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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 AUGUST 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m00076p6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Salt on Your Tongue (m00076nh)
Episode 5

Charlotte Runcie has always felt pulled to the sea, lured by its soothing, calming qualities but also enlivened and inspired by its salty wildness. When she loses her beloved grandmother and becomes pregnant with her first child, she feels its pull even more intensely.

In Salt On Your Tongue, Charlotte explores what the sea means to us, and particularly what it has meant to women through the ages. This book is a walk on the beach with Turner, with Shakespeare, with the Romantic Poets and shanty-singers. It's an ode to our oceans - to the sailors who brave their treacherous waters, to the women who lost their loved ones to the waves, to the creatures that dwell in their depths, to beach combers, swimmers, seabirds and mermaids.

Charlotte shows how the sea has inspired, fascinated and terrified us, and how she fell in love with the deep blue. Navigating through ancient Greek myths, poetry, shipwrecks and Scottish folktales, Salt On Your Tongue is about how the wild untameable waves can help us understand what it means to be human.

Read by Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Polly Coles
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00076p8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00076pb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00076pd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m00076pg)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00076pj)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Rev Dr Lesley Carroll.

O for a thousand tongue to sing
We'll walk by faith
The power of the Cross
When I survey the wondrous cross
The Lord is my salvation
In Christ alone


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m000760q)
House Buying Agony

Kevin Carr charts the agony of the first-time house buyer: is it worth the pain to avoid a lifetime of paying rent? "As you know, a mortgage is a loan where property is used as collateral. The first part of the word 'mort' is French for death, so named because trying to understand the process of getting a mortgage makes you want to die".
Recorded in front of a live audience at the Kelburn Garden Party festival in Ayrshire.
Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m00079zl)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m000766l)
Inspiration On The Island of Jura

The Island of Jura in the Inner Hebrides is one of the most sparsely populated places in Scotland. This dramatic and mountainous landscape is home to around 200 inhabitants but much more than it's fair share of artists, musicians, makers and writers. George Orwell chose the remote location of 'Barnhill' on the island to write his masterpiece '1984' near the end of his life. Although it is hard to detect the famous 'Paps' and seascapes in his dystopian vision it was Jura which allowed him the space to get his ideas on to paper.

Today Jura is home to a number of creative people who have found the inspiration and solitude they need to create and these musicians and makers have also found each other, forming a collective called FL:EDGE. Helen Mark meets Giles Perring, Amy Dunnachie, Kirsten Gow and Gini Dickinson to hear more about the history and future of Jura.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m00079zn)
Farming Today This Week

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


SAT 06:57 Weather (m00079zq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m00079zs)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m00079zv)
Stephen Hough, Stephen Poliakoff

Aasmah Mir and the Reverend Richard Coles are joined by the concert pianist and composer Stephen Hough. As an international performer he spends much of his life at airports, on planes and in hotel rooms and he talks about the thoughts and observations he has made during his travels which form his new book Rough Ideas.
Cartoonist Michael Leunig explains how, after an unpromising start, he discovered he could draw and became Australia's 'national living treasure' thanks to his popular characters, Mr Curly, Vasco Pyjama and the Duck. Michael is appearing at the Greenbelt Festival in Northamptonshire later this month.
Olivia Potts swapped a career as a criminal barrister to become a cook and food writer following the death of her mother. Baking became her comfort during this emotionally difficult time and her book A Half Baked Idea explores how going back to her mother's recipes helped her come to terms with her loss.
Jackie Cornes tells the story of falling in love as a teenager and how she defied her disapproving parents and traveled half way across the world to follow her heart.
And the playwright and director Stephen Poliakoff chooses his Inheritance Tracks: the Forsyte Saga theme by Eric Coates and Willow by Joan Armatrading.

Producer: Paula McGinley
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00079zx)
Series 25

Macclesfield

Jay Rayner and his panel are in Macclesfield. Dr Zoe Laughlin, Jordan Bourke, Sue Lawrence and Rob Owen-Brown answer the culinary questions from the audience.

With the team in "Treacle Town", the panellists can't miss the opportunity to give their favourite recipes with treacle. They also discuss the best way to use up stale bread and debate whether or not the ink in a squid ink risotto adds flavour.

Simon Spurrell, Director of the Cheshire Cheese company, brings some interesting varieties of Cheshire cheese to try.

Producer: Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Origin of Stuff (m0005mwg)
Toothbrush

What is the most personal item you own - one you don’t want anyone else using?

For Katy Brand it’s her toothbrush. So how did the toothbrush become one of life’s essentials?

With the help of resident public historian of Horrible Histories fame, Greg Jenner, Katy goes back to ancient times, when the toothbrush was merely a stick. But the brush, as we know it, only came into being much later when a convict spied a broom in his cell and had a bright idea.

But how has ingenuity and innovation shaped the toothbrush and ensured its place in our lives? And given most are plastic, how environmentally friendly is the toothbrush’s legacy?

Featuring designer and toothbrush collector, Sophie Thomas, and advocate for clean teeth, Peter Dyer, Chair of Hospital Dentists at the British Dental Association.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m00079zz)
Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0007b01)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 The Money Clinic (m0007b03)
Poppy and Cliff

Money is one of the top three strains on relationships and it’s a common cause of rift between family and friends too.

You might be cautious and risk averse and hate to see your partner frittering their money away on new clothes and nights out; while they might think you should stop being so miserly with your cash and splash out once in a while.

In the Money Box summer series Ruth Alexander introduces ‘The Money Clinic’. We eavesdrop on the conversations of three couples and a mother and son talking honestly about their finances with a relationship counsellor. We learn who they are, about their relationship with the other person, and what financial issues are coming between them. We hear practical tips on how each couple can better to manage their cash, and also how to manage the emotional side of money. We learn that individual attitudes to money are formed in early life, and how arguments about money are often about so much more than just money.

In this programme we meet Cliff and Poppy who own a cafe together but their financial mind-sets are miles apart. He’s a ‘maverick’ with money, while she’s intensely frugal. Can they find a middle ground?
Producer Smita Patel
Editor Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 Lobby Land (m00076vg)
Series 2

Brecon Bad

Sam heads to Wales to cover the fallout from the Brecon and Radnorshire by-election, giving Mia the worst birthday of her life.

Starring Yasmine Akram, Charlie Higson, Cariad Lloyd, Dan Tetsell and Daniel Lawrence Taylor.
Written by Jon Harvey, Christopher Davies and Sarah Dempster

Produced by Jon Harvey
A Naked production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0007b06)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m0007b08)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m00076nw)
Madeline Grant, Ayesha Hazarika, Robert Jenrick MP, Nick Thomas-Symonds MP

Shaun Ley presents political debate from the Media Café at Broadcasting House with a panel including the Assistant Comment Editor at The Telegraph Madeline Grant, the political commentator and comedian Ayesha Hazarika, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government Robert Jenrick and the Shadow Solicitor General Nick Thomas-Symonds MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0007b0b)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Bad Faith (b00qpsrj)
The Fire This Time

Lenny Henry stars as Jake Thorne, a police chaplain who's lost his faith and has decided, as a test for God, to behave appallingly towards those he’s supposed to help. Today Jake takes on his arch rival and nemesis Bishop Elias Wright in a battle over the soul of a mentally unstable parishioner.

Jake Thorne ...... Lenny Henry
Michael ...... Danny Sapani
Ruth Thorne ..... Jenny Jules
Vincent Ngomwe ...... Jimmy Akingbola
Rev Elias Wright ...... Cyril Nri
Chief Supt Khan ...... Vincent Ebrahim
Firearms Officer ....... Melissa Advani
Radio Voice ..... Rhys Jennings

Producer ..... Mary Peate
Writer ..... Peter Jukes


SAT 15:15 One to One (m00017s8)
Lynne Truss on travel: A year in a camper-van

In the second of three programmes about travel and why we do it, Lynne Truss talks to Jillian Moody about her experiences of travelling across the world in a campervan with her husband and three young daughters. The family bought a second-hand campervan prior to the trip which had no shower and no toilet and after a terrible first night, reality took its toll as they realised their itinerary would have to change. They were faced with many challenges en route but after 38,000 miles, there's no doubt it was a life-changing experience for Jillian. Producer Sarah Bunt.


SAT 15:30 Art of Now (m00074hl)
Hands

Our hands are the part of the body that does, that makes, but it is also a part of us that helps us communicate through gesture, signs and writing and the part of us with the most sophisticated sense of touch. Psychotherapist Philippa Perry explores what our hands tell us – through the touch, but also through the calluses and musculature they have taken on through their work. She explores the idea of how we as humans interact with and impact upon those things around us, and how they also impact upon us.

Speaking to a range of artists including blind sculptor David Johnson, violinist Min Kym and poet Justina Kehinde, she tries to understand the physicality of their work and how they connect the mental with the physical. What can our hands tell us about our world and about ourselves?

Presenter: Philippa Perry
Producer: Philippa Geering
An Overtone Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0007b0f)
Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor:Jane Thurlow


SAT 17:00 PM (m0007b0h)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Inquiry (m0007b0k)
Can You Reduce Central American Migration?

Families from the Northern Triangle countries of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador now make up the majority of migrants arriving at the US southern border. Many from urban areas are fleeing endemic gang violence, while those from rural regions are affected by droughts and food security issues.

The Mexican government is increasing security along their borders, while the Trump administration has been changing asylum law.
Could these measures help to lower the number of people choosing to make the dangerous journey? Or is there another way to make sure migrants don't feel like they need to leave their homes?


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0007b0m)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0007b0p)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007b0r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0007b0t)
Tez Ilyas, Dean Atta, Roisin Conaty, Rozi Plain, Bill Ryder-Jones, Athena Kugblenu, Nikki Bedi

Nikki Bedi and Athena Kugblenu are joined by Tez Ilyas, Roisin Conaty and Dean Atta for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Rozi Plain and Bill Ryder-Jones.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Four Thought (b0832rjl)
Sensitive Souls

Hannah Jane Walker makes the case for being a bit sensitive.

As a child Hannah was told to toughen up, not to be so sensitive, but now she says her sensitivity is who she is, and it's how she makes her income. And she thinks that people should embrace their sensitivity, and not pretend to be tough if they're not.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m0007b0w)
There Is a Light That Never Goes Out, Animals, Colson Whitehead, Olafur Eliasson, This Way Up

There Is A Light That Never Goes Out, Scenes From The Luddite Rebellion has just opened at Manchester Royal Exchange. Combining verbatim recreations and imagined encounters, it looks at Manchester and England at the beginning of industrialisation
Animals is a new film based on the novel by Emma Jane Unsworth. Two friends messily drift along and apart and back together in Dublin
Colson Whitehead's new novel The Nickel Boys fictionalises the true story of a reform institution in Florida where cruelty, abuse and violence were the norm
Olafur Eliasson: In Real Life is at Tate Modern in London - showing 27 years of the output of the Norwegian Icelandic artist
This Way Up is a new sitcom on Channel 4 starring Aisling Bea and Sharon Horgan

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Henry Hitchings, Patrice Lawrence and Jen Harvie. The producer is Oliver Jones

PodcastExtra recommendations:

Jen: Burgerz by Travis Alabanza Shit Theatre's Drink Rum with Expats, and Fair Fringe /Cost Of The Fringe/ Fringe of Colour
Henry: Jonathan Gibbs - The Large Door
Patrice: Anthony Joseph - Kitch


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0007b0y)
The British Black Panthers

The untold story of the years when Black Power came to Britain and forever left its mark - the coming together, political ideas, leaders and legacy.

Inspired by the American Black Panther Party, the British Black Panthers were founded in London’s Notting Hill in 1968 – the first Panther organisation outside the United States. Their mission was to change the terms of engagement about race in Britain, promote self-determination and challenge the British state.

Writer Kehinde Andrews, who launched the first UK Black Studies degree in Birmingham, meets key former Panthers and the generations that followed them, and – hearing from critics, artists and historians, drawing on a wealth of archive – explores their legacy.

From the late 1960s, following Enoch Powell’s Rivers of Blood speech, and throughout the early 1970s, the British Black Panthers drew on the example of their American counterparts. The politics of Black Power travelled across the Atlantic and took unique form on British soil, inspiring a generation of multi-racial Black British youth. Putting aside revolutionary rhetoric, the British Panthers focused on policing the police at street level and on educating their members in Saturday schools. They championed racial equality - better housing, legal aid, immigrants’ rights and non-racist employment practice. They took on the criminal justice system and won. They agitated, argued, demonstrated, printed a weekly paper and marched under the flag of the same logo as their American counterparts - the leaping Panther.

Special Branch responded to the movement with its own Black Power Desk, while the 1970 trial of the Mangrove Nine, following a clash between police and Black Panther demonstrators in Notting Hill, evoked Magna Carter and changed racial justice in Britain forever.

Members included Darcus Howe, Altheia Jones-LeCointe, Farroukh Dhondy, the photographer Neil Kenclock and dub poet Linton Kwesi Johnson. The movement was inclusive, embracing members from Asian as well as West Indian and African descent. The Panthers were the new, multi-racial Black youth of Britain - children of immigrants, educated in British schools and more radical and defiant than their parents.

Contributors include poet Benjamin Zephaniah, former Panthers Farrukh Dhondy, Neil Kenlock and Beverley Bryan, historian David Olusoga and Mykaell Riley of Steel Pulse, US Black Panther leaders Bobby Seale and Elaine Brown, Ian Macdonald QC and British rapper and writer Akala.

