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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 22 JUNE 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000617y)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (m0006147)
Deaf Republic

Part Four

"We lived happily during the war / And when they bombed other people's houses, we / protested, / but not enough, we opposed them but not / enough".

In a departure for Book of the Week, Radio 4 presents an adaptation of Ukrainian-American author Ilya Kaminsky's new book of poetry, read by Fiona Shaw, Christopher Eccleston, Noma Dumezweni and Arinzé Kene.

Deaf Republic defies classification - it is a poetic narrative, a drama-in-verse, a contemporary epic. In an unnamed country, soldiers shoot dead a young deaf boy at a public gathering and the townspeople respond with refusal to hear the government's commands. Deafness becomes a form of protest and resistance.

This is a fable which speaks incisively about our political moment: about populations living under occupation and about governments at war with their own people. It is about our collective deafness to trauma happening elsewhere to others; and about the news we might choose not to hear. At its heart it is also a tender love story about a pregnant woman and her husband, caught up in this crisis; their love and joy set against the horror of events.

The week's programming begins with a documentary about Ilya Kaminsky, providing the backstory to this remarkable new work, more than 15 years in the making. Deaf since the age of 4, when a doctor in his native Ukraine misdiagnosed mumps as a cold, Ilya learned as a boy to closely observe the world around him. When his family fled to the USA as political refugees and settled there, he taught himself English by translating American poems back and forth between languages. We hear from Ilya and from leading authors Andrew Motion, Max Porter, Raymond Antrobus, Garth Greenwell and Carolyn Forché.

The book itself can be heard adapted across the following four episodes. The performers are Fiona Shaw (Fleabag, Killing Eve), Christopher Eccleston (The A Word, Doctor Who), Arinzé Kene (Death of a Salesman, Been So Long, The Pass) and Olivier Award-winning Noma Dumezweni (Harry Potter, Black Earth Rising).

Illustrations by Jennifer Whitten
Produced by Mair Bosworth with original sound design and music by Aaron May.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006182)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006186)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000618b)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m000618g)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000618l)
Good Morning
This Sabbath we read in the synagogue the beautiful words of the prophet Zachariah: ‘Not by might and not by power, but by my spirit, says the Lord’.
The cynic in me feels he’s out of touch with how this world works. Might and power are constantly in evidence, while God’s spirit seems invisible, a prisoner of war, permanently disarmed in the violent drama of history.
Worse, it’s usually the most pernicious regimes who make the loudest claims that God is on their side.
But my heart maintains that Zachariah was not wrong. Deeper than hatred is love for life.
Our family once had to look after two baby squirrels, feeding them by pipette every four hours, day and night. They clung to the teats and sucked their milk with the most tenacious concentration.
It’s not just our own lives to which we cling. At heart, we feel deeply for the lives, and hurts, of others. That’s what made women reach out and contact each other across the cruel battle lines of the Balkan wars. It’s what makes bereaved parents, Palestinian and Israeli, stand together and say, ‘Put humanity first’.
I believe that within us all, often obscured by fear and previous suffering, is a profound intuitive respect for the flow of life as it traverses every living being, bestowing consciousness and uniting us all.
Such sacred energy surely inspired Beethoven when he set Schiller’s lyrics in the triumphant chorus of his Ninth Symphony:
All men shall be brothers
Where your gentle wings shall rest.
God, strengthen with your spirit those feelings which lie deeper in us than envy and hate: wonder, love and awe.


SAT 05:45 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m00060zw)
Nick Robinson talks to the deputy prime minister, David Lidington, about doing PMQs, Brexit and the Tory leadership battle, plus a re-enactment of University Challenge

Produced by Peter Snowdon and Martin Rosenbaum


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m00066w2)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m000616b)
Going Dutch in Dorset

Clare Balding joins a unique family ramble in Dorset. She is walking from Osmington Mills to Weymouth with Simon Waley and his three Dutch sons-in-law. They are here, from their home in the Netherlands, for a three day hike along a stretch of the South West Coastal Path. Simon is British; he met and married a Dutch woman and moved to the Netherlands more than twenty five years ago. They have three daughters and each met a Dutch man. For the first time, Simon – a very keen walker, who regularly comes back to the UK – is bringing his three Dutch sons-in-law to experience long-distance British trekking. He says the culture of walking is very different in the Netherlands where every square inch of land has a specific purpose, there aren’t many public footpaths, and agricultural land is out of bounds. When people do walk, it’s usually in huge, organised groups along a network of rural roads. Simon wants his family to experience both the freedom of British walking and the unique delight of youth-hostelling, something they haven’t done before.

Producer: Karen Gregor


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m00066w4)
Farming Today This Week

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


SAT 06:57 Weather (m00066w6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m00066w8)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m00066wb)
Gurinder Chadha, and Michael Caine's Inheritance Tracks

Caroline Greville-Morris on making pirate shirts for Adam Ant, and pigeon fancier Jon Day.


SAT 10:30 The Patch (m00066wd)
Knypersley

Producer Polly Weston is sent to a random UK postcode in search of a story.

The series began with a random postcode generator, and a simple idea. In an age of echo chambers, maybe by going to a postcode completely at random, we'd find important stories which have been going unnoticed.

So far the generator has led her to the extent of illegal cigarette smoking in Lincolnshire, the north-south divide in Hertfordshire, disappearing crabs in Devon, and a mysterious story of land access in the Highlands of Scotland.

Now the wheel has been spun again. Over the next three weeks Chatham in Kent, Ferryside in South-West Wales, and a collection of villages outside Stoke-on-Trent all become her patch. In each episode she goes to a different postcode in search of a story - from why a ferry with wheels is causing a stir in Wales, to the startling situation which has led to a pharmacist in Medway becoming the "local hero".

This week - Knypersley, North Staffordshire.

