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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 JULY 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0006n2k)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 The Fens: Discovering England's Ancient Depths (m0006n2m)
Episode 5

The Fens are a distinctive, complex, man-made and little understood landscape. Francis Pryor has lived in, excavated, farmed, walked and loved the Fens country for more than forty years - its levels and drains, its soaring churches, its magnificent medieval buildings. Interweaving personal experience and passion, the graft and grime of the dig, and lyrical evocations of place, he offers a unique portrait of a neglected but remarkable area of England.

Dr Pryor counterpoints the history of the Fen landscape and its transformation with the story of his own exploration of it as an archaeologist. He recounts his thrilling Bronze Age discoveries in the early 1970s at Fengate and then, a decade later, at Flag Fen near Peterborough - and what those remarkable finds tell us about our ancient ancestors and the way they lived and farmed the land.

We learn how the waterlogged landscape can be a treasure trove for archaeologists and how archaeology has the power to challenge some common misconceptions. Dr Pryor also turns his attention to the future of this low lying area of Eastern England and the challenges we face in preserving it.

Francis Pryor is one of Britain’s most distinguished living archaeologists, specialising in the study of the Bronze and Iron Ages. He has now retired from full-time field archaeology but still appears on television and writes books as well as being a working sheep farmer.

Reader: Sam Dale
Abridger: Libby Spurrier
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006n2p)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006n2r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006n2t)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0006n2w)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006n2y)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Major Anne Read

Good morning

I live in the beautiful compact city of Saint Albans, uniquely named after the man believed to be Britain’s first Christian Martyr.
Alban became a Christian sometime in the 3rd century having heard the gospel proclaimed by a travelling priest, Amphibalus. When soldiers came to arrest the priest Alban swapped? clothes with him and Amphibalus escaped. Alban was arrested and executed.

St Albans Cathedral has recently opened a new Welcome Centre to encourage people to visit the oldest place of continuous Christian worship in England.
Inside the Cathedral set in a glorious colourful row alongside Alban and Amphibalus are statues of modern saints like Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Oscar Romero and Elizabeth Romanova.

I’m glad they’re there together because in scripture saints are only ever described in a community. Saint is another word for 'Holy One' and the only single person ever described that way is Jesus. Yet Paul frequently writes to 'the saints' intimating that all followers of Christ are called to be saints too, that is to live like Christ, the Holy One of God.

So it isnt necessary to be commemorated by a statue, stained glass window or cathedral to be a saint. At the root a saint is simply someone living like Christ, in their world and time: living like Christ in their schools and offices, on their farms and factories and with their families, in their communities where it’s hard and where the need may seem overwhelming.They roll up their sleeves, are willing to get dirty and speak out for justice for those who have no voice to be heard.

We need saints! saints alive – living people! God, through your Holy Spirit and for your Kingdoms sake make us holy, make us like Christ we pray.

Amen


SAT 05:45 Four Thought (m0006lrc)
Identity Through Reading

Author Zoë Strachan charts her journey of self-discovery through reading. She describes how fiction helped her to find her identity as a gay woman and explains why she believes that access to books is vital for human flourishing. "While I was reading Swallows and Amazons, booksellers were being arrested for making available the kind of texts that changed my life. When we start banning books or censoring them from school libraries, we deny people the chance to read themselves into being."
Recorded in front of a live audience at the Kelburn Garden Party festival in the grounds of Kelburn Castle near Glasgow.
Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0006s6g)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m0006l9t)
Ulva - An Island for the People

Ulva is an island just off the coast of Mull in the Inner Hebrides. It was once home to up to 800 people but after the 'clearances' of the 19th Century it gradually declined to just 5 inhabitants today. Helen Mark visits Ulva one year after a community and government buyout was completed to find out about the plans to rebuild the abandoned houses and make this place a thriving community once more.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0006s6j)
Farming Today This Week

This programme explores the issue of public access to the countryside. How do you balance the rights of walkers, horseriders and cyclists with the needs of farmers? Charlotte Smith visits a sheep farm near Wantage in Oxfordshire, which is very close to the Ridgeway national trail. She talks to the farm manager about the impact of having a major walking route on the doorstep, attracting thousands of visitors every year. She learns about how environmental schemes have paid subsidies in the past to improve footpath access, and asks whether the proposed new system of 'public money for public goods' post-Brexit could improve access further. We also meet the officer in charge of the Ridgeway trail and the director of the North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty - who explain how the area is managed, and tell Charlotte about the impact all those tyres, hooves and pairs of walking boots have on the land.

Producer: Emma Campbell


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0006s6l)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m0006s6n)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0006s6q)
Graeme Swann, Michael Sheen

Aasmah Mir and the Rev. Richard Coles are joined by the former England cricketer and legendary spin bowler Graeme Swann. He discusses his sporting career, waltzing on Strictly and his upcoming tour with Henry Blofeld - Dancing Down the Wicket.
Libby Liburd explains how her shows Muvahood and Fighter were inspired by her own personal life experience as a single mother and a female boxer.
Christine Gould leads 50 volunteers at the Buxton Well Dressing Festival. She describes how these intricate mosaics of natural materials are painstakingly put together.
Sarah Jane Douglas is an artist, and proud Munroist number 5864. She took up walking in the mountains after her mother’s death and scattered her ashes in the Himalayas.
Guy Oliver reveals how a secret took him from a career with the Royal Navy to life as an interior designer – with projects from luxury hotels in Mayfair to adobe houses in Kabul.
And the actor Michael Sheen chooses his Inheritance Tracks: O Superman by Laurie Anderson and A Design for Life by The Manic Street Preachers.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0006s6s)
Series 25

Black Country Living Museum

Jay Rayner and his panel are at the Black Country Living Museum. Dr Annie Gray, Paula McIntyre, Tim Hayward and Andi Oliver answer the culinary questions from the audience.

The panellists discuss how to make a quick and easy sorbet, describe what they have made with ingredients found in the back of their cupboards, and debate the best crisp sandwiches.

They are joined by Clare Weston, researcher at the Black Country Living Museum Clare Weston, and Philip Rolls from Black Country Snacks.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0006s6v)
Radio 4's assessment of developments at Westminster


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0006s6x)
The battle against the gangs of El Salvador

The President of El Salvador is calling on young men to leave the country’s criminal gangs, or perish with them. He said the gangs have terrorised the country for decades, and would be dismantled. Orla Guerin has been to the capital, San Salvador, to see how the gangs menace the city.
Greece has a new Prime Minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis of the centre-right party New Democracy, defeating the socialist Alexis Tsipras. Mark Lowen was based in Athens at the height of the financial crisis, which led to Greece experiencing one of the worst peace-time depressions of the last hundred years. He returned to watch the old conservative party being brought back to power.
Five years ago, Russian-backed forces seized control of the Crimean peninsula. Ash Bhardwaj gained permission to enter Crimea, to find out what’s changed in five year’s of Russian rule.
A hundred years ago, the passing of the Addison Act spurred a huge expansion in council housing across the UK. Austria too has been remembering when it began building social housing around 100 years ago. In Vienna today more than half of its population live in subsidised apartment blocks. Some of these are of vast scale, such as Karl Marx Hof, more than half a mile long. Caroline Davies has been finding out what lessons policy makers can learn from the Viennese approach to housing.
The end of the Cricket World Cup is drawing near, and the final match, between England and New Zealand, will be watched by fans from all over the world. But what would they make of how the game is played in the Trobiand Islands, located off the coast of Papua New Guinea? The people there have a passion for cricket that borders on the extreme, as Mark Stratton has discovered.

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producer: Neil Koenig


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0006s6z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0006s71)
Fighting bank fraud branch by branch

Money Box's Drew Miller Hyndman has been to Portsmouth where this week TSB Bank held the latest in a series of in-branch sessions aimed at educating people on how to avoid becoming victims of financial fraud. Guest: Ashley Hart, Head of Fraud for TSB.

Jeremy Hunt and Boris Johnson have both set out their tax plans should they become Prime Minister. Carl Emmerson, Deputy Director of the Institute For Fiscal Studies compares, contrasts and costs the policies.

Gaps in the money management skills of children who are in, or young people who have left, care in England is the focus of a new report. It follows an inquiry by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Financial Education for Young People. Ralph who went into care when he was 14 shares his perspective on the issue. Guest: Sam Turner, Voice and Influencing Manager at Become, a charity for children in care and young care leavers.

July 31st is the deadline to renew tax credits. If you already claim them what do you have to do and if you don’t – could you? Guest Victoria Todd Head of the Low Incomes Tax Reform Group team.

Reporter: Drew Miller Hyndman
Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Charmaine Cozier
Editor: Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m0006n1y)
Series 19

Episode 6

This series of Dead Ringers features Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis Macleod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey,

The producer and creator is Bill Dare
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0006s73)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m0006s75)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0006n24)
Jake Berry MP, Tim Farron MP, Dan Jarvis MP, Alex Phillips MEP

Ritula Shah presents topical debate from Keighley Shared Church in Yorkshire with a panel including the Northern Powerhouse Minister Jake Berry MP, Dan Jarvis MP and Mayor of the Sheffield City Region, former leader of the Liberal Democrats Tim Farron and the Brexit Party MEP Alex Phillips.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0006s77)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (m0006s79)
The First Man on the Moon and How They Done It

The National Theatre of Brent present a unique dramatised radio re-enactment of the fifty year centenary of the Historic First Walking on the Moon. As it was done by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Phil Collins.

It seems only yesterday when the moon was just a mysterious light in the unknown depths of the night sky that man could only guess at the purpose of and no one knew anything about whatsoever.

Then, all of a sudden in 1969, something remarkable occurred.

The famous Space Race began literally out of the blue and the famously infamous president President Nixon, on the run avoiding investigation for dodgy dealing, ordered the US space race to begin with the famous words, "Let the Space Race begin!" - or words to that effect.

And, as if that weren’t enough, besides this historic and – we believe first ever – reconstruction of a historic astronomic event ever done on radio as it almost certainly probably happened, we will also delve controversially into the often stormy on-board relationships of the space men themselves and also - even more controversially perhaps - glimpse into their often stormy domestic lives too, in particular what it meant and how it felt to be Mrs Armstrong and Mrs Aldrin.

Did they support their space men husbands or were they, in fact, deeply divided and bitter about it having to stay at home basically and do the laundry and dusting?

These fascinating and hitherto un-probed events - and many more - will be revealed in this pioneering, historic, spectacular, authentic, yet unashamedly controversial BBC radio drama.

Cast:
Desmond Olivier Dingle – Patrick Barlow
Raymond Box – John Ramm

Written by the National Theatre of Brent – Patrick Barlow, John Ramm and Martin Duncan.

Director: Martin Duncan
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 15:15 One to One (m0006m3h)
Emma Freud meets Rukmini Callimachi

Broadcaster, journalist and producer Emma Freud had a dream to work in hard news. She talks to Rukmini Callimachi from the New York Times and presenter of the podcast 'Caliphrate' about her investigations into Islamic State. She asks Rukmini how fear doesn't stop her; why she seeks to understand those who join IS; and whether there is anything that would make her stop.
Producer: Sara Coneky


SAT 15:30 The Dying of the Ice (m0006mqv)
Olafur Eliasson

An audio elegy and a lament for the disappearing sea ice of the north pole. The sound of ice melting, thawing and shifting across a year is the essence of this tone poem, woven with song, poetry, art and music about the ice.

This first of three programmes features Andrew McGibbon in conversation with Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson who transported Greenland-bred ancient ice blocks to the country's old colonial capital Copenhagen, in a project titled Ice Watch. The blocks were arranged to resemble an ominous clock showing the amount of ice that disappears every hundredth of a second due to conditions of global warming. 

His Weather project became one of Tate Modern’s most successful installations – with over two million people visiting the exhibition, watching themselves reflected on a ceiling mirror while being bathed in artificial sunlight and doused in a sweetened atmosphere of humidified water and sugar.

The programme examines Olafur’s relationship with ice, growing up in Iceland and how Ice Watch - a piece that fused art, reality and environmentalism - brought worldwide attention to the rapid loss of the Greenland Ice Shelf.

In July 2019, a major survey of Olafur’s work is mounted at Tate Modern, including around 40 works spanning three decades.

The Dying of the Ice features the sounds of melting and retreating ice in the Arctic and the under-ice creatures living in that boundary as an active, low volume soundtrack audible throughout the programme.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producers: Louise Morris and Nick Romero

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0006s7c)
Cash Carraway, Parental leave policies, Girl code

Cash Carraway tells us about her life as a working class woman and mother living in poverty today.

We discuss the importance of parental leave policy transparency and why only 23 FTSE 100 companies make their maternity and parental leave policies available to the public with Jo Swinson the Liberal Democrat MP, Mairead Niger the chief Human Resources Officer for one of the 23, Diageo and Deborah Hargreaves the founder of the think tank, the High Pay Centre.

The novelist and writer Sohaila Abdulali who was gang raped as a seventeen year old in Mumbai talks about the continued assumptions around rape and consent.

The teacher and author Emma Kell offers advice around the move from Primary to secondary school and we hear from listeners Jane, Tony and Velda.

We discuss girl code, what it is, how it’s broken and whether it has a place outside the tv show Love Island with freelance writer Moya Lothian-McLean and Lifestyle editor at the Metro Ellen Scott.

And the Lebanese songwriter Tania Saleh and Palastinian poet Farah Chamma share their experiences as women artists in the Arab world.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Karen Dalziel


SAT 17:00 PM (m0006s7f)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m0006lbb)
The investment industry - luck or judgement?

You trust financial professionals to grow your long term savings and pension pot. But how do you know if they are investing it wisely? The UK investment industry is awash with complicated terms and conditions, and unclear and sometimes high charges, which can eat into your monetary returns. The woes of star fund manager Neil Woodford, who has temporarily frozen one of his funds to its investors after poor performance, highlights just how complicated an industry it is. Is some clarity starting to emerge? Evan Davis and expert guests look under the bonnet of the UK investment industry.

Guests:

James Anderson, partner at Baillie Gifford, who jointly manage the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust
Bella Caridade Ferreira, chief executive and founder of Fundscape
Sean Hagerty, managing director of Vanguard Europe

Producer: Lesley McAlpine


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0006s7j)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0006s7l)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006s7n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0006s7q)
Kevin Bishop, Mo Gilligan, Jasmine Lee-Jones, Charlotte Philby, DJ Yoda, Nilüfer Yanya, Sara Cox, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by Kevin Bishop, Mo Gilligan, Jasmine Lee-Jones, and Charlotte Philby. With music from DJ Yoda and Nilüfer Yanya.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0006s7s)
Ursula von der Leyen

German defence minister Ursula von der Leyen is likely to replace Jean-Claude Juncker as President of the European Commission in November. Mark Coles tells her story so far.