Presenter: Kehinde Andrews
Producer: Simon Hollis

A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari (m000747f)
Episode 3: Home

“Giorgio Vasari? Who’s he?” The very thought would have been anathema to the great man, a legend in his own lifetime but an unsung hero today. Using his own words as inspiration this three part classic serial tells a poignant story of pride, love and legacy combined with an epic journey through the art of the Renaissance - led by the man who invented the word. We begin in Florence, 1570. Giorgio Vasari is the top painter and architect of the day, as well as the official biographer of the pantheon of Renaissance artists. His vast book THE LIVES OF THE ARTISTS is already in its second edition and will stay in print well into the next millennium as the essential text for all students of art history. At the behest of his illustrious patron, the Grand Duke Cosimo de’ Medici, Vasari is about to embark on his most ambitious project ever: painting the city’s cathedral dome. When he prays for assistance, God sends him a surprise response: a new assistant, Piero, who reminds him of his own young self.

Written by Eileen Horne.

Created by Eileen Horne and Sarah Dunant

VASARI ..... Tom Conti
PIERO ..... Will Taylor
COSINA/MONA LISA ..... Jasmine Hyde
GILDA ..... Eva Feiler
TOMMASO ..... Tristan Beint
GIULIO ..... Jay Mailer
DUKE FERDINANDO ..... John Hollingworth
COSIMO/BIRD VENDOR ..... David Troughton

LEONARDO DA VINCI ..... Nick Murchie

FEDERIGO ZUCCHERO ..... Jay Mailer

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
Exec Producer: Sarah Dunant
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m0007b10)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0007621)
Love and Relationships

Whether you watch it or not, it’s hard to ignore the TV reality show ‘Love Island’, which puts a bunch of semi-naked heterosexuals in a villa and tells them to ‘couple up’. It is firmly part of the zeitgeist and now set for two series a year. There’s a clear generational disagreement about the programme: 16-34 year olds are addicted to it; geriatrics can’t stand it. What does the success of ‘Love Island’ say about the state of television, and what does the state of television say about us, the viewers? Love Island’s detractors say it’s vacuous, vulgar and exploits its vulnerable young participants in a format designed to play with their emotions. They argue it’s also morally corrupting for those who watch it – many of them impressionable adolescents with unrealistic expectations of relationships. Those who stick up for the show, including many parents of teenagers, say it contains moral lessons about modern relationships: fidelity, consent and dating etiquette. It is, they believe, both the Jane Austen of the post-millennials and a sex education primer for the over-50s. We live in the era of Tinder and Grindr where partners are selected with the swipe of a phone screen. Some worry about the effect this is having on the emotional intelligence of young people, while others say nothing’s changed; young lovers were always awkward fumblers and there’s nothing new about our obsession with good looks. Social psychologists talk about passionate love – the kind that grips a couple in the first heady phase of their relationship; and companionate love – the calmer state that follows, based on friendship, intimacy and commitment. Have we got our priorities right when it comes to love and relationships?

Producer: Dan Tierney


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (m00075jf)
Series 9

University of Aberdeen

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Aberdeen with specialist subjects including Law, Language and Linguistics and Music and questions ranging from Scottish Gaelic fishing jargon to Scottish Stop and Search Law via mallets, marimbas and a dead pigeon.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Royal Holloway University of London, Plymouth, St Catharine’s College Cambridge, Brighton and Oxford Brookes.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:30 No Egos No Divas: New Poets in Irish (m000747k)
Despite the fact that Irish is an endangered language, poetry in Irish is experiencing a remarkable resurgence. In No Egos No Divas, Louis de Paor meets young poets defying the odds.

He meets Aifric Mac Aodha, co-editor of the bilingual anthology Calling Cards, published by the Gallery Press and Poetry Ireland in 2018, and Simon Ó Faoláin, who runs an annual festival of poetry in Irish in south-west Ireland. Marcus Mac Conghail, who seamlessly blends poetry and music, tells Louis that he sees no difference between the two.

Doireann Ní Ghríofa, a member of Aosdána, Ireland’s academy of artists, talks about the poets who have inspired her and refutes the suggestion that men are absent from the current resurgence of poetry in Irish.

Ailbhe Ní Ghearbhuigh and Caitlín Nic Íomhair share their love of other languages, in addition to Irish and English, and Séamus Barra Ó Súilleabháin shows off his skills as Ireland’s first ever All-Ireland poetry slam champion in Irish.

Louis de Paor is an acclaimed poet in the Irish language and Professor of Irish Studies at the National University of Ireland, Galway.

Photo of Louis de Paor by Amanda Gentile.

Producer: Claire Cunningham
A Rockfinch production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 04 AUGUST 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0007b12)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 The Poet and the Echo (m00076v2)
What Are You Missing?

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Praxilla was a Greek poet writing in the 5th Century BC. Only fragments of her work remain.

Here, Candia McWilliam creates a lyrical story inspired by Praxilla’s hymn from the Underworld in which Adonis answers the question of what he misses most from life on earth…

Jayne Wright works in a failing department store by day and focuses on her true passion, painting, by night. She’s spent her adult life at a distance to other people whilst sharpening her perception of nature. But a momentary meeting might just change that disconnect for good.

Writer, Candia McWilliam
Reader, Victoria Liddelle
Producer, Kirsty Williams

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007b14)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007b16)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007b18)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0007b1b)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0007b1d)
Merton College, Oxford

Bells on Sunday comes from Merton College, Oxford. Cast by Christopher Hodson in 1680, these bells are the oldest complete ring of eight by one founder. The tenor weighs twenty four hundredweight and is tuned to E flat. We hear just a short part of a five hour peal of seven and a half thousand changes called Merton College Alliance.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b0832rjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m0007b3h)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b096gjdn)
Judgement Day

Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand reevaluates our use of the word judgemental, arguing that it needn't have negative connotations. She concludes that, ultimately, we need to be judged.

For some people of faith the phrase 'judgement day' summons up images of fire and brimstone. Shoshana reveals that for Jews, judgement day is an annual event. Yom HaDin, The Day of Judgement, is the biblical name for the holiday known as Rosh Hashanah. Shoshana explores the traditions of both Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (which follows ten days later).

Interweaving music ranging from Leonard Cohen's Who By Fire and Bob Marley's Judge Not to Mozart's Requiem Mass, Shoshana notes that the idea of a judgement day has always fascinated musicians. Interestingly, musical interpretations of the Day of Judgement vary wildly in tone. We hear the voices in Mozart's Requiem trembling with dread in response to a stern God, whilst Faure's Requiem does away with the wrathful imagery and depicts death as a peaceful release from struggle. Reflecting on the differences between these great composers' depiction of judgement day, Shoshana argues that we need a balance between judgement and mercy in our lives.

Shoshana goes on to reference the troubled history of the judicial system during the American Civil Rights Movement and the role of the therapist who must withhold their judgement when counselling their patients. She also examines the doctrine of karma - a system of divine justice.

Presenter: Shoshana Boyd Gelfand
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0007b3k)
Mission Impossible: High Country Farming

Farming New Zealand's high country takes grit, determination and self-possession- qualities that Iris and Kate Scott share with a recent visitor, Tom Cruise. Filming the latest instalment of the Mission Impossible franchise, Cruise flew in to shoot death-defying stunts amid the stunning scenery of the Southern Alps and Lake Wakatipu.

Nancy Nicolson has been to meet the Scott family - Kate and her mother Iris - on Rees Valley Station where cattle and sheep share the land with Hollywood film crews.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0007b3m)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0007b3p)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0007b3r)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme presented by William Crawley.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0007b3t)
ERIC

Dr Anne Wright makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of ERIC, The Children's Bowel & Bladder Charity.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘ERIC’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘ERIC’.

Registered Charity Number: 1002424


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0007b3w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0007b3y)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0007b40)
Radiant in Glory

Live from St Eustachius Church in Tavistock, Devon, in a week when the church celebrates the Feast of the Transfiguration - an experience for Jesus's disciples as they saw his clothes become dazzling white as they prayed on the mountain, and a loud voice coming from heaven saying 'This is my Son'.

The service is led by the Vicar of St Eustachius, The Very Reverend Dr Christopher Hardwick, and the preacher is the Bishop of Plymouth, The Right Reverend Nick McKinnel. The Exon Singers lead the congregation in hymns including 'Immortal, invisible, God only wise', and 'Hail to the Lord's Anointed'.

Director of Music: Joseph Judge. Organist: Alan Horsey. Producer: Ben Collingwood.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m00076ny)
The Vultures of Culture

"That culture can be - and is - being commoditised in the private sector, is a truth universally acknowledged with every ticket and book sale," writes Will Self.

But, he argues, the conflating of cultural and financial value has now spread well beyond the private realm.

The National Lottery is head of his blame list. "I think of the National Lottery as a sort of reverse Midas-touch, turning everything gold it finances to....rubbish."

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wp3fq)
Joe Harkness on the Nightingale

Norfolk based bird therapist Joe Harkness on the calming effect a nightingale song can be for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0007b43)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0007b45)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting

Writer - Liz John
Director - Jeremy Howe
Editor - Jeremy Howe

Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ..... Daisy Badger
Ben Archer ..... Ben Norris
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
PC Harrison Burns ..... James Cartwright
Neil Carter .... Brian Hewlett
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Will Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Ed Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Tracy Horrobin ..... Susie Riddell
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane ..... Perdita Avery
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Peggy Woolley ..... June Spencer


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m0007b47)
Sir Tim Waterstone, businessman

Sir Tim Waterstone is the founder of the bookshop chain that bears his name. Born in May 1939, he was the youngest of three children. His father, who worked for a tea company all his life, served in the Royal Army Service Corps during the war, and so was absent when Tim was very young. Their relationship was difficult throughout his childhood. Tim was educated at boarding schools from the age of six, when his parents went to India for two and a half years. After studying English at Cambridge and a stint working in India, he joined Allied Breweries, moving to WH Smith in 1973. Eight years later he was fired and at this point he decided to open his own bookshop.

The first Waterstone’s opened its doors in 1982 when Tim was 43. A further 86 bookshops opened within a decade. In 1993, he sold the company to his former employer, WH Smith. Five years later, he bought it back again as part of a newly formed group, HMV Media, but just three years after that, in 2001, he resigned as chairman. Since then he’s made several unsuccessful attempts to buy back the company which changed hands most recently in 2018.

He recently celebrated his 80th birthday and lives in London with his third wife, the television director Rosie Alison.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0007b49)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m00075js)
Series 71

Episode 6

The 71st series of the multi award-winning comedy panel game chaired by Jack Dee


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0007b4c)
The Search for Esiah's Seeds

Dan Saladino tells the story of the late Esiah Levy a food grower who shared seeds and changed lives.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0007b4f)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0007b4h)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Fence Me In (m0007b4k)
Adam Fowler records artists at work in different locations - from the ramparts of a ruined Northumberland castle to a small, echoing chamber - to test how their creativity is affected by the acoustics of a space.

While there has been research into how the built environment affects our wellbeing and how noise influences our ability to function, there is little on how the walls around us can create sonic environments for creative work.

Now musicians Anna Clock and Ailbhe Nic Oireachtaigh visit the University of Salford to perform in both the Anechoic Chamber, which reflects no sound at all, and the Reverberation Room which has the opposite effect, considering how each space affects their ability to improvise together.

Adam joins director Catherine Alexander at a Complicité Theatre Company rehearsal. She explains that the sonic architecture of a performance space is key to the devising of a Complicité production.

Poet Katrina Porteous demonstrates how her radio poem, Dunstanburgh Castle: A Secret as Old as the Stones, was informed by the acoustics of different parts of the ruins, from tiny garderobes to open expanses reverberant with the call of kittiwakes and the pulse of waves.

Finally, Chris Chafe from Stanford University describes a new way of creating an "internet acoustic", where musicians thousands of miles apart can play together in one acoustic space.

To test for himself how the acoustics that fence us in can affect our creativity, Adam edits part of the programme in some sonically challenging locations.

Producer: Adam Fowler
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m00076v0)
Wimborne

Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0007b4m)
Sunday Omnibus - Things That Make Relationships Work

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen with three conversations about the things that bind relationships together.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Ulverton (m0007b4p)
Ulverton

Ulverton: Return/Friends/Improvements

First of two dramas bookending a reading of Adam Thorpe's classic historical novel.

Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

The first drama consists of three parts. We begin with Return (1650) and a shepherd, William, who looks back on the end of the English Civil War and the day his boyhood friend Gabby came back to Ulverton after five years away fighting for Cromwell. This episode is followed by two further chapters from the book - Friends (1689) in the form of a sermon from the Rev Brazier which features a fatal snowstorm, and Improvements (1712) in which a farmer charts the progress of his farm in his journal, while lamenting his own lack of a son and heir to pass it on to.

The novel will be read from Monday to Friday for the next two weeks, before a second drama on Saturday 17th August.

Cast:
RETURN
WILLIAM: John Sackville,
ANNE: Emma Spurgin-Hussey,
GABBY: Tristan Sturrock
THOMAS WALTERS: Rory Wilton

FRIENDS:
REV BRAZIER: David Threlfall

IMPROVEMENTS
FARMER PLUMM: Richard Goulding

Dramatised by Sara Davies
Music and Sound Design: Herbie Homer Warbeck and John Etchells

Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (m0007b4t)
Owen Sheers - I Saw A Man

Owen Sheers talks about his novel I Saw A Man with James Naughtie and a group of readers at the Dylan Thomas Centre, Swansea.

After the sudden loss of his wife, Michael Turner moves from Wales to London to start again. Living on a quiet street in Hampstead, he develops a close bond with the Nelson family next door: Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters.

The friendship between Michael and the Nelsons at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, and then one Saturday afternoon in June 2008 Michael steps through the Nelsons’ back door, thinking their house is empty and everything changes.

Meanwhile thousands of miles away, just outside of Las Vegas, a man is setting in motion a change of events which eventually come to puncture life on that Hampstead Street.

And Michael finds himself bearing the burden of grief and a secret.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

September's Bookclub Choice : The Memory of Love by Aminatta Forna (2011)


SUN 16:30 Windbreakers, Sea Eagles and Anthrax (m0007b4w)
Poet Richard Price relives his childhood summer holidays on a beach in the northwest highlands. But its a place with a shadow, in the form of Gruinard or Anthrax island the site of WWII biological weapons testing.