Produced and presented by Polly Weston in Bristol.
Executive producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m00066wg)
Peter Oborne of The Daily Mail looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The Editor is Jonathan Brunert.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m00066wj)
Mohammed Morsi dies

The death of Mohammed Morsi throws into sharp relief the challenges facing modern day Egypt, and the bigger struggle to embrace democracy. Kevin Connolly reflects back on the defining moments of Mohammed Morsi's short presidency.
Colin Freeman visits a town in the heart of Boko Haram territory in Nigeria's north-east, and learns about a new faction which has formally declared allegiance to so-called Islamic State - and adopted a new strategy.
20 years after Nato peacekeepers entered Kosovo, James Coomarasamy meets the war widows who are challenging local norms by working for a successful pickling company.
Germany is grappling with the possibility a man with far-right links was responsible for the shooting of one of Angela's Merkel's pro-refugee allies. Reha Kansara meets a woman who spends hours each day tackling online hate speech in the country.
The warm-blooded manatee makes its way each winter to Florida in the United States. But its steadily rising population was recently blighted by toxic algae. Phoebe Smith took to the waters where she encountered one of Florida's most loved wildlife attractions.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m00066wl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m00066vc)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (m000616t)
Series 19

Episode 3

This series of Dead Ringers features Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis Macleod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey,

The producer and creator is Bill Dare
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m00066wn)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m00066wq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0006179)
Professor Catherine Barnard, Dawn Butler MP, David Davis MP, Simon Jenkins

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Wymondham High Academy in Norfolk with Professor Catherine Barnard, Shadow Secretary of State for Women & Equalities Dawn Butler MP, former Brexit Secretary David Davis MP, and the journalist and author Simon Jenkins.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m00066ws)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b08gwy5b)
Ecco

An edge-of-tomorrow science fiction drama, starring Hayley Atwell as Jo Miles, a smart and determined neuroscientist who triggers a new consciousness into being - a consciousness that emerges from the many million computers making up the internet. But has she really become mother to a new life form - or is imagination playing a wish-fulfilment trick on a woman who had hoped to be a mother?

Jo gives this emergent consciousness an acronym - ECCo.

The drama walks a knife-edge of uncertainty. ECCo (if it does indeed exist) can only communicate indirectly - a song that plays unbidden on an internet radio, the delivery of a pizza that was never ordered, a chatbot that knows Jo's name and asks her if she is sad, flickering lights whose flickers spell out the first four digits of the transcendental number pi.

Jo's husband, Ben, is concerned about her state of mind. As is her close colleague, Anwar, and her psychotherapist, Dr Swift.

But the traffic lights change miraculously to speed Jo to deliver a lecture she would otherwise be late for, her research grant comes through without a query - and unexpectedly early. Jo does seem to have someone on her side.

ECCo is written by Chris Harrald, inspired by conversations with real-life neuroscientist Daniel Bor, Research Fellow at the University of Sussex. The drama came out of a seminar organized by BBC Radio 4 Drama and the Wellcome Trust, to promote popular understanding of science.

Cast:
Jo: Hayley Atwell
Ben: John Macmillan
Dr Martha Swift: Pauline McLynn
Mr Dickerson and Professor Karswell: Joseph Marcell
Anwar: Sid Sagar
Mariana and First Year Student: Mia Selway
First Year student: Patrick Swain

Writer: Chris Harrald
Director: Sam Yates
Original music by Alex Baranowski
Producer: Melanie Harris
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:15 One to One (b08bzl92)
Nikesh Shukla meets Hayley Campbell

Novelist Nikesh Shukla is learning how to box. It's gone from memories of Rocky movies and watching the big match with family as a child to being a skill he wants for himself. When he voiced his thoughts on Twitter, journalist Hayley Campbell gave him 3 key pieces of advice. She took up kickboxing three years ago and shares how the sport and the partnership with her trainer changed her physically and mentally, but also how the boxing world became a source of fascination leading her to meet and interview some of the most powerful fighters.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SAT 15:30 The Art of Now (m00060w4)
Istanbul's Factory of Tears

Writer Isobel Finkel takes us to Istanbul, where art and censorship are never too far apart. The state’s attempts to protect citizens from illicit sounds have taken absurd forms over the years, from the banning of all Turkish-language music from the radio in the early 30s to more recent attempts to control and interfere with Arabesk, the kitsch and mournful soundtrack of the 70s and 80s which was excluded from the radio even while it was so popular it made up for three-quarters of the country's record sales.

We travel to the IMC, a vast modernist complex in the heart of Istanbul's old city that once formed a production line for Arabesk; a community unto itself where agents, record producers and record shops all crowded in on top of one another. Musicians seeking to make their name in Turkey of the 70s and 80s would turn up and audition on the steps of the IMC, where they found fame, fortune and official censure.

Isobel interviews producers, fans and stars of the genre to find out what the state was so troubled by - and speaks to a new generation of musicians who are rediscovering and reworking these once-forbidden sounds in today's Istanbul.

Presenter: Isobel Finkel
Producer: David Waters

An SPG production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m00066wv)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Sex therapist Dr Ruth, Painful gynaecological procedures, Poetry for the summer solstice

The sex therapist Dr Ruth will be discussing porn, vibrators, Vigara and the importance of communication when it comes to great sex.

We celebrate the summer solstice with the poet Elizabeth-Jane Burnett and her poem Preface.

Why are women asked to undergo painful medical procedures without adequate pain relief? We hear one woman’s experience and from Paula Briggs a consultant in reproductive health and from Katherine Tylko an anti-hysteroscopy campaigner.

UNICEF statistics reveal one woman and six new borns in Yeman die every two hours from pregnancy and childbirth complications which the organisation say is as a direct result of the conflict. We hear from Malak Hasan an advocacy and policy worker for UNICEF and from Yemeni born Mai Noman, a Digital Content Editor for the BBC’s Arabic Service.

How tricky is it to introduce a new partner to family and friends after the death of a loved one? We hear from Barbara Want whose husband died in 2012, from Colette Jelfs whose husband died in 2006 and from the relationship therapist and author Cate Campbell.

More than 2000 people have died after being infected with HIV and Hepatitis C through blood treatment. The victims were mostly infected 25 years ago in what has been called the worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS. Michelle Tolley tells us how she became infected after the birth of her first child in 1987and why she’s taking part in the Infected Blood Inquiry.

