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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 JULY 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0006v0m)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006tys)
Social and Spiritual Skin

Perched on the exterior of our delicate, intricate bodies, the skin is our largest and fastest-growing organ, weighing nine kilograms and covering two square metres. We see it, touch it and live in it every day. It’s a habitat for a mesmerisingly complex world of micro-organisms. Its physical functions are vital to our health and indeed our survival, and it’s crucial to our sense of identity. Yet how much do we really know about it?

Through the lenses of science, sociology and history, Dr Monty Lyman leads us on a journey through the comedy, tragedy and exquisite humanity of our most underrated and overlooked organ. By delving into something that seems so familiar, he reveals how the skin is far stranger and much more complex than we’ve ever imagined.

In today's final episode, from 18th century Tahiti to 21st century Birmingham (the most inkedcity in the UK), Dr Lyman travels the world to examine the human obsession with body markings. He explains the social and religious importance of tattooing and reveals that the earliest tattoos may have had a medicinal purpose.

Written by Dr Monty Lyman
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Gunnar Cauthery
Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006v0p)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006v0r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006v0t)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0006v0w)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006v0y)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Angela Tilby

Good morning.

One of my favourite film moments comes from the cartoon epic Kung Fu Panda when the wise master Oogway says to the would-be champion Po, "You are too concerned with what was and what will be. Yesterday is history, tomorrow, a mystery, but today is a gift. That is why it is called “present”’. I recognise Po’s tendency to live more in yesterday and tomorrow than today. Of course memory of things past is precious, and so is hope for future things, but the only moment we can really live in is the present moment. Master Oogway is right. The present is a gift.

All spiritual traditions teach the importance of the present moment, what the spiritual writer Eckhart Tolle calls ‘the power of now’. Jesus spoke of not being anxious, of living from trust and not fear. To be as spontaneous and carefree as the birds of the air and the lilies of the field. To do that means receiving ourselves as a gift, as though we were newly created, morning by morning.

We can make space for this awareness by a spiritual practice, saying a prayer, centring ourselves, even the deep breathing that calls us back into our bodies which are still miraculous even when they ache or play up. If we can make this space we experience time not as a whip driving us on, but as a chance to contribute to the goodness of the world and its promise. The night has passed and the day lies open before us.

Let us pray with one heart and mind. As we rejoice in the gift of this new day, so may the light of your presence, O God, set our hearts on fire with love for you.


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m0006tkv)
Facing Death Creatively

R.M. Sanchez-Camus describes how art can be used as a language with which to communicate the fear of death and dying. Drawing on his experience as a Social Practice Artist working in a hospice, he reveals how art-making can create a space where individuals can mentally remove themselves from the state of dying, and produce a lasting testament to their lives. He believes death anxieties over global extinction can similarly be approached through making art. 'It’s urgent to break the taboo of speaking about death. If we can hold this conversation within the community we can begin to support each other as citizens.'
Recorded in front of a live audience at the Kelburn Garden Party festival in the grounds of Kelburn Castle near Glasgow.
Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0006zkf)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m0006sdm)
Family Monsters Garden in Swaffham and Chelsea

Helen Mark visits the Escape Project in Swaffham, Norfolk, to find out why a group of volunteers are helping create a garden full of monsters for the Chelsea Flower Show.

These monsters represent the kinds of problems facing every family, and a garden is the perfect place to talk about them together. The Family Monsters Garden, designed by Alistair Bayford, has been inspired by 'Escape', a community allotment which welcomes people to spend time outdoors to benefit their wellbeing and especially their mental health. Escape is funded by the charity Family Action which is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. The 'family monsters' theme is designed to start a national conversation about some of the family problems we may all face, but rarely talk about.

At Escape you can plant seeds, do a bit of weeding, harvest vegetables and fruit, and make friends over Susan's homemade soup or pizza baked in the handmade, dragon-covered clay pizza oven. Although if the mason bees are still nesting in the clay, you'll have to wait another week or so. It's a wildlife haven and a soothingly busy, green place to be.

Sometimes a volunteer (like Gavin) gets so hooked on gardening they take up their own allotment. Volunteer Sarah has found she's become a bit of a celebrity because of the Chelsea buzz, and William is hoping the limelight will turn into extra funding to support the project, which has been a lifeline and a source of joy for him. Team leaders Karen and Katy know that long after memories of the Flower Show have faded, they'll still be planting lettuce and purslane, with their green-fingered extended family. Helen visits before and after the show to find out about its longer-term impact.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0006zkh)
Farming Today This Week: Cereals

Charlotte Smith visits Rothamsted Research in Hertfordshire to discover how a statistician in the 1920s, Sir Ronald Fisher, transformed the experiments that were conducted on cereals through his understanding of data analysis. Charlotte finds out about Fisher and his legacy from Andrew Mead, a statistician at Rothamsted himself. She also meets Ian Shield, an agronomist, who walks her through the fields of wheat that in some instances are set-up in a way that's a direct influence from Fisher's work. Charlotte also asks Ian about the experiments into genetic modification at Rothamsted, and how concerns around climate change now feed into their experiments.

Producer: Toby Field


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0006zkk)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m0006zkm)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0006zkp)
Ainsley Harriott

Ainsley Harriott found fame as a chef on Ready Steady Cook, which he went on to present for ten years. He has since presented cookery programmes both here and in America and has sold over two million recipe books worldwide. In his latest book, Ainsley’s Caribbean Kitchen, he explores the way that the different historical and cultural influences on the Caribbean islands have created a diverse and varied cuisine. He joins Richard and Aasmah.

They are also joined by Petra Velzeboar who was born into The Children of God group. Petra cut ties with The Children of God when she became pregnant by a non-member at 23. Once Petra was outside, she initially struggled with alcoholism and serious mental health problems but she now has received a Masters degree, runs a successful business as a therapist and hosts a podcast in which she speaks with people who have overcome mental health issues.

And Ella Dove was 25 when she went for a jog with her sister on a quiet Sunday morning. She fell badly and assumed that she had broken her leg but was shocked to discover she had fractured her knee so badly that she would need to have her leg amputated. After months recovering from the operation in a wheelchair at her parents’ house, Ella finally was able to move back to her flat in London and resume her job as a journalist at women’s magazines. She is now publishing her first novel, Five Steps to Happy, about a young woman struggling to come to terms with a serious injury.

Producer: Laura Northedge
Editor: Richard Hooper


SAT 10:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m0006zkr)
The Infinite Moonkey Cage

A special hour long episode of the hugely popular science/comedy show, celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo moon landings. Recorded at Cocoa Beach, Florida just down the road from Cape Canaveral, Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by some of the key players involved in landing the first people on the moon, on this day, 1969. Apollo 9 Astronaut Rusty Schweickart, Apollo flight director Gerry Griffin and Apollo children Jan and Andy Aldrin give their perspectives on arguably one of the greatest scientific and engineering achievements of all time. Keep listening for a very special guest appearance by Duran Duran's Nick Rhodes.

Presenters: Brian Cox and Robin Ince
Producer Alexandra Feachem


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0006zkt)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0006zkw)
A world of brandished kippers

Jacob Zuma, the former South African president, has been in the spotlight all week – live on television responding to questions at a judicial inquiry investigating corruption at the highest level. Andrew Harding reflects on truth in the age of brandished kippers.
The town of Kirkenes in northern Norway is a stone’s throw from the border with Russia. It’s now become the focus for a major spy scandal, as Sarah Rainsford has been finding out.
Martin Patience was recently part of a BBC team that received a rare invitation to visit Iran, at a time when relations with Britain are strained. He says he was warmly received, although filming at a pop concert provided a moment of uncertainty.
There’s been a long-running conflict in California over access to the beaches. On one side, the surfers, who need to be able to get to the ocean; on the other the tech millionaires, who’ve been putting up fences to keep people out. Sally Howard says the very soul of the Golden State is at stake.
And Petroc Trelawny has been aboard the QE2 for a trip down memory lane. No longer plying the high seas, she’s moored in Dubai as a floating hotel; bri-nylon and formica among the glass and steel.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0006zky)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0006zl0)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


SAT 12:30 Lobby Land (m0006v00)
Series 2

Episode One - Vis-à-Vis

Topical sitcom following life in Westminster through the eyes of Sam Peakes, a young political editor at a clickbait website, as she tries to make sense of the madness engulfing British politics. Starring Yasmine Akram, Charlie Higson, Cariad Lloyd, Dan Tetsell and Daniel Lawrence Taylor.

Cast:
Sam Peakes: Yasmine Akram
Tom Shriver MP: Charlie Higson
Mia Phillips: Cariad Lloyd
Gideon Burnside: Dan Tetsell
Nathan Edmonds: Daniel Lawrence Taylor

Written by Jon Harvey, Sarah Dempster and Christopher Davies
With additional material by Laura Major

Production Co-Ordinator: Tam Shilham
Script Editor: Dan Tetsell
Executive Producer: Lucy Armitage
Editor: Jerry Peal
Producer: Jon Harvey

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0006zl2)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m0006zl4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0006v07)
Iain Dale, Nusrat Ghani MP, Jess Phillips MP, Pete Wishart MP

Shaun Ley presents political debate from the Melton Theatre in Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire with a panel including the LBC presenter and political commentator Iain Dale, Junior Transport Minister Nusrat Ghani, the Labour MP Jess Phillips and the SNP MP Pete Wishart.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0006zl6)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (m0006zl8)
Black Water: An American Story

by Joyce Carol Oates, adapted by Sarah Wooley

A gripping drama with its origins in American political history adapted from the Pulitzer-nominated novel.

Young political writer, Kelly, is staying with friends on an island off the coast of Maine for a Fourth of July party. She is surprised and delighted when a famous US Senator arrives and, over the course of an afternoon of drinking, talking and tennis, she captivates him. The two leave in the evening to catch the last ferry, to have dinner and spend the night together. But something goes terribly wrong.

July 18th 2019 marks 50 years since the Chappaquiddick incident.

Kelly ..... Lydia Wilson
The Senator ..... Elliot Cowan
Narrator/Mother ..... Laurel Lefkow
Buffy ..... Kelly Burke
Ray ..... Chris Pavlo
Felicia/Operator ..... Emma Lau
Stacey/Woman at Party ..... Hannah Wood

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane


SAT 15:30 The Dying of the Ice (m0006smz)
Frozen Music

Andrew McGibbon explores the sounds and music of the ice, meeting the composers, musicians and indigenous artists in the Arctic region who use the ice to make music. He discovers the natural and haunting sounds made by the movements of deep frozen ice, ice melting and icebergs calving and colliding.

Terje Isungset is a drummer and ice music composer from Norway who makes his own instruments each winter and performs at festivals across the Arctic region. His beautiful sounds mingle with voices and even a string section providing a fitting and atmospheric backdrop to his environment.

Faithfully capturing the sounds of ice and making them sound art is the work of Jana Winderen who uses a range of sophisticated hydrophones across the melting and freezing seasons. Andreas Bick creates collages of ice sounds recorded all across the Arctic, from iceberg calving to resonanting ice sheets on a lake.

Arild Sundfjord is an Oceanographer who explains why Arctic sea ice matters.

This is the third of three programmes and, as with the rest of The Dying of the Ice series, features the sounds of melting and retreating ice in the Arctic along with the sounds of creatures living under the ice as an active, low volume soundtrack audible throughout the programme.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producers: Louise Morris and Nick Romero

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0006zlb)
Why black women in the UK are five times more likely to die in childbirth, Netball World Cup pivoteers, Imposter syndrome

Black women are five times more likely to die in childbirth compared to white women. We hear the personal experiences of two women Candice Brathwaite who got sepsis after her caesarean section and Remi Sade who felt she was pushed towards a more medically managed birth. We also hear from Daghni Rajasingam a consultant obstetrician who speaks for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

Clinical psychologist Jessamy Hibberd discusses the ‘imposter syndrome’ and Claire Poole who runs two businesses tells us how she sometimes feels as if she’s not good enough at work.

As the Netball World Cup draws to a close this weekend we talk about how the game has changed over the years with the BBC presenter Hazel Irvine and the former England player Sara Bayman.

The owner of Zara has announced that all the cotton, linen and polyester it uses will be organic, sustainable or recylcled by 2025. Tamsin Lejeune the CEO & Founder of Common Objective and Ethical Fashion Forum tells us how significant this move is and what sustainable means in the context of a high volume fashion business.

David Trimble, a leading figure in Northern Irish politics and joint Nobel Peace Prize Winner who now sits in the house of Lords, surprised the House this week. He stood up during a debate about Northern Ireland to say his daughter had married her girlfriend, even though he had in the past opposed same sex marriage and voted against it. We hear from his daughter Vicky Trimble and her wife Rosalind Stephens with their reactions to his speech.

We hear from three volunteers from the Netball World Cup called Pivoteers. Caswell Palmer, Mandy and Hannah Cripps

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow


SAT 17:00 PM (m0006zld)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m0006sf7)
Lessons of Theranos

What can we learn from how one medical start-up fooled Silicon Valley and the world? Elizabeth Holmes dropped out of Stanford University at 19 to start Theranos. She promised investors and the public a revolutionary blood diagnosis machine which would be less painful, accessible and affordable than ordinary lab tests. She managed to raise $9 billion in funding. Now the company is worth nothing. Holmes and her business partner may face up to 20 years in prison for fraud. How did she manage to deceive some of the world's cleverest minds - and is there something about start-up culture and the cult of the visionary leader which encourages charlatans? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS
Rebecca Jarvis, chief business, economics and technology correspondent, ABC News
Margaret Heffernan, author and entrepreneur
Jos White, entrepreneur and partner, Notion Capital

Producer: Julie Ball


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0006zlh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0006zlk)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006zlm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0006zlp)
Eve Myles, Michael Dapaah, Doon Mackichan, Richard Strange, Aldous Harding, Lady Sanity, Arthur Smith, Nikki Bedi

Nikki Bedi and Arthur Smith are joined by Eve Myles, Michael Dapaah, Doon Mackichan and Richard Strange for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Aldous Harding and Lady Sanity.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0006zlr)
An insight into the character of an influential person making the news headlines


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m0006zlt)
Making Noise Quietly, Night of the Iguana, The Moon, Laura Cummings, I Am Nicola

Theatre director Dominic Dromgoole has made his feature film debut with Making Noise Quietly; a triptych of stories about the effects of war.
Tennessee Williams' play Night Of The Iguana is based on his 1948 novel and has just opened in a new production at London's Noel Coward Theatre, featuring Clive Own and Lia WIlliams
An exhibition looking at mankind's relationship with The Moon begins at The Royal Maritime Museum in Greenwich
Laura Cummings' biography of her mother's peculiar upbringing; On Chapel Sands
A new ITV drama starring Vicki McClure; I Am Nicola

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Abigail Morris, Oliver Morton and Lynn Nead. The producer is Oliver Jones

Podcast extra recommendations:

Oliver: Herman Wouk – The Winds of War AND the Duncan Rand One Act Play Festival
Lynn: The Wonder of Wimbledon on TV
Abigail: a sonnet a day by Simon de Deney AND Call My Agent
Tom: Black Monday on Amazon Prime


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0006zlw)
James Burke: Our Man on the Moon

Fifty years ago, when the Apollo 11 mission landed the first human beings on the moon, James Burke was the voice of science for the BBC. Join him to relive the dramatic days in the studio, sharing the moment-by-moment drama to a live audience. You'll remember his excited voice counting down the seconds and desperately trying to avoid talking over any communication with the astronauts. Here is your chance to find out what went on behind the scenes as James revisits the final moments of the Apollo mission. He'll recreate the drama, struggling to make sense of flickering images from NASA and working with the limitations of 1960s technology. We'll hear what went wrong as well as what went right on the night! Illustrated with amazing archive material from both the BBC and NASA, this will be the story of the moon landings brought to you by the man who became a broadcasting legend. A night neither he nor we will never forget.