Producer Smita Patel


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m0006s7v)
The Manchester International Festival: Tree, David Lynch at Home, Parliament of Ghosts, David Nicholls. Only You and much more

The Manchester International Festival is a biannual event, enveloping the city in a wide range of arts events across the genres. We'll be casting our critical net as wide as possible
Film director David Lynch has curated a series of events at the venue Home, including an exhibition of his artwork and a series of concerts
There's been controversy around the Idris ELba/ Kwame Kei Armah play Tree, but will our panel think it's any good?
An exhibition by Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama; Parliament of Ghosts at The Whitworth Gallery reclaims and repurposes everyday artefacts
David Nicholls' new novel Sweet Sorrow is a tale of adolescent/early adult yearnings framed by a Shakespeare production
British indie film Only You follows a largely-carefree couple who get together and decide to have a baby but it's not as easy as they'd hoped
And (of course) much much more from MIF

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Sarah Crompton, Katie Popperwell and Chris Thorpe. The producer is Oliver Jones


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0006s7x)
Voice in the Machine

Talking technology has surrounded us for more than half a century. From the earliest incarnation of the Speaking Clock to the artificially intelligent personal assistants in our homes, we've slowly become accustomed to sharing our lives with machines that help us with our everyday chores.

Who better to guide us through the history of the Voice in the Machine than two of the nations most familiar voices?
  
Jon Briggs was the original voice of Siri in the UK - a fact he only discovered while watching a feature on the TV. Emma Hignett's distinctive voice can be heard on London’s buses and trains, helping people to navigate the capital. Spending the day in a smart home, these voice-over artists ask the robo-vacuum to clean the floor, request songs and jokes from personal assistant Alexa, and hop channels with a talking television.

While travelling on a bus and hearing her own voice guiding fellow passengers, Emma shares her own recording tips and tricks. A visit to the local supermarket leads to an encounter with perhaps the most irritating machine voice of all time, with repeated warnings of an "unexpected item in bagging area". As these recognisable voices dig deeper into our history with talking tech, Jon gets a little nostalgic with his own fondness for Knight Rider's talking car, KITT. 

Rifling through the archives, Jon and Emma reminisce about their memories of talkative gadgets from fact, fiction and music. In the context of the early archival recordings of talking technology, the voices of today's OK Google, Alexa, Siri and others have come a long way. But why are our assistants almost all female? And are they really listening to us all the time? 

Join these two well known voices as they grapple with these questions and their personal connection to the silicon speech that narrates our lives.

A BlokMedia production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Drama (m0006l6j)
Reading Europe: Fear

Episode 2

by Dirk Kurbjuweit

Having accused his neighbours of abusing their children, Dieter Tiberius is shot dead. But where does the guilt lie? And who, ultimately, can be trusted?

Randolph ..... John Light
Rebecca ..... Natasha Little
Dieter Tiberius ..... Joseph Kloska.
Bruno ..... Paul Hickey,
Hermann ..... Sean Baker,
Saif ..... Chris Pavlo,
Sergeant Leidinger ..... David Hounslow,
Muller ..... Catherine Cusack,
The Lawyer ..... Susan Jameson.
Other parts were played by Helen Clapp, Shaun Mason, and Jonny Holden

Dramatised by Adrian Penketh from the translation by Imogen Taylor

Directed by Marc Beeby


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m0006s7z)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0006lsp)
The Morality of Fashion

Some of the stars of this year’s Glastonbury festival have joined the chorus of campaigners denouncing ‘throwaway fashion’. They’ve given some of their own clothing to Oxfam and are encouraging their fans to buy their outfits second-hand (or ‘pre-cherished’). These days you can buy a dress for a fiver and wear it once before chucking it away. Is that proof that capitalism has gone too far? Critics of the industry cite the appalling conditions and rates of pay in the third-world factories churning out garments that will end up as non-biodegradable landfill quicker than you can say “sustainability”. There are those, on the other hand, who prefer not to be lectured by celebs famous for their multiple costume changes and who point out that the minimum wage doesn’t run to a wardrobe of high-quality clobber. Beyond the social and environmental implications of fast fashion, what about the moral value of clothes themselves? We humans have covered our nakedness ever since Adam and Eve embarrassed themselves in the Garden of Eden. Fashion lovers say that our clothes matter because they are expressions of an aesthetic sensibility, intrinsic to both self-esteem and dignity. Others believe the fuss about this season’s ‘look’ is a cynical manipulation of insecurity and a celebration of vanity and superficiality. The morality of fashion: fashionably moral.

Producer: Dan Tierney


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (m0006lnc)
Semi-final 4, 2019

(16/17)
With one remaining place in the 2019 Final up for grabs, the last four of this year's semi-finalists take to the stage. Will they remember which was the first ghost to visit Scrooge in Dickens' A Christmas Carol? What Frederick Sanger was the first British person ever to do? Or what middle name the Duke and Duchess of Sussex gave their first child?

Russell Davies has all the questions and all the answers - and he'll also be teasing the Brains with a couple of questions suggested by a listener, aiming to win a prize by outwitting them.

The semi-finalists today are:
Gareth Aubrey, a planning environmental law solicitor from South Wales
Steve Goddard, a lecturer in French from Oxford
Gary Grant, a GP from Lytham St Anne's
Alice Walker, a former IT consultant from Stockport

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Wild Geese (m0006l6n)
A few years ago, a man committed a crime and spent time in prison. In this programme, a group of his friends explore the role a poem played in their collective story. The poem is Wild Geese by the recently deceased American poet Mary Oliver.

Thanks to the On Being Project, the programme includes archive audio of Mary Oliver talking about her poem.

Contributors: Mike Chase, Marie-Claire, Angie Wootten, Chris Oates and Rosie Boulton.

Producer: Rosie Boulton
A Must Try Softer production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 14 JULY 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0006s81)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0006n1h)
I Go to Her Wardrobe

After her Mum's funeral, Rema discovers that there is plenty she never really knew, about herself or her mother. A story of glitter and grief by award-winning playwright and poet Sabrina Mahfouz. Directed by Becky Ripley.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006s83)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006s85)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006s87)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0006s89)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0006s8c)
St. Mary the Virgin, Hanbury in Worcestershire

Time now for Bells on Sunday which today comes from the church of St. Mary the Virgin, Hanbury in Worcestershire. You may hear these bells more often than you think because The Archers uses them as the fictional “St. Stephen’s Church”. The present ring of eight bells was last cast before the Second World War by John Taylor of Loughborough. We now hear them ringing Single Oxford Bob Triples.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0006s7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m0006s8k)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08p5kxq)
Seclusion

Journalist Remona Aly discovers the power of seclusion.

Throughout centuries, individuals of many faiths, cultures and disciplines have argued that seclusion is the key to unlock the mysteries both of the self and of the divine.

According to Remona, in today's connected world finding solitude has become a lost art. In fact, western culture tends to equate a desire for solitude with people who are lonely or anti-social, but there are many physical and psychological benefits to spending time alone.

Throughout time, seekers of all faith traditions have been drawn to solitude as a way of deepening their relationship with God. Remona offers the lives of the Prophet Muhammad and Imam al-Ghazali as leading examples of how seclusion can lead to overwhelming personal revelations and radical change in society.

The work of Beethoven is also examined as his phase of seclusion lead him to produce some of the most extraordinary symphonies of his career.

Remona also reflects on her own personal time of seclusion before dawn, leaving her bed to take part in a voluntary prayer known in Arabic as Tahajjud - a sacred time which she describes as therapy for the soul.

Presenter: Remona Aly
Producer: Jonathan O'Sullivan
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0006s8m)
Yorkshire Shepherdess

Hill farmer, mother to nine children and best-selling author. Ruth Sanderson joins Amanda Owen for a rare moment of relative peace and quiet on her farm. Amanda farms at Ravenseat, at the head of Swaledale in Yorkshire, with her husband Clive. She shows Ruth around her farm, pointing out nesting curlews and wild flowers, and describes how her love of the landscape has inspired her writing. On a summer morning in the sunshine Ravenseat looks like paradise, but Amanda tells Ruth that it's a very different place feeding the sheep in the wintertime.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0006s8p)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0006s8r)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0006s8t)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme presented by Edward Stourton.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0006s8w)
Theodora Children's Charity

Chef Ellis Barrie makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Theodora Children's Charity.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Theodora Children's Charity’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Theodora Children's Charity’.

Registered Charity Number: 1094532


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0006s8y)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0006s90)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0006s92)
The heavens are telling the glory of God

A service from Leicester Cathedral to mark the 50th anniversary of the Moon landings.

On 20 July 1969 human beings stepped onto the surface of the moon, in ‘one giant leap for mankind’.

Today’s service celebrates the achievement of the Apollo 11 Mission and asks whether the ‘giant leap’ has made us more, or less aware of our own human limitations and of our longing for God.

Led by the Dean of Leicester, the Very Reverend David Monteith, with contributions from staff at the National Space Centre and Christians involved in Astrophysics & Space Science.

The Cathedral Choir lead the congregation in hymns including: I the Lord of Sea and Sky, The Servant King and Great Is Thy Faithfulness.

Director of Music: Chris Ouvry-Johns. Organist: David Cowen. Producer: Alexa Good.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0006n26)
The Language of Leaving

"Of late, words have foregone their meaning or been given meanings they never had", writes Howard Jacobson.

Starting with "betrayal" and ending with "the will of the people", Howard sets out to take back sovereignty....over words.

"I can't complain", he admits, "of some parties to our great national debate being Little Englanders if I'm a little Languager.....but if each party to a discussion doesn't know what the other is talking about, we might as well not have language at all".

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0gzx)
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the greater racket-tailed drongo of South-East Asia. Across a clearing in a Malaysian forest flies a dark bird, seemingly chased by two equally dark butterflies. Those butterflies in hot pursuit aren't insects at all; they are the webbed tips of the greater racket-tailed drongo's excessively long wiry outer-tail feathers, which from a distance look like separate creatures as it flies. Glossy blue-black birds which live in wooded country and are great insect catchers, hawking after them in mid-air before returning to a perch. They're bold too and won't hesitate to harry and chase much larger birds than themselves, including, birds of prey. Like other drongos the greater racquet-tailed drongo has an extensive but not very musical repertoire which includes the sounds of other birds it meets, when it joins mixed feeding flocks, and can imitate the call of a hawk to alarm the hawk's victims and so steal food from them while they are distracted by the call: an ingenious tactic, which few other birds have learned.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0006s94)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0006t4n)
Writer - Gillian Richmond
Director - Dave Payne
Editor - Jeremy Howe

Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Phoebe Aldridge ….. Lucy Morris
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Rex Fairbrother ..... Nick Barber
Toby Fairbrother ..... Rhys Bevan
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Will Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Fiona Lloyd ..... Adjoa Andoh
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m0006t4q)
Marcus Wareing, chef

Marcus Wareing is a prize-winning chef, restaurateur, TV presenter and cookery book writer, who gained his first Michelin star at the age of just 26.

He grew up in Southport, and by the age of 11 was helping out in his family’s fruit and vegetable business, which dominated his father’s life. Marcus assumed he would join the business, but his father told him to take a catering course instead, as the family firm had no future.

When Marcus was 18, he moved to London to work at the Savoy. He loved the experience of life in a high-pressure professional kitchen and was quickly promoted. In 1993 he joined Gordon Ramsay at Aubergine, creating one of the most celebrated London restaurants of the time. He went on to launch a number of Michelin star-winning restaurants, often working with Gordon Ramsay and his company, before a much-publicized falling-out.

Marcus now runs a group of restaurants in London, founded with his wife Jane, and since 2014 he has appeared as a judge and mentor on the TV series MasterChef: The Professionals.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Sarah Taylor


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0006t4s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m0006lnt)
Series 71

Episode 3

The 71st series of the multi award-winning comedy panel game chaired by Jack Dee


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0006sgv)
Is There a Perfect Diet Just for You? The future of personalised nutrition

Dan Saladino takes part in a gruelling study aimed at working out his ideal diet. Founded by Professor Tim Spector "Predict" is one of the biggest nutrition studies ever attempted.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0006t4w)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0006t4y)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The Country vs the City (m0002snb)
How do we bridge the divide between multicultural cities, and what is perceived as the slower, more conservative, countryside? Political correspondent Chris Mason was brought up in the Yorkshire Dales, which he has now exchanged for a life in London. Here he travels from city to country and back, exploring the tensions and political trends at work in each. He challenges a few stereotypes as well, finding a sense of community in a London borough that some people in the countryside feel has been lost.

Producer Mark Rickards


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0006n1f)
Kings Heath, Birmingham

Peter Gibbs and the panel are in Kings Heath, Birmingham. Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and Matthew Pottage answer this week's horticultural queries from enthusiastic gardeners.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Rosie Merotra

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0006t50)
Sunday Omnibus - Music, New Technology and Times Past.

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen with three conversations about the wonders of live music, new technology and times past.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari (m0006t52)
Episode 1: Dome

“Giorgio Vasari? Who’s he?” The very thought would have been anathema to the great man, a legend in his own lifetime but an unsung hero today. Using his own words as inspiration this three-part classic serial tells a poignant story of pride, love and legacy combined with an epic journey through the art of the Renaissance - led by the man who invented the word. We begin in Florence, 1570. Giorgio Vasari is the top painter and architect of the day, as well as the official biographer of the pantheon of Renaissance artists. His vast book THE LIVES OF THE ARTISTS is already in its second edition and will stay in print well into the next millennium as the essential text for all students of art history. At the behest of his illustrious patron, the Grand Duke Cosimo de’ Medici, Vasari is about to embark on his most ambitious project ever: painting the city’s cathedral dome. When he prays for assistance, God sends him a surprise response: a new assistant, Piero, who reminds him of his own young self.

Written by Eileen Horne.

Created by Eileen Horne and Sarah Dunant

CAST:

VASARI .....Tom Conti
PIERO ..... Will Taylor
GRAND DUKE COSIMO DE’ MEDICI ..... David Troughton
TOMMASO ..... Tristan Beint
DUKE FRANCESCO DE’ MEDICI/CIMABUE ..... John Hollingworth
MICHELANGELO ..... Nicholas Murchie
YOUNG VASARI/DANTE ..... Joshua Akehurst
GIOTTO (teen) ..... Jay Mailer
GIOTTO (10) ..... Alexander Ryan
DANTE ..... Joshua Akehurst
PAPAL ENVOY ..... Jamie Newall

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
Exec Producer: Sarah Dunant
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0006sdp)
Iris Murdoch Special

Over the course of 26 novels including the Booker winner The Sea, the Sea, as well as The Bell, Under the Net and The Black Prince, Iris Murdoch wrote about art, philosophy and morality with the page turning skill of a thriller writer. In this special episode of Open Book, celebrating her centenary, Mariella Frostrup and guests dive into the world of her novels.

Mariella is joined in studio by biographer and friend Peter J Conradi, fellow novelist and fan Charlotte Mendelson, Anne Rowe, founder of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre, and Gary Browning, author of new book Why Iris Murdoch Matters.

And the food writer Kate Young examines the idiosyncratic food to be found in the pages of Murdoch's novels.


SUN 16:30 The Dying of the Ice (m0006t55)
The Reindeer Poets

Andrew McGibbon explores the poetry, song and yoiking of the indigenous Sami people who live across the Western European Arctic - a region including Russia's Kola Peninsula, Norway, Finland and Sweden. 