SUN 17:00 France and Germany: Divided They Stand (m00076zz)
What if it's not Brexit, but deep cracks within the EU's key Franco-German relationship that are the greatest fault line threatening the EU? Anne McElvoy explores what economists Markus Brunnermeier, Harold James, and Jean-Pierre Landau have dubbed “the Rhine Divide”. It's a deep historical divergence of French and German economic ideas and political culture. "For Germans the historical trauma is inflation, and for the French, the historical trauma are the Germans," says German historian Andreas Roedder.
Occasionally the divide blows up in a big way, such as during the Greek debt crisis, when Germany insisted on sticking to deficit rules and austerity against France's request for leeway and a bailout.
Wolfgang Schäuble, the formidable former German finance minister, now Speaker of the German parliament, talks frankly about modern French/German relations, as does Poland's former finance minister Jacek Rostowski. He remembers the Franco-German relationship during the European debt crisis as one where "France would agree to what Germany wanted as long as Germany pretended that it was consulting France."

Schäuble now "despairs" over Brexit, and lets slip that France and Germany do in fact have different views on it. Britain's departure from the EU will re-calibrate the Franco-German relationship in France's favour, recreating more of a balance between the tandem at the heart of the EU. Could that mean that France will be less likely to go along with German wishes in future? With Brexit and other challenges on the horizon, can the EU's pivotal relationship hold?

Presenter: Anne McElvoy
Producer: Arlene Gregorius
Editor: Andrew Smith


SUN 17:40 Four Thought (b0832rjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0007b4y)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0007b50)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007b52)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0007b54)
Katie Puckrik

The best of BBC Radio this week with Katie Puckrik.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0007b56)
Neil proves a calming influence and Lynda comes to the rescue


SUN 19:15 Me and My Shadow (m0007b58)
By Georgia Pritchett. The Titter sisters are a mid-20th century comic duo playing the clubs. They can’t stand one another. A dark comedy - tantalisingly acerbic, witty and macabre, exploring the curse of being the eternal stooge.

Miranda Richardson, star of Harry Potter and Blackadder, plays dark comedy monster and genius Joy. Jessica Gunning (Dr Who and BAFTA nominated film Pride) is Jane - the stooge with hate in her heart, revenge on her mind and a total sense of humour bypass.

The drama marks a welcome return to Radio 4 for star comedy writer Georgia Pritchett, who says, "The play is an investigation, and also a celebration, of comedy, comedians, double acts and jokes." Georgia is a multi-award-winning comedy writer with four Emmys, three WGA awards and a BAFTA. She is co-executive producer and writer on the HBO multi Emmy-winning show Veep and writer and co-executive producer on HBO's show, Succession, now on its second series. She is also writing episodes of Avenue Five, Armando Iannucci’s latest series for television starring Hugh Laurie.

Cast:
Jane ... Jessica Gunning
Joy ... Miranda Richardson
Ronnie/Ollie ... Adrian Scarborough
Eric/M.C. ... Sam Alexander

Pianist ... Simon Tomlinson

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Produced by Catherine Bailey

A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Annika Stranded (m0007b5b)
Series 5

Disclosures Part Two

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Chief Inspector Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Annika is still coming to terms with the death of her friend and long-time, long suffering forensic photographer Mikel. But life goes on, and so does police work on the Oslofjord. Annika must forge a new relationship with Mikel’s young replacement, Sigrid.

Episode 8: Disclosures, Part Two
Annika and Tor from the Reindeer police investigate a crime in the northern town of Alta.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4 - including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m00076v6)
Is the age of the wireless coming to an end? Roger Bolton invites the doyen of radio critics Gillian Reynolds to cast an experienced eye over the BBC’s on-line strategy and the price its radio networks like Radio 4 are paying for it.

Roger also asks Radio 4 PM presenter Evan Davis if he is becoming disillusioned by the way politicians seem to be embracing a post-truth world and avoiding directly answering his questions.

And more listeners leap out of their comfort zones - this time to embrace Michael Caine.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Alun Beach
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m00076v4)
Russi Taylor, Beji Caid Essebsi, Jane Hubert, Iván Erőd

Pictured: Russi Taylor

Matthew Bannister on

Beji Caid Essebsi who became the first democratically elected President of Tunisia in the aftermath of the Arab Spring.

Russi Taylor the versatile voice artist best known for playing Minnie Mouse. She married the man who did the voice for Mickey Mouse.

Jane Hubert, the anthropologist and psychologist who studied young people with severe learning disabilities and transformed the academic study of archaeology.

Ivan Erod who fled persecution and, in exile, became one of Hungary's leading composers.

Interviewed guest: Mohamed El Aassar
Interviewed guest: Martin Anderson
Interviewed guest: Peter Stone
Interviewed guest: Brian Sibley

Producer: Neil George

Archive Clips from: The White House video archive, 07/10/2011; Actuality of Tunisian Uprising, RT, 14/01/2011; BBC News, 30/06/ 2015; Beji Caid Essebsi inauguration ceremony, AP archive 03/08/2015; Tunisian Television -al watania, 27/07/2019; The Voice Behind The Mouse, Walt Disney Home Video; The Spirit of Mickey, Buena Vista Home Entertainment


SUN 21:00 The Money Clinic (m0007b03)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0007b3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (m0007675)
Making an Impact

The first in a new series of In Business.

Climate-change scientists have warned that the clock is ticking, environmental campaigners are blocking the streets, but until now the world of business has kept itself out of the fray. That's changing. From multi-billion pound investors, to leaders of international companies, to banking bosses, the call is going out for business to take more responsibility for the way the world runs, and the way businesses run themselves. And it’s not just their environmental impact that’s coming under scrutiny. Inequality, their supply chains and the way they treat their workforce are becoming as much a part of companies’ bottom line as simple profit. Welcome to the Impact Economy.
David Baker meets new business champions who want to overturn the old ways of doing things and put commerce at the centre of guaranteeing a future world that is good for everyone. But will it work or is it just a flash in the pan?

Producer: John Murphy


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0007b5f)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000766q)
Who Are Children's Movies Really For ?

With Antonia Quirke

Do children’s movies offer a crash course in film genres, does Rango provide an entrée into westerns, for instance ? Neil Brand believes they do, but Larushka Ivan-Zadeh is more sceptical about the educational value of films that are written mostly by middle-aged men.

Novelist Dreda Say Mitchell enters the fray in Pitch Battle. She makes the case for The Winter Rose by Jennifer Donnelly as a book that's worthy of the movie treatment. Industry insiders Rowan Woods, Lizzie Francke and Clare Binns decide whether they would give this project the green light.

Journalist Carl Anka traces the effect of Kidulthood on British culture 12 years after it was made.


SUN 23:30 Peterloo: The Massacre That Changed Britain (m00076tg)
Episode 1 - The build-up to Peterloo

Guardian Editor-in-Chief Katharine Viner charts the story of the infamous - a devastating event 200 years ago in Manchester, which would have a huge impact on how Britain was run.

Up to 80,000 people had gathered in an area that was then known as St Peter's Field in the heart of what is now city centre Manchester. Many had walked from as far afield as Bolton, Stockport and even from over the hills in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Their mission - to peacefully demand more democracy and representation in parliament.

There was tremendous unrest in working-class communities at the time. In the cotton trade, technology had started to replace what was largely a cottage industry with huge mills. Life was hard and poverty was widespread. Areas like Manchester had no direct representation in parliament. An alliance of middle and working class people united in a common effort to find ways of raising these issues with the Government.

In the meantime, the authorities, aware of what had happened in the French Revolution, were nervous the same thing could happen in Britain. And so any sign of revolt or rebellion, however peaceful, was quashed where possible.

On August 16th 1819, troops charged the crowds in St Peter's Field - 18 people lost their lives and around 700 were injured. Within days, the press were referring to it as The Peterloo Massacre, after the battle of Waterloo just four years earlier.

In this first of two programmes, Katharine meets descendants of people who were there that day. She examines the background and build-up and hears graphic accounts of the slaughter, death and injury. There are contributions from leading historians as well as dramatic reconstructions of real testimony from the time.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4



MONDAY 05 AUGUST 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0007b5h)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 The Gamble Network (m000761k)
Spin till you win

An illegal gambling website approached Jolyon Jenkins's teenage son to make a Youtube video promoting it. They promised to rig it so he would definitely win.

The site was a loot box site with a difference. Instead of virtual items to be used in video games, it offered real world prizes like gaming consoles, smartphones and hoverboards. The loot box experience has become so familiar to youngsters from gaming that sites like this are a natural extension. It's clearly a form of gambling and is covered by UK gambling law. The website in question needed, but didn't have, a licence from the UK Gambling Commission. It has promoted itself to youngsters via young Youtube “influencers”. Presenter Jolyon Jenkins's 17 year old son is himself a successful Youtuber. He was approached by the website to make a video promoting them. They wanted to commission him to make a misleading video that showed him winning as if by chance, even though he was told that they would carry on topping up his funds until he was successful. “You spin till you win”, they said. He agreed to go along with this and ended up “winning” some expensive items. The company was aware he was under 18 but said this didn’t matter.

The UK Gambling Commission gave contradictory advice about the site, raising the question of whether it is up to speed with this new kind of gambling; and trying to find out who owned, operated, and licensed the company took Jenkins to Spain, Ireland, and ultimately - in the next programme - the Caribbean.

Presenter/Producer: Jolyon Jenkins


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0007b1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007b5k)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007b5m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007b5p)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0007b5r)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007b5t)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Rev Dr Lesley Carroll.

O for a thousand tongue to sing
We'll walk by faith
The power of the Cross
When I survey the wondrous cross
The Lord is my salvation
In Christ alone


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0007b5w)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0007b5y)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08rr9g7)
Chris Jones on the Raven

Chris Jones from Worcestershire has been fascinated by the corvid family from childhood. For years he has been rescuing sick and injured birds. Here he tells the story of one of his favourite rescue ravens.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


MON 06:00 Today (m0007bj8)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (m0007bjb)
Series 7

05/08/2019

In this series the historian Peter Hennessy asks senior politicians to reflect on their life and times. Each week he invites his guest to explore their early formative influences, their experiences of the challenges they faced and their impressions of the people they knew. In this programme Alan Johnson discusses his extraordinary life lived within the Labour movement, that took him from delivering mail in south-west London, to leading the postal workers’ union, and eventually to the House of Commons, a seat at the Cabinet table and the Home Secretary’s desk in SW1.

Yet despite the width of his political experience in the Blair and Brown governments, which embraced the Department of Work and Pensions, the Department of Health and the Department for Education, as well as the Home Office, he is perhaps just as well known for his acclaimed series of memoirs - especially the first volume dealing with his childhood in a poor part of west London and the story of how his remarkable elder sister took responsibility for his upbringing after the early death of their mother.

Peter Hennessy’s other guests in this run are Chris Patten, Norman Lamont and Peter Hain.

Producer: Rob Shepherd


MON 09:45 A Woman of Firsts (m0007bjd)
Episode 1

The memoir of Edna Adan Ismail, a remarkable daughter, midwife and First Lady.

As the eldest child of an overworked doctor in 1950s Somaliland, Edna saw first-hand how poor healthcare, lack of education and ancient superstitions had devastating effects on the country’s people, especially women. When she suffered the trauma of FGM as an 8 year-old girl, Edna’s determination was born.

She became a nurse and midwife, a formidable teacher and a campaigner for women’s health. As her country was swept up in its bloody fight for independence, Edna also rose to become its First Lady and first female cabinet minister. But mixing with Presidents and Princes, she never forgot her roots and continued to train midwives – a role she has to this day.

In time, she built her own hospital, brick by brick, in the face of many obstacles - to ensure the training of future generations. The indomitable 82 year-old Edna still delivers babies. After all - as she puts it - she is "simply a midwife".

In episode one, Edna remembers her parents' attempts to give her an education despite the lack of schooling available for Somali Muslim girls. She recalls the effect of observing her father’s medical career on her own aspirations. Her childhood is traumatised by her forced circumcision at the age of 8 years-old.

Read by Cathy Tyson.
Abridged by Anna Magnusson.
Produced by Pippa Vaughan.
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007bjg)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007bjj)
The Fruits of Gwyddno

The Fruits of Gwyddno, Part 1

By Annamaria Murphy

First in the latest series of the magical drama set in Glan Don, a mysterious village perched on the wild Welsh coast.

A low tide reveals a sunken forest on the shores of Glan Don. And one of the trees bears forbidden fruit..

Starring Sion Pritchard (Phoneshop), Emma Sidi (Pls Like) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey).

Gareth.... Sion Pritchard
Diane.... Emma Sidi
Emlyn..... Ifan Huw Dafydd
Megan.... Aimee Ffion Edwards
Gwynn.... Matthew Gravelle

Series created by Meic Povey
Directed by James Robinson and John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


MON 11:00 Hearing Homelessness (m0007bjl)
Hugh Huddy meets people who are street homeless in Cardiff and experiences with them what they hear at night and what it means to them.

In 3D sound, we hear the auditory environment at night from a homeless person's perspective: the relentless, monotonous backdrop of traffic noise, the sense of threat and chaos as revellers pass by, the relief of hearing the first train of the day and the dawn chorus break as you’ve made it through another night.

Hugh is a sound artist who lost his sight in his twenties and uses sounds to navigate the world and map out a picture in his mind of what is around him. He extrapolates the layers of a soundscape and interprets its depths.

The programme is made using binaural recording, which allows the listener to hear the world through someone else’s ears, as though the sound is coming from beyond their head. They're placed in a location through sound, and through this immersion they come away with a very personal understanding of what life is like for someone living a very different life to them, right under their nose.