SAT 21:00 Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari (m0006t52)
Episode 1: Dome

“Giorgio Vasari? Who’s he?” The very thought would have been anathema to the great man, a legend in his own lifetime but an unsung hero today. Using his own words as inspiration this three-part classic serial tells a poignant story of pride, love and legacy combined with an epic journey through the art of the Renaissance - led by the man who invented the word. We begin in Florence, 1570. Giorgio Vasari is the top painter and architect of the day, as well as the official biographer of the pantheon of Renaissance artists. His vast book THE LIVES OF THE ARTISTS is already in its second edition and will stay in print well into the next millennium as the essential text for all students of art history. At the behest of his illustrious patron, the Grand Duke Cosimo de’ Medici, Vasari is about to embark on his most ambitious project ever: painting the city’s cathedral dome. When he prays for assistance, God sends him a surprise response: a new assistant, Piero, who reminds him of his own young self.

Written by Eileen Horne.

Created by Eileen Horne and Sarah Dunant

CAST:

VASARI .....Tom Conti
PIERO ..... Will Taylor
GRAND DUKE COSIMO DE’ MEDICI ..... David Troughton
TOMMASO ..... Tristan Beint
DUKE FRANCESCO DE’ MEDICI/CIMABUE ..... John Hollingworth
MICHELANGELO ..... Nicholas Murchie
YOUNG VASARI/DANTE ..... Joshua Akehurst
GIOTTO (teen) ..... Jay Mailer
GIOTTO (10) ..... Alexander Ryan
DANTE ..... Joshua Akehurst
PAPAL ENVOY ..... Jamie Newall

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
Exec Producer: Sarah Dunant
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m0006zly)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0006tm1)
Surveillance and Human Freedom

Big Brother is watching you. George Orwell’s chilling words are now a reality. In China’s Xinjiang province, Uyghur Muslims have been described by one official as laboratory mice in an experiment of “advanced, predictive, algorithmic surveillance”. The comments were made to an undercover film-maker, whose documentary, “Inside the Chinese Digital Gulag”, airs this week. The film depicts a society based on phone surveillance apps and a vast network of cameras tracking individuals and even reading their body language to determine their ‘threat level’. The Chinese authorities insist these are necessary security measures; human rights watchers say they are inhuman. Closer to home, civil liberties campaigners are unhappy that several UK police forces are trying out facial recognition cameras. What level of state surveillance is morally acceptable in a liberal democracy? While we’re busy pondering that question, let’s not ignore the fact that most of us accept being spied upon in our own homes by our smartphones and computers. Some of us believe it is a price worth paying for convenience and inter-connectedness. Others warn that information is power and power corrupts. The recent eruption of dystopian drama on our TV screens could point to a deeper unease about the current threats posed to human freedom. Are we giving away too much control to artificial intelligence? Are we sleep-walking into our own Orwellian nightmare? And do we care?

Producer: Dan Tierney


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (m0006sgs)
The Final, 2019

(17/17)
The 2019 season of the annual general knowledge competition reaches its climax, as the four competitors who have come through heats and semi-finals unscathed line up to see which of them can become the 66th Brain of Britain champion.

As always, they'll face Russell Davies's questions on unpredictable topics, from Russian history to Formula One, from medicine to opera. A tight contest is assured between four formidable quiz players, who are:

Gareth Aubrey, a planning environmental law solicitor from South Wales
Frankie Fanko, a freelance translator from Leicestershire
Roger Look, a retired consultant clinical psychologist from Warwickshire
David Stainer, a tax advisor from Hertfordshire.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 The Dying of the Ice (m0006t55)
The Reindeer Poets

Andrew McGibbon explores the poetry, song and yoiking of the indigenous Sámi people who live across the Western European Arctic - a region including Russia's Kola Peninsula, Norway, Finland and Sweden. 

The relationship between the traditional epic yoik songs and contemporary poetry is explored, along with the multimedia approach that several contemporary Sámi poets and artists choose for their creative expression. The yoik is the distinctive form of cultural expression for the Sámi people and comparable to the traditional chanting of some First Nations in the Northern American continent.

The United Nations has designated 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages, and the programme features Mikkal Morottaja, aka Amoc, a poet who raps in Inari Sámi - a language spoken by fewer than 300 people in the world. He raps about Father Christmas being overwhelmed with selfish Christmas demands. Anna Morottaja is a traditional Inari Sámi "livde" singer, who can sing northern bird imitations and stories of mischievous birds of prey, while Ánnámáret tells stories from her family background as a reindeer herder using the traditional yoik, through poetry and through music.

Sámi poetry takes tradition seriously, looking back to find the way forward, and giving a group of people in the Arctic north a voice.

This is the second of three programmes and, as with the rest of The Dying of the Ice series, features the sounds of melting and retreating ice in the Arctic along with the sounds of creatures living under the ice as an active, low volume soundtrack audible throughout the programme.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producers: Louise Morris and Nick Romero

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 21 JULY 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0006zm0)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0006tzm)
Sonny's Bench

An original short work for BBC Radio 4 by the Northern Irish writer Dawn Watson. As read by Ian McElhinney (Derry Girls, Game of Thrones.)

Dawn Watson was born in Belfast. She has just published her debut poetry pamphlet The Stack of Owls is Getting Higher and has short stories in anthologies Still Worlds Turning and Belfast Stories. Her stories and poems have been published in literary journals including The Stinging Fly, The Moth and The Tangerine. Dawn is an AHRC PhD candidate at the Seamus Heaney Centre, writing a prose poem novel and researching prose poetics.

Writer ..... Dawn Watson
Reader ..... Ian McElhinney
Producer ..... Michael Shannon


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006zm2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006zm4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006zm6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0006zm8)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0006zmb)
Worcester Cathedral

Time now for Bells on Sunday, which this week comes from Worcester Cathedral. The tower contains fifteen ringing bells tuned to the major scale of B and a large clock bell. The current ringing bells were cast in 1928, replacing an earlier peal dating back to 1869, which had been cast as part of the Cathedral’s Victorian restoration. We hear the back eight bells ringing ‘London Surprise Major.’


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0006zlr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m0007001)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08zzlfl)
Freedom

Theologian Dr Jane Williams examines the nature and extent of human freedom.

Recalling her childhood in an Indian boarding school, Jane remembers her unhappiness as a rebellious pupil in a life controlled by bells. She explains that she saw herself "as standing in the great company of revolutionaries, demanding my freedom from the school authorities."

Her rebellion never occurred, but Jane's search for freedom continued.

In this programme, she journeys through the theories of natural selection, psychotherapy and capitalism - along with the poetry of Frost, Cummings and Milton - and discovers that "there is no place of perfect, unconstrained freedom, in which we have entirely what we want. But that does not make us automata: we do have choices about what we will serve."

Jane notes that even Jesus had to make choices. "In choosing to be the Son of God, in every action, Jesus lays aside other choices, but that does not make him less free. On the contrary, it makes him exactly who he is."

Music from Mozart, Elgar, and Prokofiev accompany her journey which culminates in John Donne's climatic poem, Batter my Heart three person'd God, which reveals that freedom is, "paradoxically, only to found in being overpowered by something worth all other kinds of choice."

Presenter: Jane Williams
Producer: Michael Wakelin
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0007003)
Great Yorkshire Cheese

High in the Yorkshire Dales, Andrew and Sally Hatton are taking a leaf out of the history books to set their Nidderdale hill farm on a solid footing for the future. They’re making a traditional seasonal unpasteurised farmhouse cheese with milk from their small herd of critically rare Northern Dairy Shorthorns. It’s the kind of cheese and breed of cattle that were commonplace in the Dales a hundred years ago, but now both are very rare. Caz Graham drops in as one of Britain's top cheese buyers, Bronwyn Percival of Neal's Yard Dairy drops in to taste the new cheese that the Hattons hope to offer to the public later this summer.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0007005)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0007007)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0007009)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme presented by Edward Stourton.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000700c)
Frontline AIDS

Simon Callow makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Frontline AIDS.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Frontline AIDS’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Frontline AIDS’.

Registered Charity Number: 1038860


SUN 07:57 Weather (m000700f)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000700h)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000700k)
Rich Fools?

Jesus’ hard hitting parable about the rich fool (Luke 12:13-21) forms the centrepiece of Sunday Worship’s 2019 visit to the Keswick Convention. The preacher is Julian Hardyman, Senior Pastor of Eden Baptist Church in Cambridge, who will explore contemporary resonances of this two thousand year old parable about a farmer building bigger barns for his abundant harvest.
Leaders: Peter Maiden and Anna Putt with music by Cornerstone Worship's Colin Webster and Phil Moore. Producer: Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0006v09)
British Populism and Brexit

"Could it be that the only way out at this point is a no deal Brexit of the kind that so many dread?" asks John Gray.

He argues that it is the logical conclusion of present events.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b08zc77w)
Alex Gregory on the White Stork

Double Olympic gold medal-winning rower Alex Gregory recalls seeing white stork in Portugal for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Mark Ward
Photograph: Boberskik.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000700m)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000700p)
Writer - Sarah McDonald Hughes
Director - Tracey Neale
Editor - Jeremy Howe

Ben Archer ..... Ben Norris
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Phoebe Aldridge ….. Lucy Morris
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Leonard Berry ..... Paul Copley
Chris Carter ..... Wilf Scolding
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Rex Fairbrother ..... Nick Barber
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Will Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Bev Hanson ..... Alison Belbin
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Fiona Lloyd ..... Adjoa Andoh
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Philip Moss ..... Andy Hockley
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m000701x)
John Cooper Clarke, poet

John Cooper Clarke first achieved fame with his poetry during the punk rock era of the late 1970s. Born in Salford in 1949 to Hilda and George, he suffered from tuberculosis as a child and was sent to recuperate with a relative in Wales. He failed his 11 plus exam and was educated at a secondary modern school which he hated. However the one “rose in a garden of weeds” was his English teacher, Mr Malone, who instilled a love of poetry in John and his classmates.

John had various odd jobs after leaving school at 15 and by his mid-20s, he was reciting his poetry in clubs around Manchester. His entry into the punk scene was helped, he says, by “already looking like a punk”, and despite some initially hostile receptions from audiences waiting for the Sex Pistols or the Buzzcocks, he acquired a cult status, going on to release five albums of his poetry set to music by former Joy Division producer Martin Hannett.

By early 1980s, he was also in the grip of a heroin addiction which would see him write very little for over a decade. He cleaned up in the early 90s after marrying his second wife, Evie, and having a daughter, Stella. His star began to rise again in 2007 when one of his poems was used in an episode of The Sopranos and others were included on the GCSE syllabus, which led to collaborations with artists like Plan B and Alex Turner of the Arctic Monkeys.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000701z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m0006sh7)
Series 71

Episode 4

The 71st series of the multi award-winning comedy panel game chaired by Jack Dee


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0006zxd)
Good Enough for Granny: What's so special about the food our grandmothers cook?

We asked you to tell us stories of meals you remember your grandmothers making. Now Sheila Dillon asks why these dishes - whether delicious or otherwise - stick with us into adulthood. Food writer Alissa Timoshkina shares her Grandparents Siberian recipes which provide the essence for her book 'Salt & Time: Recipes from a Russian Kitchen'. Blogger Ann Storr reminisces about her grannie's high standards at the table. And we hear from people trying to preserve age old recipes, before they disappear for good.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced in Bristol by Clare Salisbury


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0007022)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0007024)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (m0007026)
Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from writers and journalists which reflect the range of contemporary life in the United Kingdom.

Writer and broadcaster, Ian McMillan, embarks on a high summer stroll along the bridle path that links his home with the post-industrial landscape of South Yorkshire, taking in a flattened colliery, a screaming mandrake, Peter Falk, the X19 bus to Barnsley and a magpie - or is it two?
Journalist and part-time canoeist, Bob Walker, embarks on a "Three Men in a Boat"-style progress on the river Wye - which for much of its course marks the border between Wales and England. He quickly finds out that, just as in Jerome K. Jerome's time, there is often ferocious competition among the different users of the water space for access. And money often lies at the heart of the wrangling...
With mental health issues finally commanding more attention at home, work and in society generally, Christine Finn returns to her home town of Deal to discover how those managing conditions are being helped by the use of allotments. Along the way, she realises that old-style denial of mental health problems had gone on much closer to home than she had previously thought.
As the nation's gargantuan appetite for soft fruit reaches its apogee, John Murphy journeys to the poly-tunnels of the garden of England to learn how this demand is satisfied and how berry farmers' costs may yet force radical changes to the way strawberries, raspberries, loganberries - and all the rest - reach our tables. He also hears how the poly-tunnels can be unexpectedly romantic locations.
And Ayo Akinwolere ponders how and when the relationship between fathers and sons alters, their roles invert and how well-prepared both are for the change.