The Bristol based cook and food writer Elly Curshen known on social media as Elly Pear Cooks The Perfect Spiced paneer, spinach and grains.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow


SAT 17:00 PM (m00066wx)
Saturday PM: 22/06/2019

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m0006177)
Commerce and Crime

From Somali pirates who've turned kidnapping into a global enterprise to cybercrime and fraud - the worlds of business and wrongdoing potentially have much in common. Clever criminals build business empires and fraud is sometimes carried out by well paid workers at legitimate companies. What the two worlds can have in common is a pursuit of profit and a series of apparently rational calculations. Evan Davis and guests explore why some bright, talented people try to get rich the wrong way, while others manage to do it within the rules.

Guests

Barrister, Sara George, a partner at Sidley Austin LLP
Michael Corrigan, Chief Executive at Prosper 4 - a training and recruitment firm for former prisoners
and Dr Anja Shortland, Reader in Political Economy at King's College, London.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00066x0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m00066x2)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00066x5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m00066x9)
Lolita Chakrabarti, Indira Varma, Ayisha Malik, Lynette Linton, Jorja Smith, Ida Mae, Sara Cox, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by Lolita Chakrabarti, Indira Varma, Ayisha Malik, and Lynette Linton for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Jorja Smith and Ida Mae.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Profile (m00066tr)
Joshua Wong

Joshua Wong has gone from schoolboy protester to the face of the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong - a passionate defender of the territory’s right to self determination. He’s been repeatedly arrested and jailed. Now this week - fresh out of prison - the 22-year-old Wong is back in the limelight, putting himself on a collision course with the authorities in mainland China.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m00066xf)
Bitter Wheat, Toy Story 4, Keith Haring, On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous, Beecham House

19 years after the first Toy Story film became a world wide hit, Toy Story 4 hits the cinema screens. Featuring the voices of Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Keanu Reeves, and Annie Potts - as the kick-ass heroine Bo Peep - what does the Toy Story franchise have to offer the new generation of toy loving kids? When the new kid on the block Bonny (who replaced Andy as the child playmate at the end of Toy Story 3) makes her own toy out of a spork - called Forky and voiced by Tony Hale - Forky is convinced he belongs in the trash he was made from - is the same true of the franchise?

John Malkovich returns to the stage after a 33 year absence to star in David Mamet's Bitter Wheat about a depraved hollywood mogul at the Garrick Theatre in London. The press release describes the play's protagonist Barney Fein, "as a bloated monster – a studio head, who like his predecessor, the minotaur, devours the young he has lured into his cave." Bitter Wheat also stars Doon Mackichan - as Sondra, Barney Fein's PA - and Ioanna Kimbook.

Keith Haring at Tate Liverpool is the first major exhibition in the UK of American artist Keith Haring (1958-1990). Keith Haring brings together more than 85 works exploring a broad range of the artist's practice including large-scale drawings and paintings, most of which have never been seen in the UK.
Haring was a unique presence in 1980's New York counter culture. Best known for his iconic motifs, such as barking dogs, crawling babies and flying saucers and for creating a body of work which reflected his political views, contributing to nuclear disarmament campaigns, creating a famed Crack is Whack mural and designing anti-apartheid posters.

American-Vietnamese writer Ocean Vuong is the TS Eliot prize winning author of Night Sky with Exit Wounds. His debut novel "On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous" continues to explore his family's experience as immigrants and shows how his life story - as much as theirs - is shaped by the devastating legacy of the Vietnam war.

Tom Bateman, Lesley Nicol, Marc Warren and Leo Suter lead a huge ensemble cast for ITV’s new period drama Beecham House, set in India at the cusp of the 19th century. It tells the story of John Beecham, played by Tom Bateman, who arrives in India in 1795 as a former employee of the East India Company – an institution that politically and commercially dominated India during British colonial rule. Beecham House is co-created, written and directed Gurinder Chadha whose past credits include Bend It Like Beckham, Bride and Prejudice, and Viceroy’s House.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m00066xk)
The Age of Emulsion: with Laurence Llewelyn Bowen

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen explores the social history of DIY home improvements, from Chintz to Changing Rooms and beyond.

The Age of Emulsion is a story about our changing attitudes to housing, consumerism, national identity, sense of individuality, class, politics, and relationships between the sexes.

Starting from the 1950s, Laurence draws on the rich TV and radio archive to show how DIY went from being a necessity after the Second World War, to a wholesome leisure activity, and a fully-blown national obsession.

What’s clear is that TV and radio played a pivotal role. Britain’s first hardboard hero was Barry Bucknell whose Do It Yourself TV series launched in 1956, attracting 7 million viewers. Magazines like Practical Householder advertised tools but also a modern lifestyle to go with it.

Over the next 50 years, TV and magazines would teach us practical skills and democratise interior design - from distressing, to rag rolling and stencilling. In the 90s, DIY became the new rock and roll, as reality makeover shows combined emotion AND emulsion. But what does our attitude say about us now? As DIY retailers struggle and millennials are blamed for their lack of skills, is this the end of the Age of Emulsion?

Laurence also sets two of his favourite interior decorating challenges to novice DIYers Mae-Li Evans and Calum Lynn

Producer: Victoria Ferran
Exec Producer: Susan Marling

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Drama (m00060x7)
Reading Europe: Savages

Episode 1

It is the eve of the French presidential elections (“The Election of the Century” say the headlines), and Idder Chaouch, the country’s first Arab candidate has victory in his sights.

Meanwhile, the French-Algerian Nerrouche family is preparing for a grand wedding. But something is up with younger cousin Krim.

Linking these two worlds is heartthrob actor Fouad Nerrouche. Within a matter of hours, the threads begin to unravel on both wedding and election campaign, and the collision between the destiny of a family and the hopes of a nation becomes inevitable.