The relationship between the traditional epic yoik songs and contemporary poetry is explored, along with the multimedia approach that several contemporary Sami poets and artists choose for their creative expression. The yoik is the distinctive form of cultural expression for the Sami people and comparable to the traditional chanting of some First Nations in the Northern American continent.

The United Nations has designated 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages, and the programme features Mikkal Morrotaja, aka Amoc, a poet who raps in Inari Sámi - a language spoken by fewer than 300 people in the world. He raps about Father Christmas being overwhelmed with selfish Christmas demands. Anna Morottaja is a traditional Inari Sámi "livde" singer, who can sing northern bird imitations and stories of mischievous birds of prey, while Elle Marja Eira tells stories from her family background as a reindeer herder using the tradition yoik, through poetry and through music.

Sami poetry takes tradition seriously, looking back to find the way forward, helping to give a small group of people in the Arctic north a voice.

This is the second of three programmes and, as with the rest of The Dying of the Ice series, features the sounds of melting and retreating ice in the Arctic along with the sounds of creatures living under the ice as an active, low volume soundtrack audible throughout the programme.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producers: Louise Morris and Nick Romero

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0006m3y)
Bitter Brew

With the rise in ethical consumerism, File on 4 explores the hidden suffering of tea workers in Africa. Attacked because of their tribal identity, reporter Anna Cavell hears harrowing stories of murder, rape and violence and asks whether more could or should have been done to protect them when trouble broke out.

Producer: Nicola Dowling
Reporter: Anna Cavell
Editors: Gail Champion & Andrew Smith

Photo credit:; carefullychosen\Getty Images


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0006s7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0006t57)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0006t59)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006t5c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0006t5f)
Testament

The best of BBC Radio this week with Testament


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0006s98)
Alistair faces an impossible task and Peggy has a change of heart.


SUN 19:15 The Absolutely Radio Show (m0006s9b)
Series 3

Episode 2

The hugely popular sketch show returns for a third series on BBC Radio 4. Pete Baikie, Morwenna Banks, Moray Hunter, Gordon Kennedy and John Sparkes revisit some of their much-loved characters, and also introduce some newcomers.

Absolutely was a big hit on Channel Four in the late 80s and early 90s. In 2013, the group got back together for the Sketchorama: Absolutely Special for BBC Radio 4 - winning a BBC Audio Drama Award in the Best Live Scripted Comedy category. The Absolutely Radio Show followed, with the first two series picking up Celtic Media Award nominations for Best Radio Comedy, while the second series was also nominated for a BBC Audio Drama Award in 2018.

This second episode includes The Rev McMinn encountering the European political elite in his local Minimart, Gwynedd’s insomnia driving Denzil to despair and then song, and Frank Hovis fondly remembering his holidays. From the archive, we have never before heard footage from Dunkirk rescuers and four-and-three-quarter year-old Jack gives the eulogy at his Grandpa’s funeral.

Written and Performed by: Peter Baikie, Morwenna Banks, Moray Hunter, Gordon Kennedy and John Sparkes
Production Manager Sarah Tombling
Recording Engineer Dave Murricane
Editor Pete Baikie
Producer Gus Beattie
Producer Gordon Kennedy
BBC Executive Sioned Wiliam
Recording Venue The Oran Mor, Glasgow

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 Annika Stranded (m0006s9d)
Series 5

Manoeuvres

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Chief Inspector Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Annika is still coming to terms with the death of her friend and long-time, long suffering forensic photographer Mikel. But life goes on, and so does police work on the Oslofjord. Annika must forge a new relationship with Mikel’s young replacement, Sigrid.

Episode 5: Manoeuvres
When a soldier is found murdered during NATO exercises in the Kvikneskogen forest, the army asks Annika to investigate.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4 - including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0006n1m)
What is it like to be the only women in the BBC Test Match special commentary box? Alison Mitchell takes us inside the holy of cricketing holies, and summariser Vic Marks explains why he often stays silent.

We also hear from the commissioning executive of the Asian Network on whether the so-called Tebbit Test has any relevance today.

Also, 5 Live’s Pienaars Politics a switch-on or a switch-off? Our latest pair of guest listener reviewers share their thoughts.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0006n1k)
Eva Kor, Christopher Booker, João Gilberto, John McCririck

Pictured: Eva Kor

Matthew Bannister on

Eva Kor who, with her twin sister, was the subject of experiments by the Nazi doctor Josef Mengele in Auschwitz. She later publicly forgave her tormentors.

Christopher Booker, the founding editor of Private Eye and Telegraph columnist.

João Gilberto, the Brazilian pioneer of bossa nova music whose hits included The Girl From Ipanema.

And John McCririck, the eccentric TV racing pundit who was criticised for his sexist views.

Interviewed guest: Alex Kor
Interviewed guest: Penny Tierney
Interviewed guest: Tim Stanley
Interviewed guest: Robin Denselow
Interviewed guest: Alastair Down
Interviewed guest: Cornelius Lysaght
Producer: Paula McGinley

Archive clips from: Outlook, World Service 13/05/2015; Dirty Years Of Satire, Radio 4 06/10/1991; That Was The Week That Was, BBC One 19/12/1963; Today, Radio 4 04/07/2019; New Names Making News, Radio 4 18/12/1962; John McCririck Interview, Star Sports April 2018; Celebrity Big Brother, Channel 4 2005; Big Brother's Big Mouth, Channel 4 18/08/2006.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0006s71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0006s8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0006lp0)
The Forgotten Half

More and more young people now go to university. But what's on offer for those who don't? Public and political attention is far more focused on the university route. Paul Johnson discovers why other kinds of further education and training have been neglected, leaving many young people facing much more difficult choices. Yet the needs of the economy and the choices of many shrewd young people suggest non-university education may be heading for revival.

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Jasper Corbett


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0006s9h)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 TED Radio Hour (m0006mmp)
Series 5

The Five Senses

A journey through fascinating ideas based on talks by riveting speakers on the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) stage.

Guy Raz explores how our brains make sense of sensation, and how our minds manufacture 'reality'.

First broadcast in the USA on National Public Radio in 2017.


SUN 23:50 A Point of View (m0006n26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]



MONDAY 15 JULY 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0006s9l)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07dm2pj)
Engineers of Jihad. Orange jumpsuits

Laurie Taylor asks why so many Islamist extremists come from an engineering background. He talks to Steffen Hertog, Associate Professor of Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics, about a new study which finds that Islamist and right-wing extremism have more in common than either does with left-wing extremism, in which engineers are absent while social scientists and humanities students are prominent. Is there a mindset susceptible to certain types of extremism? They're joined by Raffaello Pantucci, Director of International Security Studies at the Royal United Services Institute.

Orange prison jumpsuits: Elspeth Van Veeren, Lecturer in Political Science at the University of Bristol, discusses the US prisoner uniform which took on a transnational political life due to the Global War on Terror. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0006s8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006s9n)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006s9q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006s9s)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0006s9v)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006s9x)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Major Anne Read

Good morning

One Sunday morning I took a call about a victim of human trafficking who needed to be picked up from her place of rescue and taken to a safe house. The Salvation Army has a large team of volunteers who provide this service but on this occasion I was free myself and able to respond.

When we met Mai she was trembling nervously, avoiding any eye contact and could barely even reach out to shake hands. A small middle aged Vietnamese woman, she sat curled up silently in the back seat of our car as we drove along the motorway with the radio playing quietly in the background. Suddenly she tapped me on the shoulder and said ‘music… music…’

I turned the radio up and the beautiful sound of Gregorian plain song filled our car. Recognizing it as church music Mai animatedly put her hands together and with tears in her eyes exclaimed ‘God… God…’

In that moment our reliable old car became a holy place, a sanctuary of the Spirit. God was present and at work.

Soon afterwards we reached the safe house where the process of restoration and rehabilitation would begin for Mai. I pointed to the small stained glass cross in the window and clumsily signed that I would pray for her. Mai hugged me before we left and I knew in some miraculous way without me being able to communicate in words at all, God had breathed His peace and assurance into her heart.

I wonder if today unexpected and unlikely places might become special places where God might be revealed and we might become aware that miracles can still happen.

God, wherever we are, in our cars or colleges, in our homes, hospitals and hearts work your miracles we pray. Amen


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0006s9z)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0006sb1)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0hgk)
Eastern Orphean Warbler

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the eastern orphean warbler in an olive grove near Athens. Until recently there used to be just a single species of Orphean Warbler; a summer visitor to southern Europe, North Africa and western Asia: a handsome bird much like a large blackcap with a white throat and greyish-brown back. But across the wide breeding range which stretches from Portugal to Pakistan some orphean warblers look and sound different. Those east of Italy tend to be subtly greyer above and paler beneath. And the songs of birds from Greece eastwards are longer and richer, often including the richness of nightingale like notes. These slight differences have persuaded many ornithologists that the Eastern Orphean warbler is a different species to the Western Orphean Warbler. Biologists call this "splitting "although exactly where these new species boundaries lie is a moot point.


MON 06:00 Today (m0006sfz)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 The Listening Project (m0006sg1)
The Listening Summer Special - from the Rhondda Valley.

Fi Glover presents the first of two The Listening Project Summer Specials. Today's edition comes from Treorchy in the Rhondda Valley and includes a lively range of The Listening Project conversations recorded in Wales in the past year. Among Fi's guests will be BBC Radio Wales producer Lynne Rosser who recorded them, journalist and broadcaster Carolyn Hitt and Radio 1 and 6 Music presenter Huw Stephens.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


MON 09:45 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006shs)
The Swiss Army Organ

Perched on the exterior of our delicate, intricate bodies, the skin is our largest and fastest-growing organ, weighing nine kilograms and covering two square metres. We see it, touch it and live in it every day. It’s a habitat for a mesmerisingly complex world of micro-organisms. Its physical functions are vital to our health and indeed our survival, and it’s crucial to our sense of identity. Yet how much do we really know about it?

Through the lenses of science, sociology and history, Dr Monty Lyman leads us on a journey through the comedy, tragedy and exquisite humanity of our most underrated and overlooked organ. By delving into something that seems so familiar, he reveals how the skin is far stranger and much more complex than we’ve ever imagined.

In today’s episode, Dr Monty Lyman describes the form and function of the layers of the skin, and its vital role as a protective barrier. We learn about the causes of eczema, the efficacy of spa water, and the operation of the body’s immune system.

Written by Dr Monty Lyman
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Gunnar Cauthery.
Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006sg5)
Black women are five times more likely to die in childbirth than white women. Why?

Black women are now five times more likely to die as a result of complications in pregnancy than white women. This is according to the latest study from MBRRACE-UK (Mothers and Babies: Reducing Risk through Audits and Confidential Enquiries across the UK). And the risk has been increasing year on year. On today’s Woman’s Hour we concentrate on these disturbing statistics – released late last year, but receiving very little attention.

We discuss why this could be happening with Elsie Gayle, an independent midwife and nurse with 30 years’ experience in the NHS; Daghni Rajasingham, a consultant obstetrician who speaks for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists; Jenny Douglas, the founder and chair of the Black Women’s Health and Well Being Research Network and a senior lecturer at the Open University; And Mars Lord, a Doula.

We also hear the birth experiences of some of the many women who contacted us, and are joined in the studio by Remi Sade, a writer and podcaster, and Candice Braithwaite, the founder of Make Motherhood Diverse.

And we look at historical attitudes to black women’s bodies in obstetrics and gynaecology. Deirdre CooperOwens is a Professor of History who explores how the field of gynaecology developed through the experimental treatment of Black save women in the American south. She is professor of history and medicine at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the author of Medical Bondage: Race, Gender, and the Origins of American Gynaecology.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Helen Fitzhenry
Interviewed guest: Elsie Gayle
Interviewed guest: Daghni Rajasingam
Interviewed guest: Jenny Douglas
Interviewed guest: Candice Brathwaite
Interviewed guest: Remi Sade
Interviewed guest: Mars Lord


MON 10:45 Moon (m0006sg7)
Launch

Adapted by Anita Sullivan

Part one of Apollo 11's five day journey to the moon. A verbatim drama, performed by actors, using the original NASA transcripts from the mission.

In this first episode - Launch - Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins blast off from the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida and prepare to leave Earth's orbit.

It's fifty years since Apollo 11 put human beings on another world. Over the anniversary week, Radio 4 tells the story of the five day journey to the moon, using the astronauts’ own words, which are taken entirely from the transcripts of the mission. We travel with Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins on their epic journey, experiencing everything as they did.

A unique perspective on the most historic journey in the history of humanity.

Thanks to Professor Chris Welch, International Space University.

Neil Armstrong.... Nathan Nolan
Buzz Aldrin.... Ronan Summers
Michael Collins.... Edward Hogg
Narrator.... Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


MON 11:00 The Untold (m0006sg9)
Worth Her Weight

Growing up, Georgia was always the fiery one. Independent, determined and committed, she was the kind of student who gave everything her all, and achieved whatever she put her mind to. When she set her sights on Oxford University she taught herself A-level Classics from the kitchen table to get there.

In just one month’s time she’ll be competing in her first Strong Man competition. She’ll be pushing her body to its limits, running with 10 stone barrels, deadlifting 18 stone bars and pulling 20 stone sleds.

But this is not just a story about getting physically strong. This is a story of pushing through mental and emotional challenges, it is about leaving the past behind and gaining strength after things go wrong.

As we follow Georgia in the lead up to the competition, we get a rare glimpse into the Strong Man world: a male-dominated world that’s starting to open its doors to women.

They say that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, but will weightlifting really help Georgia regain control of her life?

Presented by Grace Dent
Produced by Alice Homewood


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0006s7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0006t71)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Sweet Sorrow (m0006sgg)
Episode 6

A decade after the publication of his bestselling novel, One Day, featuring the story of Emma and Dexter, David Nicholls has again created a triumphantly engaging pair of young lovers.

When Charlie Lewis meets Fran Fisher in the summer of 1996, he is at something of a loose end. School is out and so is the sun, but his future is not looking bright. He has been hit hard by his parents' split and is not happy about the role assigned to him by his mother - keeping an eye on his depressed and bankrupt father.

Failure hangs in the air - not just the closure of his father's record shop but also Charlie's inability to complete most of his GCSE exams. But then Fran Fisher almost literally stumbles across him and a whole new world opens up.

David Nicholls' last novel, Us, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014. Earlier this year, he won a BAFTA for Patrick Melrose, his television adaptation of the novels by Edward St Aubyn.

In Sweet Sorrow he gives us a pitch-perfect portrayal of the anguish and joys of adolescence brilliantly laced with wit and compassionate humour.

James Norton, familiar from his roles in McMafia and War and Peace as well as the psychopathic villain in Happy Valley, reads his first book for BBC Radio.

Produced by Jill Waters
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0006sgj)
Carer costs, Stubbing out cigarettes, Cruises for younger people

A new report says unpaid carers are struggling financially to provide for their OWN futures - we hear from one carer who is battling to survive.