Producer Simon Coates


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0006tzk)
RHS Garden Wisley: Part One

Kathy Clugston and the gardening experts are at RHS Garden Wisley. Matthew Pottage, Christine Wilson and Matthew Wilson answer this week's questions from gardening enthusiasts.

The panellists discuss black fly, offer planting suggestions for shady areas, and advise on growing Luffa. They also talk about how they were inspired to start gardening.

Away from the questions, Matthew Wilson catches up with Matthew Pottage, three years into his role as Curator of RHS Garden, Wisley to see what he's been up to.

Producer: Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0007028)
Sunday Omnibus - Education, Friendship and Art in Action

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen - with three conversations about the value of education and of friendship and of art in action.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari (m000702b)
Episode 2: Rome

“Giorgio Vasari? Who’s he?” The very thought would have been anathema to the great man, a legend in his own lifetime but an unsung hero today. Using his own words as inspiration this three-part classic serial tells a poignant story of pride, love and legacy combined with an epic journey through the art of the Renaissance - led by the man who invented the word. We begin in Florence, 1570. Giorgio Vasari is the top painter and architect of the day, as well as the official biographer of the pantheon of Renaissance artists. His vast book THE LIVES OF THE ARTISTS is already in its second edition and will stay in print well into the next millennium as the essential text for all students of art history. At the behest of his illustrious patron, the Grand Duke Cosimo de’ Medici, Vasari is about to embark on his most ambitious project ever: painting the city’s cathedral dome. When he prays for assistance, God sends him a surprise response: a new assistant, Piero, who reminds him of his own young self.

Written by Eileen Horne.

Created by Eileen Horne and Sarah Dunant

CAST

VASARI ..... Tom Conti

PIERO ..... Will Taylor

COSINA ..... Jasmine Hyde
CARDINAL DE’ MEDICI/MANSERVANT ..... Tristan Beint
ENRICO ..... Joshua Akehurst
DR MARIO ..... Jay Mailer
MICHELANGELO ..... Nick Murchie
SODERINI/OLD PRIEST ..... David Troughton

ANDREA CASTAGNO ..... Nick Murchie

VENEZIANO ..... John Hollingworth

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
Exec Producer: Sarah Dunant
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000702d)
Ocean Vuong, Bauhaus novels, Sudan literary postcard

Ocean Vuong won the T.S. Eliot Prize for his poetry collection Night Sky with Exit Wounds. He talks to Mariella Frostrup about moving into fiction with debut novel On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous.

As the Bauhaus celebrates its centenary, novelists Naomi Wood and Theresia Enzensberger explain what drew them to writing about life at the schools in their new novels.

And Jamal Mahjoub sends Open Book a literary postcard from Khartoum, where literary culture endures despite authoritarian rule and recent violence.


SUN 16:30 Warsan Shire: Brave Girl Rising (m000702g)
Inspired by her long-distance friendship with Nasro, a young refugee living in a Kenyan camp, Warsan Shire has written and reads five poems about her and the experience of exile. The much admired Somali/British poet has become the laureate of displaced persons - her own family fled Somalia when she was very young.

Warsan Shire's first collection of poetry, Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth, established her reputation. Her contribution of poems to Beyoncé's 2016 visual album Lemonade, made her internationally famous.

Warsan gives very few interviews so we are delighted to feature some of her thoughts about writing, visiting Somalia, her own family and what poetry can achieve.

The poems for Nasro were written to accompany a film, Brave Girl Rising, that highlights the plight of young women refugees and the vital importance for them of education.

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0006sp0)
Hidden Figures? The True Scale of Military Sexual Allegations

Ten years ago the alleged rape and subsequent suicide of Royal Military Police Corporal, Anne-Marie Ellement, highlighted problems with the way the British military handles allegations of sexual offences against female service personnel. File on 4 investigates ten years on, what has changed?

There's no doubt that the top echelons of the armed forces take such cases very seriously indeed. Speaking about recent allegations, the Chief of the General Staff, General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith said it was unacceptable and in stark contrast with everything the British Army represents. But how far has that attitude filtered down the ranks in reality?

File on 4 hears from current and former female service personnel who alleged that they were sexually harassed, assaulted or raped, about how they feel they were let down by their chain of command when they reported their ordeal. We hear their criticism of the official Services Complaint system. And why they think the incompetence of the service police undermined their attempts to gain justice.

We also hear from former members of the service police itself who explain why they think that their former comrades are not fit to investigate serious crime and why the system must be reformed. For its part, the Ministry of Defence tells the programme it accepts there are shortcomings and that changes are on the way,

Presenter: Paul Connolly
Producer: Paul Waters
Editor: Andrew Smith

Photo credit: MoD


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0006zlr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000702j)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m000702l)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000702n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000700t)
Nick Baker

You’ll be moonstruck by this week’s edition as Nick Baker presents all the radio highlights marking the anniversary of the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle touch down.

There’s plenty more space for skin, clean eating and the ‘the’ word.

Music from Rigoletto, Anti Nowhere League and Julie London adds to the atmosphere, John Finnemore tells tales and Mark Benton makes plans with Nigel.

Producer: Stephen Garner
Production Support: Vanessa Ford


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0006zx7)
Shula makes a decision and Clarrie looks to the future.


SUN 19:15 The Absolutely Radio Show (m000700w)
Series 3

Episode 3

The hugely popular sketch show returns for a third series on BBC Radio 4. Pete Baikie, Morwenna Banks, Moray Hunter, Gordon Kennedy and John Sparkes revisit some of their much-loved characters, and also introduce some newcomers.

Absolutely was a big hit on Channel Four in the late 80s and early 90s. In 2013, the group got back together for the Sketchorama: Absolutely Special for BBC Radio 4 - winning a BBC Audio Drama Award in the Best Live Scripted Comedy category. The Absolutely Radio Show followed, with the first two series picking up Celtic Media Award nominations for Best Radio Comedy, while the second series was also nominated for a BBC Audio Drama Award in 2018.

In the third episode of the series, Calum Gilhooley visits his optician and makes a good point for possibly the first time ever, The Rev McMinn saves his Minimart from chemical attack, and we meet Social Media Blogger and Influencer Susie Twip. From the archive, we hear the "See it. Say it. Sort it." campaign in action.

Written and Performed by: Peter Baikie, Morwenna Banks, Moray Hunter, Gordon Kennedy and John Sparkes
Production Manager Sarah Tombling
Recording Engineer Dave Murricane
Editor Pete Baikie
Producer Gus Beattie
Producer Gordon Kennedy
BBC Executive Sioned Wiliam
Recording Venue The Oran Mor, Glasgow

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Annika Stranded (m000700y)
Series 5

Convalescence

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Chief Inspector Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Annika is still coming to terms with the death of her friend and long-time, long suffering forensic photographer Mikel. But life goes on, and so does police work on the Oslofjord. Annika must forge a new relationship with Mikel’s young replacement, Sigrid.

Episode 6: Convalescence
Recovering in hospital from a gunshot wound, Annika involves herself with a suspicious death on the ward.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4 - including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0006tzr)
Are the BBC Proms elitist? In Feedback this week, the Controller of the Proms David Pickard passionately rejects suggestion.

"Trite and naïve." That was Rajan Datar’s view of Norman Tebbit’s cricket test. Was the presenter guilty of being judge and jury - opinionated when he should have been impartial?

And two listeners review Private Passions, a programme they would not normally switch on. Would they do so a second time?

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0006tzp)
Audrey Eyton, Arthur Ryan, Jack Bond, Rip Torn

Pictured: Audrey Eyton

Matthew Bannister on

Arthur Ryan, the Irish retailer who created Primark - known for selling fast fashion at low prices.

Audrey Eyton, who devised the F-Plan diet, which encouraged people to eat fibre to lose weight.

Jack Bond, the Lancashire cricket captain who led his team to success in the one-day game.

Rip Torn, the film and stage actor known for his violent temper who appeared in DodgeBall, Men In Black and latterly The Larry Sanders Show.
His daughter Angelica Page, who is also an actor, pays an emotional tribute.

Interviewed guest: Paul Marchant
Interviewed guest: Teresa Wickham
Interviewed guest: Carole Stone
Interviewed guest: David Lloyd
Interviewed guest: Angelica Page
Producer: Paula McGinley

Archive clips from: Profile, Radio 4 22/06/2008; Midnight News, Radio 4 25/04/2013; Enterprise: Audrey Eyton, Radio 4 24/12/1981; See You Sunday, BBC 1 Wales, 05/05/1991; Breakfast Time, BBC One 14/10/1983; North West Tonight, BBC One 11/07/1996; 5 Live cricket commentary, 14/07/2019; 30 Rock, NBC 2009; The Larry Sanders Show, HBO 1998; Maidstone, directed by Norman Mailer, Supreme Mix Productions 1971; DodgeBall, directed by Rawson Marshall Thurber, Twentieth Century Fox / Red Hour Films / Mediastream Vierte Film GmbH & Co. Vermarktungs KG 2004; Rip Torn on InnerVIEWS, Houston PBS, 05/02/2010.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0006zl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000700c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0006shh)
Going the way of the dodo? The decline of Britain's two main parties.

Recent polling data and election results paint a picture of woe for Britain's two main political parties. Of course both Labour and the Conservatives have suffered periods of decline throughout their history. But arguably never before have both parties been so riven by internal divides and suffered such a loss of public confidence at the same time. Edward Stourton looks to historical precedents for guidance on today's political turmoil and asks if the two parties' decline is now terminal. With Tim Bale of Queen Mary University of London; Lord Lexden, official historian of the Conservative Party; Deborah Mattinson of Britain Thinks; Charlotte Lydia Riley of the University of Southampton; John Sergeant, former BBC Chief Political Correspondent; and Adrian Wooldrige, author of the "Bagehot" column at The Economist.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0007011)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Moth Radio Hour (m0007013)
Series 9

The Ties That Bind

True stories told live in the USA: Catherine Burns introduces tales of the struggles, support and safety of the that family provides.

The Moth is an acclaimed not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling based in the USA. Since 1997, it has celebrated both the raconteur and the storytelling novice, who has lived through something extraordinary and yearns to share it. Originally formed by the writer George Dawes Green as an intimate gathering of friends on a porch in Georgia (where moths would flutter in through a hole in the screen), and then recreated in a New York City living room, The Moth quickly grew to produce immensely popular events at theatres and clubs around New York City and later around the USA, the UK and other parts of the world.

The Moth has presented more than 15,000 stories, told live and without notes, to standing-room-only crowds worldwide. The Moth podcast is downloaded over 27 million times a year.

Featuring true stories told live on stage without scripts, from the humorous to the heart-breaking.

The Moth Radio Hour is produced by Jay Allison and Atlantic Public Media in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and is distributed by the Public Radio Exchange.


SUN 23:50 A Point of View (m0006v09)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]



MONDAY 22 JULY 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0007016)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b09bz02x)
War in the air

War in the air: Laurie Taylor explores the history of aerial bombing and tear gas; from the battlefield to urban streets. He's joined by Thomas Hippler, Professor of Modern History at Caen University, Normandy, Anna Feigenbaum, Senior Lecturer in Digital Storytelling at Bournemouth University and Steve Graham, Professor of Professor of Cities and Society at Newcastle University. Revised repeat.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0006zmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0007018)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000701b)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000701d)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000701g)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000701j)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Angela Tilby

Good morning.

Late July often marks endings, particularly for young people as the school year draws to a close. There may have been special events, proms, sports days, plays and performances. For many this is a chance to say goodbye, to end this phase of life as well as we can, relishing perhaps for the last time, the company of those whose lives have crossed with ours.

In the last week of my university life I got into conversation with a student I had not known very well. We had done different courses, we had different friends. We hadn’t deliberately avoided each other but we hadn’t really met either. And now it was too late and we both knew it. So we chatted about nothing very much for a few minutes and then as our conversation petered out she said to me, a bit awkwardly, ‘Well, have a nice life!’ It was an extraordinary thing to say, because it suddenly opened up the unknown vista of what lay ahead, a future neither of us could see.

I am sure I responded with something obvious like, ‘You too’. It was a casual conversation, but it made a lasting impression. I often thought her words were a kind of benediction, a blessing I was being given and which I haltingly tried to return. There was a finality about our words to one another. We could not rerun the past. But we could still be grateful. Our transitions through time are always an opportunity to bless and be blessed.

I remember these words from a hymn by Kevin Nichols, "Take all we start and spoil, each hopeful dream, the chances we have missed the graces we resist, Lord……redeem".


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000701l)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m000701n)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08yq8g2)
Paul Brook on the Black Tern

Paul Brook recalls a long awaited for encounter with a black tern near Leeds for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Maggie Ayre
Photograph: Darran Jones.


MON 06:00 Today (m0006zwf)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 The Listening Project (m0006zwh)
The Listening Project Summer Special - from Bournemouth

Fi Glover and guests with the second of two The Listening Project Summer Specials. Today's edition was recorded in The Listening Project Booth on Bournemouth seafront and includes a lively range of The Listening Project conversations recorded in the Solent region the past year. Among Fi's guests will be BBC Radio Solent producer Julie Massiter who gathered them; Bournemouth-based businessman Mark Cribb; and the most successful Olympic skeleton athlete of all time, Lizzie Yarnold.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


MON 09:45 The Great Romantic (m0006zy8)
Episode 1

Neville Cardus described how one majestic stroke-maker 'made music' and 'spread beauty' with his bat. Between two world wars, he became the laureate of cricket by doing the same with words.

In The Great Romantic, award-winning author Duncan Hamilton demonstrates how Cardus changed sports journalism for ever. While popularising cricket - while appealing, in Cardus' words to people who 'didn't know a leg-break from the pavilion cat at Lord's'- he became a star in his own right with exquisite phrase-making, disdain for statistics and a penchant for literary and musical allusions.

Among those who venerated Cardus were PG Wodehouse, John Arlott, Harold Pinter, JB Priestley and Don Bradman. However, behind the rhapsody in blue skies, green grass and colourful characters, this richly evocative biography finds that Cardus' mother was a prostitute, he never knew his father and he received negligible education. Infatuations with younger women ran parallel to a decidedly unromantic marriage. And, astonishingly, the supreme stylist's aversion to factual accuracy led to his reporting on matches he never attended.