Written by Sabri Louatah
Adapted for radio by Hugh Costello from the translation by Gavin Bowd

Krim ..... Mohammad Amiri
Fouad & Benbaraka ..... Khalid Laith
Rabia..... Sirine Saba
Luna, Kenza & Jasmine ..... Shavani Cameron
Uncle Bouzid ..... Nabil Elouahabi
Granny Nerrouche & Bride’s Mother ...... Amira Ghazalla
Great Uncle Ferhat ..... Raad Rawi
Slim ..... Hamza Jeetooa
Momo ...... Farshid Rokey
Chaouch & Rachid ..... Waleed Elgadi
Zoran ...... Emma Frankland
Djamel ..... Ali Barouti
French girl ..... Catriona Stirling
French guy …. Will Howard
Young child ..... Beatrice Butler

Other voices played by the cast

Executive Producer: Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson and Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m00066xp)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (m00060vc)
2019: Jonathan Sumption

5/5. Shifting the Foundations

Jonathan Sumption argues against Britain adopting a written constitution as a response to political alienation. The former UK Supreme Court Justice has argued that politics is in decline partly, at least, because the courts and the law is increasingly doing what politicians used to do. This has indirectly contributed to the electorate’s increasing rejection of the political process. There is growing resentment against the political elite. So what can we do? Lord Sumption makes some suggestions to restore faith in democracy – starting by fixing the party system and changing the way we vote.

The programme is recorded in front of an audience at Cardiff University.

The Reith Lectures are presented and chaired by Anita Anand and produced by Jim Frank

Editor: Hugh Levinson


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (m000612y)
Semi-Final 1, 2019

(13/17)
Russell Davies welcomes the first four of this season's semi-finalists to the Radio Theatre in London. All of the competitors have won their heats or been high-scoring runners-up in the tournament so far. The standard promises to be high and the pace hots up, with a place in the 2019 Final awaiting today's winner.

Competing today are:
Frankie Fanko, a freelance translator from Market Harborough
Tim Hall, a researcher from Kidlington in Oxfordshire
Stephen Hatcher, a teacher of modern languages from Ashbourne in Derbyshire
Ruth Wright, a part-time gardener from a village near Moreton-in-Marsh in the Cotswolds.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets (m00060xk)
Episode 3 - Yorkshire

Academic Dr Katie Edwards examines the roots and prevalence of dialect poetry in Yorkshire.

Ever since Katie found herself mocked in academic circles for her broad South Yorkshire accent, she's made it her mission to celebrate her linguistic heritage. She travels round what was historically England's largest county discovering a huge range of dialect and dialect poetry. She meets with members of the Yorkshire Dialect Society, hears how dialect has evolved in different parts of Yorkshire, finds out what's been lost down the years and discovers a fresh passion for using Yorkshire dialect among several young poets in the region.

From Ilkley Moor Bah Tat (Yorkshire's unofficial national anthem) via the industry and land that spawned much of the dialect, to poets using it as part of various types of social activism, Katie gets a real sense of a county in which dialect is still very much an important part of identity.

A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 23 JUNE 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m00066xt)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m00066s6)
The Rivals

A writer receives a message requesting he visit a hospice in order to make peace with a man he hasn't seen in over forty years. An original short story for BBC Radio 4 by the Irish poet, playwright and novelist Dermot Bolger. As read by Owen Roe.

Dermot Bolger is one of Ireland’s most respected authors whose awards include the Samuel Beckett Award and the A.E. Memorial Prize. An acclaimed poet, playwright and novelist, his works have been staged and published in many countries. His extensive radio credits include 'Hunger Again', 'The Kerlogue', 'The Night Manager' and 'The Fortunestown Kid'. The audio version of his own novel 'The Woman’s Daughter' was awarded the Worldplay Award for Best Script.

Writer ..... Dermot Bolger
Reader ..... Owen Roe
Producer ..... Michael Shannon


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00066xy)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00066y2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00066y6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m00066yb)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m00066vk)
All Saints, Inveraray, Argyll

Bells on Sunday comes from the detached tower of All Saints, Inveraray, in Argyll. The 126-foot-high tower was completed in 1921 as a memorial to the members of the Clan Campbell who died in the First World War. The tower contains a peak of ten bells cast by John Taylor and Company of Loughborough in 1920. The tenor weighs forty one and a half hundredweight and is tuned to C. They are the second heaviest ringing peal of ten bells in the world, Wells Cathedral being the heaviest with a tenor weighing 56 hundredweight. We now hear them ringing Horton's four Spliced Surprise Royal.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m00066tr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m00066sd)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b081l7w0)
Inside Out

Journalist Remona Aly uses music, prose and poetry to explore the experience of being both an insider and an outsider.

Having grown up in Britain as the child of Indian parents, Remona is familiar with the feeling of being on the outside. As a child she was the only brown girl in a white neighbourhood. She explains that, in Britain, she’s still “not quite British enough” for some while, when visiting her relatives in India, she gets referred to as “the English one”.

Muslims, Remona argues, have outsider blood flowing through their veins. The Prophet Muhammad himself was cast out from society in the land of his birth. Shunned and persecuted by his own people, he, along with a small band of early Muslims, became refugees, migrating from the trials of Mecca to the sanctuary of Medina in what is now Saudi Arabia. This experience of being an outsider, Remona explains, was vital to the leadership of the Prophet when he came to build a new community of followers.

According to Remona, the ability to traverse the worlds of the insider and outsider can be hugely beneficial. By embracing outsider status, we can step back from the action and gain crucial insights into the society to which we belong.

The programme features readings from psychologist Adrian Furnham and influential Muslim convert Leopold Weiss. Remona also draws upon the poetry of Rumi and the music of Yusuf Islam and Woody Guthrie.

Presenter: Remona Aly
Producer: Max O’Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 Living World (m00066sg)
Skomer

Brett Westwood travels to the island of Skomer off the Pembrokeshire coast in search of burrow-nesting puffins. As well as these 'clowns of the air', he finds an island carpeted in pink sea campion, fading bluebells, and lime green bracken. Away from the cliffs which are bustling with sea birds, he enjoys his very first encounter with the Skomer vole, which as its name suggests, is endemic to this island. Producer Sarah Bunt


SUN 06:57 Weather (m00066sj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m00066sl)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m00066sn)
Silence and Crime; Married Catholic Priests; Democratic Party Debates

The documentary maker Mobeen Azhar discusses his new BBC 3 documentary 'Hometown' which takes a look at the crimes of some young Asian men in the North of England and explains why many in the community turn a blind eye to illegal activities.