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0007b0t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0007bjp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Ulverton (m0007bjr)
Ulverton

Episode 2

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Ulverton House, 1743. Lady Chalmers is confined to her room in the weeks and months after the birth of her first child. Her letters reveal a turbulent state of longing.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Eleanor Tomlinson
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0007bjt)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (m0007bjw)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0007bjy)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 The TED Interview (m0007j4c)
Bill Gates

Founded in 1984 in the USA, TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. The first TED Talks were first posted online in 2006 and since then TED Talks have had many millions of views.

In The TED Interview hosted by Chris Anderson – audiences can immerse themselves more deeply in some of the most compelling ideas heard on the TED stage.

Bill Gates looks to the future
Microsoft founder Bill Gates takes us deep into his remarkable history and propels us into the future of technology and philanthropy.

Selected highlights from a TED original podcast.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0007b56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b09r3zv3)
4/4

Finale Con Porca

by Sarah Wooley

A comedy drama series about the exploits - musical and otherwise - of a string quartet.
After playing in a festival in Lucca, the quartet is on its way home when they receive a new booking. Fergus has invited Kelly, a young Australian woman, to travel with them. Could things be beginning to go right for the Benjamin Quartet?

All music was played by the Edinburgh Quartet

4/4 was created by Robin Brooks and Sarah Wooley

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m0007bk0)
Series 9

University of Plymouth

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Plymouth with specialist subjects including History, Geology and Human Biosciences and questions ranging from deadly jellyfish to glowing jellyfish via Jack Straw, Krishna and Planck’s Constant.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Royal Holloway University of London, Aberdeen, St Catharine’s College Cambridge, Brighton and Oxford Brookes.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0007b4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Evidently Art (m0007bk3)
There is a growing movement of artists engaging in making investigative art. These art works use evidence and forensic testing to challenge our understanding of murders, scandals, and financial skullduggery.

The artists’ work focuses on revealing how economic, political, legal, linguistic, and cultural structures can be manipulated to benefit corporations, government agencies and law enforcement departments.

Forensic Architecture is based in Goldsmiths, University of London, and is a Turner Prize shortlisted, multi-disciplinary research group. They have been investigating the notorious murder of Halit Yozgat in Kassel, Germany. Using forensic tests based on witness statements they aimed to prove that a Secret Service agent who was in the internet cafe around the time of the murder and who claimed that he did not witness it, may have committed perjury. 

Forensic Architecture’s tests sought to prove whether the agent could have heard or seen the crime, or even smelt the gunpowder, presenting this evidence partly through a video at an art exhibition and later, within the court case itself.

The realm of truth seeking has opened up, it is no longer solely the domain of institutions and states. Citizen journalism and the digital age has created a new army of investigators. While this can be dangerous with the proliferation of fake news, rigorously researched and clearly presented evidence is also emerging. Artists are using their skills of commanding a public through gallery spaces - translating complicated evidence, simply and in a visually arresting way, generating debates.

Can the way artists encode and present data inspire new investigation practices in detective work or journalism? Possibly, but considering works of art as evidence within a court case, however factually based they are, remains a challenge. The accused tend to use its association with the art world to delegitimise the hard facts and scientific tests they present. However, this is not enough to prevent these complex art installations being accepted as new forms of evidence.

Evidently Art shows that works of investigative art are making a real impact on the outcome of court cases, and pioneering new forms of visual evidence.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon

Executive Producers Sarah Cuddon, Nick Romero

Producer Louise Morris

A Curtains For Radio Production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (m0007bk5)
Series exploring the place and nature of faith in today's world.x


MON 17:00 PM (m0007bk7)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007bk9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (m0007bkc)
Series 85

Episode 1

First in the brand new series.

Graham Norton, Zoe Lyons, Jenny Eclair and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0007bcy)
Kate makes her feelings clear and things don't go to plan for Kirsty


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0007bkg)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007bjj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Hannah Walker Is a Highly Sensitive Person (m0007bkj)
Hannah Jane Walker argues that sensitivity is overlooked, dismissed and under-utilised, and argues that our society would be much better off if we embraced it instead.

Two years ago, Hannah gave a Four Thought talk about sensitivity, and received hundreds of emails from strangers, reaching out to tell her the same things: that sensitivity in our society isn’t considered useful, and that, well, ‘that’s just the system that we live in, isn’t it?’ Since then, Hannah has felt slightly ashamed at having started such a powerful conversation without offering a solution. And so in this programme she sets out to do just that. She’ll be talking to several of her correspondents, as well as a psychologist, a neuroscientist, an economist and even a newly-minted activist for the highly sensitive.

The programme focuses on highly sensitive people, but sensitivity is a spectrum and as Hannah hears more about it, she also finds out more about the benefits all of us can take from being in closer touch with our sensitive sides.

Producer: Giles Edwards


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m000765h)
America's Hospital Emergency

A small town goes on life-support after its lone hospital closes. The story of Jamestown, Tennessee, recorded in the emotional hours and days after its 85-bed facility shut. Rural hospitals are closing across the United States, leaving patients dangerously exposed. Can Jamestown buck the trend and reopen?
Produced and presented by Neal Razzell.


MON 21:00 The Black Blood Donor Crisis (m00074hj)
Lindsay Johns is lying on a reclining chair in Tooting, south London, with a needle in his arm. He’s giving platelets – as he has done every two weeks for more than a decade. On the wall opposite him is a poster pleading for more black and Asian blood donors, a call which often goes unheeded. Exasperated, Lindsay is now setting out to find out why rates of blood donation are so low amongst people of colour like him.

This chronic shortage of BAME donors can cause clinical problems. Contrary to popular belief, not all blood is the same, and some types of rare blood are only found in donors from minority backgrounds. And there is a particularly high demand from people who need regular transfusions, like those with sickle cell disease.

Which all poses the question: why is there still a problem? Lindsay will set out from Tooting on a mission to answer it.

In Cardiff he meets a doctor who explains how this shortage of blood from donors of colour can cause health problems. In London, he meets people with sickle cell disease who drag their friends along to give blood, joins an NHS blood drive in one of the city’s most diverse boroughs, and meets a Muslim man who wants to see more Muslims give blood. Along the way he hears from a BBC journalist who thinks she has part of the answer, and a researcher with the Dutch blood donation system who has studied all the international research. And finally he travels back to the office above the clinic in Tooting, to meet the woman tasked with solving the problem for the NHS.

Producer: Giles Edwards


MON 21:30 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (m0007bjb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007bkm)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Ulverton (m0007bjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m00074j4)
Vikings

Michael Rosen discovers how the Vikings changed English. These invaders brought with them the words knife, gun, slaughter, ransack and anger. But then they settled, using their anger, verbs and great hair to transform our grammar, and our understanding of the landscape. With author Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough and historical linguist Laura Wright.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby


MON 23:30 Partition Voices (b08z9p9w)
Series 1

Division

On the 70th anniversary of the partition of India, Kavita Puri hears remarkable first-hand testimonies from both British Asians and the Colonial British. The division of the Indian subcontinent into Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan resulted in one of the largest migrations the world has ever seen. Over 10 million people sought refuge in one or other of the new dominions. Unspeakable violence accompanied the displacement, claiming up to a million lives, while tens of thousands of women suffered rape and abduction. Many of those who experienced the chaos have kept their silence ever since, such was their trauma. Yet those taking part in this series speak with remarkable clarity about the tumultuous events, whose legacy endures to this day within Britain's South Asian communities.

This first programme covers the years leading up to partition; a time in which many Muslims, Sikhs and Hindus recall living together harmoniously - indeed, sometimes remarkably closely. We hear about the calls for the British to quit India; the rising clamour for an independent Pakistan; the dread as communal rioting gripped ever more of the subcontinent; and how the movement of people began even before partition, as the first refugees abandoned lands inhabited for centuries; and how independence day was marked on both sides of the border.

Producer: Mike Gallagher, Tim Smith, Ant Adeane

Academic Consultants:-

Dr Joya Chatterji, Professor of South Asian History, University of Cambridge
Dr Andrew Whitehead, Honorary Professor, University of Nottingham

Radio 4's Partition Voices recordings will be archived in full in the British Library Sound Archive.



TUESDAY 06 AUGUST 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0007bkp)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 A Woman of Firsts (m0007bjd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007bkr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007bkt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007bkw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0007bky)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007bl0)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Rev Dr Lesley Carroll.

O for a thousand tongue to sing
We'll walk by faith
The power of the Cross
When I survey the wondrous cross
The Lord is my salvation
In Christ alone


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0007bl2)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08y1f9c)
Danielle Meyer on the Gannet

RSPB Yorkshire staff are reflecting on birds all this week for Tweet of the Day. Today Community and Volunteer Development Officer Danielle Meyer recalls working with gannets on Bempton cliffs in Yorkshire

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tom Bonnett.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0007bbr)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Fry's English Delight (m0007bbw)
Series 10

Order!

Order, Order! Settle down now, while the register is called. Abrahams? Atkins? Arnold? And reflect – why do we remember old classmates whose surnames occur at the beginning of the alphabet? According to a professor of economics at Colorado University, the initial of your surname (if you’re a man) may affect your life chances. The nearer A you are, the better. The professor’s surname is Zax.

The subject of order is by no means as easy as ABC. Alphabetical order as we know it occurs in languages used by 75% of humanity and is 5000 years old. This programme tries to discover why. And fails. Word order in sentences much simpler should be. Yet some rules - about, for example, the order in which adjectives occur in a sentence - are rather complicated. Why Jolly Green Giant and not Green Jolly Giant? And why ping pong, not pong ping?

All this enjoyable complexity comes before we even tackle the subject of orderliness. Writer David Sedaris, for example, is famous for pristine prose and a desire to have order in his daily surroundings. He goes to great length to achieve both, as Stephen finds out. But are they connected? Aren’t writers supposed to live disorderly lives?
The big question, which we leave till last in our running order, is how does language order thought? A psycho-linguist explains.

Oh yes, don’t forget the giving of orders, and the role of the exclamation mark. We meet a journalist and editor who told her staff not to use them for a month. It was harder than she imagined!

Producer Nick Baker/Testbed Productions


TUE 09:30 Classified Britain (m0007bc2)
Series 2

Edinburgh Evening Courant 14 April 1827

James Naughtie explores history through front page small ads.

The classified ads of the Edinburgh Evening Courant of April the 14th 1827 reveal the importance of the port of Leith - with direct passenger routes to Elsinore and St Petersburg, a public lecture intended to debunk Phrenology - the idea that an individual’s character can be determined from the shape of their skull, and Walter Scott, Europe's most prolific author, hoping to stay out of the new Bridewell debtor's prison.

Front page news is a relatively late addition to the newspaper business. For most of their first couple of centuries, British newspapers carried classified ads rather than news on their front page. They transformed the hustle and bustle of the marketplace into newsprint, so you could take it home or to the inn to pore over at your leisure.

James Naughtie travels the country discovering how these front page ads give us a snapshot of time and place, exploring how they weave national and local life together - the heartbeat of history rolling daily or weekly off the presses.

The ads tell us what people were eating, drinking and wearing, what was on stage and what people were playing at home. They mark the mood of the time through notices for public meetings held to stoke up or damp down public fears of crime and political unrest. They are a record of the notices placed for houses and public buildings to be built, licenses applied for and subscriptions raised for publications and commemorations. They show the latest labour saving gadgets "trending" as technology arrived, and they track jobs and trades on the way up and down as the British Empire waxed and waned. The ever present ads for patent medicines record our most popular ailments.

Produced by John Forsyth.
Assistant Producer: Alexandra Quinn.
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 A Woman of Firsts (m0007bc7)
Episode 2

The memoir of Edna Adan Ismail, a remarkable daughter, midwife and First Lady.

As the eldest child of an overworked doctor in 1950s Somaliland, Edna saw first-hand how poor healthcare, lack of education and ancient superstitions had devastating effects on the country’s people, especially women. When she suffered the trauma of FGM as an eight-year-old girl, Edna’s determination was born.

She became a nurse and midwife, a formidable teacher and a campaigner for women’s health. As her country was swept up in its bloody fight for independence, Edna also rose to become its First Lady and first female cabinet minister. But mixing with Presidents and Princes, she never forgot her roots and continued to train midwives – a role she has to this day.

In time, she built her own hospital, brick by brick, in the face of many obstacles - to ensure the training of future generations. The indomitable 82-year-old Edna still delivers babies. After all - as she puts it - she is 'simply a midwife'.

In this episode, Edna travels to London to complete her nursing training. The training is demanding but her father assures her that midwifery will make a huge difference to women’s health when she returns home.

Read by Cathy Tyson
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Pippa Vaughan
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007bcd)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007bcg)
The Fruits of Gwyddno

The Fruits of Gwyddno, Part 2

By Annamaria Murphy

Second in the latest series of the magical drama set in Glan Don, a mysterious village perched on the wild Welsh coast.

Diane makes a decision that will impact everyone in Glan Don.

Starring Sion Pritchard (Phoneshop), Emma Sidi (Pls Like) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey).

Gareth.... Sion Pritchard
Diane.... Emma Sidi
Emlyn..... Ifan Huw Dafydd
Megan.... Aimee Ffion Edwards
Matty.... Siw Hughes

Series created by Meic Povey
Directed by James Robinson and John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


TUE 11:00 The Power of Deceit (m0007bck)
Lucy Cooke sets out to discover why honesty is almost certainly not the best policy, be you chicken, chimp or human being. It turns out that underhand behaviour is rife throughout the animal kingdom, and can be a winning evolutionary strategy. From sneaky squid, to cheating cuckoos, some species will resort to truly incredible levels of deception and deviousness to win that mate, or get more food. And when it comes to social animals like we humans, it turns out that lying, or at least those little white lies, may be the social glue that binds us all together.

Lucy heads to the RSPB cliffs at Bempton, with Professor Tim Birkhead to discover why so many bird species appear to be such proficient deceivers, as well as visiting the very crafty ravens at The Tower of London. She speaks to psychologist Richard Wiseman about how to spot when someone is lying, and finds out whether she is any good at it. In fact, can we trust any of what she says in this documentary at all?