Yet Cardus also belied his impoverished origins to prosper in a second class-conscious profession, becoming a music critic of international renown. The Great Romantic uncovers the dark enigma within a golden age.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Polly Coles
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006zwm)
Takeover 2019 - Nadiya Hussain, TV cook, author, presenter

Nadiya Hussain says, "My edition of Woman’s Hour focuses on time, and our lack of it! Having enough ‘time’ for everything feels like a constant battle. We're juggling childcare and career demands and I wonder whether women are feeling the pressure more than ever before, and more than men. I'm looking at what we can do to relax and switch off, and tell you what works for me!"

To talk a bit more about Nadiya's ideas we're joined by the food writer Bee Wilson, gardener Hollie Newton and psychologist, Dr. Katherine Garzonis from the Mental Health Foundation.


MON 10:45 House Rules (m0006zwp)
Series 2

Episode 1

1/5

Second series of Ben Lewis’s witty real-time drama set around a kitchen table at the weekly meetings of an argumentative yet lovable blended family.

Drawing on her experience as Assistant Chairperson of the Key Stage 3 Debating Society, 14 year-old Amelia has established her very own weekly meetings at home.

Every Monday evening, gavel in hand, Amelia calls the Washburn McGintys together to air their grievances and attempt to resolve their problems.

But with a new baby due any day, and grandmother Jan still living in the house, there’s an air of uncertainty around what kind of a future the family hope to share.

Cast:
Amelia ….. Cleo Demetriou
Jan ….. Barbara Flynn
Sean….. Jonathan Forbes
Nicole ….. Claire Rushbrook
Callum ….. Elliot Speller-Gillott

Directed by Kirsty Williams


MON 11:00 The Untold (m0006zwr)
Fifteen Years Later

Fifteen years ago Anna was diagnosed with cancer, and eventually had to have a double mastectomy. Now, as she turns 50, she returns to hospital for full reconstructive surgery.

Presented by Grace Dent
Produced in Bristol by Polly Weston


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0006zlp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m000705n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Warlow Experiment (m0006zwx)
Episode 1

By Alix Nathan. Herbert Powyss lives on an estate in the Welsh Marches, with enough time and income to pursue a gentleman’s fashionable investigation into botanical experimentation. But he longs to make his mark in the field of science – something consequential enough to present to The Royal Society in London.

Influenced by something he’s read, he decides to conduct a radical investigation into the Resilience of the Human Mind Without Society. He places an ad for a suitable guinea pig.

Only one man is desperate enough to apply for the job - a semi-literate, angry wife-basher.

What could possibly go wrong?

Episode 1:
Herbert Powyss introduces John Warlow to what is to be Warlow’s new isolated life in the basement, for the next seven years.

Alix Nathan is the author of His Last Fire, a collection of short stories and the novel The Flight Of Sarah Battle.

Writer: Alix Nathan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Robert Glenister
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0006zwz)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (m0006zx1)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0006zx3)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b0bch41t)
Series 2

The Duke of Wellington's Boots

David Cannadine returns with five more programmes examining the careers of British Prime Ministers through their props of power. From the Duke of Wellington's boot to Mrs Thatcher's handbag, he explores political fame and image through the way in which an object or prop can come to define a political leader.

When the Duke of Wellington died, his horse carried a pair of his boots the reverse way around in the stirrups at the end of his funeral procession. The sight of these boots brought tears to the eyes of the thousands of mourners at his state funeral. The Duke became associated with his boots after he wrote to his boot maker from the Iberian Peninsula to request he made shorter boots without a tassel, which fitted under trousers, because the Duke tended to wear civilian dress while on campaign.

David Cannadine meets the present Duke of Wellington to explore how his ancestor's utilitarian boots quickly caught on with patriotic British gentlemen, eager to emulate their war hero. But Wellington's boots were turned against him during his premiership by his enemies, who characterised him as a military despot, complete with jackboots and spurs.

The Duke's eponymous footwear were revived again in the aftermath of the First World War, when Wellingtons reappeared in a new guise as our more familiar and much loved 'wellies' - no longer made of leather, but of rubber.

Readings by Ewan Bailey and Will Huggins

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Series Researcher: Martin Spychal

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0006zx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b09pl2sk)
4/4

Scherzo

by Sarah Wooley

The Benjamin Quartet, with their new First Violin Paul, has played to a tiny audience in Brussels, where Fergus has been taken ill with a suspected heart attack.

All music was played by the Edinburgh Quartet

4/4 was created by Robin Brooks and Sarah Wooley

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m0006zx9)
Series 9

Royal Holloway, University of London

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from Royal Holloway, University of London, with specialist subjects including Criminology, English and Law and questions ranging from Louis XIV to Lego via yowling and yodelling.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Aberdeen, Plymouth, St Catharine’s College Cambridge, Brighton and Oxford Brookes.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0006zxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Voices of... (m0006zxg)
Series 4

Stephanie Phillips

Growing up in Wolverhampton, Steph Phillips was a quiet girl, shy to the point of wanting to vanish during social occasions and conscious that as a black teenage female she was, anyway, invisible to most of society. These days, she's found her voice in a space where she can be what she describes as her "full self'" - she's the guitarist and lead singer with the black feminist punk band Big Joanie.

In a lineage of music-making with attitude that can be traced back through Riot Grrrl to the original punk icon, the late Poly Styrene of X-Ray Specs, Steph now commands a stage on which issues of identity, of race and gender, of political activism and artistic expression collide in joyful, noisy creativity.

Presented and produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (m0006zxj)
Free Will

What is the relationship between free will and religion? Historically, theistic religions have been dogged by questions concerning the nature of human agency. Do we make the choices we have in life because we can freely choose or does God somehow map life for us? If we don’t have free will how can we be held responsible for our actions in this life and the next? A belief in free will is central to the religious concept of "sin". Our criminal justice system rests on it. Yet developments in neuroscience suggest free will could be an illusion – that you can reduce human behaviour to the firing of neurons in the brain. But how can we live a moral life if we don’t have free will?

Joining Ernie Rea to discuss belief in free will are Rev Sharon Grenham-Thompson, an Anglican minister and former prison chaplain; Professor Rasjid Skinner a consultant clinical psychologist and Dr Richard Christian, Research Associate in Philosophy and Economics at the University of Manchester.

Producer:
Catherine Earlam

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox


MON 17:00 PM (m0006zxl)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006zxq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m0006zxs)
Series 71

Episode 5

The 71st series of the multi award-winning comedy panel game chaired by Jack Dee


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0006zv1)
Jazzer attempts to conceal his frustration and the pressure piles on Tom.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0006zxv)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 House Rules (m0006zwp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Colour of Justice (m0006zxx)
Twenty years after a Government report criticised the UK judiciary for the lack of non-white judges, Edward Adoo investigates why so little has changed.

A recent Department of Justice review showed that ethnic minority groups make up only 11% of magistrates and 7% of judges. It also acknowledged that people from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds make up 25% of the England and Wales prison population and 41% of the youth justice system - but only 14% of the general population. This suggests there is a wide ethnicity gap between those incarcerated and those who sentence them.

Broadcaster Edward Adoo grew up in the shadow of his grandfather Julius Sarkodee-Adoo, a former Chief Justice of Ghana who was also a prolific writer on post-independence law. He is widely acknowledged as one the most important and influential judicial figures in post-colonial African history. Like many Africans of his generation, he received his training in London, studying law at King’s College before being called to the Bar in 1932. His ethnic background was no barrier to his career 80 years ago – nowadays the figures suggest it’s a little harder.

Presenter: Edward Adoo
Producer: Simon Jarvis
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Analysis (m0006zxz)
The Working Week

Throughout the first half of the 20th century, the working week gradually got shorter and shorter. As technological advances powered economic growth, workers reaped the gains not just in the form of higher pay, but more leisure time. The economist John Maynard Keynes predicted we'd eventually all be working a 15-hour week. Even in the 1970s the expectation that 8 hour days would be reduced to 6 was widely held across the political spectrum. But this all ground to a halt in the 1980s.

In this edition of Analysis Sonia Sodha explores the great leisure mystery: whatever happened to this dream of working less? And why is the idea of a 4-day working week gaining traction on the political left in Britain? What would a society that ditches the long-hours culture, and re-embraces the leisure dream look like, and is it really possible to achieve this without increasing inequality between the haves and have-nots of the labour market?


MON 21:00 Moonbase 2029 (m0006smx)
Fifty years after Apollo astronauts first walked on the lunar surface, the world is heading back to make the Moon a new home.

“We left flags and footprints,” said the head of NASA Jim Bridenstine recently. “This time when we go, we’re going to go to stay.”

The United States has pledged to return by 2024 and NASA is building an orbiting space station near the Moon, called the Lunar Gateway, and is planning a field station as a base.

But the return to the Moon will be international. The European Space Agency (ESA), for instance, is building the service module for NASA’s Orion spacecraft - which will take humans to the Moon using its new giant SLS rocket. China aims to get its own astronauts on the Moon within the decade. Meanwhile ESA is constructing a lunar simulator facility in Cologne, Germany.

Space expert and TV science presenter Dallas Campbell hears from scientists at NASA, ESA and the German Aerospace Centre DLR who are working to make the practicalities of building a Moonbase reality.

Dallas meets those who are experimenting with solar ovens to build lunar bricks and one researcher who is making filters for human urine to produce fertiliser for crops on the Moon.

British astronaut Tim Peake discusses his recent lunar training underwater and Dallas travels to Bavaria to discover why current astronauts are training there for a lunar landing.

Producer: Sue Nelson
A Boffin Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 21:30 The Listening Project (m0006zwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006zy2)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Warlow Experiment (m0006zwx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (m0006snh)
The most powerful word

Michael Rosen explores the strange history of 'The', the most influential word in English. It's used more than twice as much as any other English word, and has given philosophers centuries of head-scratching. So how did a word which means nothing, and didn't even exist in Old English, come to dominate our language? With linguists Laura Wright and Jonathan Culpeper, and philosopher Barry Smith.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006zy4)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 23 JULY 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0006zy6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 The Great Romantic (m0006zy8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006zyb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006zyd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006zyg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0006zyj)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006zyl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Angela Tilby

Good morning.

I have a strong instinct in the summer to want to be outside and close to nature. It is partly to do with the space that nature opens up and partly to do with the vivid colours of this time of year. Summer gives us blues and greens, sometimes the yellow of parched grass and the brown of earth, together with the dash of brighter shades from plants and fruits. When I was a child we invariably made for the sea. And even it if weather was awful, (which it not infrequently was), I would be in and out of water, shivering sometimes but determined not to be cheated of our annual visit to the seaside.

Even now when I am more likely to holiday in the Mediterranean my spirits lift at the sight of the sea and the strange promise of renewal it always seems to hold. In fact I now live by the sea in Portsmouth and am constantly grateful for its changing moods, its calm and its restlessness, its elemental power. It helps me understand why water plays a part in faith. Water to purify, water to cleans, water as a symbol of a clear conscience.

I remember once seeing a film of a Christian baptism on the sea coast in Kenya. Hundreds of worshippers, the baptised in their white garments, the waves rolling in, and just the hint of real danger along with the promise of salvation. For many of us, seas and forests, rivers and mountains are sacraments of nature, hints of the mysterious force which has brought us into being and still sustains us in life.

As we renew our strength through rest and play, Lord renew our spirits, immerse us in hope, faith and love.

Amen.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0006zyn)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08xcpkw)
Paul Brook on the Garden Warbler

Paul Brook discusses watching a garden warbler for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0006zt4)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m0006zt6)
Robin Dunbar on why we have friends

Maintaining friendships is one of the most cognitively demanding things we do, according to Professor of Evolutionary Psychology Robin Dunbar. So why do we bother? Robin has spent his life trying to answer this deceptively simple question. For most of his twenties, he lived with a herd of five hundred gelada monkeys in the Ethiopian highlands. He studied their social behaviour and concluded that an ability to get on with each other was just as important as finding food, for the survival of the species. Animals that live in large groups are less likely to get eaten by predators. When funding for animal studies dried up in the 1980s, he turned his attention to humans. and discovered there’s an upper limit to the number of real friends we can have, both in the real world and on social media.
Producer: Anna Buckley


TUE 09:30 One to One (m0006zt8)
Being a Gay Dad

David Gregory-Kumar talks about parenting with fellow gay dad, Chris Hurlston.

David is a BBC journalist, and he's also a gay dad. Across three editions of One to One he is exploring different aspects of gay parenting. Today he meets Chris Hurlston whose children were carried by surrogate mothers, one from India and the other from Nepal.

David and Chris discuss their different experiences of surrogacy, the challenges of raising a daughter, and the protests against teaching LGBT equality in the city where they both live.

Producer: Karen Gregor


TUE 09:45 The Great Romantic (m0006ztb)
Episode 2

Neville Cardus described how one majestic stroke-maker 'made music' and 'spread beauty' with his bat. Between two world wars, he became the laureate of cricket by doing the same with words.

In The Great Romantic, award-winning author Duncan Hamilton demonstrates how Cardus changed sports journalism for ever. While popularising cricket - while appealing, in Cardus' words to people who 'didn't know a leg-break from the pavilion cat at Lord's'- he became a star in his own right with exquisite phrase-making, disdain for statistics and a penchant for literary and musical allusions.

Among those who venerated Cardus were PG Wodehouse, John Arlott, Harold Pinter, JB Priestley and Don Bradman. However, behind the rhapsody in blue skies, green grass and colourful characters, this richly evocative biography finds that Cardus' mother was a prostitute, he never knew his father and he received negligible education. Infatuations with younger women ran parallel to a decidedly unromantic marriage. And, astonishingly, the supreme stylist's aversion to factual accuracy led to his reporting on matches he never attended.

Yet Cardus also belied his impoverished origins to prosper in a second class-conscious profession, becoming a music critic of international renown. The Great Romantic uncovers the dark enigma within a golden age.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Polly Coles
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006ztf)
Takeover 2019 - Harriet Wistrich, lawyer and founder of Centre for Women's Justice

Harriet Wistrich is a human rights lawyer and founder and director of the Centre for Women's Justice. Her cases are consistently in the news – the fight to keep the so-called ‘black cab rapist’, John Worboys in prison and the release of Sally Challen, who had been imprisoned for the murder of her abusive husband. As part of our Takeover week Harriet discusses surviving a disabled sibling, her admiration for Claudia Clare a ‘subversive ceramicist’, the treatment of women accused of lying about a rape allegation, and why Zem Zem Mohammed, an Eritrean refugee is someone she holds in great esteem.