The Democratic party leadership debates start this week when 20 candidates will rally for position over two nights in the USA. Sarah Posner tells William which of the candidates have evoked their religious beliefs.

Why is the Alliance of Religions and Conservation (ARC) closing after 23 years? Martin Palmer, the man who has run the ARC from the moment it was initiated by the Duke of Edinburgh in 1986, discusses the organisation's pioneering work in bringing religions across the globe together to tackle climate change.

The Catholic Church is to consider allowing married men to become priests in remote areas of South America. William talks to Joanna Moorhead about the implications of this announcement.

Producers:
Helen Lee
Peter Everett

Editor:
Amanda Hancox


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m00066sq)
Women for Women International

Chef and food-writer Thomasina Miers makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Women for Women International.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Women for Women International’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Women for Women International’.

Registered Charity Number: 1115109


SUN 07:57 Weather (m00066ss)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m00066sv)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m00066sx)
The Spectrum of Salvation

Accessing God through the colours of his creation, Baptist minister the Revd Richard Littledale leads a reflection on the colours of the created world and how they stimulate faith. Producer: Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000617f)
A Knight in Shining Armour?

Linda Colley argues that we all have a role to play in resolving our present political difficulties.

In tough times, she says, there's a long history of people searching for a "modern man on horseback, a populist hero, who they hope will come and rescue them and make the bad things go away".

But she says there are many problems with this - the most obvious one being that "leaders of this sort never properly deliver and usually do immense damage".

She concludes that all of us must get involved in the work of effective democratic politics.

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxj9)
Galapagos Mockingbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents a bird which intrigued Darwin, the Galapagos mockingbird. There are four species of Mockingbird in the Galapagos islands, which probably all descended from a single migrant ancestor and then subsequently evolved different adaptations to life on their separate island clusters, hence their fascination for Charles Darwin. The most widespread is the resourceful Galapagos Mockingbird. Unlike other mockingbirds which feed on nectar and seeds, the Galapagos mockingbird has adapted to its island life to steal and break into seabird eggs and even attack and kill young nestlings. They'll also ride on the backs of land iguanas to feed on ticks deep within the reptiles' skin and will boldly approach tourists for foot. They aptly demonstrate the theory of the "survival of the fittest".


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m00066sz)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m00066t1)
Writer ….. Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti
Director ….. Marina Caldarone
Editor ….. Jeremy Howe

Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Adam Macy ….. Andrew Wincott
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Kirsty Miller ….. Annabelle Dowler
Peggy Woolley ….. June Spencer
Philip Moss ….. Andy Hockley


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m00066t3)
Emily Eavis, festival organiser

Emily Eavis is co-organiser of the Glastonbury Festival. Together with her husband and her father, she masterminds the booking of bands and oversees the setting up of what is the largest greenfield festival in the world. The site itself becomes the size of Oxford town centre once it’s built and rigged, and when tickets for 2019 went on sale, they sold out within 36 minutes.

Born in 1979, she was a small child when her parents, Jean and Michael, were inspired to make the Glastonbury Festival an annual event, although she wasn’t keen on the yearly invasion of the family farm. By her late teens, however, she had changed her views. She left Worthy Farm to study to be a teacher at Goldsmiths College in London but when, at the end of her first year, her mother was diagnosed with cancer, Emily left and went home to help look after her and to help her father run that year’s festival.

Emily never went back to university. Motivated by a visit to Haiti to look at Oxfam projects, she spent a few years in London putting on charity gigs, before returning home to work with her father running the festival. She married her husband, Nick Dewey, manager of The Chemical Brothers in 2009. The couple have three children and live on Worthy Farm.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m00066t5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m000613c)
Series 84

Episode 6

Tony Hawks, Cariad Lloyd, Zoe Lyons and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

A BBC Studios Production


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m00066t7)
Baking in the Nordics: The Bread Adventures of Chef Magnus Nilsson

Magnus Nilsson takes Dan Saladino on a Nordic baking tour.

For a nearly a decade Magnus, who is one of the world's most celebrated chefs, travelled through the region (which includes Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, Finland and the Faroe Islands) and reached an important and controversial conclusion.

He argues that the Nordics has the most diverse and the deepest baking culture in the world today. His research resulted in a hefty tome, The Nordic Baking Book (Phaidon), full of more 700 of the thousands of recipes he discovered when he visited cooks in their homes.

Why the world's most diverse baking culture? Magnus's reasoning is that because the region covers such a vast geographical area and its population is spread out across remote villages, information spread slowly historically. This includes recipes and so a huge amount of diversity can still be found in these isolated pockets. When it comes the depth of the baking culture, Magnus points to the fact that fresh yeast is so ubiquitous in the Nordic countries, you can often buy a packet from a newsagents or convenience store.

I also has some dramatic climatic extremes, as summer starts to arrive in one area, there can be snow and ice in another. This means that while wheat can be grown in one location, only barley, rye or oats might only be possible in another. Again, this adds to the richness of its baking culture. To illustrate this Magnus takes Dan to a communal oven set in a remote farmhouse in northern Sweden to show how families gather once or twice a year to make flatbreads with barley and rye, a speciality of an area called Jamtland.

Meanwhile, another kind of diversity is flourishing in the region's fields with the rediscovery and revival of ancient grains. Farmer Fintan Keenan describes some of the old (but new) varieties; what they taste like and why they might prove to be important for all of our food futures.

Presented by Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m00066t9)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m00066tc)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (m00066tf)
In the latest programme of the monthly series, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from journalists and writers around the United Kingdom that reflect the range of contemporary life in the country.

Alison Holt considers with a Somerset family why adult social care is the policy reform no UK government does anything about. In the week of BBC Cardiff Singer of the World, Martin Smith asks how far the Welsh heritage in singing is endangered and whether it might yet be part of Wales' economic future. With the time-worn quips over an Essex town ringing in her ears, Jo Glanville discovers that established notions of Southend as a seaside resort with its best days behind it are out-of-date. Andrew Green looks at the idea of the bird celebrated in the most popular piece of classical music in Britain and the reality of its existence today on the Chilterns. And Dan Johnson contemplates the personal and social links between a stately pile near Barnsley and those who live in the communities close to it.

