media is about stories, and what's more interesting - to you at least - than telling your own?

When you post, you're building a narrative: this is who I am and this is what I like.

You're creating your very own movie, pulling in a range of characters. Then you've got stage sets and let's not forget the bit parts; those people who dip in and out of your life and provide endless story fodder.

But what happens when you discover that it's you who has in fact been cast in the cameo role in someone else's social media story?

We hear from the unwitting extras: from the seat mates on a plane caught in a publicity storm after a woman posted about the apparent beginning of their great romance, to a man who helped his neighbour and ended the subject of her tweets.

So what does this mean for personal autonomy, having a voice, and the limits of the stories we can or should tell online? Does the digital world blur the boundaries between what stories are yours to tell?

Aleks Krotoski explores the tension between entitlement and a feeling of voicelessness.

Producer: Caitlin Smith



FRIDAY 11 OCTOBER 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m00094m4)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m00094kq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00094m6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00094m8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00094mb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m00094md)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00094mg)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with writer and blogger on mental health issues and faith, Emma Scrivener.

Good morning.

Years ago, anxiety wasn’t recognised as a disorder. Now, along with depression, it’s the most common form of mental illness, according to the Mental Health Foundation .

All of us have worries. Sometimes they’re small and easily solved. Like: Why haven’t I had a reply to my email? Or, why is my car making that strange noise? But sometimes our anxieties can be overwhelming. The Apostle Paul was no stranger to such pressures. When he wrote to the church in Philippi, he was chained to two guards and awaiting his fate. If anyone had cause to despair, it was him. Yet in his New Testament letter to the Philippians chapter 4, he argues that we can be surrounded by God’s peace – whatever our circumstances.

He writes, "Do not be anxious about anything; but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus".

When life is difficult, St Paul doesn’t urge us to put on a brave face or act strong. He tells us to acknowledge our fears –. then bring them to our heavenly Father. St Paul doesn’t promise us easy solutions to worry or instant relief. But by praying our fears, we can also know God’s peace.

Heavenly Father, May we know the power, the presence and the peace of Christ in the midst of trouble. Take away our anxieties and fill us with your peace. In Jesus’ name.

Amen.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m00094mj)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09k8qz7)
Doug Allan on the Giant Petrel

In the last of five recollections about his encounters with birds in Antarctica, wildlife cameraman Doug Allan recalls his encounters with Giant Petrels with mixed feelings as he recalls their baleful stare, steely grey blue eyes and predatory intent!

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Christopher Mckenzie.


FRI 06:00 Today (m000950l)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m00092wm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Body: A Guide for Occupants (m000952d)
Episode 5

Bill Bryson reads from his fascinating, witty and often surprising journey around the human body. He concludes today with the strangeness of sleep.

The award-winning author of A Short History of Nearly Everything and the bestselling Notes from a Small Island has for decades entertained and educated readers on both sides of the Atlantic, and around the world.

The Body: A Guide for Occupants confirms Bryson as a true polymath. In it, he answers questions such as how much would it cost to make a human and why our faces have evolved their peculiar shape, as well as exploring the mysteries that continue to elude scientists today.

Read by Bill Bryson
Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Ciaran Bermingham


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000950q)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 The Citadel (m000950s)
Series 6

Episode 5

The Citadel by Christopher Reason. Based on the novel by A J Cronin.
Denny and Manson are brought to court.
Denny.................Julian Lewis Jones
Manson.............George Blagden
Christine............Catrin Stewart
Pritchard.................Stephen Marzella
Judge.....................John Branwell
Director/Gary Brown
Producers Pauline Harris & Gary Brown


FRI 11:00 The Corrections (m000950v)
The Carbonara Case

The Corrections re-visits four news stories which left the public with an incomplete picture of what really happened.

In August 2017, The Times published a piece with the headline ‘Christian child forced into Muslim foster care’. The story was front-page news the next day as well - and the next – but was it right?

Produced and presented by Jo Fidgen and Chloe Hadjimatheou


FRI 11:45 Four Thought (m00081v3)
A Pleasure Culture of War

Historian Kasia Tomasiewicz discusses how to commemorate war.