The tobacco firm Philip Morris says it wants to go smoke-free - so why would they want to stub out their own cigarettes?

The growth in online shopping seems to be slowing down. Is this a signal that we are ready to head back to the high street?

Why the NHS in Northern Ireland is being hampered by the political deadlock.

And go-karts and foam parties.... how cruise ships are changing to attract a new and younger clientele.

PRESENTER: WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER: PETE WILSON


MON 12:57 Weather (m0006sgl)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0006sgn)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 Tales from the Lobby (m0006sgq)
Series 1

When did it begin?

Talk to the academics and they'll suggest lobbying has existed as long as men have been in power. But according to Tamasin Cave of Spinwatch, it really took off at the time of ordinary men and women getting the vote. Now powerful interests felt compelled to protect themselves. In the United States a man called Edward Bernays - Sigmund Freud's nephew - developed the idea of an 'invisible elite'. He also came up with extraordinary ways of controlling the crowd. With contributions from Mark Borkowski and Professor Wyn Grant, and presented by Michael Crick.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0006s98)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b09ntdc7)
4/4

Introduction and Allegro

by Robin Brooks

A new comedy drama series about the exploits - musical and otherwise - of a string quartet.

All music was played by the Edinburgh Quartet

4/4 was created by Robin Brooks and Sarah Wooley

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (m0006sgs)
The Final, 2019

(17/17)
The 2019 season of the annual general knowledge competition reaches its climax, as the four competitors who have come through heats and semi-finals unscathed line up to see which of them can become the 66th Brain of Britain champion.

As always, they'll face Russell Davies's questions on unpredictable topics, from Russian history to Formula One, from medicine to opera. A tight contest is assured between four formidable quiz players, who are:

Gareth Aubrey, a planning environmental law solicitor from South Wales
Frankie Fanko, a freelance translator from Leicestershire
Roger Look, a retired consultant clinical psychologist from Warwickshire
David Stainer, a tax advisor from Hertfordshire.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0006sgv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Voices of... (m0006sgx)
Series 4

Kurt Wagner

An intimate portrait of Kurt Wagner, singer and creative force behind American indie band Lambchop.

Growing up in Nashville, Tennessee, Kurt Wagner's artistic aspirations were inclined towards the visual arts rather than the city's all-pervasive country music scene. But hanging around friends, exchanging school cello for garage guitar, he found that he became - by default - the singer. No-one else wanted the role.

So began Lambchop, an indie rock band that Kurt mischievously publicised as 'Alt-country' to see which music hacks actually troubled to listen rather than just re-hash the press release.

Recorded on his porch at home in Nashville, Kurt reflects on his idiosyncratic vocal style, his embracing of technology and sharing life with a political activist in a Republican state in the third year of Donald Trump's presidency.

Presented and produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (m0006sgz)
The Imagination

Creative expression has often accompanied internal religious experience. And religious experience, by its nature other-worldly, is deeply connected to the power of the mind to contemplate, visualise and to imagine that there is a God. In a special edition in front of a live audience at the Hay-on-Wye Literature Festival Ernie Rea explores the relationship between religion, creativity and the imagination with Professor Anna Abraham, Neuroscientist and Professor of Psychology at Leeds Beckett University, Mohammed Ali, a Street Artist and Curator, Barnabas Palfrey Lecturer in Christian Spirituality, at Sarum College in Salisbury and Manchester born poet and playwrite, Louise Wallwein

Producer:
Catherine Earlam

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox


MON 17:00 PM (m0006sh1)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006sh5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m0006sh7)
Series 71

Episode 4

The 71st series of the multi award-winning comedy panel game chaired by Jack Dee


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0006sh9)
Clarrie makes a shocking discovery and Natasha attempts diplomacy.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0006shc)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 Moon (m0006sg7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Unexpected History of Clean Eating (m0006shf)
Guilty pleasures, cheeky treats – comedian Sofie Hagen asks why we put moral judgements onto the food we eat.

Clean eating is the diet of the moment. All over Instagram, people post photos of their beautiful plates of leafy vegetables and their artistically framed green smoothies – #plantpowered, #detox, #cleanlife.

Sofie Hagen is definitely not a clean eater. But she’s fascinated by the way it frames foods as “good”, “clean” and virtuous, and, by extension, other foods as “bad” or “dirty”.

This moralising around food doesn’t only exist in the world of clean eating. It pervades all sorts of diets - most of which Sofie tried between the ages of 8 and 22. And even if you’ve never dieted yourself, you’ve probably seen snacks marketed as “guilt free”, or considered having a “cheeky treat” for dessert.

This programme is not about whether a plate of lentils is healthier than a plate of pasta, or the nutritional content of a heritage tomato. It’s not even about whether you should try to eat more healthily. It’s asking how what we eat became so tied up with how “good” we are as people.

Sofie hears about the 19th century woman who didn’t eat or drink for five years, why eating soap was once considered a cure for corpulency, and how this might all have something to do with an apple in the Garden of Eden. She’ll talk to former clean eating evangelist Pixie Turner, eating disorder specialist Renee McGregor and advertising exec Rory Sutherland. Does sin sell?

Academic advisor: Jessica Hamel-Akre
Producer: Hannah Marshall
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Analysis (m0006shh)
Going the way of the dodo? The decline of Britain's two main parties.

Recent polling data and election results paint a picture of woe for Britain's two main political parties. Of course both Labour and the Conservatives have suffered periods of decline throughout their history. But arguably never before have both parties been so riven by internal divides and suffered such a loss of public confidence at the same time. Edward Stourton looks to historical precedents for guidance on today's political turmoil and asks if the two parties' decline is now terminal. With Tim Bale of Queen Mary University of London; Lord Lexden, official historian of the Conservative Party; Deborah Mattinson of Britain Thinks; Charlotte Lydia Riley of the University of Southampton; John Sergeant, former BBC Chief Political Correspondent; and Adrian Wooldrige, author of the "Bagehot" column at The Economist.


MON 21:00 Remorse: A Sorry Story (m0002zzx)
Vikram Dodd investigates the role remorse plays in criminal sentencing.

The philosopher Adam Smith famously said that of all the sentiments that can enter a man's breast, remorse is the most dreadful. But Adam Smith never had to look in the eye of the man or woman who has just been convicted of a crime and work out how much, if anything, to reduce a sentence to take account of their expression of remorse. Was it genuine? Or were they empty words in a cynical attempt to game the criminal justice system?

Guardian crime correspondent Vikram hears how the currency of remorse has increased with the introduction of Sentencing Guidelines that were intended to introduce more consistency and transparency into sentencing decisions. Sentencing judges are now required to explain the role remorse has played in calculating a sentence.

Remorse has also gained profile in the public perception of justice. Court reporters will often quote what the judge said about remorse for news bulletins and, in the highest profile cases police, prosecutors and families line up to comment on the judge's assessment of the perpetrator's remorse.

The programme explores how an accused might show remorse, who measures it and what is known about the connection between remorse and reoffending. While the public might reasonably get an impression that remorse plays a big part in keeping someone in or out of jail, what difference have the sentencing guidelines made in practice?

Produced by John Forsyth
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 21:30 The Listening Project (m0006sg1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006shl)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 Sweet Sorrow (m0006sgg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Art of Now (m00045kw)
The Return of Voguing

Clara Amfo assesses the rise of voguing in the UK, a dance form with its origins among queer, mostly black and Latino people in the Harlem ballroom scene. Voguing is currently having a resurgence in popularity thanks to shows like Pose, Top 40 artists using the dance form in their music videos and live performances, and the current political climate.

Clara seeks out key players from the UK scene past and present, takes a lesson in some of the different vogue styles, and attends a ball where people are pulling incredible shapes, competing, and flaunting their outfits.

She also discovers a highly politicised subculture of deep importance - even a lifeline - to some members of the LGBTQ community.

Contributors include:
Jay Jay Revlon - dancer, activist and event organiser
Les Child - choreographer and founder of the House of Child
Roy Brown (aka Roy INC) - performer and first member of the House of Child
Darren Suarez - artistic director and founder of the House of Suarez
Marc Thompson - social activist and mentor

A Wisebuddah production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006shn)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 16 JULY 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0006shq)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006shs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006shv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006shx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006shz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0006sj1)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006sj3)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Major Anne Read

Good morning,

On the days I wear my full Salvation Army navy serge uniform I also wear my red and gold long service badge. To be honest it’s partly because I want to ‘jazz up’ my otherwise plain uniform a bit but there is better reason.

Like most people my life has been something of a roller coaster – sometimes rushing along so fast, often exhilarating but now and then scary with its highs and lows and sometimes just wishing I could get off! But looking back I know that God has always been with me and helped me all the way.
The Old Testament tells how the Israelites were victorious over the Philistines and the prophet Samuel chose a stone - I guess it was an out-of- the-ordinary kind of stone - and laid it at the site of the battle. He called the stone Ebenezer or ‘Stone of Help’ and as he set the stone up Samuel declared ‘The Lord helped us all the way to this place’.

An old gospel song inspired by the story tells of ‘raising an ebenezer’ - of looking back and registering our thankfulness for God’s help.
Well I wear my Ebenezer! It’s my long service badge. Not many of us wear them, but this is my way of setting up a marker to say ‘The Lord helped me all the way to this place’.

Looking back to see God at work in our lives can be a really positive experience. Perhaps today you might like to lay down a marker. It may be by finding a special stone but it may be by writing a psalm or painting a picture or just saying a prayer.

Father God, we praise you for all that is past and trust you for all that’s to come.

Amen


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0006sj5)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sylr1)
Red-crowned Crane

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the red-crowned crane from Japan and Asia. Backlit by a Japanese winter sun, huge black and white birds dance for an audience. Their plumage mirrors the dazzling snow and dark tree-trunks. The only spots of colour are crimson - the caps of these Red-crowned Cranes. Red-crowned Cranes breed only in far-eastern Russia. Tall, majestic and very vocal, red-crowned cranes gather in groups to reinforce pair-bonds, by leaping into the air and fluttering their 2.5 metre wings, sometimes holding sticks or twigs in their long bills. During winter months, the cranes are fed with grain, and receive a stream of captivated visitors. In front of a wall of clicking camera shutters, the cranes perform their elaborate dance, to delight their captivated audience.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0006smg)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m0006sml)
Katherine Joy on moon rock

Katherine Joy studies moon rock. She has studied lunar samples that were brought to earth by the Apollo missions (382kg in total) and hunted for lunar meteorites in Antarctica, camping on ice for weeks on end and travelling around on a skidoo. Working at the forefront of the second wave of lunar exploration, she studied remote sensing data from Europe’s first mission to the moon, Smart 1 which launched in 2003 and data from many subsequent missions. She tells Jim Al-Khalili why she believes the moon is the most exciting destination in our solar system and explains what it can tell us about the long history of planet earth.
Beneath the magnificent desolation of the moon’s surface, multicoloured rocks contain vital clues about the history of our solar system. Every crater on the moon is evidence of a collision and the chemistry of these rocks tells us when these collisions took place. Katherine’s research supports the idea that a period known as the late heavy bombardment was a particularly turbulent time. Could the late heavy bombardment explain the origin of life on earth?
Producer: Anna Buckley


TUE 09:30 One to One (m0006smn)
A Surrogate's Story

David Gregory-Kumar is a BBC journalist, and he's also a gay dad. Across three editions of One to One, he's exploring different aspects of gay parenting. Today he speaks to DaJon, the surrogate who carried his, and his husband Suraj's, baby girl.

Producer: Karen Gregor


TUE 09:45 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006spd)
Gut Feeling

Perched on the exterior of our delicate, intricate bodies, the skin is our largest and fastest-growing organ, weighing nine kilograms and covering two square metres. We see it, touch it and live in it every day. It’s a habitat for a mesmerisingly complex world of micro-organisms. Its physical functions are vital to our health and indeed our survival, and it’s crucial to our sense of identity. Yet how much do we really know about it?

Through the lenses of science, sociology and history, Dr Monty Lyman leads us on a journey through the comedy, tragedy and exquisite humanity of our most underrated and overlooked organ. By delving into something that seems so familiar, he reveals how the skin is far stranger and much more complex than we’ve ever imagined.

In today’s episode, Dr Monty Lyman explores how what we eat and drink can affect our skin, and the importance of particular vitamins in our diet.

Written by Dr Monty Lyman
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Gunnar Cauthery
Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006sms)
Netball World Cup

Live from Liverpool's M&S Bank Arena for the Netball World Cup, we're joined by BBC Sport's Hazel Irvine and former England Netball captain Ama Agbeze to discuss the tournament so far, predictions for the rest of the week and prospects for the growing popularity of the game.

What does it take to organize a World Cup? We’ll be talking to the Event Director, Lindsay Impett. We're also joined by volunteers at the event te tell us about why they're getting involved.

And we hear from under 11s in Hertfordshire learning netball on a Saturday morning - and Laura Vila and Corinne Askey who set up Mighty Netball to encourage girls to love playing sport.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Jane Thurlow


TUE 10:45 Moon (m0006smv)
Translunar Injection

Adapted by Anita Sullivan

Part two of Apollo 11's five day journey to the moon. A verbatim drama, performed by actors, using the original NASA transcripts from the mission.

In this second episode - Translunar Injection - the crew initiate the burn that will power them out of Earth orbit, on a course with the moon.

It's fifty years since Apollo 11 put human beings on another world. Over the anniversary week, Radio 4 tells the story of the five day journey to the moon, using the astronauts’ own words, which are taken entirely from the transcripts. We travel with Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins on their epic journey, experiencing everything as they did.

A unique perspective on the most historic journey in the history of humanity.

Thanks to Professor Chris Welch, International Space University.

Neil Armstrong.... Nathan Nolan
Buzz Aldrin.... Ronan Summers
Michael Collins.... Edward Hogg
Narrator.... Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


TUE 11:00 Moonbase 2029 (m0006smx)
Fifty years after Apollo astronauts first walked on the lunar surface, the world is heading back to make the Moon a new home.

“We left flags and footprints,” said the head of NASA Jim Bridenstine recently. “This time when we go, we’re going to go to stay.”

The United States has pledged to return by 2024 and NASA is building an orbiting space station near the Moon, called the Lunar Gateway, and is planning a field station as a base.

But the return to the Moon will be international. The European Space Agency (ESA), for instance, is building the service module for NASA’s Orion spacecraft - which will take humans to the Moon using its new giant SLS rocket. China aims to get its own astronauts on the Moon within the decade. Meanwhile ESA is constructing a lunar simulator facility in Cologne, Germany.

Space expert and TV science presenter Dallas Campbell hears from scientists at NASA, ESA and the German Aerospace Centre DLR who are working to make the practicalities of building a Moonbase reality.

Dallas meets those who are experimenting with solar ovens to build lunar bricks and one researcher who is making filters for human urine to produce fertiliser for crops on the Moon.

British astronaut Tim Peake discusses his recent lunar training underwater and Dallas travels to Bavaria to discover why current astronauts are training there for a lunar landing.