TUE 10:45 House Rules (m0006zth)
Series 2

Episode 2

2/5

Second series of Ben Lewis’s witty real-time drama set around a kitchen table at the weekly meetings of an argumentative yet lovable blended family.

Drawing on her experience as Assistant Chairperson of the Key Stage 3 Debating Society, 14 year-old Amelia has established her very own weekly meetings at home.

Every Monday evening, gavel in hand, Amelia calls the Washburn McGintys together to air their grievances and attempt to resolve their problems.

Tonight, whilst Nicole is feeling oppressively pregnant, the family discover they have a stranger in their midst.

Cast:

Amelia ….. Cleo Demetriou
Jan ….. Barbara Flynn
Sean….. Jonathan Forbes
Nicole ….. Claire Rushbrook
Callum ….. Elliot Speller-Gillott

Directed by Kirsty Williams


TUE 11:00 India’s Street Cricketers: Crossing Boundaries (m0006dmw)
How street children from Kolkata got to play at the world's most famous cricket ground - Lord's in London. Andrea Catherwood hears the often harrowing stories of four teenagers who were brought up on the streets of the city of 16 million. Anjali, Jabbir, Milli and Tarak are all 15 years old. They have dreams and hopes of opportunities far different from the hardship they were born into. They were selected to be part of the North India team to play in the Street Cricket World Cup - and compete on the same hallowed turf as their cricketing heroes. But getting to Britain proved to be far from an easy task...
Producer: Rumella Dasgupta


TUE 11:30 Where are all the black women in Grime? (m0003tcf)
Journalist and Grime fan Yomi Adegoke noticed something lacking when it comes to discovering and enjoying the genre of music she loves. Women who look like her.

Whether it’s behind the scenes or at the forefront, black women seem noticeably absent while, in the past 15 years, stars such as Dizzee Rascal, Stormzy, Wiley and Skepta have become mainstream names as the genre grows exponentially, exporting this distinctly British sound internationally from China to the USA.

Yomi takes a journey through the music industry to ask some difficult questions. She meets the women who are making waves - including veteran artists Lioness and Shystie, as well as industry insiders and those scrutinising the scene from the outside.

She finds that, though significantly outnumbered, black women can be found among the artists, producers, managers and tastemakers, but they lack the profile and representation of their male and/or white counterparts.

It's also a problem the industry seems reluctant to address, raising uncomfortable questions indicative of the wider challenges black women face in the UK - colourism and misogynoir.

Yomi hears how this inimitable, thriving genre is defined by the artists who make it, and discovers a complex music scene that celebrates its black female artists on the one hand, but hasn’t yet given them the space, profile or support to grow.

But are things changing?

With contributions from Dr Joy White, Alex 'Twin' Boateng, Jasmine Dotiwala and more.

Produced by Sefa Nkyi
Mixed by Steve Wyatt
A Boom Shakalaka production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0006ztl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Warlow Experiment (m0006ztn)
Episode 2

By Alix Nathan. Herbert Powyss lives on an estate in the Welsh Marches, with enough time and income to pursue a gentleman’s fashionable investigation into botanical experimentation. But he longs to make his mark in the field of science – something consequential enough to present to The Royal Society in London.

Influenced by something he’s read, he decides to conduct a radical investigation into the Resilience of the Human Mind Without Society. He places an ad for a suitable guinea pig.

Only one man is desperate enough to apply for the job - a semi-literate, angry wife-basher.

What could possibly go wrong?

Episode 2:
Warlow begins his seven-year term of isolation. It is 1793 and planks are nailed across the basement door. Warlow and Powyss will meet again in 1800. When the experiment is completed, Warlow will get £50 a year for life.

Alix Nathan is the author of His Last Fire, a collection of short stories and the novel The Flight Of Sarah Battle.

Writer: Alix Nathan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Robert Glenister
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0006ztr)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0006ztt)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0006ztw)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b0bd8hqx)
Series 2

Benjamin Disraeli's Novels

David Cannadine examines the careers of British Prime Ministers through their props of power.

In producing his seventeen novels, Benjamin Disraeli was unusual among British Prime Ministers in that he created his own props. Indeed, his duel public persona as author and politician brought him public acclaim and prominence and transformed him into one of the first ever media celebrities. But this turned out to be a very high-risk strategy. Disraeli's novels prompted a great deal of distrust among both his political opponents and those within the Conservative party, and they were used to portray him as an opportunist who was not to be trusted.

David Cannadine visits Hughenden Manor in Buckinghamshire, Disraeli's former home and the place where he wrote his most famous novels, to explore how this Prime Minister merged fact and fiction in his life and in his work.

Readings by Ewan Bailey and Will Huggins

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Series Researcher: Martin Spychal

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0006zv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b08x8y14)
The Crossing

Pauline McLynn and Owen O'Neil play a middle aged married couple living on a farm that straddles the Irish border. They are overwhelmed by debt. When a mysterious man they've contacted online arrives to meet them in person they hope he has the solution to all their problems.

Set on St Bridget's Day, which also happens to be the pagan festival of Imbolc, Gabriel arrives on the Ward's property suggesting a way out of their impossible money problems. Over the years, they've re-mortaged way beyond the value of the farm. Dávid, a Lithuanian migrant worker, senses something is up.

After a tour of the farm and a lunch meeting with the enigmatic Gabriel, Kath and Matthew Ward must reach a decision. Should they entrust their future to this strange businessman?

The Crossing marks a Radio 4 debut for writer Tara Hegarty and director JP McKeown.

Written by Tara Hegarty
Director: JP McKeown
Sound Designer: Eloise Whitmore
Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0006zv3)
Series 25

Southend-On-Sea

Jay Rayner and his culinary panel are in Southend-On-Sea. Dr. Zoe Laughlin, Clodagh McKenna, Andi Oliver and Tim Anderson answer the questions from the audience.

This week, the panellists offer recipe suggestions for sour gooseberries, describe how to cook chips perfectly, and come up with the perfect dessert for gin-lovers.

They are joined by Andrew Lawrence from Osborne Bros, who has brought along some cockles.

Producer: Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (m0003cw1)
Guy Disney

Guy Disney was on his second tour of Afghanistan and serving as Captain with the Light Dragoons in Helmand Province when he was caught in an ambush which changed his life. During a 10-day period which claimed the lives of 11 British servicemen, Disney’s vehicle was out on patrol when it was hit from the side by a rocket-propelled grenade.

He tells Peter that his life was saved by the quick action of those with him, who put a tourniquet on his leg to stop the bleeding. He was airlifted to a field hospital, where he had his first operation – just 24 hours later he was flown back to the UK for further surgery.

In the immediate aftermath he was intent on recovery and determined to get used to life with a prosthetic leg as quickly as possible. His initial hopes centred on being able to return to Afghanistan: “I think I had in the back of my mind that I wanted to go at things as if nothing had changed.

“I remember saying to a consultant I want to re-join the guys and I remember starting to train, putting on a back pack and walking for miles. My leg was raw, I physically exhausted - it was odd feeling and it made me realise that wasn’t going to happen.”

Instead Guy turned back to horse racing, which he’d always loved: “The racing for me is a complete drug, I'm absolutely addicted to it - going over an obstacle at thirty miles an hour on half a tonne of animal is the most astonishing feeling in the world. Going on a horse over a fence, that's where the real point of elation is.”

But when he applied for his jockey’s licence in 2010 he was turned down by the British Horseracing Authority: “They had concerns that I’d get the prosthetic stuck or if my foot slipped out of the iron I wouldn’t be able to get it back in as I couldn’t feel it. It was a shock as I hadn’t thought up to that point that the injury was going to change my life.”

He vented his frustration by signing up for Prince Harry’s Walking With The Wounded trek to the North Pole. It marked the start of Guy’s long lasting commitment to help injured ex-servicemen and during the preparations he met David Carey, a doctor training to be a barrister, who offered to help challenge the BHA decision.

After months of work and with the help of Toe Stoppers, stirrup irons where the foot is prevented from slipping forward, they eventually managed to overturn the BHA decision and he was free to race again. In 2017 he won the Royal Artillery Gold Cup at Sandown Park and last year he became the first amputee jockey to ride over the Grand National fences in the Foxhunters’ Chase at Aintree.

“I always get quite nervous before the racing and then the moment you're sat on the horse you're set into the race you can't change anything, you get down to the start and what will be will be. It’s a feeling of complete contentment.”

Alongside the racing Guy is committed to several charities and worked with disadvantaged youngsters in Nottingham through the Royal Foundation. The role included building relationships that could help engage them and build up skills and training.

As a trustee at Walking with the Wounded he has been asked to help oversee a project in Zambia and is training rangers who encounter many dangers. “There are some key areas I've got funded to trial through the Royal Foundation and Walking With The Wounded, where we take teams of servicemen and women to help.

“Stopping medical bleeds is a big priority and we can teach them how to use a tourniquet. The moment something happens out there you have sixty seconds if you want to stop arterial bleed. Giving them the skills can help save many lives.”


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0006zv5)
Glyn Maxwell

Michael Rosen explores the sound and rhythm of English with acclaimed poet Glyn Maxwell. From nursery rhymes and nonsense poetry to Shakespeare and Bob Dylan.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m0006zv7)
Pam Hogg and Mark Billingham

The fashion designer Pam Hogg and crime writer Mark Billingham make their choices of a good read. Pam's is Geek Love by Katherine Dunn, Mark has chosen Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon while Harriett goes for Bookworm by Lucy Mangan.
Join our Instagram book club @agoodreadbbc
Producer: Maggie Ayre


TUE 17:00 PM (m0006zv9)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006zvc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers (m0006zvf)
Series 2

Sport

A new series of potentially misremembered anecdotes from Andy Hamilton.

Over this 4 part series, Andy will be sort of remembering tales about Sport, Class, Religion and Stupidity. Through comic observations and personal anecdotes he will explore each theme, examining how much (or how little) things have changed in the 60ish years he's been on this planet.

In this first episode Andy looks at Sport, a subject very close to his heart and something he’ll argue you should try and care about as well – however much of a non-fan you may claim to be! Expect heavy old leather footballs, annoyingly helpful cricket teammates and a round of golf interrupted by poisonous snakes.

Andy was born in Fulham in 1954, read English at Cambridge and then in 1976 began writing comedy for BBC Radio, on programmes like Week Ending and The News Huddlines. In 1990, he and Guy Jenkin created Drop the Dead Donkey for Channel 4. Andy has spent much of his working life making acute observations about politics and family life. In 2007, again with Guy Jenkin, he created the massive TV hit, Outnumbered, which celebrated the chaos of life with young children. More recently they created the highly topical Ballot Monkeys for Channel 4, which charted the absurdities of the General Election and then the EU Referendum. For over 20 years he has been playing the part of Satan in his Radio 4 sitcom, Old Harry's Game. Andy is also a popular panellist on shows such as The News Quiz and Have I Got News For You.

Featured clip acknowledgements::

Murray Walker – ITV - 1999 San Marino Grand Prix
Eddie Waring – BBC – Challenge Cup Final 1968
Peter O’Sullevan – BBC – Grand National 1977
Kenneth Wolstenholme – BBC – 1966 World Cup Final

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0006zvj)
Rex finds himself at a crossroads and Phoebe tries to get her point across.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0006zvl)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 House Rules (m0006zth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 From College to Clink (m0006zvn)
What happens when top graduates work behind bars as prison officers? Lucy Ash meets young people who have forsaken lucrative careers in the City or elsewhere, for what many see as one of the world’s worst jobs. They’re part of Graduates Unlocked, a scheme which, which is trying to replicate in the prison service the success of Teach First, the programme that sends high-flyers into inner-city schools.

The aim is to raise the status and reputation of prison officers, to boost recruitment and cut reoffending. It is hoped that youthful enthusiasm plus resilience and empathy could bring a much needed revolution to the criminal justice system.

But faced with acute understaffing and assaults on prison officers at record levels, how much of a difference can the graduates make? Lucy meets a group of young men and women who are are sent to HMP Aylesbury, which holds the longest-sentenced young adult males in the English prison system. The youth offender institution in Buckinghamshire is "in a perpetual state of crisis" according to the Howard League for Penal Reform. A few months into the graduates' stint there, the youth prison is placed in special measures for keeping some inmates locked up for 23 hours a day. Can the graduates' early idealism survive the reality of life behind bars?

Producer: Arlene Gregorius


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0006zvq)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0006zvs)
Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, separating fact from fiction and bringing clarity to conflicting health advice, with the help of regular contributor GP Margaret McCartney


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m0006zt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006zvv)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 The Warlow Experiment (m0006ztn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Mr Muzak (b095qcjy)
Series 1

Rock the Boat

Richie Webb stars as performance shy cocktail pianist Nigel Penny.

Nigel Penny's attempts to live his life in the background have been thwarted by the surprise arrival of his entrepreneurial half-brother, Pav (Paul G Raymond) who is desperate to find gigs for Nigel and his musical partner, wannabe singer Rachel (Jess Robinson).

Despite his protestations of sea-sickness, Pav books Nigel to accompany Rachel as the entertainment on a floating barge at an event hosted by Belinda (Vicki Pepperdine), an old acquaintance of Nigel's. Meanwhile Stan (Dave Lamb) is yearning to return to his homeland.

Directed by Nick Walker
Audio Production by Matt Katz
Written and produced by Richie Webb
A Top Dog production for Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006zvx)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 24 JULY 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0006zvz)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 The Great Romantic (m0006ztb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006zw1)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006zw3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006zw5)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0006zw7)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006zw9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Angela Tilby

Good morning.

These days of late July can sometimes seem quite lazy and even languid. I’ve known many wet Julys but my childhood image is of overburdened trees boughs bent to breaking point with their burden of green leaves. There’s often a heaviness in the air. And there’s either hazy sunshine, or piercing blue skies with banks of dark threatening clouds. I often feel even now that there is a tiredness about July, as though all the effort of spring and early summer has run out and nature is no longer fresh but dusty and overblown, ready to nod off for a while.