Reporting for her first day shadowing the curatorial team at the Imperial War Museum, Kasia found herself conflicted. Feeling awe at the size of the tanks, planes and other machines of war, and remembering the pleasurable associations from Airfix kits and games with her siblings from her own childhood, she tried to balance these feelings with the awareness that the objects also embody death and destruction. How do these different responses affect what Kasia describes as the 'pleasure culture of war'?

Producer: Giles Edwards.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0009577)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Confession (m000950z)
Episode 5

The new novel by Jessie Burton, the bestselling author of The Miniaturist and The Muse.

Rose Simmons is adrift in her mid-thirties and still trying to decide what to do with her life. Her own mother disappeared when she was a baby and she's never known the truth of what happened to her.

When she learns that the last person to see her was Constance Holden, a reclusive novelist who withdrew from public life at the peak of her fame, Rose is drawn to the door of Connie's imposing house in search of a confession . . .

Read by Rachel Shelley and Katherine Press
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Mair Bosworth


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0009511)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0009513)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0009515)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The Art of Innovation (m0009517)
Patterns from Atoms

The thousands of visitors to the 1951 Festival of Britain were greeted with textile designs on wallpaper and furnishings that had come from atomic scale images created by X ray crystrallography. Images of compounds such as insulin and haemoglobin informed almost every aspect of the festival décor. It was the result of a unique collaboration between textile designers, manufacturers and scientists.

Tilly examines the evolution of the Festival Pattern Group, who would weave a fine line between good design and scientific credibility. As the Group’s molecular patterns on wallpaper and clothing held in the Science Museum Group’s collection reveal, a new window into an invisible molecular world now opened up to the public, a world which previously had only been visible to scientists. Whilst it was all part of the Festival’s post war “tonic to the nation” it rendered the atom benign in an era of cold war anxiety about the excesses of science. It also raised the cultural profile of crystallography.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Photograph courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m00094ls)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Elsinore (b09l8z3s)
Episode 2

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

Claudius returns to Elsinore where he must confront his brother about the failure to pay the ransom demanded by Captain True. He must also deal with a strange Danish farmer who wants to give King Hamlet a gift of very fine horses.

Set in an alternative Europe in the 1930s, Elsinore imagines the turbulent world of the Danish Court in events that take place some years before the story told in Shakespeare's Hamlet.

Directed by Marc Beeby & Sasha Yevtushenko.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0009519)
Chesham

Kathy Clugston and the panel are in Chesham.

Producer: Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000951c)
An original short work for radio.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000951f)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m000951h)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m000951k)
Linton and Gareth - Worth More than a Bin Bag

Friends discuss their passion for helping young people in care transport their belongings. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m000951m)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000951r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m000951t)
Series 100

Episode 7

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Phil Wang.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m000951w)
Writer, Adrian Flynn
Director, Gwenda Hughes
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jolene Archer ….. Buffy Davis
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Justin Elliot ….. Simon Williams
Rex Fairbrother ….. Nick Barber
Toby Fairbrother ….. Rhys Bevan
Eddie Grundy ….. Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Will Grundy ….. Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Elizabeth Pargetter ….. Alison Dowling
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Lexi Viktorova ….. Ania Sowinski
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley
Joy Horville ….. Jackie Lye


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m000951y)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 The Citadel (m000950s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0009520)
Lord Blunkett

Topical debate from High Storrs School in Sheffield with a panel including the Labour peer Lord Blunkett.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0009522)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 The Art of Innovation (m0009524)
Omnibus 3

Sir Ian Blatchford, Director of the Science Museum Group, and the Science Museum’s Head of Collections, Dr Tilly Blyth, with their third omnibus edition in which they draw upon key works of art along with objects from the Science Museum Group's collection to explore how art and science have inspired each other in early 20th century's growing Age of Ambivalence.

Along the way: artists' satirical and furious response to the horrors of mechanised warfare; the clock as a friend and enemy in the industrial workplace; seeking a new language for science and art from mathematical models; the art of the possible as supersonic speeds become reality; turning the atom benign in the Cold War era at the 1951 Festival of Britain.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Produced in partnership with The Science Museum Group

Readers: Shaun Mason, Katherine Cusack, Sean Baker.