Producer: Sue Nelson
A Boffin Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:30 The Dying of the Ice (m0006smz)
Frozen Music

Andrew McGibbon explores the sounds and music of the ice, meeting the composers, musicians and indigenous artists in the Arctic region who use the ice to make music. He discovers the natural and haunting sounds made by the movements of deep frozen ice, ice melting and icebergs calving and colliding.

Terje Isungset is a drummer and ice music composer from Norway who makes his own instruments each winter and performs at festivals across the Arctic region. His beautiful sounds mingle with voices and even a string section providing a fitting and atmospheric backdrop to his environment.

Faithfully capturing the sounds of ice and making them sound art is the work of Jana Winderen who uses a range of sophisticated hydrophones across the melting and freezing seasons. Andreas Bick creates collages of ice sounds recorded all across the Arctic, from iceberg calving to resonanting ice sheets on a lake.

Arild Sundfjord is an Oceanographer who explains why Arctic sea ice matters.

This is the third of three programmes and, as with the rest of The Dying of the Ice series, features the sounds of melting and retreating ice in the Arctic along with the sounds of creatures living under the ice as an active, low volume soundtrack audible throughout the programme.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producers: Louise Morris and Nick Romero

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0006tmv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Sweet Sorrow (m0006sn3)
Episode 7

A decade after the publication of his bestselling novel, One Day, featuring the story of Emma and Dexter, David Nicholls has again created a triumphantly engaging pair of young lovers.

When Charlie Lewis meets Fran Fisher in the summer of 1996, he is at something of a loose end. School is out and so is the sun, but his future is not looking bright. He has been hit hard by his parents' split and is not happy about the role assigned to him by his mother - keeping an eye on his depressed and bankrupt father.

Failure hangs in the air - not just the closure of his father's record shop but also Charlie's inability to complete most of his GCSE exams. But then Fran Fisher almost literally stumbles across him and a whole new world opens up.

David Nicholls' last novel, Us, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014. Earlier this year, he won a BAFTA for Patrick Melrose, his television adaptation of the novels by Edward St Aubyn.

In Sweet Sorrow he gives us a pitch-perfect portrayal of the anguish and joys of adolescence brilliantly laced with wit and compassionate humour.

James Norton, familiar from his roles in McMafia and War and Peace as well as the psychopathic villain in Happy Valley, reads his first book for BBC Radio.

Produced by Jill Waters
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0006sn5)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0006sn7)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0006sn9)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 Tales from the Lobby (m0006snc)
Series 1

How Does It Work?

In 2014 the coalition government passed a catchy piece of legislation - the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-Party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act. But what does that mean? And how does it work?
Michael Crick finds out with help from Alex Deane of FTi Consulting, as well as Lionel Zetter and Duncan Hames of Transparency International UK.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0006sh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m0006snf)
Making Plans with Nigel

When 45-year-old writer and IT nerd Stu finds a lump in what he calls his left breast he leaps into action with the most sensible plan he can come up with - he googles for reassurance then ignores it.

Nothing to worry about, he decides. Breast cancer only affects women or really old men, after all.

Except - sometimes it doesn't...

Stuart Houghton's semi-autobiographical drama, set in the period leading up to the 2016 EU referendum.

Cast:
Stuart....................MARK BENTON
Natalie…..............SALLY LINDSAY
Nigel Farage.......LEWIS MACLEOD
Ben…………...........JOHN RAMM
Fiorentina/Nurse.......BECKY WRIGHT
Mr Kashap…...…PAUL BAZELY
Barbara…….........CHERRELLE SKEETE
Doctor Miller/Miriam…EMMA FIELDING
Jim/Brian…….BEN CROWE
All other parts are played by members of the cast.

Producer: Karen Rose
Sound Design: David Thomas
Broadcast Assistant: Sarah Tombling

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0006s6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (m000358x)
In the first programme of the series Peter White, blind from birth, meets Victoria Arlen, the Paralympic gold medallist who is now a successful sports commentator. As a child she contracted two rare auto-immune conditions which caused swelling in her brain and spinal cord. She was left in a persistent vegetative state, but what her parents and doctors did not know was that she was conscious and aware of everything going on around her.

Victoria lived in her 'locked-in' world for almost four years. By the time she was fifteen her condition had worsened to the point where she was having almost non-stop seizures throughout the day and night. It was a chance readjustment of medications aimed at reducing these that eventually led to her being able to move her eyelids for the first time. She could communicate at last:

'I took a look around and was like: "This is freedom. My Mum walked over and I locked eyes with her - I have these big brown eyes and ever since I was a baby you could tell what I was thinking and feeling based on my eyes. My Mum lent over and asked if I could blink, to send a signal that I was there."

Victoria blinked furiously, and for the first time in years her family had hope. Her recovery involved relearning everything, from wiggling her fingers to making noises with her vocal cords. Doctors told her that some of the damage would be permanent, leaving her paralyzed from the waist down. She adapted to life in a wheelchair, returning to school and to swimming, the sport she had loved as a child: two years after her brothers put her in a life jacket and lifted her into a hydrotherapy pool, she qualified for the US Paralympic team.

At London 2012 she won a gold medal and set a new World Record in 100m freestyle - narrowly beating the British swimmer, Ellie Simmonds. The tears which followed as family and friends watched on from the spectator stands were the first tears of hope and joy since the illness struck.

"I just put my head down, said a prayer and touched - when I looked up I saw the one next to my name and the world record not too far from that and it was an incredible moment. If you'd told me two years prior to this that I'd be swimming on the world stage, winning a gold medal, I'd have probably rolled over in my life jacket, or been sitting there thinking that's not very nice, I can't even hold me head up right now and I'm just learning how to float again

"And then to look up and see my family in the stands and it was this first time in this whole journey of nearly six years, that we were crying tears of joy and crying from happiness. So the medal had such a big meaning because it solidified that I'd made it and I'd survived and now it was time to live and move forward."

Which is what Victoria has been doing every day since: she is recovering physically, is a successful sports broadcaster, has written a book about her experiences called 'Locked In,' and is also modelling an underwear range.

All of those selected for this programme raise issues connected with their own disability and the challenges they've faced. The format allows Peter to explore their motivation and experiences and the slight air of irreverence gives the programmes a very original and winning feel, with listeners enjoying hearing him ask the questions others might be too embarrassed or politically correct to ask.

Recent interviewees include Cyrus Habib, who lost his eyesight to cancer when he was eight but has gone on to become America's first blind Lieutenant Governor; the new Government Minister, Robert Halfon, who was born with spastic diplegia and faced particular problems when out campaigning and the CBeebies Presenter Cerrie Burnell, who became the victim of a disturbing online campaign after parents complained that she was scarring toddlers by not wearing a prosthetic arm.

Producer: Sue Mitchell


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0006snh)
The most powerful word

Michael Rosen explores the strange history of 'The', the most influential word in English. It's used more than twice as much as any other English word, and has given philosophers centuries of head-scratching. So how did a word which means nothing, and didn't even exist in Old English, come to dominate our language? With linguists Laura Wright and Jonathan Culpeper, and philosopher Barry Smith.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m0006snk)
Dolly Alderton and Clare Mackintosh

Dolly Alderton, author and presenter of The High Low podcast and crime writer Clare Mackintosh, former police officer and author of I Let You Go, talk about the books they love to presenter Harriett Gilbert. They are: The Rachel Papers by Martin Amis, Grace Williams Says It Loud by Emma Henderson and After the Party by Cressida Connolly. Guess who chooses Martin Amis?
Follow us on instagram and share your thoughts on books @agoodreadbbc
Producer Beth O'Dea


TUE 17:00 PM (m0006snm)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006snr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Heresy (m0006snt)
Series 11

Episode 6

Joining Victoria Coren Mitchell to commit heresy about superhero movies and rock stars are Jo Bunting, Phil Wang and Richard Osman.

Produced by Victoria Coren Mitchell and Daisy Knight
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0006snw)
It's an emotional day for Jim, and Ben goes to extreme lengths.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0006sny)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 Moon (m0006smv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m0006sp0)
Defenceless in the MoD?

Ten years ago the alleged rape and subsequent suicide of Royal Military Police Corporal, Anne-Marie Ellement, highlighted problems with the way the British military handles allegations of sexual offences against female service personnel. File on 4 investigates ten years on, what has changed?

There's no doubt that the top echelons of the armed forces take such cases very seriously indeed. Speaking about recent allegations, the Chief of the General Staff, General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith said it was unacceptable and in stark contrast with everything the British Army represents. But how far has that attitude filtered down the ranks in reality?

File on 4 hears from current and former female service personnel who alleged that they were sexually harassed, assaulted or raped, about how they feel they were let down by their chain of command when they reported their ordeal. We hear their criticism of the official Services Complaint system. And why they think the incompetence of the service police undermined their attempts to gain justice.

We also hear from former members of the service police itself who explain why they think that their former comrades are not fit to investigate serious crime and must be reformed.

Presenter: Paul Connolly
Producer: Paul Waters
Editor: Andrew Smith

Photo credit: MoD


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0006sp2)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0006sp4)
Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, separating fact from fiction and bringing clarity to conflicting health advice, with the help of regular contributor GP Margaret McCartney


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m0006sml)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006sp6)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 Sweet Sorrow (m0006sn3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Mr Muzak (b094hm69)
Series 1

We've Only Just Begun

Richie Webb stars as performance shy cocktail pianist Nigel Penny.

Nigel Penny's attempts to live his life in the background are thwarted by the surprise arrival of his entrepreneurial half-brother, Pav (Paul G Raymond). Pav hooks Nigel up with desperate wannabe singer Rachel (Jess Robinson) and strong-arms the pair onto the books of his fledgling entertainment agency.

With a gig at a Carpenters-themed wedding on the horizon, Nigel has to contend not only with his job at an Italian Restaurant run by a probably-not-an-actual-Italian, but also with Pav's mysterious new Ukrainian friend, Stan (Dave Lamb), and some disturbing news about his new musical partner.

Directed by Jim North and Matt Katz
Written and Produced by Richie Webb
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006sp8)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 17 JULY 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0006spb)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006spd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006spg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006spj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006spl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0006spn)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006spq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Major Anne Read

Good morning

Today my husband and I celebrate 100 years of marriage – well I exaggerate of course, but it seems a long time ago that my husband proposed by the side of the Thames below Tower Bridge among the romantic ruins of abandoned warehouses. Today the area is unrecognisable with its shops and restaurants and expensive homes.

But this area of pleasant memories for me has an unhappy history.

In times past London was the epicenter of the slave industry. Thousands of people taken captive in West Africa, packed tightly into the holds of ships for endless weeks, were brought here to be traded as slaves. Having survived this horrendous journey, they sailed slowly up the river to be unloaded, just like any other cargo, another commodity to be traded. Although London's docks have changed beyond all recognition this trade in human beings continues in cities, towns and countryside across Britain and around the world.

From the beginning The Salvation Army has worked to set people free from the evil of slavery. and with others we continue this fight today.

To the Psalmist marveling how God could possibly be mindful or engaged with his human creation came the insight that all humankind, created a little lower than the angels, had been crowned with glory and honour, being made in the likeness of God. For this reason human beings must never be treated as commodities to be traded, bought and sold as slaves; for every human being is of immeasurable value to God the objects of his endless compassion and engaging care.

God, help us to recognise the worth you place on us and to see the worth in others.

Amen


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0006sps)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sym21)
Black Chinned Hummingbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the North American black chinned hummingbird. What seems to be a large green beetle is flying erratically across a Los Angeles garden: suddenly, it hovers in mid-air to probe a flower bloom; this is a black-chinned hummingbird. Although often thought of as exclusively tropical, a few species of hummingbirds occur widely in North America and in the west; the Black-chinned hummingbird is the most widespread of all. Both sexes are glittering emerald above: the male's black throat is bordered with a flash of metallic purple, which catches the sun. Black-chinned "hummers" are minute, weighing in at just over 3 grams. But they are pugnacious featherweights seeing off rival males during intimidation flights with shrill squeals, whilst remarkably beating their wings around 80 times a second. They'll also readily come to artificial sugar-feeders put out by householders to attract these flying jewels to their gardens.


WED 06:00 Today (m0006tkn)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Soul Music (m0006tks)
Series 28

Streets of London by Ralph McTell

50 years after it was first recorded, Ralph McTell and others discuss a song that was written for a heroin addict, became an anthem against homelessness, and transcended the folk genre to become an enduring classic.

Ralph McTell says he’s thought constantly about the “blip in my graph” that is Streets of London. People say to him “50 years. One hit. You think you’d have given up by now”. But, Ralph says, that’s not why he writes songs. And, of course, he’s written many. Many that he considers far better than Streets of London. But this remains his best known, best loved, and most played track. It was first recorded 50 years ago, in 1969, for his album Spiral Staircase although it wasn’t released as a single until 1974.

Taking part in Soul Music, alongside Ralph, with their stories and memories connected to Streets of London, are:

Jerry Playle, a music producer. His first ever public performance as a teenage guitarist was of Streets of London. The guitar part went well, but when he opened his mouth to sing, he realised - to his horror - that he couldn't...

Gwen Ever, a DJ. He became homeless in the 1980s. It’s the unlikely punk version of Streets of London by the Anti Nowhere League that reminds him of this time.

Maria Bentley-Dingwall, the daughter of Iris Bentley. Iris was the sister of Derek Bentley who was hanged for a murder he did not commit. Iris spent her life campaigning for his conviction to be quashed. Ralph McTell grew up knowing this story, became a friend of the family, wrote a song about the case, and sang Streets of London at Iris Bentley’s funeral.

Producer: Karen Gregor


WED 09:30 Four Thought (m0006tkv)
Facing Death Creatively

R.M. Sanchez-Camus describes how art can be used as a language with which to communicate the fear of death and dying. Drawing on his experience as a Social Practice Artist working in a hospice, he reveals how art-making can create a space where individuals can mentally remove themselves from the state of dying, and produce a lasting testament to their lives. He believes death anxieties over global extinction can similarly be approached through making art. 'It’s urgent to break the taboo of speaking about death. If we can hold this conversation within the community we can begin to support each other as citizens.'
Recorded in front of a live audience at the Kelburn Garden Party festival in the grounds of Kelburn Castle near Glasgow.
Presenter: Olly Mann
Producer: Sheila Cook


WED 09:45 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006tkx)
Towards the Light

Perched on the exterior of our delicate, intricate bodies, the skin is our largest and fastest-growing organ, weighing nine kilograms and covering two square metres. We see it, touch it and live in it every day. It’s a habitat for a mesmerisingly complex world of micro-organisms. Its physical functions are vital to our health and indeed our survival, and it’s crucial to our sense of identity. Yet how much do we really know about it?

Through the lenses of science, sociology and history, Dr Monty Lyman leads us on a journey through the comedy, tragedy and exquisite humanity of our most underrated and overlooked organ. By delving into something that seems so familiar, he reveals how the skin is far stranger and much more complex than we’ve ever imagined.