Producer Simon Coates


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000615x)
Summer Garden Party at Mount Stewart: Part Two

Peter Gibbs hosts the second of two specials from the annual GQT Summer Garden Party. Matt Biggs, Pippa Greenwood, James Wong and Anne Swithinbank answer horticultural questions from the audience at National Trust Mount Stewart in County Down, Northern Ireland.

This week the panellists are quizzed about a mysterious fungal growth on a plum tree, pruning herbaceous geraniums and encouraging a Clivia to flower. They also offer suggestions for a windy balcony and a ruby plant to celebrate a ruby wedding anniversary, alongside some advice for gardening in damp soil.

Away from the questions, Neil Porteous takes Matthew Pottage around the Italian Garden at Mount Stewart to find out about it's mythical inspiration.

Produced by Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m00066th)
Sunday Omnibus - Home is Where the Heart is

Three conversations about the path we choose to take and our ties to home and loved ones. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


SUN 15:00 Drama (m00066tk)
Reading Europe: Savages

Episode 2

It is the eve of the French presidential elections (“The Election of the Century” say the headlines), and Idder Chaouch, the country’s first Arab candidate has victory in his sights. Meanwhile, the French-Algerian Nerrouche family is preparing for a grand wedding. But something is up with younger cousin Krim. Linking these two worlds is heartthrob actor Fouad Nerrouche. Within a matter of hours, the threads begin to unravel on both wedding and election campaign, and the collision between the destiny of a family and the hopes of a nation becomes inevitable.

By Sabri Louatah
Adapted for radio by Hugh Costello from the translation by Gavin Bowd

Krim ..... Mohammad Amiri
Fouad, Nazir & Benbaraka ..... Khalid Laith
Rabia..... Sirine Saba
Luna, Kenza & Jasmine ..... Shavani Cameron
Uncle Bouzid ..... Nabil Elouahabi
Granny Nerrouche & Bride’s Mother ...... Amira Ghazalla
Great Uncle Ferhat ..... Raad Rawi
Slim ..... Hamza Jeetooa
Momo ...... Farshid Rokey
Chaouch ..... Waleed Elgadi
Zoran ..... Emma Frankland
Fares ..... Ali Barouti
Aurelie ..... Catriona Stirling
Tristan …. Will Howard

Other voices were played by the cast

Executive producer …. Sara Davies
Produced by Nicolas Jackson & Steve Bond

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m00066tm)
Kevin Barry on his new novel, and we discuss queer nature writing

Irish author Kevin Barry, winner of the Impac Award and the Goldsmiths Prize, discusses his new novel Night Boat to Tangier, a dark comedy billed as Waiting For Godot meets In Bruges.

Novelist and journalist Molly Flatt, who writes about culture and technology for the Bookseller, discusses a growing trend for book versions of successful podcasts.

25 years since the death of Derek Jarman, Mariella is joined by writers Philip Hoare and Mike Parker to explore queer nature writing, a genre concerned with the push and pull of the natural world, from a queer perspective.

Producer: Jack Soper
Editor: Di Speirs


SUN 16:30 Four Seasons (m00066tp)
Summer

A collection of poems celebrating the midpoint of summer and the longest day of the year, read by Jason Watkins, Anton Lesser, Juliet Stevenson, Siobhan Redmond, Adjoa Andoh and Simon Russell Beale. Mona Arshi and Elizabeth-Jane Burnett read their own poetry on a summery theme.

Produced by Mair Bosworth and Sally Heaven


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m00060y8)
The Right Place for Reg?

On December 21st 2018, 94-year-old, World War 2 veteran, Reginald Herbert Thompson was taken to hospital after a fall at his home near Leicester. So began a journey which would see him transferred thirteen times, between five different hospitals, in the last ten weeks of his life.

Those who run the NHS claim that recent reforms will revolutionise the way frail patients are cared for. Older people like Reg will be looked after at home - an army of nurses, GP’s and other healthcare professionals working in tandem to provide ever more care in the community. It’s hoped these changes will ease the pressure on scarce hospital beds. But with the health service already straining to fill vacancies, will there really be enough nurses to meet that lofty ambition?

As the NHS struggles to cope with an ageing population, annual winter crises and staff shortages, Tom Wright investigates what Reg Thompson's story tells us about the future of the NHS.

Presenter: Tom Wright
Editor: Andrew Smith


SUN 17:40 Profile (m00066tr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m00066tw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m00066ty)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00066v1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m00066v4)
Zubeida Malik

The best of BBC Radio this week with Zubeida Malik

In this week's edition we recall the joy of mix tapes, hear the some creepy radio and explore hair in the community.

We discover how Chinese students feel about going to school in Britain and find out why shaving and hanging out at the barbers was the thing to do three hundred years ago.

Producer: Cecile Wright
Production support: Vanessa Ford


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m00066v6)
Jazzer's attempt to do the right thing backfires and Tony tries to voice his concerns.


SUN 19:15 A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics (b08jdz0k)
Series 2

The Prophecy

By Richard Katz and John Nicholson

In medieval Scotland, a pair of soldiers, fleeing their own regiment, come face-to-face with a trio of witches on a desolate moor. One of them receives a prophecy that he will become King of Scotland. It's a classic case of mistaken identity.

In this second series, the comedy troupe Peepolykus assume the roles of minor characters in great works of fiction and derail the plot through their hapless buffoonery.

Director, Sasha Yevtushenko.


SUN 19:45 Annika Stranded (m00066v8)
Series 5

Sea Monsters

Eight new cases to challenge the detective wit of Chief Inspector Annika Strandhed, queen of the Oslo Police boat patrol.

Annika is still coming to terms with the death of her friend and long-time, long suffering forensic photographer Mikel. But life goes on, and so does police work on the Oslofjord. Annika must forge a new relationship with Mikel’s young replacement, Sigrid.