Music composed by Mark Russell


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0009526)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Confession (m000950z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m0009376)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:25 The Digital Human (m0006lnk)
Series 17

Between

Our personal space is like an invisible sphere around us, reaching from our bodies at the centre to the tips of our fingers. Ironically, this is also where many of us keep our phones - the windows that lets us see into the rest of the world - and the door that lets the rest of the world into our personal space. What’s the best way to control who comes in, and what do we need to do when we want to close it?

Produced by Kate Bissell


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0009528)
Phil and Stephanie - People think their love islands

Married couple on what's made their relationship work and how attitudes are changing. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m0009376)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m0009376)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0008y97)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0009522)

Agendum 23:00 THU (m00094m2)

Alone 18:30 THU (m00094lp)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0008wv1)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m0009388)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m00092tr)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0008y95)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0009520)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m00092vd)

Art of Now 23:30 SAT (m000765p)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m00094lh)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m00094lh)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m00092vv)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m00092vv)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (m00092x0)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (m00092x0)

Brief Lives - Series 11 14:15 WED (m00094jb)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m00092wh)

Bunk Bed 23:15 WED (b03zr0w2)

Charlotte and Lillian 23:00 WED (m00094k1)

Clare in the Community 18:30 TUE (m000937l)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (m0009372)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m0009372)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (m0008wtb)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (m0009375)

David Cannadine: On Crossing the Religious Divide 11:00 MON (m0007479)

Degrees of Love 21:00 MON (m0008y48)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m00092wm)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m00092wm)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b0b6bzhc)

Drama 14:15 MON (b098jrzw)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b0939gly)

Drama 14:15 THU (b09b0wb8)

Elsinore 14:15 FRI (b09l8z3s)

Evidently Art 13:30 SUN (m0007bk3)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m00092t3)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m00092y2)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m000939b)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0009398)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m00094kj)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m00094mj)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m000951h)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0008y55)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m000937z)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m0008wnb)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m00094hj)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m00094hj)

Four Thought 11:45 FRI (m00081v3)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m00092tf)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m00094kx)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0009380)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m000937v)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m00094jv)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m00094lv)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m000951y)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0008y8j)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0009519)

God's Work 11:30 WED (m00094hv)

Have You Heard George's Podcast? 23:00 MON (p07mk8gp)

Hearing Homelessness 23:30 SUN (m0007bjl)

I Was... 16:00 MON (m000937c)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m00094kn)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m00094kn)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0009383)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0009387)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0009387)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0008y8n)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000951f)

Leaks, Tweets and Modern Diplomacy 11:00 TUE (m000935w)

Living World 06:35 SUN (m00092vz)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m00092v6)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m00092v6)

Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time 21:00 SAT (m0007wr7)

Margaret Thatcher: Herself Alone 00:30 SAT (m0008y7r)

Mary Portas: On Style 11:30 TUE (m0009360)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0008y9h)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m00092vj)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m00092xp)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m000938l)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m000938h)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m00094k4)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m00094m4)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m00092tk)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m00092tk)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m00094jd)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0008wpr)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m00094jx)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (m0008y8q)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0008y9r)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m00092vs)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m00092xy)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0009393)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0009390)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m00094kd)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m00094md)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m00092vx)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m00092th)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m00092wp)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000936c)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0009364)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m00094ms)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m00094l1)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0009577)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m00092t1)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m00092w3)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m00092wc)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m00092vg)

News 13:00 SAT (m00092tp)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m00095bq)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (m00094hg)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (m00094hg)

Out of Office 16:00 TUE (m0003zyk)

PM 17:00 SAT (m00092tw)

PM 17:00 MON (m000937m)

PM 17:00 TUE (m000937b)

PM 17:00 WED (m00094jl)

PM 17:00 THU (m00094lk)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000951m)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m00092xb)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (m00092x2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0008y9t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m00092y0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0009397)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0009394)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m00094kg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m00094mg)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m00092v8)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m00092v8)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m00092v8)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m00092w7)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m00092w7)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m00092w7)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m0008wlh)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (m0009996)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b008nb6p)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m00092t9)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m00092vb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0008y9m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m00092vn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m00092xt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m000938v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000938r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m00094k8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m00094m8)

Shappi Khorsandi Gets Organised 20:00 MON (m0009384)