In today’s episode, Dr Lyman explains that the sun brings light, life, and healing powers, but also demands reverence. The ancient Greeks made Apollo god of the sun but, rather tellingly, he was also god of healing and disease. We hear how and why we tan, and of the dangers of ‘tanorexia’ - an addictive condition. There are also beauty tips from Queen Cleopatra and Empress Elisabeth of Austria.

Written by Dr Monty Lyman
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Gunnar Cauthery
Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006tkz)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 Moon (m0006tl1)
Cislunar Transit

Adapted by Anita Sullivan

Part three in the story of Apollo 11's journey to the moon. A verbatim drama, performed by actors using the original NASA transcripts from the mission.

In this third episode - Cislunar Transit - Apollo 11 coasts across the void between the Earth and the Moon at nearly 4,000 miles per hour.

It's fifty years since Apollo 11 put human beings on another world. Over the anniversary week, Radio 4 tells the story of the five day journey to the moon, using the astronauts’ own words, which are taken entirely from the transcripts. We travel with Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins on their epic journey, experiencing everything as they did.

A unique perspective on the most historic journey in the history of humanity.

Thanks to Professor Chris Welch, International Space University.

Neil Armstrong.... Nathan Nolan
Buzz Aldrin.... Ronan Summers
Michael Collins.... Edward Hogg
Narrator.... Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0006tl3)
Claire and Sylvia - Educating Sylvia

Mother and daughter compare notes on the experience of going to university. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 The Unexpected History of Clean Eating (m0006shf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 All Those Women (b086tfbm)
Series 2

Episode 2

Comedy series by Katherine Jakeways about four generations of women living under one roof.

It's time for some well-earned relaxing after Maggie won some vouchers to a spa. But what should be the opportunity for a bit of a lie down soon gets a bit fraught. 'There's a fine line between a spa day and a detention centre isn't there?'

All Those Women explores familial relationships, ageing, marriages - it's about life and love and things not turning out quite the way that you'd expected them to. Every week we join Hetty, Maggie, Jen and Emily as they struggle to resolve their own problems, and support one another.

Written by KATHERINE JAKEWAYS
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0006tqk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Sweet Sorrow (m0006tl7)
Episode 8

A decade after the publication of his bestselling novel, One Day, featuring the story of Emma and Dexter, David Nicholls has again created a triumphantly engaging pair of young lovers.

When Charlie Lewis meets Fran Fisher in the summer of 1996, he is at something of a loose end. School is out and so is the sun, but his future is not looking bright. He has been hit hard by his parents' split and is not happy about the role assigned to him by his mother - keeping an eye on his depressed and bankrupt father.

Failure hangs in the air - not just the closure of his father's record shop but also Charlie's inability to complete most of his GCSE exams. But then Fran Fisher almost literally stumbles across him and a whole new world opens up.

David Nicholls' last novel, Us, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014. Earlier this year, he won a BAFTA for Patrick Melrose, his television adaptation of the novels by Edward St Aubyn.

In Sweet Sorrow he gives us a pitch-perfect portrayal of the anguish and joys of adolescence brilliantly laced with wit and compassionate humour.

James Norton, familiar from his roles in McMafia and War and Peace as well as the psychopathic villain in Happy Valley, reads his first book for BBC Radio.

Produced by Jill Waters
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0006tl9)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m0006tlc)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0006tlf)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Tales from the Lobby (m0006tlh)
Series 1

Clever Tricks

Richard Brooks of Private Eye used to work as a tax inspector - a line of work that has been a great help in his investigations into how lobbying works. With contributions from Peter Oborne, Tamasin Cave, and former Labour Home Secretary Alan Johnson who reveals how many tricks he employed in his campaign as a union boss fighting to prevent the privatisation of Royal Mail.

The presenter is Michael Crick, the producer Miles Warde.


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0006snw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b07nmvmh)
The Coup

Three entertaining new dramas imagine key moments in the Clintons’ personal and political lives together, closely based on the published accounts and opinions of those who’ve witnessed their enduring partnership.

1995, and President Bill Clinton's business dealings in the failed Whitewater property scheme are under investigation by the Independent Counsel, Kenneth Starr. When Susan McDougal, one of the partners in the scheme, is asked to implicate the Clintons in return for her own immunity, she refuses to lie.

1998, and the Independent Counsel is running out of time. When he receives tapes of an interview with an intern called Monica Lewinsky, the investigation takes a new turn to indict the President for perjury.

‘The Coup’ explores the nexus of truth and lies which threatened to undermine a Presidency.

Bill Clinton ..... Corey Johnson
Hillary Rodham Clinton ..... Fenella Woolgar
Susan McDougal ..... Samantha Dakin
Bobby McDaniel/Rahm Emanuel ..... Rhashan Stone
OIC Lawyer/Sidney Blumenthal ..... Joseph Balderrama
George Stephanopoulos ..... Tom Forrister
Jim McDougal ..... Brian Protheroe
Claudia Riley ..... Clare Perkins
Waitress ..... Kirsty Oswald
Judge ..... Sean Baker

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0006tlk)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0006sp4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b09bz02x)
War in the air

War in the air: Laurie Taylor explores the history of aerial bombing and tear gas; from the battlefield to urban streets. He's joined by Thomas Hippler, Professor of Modern History at Caen University, Normandy, Anna Feigenbaum, Senior Lecturer in Digital Storytelling at Bournemouth University and Steve Graham, Professor of Professor of Cities and Society at Newcastle University.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0006tln)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m0006tlq)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006tlv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Pin (m0006tlx)
Series 4

Crimewave

The latest series from Ben and Alex, aka "The Pin", is a sketch-sitcom hybrid. The award-winning sketch duo are forced to record their latest series in their flat and the boys are glad of the new creative freedom this opportunity presents, away from the "prying eyes of the BBC". Unfortunately this week, a crimewave has hit their neighbourhood, so Ben and Alex are forced to take drastic measures.

The Pin At Home is written by Alex Owen and Ben Ashenden

It stars:

Alex Owen as Alex
Ben Ashenden as Ben
Pippa Haywood as Michelle
Celeste Dring as Maria
Mark Davison as James
Will Brown as Wes
and
James McNicholas as Police Officer

It was produced by Sam Michell

A BBC Studios Production


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0006sdk)
Peggy's scheme attracts attention and Lilian oversteps the mark.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0006tlz)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 Moon (m0006tl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m0006tm1)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Anne McElvoy, Matthew Taylor, Mona Siddiqui and Tim Stanley.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (m0006tkv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Stranger Than Sci-Fi (m0006tm3)
Babies In Bags

Astro-physicist Dr Jen Gupta and comedian Alice Fraser travel the parallel worlds of science and sci-fi.

Starting with the latest books and films, they discover real life science that sounds too strange to be true - from babies grown in bags, via black hole Jacuzzis, to flowers that behave like our ears.

Each programme starts with imagined futures and ends with today’s latest scientific research, exploring along the way how each impacts the other. This episode dives into the science behind Anne Charnock's book, Dreams Before The Start Of Time, which imagines a future where babies can be grown in artificial wombs. How close is modern technology to making this a reality?

Jen and Alice talk to Anne Charnock, Science Fiction historian Lisa Yaszek, research scientist Matt Kemp and investigative journalist Jenny Kleeman.

Produced by Joe Sykes and Rich Ward
Executive Producer: Peggy Sutton
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


WED 21:30 Soul Music (m0006tks)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006tm6)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 Sweet Sorrow (m0006tl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Darren Harriott: Black Label (m0006tm8)
Gangs

Radio 4 showcases fast-rising comedy star Darren Harriott in his debut stand-up series.

Recorded in Darren's hometown of Birmingham, Black Label explores the different labels and roles he's been assigned throughout his life - Brummie, gang member, brother and son, bouncer and now comic. Each episode of Black Label consists of incredibly open-hearted stories from the front line of Darren's life - challenging, enlightening and properly funny comedy.

In Episode 2 Darren looks back at his time in a teenage gang; what attracted him to help form the TCK (Terror Clan Killaz)? What drew the members together and why did he leave the gang?

Written and Performed by Darren Harriott

Photo by Freddie Claire

Produced by Adnan Ahmed

BBC Studios Production


WED 23:15 TEZ Talks (b09nxtzy)
Series 2

5. Tezifesto

Tez Ilyas returns for a second series of TEZ Talks.

In this first episode Tez talks about moving back home to Blackburn and discusses class differences and social mobility before announcing his candidacy for Prime Minister.

Written and performed by Tez Ilyas
Produced by Carl Cooper

A BBC Studios Production


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006tmb)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 18 JULY 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0006tmd)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006tkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006tmg)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006tmj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006tml)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0006tmn)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006tmq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Major Anne Read

Good morning,

For a few years my service in The Salvation Army took me with my husband to New Zealand. Our responsibilities meant we travelled around that beautiful country. On long car journeys we loved taking a quick detour for a dip in the waters of one of New Zealand’s thermal pools. We would arrive at our destination aches and pains gone, as fresh as daisies, through our soak in the therapeutic waters.

For generations Maori have appreciated the healing properties of their thermal springs, where warriors wounded in battle would bathe their wounds.

In Britain Roman soldiers built a reservoir around the natural springs that came bubbling up from deep underground in what is now the city of Bath. The baths were not just for R and R: their waters were valued for their healing powers too. In fact for centuries, people travelled to spa towns all over Britain to experience the healing properties of our ancient springs and with a renewed appreciation of their waters baths are being restored and rebuilt.

One of the Salvation Army’s Generals, Albert Orsborn also lived for some time to New Zealand. Visiting Te Aroha, the healing springs flowing from the mountain inspired him to think of Calvary and God’s cleansing, life giving stream flowing in redemption for all humankind.

He wrote 'From a Hill I know, healing waters flow… all I require to cleanse me and restore.' You might want to make General Orsborn’s prayer your own this morning:

Wash from my hands the dust of earthly striving;
Take from my mind the stress of secret fear;
Cleanse thou the wounds from all but thee far hidden,
And when the waters flow let my healing appear."

Amen


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0006tms)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04symwf)
Marabou Stork

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the gaunt undertaker looking marabou stork in Africa. It is not very scientific to describe a bird as ugly, but the marabou stork would not win any prizes for beauty or elegance. This bulky stork, with a funereal air, has a fleshy inflatable sac under its throat which conspicuously wobbles as it probes African rubbish dumps for carrion. Seemingly more at home amongst the melee of vultures and jackals squabbling over a carcass, it is known in some areas as the undertaker bird. But, in the air the marabou stork is an elegant sight. It has one of the largest wingspans of any bird, up to 3 metres across. Soaring effortlessly on these broad wings the storks scan the sub-Saharan landscape for food. Marabou storks are doing well, thanks to our throwaway society and they've learned to connect people with rubbish – a salutary association one might say.

Producer : Andrew Dawes


THU 06:00 Today (m0006scn)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Bringing Up Britain (m0006scq)
Series 12

Liar Liar

When should we celebrate deception and when be concerned we might have a compulsive liar in the family?

Mariella Frostrup explores why our children lie, asking how best to bring up children into a post-truth world.

She hears research that highlights how bad parents are at spotting their own children’s lies, new ways that work to encourage honesty and how punishing a liar can often backfire.

Parents walk a fine line when they expect truth from their children while lying themselves. A new study exposes the impact our deceit can have on young children and Melissa Guida-Richards tells the heart wrenching moment she discovered the truth about herself, the shock of finding her whole identity had been built on her parents’ lies.

But when are children ready for those big truths, how should we respond to difficult questions about death, divorce or terrorism?

Is lying a necessity that makes the world go round or are we on a slippery slope, where our small lies are escalating without us noticing?

Teasing apart the tangled web of deceit with Mariella are Chartered Psychologist, Dr Sarah Kuppen, Senior Lecturer in Developmental Psychology at Anglia Ruskin University, Dr Angharad Rudkin, Clinical Psychologist at the University of Southampton, Dr Hannah Cassidy, Senior Lecturer in Forensic Psychology at the University of Brighton, and Ian Leslie, author of Born Liars.


THU 09:45 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006scs)
The First Sense

Perched on the exterior of our delicate, intricate bodies, the skin is our largest and fastest-growing organ, weighing nine kilograms and covering two square metres. We see it, touch it and live in it every day. It’s a habitat for a mesmerisingly complex world of micro-organisms. Its physical functions are vital to our health and indeed our survival, and it’s crucial to our sense of identity. Yet how much do we really know about it?

Through the lenses of science, sociology and history, Dr Monty Lyman leads us on a journey through the comedy, tragedy and exquisite humanity of our most underrated and overlooked organ. By delving into something that seems so familiar, he reveals how the skin is far stranger and much more complex than we’ve ever imagined.

Why can’t we tickle ourselves? Why - and how - do we blush? Why do we sometimes experience a pleasurable ‘aesthetic shiver’? In today’s episode, Dr Lyman explores the relationship between our brain and our skin.

Written by Dr Monty Lyman
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Gunnar Cauthery
Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006scw)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 Moon (m0006scy)
Lunar Orbit

Adapted by Anita Sullivan

Part four in the story of Apollo 11's journey to the moon. A verbatim drama, performed by actors using the original NASA transcripts from the mission.

In this fourth episode - Lunar Orbit - the astronauts wake to find themselves face-to-face with another world.

It's fifty years since Apollo 11 put human beings on another world. Over the anniversary week, Radio 4 tells the story of the five day journey to the moon, using the astronauts’ own words, which are taken entirely from the transcripts. We travel with Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins on their epic journey, experiencing everything as they did.

A unique perspective on the most historic journey in the history of humanity.

Thanks to Professor Chris Welch, International Space University.

Neil Armstrong.... Nathan Nolan
Buzz Aldrin.... Ronan Summers
Michael Collins.... Edward Hogg
Narrator.... Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m0006sd1)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 EXPOSED: Young Female Photographers (m0006sd3)
Emma Dabiri meets three emerging female artists under 30 who are bringing a fresh new perspective to the world of photography.

Part of a wave of young British photographers who have grown up in a world of social media and camera phones, their work is smart and subversive - exploring ideas of female identity, sex, beauty, food, community, and consumerism. Appreciated by a hugely receptive audience, both at exhibitions and art fairs but also online, they've harnessed the power of instagram to showcase their work to a younger generation of art lovers.

Juno Calypso is a fine artist and photographer with a string of awards and has just been acquired by Manchester Art Gallery. Using herself as the model, she seeks out extraordinary, unnerving locations - Honeymoon hotels, futuristic 1960s bunkers - to explore issues surrounding female identity, beauty and consumerism. We meet her in her blood-splattered studio making work for the Women's World Cup.

Maisie Cousins has just published her first book - Rubbish, Dipping Sauce, Grass, Peonie, Bum - based on the titles of her last three exhibitions. Her blown-up images of food and plant-life are sticky, sweaty and unmistakably erotic. For Maisie, it's less problematic to objectify something that's already an object: "Nobody’s going to tell me off for making a sexy plastic or a sexy fruit. They’re inanimate". She likes to create mini fantasy worlds, photographing at a close distance, to tell the most lies she can.