To my childhood self, July sometimes seemed interminable. I can remember lying in the grass looking up into the sky for hours, not absorbed, but bored, the only thrill was the promise of a thunderstorm. July reminds me that our subjective experience of living in time is that it speeds up and slows down. The slowing of time often reflects our sense that life has become monotonous. We are bored perhaps with our job, bored with those we live or work with, and above all bored with ourselves. Even distractions don’t help when time itself seems to have slowed down to a crawl.

But over the years I have come to think that learning to live with boredom is one of the most important lessons we have to learn. It is an essential ingredient of the spiritual life, of learning to live in time and learning to pray. A lot of prayer is repetition, habit, just carrying on faithfully. But it is a habit which builds character and ultimately brings us freedom.

In the words of the poet Gerard Manley Hopkins, "Mine O thou Lord of life, send my roots rain".


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0006zwc)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08x9htb)
John Clifton on the Bee-Eater

RSPB Old Moor Learning Officer John Clifton on the bee-eater for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.


WED 06:00 Today (m000709w)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Soul Music (m00070b2)
Series 28

Wind of Change

“I follow the Moskva, down to Gorky Park… listening to the wind of change.”

The German rock band Scorpions’ lead singer Klaus Meine was inspired to write Wind of Change at a rock festival in Moscow in the summer of 1989. Politics were rapidly shifting in the Soviet Union at the time as a result of Mikhail Gorbachev’s reforms. Recalling the peaceful yet revolutionary atmosphere at the concerts, Klaus said “there was a whole new generation of Russian kids that said the Cold War would be over soon - we could literally feel the world changing in front of our eyes”.

No one had any idea that the Berlin wall would come down only a few months later. Wind of Change was released in 1990, and has since become an unofficial anthem for the end of the Cold War and the reunification of Germany in 1991. The power ballad is one the best-selling singles in history, and popular all over the world.

Featuring interviews with lead singer of the Scorpions Klaus Meine, Russian rock musician Stas Namin, and true stories of what the song means to people who lived in the former USSR.


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m00070b4)
Thought-provoking talks in which speakers explore original ideas about culture and society


WED 09:45 The Great Romantic (m00070c3)
Episode 3

In The Great Romantic, award-winning author Duncan Hamilton demonstrates how Cardus changed sports journalism for ever. While popularising cricket - while appealing, in Cardus' words to people who 'didn't know a leg-break from the pavilion cat at Lord's'- he became a star in his own right with exquisite phrase-making, disdain for statistics and a penchant for literary and musical allusions.

Among those who venerated Cardus were PG Wodehouse, John Arlott, Harold Pinter, JB Priestley and Don Bradman. However, behind the rhapsody in blue skies, green grass and colourful characters, this richly evocative biography finds that Cardus' mother was a prostitute, he never knew his father and he received negligible education. Infatuations with younger women ran parallel to a decidedly unromantic marriage. And, astonishingly, the supreme stylist's aversion to factual accuracy led to his reporting on matches he never attended.

Yet Cardus also belied his impoverished origins to prosper in a second class-conscious profession, becoming a music critic of international renown. The Great Romantic uncovers the dark enigma within a golden age.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Polly Coles
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00070b8)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 House Rules (m00070bl)
Series 2

Episode 3

3/5

Second series of Ben Lewis’s witty real-time drama set around a kitchen table at the weekly meetings of an argumentative yet lovable blended family

Drawing on her experience as Assistant Chairperson of the Key Stage 3 Debating Society, 14 year-old Amelia has established her very own weekly meetings at home.

Every Monday evening, gavel in hand, Amelia calls the Washburn McGintys together to air their grievances and attempt to resolve their problems.

It’s the first meeting with the new baby present. Will the family manage to hold their tempers for the fifteen minutes it takes to run through the agenda?

Cast:

Amelia ….. Cleo Demetriou
Jan ….. Barbara Flynn
Sean….. Jonathan Forbes
Nicole ….. Claire Rushbrook
Callum ….. Elliot Speller-Gillott

Directed by Kirsty Williams


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m00070h1)
William and Jack - The Sharing of Pain

Friends who met through being part of a group offering emotional support to men. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 The Colour of Justice (m0006zxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 All Those Women (b087ts6z)
Series 2

Episode 3

Comedy series by Katherine Jakeways about four generations of women living under one roof.

An unexpected death leads all four of the family to consider what's really important, as well as giving David a chance to spend some quality time (of sorts) with Maggie, much to Hetty's disapproval.

All Those Women explores familial relationships, ageing, marriages - it's about life and love and things not turning out quite the way that you'd expected them to. Every week we join Hetty, Maggie, Jen and Emily as they struggle to resolve their own problems, and support one another.

Written by KATHERINE JAKEWAYS
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m00070h3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Warlow Experiment (m00070bv)
Episode 3

By Alix Nathan. Herbert Powyss lives on an estate in the Welsh Marches, with enough time and income to pursue a gentleman’s fashionable investigation into botanical experimentation. But he longs to make his mark in the field of science – something consequential enough to present to The Royal Society in London.

Influenced by something he’s read, he decides to conduct a radical investigation into the Resilience of the Human Mind Without Society. He places an ad for a suitable guinea pig.

Only one man is desperate enough to apply for the job - a semi-literate, angry wife-basher.

What could possibly go wrong?

Episode 3:
Powyss has no family of his own and becomes entranced by Warlow's wife, Hannah. Powyss pays her and for her children to attend school.

Alix Nathan is the author of His Last Fire, a collection of short stories and the novel The Flight Of Sarah Battle.

Writer: Alix Nathan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Robert Glenister
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m00070h5)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m00070h7)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m00070h9)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b0bf630w)
Series 2

William Gladstone's Axe

David Cannadine examines the careers of British Prime Ministers through their props of power.

Standing in a fireplace in his Temple of Peace at Hawarden Castle in Wales, is a selection of axes used by William Gladstone to chop down trees. David meets Charlie Gladstone, the current resident at Hawarden, to examine these axes and discuss the attraction of tree-felling for his ancestor, William. It was a vigorous physical activity that took his mind off everything else, especially public affairs.

Gladstone's axe was a Prime Minister's Prop which also became a powerful political metaphor. Gladstone was often depicted by his supporters as swinging his axe to eliminate wrongdoing and error, literally root and branch. And the image of him retreating to Hawarden, working away with his axe, appealed to working people who, as one historian has commented, "found a great statesman and popular leader in the plain clothes of a labourer".

To his critics however, Gladstone's axe was an apt metaphor for his increasingly radical politics, which seemed to them to be violent and destructive. For Tory opponents, and for Queen Victoria, the contrast with William Gladstone's great political rival Benjamin Disraeli was striking. For while Gladstone chopped down trees on his country estate at Hawarden, Disraeli planted them at Hughenden Manor, his rural retreat in Buckinghamshire.

Readings by Ewan Bailey and Will Huggins

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Series Researcher: Martin Spychal

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0006zvj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b07p0kv5)
The Clintons

The Man Scale

Three entertaining new dramas imagine key moments in the Clintons’ personal and political lives together, closely based on the published accounts and opinions of those who’ve witnessed their enduring partnership.

2008, and Hillary Clinton is running for the Democratic Presidential Nomination. A long-heralded, well-organised and well-funded candidate, the figures are all going her way, until a charismatic young Senator from Illinois starts to make speeches. And as the race between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton goes down to the wire, is Bill's role in her campaign the real problem?

Everything Hillary does - including her decision to fight on, or withdraw - is somehow being weighed in 'The Man Scale'...

Hillary Rodham Clinton ..... Sian Thomas
Bill Clinton ..... Corey Johnson
Chelsea Clinton ..... Janine Harouni
Patti Solis Doyle ..... Nancy Crane
Mark Penn ..... Trevor White
Huma Abedin ..... Lisa Caruccio Came
Kevin ..... Jason Barnett
Air Hostess ..... Kirsty Oswald

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting


WED 15:00 Money Box (m00070hf)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0006zvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 The Gamble Network (m00070hh)
The Loot Box scandal

Over three programmes, Jolyon Jenkins explores whether children are being enticed into gambling through video game "loot boxes", and how an apparently harmless bit of fun has links that stretch all the way across the world and involve a small Caribbean island which has seen gambling-related murder and high level corruption.

Loot boxes are a feature of games in which you pay to open random packs or crates of virtual items, some of which are rare and desirable. In some cases, these items can be traded for cash, either on the manufacturer’s own platform or through third party sites. Because the virtual items are kind of virtual parallel currency, they represent an easy way for children to gamble, and in some cases children have lost large sums. We also see a proliferation of straight up gambling sites that use virtual items interchangeably with cryptocurrency, and with no age verification checks.

But there is also evidence that, even where the virtual items cannot be “cashed out”, the experience of buying loot boxes is associated with problem gambling. This evidence suggests that either games companies are causing people (largely children) to get a problem gambling habit, or those who already have a problem with gambling are being drawn to video games where their habit is fed. The UK Gambling Commission doesn’t consider loot boxes to be covered by gambling law. But is this the wrong question? Maybe the issue is not whether loot boxes are technically gambling, but if they are causing harm.

Presenter/Producer: Jolyon Jenkins


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m00070hl)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m00070hn)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00070hq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Pin (m00070bd)
Series 4

Ep 4: Sabotage

The latest series from Ben and Alex, aka "The Pin", is a sketch-sitcom hybrid. The award-winning sketch duo are forced to record their latest series in their flat and the boys are glad of the new creative freedom this opportunity presents, away from the "prying eyes of the BBC". Unfortunately this week, their plans are thrown into disarray when Ben's mum decides she wants her flat back and has sent estate agents in. Luckily, the boys have some anti-eviction tricks up their sleeves...

The Pin At Home is written by Alex Owen and Ben Ashenden

It stars:

Alex Owen as Alex
Ben Ashenden as Ben
Pippa Haywood as Michelle/Henrietta the ghost
Celeste Dring as Maria
James McNicholas as David/Neville/Kronon
Krupa Pattani as Jane/Sophie
Ed McArthur as Clint/Bargeman 1
and
Jason Forbes as Bargeman 2

It was produced by Sam Michell

A BBC Studios Production


WED 19:00 The Archers (m00070bg)
Is Ed's ordeal finally over? And Toby solves a mystery at The Bull.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m00070bj)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 House Rules (m00070bl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m00070bn)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Matthew Taylor, Melanie Philips, Mona Siddiqui and Tim Stanley.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m00070b4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Stranger Than Sci-Fi (m00070bq)
Black Hole Jacuzzis

Astro-physicist Jen Gupta and comedian Alice Fraser travel the parallel worlds of science and sci-fi.

Starting with the latest books and films, they discover real life science that sounds too strange to be true - from babies grown in bags, via black hole Jacuzzis, to flowers that behave like our ears.

In this episode they dive into the science behind Claire Denis’s film High Life, which is about a group of criminals travelling towards a black hole. They explore the mysteries of the void, a strange scientific theory called The Penrose Process and try to find out if one day black holes might provide us with limitless resources of energy.

Produced by Joe Sykes
Executive Producer: Peggy Sutton
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


WED 21:30 Soul Music (m00070b2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m00070bs)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 The Warlow Experiment (m00070bv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Darren Harriott: Black Label (m00070bx)
Bouncer

Recorded in Darren's hometown of Birmingham, Black Label explores the different labels and roles he's been assigned throughout his life - Brummie, gang member, brother and son, bouncer and now comic. Each episode of Black Label consists of incredibly open-hearted stories from the front line of Darren's life - challenging, enlightening and properly funny comedy.

In Episode 3, Darren looks back at his time as a bouncer working on the doors of nightclubs and shops. On a zero hours contract and trying to make it as a comedian, he looks back at the fights and insults he faced, and the friendships on the door.

Written and Performed by Darren Harriott

Photo by Freddie Claire

Produced by Adnan Ahmed

BBC Studios Production


WED 23:15 TEZ Talks (b09pmbdt)
Series 2

6. Are youse Muslim and that?

In this episode Tez talks about lack of Asian role models in TV and film and he discusses his feelings about being a role model himself.

Written and performed by Tez Ilyas
Produced by Carl Cooper

A BBC Studios Production


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00070bz)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 25 JULY 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m00070c1)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 The Great Romantic (m00070c3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00070c5)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00070c7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00070c9)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m00070cc)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00070cf)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Angela Tilby

Good morning.

I can’t get out of my mind at the moment those school leavers who are waiting for important exam results. GCSE’s will be announced four weeks today, and A levels three weeks today. It’s many years since I took an exam but its only comparatively recently that my dreams caught up with me - for years I used to have exam anxiety dreams. You know the sort of thing. You can’t find the room where the exam is being held, or you get there, turn over the paper and find you have revised the wrong book, or you are sitting an exam in a language you don’t know. I would sometimes wake up gasping with terror.

In reality, though I was always nervous before exams I was one of those people who tended to rise to the challenge and stuffed myself with facts effectively enough to get through. That doesn’t mean I always reached real understanding. I have cheerfully forgotten everything I once knew about, for example, the unification of Italy, or William Henry Hudson’s (to me) rather dreary novel Far Away and Long Ago.

Testing of one kind or another is part of life and we face it all the time, in our work and relationships, in our inner attitudes, in our ability to persevere in difficulty and bounce back in defeat. Every test we face is an experiment: we try ourselves against reality. It’s nice to pass of course, it’s nice to win, but the real point is the way testing shows us the truth about ourselves, and encourages us to tread boldly into the next phase of life.

So, today, good Lord, in trial and temptation keep us faithful; in success keep is humble, in defeat, give us the faith to try again.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m00070ch)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wn2jh)
John McPherson on the Hooded Crow

Wildlife photographer John McPherson recalls, for Tweet of the Day, watching hooded crows working intelligently to obtain food caught by an otter on the Isle of Mull.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


THU 06:00 Today (m00070jf)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Bringing Up Britain (m00070jk)
Series 12

Parents v Teachers

Parents and teachers - both have a huge part to play in the upbringing of our children. As the term in loco parentis implies, school has a strong authority in the raising of our kids. But if recent headlines are to be believed, the line between who does what is getting increasingly blurred. 'Nappy changer hired by infant school', 'teaching staff urged to supervise tooth-brushing'– some recent headlines which seem to indicate how, increasingly, it’s falling to teachers to play parent. Education minister Damien Hinds says parents who aren’t engaging with their children’s education cost them dear, whilst the head of Ofsted has also recently warned that parents are 'abdicating their responsibilities' by leaving schools to tackle issues best dealt with at home.