Shappi Khorsandi Gets Organised 11:00 WED (m0009384)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0008y9k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0008y9p)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m00092v0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m00092vl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m00092vq)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m00092x4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m00092xr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m00092xw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m000938q)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m000938z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m000938m)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000938w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m00094k6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m00094kb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m00094m6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m00094mb)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m0008y8l)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000951c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m00092v4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m00092x8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m000937r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m000937g)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m00094jq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m00094lm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000951r)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (m0002g33)

Stand-Up Specials 19:15 SUN (m00092xg)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m000935s)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m000935s)

Stillicide 19:45 SUN (m00092xj)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m00092wf)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m00092w5)

Tales from the Stave 11:30 THU (m00094kz)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m00092wk)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m00092xd)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m00092xd)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m000936y)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m000936y)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000937q)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000937q)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m00094js)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m00094js)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m00094ls)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m00094ls)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m000951w)

The Art of Innovation 13:45 MON (m0009371)

The Art of Innovation 13:45 TUE (m000936t)

The Art of Innovation 13:45 WED (m00094j8)

The Art of Innovation 13:45 THU (m00094lc)

The Art of Innovation 13:45 FRI (m0009517)

The Art of Innovation 21:00 FRI (m0009524)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 09:45 MON (m000935x)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 00:30 TUE (m000935x)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 09:45 TUE (m000935f)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 00:30 WED (m000935f)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 09:45 WED (m00094hl)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 00:30 THU (m00094hl)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 09:45 THU (m00094kq)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 00:30 FRI (m00094kq)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants 09:45 FRI (m000952d)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m0009998)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m00094lx)

The Citadel 10:45 MON (m0009365)

The Citadel 19:45 MON (m0009365)

The Citadel 10:45 TUE (m000935m)

The Citadel 19:45 TUE (m000935m)

The Citadel 10:41 WED (m00094hq)

The Citadel 19:45 WED (m00094hq)

The Citadel 10:45 THU (m00094kv)

The Citadel 19:45 THU (m00094kv)

The Citadel 10:45 FRI (m000950s)

The Citadel 19:45 FRI (m000950s)

The Confession 12:04 MON (m000936j)

The Confession 22:45 MON (m000936j)

The Confession 12:04 TUE (m0009368)

The Confession 22:45 TUE (m0009368)

The Confession 12:04 WED (m00094j0)

The Confession 22:45 WED (m00094j0)

The Confession 12:04 THU (m00094l3)

The Confession 22:45 THU (m00094l3)

The Confession 12:04 FRI (m000950z)

The Confession 22:45 FRI (m000950z)

The Corrections 11:00 FRI (m000950v)

The Digital Human 23:30 WED (m0006134)

The Digital Human 23:30 THU (m00066yy)

The Digital Human 23:25 FRI (m0006lnk)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m0008wlp)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m00094lf)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m00092wr)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m00092wr)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (m000937h)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (m000937h)

The Inquiry 17:30 SAT (m00092ty)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m00092tc)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m00092tc)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m000935c)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m000935c)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m00092wy)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m00094hs)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m000951k)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m0009528)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m00094jj)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (m0008wtt)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (m000937w)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (m0008y8z)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m000951t)

The Quanderhorn Xperimentations 18:30 WED (b0bbp001)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m0009cgl)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m00092ww)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m000938g)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m000938c)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m00094jz)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m00094m0)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0009526)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m0008wpf)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m00094jg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m000987h)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m000986g)

Today 07:00 SAT (m00092t7)

Today 06:00 MON (m000935n)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0009359)

Today 06:00 WED (m00094hd)

Today 06:00 THU (m00094kl)

Today 06:00 FRI (m000950l)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b09h6x6h)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b09k0p9b)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b09k6gl1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b09k6q40)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b09k894d)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b09k8qz7)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m00092t5)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m00092tm)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m00092v2)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m00092w1)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m00092w9)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m00092wt)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m00092x6)

Weather 05:56 MON (m00092y4)

Weather 12:57 MON (m000936s)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m000936k)

Weather 12:57 WED (m00094j4)

Weather 12:57 THU (m00094l7)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0009513)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m00092xm)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m00092tt)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0009361)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m000935j)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m00094hn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m00094ks)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m000950q)

World at One 13:00 MON (m000936x)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m000936p)

World at One 13:00 WED (m00094j6)

World at One 13:00 THU (m00094l9)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0009515)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m000936n)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m000936g)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m00094j2)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m00094l5)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0009511)