But for Sophie Green, honesty and authenticity are key. A portrait and social documentary photographer who, since winning the Magnum Graduate Award, has been exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery twice as part of the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, and has published two books. From African churches, to stock car racing and arm wrestlers, her work investigates British identity today and the glue that unites communities and subcultures.

With insights from journalist Charlotte Jansen, collector Nick Sutton, and gallerist Hannah Watson.

Image courtesy of Juno Calypso and TJ Boulting

Produced by Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0006sd5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Sweet Sorrow (m0006sd7)
Episode 9

A decade after the publication of his bestselling novel, One Day, featuring the story of Emma and Dexter, David Nicholls has again created a triumphantly engaging pair of young lovers.

When Charlie Lewis meets Fran Fisher in the summer of 1996, he is at something of a loose end. School is out and so is the sun, but his future is not looking bright. He has been hit hard by his parents' split and is not happy about the role assigned to him by his mother - keeping an eye on his depressed and bankrupt father.

Failure hangs in the air - not just the closure of his father's record shop but also Charlie's inability to complete most of his GCSE exams. But then Fran Fisher almost literally stumbles across him and a whole new world opens up.

David Nicholls' last novel, Us, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014. Earlier this year, he won a BAFTA for Patrick Melrose, his television adaptation of the novels by Edward St Aubyn.

In Sweet Sorrow he gives us a pitch-perfect portrayal of the anguish and joys of adolescence brilliantly laced with wit and compassionate humour.

James Norton, familiar from his roles in McMafia and War and Peace as well as the psychopathic villain in Happy Valley, reads his first book for BBC Radio.

Produced by Jill Waters
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0006sd9)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m0006sdc)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0006sdf)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 Tales from the Lobby (m0006sdh)
Series 1

Lobbying for Foreigners

In 1938 the US government introduced a Foreign Agents registration Act, prompted in part by fears of Nazi agents working in the US. Now Bob Seely MP wants to introduce an upgraded version over here. But what exactly are his concerns? Michael Crick meets two men who have lobbied for foreign governments, while Richard Brooks of Private Eye outlines how widespread he thinks the problems are.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0006sdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b08w0zn8)
Perimeter

By Josie Long and Liam Williams

In the not-so-distant future, siblings Josie and Liam live in a city divided by a giant, electrified fence. The haves live on one side, the have-nots on the other.

Josie and Liam live on the non-affluent side of the city and share a room - as in Josie lives in it for twelve hours a day and Liam for the other twelve; it is too small for two people to be in at one time. Then one day they're offered the opportunity to cross the fence and see how the other half lives.

A dystopian comedy about an increasingly divided society written by and starring comedians Josie Long and Liam Williams.

Josie Long
"There's a lovable romantic sensibility here... heartfelt and eccentric." (The Guardian)
Josie is often described as a unique voice in comedy. She started stand-up at 14, winning the BBC New Comedy Award. She has appeared on: The News Quiz, Just A Minute, Never Mind the Buzzcocks, The Alternative Comedy Experience, Have I Got News For You and 8 out of 10 Cats, and is the voice of the Radio 4 show Short Cuts.

Liam Williams
"The Philip Larkin of British Comedy." (The Huffington Post)
Liam is a stand-up comedian, host of Invisible Dot's Stories night, and one-third of comedy sketch troupe Sheeps. He was shortlisted in 2013 for Best Newcomer at Edinburgh Festival, and his show 'Capitalism' was nominated for Foster's Best Comedy Show at Edinburgh last year. He's written and starred in his own series for Radio 4 (Liam Williams: Ladhood) and BBC 3 (Pls Like).

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0006sdm)
Family Monsters Garden in Swaffham and Chelsea

Helen Mark visits the Escape Project in Swaffham, Norfolk, to find out why a group of volunteers are helping create a garden full of monsters for the Chelsea Flower Show.

These monsters represent the kinds of problems facing every family, and a garden is the perfect place to talk about them together. The Family Monsters Garden, designed by Alistair Bayford, has been inspired by 'Escape', a community allotment which welcomes people to spend time outdoors to benefit their wellbeing and especially their mental health. Escape is funded by the charity Family Action which is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. The 'family monsters' theme is designed to start a national conversation about some of the family problems we may all face, but rarely talk about.

At Escape you can plant seeds, do a bit of weeding, harvest vegetables and fruit, and make friends over Susan's homemade soup or pizza baked in the handmade, dragon-covered clay pizza oven. Although if the mason bees are still nesting in the clay, you'll have to wait another week or so. It's a wildlife haven and a soothingly busy, green place to be.

Sometimes a volunteer (like Gavin) gets so hooked on gardening they take up their own allotment. Volunteer Sarah has found she's become a bit of a celebrity because of the Chelsea buzz, and William is hoping the limelight will turn into extra funding to support the project, which has been a lifeline and a source of joy for him. Team leaders Karen and Katy know that long after memories of the Flower Show have faded, they'll still be planting lettuce and purslane, with their green-fingered extended family. Helen visits before and after the show to find out about its longer-term impact.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0006s8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0006sdp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m0006sdr)
The secrets of screen acting

With Antonia Quirke

Actor and coach Denis Lawson reveals all the things that a film star needs to know but was too afraid to ask, and why that advice was vital to his nephew Ewan McGregor when he left drama school.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0006sdt)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0006sdw)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006sdy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Welcome to Wherever You Are (m0006sf0)
Series 2

Episode 1

Welcome To Wherever You Are is a truly global stand-up show, in which comedians perform from wherever on the planet they happen to be, via high quality phone lines and internet video, to a live audience in the BBC Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House, London.

This episode features acts from Australia, South Africa and Sweden (via New Zealand). First up is Steph Tisdell @StephTisdell, the First Nations Australian stand-up whose big break was victory in the Deadly Funny competition in 2014. Joining Steph is Schalk Bezuidenhout @schalkiebez an Afrikaaner from Cape Town whose show South African White Boy will be at the Edinburgh Festival this summer. Finally there’s the international stand-up stalwart, Al Pitcher @TheAlPitcher who dials in from Sweden to give us the lowdown on life in Stockholm.

The show is hosted by Andrew Maxwell, a multiple Edinburgh Comedy Award nominee and a regular on The News Quiz, The Now Show, and who has presented his own Radio 4 series, Andrew Maxwell's Public Enemies.

Producer: Richard Morris
Production co-ordinator: Hayley Sterling
A BBC Studios Production


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0006sf3)
Shula comes to the rescue and it's a wild night out for the Aldridge family


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0006sf5)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 Moon (m0006scy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Making History (m000256d)
Bloodlines

Tom Holland and Iszi Lawrence follow history’s lines and linkages to uncover connections and compelling stories. This week, with the imminent arrival of a new Royal baby, Tom and Iszi examine bloodlines - from some of the Queen’s own surprising ancestors, to the vagaries of dog breeding.

Adam Rutherford discusses how DNA testing has informed the study of history and the programme asks if race really is a question of genetics, or a cultural construct.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m0006sf7)
Lessons of Theranos

What can we learn from how one medical start-up fooled Silicon Valley and the world? Elizabeth Holmes dropped out of Stanford University at 19 to start Theranos. She promised investors and the public a revolutionary blood diagnosis machine which would be less painful, accessible and affordable than ordinary lab tests. She managed to raise $9 billion in funding. Bow the company is worth nothing. Holmes and her business partner may face up to 20 years in prison for fraud. How did she manage to deceive some of the world's cleverest minds - and is there something about start-up culture and the cult of the visionary leader which encourages charlatans? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

GUESTS
Rebecca Jarvis, chief business, economics and technology correspondent, ABC News
Margaret Heffernan, author and entrepreneur
Jos White, entrepreneur and partner, Notion Capital

Producer: Julie Ball


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0006sdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Bringing Up Britain (m0006scq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006sfb)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 Sweet Sorrow (m0006sd7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Elephant in the Room (m0006sfd)
Episode 4

Sarah Millican hosts a new panel show using surveys to discover who is the most Average Jolene, and who is the most Maverick Matilda. This week's sparkling panel features Lucy Beaumont, Annabel Giles, Evelyn Mok and Toby Hadoke.

Surveys on subjects including childhood, daily rituals and favourite cheese are the basis for Sarah's questions to the panellists, discovering who is the closest to, and furthest from, the average. Surprising quirks, hilarious insights and unexpected anecdotes are revealed along the way.

The winner will be the most average. But joint winner will be the most different, the furthest from the norm.

A little bit like a dinner party, but one where you know all of the spoons.

A Chopsy production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006sfg)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 19 JULY 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0006sfj)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006scs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006sfl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006sfn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006sfq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0006sfs)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0006sfv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Major Anne Read.

Good morning

Last month, my 95 year old father in law, Harry jumped out of a plane. The member of the Red Devil parachute team he was strapped to took responsibility for Harry’s landing. But 75 years previously in the early hours of D-Day, he and his young comrades of 6th Airborne jumped into the shell and tracer bullet riven darkness alone.

The number of people staying active into old age has grown tremendously during Harry’s lifetime. And many of them claim to have the secrets of a good old age including having a nice cup of tea - and giving the tea bag a good stir before you take it out; balancing on one leg - probably not whilst drinking your cup of tea; and watching an hour less television - perhaps that’s the hour you spend standing on one leg and drinking tea.

Contrary to the idea that older people are a drain on our economy, our communities are richer not just for what older people can do but for the wisdom and inspiration they can bring.

Before his jump to honour his comrades Harry said, ‘whatever age we are, we are more than capable of shrinking from something that we feel is beyond us. But, I believe we should not withdraw from a challenge – yesterday is not our best, our best is tomorrow.’

Through the prophet Isaiah God said ‘I will be your God throughout your lifetime – until your hair is white with age. I made you and I will carry you along and save you.’

Mighty God, thank you that we need not fear jumping into the darkness alone, because you are with us. Give us courage to face the challenges of this day we pray.

Amen


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0006sfx)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04syygh)
Hawaiian Goose (Nene)

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the Nene, or the endemic and rare Hawaiian goose. Visit a Wildfowl and Wetland Trust centre in the UK and it is likely you'll be mobbed by the nasal calls of one of the world's rarest birds, the Hawaiian Goose or "Ne-Ne". In the late 18th century there were around 25,000 of these neat attractive geese, with ochre cheeks and black-heads, on the Hawaiian Islands. But by the early 1950s, due to development and introduced predators, a mere 30 or so remained. A few of these remaining Nene's were taken to Slimbridge, home of Peter Scott's Wildfowl Trust as part of a captive breeding programme. They bred successfully and now many generations of geese produced there have been returned to their native islands. Their future is still precarious in the wild, but as the state bird of Hawaii the Nene's outlook is more secure today than for the last seventy years.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0006tyq)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0006t4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Remarkable Life of the Skin (m0006tys)
Social and Spiritual Skin

Perched on the exterior of our delicate, intricate bodies, the skin is our largest and fastest-growing organ, weighing nine kilograms and covering two square metres. We see it, touch it and live in it every day. It’s a habitat for a mesmerisingly complex world of micro-organisms. Its physical functions are vital to our health and indeed our survival, and it’s crucial to our sense of identity. Yet how much do we really know about it?

Through the lenses of science, sociology and history, Dr Monty Lyman leads us on a journey through the comedy, tragedy and exquisite humanity of our most underrated and overlooked organ. By delving into something that seems so familiar, he reveals how the skin is far stranger and much more complex than we’ve ever imagined.

In today's final episode, from 18th century Tahiti to 21st century Birmingham (the most inkedcity in the UK), Dr Lyman travels the world to examine the human obsession with body markings. He explains the social and religious importance of tattooing and reveals that the earliest tattoos may have had a medicinal purpose.

Written by Dr Monty Lyman
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Read by Gunnar Cauthery
Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006tyv)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 Moon (m0006tyx)
Landing

Adapted by Anita Sullivan

Adapted by Anita Sullivan. Final episode of Apollo 11's epic journey to the moon. A verbatim drama, performed by actors using the original NASA transcripts from the mission.

In this fourth episode - Landing - Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin climb into the Lunar Module and begin their descent to the moon's surface.

It's fifty years since Apollo 11 put human beings on another world. Over the anniversary week, Radio 4 tells the story of the five day journey to the moon, using the astronauts’ own words, which are taken entirely from the transcripts. We travel with Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins on their epic journey, experiencing everything as they did.

A unique perspective on the most historic journey in the history of humanity.

Thanks to Professor Chris Welch, International Space University.

Neil Armstrong.... Nathan Nolan
Buzz Aldrin.... Ronan Summers
Michael Collins.... Edward Hogg
Narrator.... Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


FRI 11:00 D for Diagnosis (m0006tyz)
What's in a Label?

Suzy built her life around a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, joining a support group, even writing a book about it, only to be given a completely different diagnosis not once, but twice. She lost her support group and a big part of her identity when her diagnosis was changed.

In this second programme in the series, Claudia considers the value and the accuracy of diagnoses in mental health. Unlike a broken wrist, diabetes or anaemia, where you can be fairly hopeful that the testing makes the diagnosis watertight, there is not a single x-ray, blood test or biopsy that can give a definitive diagnosis of a mental health problem. Instead the symptoms that a person describes are assessed and a diagnoses given based on how they cluster and fit with diagnostic categories. The whole process is much more fluid, with many symptoms shared or absent both within and between different disorders and conditions.

As Suzy describes, a mental health diagnosis can be seismic for the person concerned. In a positive way it can bring recognition, relief, treatment and recovery and in a negative way it can bring judgement, prejudice, discrimination and isolation. Because a diagnosis in mental health is above all, intensely personal. It can feel aimed at the very centre of you and your identity.

Claudia explains the backdrop to the classification of mental health conditions. She looks at the Psychiatrists' Bible, a.k.a. the DSM or the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and considers the enormous growth in each of five volumes published over the past 70 years (it's said the last edition is big enough to stop a bullet) How does this American framework affect how we view, assess and treat mental health difficulties in this country?

There are some who disagree profoundly with formal classification framed by the DSM, describing it an inappropriate "medical model" for mental health problems. Claudia talks to clinical psychologist, Dr Lucy Johnstone, who has never, in her 30 year career, given a diagnosis and believes the starting point should be not "what's wrong with me?" but "what's happened to me?". But Claudia also hears from others, including the former President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Professor Sir Simon Wessely, who maintain diagnoses are accurate, valuable and flexible enough so that good clinicians can use them as the starting point for care.

Rosie tells Claudia how her diagnosis for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder gave her the key to understanding years of troublesome and persistent thoughts and Jane, diagnosed with a developmental condition, Autism Spectrum Disorder, describes how getting a formal diagnosis gave her the knowledge and confidence to change careers and find work in a more supportive environment.

And Suzie, a peer researcher at the Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow, whose diagnosis kept changing, gives tips about how to deliver and change diagnoses with compassion, care and understanding.

Producer: Fiona Hill


FRI 11:30 British Troll Farm (m0006tz1)
A new sitcom starring Daniel Ings (Lovesick) and Nicola Coughlan (Derry Girls), set in a secret British military unit dedicated to fighting the social media cyberwar. Badly.