Simultaneously, parents are being increasingly relied upon by schools to fill ever larger gaps; from music, art and sports activities to subsidising anything from teaching equipment like books and glues to essentials like toilet paper. In addition, more parents are being asked to pay for school clubs, sports days and concerts- all of which used to be free.

So what is the current state of this crucial relationship and what role are parents playing in the education picture? Mariella Frostrup is joined by headteacher Sarah Hewitt Clarkson, Madeleine Holt co-founder of Rescue Our Schools, Ruth Lowe from Parentkind and Anastasia de Waal – Director of the Family & Education Unit at Civitas.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki


THU 09:45 The Great Romantic (m00070kh)
Episode 4

In The Great Romantic, award-winning author Duncan Hamilton demonstrates how Cardus changed sports journalism for ever. While popularising cricket - while appealing, in Cardus' words to people who 'didn't know a leg-break from the pavilion cat at Lord's'- he became a star in his own right with exquisite phrase-making, disdain for statistics and a penchant for literary and musical allusions.

Among those who venerated Cardus were PG Wodehouse, John Arlott, Harold Pinter, JB Priestley and Don Bradman. However, behind the rhapsody in blue skies, green grass and colourful characters, this richly evocative biography finds that Cardus' mother was a prostitute, he never knew his father and he received negligible education. Infatuations with younger women ran parallel to a decidedly unromantic marriage. And, astonishingly, the supreme stylist's aversion to factual accuracy led to his reporting on matches he never attended.

Yet Cardus also belied his impoverished origins to prosper in a second class-conscious profession, becoming a music critic of international renown. The Great Romantic uncovers the dark enigma within a golden age.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Polly Coles
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00070jp)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 House Rules (m00070k0)
Series 2

Episode 4

4/5

Second series of Ben Lewis’s witty real-time drama set around a kitchen table at the weekly meetings of an argumentative yet lovable blended family

Drawing on her experience as Assistant Chairperson of the Key Stage 3 Debating Society, 14 year-old Amelia has established her very own weekly meetings at home.

Every Monday evening, gavel in hand, Amelia calls the Washburn McGintys together to air their grievances and attempt to resolve their problems.

Today the grown-ups turn the tables on Amelia and call an emergency meeting after she’s brought home by the police in the middle of the night.

Cast:

Amelia ….. Cleo Demetriou
Jan ….. Barbara Flynn
Sean ….. Jonathan Forbes
Nicole ….. Claire Rushbrook
Callum ….. Elliot Speller-Gillott

Directed by Kirsty Williams


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m00070mw)
The Undercover Migrant

When Azeteng, a young man from rural Ghana, heard stories on the radio of West African migrants dying on their way to Europe, he felt compelled to act. He took what little savings he had and bought glasses with a hidden camera – his “secret spectacles”. Then he put himself in the hands of people smugglers and travelled 3,000 miles on the desert migrant trail north, aiming to document the crimes of the traffickers. Along the way he saw extortion, slavery, and death in the vast stretches of the Sahara. In this edition of Crossing Continents we tell the story of his journey – a journey that thousands of young Africans like him attempt each year. Reporter, Joel Gunter.

Producer, Josephine Casserly.

(Photo: Azeteng's secret spectacles. Credit: Charlie Northcott/BBC)


THU 11:30 The Angels of the Bayou (m00070my)
Kenny Hill was a bricklayer who arrived in the small town of Chauvin, Louisiana in 1988. He built himself a small home by the side of the bayou and began to make statues. Over the course of 13 years, he created a sculpture park filled with angels, self-portraits, and Americana icons that has been hailed as one of America's great works of 'outsider art'.

Then, one day, Kenny Hill knocked the head off one of his angels and vanished.

Kenny's arrival and his subsequent artistic creations were unusual because Chauvin is a town with a dwindling population. The coastal land loss affecting much of south-eastern Louisiana means that Chauvin is gradually disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico. The hurricanes are getting more and more severe and, with each passing month, residents are noticing more water creeping into their front yards. The younger generations are moving further north, leaving the future of the town in doubt.

We meet the residents of Chauvin who knew Kenny Hill - and attempt to find out what happened to him after he left the town. And we examine what his artwork and legacy have come to mean for a community that is being eroded.

Producer: Ant Adeane
An SPG production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m00070n0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Warlow Experiment (m00070k7)
Episode 4

By Alix Nathan. Herbert Powyss lives on an estate in the Welsh Marches, with enough time and income to pursue a gentleman’s fashionable investigation into botanical experimentation. But he longs to make his mark in the field of science – something consequential enough to present to The Royal Society in London.

Influenced by something he’s read, he decides to conduct a radical investigation into the Resilience of the Human Mind Without Society. He places an ad for a suitable guinea pig.

Only one man is desperate enough to apply for the job - a semi-literate, angry wife-basher.

What could possibly go wrong?

Episode 4:
Powyss gets ever more obsessed by Hannah. It's the constant gossip on the estate. Powyss has put in a listening tube so that he can monitor Warlow's movement. It is less effective than Powyss hoped for, but it will come back to haunt him.

Alix Nathan is the author of His Last Fire, a collection of short stories and the novel The Flight Of Sarah Battle.

Writer: Alix Nathan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Robert Glenister
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m00070n2)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m00070n4)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m00070n6)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b0bfyv44)
Series 2

Winston Churchill's Cigar

David Cannadine examines the careers of British Prime Ministers through their props of power.

It was during the Second World War that Winston Churchill adopted the cigar as his most indispensable Prime Ministerial prop and he rarely appeared in public without it. Clenched tightly between his jaws, his cigar signified defiance and determination, resolve and resolution.

Glowing brightly and accompanied by expansive gestures, it radiated confidence and hope. But the fact that Churchill liked cigars was a sign for Hitler that he was a weak man and a poor leader, and Nazi propaganda depicted Churchill and his cigar as decadent and self-indulgent.

David visits Chartwell, Churchill's Kent country home, to view his famous cigar cabinet which now houses paints in his studio. He discusses the way in which Churchill's cigar became synonymous with his political image - so much so that, towards the end of his life, he gave out cigars as a calling card and his global fame meant they went for thousands at auction.

Readings by Ewan Bailey and Will Huggins

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Series Researcher: Martin Spychal

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (m00070bg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m00070nb)
Faded Glory

Original drama recorded on location in Rhyl written by Rebekah Harrison

Childhood sweethearts Dave and Sue, whose lives have taken them very different ways, meet after 22 years. A bitter sweet love story set against the backdrop of Rhyl: once a thriving seaside town now desperately trying to reinvent itself to survive.

SUE.....Shobna Gulati
DAVE.....Roger Evans
GEMMA.....Annie-Rose Tate

Directed by Nadia Molinari

The drama was recorded on location in Rhyl, with special thanks to actors from Prestatyn Youth Theatre and Prestatyn Comunity Players for additional voices and staff at Les & Rita's Fish Bar.


THU 15:00 Open Country (m00070nd)
Rockfield Studios

Music Journalist Laura Barton visits Rockfield Studios to hear how this farm based facility became the birthplace to some of the greatest albums of all time.

Rockfield Studios lies just outside just outside the village of Rockfield, near Monmouth in Wales. It began its commercial recording life in 1961 and in 1965 was acknowledged to be the first residential recording studio in the world. It’s played host to many of the world’s biggest artists including Iggy pop, Coldplay, Oasis and Black Sabbath and in 1975 it was the primary studios used by Queen for recording ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ – but it began life as a family farm and still holds on to these rural routes.

Laura spends the day with members of the studio's founding family and hears the stories of how this rural landscape and local community found their way into the legendary albums that were produced there.

Presented by Laura Barton
Produced by Nicola Humphries


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000700c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m000702d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m00070ng)
Moira Buffini on Stalker

With Francine Stock.

Moira Buffini, the writer of Byzantium and the latest Jane Eyre adaptation, talks about the film that has been a major influence on her career- Tarkovsky's Stalker, which foreshadowed the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Moira and Francine hear from Nick Rush-Cooper, who worked as a tourist guide in the abandoned city.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m00070k2)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m00070nj)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00070nl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Welcome to Wherever You Are (m00070jt)
Series 2

Episode 2

Welcome To Wherever You Are is a truly global stand-up show, in which comedians perform from wherever on the planet they happen to be, via high quality phone lines and internet video, to a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, London.

In this episode there’s stand-up from Serbia, Zimbabwe and the USA. Nikola Silic @NikolaSilic from Belgrade is one of the biggest names on the comedy scene in the Balkans and will feature at Croatia’s new international comedy festival this summer. Carl Joshua Ncube @carljoshuancube, “the biggest Zimbabwean stand-up comedian in the world” performs whilst metres from the Victoria Falls and from New Jersey we present Maysoon Zayid @maysoonzayid, one of America’s first Muslim comedians and widely believed to be the first person to perform stand-up in Palestine and Jordan.

The show is hosted by Andrew Maxwell, a multiple Edinburgh Comedy Award nominee and a regular on The News Quiz, The Now Show, and who has presented his own Radio 4 series, Andrew Maxwell's Public Enemies.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Hayley Sterling
A BBC Studios Production


THU 19:00 The Archers (m00070jw)
Jim reveals his true feelings and Pat reaches a compromise.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m00070jy)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 House Rules (m00070k0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Making History (m00027n4)
Power Lines

Tom Holland and Iszi Lawrence explore the stories revealed by history's lines and linkages to uncover connections and compelling stories.

This week - power lines. Tom makes a beeline for the Science Museum to find the first ever transatlantic telegraph cable, and discovers a recording of a Paul Robeson concert marking a historic moment in telecommunications.

Iszi goes pylon spotting and hears about a pioneer who helped found the Electrical Association for Women.

Producer: Craig Templeton-Smith
A Pier production for Radio 4


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m000713p)
The Future of Commercial Aviation

How can the aviation industry marry sustainability with increasing passenger numbers? Since the deregulation of Europe's airlines in the late 1990s, more and more of us have been flying every year. Whilst this may be good news for the airline industry, it's not good news for the environment. Manufacturers are trying to make models lighter and more fuel efficient, with a pledge by IATA to cut emissions to 50% by 2050. Nevertheless, experts say we are at least fifteen years away from hybrid engine powered flight. Evan Davis and guests ask whether commercial aviation can meet its climate targets through new technology and more fuel efficient engines, whilst keeping costs down for the airlines and the customer?

GUESTS

Paul Kahn, president, Connectivity, Cobham Plc

Volodymyr Bilotchak, economist, author of The Economics of Airlines

Rob Morris, head of Global Consultancy, Ascend by Cirium

Presenter: Evan Davis

Producer: Julie Ball

Editor: Hugh Levinson


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m00070k2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Bringing Up Britain (m00070jk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m00070k5)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 The Warlow Experiment (m00070k7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Elephant in the Room (m00070k9)
Episode 5

Sarah Millican hosts a new panel show using surveys to discover who is the most Average Jolene, and who is the most Maverick Matilda. This week's sparkling panel features Sara Pascoe, Jen Brister, Sally-Anne Hayward and Gearoid Farrelly.

Surveys on subjects including childhood, daily rituals and favourite cheese are the basis for Sarah's questions to the panellists, discovering who is the closest to, and furthest from, the average. Surprising quirks, hilarious insights and unexpected anecdotes are revealed along the way.

The winner will be the most average. But joint winner will be the most different, the furthest from the norm.

A little bit like a dinner party, but one where you know all of the spoons.

A Chopsy production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00070kc)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 26 JULY 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m00070kf)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 The Great Romantic (m00070kh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00070kk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00070km)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00070kp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m00070kr)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00070kt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Canon Angela Tilby

Good morning.

I suppose the most important aspect of the summer for most of us is the promise of a break from our routines. A chance to rest from work, from the tyranny of the alarm clock, and the struggle to keep up with ourselves. We know in some part of our minds that the life we live is profoundly unnatural. Too much time keeping, too much pressure, too much artificial light.

We have lost the rhythms that our forebears knew of rising at dawn and going to bed at dusk, of adjusting our body clocks to the time of year. Many of us find we sleep less in the summer and seem to need it less, while in winter I feel quite attracted to hibernation! There's a hymn sung by the nuns of Stanbrook Abbey which speaks of seeking God’s glory ‘in rest, as in activity’. That appeals to me, because it contradicts the commonly held view that we should be filling every moment by doing things and being useful. Time then becomes a tyrant, extracting our last drop of energy, insisting that we work harder and longer.

It is easy to get into this thought trap and then find that rest and relaxation become a real problem. We begin to fear that we won’t get enough sleep and the fear itself keeps us awake. It’s like the phone apps which are designed to measure sleep which apparently cause some to get insomnia. So today I want to go to my work in a measured way, and to take my rest seriously. And also to look forward without guilt, for a real break.

Thy glory may we ever seek in rest as in activity, until its fullness is revealed, O source of life, O Trinity.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m00070kw)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wpd52)
John MacPherson on the Herring Gull

Wildlife photographer John MacPherson recalls a childhood memory of his mother and a herring gull for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


FRI 06:00 Today (m00070z7)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000701x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Great Romantic (m0007106)
Episode 5

In The Great Romantic, award-winning author Duncan Hamilton demonstrates how Cardus changed sports journalism for ever. While popularising cricket - while appealing, in Cardus' words to people who 'didn't know a leg-break from the pavilion cat at Lord's'- he became a star in his own right with exquisite phrase-making, disdain for statistics and a penchant for literary and musical allusions.

Among those who venerated Cardus were PG Wodehouse, John Arlott, Harold Pinter, JB Priestley and Don Bradman. However, behind the rhapsody in blue skies, green grass and colourful characters, this richly evocative biography finds that Cardus' mother was a prostitute, he never knew his father and he received negligible education. Infatuations with younger women ran parallel to a decidedly unromantic marriage. And, astonishingly, the supreme stylist's aversion to factual accuracy led to his reporting on matches he never attended.

Yet Cardus also belied his impoverished origins to prosper in a second class-conscious profession, becoming a music critic of international renown. The Great Romantic uncovers the dark enigma within a golden age.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Polly Coles
Produced by Clive Brill

A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00070zf)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 House Rules (m00070zp)
Series 2

Episode 5

5/5

Second series of Ben Lewis’s witty real-time drama set around a kitchen table at the weekly meetings of an argumentative yet lovable blended family

Drawing on her experience as Assistant Chairperson of the Key Stage 3 Debating Society, 14 year-old Amelia has established her very own weekly meetings at home.