Presenter Lucy Cooke
Producer Alexandra Feachem


TUE 11:30 Art of Now (m0002z90)
A New School for New Orleans

Clara Amfo travels to New Orleans to meet the staff and artists from The Embassy, a dynamic, groundbreaking music studio in the 8th and 9th Districts. Based in one of the city’s most deprived areas, the studio works with music artists of all kinds to develop creative and professional skills.

Clara discovers an evolving model for musical learning developing in the face of escalating cuts to education, welfare and social investment - in a city still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Katrina 14 years ago. In a place that relies so heavily on its musical history for tourism, is there hope for some of its hardest-hit communities to create a new musical identity?

Initially based solely around music, the team behind The Embassy has since responded to the needs of the community with its 24 Carrot Garden project, and now a new project - The Material Institute - being developed in conjunction with UK-based architecture, art and design collective Assemble.

The Embassy’s program director Aimée Toledano balances the challenge of providing meaningful artistic development for those using the Embassy with the much wider obstacles that come with trauma, violence and an uncertain future.

Clara hears the stories of the New Orleans residents finding identity, hope and practical skills from a dynamic approach to creative development and learning.

Produced by Tayo Popoola
A Boom Shakalaka production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0007bcm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Ulverton (m0007bcp)
Ulverton

Episode 3

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Ulverton House, 1743. Lady Chalmers is confined to her room in the weeks and months after the birth of her first child. Her letters reveal a turbulent state of longing.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Eleanor Tomlinson
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0007bcr)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0007bct)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0007bcw)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 The TED Interview (m0007j4f)
Monica Lewinsky

Founded in 1984 in the USA, TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. The first TED Talks were first posted online in 2006 and since then TED Talks have had many millions of views.

In The TED Interview hosted by Chris Anderson - audiences can immerse themselves more deeply in some of the most compelling ideas heard on the TED stage.

Monica Lewinsky argues for a bully-free world:
Monica Lewinsky reveals the very personal price to public humiliation and explores how we can all do better.

Selected highlights from A TED original podcast.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0007bcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b08xbhgw)
In His Kiss

Anna's looking for comedy material, George is looking for love. When two people inhabit completely different emotional worlds, can there ever be a happy ending? Harry McEntire and Niamh McGowan feature in this romantic comedy by Lucy Montague Moffatt.

Aspiring comedian Anna, has moved to Manchester from Ireland to try to make it on the stand-up scene. She joins a dating app, looking for excitement and material for her shows.

Mancunian undertaker George is looking for love. When he meets Anna for a first date, he is immediately smitten. She finds him endearing, but endearing like a puppy. To help him out, she offers to spruce up his dating profile. He offers to do the same for her. How can you say no to a puppy?

George's brother Will tries to persuade George to give up now. Anna's friend Tash thinks Anna is wasting her time on someone so obviously unsuitable. Romance, cynicism and undeniable attraction make for a powerful mix. Will they, or won't they ever get together? Perhaps with a little help from Cher...

In His Kiss marks a debut on Radio 4 for writer Lucy Montague Moffatt and director Julia Ford.

Writer: Lucy Montague Moffatt
Sound Designer: Eloise Whitmore
Piano arrangements and performance: Sarah Spencer

Director: Julia Ford
Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m00079zx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (m0003td8)
Isaac Lidsky was only young when doctors diagnosed a rare eye condition which would eventually lead to him and two of his three sisters losing their sight. He hasn’t let blindness slow him down, however, and on top of his legal career he has made millions through tech start-ups. To add to his work load he is the father of triplets and wants to be a hands on Dad!


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0007bd0)
Philosophy in English

Michael Rosen looks at philosophy in English, from 17th century ideas to modern corporate slogans, via the daffodils of William Wordsworth. With historical linguist Laura Wright and philosopher Jonathan Rée

Producer: Melvin Rickarby


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0007bd2)
Series 49

Ed Balls nominates Herbert Howells

Ed Balls discusses the influence of the 20th-century composer Herbert Howells with biographer Paul Spicer. Presented by Matthew Parris.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0007bd4)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007bd6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers (m0007bd8)
Series 2

Religion

Radio 4 favourite Andy Hamilton presents a collection of observations and reminiscences from his personal life and 40-plus years working in comedy.

Over this four-part series, Andy will be sort of remembering tales about Sport, Class, Religion and Stupidity. Through comic observations and personal anecdotes, he will explore each theme, examining how much (or how little) things have changed in the 60ish years he's been on this planet.

This week, Andy considers Religion. From his early experiences as a choirboy through to his confirmation as a Church of England atheist. He shares fond memories of playing Satan in Radio 4’s long running sit com ‘Old Harry’s Game’. Andy also muses on the enduring popularity of religion. And which deity might be best at sport.

Andy was born in Fulham in 1954, read English at Cambridge and then in 1976 began writing comedy for BBC Radio, on programmes like Week Ending and The News Huddlines. In 1990, he and Guy Jenkin created Drop the Dead Donkey for Channel 4. Andy has spent much of his working life making acute observations about politics and family life. In 2007, again with Guy Jenkin, he created the massive TV hit Outnumbered, which celebrated the chaos of life with young children. More recently they created the highly topical Ballot Monkeys and Power Monkeys for Channel 4, which charted the absurdities of the General Election and then the EU Referendum. For over 20 years he has been playing the part of Satan in his Radio 4 sitcom, Old Harry's Game. Andy is also a popular panellist on shows such as The News Quiz and Have I Got News For You.

Producer: Claire Jones
A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0007bdb)
Ed has a confession to make and Susan is desperate to make things right


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0007bdd)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007bcg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Can Facebook Survive? (m0007bdg)
David Baker, contributing editor of Wired, explores the challenges facebook must meet and overcome in order to survive after a disastrous period which has seen the reputation and the business model of the social media giant questioned like never before.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0007bdj)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0007bdl)
Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, separating fact from fiction and bringing clarity to conflicting health advice, with the help of regular contributor GP Margaret McCartney


TUE 21:30 Fry's English Delight (m0007bbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007bdn)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Ulverton (m0007bcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Does the Team Drink? (m0007bdq)
Comedy and alcohol have often been linked down the years, but why do the two go hand-in-glove? The days of the seven-round lunch are - for most - no longer part of the cut-and-thrust of comedy writing and performing, but booze and laughter are still very closely linked, both on and off-stage. Practitioners behind and in front of the curtain are often no strangers to "the raising of the wrist".

In conversation with writers and performers across the generations, writer Louis Barfe explores the connections between alcohol and entertainment.

Written and presented by Louis Barfe
Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:30 Partition Voices (b09013nl)
Series 1

Aftermath

First-hand accounts of the turmoil and violence in the immediate weeks after India's partition. On the 70th anniversary of partition, Kavita Puri hears remarkable testimonies from both British Asians and the Colonial British. The division of the Indian subcontinent into Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan resulted in one of the largest forced migrations the world has ever seen. Over 10 million people sought refuge in one or other of the new dominions. Unspeakable violence accompanied the displacement, claiming up to a million lives, while tens of thousands of women suffered rape and abduction. Many of those who experienced the chaos have kept their silence ever since, such was their trauma. Yet those taking part in this series speak with remarkable clarity about the tumultuous events, whose legacy endures to this day within Britain's South Asian communities.

Programme 2 hears about the weeks immediately after partition took place. British India had been divided along religious lines and millions now found themselves on the wrong side of the border. Muslims moved to Pakistan, Hindus and Sikhs in the opposite direction. We hear eyewitness accounts of painful goodbyes, separations, and epic journeys; of ambushed trains crossing the new border, filled with corpses; of how the fertile plains of the Punjab became killing fields; the shocking ordeal of women, who risked kidnapping and sexual violence; as well as stories of courage and humanity during this turbulent time.

Producer: Mike Gallagher, Tim Smith, Ant Adeane

Academic Consultants:-

Dr Joya Chatterji, Professor of South Asian History, University of Cambridge
Dr Andrew Whitehead, Honorary Professor, University of Nottingham

Radio 4's Partition Voices recordings will be archived in full in the British Library Sound Archive.



WEDNESDAY 07 AUGUST 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0007bds)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 A Woman of Firsts (m0007bc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007bdv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007bdx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007bdz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0007bf1)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007bf3)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Rev Dr Lesley Carroll.

O for a thousand tongue to sing
We'll walk by faith
The power of the Cross
When I survey the wondrous cross
The Lord is my salvation
In Christ alone


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0007bf5)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b092fszs)
Amy Liptrot on the Corncrake

Writer and Orkney native Amy Liptrot recalls her work as the RSPB's corncrake officer on the look out for this largely nocturnal bird in the wee small hours for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Mark Ward.


WED 06:00 Today (m0007bvr)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 A Singer's Guide to Britain (m0007bvt)
Song of Myself

Renowned baritone, Roderick Williams explores how songs and singing can help us help us to define who we are and connect to the communities we inhabit.

In this first programme Roderick looks at the power of song to express a sense of identity and belonging. He visits Kilmarnock, where Eddi Reader explains how the songs of Robert Burns brought her back to an essence of Scotland after many years living away. In Aberystwyth, Georgia Ruth talks about passing on the songs of the Welsh language to her young son and the inspiration of the pioneering song collector Ruth Herbert Lewis. And we join siblings Cuthbert and Lydia Noble as they build a dry stone wall in Shepley, West Yorkshire.

Featuring, Billy Bragg, Fay Hield, Cuthbert Noble, Lydia Noble Eddi Reader and Georgia Ruth.

The instinct to sing is as old as humans themselves and, in Britain, we have been singing our story, consciously and unconsciously, all through our history. Songs that harness a fleeting thought, capture a mood, tell a tall tale, or simply make us smile.
In this four part series, Roderick Williams explores different aspects of our British story, through the lens of the songs we sing. He’ll show how songs can transport us across all classes, all eras and all areas of the UK. Each song can tell us something essential about our nation at different times and places by teleporting us right inside the experience of someone who was there. We’ll see how songs have passed from singer to singer, from listener to listener, reflecting who we are as a nation, and celebrating the things we hold most dear.


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m0007bvx)
Thought-provoking talks in which speakers explore original ideas about culture and society


WED 09:45 A Woman of Firsts (m0007bvz)
Episode 3

The memoir of Edna Adan Ismail, a remarkable daughter, midwife and First Lady.

As the eldest child of an overworked doctor in 1950s Somaliland, Edna saw first-hand how poor healthcare, lack of education and ancient superstitions had devastating effects on the country’s people, especially women. When she suffered the trauma of FGM as an eight-year-old girl, Edna’s determination was born.

She became a nurse and midwife, a formidable teacher and a campaigner for women’s health. As her country was swept up in its bloody fight for independence, Edna also rose to become its First Lady and first female cabinet minister. But mixing with Presidents and Princes, she never forgot her roots and continued to train midwives – a role she has to this day.

In time, she built her own hospital, brick by brick, in the face of many obstacles - to ensure the training of future generations. The indomitable 82-year-old Edna still delivers babies. After all - as she puts it - she is 'simply a midwife'.

In episode three, Edna experiences a profound culture shock when she returns to a newly independent Somali Republic. She longs to put into practice all she’s learned from the advanced medical teaching on offer in London. Instead, she is soon working in a hospital with no guidance, little equipment - and no salary.

Read by Cathy Tyson
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Pippa Vaughan
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007bw1)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 Curious Under the Stars (m0007bw3)
The Fruits of Gwyddno

The Fruits of Gwyddno, Part 3

By Annamaria Murphy

Third in the latest series of the magical drama set in Glan Don, a mysterious village perched on the wild Welsh coast.

Diane prepares to leave Glan Don.

Starring Sion Pritchard (Phoneshop), Emma Sidi (Pls Like) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey).

Gareth.... Sion Pritchard
Diane.... Emma Sidi
Emlyn..... Ifan Huw Dafydd
Matty…. Siw Hughes

Series created by Meic Povey
Directed by James Robinson and John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0007bw5)
Craig and Russell - I Thought I Looked Great

Two friends who live in Dundee look back to where their sense of street came from. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 Hannah Walker Is a Highly Sensitive Person (m0007bkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 All Those Women (b09ny2yh)
Series 3

Episode 1

Comedy series by Katherine Jakeways about four generations of women living under one roof.

Hetty's trying to talk Maggie out of lunch with an old friend who Maggie doesn't actually like. Meanwhile Jen's work placement isn't going entirely to plan and Emily's getting in a muddle.

All Those Women explores familial relationships, ageing, marriages - it's about life and love and things not turning out quite the way that you'd expected them to. Every week we join Hetty, Maggie, Jen and Emily as they struggle to resolve their own problems, and support one another.

Written by KATHERINE JAKEWAYS
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0007bw7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Ulverton (m0007bw9)
Ulverton

Dissection (1775)

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

Dissection: In the year 1775 an illiterate mother dictates letters for her son who has moved away from Ulverton.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Clare Corbett
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0007bwc)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m0007bwf)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0007bwh)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 The TED Interview (m0007j4k)
Yuval Noah Harari

Founded in 1984 in the USA, TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. The first TED Talks were first posted online in 2006 and since then TED Talks have had many millions of views.

In The TED Interview hosted by Chris Anderson - audiences can immerse themselves more deeply in some of the most compelling ideas heard on the TED stage.

Yuval Noah Harari reveals the real dangers ahead.
Historian and futurist Yuval Noah Harari - author of ‘Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind' - has a story about the future that's profound, exciting and unsettling.

Selected highlights from a TED original podcast.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0007bdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0b1q7ms)
Rumpole

Rumpole and the Golden Thread

In Africa defending an old pupil in a murder trial, Rumpole is arrested and Phillida arrives to bail him out. A spark between them is rekindled and burns throughout the final episodes of this long running Radio 4 series.