Episode 2: Sea Monsters
Delivering a guest lecture to criminology students, Annika recounts a case involving a murder at the aquarium.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories have often featured on BBC Radio 4 - including the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010) and the plays Life Coach (2010) and Stormchasers (2012). The previous series of Annika Stranded were broadcast in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

Writer: Nick Walker
Reader: Nicola Walker
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0006169)
In Feedback this week Roger Bolton asks if Jo Brand went too far on Radio 4’s comedy show Heresy, and whether some subjects should be off limits all together.

The row about the BBC withdrawing free TV licences from most over 75s won’t go away. Would it be better for the Corporation to cut BBC2 and Radio 5 Live? Roger hears your views.

And the Head of BBC Newsgathering, Jonathan Munro, is back to answer charges that his journalists aren’t sufficiently challenging in their political interviews.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Dixon
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0006165)
Franco Zeffirelli, Gloria Vanderbilt, Mohamed Morsi, Philomena Lynott

Pictured: Franco Zeffirelli

Matthew Bannister on

Franco Zeffirelli, the stage and film director known for his opulent designs and flamboyant personality.

Gloria Vanderbilt, the heiress who overcame personal tragedy and was the first to market designer jeans.

Mohamed Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected President, who was ousted from office after only a year.

Philomena Lynott, who ran a hotel frequented by rock stars and footballers and was the proud Mum of Thin Lizzy lead singer Phil Lynott.

Interviewed guest: Rupert Christiansen
Interviewed guest: Reverend Richard Coles
Interviewed guest: Rosemary Feitelberg
Interviewed guest: Dr Hesham Hellyer
Interviewed guest: Jackie Hayden

Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: Desert Island Discs, Radio 4 07/01/1978; Romeo and Juliet, directed by Franco Zeffirelli, Old Vic 1960; Romeo and Juliet, directed by Franco Zeffirelli, Verona Produzione/ BHE Films /Dino de Laurentiis Cinematografica 1968; The Taming of the Shrew, directed by Franco Zeffirelli, Columbia Pictures, Royal Films International, F.A.I. 1967; Gloria Vanderbilt in Studio Q, Q on CBC 30/07/2012; The Love Boat, ABC 1977; The Risk Business, BBC One 22/04/1981; 2012 CGI Annual Meeting, Clinton Global Initiative; 15/10/2012; Analysis, Radio 4 06/10/2013; Outlook, BBC World Service 24/09/2012.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m00066vc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m00066sq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m000613h)
Green technology and early adoption

Climate change has shot up the current political agenda in part due to the Extinction Rebellion protests. An urgent question now facing UK policymakers is whether they should accelerate the adoption of cutting-edge green energy technology to curb the country's carbon emissions. But are there dangers of being an early adopter of new technology? What happens if it doesn't work or if it's outpaced by newer technologies which are cheaper and more efficient? The BBC's Business Editor, Simon Jack, investigates.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m00066vf)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000616g)
Midnight Sun Film Festival

Antonia Quirke and Caitlin Benedict visit the Midnight Sun Film Festival in Lapland, where the sun shines for 24 hours in summer and films are shown every hour of the day. There they speak to Iranian exiles Mohsen Makhmalbaf and Marzieh Meshkini, Brazilian director Fernando Meirelles, French auteur Arnaud Desplechin and Mark Jenkin from Cornwall.

Along the way, they meet the people who make the festival possible, the volunteers, and find out why all the directors are expected to get into a sauna and go skinny dipping.


SUN 23:30 Time Brings Roses: A Radio Cabaret (m00040m7)
Welcome to the cabaret at Juwelia’s gallery in Neukölln, Berlin. Our hostess is at the window, a rose in her hair, waiting to see what happens. “Who knows what the evening will bring?” she is fond of saying. “I’m sitting here and I look good. That’s all, no?”

It is a schmoozy-coozy salon, a space for burlesque, where shared fantasies become reality. Juwelia’s paintings cover the walls, self-portraits with lovers in sunflower fields or by the bins at the local U-Bahn station. Her songs tell of a changing neighbourhood - “Once Bratwurst, now Champagne” - and of her life as the most beautiful woman in Berlin.

“The ways of my own life have led me elsewhere. But I hope that some young foreigner has fallen in love with this city and is writing what happened or might have happened to him there...” - Christopher Isherwood, Preface to The Berlin Stories.

We arrive at the Juwelia's with the guests to take our place at a tiny table and drink Sekt. At some point the show begins - songs, dancing, a lecture on capitalism delivered with the aid of two balloons. Guests step up from the audience to take a turn on the little stage. Our Isherwood-quoting narrator is a sound recordist, happy to put down the book and the broom and enter the world of the cabaret.

Produced by Phil Smith
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4



MONDAY 24 JUNE 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m00066vh)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08k34n6)
The ways women age - Beauty politics

The ways women age: Laurie Taylor talks to Abigail Brooks, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Providence College USA, and author of a study which asks why women choose or reject cosmetic anti ageing proceedures. Also, beauty politics in the Neoliberal age. Ros Gill, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at City University, discusses the ways in which women are required to be 'aesthetic entrepreneurs', maintaining a constant vigilance about their appearance. They're joined by Rachel Wood, Research Associate in the Department of Psychology, Sociology and Politics at Sheffield Hallam University. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m00066vk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00066vm)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00066vp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00066vr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m00066vt)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00066vw)
Good Morning
On this day in 1812 Napoleon led his Grande Armee across the Niemen and invaded Russia. Maimed by the Czar’s Army at Borodin, his forces limped to a torched and abandoned Moscow, before the bitter winter reduced them to frost-eaten remnants and Napoleon to an ignominious fugitive.
129 years later, on almost the same date, Hitler attacked the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa. It was one of the most vicious invasion forces in history. Civilian populations were destroyed, prisoners in their millions starved to death. Behind the lines came the Einsatzgruppen, killing units, tasked with the mass execution of Jews, whom they murdered by the hundreds of thousands.
Their fortunes in Russia led the Nazis to expedite their genocidal plans elsewhere, building the death camps of Belzec, Treblinka and Sobibor. I have holiday pictures of the members of my father’s family who perished there; Arnold, a little boy, sweet in his Navy suit.
Hitler should have remembered what happened to Napoleon, my grandmother used to say. But few of us learn from our own mistakes, let alone those of others.
Today populism and racism are once again on the rise. We desperately need to learn from history.
We need leaders who shun violence and contempt, refuse to court popularity by fanning the hatred of others, and understand how to unite people instead of driving them apart.
Never before have we so urgently needed to combine the wisdom and resources of all peoples and faiths to protect the future of the very planet, on which we all depend.
God, give us the wisdom to learn from history.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m00066vy)
24/06/19: Farmer survey on the environment, Water-saving pig troughs, Farmland birds

In a new survey one third of farmers say they're taking no environmental action to deal with problems on their farm. Charlotte Smith asks Helen Chesshire from the organisation who conducted the survey what this tells us about farmers' attitudes towards the natural world.