Welcome to the British Troll Farm - the nickname of a fairly top-secret soft-power Government installation, in a rented warehouse off the A23, just pass Kwiksave, you know, on the left, after the Hedgehog Sanctuary. Filled with nearly-quite-a-few millennials, all typing, blogging and spoofing to defend British interests.

The problem is it’s not exactly easy to defend British values passionately, like the Russians and the Chinese do theirs. And can you really use Putin-esque tactics to promote the idea that parliamentary democracy is sort of fine and that cricket is vaguely worth watching?

This will be the first ever comedy to exploit the online world we all swim in, combining smartphones and satire with an ensemble workplace sitcom. This is an inverse Bletchley Park - staffed by idiots. With apps.

Cast:
Joshn ..... Daniel Ings
Caz ..... Nicola Coughlan
Phil ..... Steve Edge
Bim ..... Tala Gouveia
Narrator ..... Ewan Bailey

Special guest:
The Russian Ambassador ..... Kerry Shale

Written by Jack Bernhardt
Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0006tz3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Sweet Sorrow (m0006tz5)
Episode 10

A decade after the publication of his bestselling novel, One Day, featuring the story of Emma and Dexter, David Nicholls has again created a triumphantly engaging pair of young lovers.

When Charlie Lewis meets Fran Fisher in the summer of 1996, he is at something of a loose end. School is out and so is the sun, but his future is not looking bright. He has been hit hard by his parents' split and is not happy about the role assigned to him by his mother - keeping an eye on his depressed and bankrupt father.

Failure hangs in the air - not just the closure of his father's record shop but also Charlie's inability to complete most of his GCSE exams. But then Fran Fisher almost literally stumbles across him and a whole new world opens up.

David Nicholls' last novel, Us, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2014. Earlier this year, he won a BAFTA for Patrick Melrose, his television adaptation of the novels by Edward St Aubyn.

In Sweet Sorrow he gives us a pitch-perfect portrayal of the anguish and joys of adolescence brilliantly laced with wit and compassionate humour.

James Norton, familiar from his roles in McMafia and War and Peace as well as the psychopathic villain in Happy Valley, reads his first book for BBC Radio.

Produced by Jill Waters
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0006tz7)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0006tz9)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0006tzc)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Tales from the Lobby (m0006tzf)
Series 1

Lobbying in the age of Brexit

When Frank Field entered Parliament in 1979, he knew exactly whom to lobby - Margaret Thatcher, the most powerful person in the land. But ever since the referendum of 2016, ministers and prime ministers have come and gone. The world of politics - and lobbying - has entered a period of instability and flux. In this final episode we hear from Jasmine Whitbread of London First and Mark Shorrock of Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon about lobbying in the age of Brexit. And two lobbyists - Iain Anderson and Alex Deane - explain what they think will happen next.

The presenter is Michael Crick, the producer Miles Warde


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0006sf3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 The Interrogation (m0006tzh)
The Interrogation - Series 7

Nadine

Today Detective team D.I. Matthews and D.S. Armitage have to interview Nadine, who Sean has known since childhood and what's more, she's a police officer, so it's uncomfortable for everyone.

Max ..... Kenneth Cranham
Sean ..... Alex Lanipekun
Nadine ..... Bianca Stephens

Writer ..... Roy Williams
Music ..... David Pickvance
Director ..... Mary Peate
Producer ..... Jessica Dromgoole


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0006tzk)
RHS Wisley

Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m0006tzm)
Sonny's Bench

An original short work for BBC Radio 4 by the Northern Irish writer Dawn Watson. As read by Ian McElhinney (Derry Girls, Game of Thrones.)

Dawn Watson was born in Belfast. She has just published her debut poetry pamphlet The Stack of Owls is Getting Higher and has short stories in anthologies Still Worlds Turning and Belfast Stories. Her stories and poems have been published in literary journals including The Stinging Fly, The Moth and The Tangerine. Dawn is an AHRC PhD candidate at the Seamus Heaney Centre, writing a prose poem novel and researching prose poetics.

Writer ..... Dawn Watson
Reader ..... Ian McElhinney
Producer ..... Michael Shannon


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0006tzp)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m0006tzr)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m0006tzt)
Clodagh and Emma - Thanks Dad

Two artists and activists talk light-heartedly about how much their art means to them. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m0006tzw)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006tzy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Lobby Land (m0006v00)
Series 2

Episode 1

Topical sitcom following life in Westminster through the eyes of Sam Peakes, a young political editor at a clickbait website, as she tries to make sense of the madness engulfing British politics. Starring Ophelia Lovibond, Charlie Higson, Cariad Lloyd, Dan Tetsell and Daniel Lawrence Taylor.

Cast:
Sam Peakes: Ophelia Lovibond
Tom Shriver MP: Charlie Higson
Mia Phillips: Cariad Lloyd
Gideon Burnside: Dan Tetsell
Nathan Edmonds: Daniel Lawrence Taylor

Written by Jon Harvey, Sarah Dempster and Christopher Davies

Production Co-Ordinator: Tam Shilham
Executive Producer: Lucy Armitage
Editor: Jerry Peal
Producer: Jon Harvey

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m0006v03)
Writer - Sarah McDonald Hughes
Director - Tracey Neale
Editor - Jeremy Howe

Ben Archer ..... Ben Norris
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Phoebe Aldridge ….. Lucy Morris
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Leonard Berry ..... Paul Copley
Chris Carter ..... Wilf Scolding
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Ruairi Donovan ….. Arthur Hughes
Rex Fairbrother ..... Nick Barber
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Will Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Bev Hanson ..... Alison Belbin
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Fiona Lloyd ..... Adjoa Andoh
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Philip Moss ..... Andy Hockley
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m0006v05)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 Moon (m0006tyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0006v07)
Iain Dale, Nusrat Ghani MP, Jess Phillips MP, Pete Wishart MP

Shaun Ley presents political debate from Melton Mowbray Theatre in Leicestershire with a panel including the LBC presenter and political commentator Iain Dale, Junior Transport Minister Nusrat Ghani, the Labour MP Jess Phillips and the SNP MP Pete Wishart.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0006v09)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Tales from the Lobby (m0006v0c)
Tales from the Lobby (Omnibus)

Episode 2

Radio 4 brings its multifocal lens to the lobbying industry


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006v0f)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 Sweet Sorrow (m0006tz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m0006snk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006v0h)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0006v0k)
Christopher and Connor - Forging Friendships

PhD students talk about how hard it can be to make friends and what defines friendship. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m0006snk)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m0006snk)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0006n26)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (m0006n26)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0006v09)

All Those Women 11:30 WED (b086tfbm)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0006lp0)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m0006shh)

Annika Stranded 19:45 SUN (m0006s9d)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0006s77)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0006n24)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0006v07)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0006s7x)

Art of Now 23:00 MON (m00045kw)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0006sdt)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0006sdt)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0006s8c)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0006s8c)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (m0006sgz)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (m0006lnc)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (m0006sgs)

Bringing Up Britain 09:00 THU (m0006scq)

Bringing Up Britain 21:30 THU (m0006scq)

British Troll Farm 11:30 FRI (m0006tz1)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0006s94)

D for Diagnosis 11:00 FRI (m0006tyz)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 THU (b08w0zn8)

Darren Harriott: Black Label 23:00 WED (m0006tm8)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m0006n1y)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m0006t4q)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0006t4q)

Drama 14:30 SAT (m0006s79)

Drama 21:00 SAT (m0006l6j)

Drama 14:15 MON (b09ntdc7)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m0006snf)

Drama 14:15 WED (b07nmvmh)

EXPOSED: Young Female Photographers 11:30 THU (m0006sd3)

Elephant in the Room 23:00 THU (m0006sfd)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0006s6j)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0006s9z)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0006sj5)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0006sps)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0006tms)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0006sfx)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0006n1m)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m0006tzr)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0006m3y)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m0006sp0)

Four Thought 05:45 SAT (m0006lrc)

Four Thought 09:30 WED (m0006tkv)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (m0006tkv)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0006s6x)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m0006sd1)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0006shc)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0006sny)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0006tlz)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0006sf5)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m0006v05)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0006n1f)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0006tzk)

Heresy 18:30 TUE (m0006snt)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (m0006lnt)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (m0006sh7)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0006sp2)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0006sp4)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0006sp4)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0006n1k)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0006tzp)

Lobby Land 18:30 FRI (m0006v00)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0006s7q)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0006s7q)

Making History 20:00 THU (m000256d)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0006n2k)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0006s81)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0006s9l)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0006shq)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0006spb)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0006tmd)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0006sfj)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0006s71)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0006s71)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0006tlk)

Moon 10:45 MON (m0006sg7)

Moon 19:45 MON (m0006sg7)

Moon 10:45 TUE (m0006smv)

Moon 19:45 TUE (m0006smv)

Moon 10:41 WED (m0006tl1)

Moon 19:45 WED (m0006tl1)

Moon 10:45 THU (m0006scy)

Moon 19:45 THU (m0006scy)

Moon 10:45 FRI (m0006tyx)

Moon 19:45 FRI (m0006tyx)

Moonbase 2029 11:00 TUE (m0006smx)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0006lsp)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m0006tm1)

Mr Muzak 23:00 TUE (b094hm69)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0006n2w)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0006s89)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0006s9v)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0006sj1)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0006spn)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0006tmn)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0006sfs)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m0006s8k)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0006s6z)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0006t4s)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0006t71)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0006tmv)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0006tqk)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0006sd5)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0006tz3)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0006s6g)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0006s8r)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0006s90)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m0006s7z)

News 13:00 SAT (m0006s75)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 15:30 TUE (m000358x)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (m0006s8m)

One to One 15:15 SAT (m0006m3h)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m0006smn)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0006sdp)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m0006sdp)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m0006l9t)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0006sdm)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0006s7f)

PM 17:00 MON (m0006sh1)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0006snm)

PM 17:00 WED (m0006tlq)

PM 17:00 THU (m0006sdw)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0006tzw)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0006t5f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0006n2y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0006s9x)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0006sj3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0006spq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0006tmq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0006sfv)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0006s7s)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0006s7s)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0006s7s)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0006s8w)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0006s8w)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0006s8w)

Remorse: A Sorry Story 21:00 MON (m0002zzx)

Renaissance Man: The Last Judgement of Giorgio Vasari 15:00 SUN (m0006t52)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0006s6q)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m0006s7v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0006n2r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0006s85)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0006s9q)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0006shx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0006spj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0006tmj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0006sfn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0006n2p)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0006n2t)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0006s7j)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0006s83)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0006s87)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0006t57)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0006s9n)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0006s9s)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0006shv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0006shz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0006spg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0006spl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0006tmg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0006tml)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0006sfl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0006sfq)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m0006n1h)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m0006tzm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0006s7n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0006t5c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0006sh5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0006snr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0006tlv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0006sdy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0006tzy)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08p5kxq)

Soul Music 09:00 WED (m0006tks)

Soul Music 21:30 WED (m0006tks)

Stranger Than Sci-Fi 21:00 WED (m0006tm3)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0006s92)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0006s8t)

Sweet Sorrow 12:04 MON (m0006sgg)

Sweet Sorrow 22:45 MON (m0006sgg)

Sweet Sorrow 12:04 TUE (m0006sn3)

Sweet Sorrow 22:45 TUE (m0006sn3)

Sweet Sorrow 12:04 WED (m0006tl7)

Sweet Sorrow 22:45 WED (m0006tl7)

Sweet Sorrow 12:04 THU (m0006sd7)

Sweet Sorrow 22:45 THU (m0006sd7)

Sweet Sorrow 12:04 FRI (m0006tz5)

Sweet Sorrow 22:45 FRI (m0006tz5)

TED Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (m0006mmp)

TEZ Talks 23:15 WED (b09nxtzy)

Tales from the Lobby 13:45 MON (m0006sgq)

Tales from the Lobby 13:45 TUE (m0006snc)

Tales from the Lobby 13:45 WED (m0006tlh)

Tales from the Lobby 13:45 THU (m0006sdh)

Tales from the Lobby 13:45 FRI (m0006tzf)

Tales from the Lobby 21:00 FRI (m0006v0c)

The Absolutely Radio Show 19:15 SUN (m0006s9b)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0006t4n)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0006s98)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0006s98)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0006sh9)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0006sh9)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0006snw)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0006snw)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0006sdk)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0006sdk)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0006sf3)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0006sf3)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m0006v03)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m0006lbb)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m0006sf7)

The Country vs the City 13:30 SUN (m0002snb)

The Dying of the Ice 15:30 SAT (m0006mqv)

The Dying of the Ice 16:30 SUN (m0006t55)

The Dying of the Ice 11:30 TUE (m0006smz)

The Fens: Discovering England's Ancient Depths 00:30 SAT (m0006n2m)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m0006sdr)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0006sgv)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0006sgv)

The Interrogation 14:15 FRI (m0006tzh)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m0006s6s)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m0006s6s)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m0006sml)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m0006sml)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0006t50)

The Listening Project 09:00 MON (m0006sg1)

The Listening Project 21:30 MON (m0006sg1)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0006tl3)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m0006tzt)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m0006v0k)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0006tln)

The Pin 18:30 WED (m0006tlx)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 09:45 MON (m0006shs)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 00:30 TUE (m0006shs)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 09:45 TUE (m0006spd)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 00:30 WED (m0006spd)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 09:45 WED (m0006tkx)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 00:30 THU (m0006tkx)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 09:45 THU (m0006scs)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 00:30 FRI (m0006scs)

The Remarkable Life of the Skin 09:45 FRI (m0006tys)

The Unexpected History of Clean Eating 20:00 MON (m0006shf)

The Unexpected History of Clean Eating 11:00 WED (m0006shf)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m0006sg9)

The Voices of... 16:00 MON (m0006sgx)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m0006s6v)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0006t4y)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0006shl)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0006sp6)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0006tm6)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0006sfb)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0006v0f)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b07dm2pj)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b09bz02x)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m0006shn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m0006sp8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0006tmb)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m0006sfg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m0006v0h)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0006s6n)

Today 06:00 MON (m0006sfz)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0006smg)

Today 06:00 WED (m0006tkn)

Today 06:00 THU (m0006scn)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0006tyq)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0gzx)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04t0hgk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04sylr1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04sym21)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04symwf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04syygh)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m0006s6l)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m0006s73)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m0006s7l)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m0006s8p)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m0006s8y)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m0006t4w)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m0006t59)

Weather 05:56 MON (m0006sb1)

Weather 12:57 MON (m0006sgl)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0006sn7)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0006tlc)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0006sdc)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0006tz9)

Welcome to Wherever You Are 18:30 THU (m0006sf0)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0006s9h)

Wild Geese 23:30 SAT (m0006l6n)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0006s7c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0006sg5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0006sms)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0006tkz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0006scw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0006tyv)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0006snh)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0006sgn)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0006sn9)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0006tlf)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0006sdf)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0006tzc)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0006sgj)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m0006sn5)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m0006tl9)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m0006sd9)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0006tz7)