For fifteen years and 33 episodes, Rumpole has fought, won and, very rarely, lost myriad cases - and fallen in and out of love with his wife Hilda and
"the Portia of our Chambers", Phillida Trant, who adores him, and probably always will. These three final episodes leave us guessing until the very end - will Rumpole finally leave his wife Hilda, "She who must be obeyed", for Phillida?

Adapted by Richard Stoneman
Directed by Marilyn Imrie

A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 The Money Clinic (m0007b03)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0007bdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 The Gamble Network (m0007bwl)
How gambling interests bought a country

The trail leads us to Curacao, a small island off the coast of Venezuela. This is where many of the offshore gambling sites that at least turn a blind eye to under-age gambling are licensed.

These Curacao licences have no validity in the UK, but they do allow operators to open bank accounts. According to the US State Department, Curacao is a major route for money laundering of drugs money from Latin America, with online gambling being one of the methods used. But who issues the licences? The plot thickens as it turns out that the licensing system is of doubtful legality, and could have been designed to encourage political corruption. In fact, we discover, one of Curacao’s top politicians was assassinated a few days after threatening to blow the gaff on online gambling. The first prime minister of the newly autonomous island was jailed for political corruption, after it was shown that he had laundered money received by a major gambling operator alleged by the Italian police to have mafia connections.

So it appears that from the outset, organised crime set out to buy an island to facilitate gambling and drug money laundering. Could it be that the gambling your child is doing with video games is ultimately connected to organised crime and murder on the other side of the world?

Presenter/Producer: Jolyon Jenkins


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0007bwn)
Hunting spies and exposing lies

Eliot Higgins is the founder of Bellingcat, the team of open-source investigators behind a series of extraordinary scoops. Their investigations into Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 and the Salisbury poisoning case have made headlines around the world.

In this extended edition of The Media Show, Eliot Higgins tells Amol Rajan how his online hobby of analysing social media videos from the Syrian conflict led to the creation of Bellingcat and a new career in open-source journalism.

Producer: Richard Hooper
Assistant Producer: Natalia Fernandez


WED 17:00 PM (m0007bwq)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007bws)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Gaby's Talking Pictures (m0007bwv)
Series 2

Episode 2

Gaby Roslin hosts the film quiz with impressions by Alistair McGowan and Ronni Ancona. This week, team captains John Thomson and Ellie Taylor are joined by special guests Ben Bailey Smith and Dave Berry.

Presented by Gaby Roslin
Team Captains: John Thomson and Ellie Taylor
Impressionists: Alistair McGowan and Ronni Ancona
Created by Gaby Roslin
Written by Carrie Quinlan and Barney Newman

Produced by Gaby Roslin and Barney Newman
Executive Producer Gordon Kennedy
Recorded at RADA Studios, London

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0007bwx)
Oliver finds himself unexpectedly impressed and there's tension at Brookfield


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0007bwz)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007bw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (m0007bx1)
Citizenship

Clive Anderson and guests discuss whether the Home Office should have the power to take away the citizenship of someone born and brought up in Britain.

If a British person travels to Syria and joins a proscribed terrorist group, should they be allowed to keep their British citizenship? The case of Shamima Begum, whose citizenship was revoked earlier this year, made headlines - but she’s far from the only British-born person to have her passport taken away. In 2017, the Home Office issued 104 deprivation of citizenship orders in cases where the Secretary of State believed that the deprivation was “conducive to the public good”.

Are these deprivations a vital tool in our fight against terrorism, or a worrying move towards turning citizenship into a privilege rather than an inalienable right.

Immigration lawyer Fahad Ansari argues that, by revoking citizenship from people who have the right to citizenship in another country, the government is creating a two-tier system, where someone with family ties outside Britain can be treated differently to someone without them. The former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation Lord Carlile says that we need to be able to protect the public from people who intend to carry out terror attacks and removing citizenship is one way to do that, particularly where there is not enough evidence for a criminal trial.

Clive’s guests will also explore what’s required to become a British citizen, attempting to answer some questions from the Life in the UK test with Professor Thom Brooks from Durham Law School – himself a dual British-US citizen.

Producer: Hannah Marshall
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m0007bvx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Stranger Than Sci-Fi (m0007bx3)
Space Colonies

Astro-physicist Dr. Jen Gupta and comedian Alice Fraser travel the parallel worlds of science and sci-fi.

Starting with the latest books and films, they discover real life science that sounds too strange to be true - from babies grown in bags, via black hole Jacuzzis, to flowers that behave like our ears.

In this episode, Jen and Alice explore one of the oldest questions in science and science fiction - why should we travel into space? At a time when Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos are promising space colonies in the next fifty years, is it time to rethink our relationship with space? They talk to the astro-biologist Dr. Louisa Preston about whether there is life out there on other planets.

Then they find out how we might already be endangering that potential life. The space archeologist Dr Alice Gorman explains how we are polluting our solar system, why we should worry about space junk and what a manifesto for sustainable space travel might look like.

Produced by Joe Sykes
Executive Producer: Peggy Sutton
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


WED 21:30 A Singer's Guide to Britain (m0007bvt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007bx5)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Ulverton (m0007bw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 The John Moloney Show (m0007bx7)
Jeffrey, the Jack Russell

The Godfather of British stand-up John Moloney returns to the live stage to share his latest tribulations of modern life.

This week, John welcomes a new member to the family, Jeffrey, who causes nearly as much mischief as his 'father' used to do when he was growing up. This is the start of a new, healthier journey for John, where he really does go and see a man about a dog.

Featuring Karen Bartke and Tim Wallers.

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 TEZ Talks (b09r6fw5)
Series 2

8. Made in Britain

In this final episode of the series Tez talks about what it is like being both Muslim and British at the same time.

Written and performed by Tez Ilyas
Produced by Carl Cooper

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:30 Partition Voices (b090wg29)
Series 1

Legacy

First-hand accounts of the turmoil and violence in the immediate weeks after India's partition and their continuing legacy in Britain. On the 70th anniversary of partition, Kavita Puri hears remarkable testimonies from both British Asians and the Colonial British. The division of the Indian subcontinent into Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan resulted in one of the largest forced migrations the world has ever seen. Over 10 million people sought refuge in one or other of the new dominions. Unspeakable violence accompanied the displacement, claiming up to a million lives, while tens of thousands of women suffered rape and abduction. Many of those who experienced the chaos have kept their silence ever since, such was their trauma. Yet those taking part in this series speak with remarkable clarity about the tumultuous events, whose legacy endures to this day within Britain's South Asian communities.

Programme 3 hears about the reverberations of Partition in Britain for those who lived through it and the subsequent generations. It is a story of loss and what endures. We hear of emotional pilgrimages back to the place that people fled; why many of the partition generation kept their silence for 70 years; how the second and third generation are trying to piece together their family history; and how the memory of shared existence and traditions is what many survivors want remembered.

Producers: Michael Gallagher, Tim Smith and Ant Adeane

Radio 4's Partition Voices recordings will be archived in full in the British Library Sound Archive.



THURSDAY 08 AUGUST 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0007bx9)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 A Woman of Firsts (m0007bvz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007bxc)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007bxf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007bxh)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0007bxk)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007bxm)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Rev Dr Lesley Carroll.

O for a thousand tongue to sing
We'll walk by faith
The power of the Cross
When I survey the wondrous cross
The Lord is my salvation
In Christ alone


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0007bxp)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b097cjz7)
Robert Martin on the Cerulean Paradise-flycatcher

Rob Martin of BirdLife International shares an encounter in Indonesia with one of the rarest birds in the world: the Cerulean Paradise-flycatcher, which he feared was extinct.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Eliza Lomas.


THU 06:00 Today (m0007cv1)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Her Story Made History (m0007cv3)
Series 2

Betty Bigombe

How this Ugandan politician negotiated for peace with the brutal warlord Joseph Kony. In this series, Lyse Doucet, the BBC's Chief International Correspondent, talks to remarkable women across the globe about their role in the democratic system.

In the 1980s, President Museveni asked Betty Bigombe to go to the north of the country and try and negotiate piece with a notorious warlord; Joseph Kony of the Lord's Resistance Army. Her friends told her: 'Resign, he wants you dead. This is not a woman's job.' Yet despite witnessing some unspeakable horrors, she was determined to see things through - at great risk to her own safety. It was a process that dominated two decades of her life and although it took its toll personally and professionally she tells Lyse: 'I have no regrets. I would do it again'.

Producer: Ben Carter


THU 09:30 One to One (m0003qx3)
Life in prison: Alan Rusbridger talks to Jonathan Aitken

In 1999, Jonathan Aitken was sentenced to 18 months for perjury and perverting the course of justice. He went on to spend seven months behind bars, in three different prisons. At the time, Alan Rusbridger was his adversary. Then editor of The Guardian newspaper, Alan had reported Jonathan to the police for perjury after a high profile libel trial.

Twenty years on, Alan sits down with Jonathan, now a chaplain at Pentonville Prison, to find out what he learned from life behind bars, how the experience of incarceration changed the way he thought, and how it continues to shape his life today.

Producer: Camellia Sinclair


THU 09:45 A Woman of Firsts (m0007cv5)
Episode 4

The memoir of Edna Adan Ismail, a remarkable daughter, midwife and First Lady.

As the eldest child of an overworked doctor in 1950s Somaliland, Edna saw first-hand how poor healthcare, lack of education and ancient superstitions had devastating effects on the country’s people, especially women. When she suffered the trauma of FGM as an 8 year-old girl, Edna’s determination was born.

She became a nurse and midwife, a formidable teacher and a campaigner for women’s health. As her country was swept up in its bloody fight for independence, Edna also rose to become its First Lady and first female cabinet minister. But mixing with Presidents and Princes, she never forgot her roots and continued to train midwives – a role she has to this day.

In time, she built her own hospital, brick by brick, in the face of many obstacles - to ensure the training of future generations. The indomitable 82 year-old Edna still delivers babies. After all - as she puts it - she is "simply a midwife".

In episode four, Edna recalls the pain and humiliation of her wedding night as a circumcised woman. Now a First Lady, married to the Somali Republic’s Prime Minister, she insists on continuing to work at the hospital and carrying out emergency midwifery work in remote nomadic settlements. Political turmoil affects her personal life.

Read by Cathy Tyson.
Abridged by Anna Magnusson.
Produced by Pippa Vaughan.
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007cv7)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007cv9)
The Fruits of Gwyddno

The Fruits of Gwyddno, Part 4

By Annamaria Murphy

Fourth in the latest series of the magical drama set in Glan Don, a mysterious village perched on the wild Welsh coast.

Down in the sunken forests of Gwyddno, Gwynn makes a dangerous discovery.

Starring Sion Pritchard (Phoneshop), Emma Sidi (Pls Like) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey).

Gareth.... Sion Pritchard
Diane.... Emma Sidi
Emlyn..... Ifan Huw Dafydd
Gwynn.... Matthew Gravelle

Series created by Meic Povey
Directed by James Robinson and John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m0007cvc)
Genoa's Broken Bridge

An icon of Italian design; a centrepiece of a community; a tragedy waiting to happen? When the Morandi bridge opened in 1967, it was one of the longest concrete bridges in the world, connecting the port of Genoa with the rest of Italy and Italy with northern Europe. Built during the post-war economic boom, it was the centrepiece of Italy’s plans to modernise its roads and was a proud symbol of the country’s engineering and architectural expertise. But all that came to a tragic end in August last year when a section of the bridge collapsed killing 43 people and leaving 600 people without a home. Helen Grady speaks to people whose lives have been touched by the bridge from the moment it was built to the moment it collapsed. And she asks how such a vital piece of infrastructure, carrying thousands of cars and lorries every day, could be allowed to fail.

Producer Alice Gioia


THU 11:30 Art of Now (m0007cvf)
Batter! Batter! Boom!

How are some of Scotland’s diverse communities discovering the joys of sound art? Join the new generation of noise-makers, as they get creative with their sonic environments.

The very idea of sonic art is, for many, a complete turn-off. It can feel exclusive, challenging, and even threatening. Yet in some surprising places, creative noise-making is capturing the imagination.

In Glasgow, audio innovators from a variety of backgrounds are collecting sounds around them, then shaping their recordings into playful, bizarre and beautiful compositions.

What attracts these new noise-makers? How does their work smash sonic stereotypes? And, who’s listening?

Radio producer Steve Urquhart spends time with emerging sound recordists – including unaccompanied young asylum seekers exploring their new audio environments, and people with disabilities crafting original work for an experimental art radio station.

“To go into the sound landscapes, there’s depth and openness, and valleys…”

“Around Possilpark we found the really cool sounds in puddles, bottles, squeaky doors…”

“Can I make a joyous noise here? That’d be dead good!”

Featuring work created with:
Maryhill Integration Network
New Young Peers Scotland
Project Ability
Radiophrenia
Young People’s Futures, Possilpark

Produced and presented by Steve Urquhart
A Boom Shakalaka production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0007cvh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Ulverton (m0007cvk)
Ulverton

Rise (1803)

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

In Rise (1803), Samuel Daye recalls working for a master carpenter in the village of Ulverton.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by TBC
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0007cvm)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m0007cvp)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0007cvr)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 The TED Interview (m0007j4h)
Elizabeth Gilbert

Founded in 1984 in the USA, TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. The first TED Talks were first posted online in 2006 and since then TED Talks have had many millions of views.

In The TED Interview hosted by Chris Anderson - audiences can immerse themselves more deeply in some of the most compelling ideas heard on the TED stage.

Elizabeth Gilbert shows up for...everything.
Chris Anderson talks to Elizabeth Gilbert. As a writer, Elizabeth Gilbert is notorious for placing her heart squarely on her sleeve. Her best-selling memoir "Eat Pray Love" was a sensation precisely because of her eloquent, open-hearted descriptions of fear, divorce and wanting everything life had to offer. When she spoke at TED back in 2009, she charmed the audience with her frank descriptions of what happened after the book became a runaway success and her lyrical ideas of the nature of creativity. Nearly ten years later, in this extraordinarily intimate conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, she shares why openness, transparency and creativity are still central to her philosophy of life -- even when faced with moments of desperation and personal tragedy.