Every Monday evening, gavel in hand, Amelia calls the Washburn McGintys together to air their grievances and attempt to resolve their problems.

But recently the meetings seem to be causing more problems than they resolve. So Sean and Nicole write up their own agenda and enforce a mandatory sit down to see if they can stop their family falling apart.

Cast:

Amelia ….. Cleo Demetriou
Jan ….. Barbara Flynn
Sean….. Jonathan Forbes
Nicole ..… Claire Rushbrook
Callum ….. Elliot Speller-Gillott

Directed by Kirsty Williams


FRI 11:00 D for Diagnosis (m0007126)
Ever Changing Labels

Treatment for most mental health problems is designed for the "unicorns"; people who have just one clear-cut diagnosis. But in reality, many people experience more than one problem and their symptoms can be shared across different formal diagnostic categories. The true picture is one of cross-cutting, porous diagnostic boundaries.
In this third and final programme in her series, Claudia looks at how new science is adapting to this new reality, making links between and within the traditional boundaries of different conditions in order to develop new treatments. The hope is that the end result will be more personalised, individualised treatments rather than a one-size fits all approach to care.
Researchers at the MRC's Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge are working across boundaries with a new strategy called the transdiagnostic approach. They are testing new treatment modules where the person needing help, whether they have anxiety, depression, OCD or PTSD, is supported to select from a menu of treatments, like a pick and mix choice, to target the symptoms that are most affecting them. This transdiagnostic approach, Professor Tim Dalgleish says, better matches how people experience mental health difficulties in real life. Pat and Emily tell Claudia how the transdiagnostic treatments have given them new tools to cope with their difficulties and clinical psychologists and research scientists Dr Melissa Black and Dr Caitlin Hitchcock describe how this approach could be adapted for many other mental health problems.
Also in Cambridge, how the diagnostic category of depression could be broken down into lots of differently identified conditions. Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Cambridge, Ed Bullmore, tells Claudia that in the future, there are likely to be many sub-types of depression with different causes and potential treatments. He is currently researching depression caused by inflammation in the body and although it's very early days, the possibility is that "inflamed depression" could be standalone diagnosis in the future.
And in London, researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry at Kings College, London, are working to dissolve the diagnostic boundaries for three very different neurodevelopmental conditions: autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia. There are already recognised overlaps and genetic links between these conditions and teams led by Declan Murphy, Professor of Psychiatry and Grainne McAlonan, Professor of Translational Neuroscience, are working to identify these common pathways in order to develop treatments that work for particular groups of people.

Producer: Fiona Hill


FRI 11:30 The Specials (m0007128)
Alice's life is complicated. She is recently separated from her husband, and her dad is living in her shed. Well, her "annexe". Her one constant in the madness is her son Henry, a straight-talking, no-nonsense 12-year-old, with a passion for the Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy and a diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Henry's best friend is Erin, who has a heart of gold, though she has previously tried to burn down a school. And Alice's best friend is Erin's mum Carla, because if there's one thing that can bring two people together it's having the rest of the school mums tut at your children.

Alice - Ruth Jones
Henry - Charlie Lock
Tom - Simon Armstrong
Erin - Liwsi Kilcourse
Carla - Eirlys Bellin
The Best Waitress - Nadia Kamil

Written by Jenny Laville
Produced and Directed by Victoria Lloyd
Recorded on location in Llandaff, Wales

A BBC Studios Production


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000712b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Warlow Experiment (m00070zy)
Episode 5

The Warlow Experiment by Alix Nathan

Herbert Powyss lives on an estate in the Welsh Marches with enough time and income to pursue a gentleman’s fashionable investigation into botanical experimentation. But he longs to make his mark in the field of science – something consequential enough to present to The Royal Society in London. Influenced by something he’s read, he decides to conduct a radical investigation into the Resilience of the Human Mind Without Society. He places an ad for a suitable guinea pig.

Only one man is desperate enough to apply for the job; a semi-literate, angry wife-basher.

What could possibly go wrong?

Episode 5
After three years, Powyss is losing heart with his experiment. But a cataclism awaits when the listening tube that Powyss had manufactured to spy on his prisoner is discovered by the enraged Warlow, who creates chaos in the cellar.

Alix Nathan is the author of His Last Fire, a collection of short stories and the novel The Flight Of Sarah Battle.

Writer: Alix Nathan
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Robert Glenister
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000712d)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m000712g)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m000712j)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b0bgg1d0)
Series 2

Margaret Thatcher's Handbag

David Cannadine examines the careers of British Prime Ministers through their props of power.

In an inconspicuous-looking box, in a locked drawer, deep in the archives at Churchill College, Cambridge sits Margaret Thatcher's handbag. David comes face-to-face with this artefact which came to represent the most visible symbol of our first female Prime Minister's power to command. As Charles Moore put it in his official biography, "her handbag became the sceptre of her rule". It was a prop that Mrs Thatcher would produce at meetings to show she meant business.

Although Margaret Thatcher didn't like the connotation, by the time of the Falklands conflict, a new verb entered the English language - "to handbag", meaning to subject your opponent to a forthright verbal assault or strident criticism. For the rest of her life, Mrs Thatcher's handbag was almost as newsworthy an item as she was herself and on the day she died, one of her handbag-makers saw a sharp rise in sales of her favourite black structured design.

Readings by Ewan Bailey, Will Huggins and Claire Vousden

Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
Series Researcher: Martin Spychal

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m00070jw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 The Interrogation (m000712n)
The Interrogation - Series 7

Evie

Roy Williams' contemporary crime drama. D.I. Max Matthews and D.S. Sean Armitage pride themselves on their confounding interrogation technique, but nothing has prepared them for Evie.

Cast

Max ..... Kenneth Cranham
Sean ..... Alex Lanipekun
Evie ..... Marcia Warren
PC Jones ..... Helen Clapp

Writer ..... Roy Williams
Music ..... David Pickvance
Director ..... Jessica Dromgoole
Producer ..... Mary Peate


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000712q)
RHS Garden Wisely: Part Two

Kathy Clugston and the gardening team are back at RHS Garden, Wisely. Matthew Pottage, Christine Wilson and Matthew Wilson answer this week's questions from the audience.

Producer: Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 The Poet and the Echo (m000712s)
You and I

Leila Aboulela’s story, inspired by the 13th century Persian poet Rumi,
imagines a terraced garden in Italy where a relationship blossoms between
a young African slave girl and the heir to a Sultan’s throne.

Reader: Adura Onashile
Producer: Bruce Young


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000712w)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m000712y)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m0007130)
Sarah and Tracey – It's Not Just the Hands

Two sign language interpreters on giving deaf people the same experiences as the hearing. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m0007132)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0007134)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Lobby Land (m00070zk)
Series 2

Episode 2

Second series of the Westminster sitcom.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m000713m)
Will's actions have terrible consequences and Adam finds himself backed into a corner

Writer - Tim Stimpson
Director - Kim Greengrass
Editor - Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Pip Archer ..... Daisy Badger
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Tom Archer ..... William Troughton
Phoebe Aldridge ….. Lucy Morris
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Leonard Berry ..... Paul Copley
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Rex Fairbrother ..... Nick Barber
Toby Fairbrother ..... Rhys Bevan
Alan Franks ..... John Telfer
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Will Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Ed Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ..... Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Tim Oatey .....Carl Prekopp
Johnny Phillips ..... Tom Gibbons
Robert Snell ..... Graham Blockey
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m00070zm)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 House Rules (m00070zp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m00070zr)
Stephen Bush, Geoffrey Cox QC MP, Mary Creagh MP, Alice Thomson

Shaun Ley presents topical debate from Ottery St Mary Parish Church in Devon with a panel including the Political Editor of the New Statesman magazine Stephen Bush, the Attorney General Geoffrey Cox QC MP, Chair of the Environmental Audit Committee Mary Creagh MP, and Alice Thomson, political interviewer at The Times.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m00070zt)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (m0006zkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:00 on Saturday]


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m00070zw)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Warlow Experiment (m00070zy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m0006zv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0007100)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0007102)
Nadia and Ernie - You See All These Beautiful People

Friends talk about the joys of food; body image, and body dysmorphia. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m0006zv7)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m0006zv7)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0006v09)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (m0006v09)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m00070zt)

All Those Women 11:30 WED (b087ts6z)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0006shh)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m0006zxz)

Andy Hamilton Sort of Remembers 18:30 TUE (m0006zvf)

Annika Stranded 19:45 SUN (m000700y)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0006zl6)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0006v07)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m00070zr)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0006zlw)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m00070k2)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m00070k2)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0006zmb)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0006zmb)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (m0006zxj)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (m0006sgs)

Bringing Up Britain 09:00 THU (m00070jk)

Bringing Up Britain 21:30 THU (m00070jk)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m000700m)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m00070mw)

D for Diagnosis 11:00 FRI (m0007126)

Darren Harriott: Black Label 23:00 WED (m00070bx)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m000701x)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m000701x)

Drama 14:30 SAT (m0006zl8)

Drama 14:15 MON (b09pl2sk)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08x8y14)

Drama 14:15 WED (b07p0kv5)

Drama 14:15 THU (m00070nb)

Elephant in the Room 23:00 THU (m00070k9)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0006zkh)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m000701l)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0006zyn)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0006zwc)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m00070ch)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m00070kw)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0006tzr)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m000712y)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0006sp0)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m0006tkv)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m00070b4)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m00070b4)

From College to Clink 20:00 TUE (m0006zvn)

From Our Home Correspondent 13:30 SUN (m0007026)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0006zkw)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0006zxv)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0006zvl)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m00070bj)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m00070jy)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m00070zm)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0006tzk)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000712q)

House Rules 10:45 MON (m0006zwp)

House Rules 19:45 MON (m0006zwp)

House Rules 10:45 TUE (m0006zth)

House Rules 19:45 TUE (m0006zth)

House Rules 10:41 WED (m00070bl)

House Rules 19:45 WED (m00070bl)

House Rules 10:45 THU (m00070k0)

House Rules 19:45 THU (m00070k0)

House Rules 10:45 FRI (m00070zp)

House Rules 19:45 FRI (m00070zp)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (m0006sh7)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (m0006zxs)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0006zvq)

India’s Street Cricketers: Crossing Boundaries 11:00 TUE (m0006dmw)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0006zvs)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0006zvs)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0006tzp)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000712w)

Lobby Land 12:30 SAT (m0006v00)

Lobby Land 18:30 FRI (m00070zk)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0006zlp)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0006zlp)

Making History 20:00 THU (m00027n4)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0006v0m)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0006zm0)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0007016)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0006zy6)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0006zvz)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m00070c1)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m00070kf)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0006zl0)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0006zl0)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m00070hf)

Moonbase 2029 21:00 MON (m0006smx)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0006tm1)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m00070bn)

Mr Muzak 23:00 TUE (b095qcjy)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0006v0w)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0006zm8)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m000701g)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0006zyj)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0006zw7)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m00070cc)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m00070kr)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m0007001)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0006zky)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m000701z)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m000705n)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0006ztl)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m00070h3)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m00070n0)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000712b)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0006zkf)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0007007)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m000700h)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m0006zly)

News 13:00 SAT (m0006zl4)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 15:30 TUE (m0003cw1)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0007003)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m0006zt8)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m000702d)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m000702d)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m0006sdm)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m00070nd)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0006zld)

PM 17:00 MON (m0006zxl)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0006zv9)

PM 17:00 WED (m00070hn)

PM 17:00 THU (m00070nj)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0007132)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m000700t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0006v0y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m000701j)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0006zyl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0006zw9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m00070cf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m00070kt)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 MON (b0bch41t)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 TUE (b0bd8hqx)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 WED (b0bf630w)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 THU (b0bfyv44)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 FRI (b0bgg1d0)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0006zlr)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0006zlr)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0006zlr)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m000700c)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m000700c)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m000700c)

Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari 21:00 SAT (m0006t52)

Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari 15:00 SUN (m000702b)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0006zkp)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m0006zlt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0006v0r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0006zm4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m000701b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0006zyd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0006zw3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m00070c7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m00070km)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0006v0p)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0006v0t)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0006zlh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0006zm2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0006zm6)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m000702j)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0007018)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m000701d)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0006zyb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0006zyg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0006zw1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0006zw5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m00070c5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m00070c9)

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Short Works 00:30 SUN (m0006tzm)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08zzlfl)

Soul Music 09:00 WED (m00070b2)

Soul Music 21:30 WED (m00070b2)

Stranger Than Sci-Fi 21:00 WED (m00070bq)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m000700k)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0007009)

TEZ Talks 23:15 WED (b09pmbdt)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (m0006zx9)

The Absolutely Radio Show 19:15 SUN (m000700w)

The Angels of the Bayou 11:30 THU (m00070my)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m000700p)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0006zx7)

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The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m0006sf7)

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The Colour of Justice 20:00 MON (m0006zxx)

The Colour of Justice 11:00 WED (m0006zxx)

The Dying of the Ice 15:30 SAT (m0006smz)

The Dying of the Ice 23:30 SAT (m0006t55)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m00070ng)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0006zxd)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0006zxd)

The Gamble Network 16:00 WED (m00070hh)

The Great Romantic 09:45 MON (m0006zy8)

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The Infinite Monkey Cage 10:00 SAT (m0006zkr)

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The Interrogation 14:15 FRI (m000712n)

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The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m0006zt6)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m0006zt6)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0007028)

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The Media Show 16:30 WED (m00070hl)

The Moth Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (m0007013)

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The Poet and the Echo 15:45 FRI (m000712s)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 00:30 SAT (m0006tys)

The Specials 11:30 FRI (m0007128)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m0006zwr)

The Voices of... 16:00 MON (m0006zxg)

The Warlow Experiment 12:04 MON (m0006zwx)

The Warlow Experiment 22:45 MON (m0006zwx)

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The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m0006zkt)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0007024)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0006zy2)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b09bz02x)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m0006zy4)

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Warsan Shire: Brave Girl Rising 16:30 SUN (m000702g)

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Welcome to Wherever You Are 18:30 THU (m00070jt)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0007011)

Where are all the black women in Grime? 11:30 TUE (m0003tcf)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0006zlb)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (m0006snh)

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World at One 13:00 MON (m0006zx3)

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