Selected highlights from a TED original podcast.


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0007bwx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m0007cvt)
The Summer Snows

Robert Bathurst stars in a dramatisation of the writer Christopher Nicholson’s non-fiction book, Among the Summer Snows. In late summer in 2016, Nicholson sets off from Dorset for the Scottish mountains in search of snow. He’s not entirely sure why he’s going. He’s haunted by the death of his wife, he has a daughter with chronic fatigue, and he has recently had a back operation. Yet he has a compulsion to hunt for the last remnants of snow, the iceberg relics of winter. A poetic and compelling exploration of what matters in the writer’s life as he confronts nature in the raw, dramatised by Nicholson and Jonathan Smith.
Christopher ..... Robert Bathurst
Hugh ..... Christopher Harper
Helen ..... Helen Clapp
Young Christopher ..... Oliver Zetterstrom
Mother ..... Catherine Cusack
Richard ..... David Hounslow
Ranger ..... Kenny Blyth
Mrs Cameron ..... Hilary Maclean
Other parts played by the cast
Producer/director: Bruce Young


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0007cvw)
Southwell's Workhouse

Helen Mark visits the last surviving workhouse, the minster and a very special apple tree to find out how these important landmarks in Southwell have impacted on the lives of those who live there.

Michael Perkins lived in the workhouse in 1948 with his mother and six siblings when they became homeless. Now aged 75 he goes back to the workhouse and revisits the room he lived in – he remembered “the pink brick walls and always feeling hungry“.
The workhouse was a place of last resort for the poorest and opened in 1824 and was built by Rev John Becher a resident and clergyman of Southwell Minster.
Robert Merryweather’s great grandfather was fortunate and didn’t need to turn to the workhouse as aged just seventeen it was him and his family who pioneered the 'Bramley apple' from the original 200 year old apple tree planted in Southwell .
But, Emma Rose a dancer, says she probably wouldn’t have escaped the workhouse had she been born a 100 years ago – last year the young single mum found herself homeless. After visiting the workhouse she choreographed a dance inspired by the stories of mums being separated from their children which was a common practice in the workhouse.

Today, the workhouse is owned by the National Trust and is one of the last remaining workhouses where visitors can get a glimpse of what life was like for those who lived there. This year for the first time the infirmary which was added onto the workhouse a few years later, has been restored and gives an insight into how the sick and dying were treated.

Presenter Helen Mark
Producer: Perminder Khatkar

Dance choreographed by Emma Rose.
Filmed by Artist & Filmmaker Benjamin Wigley from ARTDOCS with sound design by CJ Mirra.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0007b3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (m0007b4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m0007cvy)
Where to Begin With... Quentin Tarantino

With Raifa Rafiq

Raifa Rafiq, of the Mostly Lit podcast, hosts three summer specials called Where To Begin With...

In the first edition, she enlists the help of critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey to find out where she should begin with the films of Quentin Tarantino.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0007cw0)
Gareth Mitchell and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0007cw2)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007cw4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Welcome to Wherever You Are (m0007cw6)
Series 2

Episode 4

Welcome To Wherever You Are is a truly global stand-up show, in which comedians perform from wherever on the planet they happen to be, via high quality phone lines and internet video, to a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, London.

This week’s show features the best in international stand-up from Argentina, Hungary and Slovenia. Eliana La Casa @elianalacasa
is the resident MC of Buenos Aires’ first English language stand-up night and performs for us from Radio Colmena in the heart of la gran capital. Ambrus Oroscz @AmbroseOrosz, the first Hungarian to perform stand-up at the Edinburgh festival dials in from Budapest with stories of politics and his favourite “uncle jokes”. Tin Vodopivec @tinvodopivec Skypes in from Radio Slovenia in Llubljana where he’s the biggest national stand-up having recently supported Eddie Izzard on his tour in the country.

The show is hosted by Andrew Maxwell, a multiple Edinburgh Comedy Award nominee and a regular on The News Quiz, The Now Show, and who has presented his own Radio 4 series, Andrew Maxwell's Public Enemies.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Hayley Sterling
A BBC Studios Production


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0007cw8)
There's bad news for Jazzer and Jakob gets the wrong end of the stick


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0007cwb)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007cv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Making History (m0002gqz)
Bread Lines

Tom Holland and Iszi Lawrence follow history’s story-laden lines and linkages to uncover connections and compelling stories. This week, with food banks and the effects of austerity never far from the headlines, Tom and Iszi examine breadlines and hunger, from the Scottish clearances to the Rowntrees in York.

Archaeobotanist Professor Dorian Fuller talks about the significance of the recent discovery of the world’s oldest bread – which dates back 14,500 years to the time of hunter-gatherers before the beginning of farming.

Producer: Kim Normanton
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


THU 20:30 In Business (m0007cwd)
Berries Galore

Strawberries at Christmas? No problem! And as cheap as ever? Yes, of course! Many of us have become used to buying whatever fruit and vegetables we want, whenever we want, no matter the season. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries are available in supermarkets all year round. Until recently that was not the case. So what does it take for this to happen and what’s the cost? John Murphy peels back the layers of the berry industry, which has grown massively in recent years. Despite increasing production costs, prices have remained stable. Can that continue? Politics, economics and the environment could have a bruising impact on producers and on the price and availability of the fresh fruit we eat.

Presenter: John Murphy
Producer: Sally Abrahams


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0007cw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Her Story Made History (m0007cv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007cwg)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Ulverton (m0007cvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Elephant in the Room (m0007cwj)
Episode 7

Sarah Millican hosts a new panel show using surveys to discover who is the most Average Jolene, and who is the most Maverick Matilda. This week's panel features Jo Caulfield, Emma Kennedy, Jessica Fostekew and Mark Watson.

Surveys on subjects including childhood, daily rituals and favourite cheese are the basis for Sarah's questions to the panellists, discovering who is the closest to, and furthest from, the average. Surprising quirks, hilarious insights and unexpected anecdotes are revealed along the way.

The winner will be the most average. But joint winner will be the most different, the furthest from the norm.

A little bit like a dinner party, but one where you know all of the spoons.

A Chopsy production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 The Untold (b09jcd4d)
The Oboe Man

Paul Mosby was a professional oboist. Now with advanced Alzheimers, he is largely non-verbal, and spends his days walking the corridors of his care home. His wife Yvonne and daughter Helen hope that music therapy might awaken his connexion with music, and with himself. Paul made the decision to stop playing the oboe nearly twenty years ago. He put it away in a box, and has not played since. And the early music sessions don't go well - Paul only stays a few minutes and then again begins his endless walking. Then his daughter brings in an old oboe that he gave her many years before - will it evoke any memories in Paul and re-connect him with his past?



FRIDAY 09 AUGUST 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0007cwl)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 A Woman of Firsts (m0007cv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007cwn)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0007cwq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0007cws)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0007cwv)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0007cwx)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with Rev Dr Lesley Carroll.

O for a thousand tongue to sing
We'll walk by faith
The power of the Cross
When I survey the wondrous cross
The Lord is my salvation
In Christ alone


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0007cwz)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (m00026h0)
Trudie Goodwin on the Carib Grackle

Trudie Goodwin is probably best known for her television roles as Sergeant June Ackland in The Bill and latterly in Emmerdale. But during all that time Trudie has possessed a lifelong interest in birds and bird watching. It was while on holiday in the Caribbean that Trudie first heard the call of the male carib grackle, a tropical blackbird. And she fell in love with this noisy, curious and intelligent bird so much she'd have loved to bring one home with her after the holiday.

You can hear more from Trudie in her Tweet of the Week omnibus available on the Radio 4 website

Producer : Andrew Dawes


FRI 06:00 Today (m0007dj2)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0007b47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 A Woman of Firsts (m0007dkx)
Episode 5

The memoir of Edna Adan Ismail, a remarkable daughter, midwife and First Lady.

As the eldest child of an overworked doctor in 1950s Somaliland, Edna saw first-hand how poor healthcare, lack of education and ancient superstitions had devastating effects on the country’s people, especially women. When she suffered the trauma of FGM as an eight-year-old girl, Edna’s determination was born.

She became a nurse and midwife, a formidable teacher and a campaigner for women’s health. As her country was swept up in its bloody fight for independence, Edna also rose to become its First Lady and first female cabinet minister. But mixing with Presidents and Princes, she never forgot her roots and continued to train midwives – a role she has to this day.

In time, she built her own hospital, brick by brick, in the face of many obstacles - to ensure the training of future generations. The indomitable 82-year-old Edna still delivers babies. After all - as she puts it - she is 'simply a midwife'.

In the final episode, Edna’s marriage to Mohammed ends, following a military coup. But, undaunted and in the face of extraordinary obstacles, Edna achieves her life’s ambition - she builds her longed-for hospital. She also continues her passionate campaign against FGM.

Read by Cathy Tyson
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Pippa Vaughan
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0007dj6)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007dj8)
The Fruits of Gwyddno

The Fruits of Gwyddno, Part 5

By Annamaria Murphy

Last in the current series of the magical drama set in Glan Don, a mysterious village perched on the wild Welsh coast.

As the tide returns to reclaim the sunken forest, Diane and Gareth prepare to complete the sale of the Druids Rest.

Starring Sion Pritchard (Phoneshop), Emma Sidi (Pls Like) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey).

Gareth.... Sion Pritchard
Diane.... Emma Sidi
Emlyn..... Ifan Huw Dafydd
Megan.... Aimee Ffion Edwards
Matty…. Siw Hughes

Series created by Meic Povey
Directed by James Robinson and John Norton
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


FRI 11:00 Peterloo: The Massacre That Changed Britain (m0007djb)
Episode 2 - the aftermath of Peterloo

Guardian Editor-in-Chief Katharine Viner charts the story of the infamous - a devastating event 200 years ago in Manchester, which would have a huge impact on how Britain was run.

Up to 80,000 people had gathered in an area that was then known as St Peter's Field in the heart of what is now city centre Manchester. Many had walked from as far afield as Bolton, Stockport and even from over the hills in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Their mission - to peacefully demand more democracy and representation in parliament.

There was tremendous unrest in working-class communities at the time. In the cotton trade, technology had started to replace what was largely a cottage industry with huge mills. Life was hard and poverty was widespread. Areas like Manchester had no direct representation in parliament. An alliance of middle and working class people united in a common effort to find ways of raising these issues with the Government.

In the meantime, the authorities, aware of what had happened in the French Revolution, were nervous the same thing could happen in Britain. And so any sign of revolt or rebellion, however peaceful, was quashed where possible.

On August 16th 1819, troops charged the crowds in St Peter's Field - 18 people lost their lives and around 700 were injured. Within days, the press were referring to it as The Peterloo Massacre, after the battle of Waterloo just four years earlier.

In this second of two programmes, Katharine examines what happened in the immediate aftermath of Peterloo. She hears about those who lost their lives, the survivors, the press and public reaction and the attempts at a cover up. She also looks at the impact Peterloo had on British life and politics in subsequent years and decades – how the Government tightened controls on the people but how, gradually, things began to change and the franchise was extended. One of the direct outcomes of the massacre was the establishment of The Guardian newspaper - known then as the Manchester Guardian - just two years later.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:30 Hazel Tours (m0007djd)
A new comedy from the creators of Clare in the Community.

Meet Hazel Begg, local historian and proud resident of Weith - a town in the Scottish Borders. Hazel’s the brains behind a one-woman tourism empire (well, she’s in charge of local interest tours of the town, but she’s got big plans for the place).

Join her tour group, as she reveals Weith's hidden secrets and, inadvertently, some of her own.

A brand new sitcom for Radio 4, written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden.

Starring:
KAREN FISHWICK, JAMIE QUINN, MIKE MCSHANE, EWAN BAILEY, GBEMISOLA IKUMELO, MARGARET CABOURN-SMITH

Produced by Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0007dm2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Ulverton (m0007djj)
Ulverton

Deposition

Adam Thorpe's ground-breaking Ulverton was published in 1992. Although it was a first novel, the reviews heralded a "masterpiece" (Peter Kemp, Sunday Times) and it was also celebrated in the American press - "as encompassing a portrait of what it means to be British as I have ever read" (Seattle Times) and "One of the great British fictional works of our time" (LA Times).

It's a novel which has long been celebrated for the way it employs all the lyrical agility of the English language as it evolved down the centuries to give us a narrative that is shaped by time and character and born of a particular landscape - the chalk downlands of West Berkshire. A succession of different voices offer brief glimpses of life in Ulverton at roughly a generation's interval.

In Deposition, a clerk takes notes during a trial, but is distracted by thoughts of his betrothed.

Written by Adam Thorpe
Read by Emma Spurgin Hussey, Rory Wilton, Tristan Sturrock
Abridged by Sara Davies and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0007djl)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0007djn)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0007djq)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The TED Interview (m0007j56)
David Brooks

Founded in 1984 in the USA, TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. The first TED Talks were first posted online in 2006 and since then TED Talks have had many millions of views.

In The TED Interview hosted by Chris Anderson - audiences can immerse themselves more deeply in some of the most compelling ideas heard on the TED stage.

David Brooks on political healing
New York Times pundit David Brooks describes a plan to rebuild broken communities and offers actionable steps to live a more meaningful life.

Selected highlights from a TED original podcast.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0007cw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 The Interrogation (m0007djs)
The Interrogation - Series 7

Carly

Carly bit a police officer, but that's not why D.I. Max Matthews and D.S. Sean Armitage want to talk to her.

Cast

Max ..... Kenneth Cranham
Sean ..... Alex Lanipekun
Carly ..... Lizzy Watts
Nathan ..... Joseph Ayre

Writer ..... Roy Williams
Music ..... David Pickvance
Director ..... Jessica Dromgoole
Producer ..... Mary Peate


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0007djv)
Country File Live at Blenheim Palace

Peter Gibbs chairs the show at Country File Live at Blenheim Palace. Christine Walkden, Bob Flowerdew and James Wong answer this week's questions from budding gardeners.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 The Poet and the Echo (m0007djx)
Three Things Which Come Unasked

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Iain Finlay Macleod takes an anonymous Gaelic poem as the inspiration for a witty contemporary story.

Writer, Iain Finlay Macleod
Reader, Fiona MacNeil
Producer, Gaynor Macfarlane

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0007djz)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0007dk1)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m0007dk3)
Dillon and Jim - Living with Asperger’s

Father and son, both with Asperger’s Syndrome, talk about how it has affected their lives. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m0007dk5)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007dk9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Lobby Land (m0007dkc)
Series 2

Episode 4

Second series of the Westminster sitcom.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m0007dkf)
Writer – Liz John
Director – Rosemary Watts
Editor – Jeremy Howe

Ruth Archer ….. Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Harrison Burns ….. James Cartwright
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Eddie Grundy ….. Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Will Grundy ….. Philip Molloy
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kate Madikane ….. Perdita Avery
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Oliver Sterling ….. Michael Cochrane
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley
Jakob Hakansson ….. Paul Venables


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m0007dkh)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 Curious Under the Stars (m0007dj8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0007dkk)
Nimco Ali, Ruth Lea, Lloyd Russell-Moyle MP, Grant Shapps MP

Ritula Shah presents political debate from the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, London with the FGM campaigner Nimco Ali, Economist Ruth Lea, Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle and the Conservative MP Grant Shapps.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0007dkm)
To the Bathroom!

"Christianity has a lot to answer for," writes Will Self, "when it comes to our estrangement from our bodies - making our evacuations, quite as much as our sexual acts - an anathema in polite society".

Will argues that our infantilism in this regard detracts from our engagement with the world.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


FRI 21:00 Is That Machine On? (b0b3vv2q)
Stuart Maconie celebrates the golden age of the music press interview.

In the heyday of the printed music media between the mid-sixties and the early noughties, the music interview was many things - combative, intimate, confessional, unhinged, flirtatious, sometimes violent - but it was rarely dull. Still, it seems that long-gilded age of rock journalism is now over.

The days of extraordinary access, when a reporter might spend a week with a band on its tour bus or private plane, hanging out in their dressing rooms and hotel suites, are at an end. The music papers are gone. Earlier this year NME - the last inky survivor - went online only.

Stuart Maconie looks back at the lost world - those revealing encounters between journalist and musician. The programme features classic recorded archive interviews with Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, Bob Marley and Michael Jackson - as well as contributions from journalists Caitlin Moran, Barney Hoskyns, Allan Jones, Dawn Slough and others.

Presenter: Stuart Maconie
Producer: Jonathan Mayo
A TBI production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0007dkp)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Ulverton (m0007djj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0007bd2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:25 The Untold (b09r3yyb)
Out of Their League

Grace Dent tells the story of Yeovil Town Ladies, a team of part time players who must raise £350,000 in order to turn professional and stay in the top tier of women's football.

In November 2016 Yeovil Town Ladies Football Club hit the headlines with a fairy tale story. They were the part time team who had won their way to Women's Super League 1, the highest level of football in the country. A team of students, nurses and firefighters would rub shoulders with Arsenal, Chelsea and Manchester City.

Yet just a few weeks into their first season in WSL 1, the club was hit with devastating news. In order to remain in the league next season, they need to apply as a fully professional club and raise £350,000 to pay their players.

With just a few weeks before the application must be submitted, Grace Dent follows the club as they raise funds while facing gruelling matches against the best players in the world.

Producers: Mohini Patel and Sam Peach.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0007dks)
Gemma and Laura - Queers on Stage

Two cabaret artists living in Belfast talk about their focus on feminist and LGBT issues. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m00076ny)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0007dkm)

A Singer's Guide to Britain 09:00 WED (m0007bvt)

A Singer's Guide to Britain 21:30 WED (m0007bvt)

A Woman of Firsts 09:45 MON (m0007bjd)

A Woman of Firsts 00:30 TUE (m0007bjd)

A Woman of Firsts 09:45 TUE (m0007bc7)

A Woman of Firsts 00:30 WED (m0007bc7)

A Woman of Firsts 09:45 WED (m0007bvz)

A Woman of Firsts 00:30 THU (m0007bvz)

A Woman of Firsts 09:45 THU (m0007cv5)

A Woman of Firsts 00:30 FRI (m0007cv5)

A Woman of Firsts 09:45 FRI (m0007dkx)

All Those Women 11:30 WED (b09ny2yh)

Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers 18:30 TUE (m0007bd8)

Annika Stranded 19:45 SUN (m0007b5b)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0007b0b)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m00076nw)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0007dkk)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0007b0y)

Art of Now 15:30 SAT (m00074hl)

Art of Now 11:30 TUE (m0002z90)

Art of Now 11:30 THU (m0007cvf)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0007cw0)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0007cw0)

Bad Faith 14:30 SAT (b00qpsrj)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0007b1d)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0007b1d)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (m0007bk5)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (m0007b4t)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (m0007b4t)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0007b43)

Can Facebook Survive? 20:00 TUE (m0007bdg)

Classified Britain 09:30 TUE (m0007bc2)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m000765h)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m0007cvc)

Curious Under the Stars 10:45 MON (m0007bjj)

Curious Under the Stars 19:45 MON (m0007bjj)

Curious Under the Stars 10:45 TUE (m0007bcg)

Curious Under the Stars 19:45 TUE (m0007bcg)

Curious Under the Stars 10:41 WED (m0007bw3)

Curious Under the Stars 19:45 WED (m0007bw3)

Curious Under the Stars 10:45 THU (m0007cv9)

Curious Under the Stars 19:45 THU (m0007cv9)

Curious Under the Stars 10:45 FRI (m0007dj8)

Curious Under the Stars 19:45 FRI (m0007dj8)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m0007b47)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0007b47)

Does the Team Drink? 23:00 TUE (m0007bdq)

Drama 14:15 MON (b09r3zv3)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08xbhgw)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0b1q7ms)

Drama 14:15 THU (m0007cvt)

Elephant in the Room 23:00 THU (m0007cwj)

Evidently Art 16:00 MON (m0007bk3)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m00079zn)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0007b5w)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0007bl2)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0007bf5)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0007bxp)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0007cwz)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m00076v6)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0007dk1)

Fence Me In 13:30 SUN (m0007b4k)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m000760q)

Four Thought 19:00 SAT (b0832rjl)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b0832rjl)

Four Thought 17:40 SUN (b0832rjl)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m0007bvx)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m0007bvx)

France and Germany: Divided They Stand 17:00 SUN (m00076zz)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m00079zz)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0007bkg)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0007bdd)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0007bwz)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0007cwb)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m0007dkh)

Fry's English Delight 09:00 TUE (m0007bbw)

Fry's English Delight 21:30 TUE (m0007bbw)

Gaby's Talking Pictures 18:30 WED (m0007bwv)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m00076v0)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0007djv)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m0007bd2)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m0007bd2)

Hannah Walker Is a Highly Sensitive Person 20:00 MON (m0007bkj)

Hannah Walker Is a Highly Sensitive Person 11:00 WED (m0007bkj)

Hazel Tours 11:30 FRI (m0007djd)

Hearing Homelessness 11:00 MON (m0007bjl)

Her Story Made History 09:00 THU (m0007cv3)

Her Story Made History 21:30 THU (m0007cv3)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (m00075js)

In Business 21:30 SUN (m0007675)

In Business 20:30 THU (m0007cwd)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0007bdj)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0007bdl)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0007bdl)

Is That Machine On? 21:00 FRI (b0b3vv2q)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (m0007bkc)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m00076v4)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0007djz)

Lobby Land 12:30 SAT (m00076vg)

Lobby Land 18:30 FRI (m0007dkc)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0007b0t)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0007b0t)

Making History 20:00 THU (m0002gqz)

Me and My Shadow 19:15 SUN (m0007b58)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m00076p6)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0007b12)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0007b5h)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0007bkp)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0007bds)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0007bx9)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0007cwl)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0007621)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m00076pg)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0007b1b)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0007b5r)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0007bky)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0007bf1)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0007bxk)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0007cwv)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m0007b3h)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0007b01)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0007b49)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0007bjp)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0007bcm)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0007bw7)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0007cvh)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0007dm2)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m00079zl)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0007b3p)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0007b3y)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m0007b10)

News 13:00 SAT (m0007b08)

No Egos No Divas: New Poets in Irish 23:30 SAT (m000747k)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 15:30 TUE (m0003td8)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0007b3k)

One to One 15:15 SAT (m00017s8)

One to One 09:30 THU (m0003qx3)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m000766l)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0007cvw)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0007b0h)

PM 17:00 MON (m0007bk7)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0007bd4)

PM 17:00 WED (m0007bwq)

PM 17:00 THU (m0007cw2)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0007dk5)

Partition Voices 23:30 MON (b08z9p9w)

Partition Voices 23:30 TUE (b09013nl)

Partition Voices 23:30 WED (b090wg29)

Peterloo: The Massacre That Changed Britain 23:30 SUN (m00076tg)

Peterloo: The Massacre That Changed Britain 11:00 FRI (m0007djb)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0007b54)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m00076pj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0007b5t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0007bl0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0007bf3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0007bxm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0007cwx)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0007b3t)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0007b3t)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0007b3t)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 09:00 MON (m0007bjb)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 21:30 MON (m0007bjb)

Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari 21:00 SAT (m000747f)

Salt on Your Tongue 00:30 SAT (m00076nh)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m00079zv)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m0007b0w)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m00076pb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0007b16)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0007b5m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0007bkt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0007bdx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0007bxf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0007cwq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m00076p8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m00076pd)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0007b0m)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0007b14)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0007b18)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0007b4y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0007b5k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0007b5p)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0007bkr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0007bkw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0007bdv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0007bdz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0007bxc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0007bxh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0007cwn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0007cws)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0007b0r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0007b52)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0007bk9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0007bd6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0007bws)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0007cw4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0007dk9)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b096gjdn)

Stranger Than Sci-Fi 21:00 WED (m0007bx3)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0007b40)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0007b3r)

TEZ Talks 23:15 WED (b09r6fw5)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (m00075jf)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (m0007bk0)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0007b45)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0007b56)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0007b56)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0007bcy)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0007bcy)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0007bdb)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0007bdb)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0007bwx)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0007bwx)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0007cw8)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0007cw8)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m0007dkf)

The Black Blood Donor Crisis 21:00 MON (m00074hj)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m000766q)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m0007cvy)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0007b4c)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0007b4c)

The Gamble Network 00:15 MON (m000761k)

The Gamble Network 16:00 WED (m0007bwl)

The Inquiry 17:30 SAT (m0007b0k)

The Interrogation 14:15 FRI (m0007djs)

The John Moloney Show 23:00 WED (m0007bx7)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m00079zx)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m00079zx)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0007b4m)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0007bw5)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m0007dk3)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m0007dks)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0007bwn)

The Money Clinic 12:04 SAT (m0007b03)

The Money Clinic 21:00 SUN (m0007b03)

The Money Clinic 15:00 WED (m0007b03)

The Origin of Stuff 11:00 SAT (m0005mwg)

The Poet and the Echo 00:30 SUN (m00076v2)

The Poet and the Echo 15:45 FRI (m0007djx)

The Power of Deceit 11:00 TUE (m0007bck)

The TED Interview 13:45 MON (m0007j4c)

The TED Interview 13:45 TUE (m0007j4f)

The TED Interview 13:45 WED (m0007j4k)

The TED Interview 13:45 THU (m0007j4h)

The TED Interview 13:45 FRI (m0007j56)

The Untold 23:30 THU (b09jcd4d)

The Untold 23:25 FRI (b09r3yyb)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0007b4h)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0007bkm)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0007bdn)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0007bx5)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0007cwg)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0007dkp)

Today 07:00 SAT (m00079zs)

Today 06:00 MON (m0007bj8)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0007bbr)

Today 06:00 WED (m0007bvr)

Today 06:00 THU (m0007cv1)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0007dj2)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b08wp3fq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b08rr9g7)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b08y1f9c)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b092fszs)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b097cjz7)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (m00026h0)

Ulverton 15:00 SUN (m0007b4p)

Ulverton 12:04 MON (m0007bjr)

Ulverton 22:45 MON (m0007bjr)

Ulverton 12:04 TUE (m0007bcp)

Ulverton 22:45 TUE (m0007bcp)

Ulverton 12:04 WED (m0007bw9)

Ulverton 22:45 WED (m0007bw9)

Ulverton 12:04 THU (m0007cvk)

Ulverton 22:45 THU (m0007cvk)

Ulverton 12:04 FRI (m0007djj)

Ulverton 22:45 FRI (m0007djj)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (m0007bx1)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m00079zq)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m0007b06)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m0007b0p)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m0007b3m)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m0007b3w)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m0007b4f)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m0007b50)

Weather 05:56 MON (m0007b5y)

Weather 12:57 MON (m0007bjw)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0007bct)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0007bwf)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0007cvp)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0007djn)

Welcome to Wherever You Are 18:30 THU (m0007cw6)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0007b5f)

Windbreakers, Sea Eagles and Anthrax 16:30 SUN (m0007b4w)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0007b0f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0007bjg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0007bcd)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0007bw1)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0007cv7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0007dj6)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m00074j4)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0007bd0)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0007bjy)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0007bcw)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0007bwh)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0007cvr)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0007djq)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0007bjt)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m0007bcr)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m0007bwc)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m0007cvm)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0007djl)