Anna Hill has been to meet Rob McGregor, a pig farmer in Norfolk who has installed drinking nozzles to his troughs which he says has led to a dramatic drop in water usage and an increase in quality of pork.

This week Farming Today is looking at farmland birds and Charlotte asks Martin Harper from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds what can be done to help the dwindling numbers of Grey Partridge and Turtle Dove, and also what he makes of the recent recall and then reinstatement of General Licenses to shoot certain species of birds to protect farmland.

Producer: Toby Field


MON 05:56 Weather (m00066w0)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxq8)
Montezuma Oropendola

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Panamanian Montezuma oropendola. In a clearing in the humid rainforest in Panama a tall tree appears to be draped in hanging baskets. These are the nests of a New World blackbird, Montezuma oropendola. The male produces an ecstatic bubbling liquid call as he displays to females, reaching a crescendo whilst bowing downwards from his perch, spreading his wings and raising his tail. They weave long tubular basket-like nests from plant fibres, which they suspend in clusters from tall trees. Colonies can contain up to one hundred and seventy nests, but more usually number about thirty.


MON 06:00 Today (m00066x6)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m00066xb)
The power of poetry

Rowan Williams celebrates The Book of Taliesin – legendary Welsh poems of enchantment and warfare. The former Archbishop of Canterbury tells Andrew Marr how the collection of poems speak of a lost world of folklore and mythology, and the figure of Taliesin is an elusive and exuberant creative poetic fiction.

Martin Sixsmith tells the extraordinary story of the Russian poet Sergei Yesenin at the turn of the 20th century. Yesenin lived through the most turbulent times in Russian history, and during an age when poets were stars, and millions could recite his works by heart.

The poet Jay Bernard has found inspiration in exploring the black British archive, and the enquiry into the New Cross Fire in 1981 which killed thirteen young people. The poems shine a light on an unacknowledged chapter in British history, and find resonance with the horror of the Grenfell tower fire two years ago.

The poet, writer and teacher, Kate Clanchy has seen first-hand poetry’s unique ability to unleash young voices. At the multicultural school in Oxford where she teaches, students speak 30 languages and poetry has become a vital part of bringing pupils together, giving them pride in their work and allowing them to express the reality of their lives.

Producer: Katy Hickman

Image of Jay Bernard, taken by Joshua Virasami


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (m00066xg)
Modern Nature

Episode 1

2019 marks 25 years since the death of director, writer and artist Derek Jarman. Modern Nature is Jarman’s chronicle of life in his remote cottage on the barren coast of Dungeness in the years after his HIV diagnosis. Facing an uncertain future, Jarman found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. Some perished beneath wind and sea-spray while others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

Modern Nature is both a diary of the garden and a meditation by Jarman on his own life: his childhood, his time as a young gay man in the 1960s and his renowned career as an artist, writer and film-maker. It is at once a lament for a lost generation, an unabashed celebration of gay sexuality, and a devotion to all that is living.

Rupert Everett knew Jarman personally and features in the diaries. The programme was recorded on location at Prospect Cottage, Jarman's former home, at the very desk where much of Modern Nature was written and features a rich soundscape of the house and area where it was recorded alongside a soundtrack of music taken from works by Benjamin Britten.

Rupert Everett has performed in many prominent films including The Madness of King George (1994), Shakespeare in Love (1998), Inspector Gadget (1999), The Next Best Thing (2000), Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Silk Stocking (2004), The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005), Stardust (2007), Wild Target (2010), Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) and The Happy Prince which he wrote and directed (2018).

Programme image: Derek Jarman outside Prospect Cottage in Dungeness courtesy of photographer Howard Sooley.

Written by Derek Jarman
Read by Rupert Everett
Produced, abridged and directed by Simon Richardson


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m00066xn)
Exploring Teenage Mental Health - our series continues

The Brexit Party won 29 seats in last month’s European elections taking nearly a third of all votes cast. Eight of those MEPs are women and we’re joined by two of them. Belinda De Lucy was elected for the East of England region and June Mummery for the South East. With the opening session of the European Parliament in Strasbourg next week we talk to them about why they personally decided to stand and what they hope to do in their new role.

Third in our series about teenage mental health. So far we’ve talked to doctors and teachers, today we hear from the parents. 75% of mental health problems start before a child reaches their 18th birthday. How do parents or carers cope when their child develops an issue and they find themselves trying to help find solutions to really complex or upsetting problems? Catherine Carr reports.

Dame Inga Beale was the first female CEO of Lloyds of London for five years until the end of 2018. She discusses why she believes gender quotas in all areas are necessary to create fundamental change in redressing the gender balance.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Belinda De Lucy
Interviewed Guest: June Mummery
Reporter: Catherine Carr
Interviewed Guest: Dame Inga Beale


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m00066xs)
Why Mummy Drinks

Episode 1

1/5

By Gill Sims. Dramatised by Christine Entwisle.

Ellen is a stressed-out working-mum. She’s got high hopes of having a perfect life, but the gulf between her aspiration and her reality is an ever-widening chasm of chaos. But this is the year that everything will change…for sure.

Cast:
Ellen … Gabriel Quigley
Simon … Stuart McQuarrie
Kathy … Sally Reid

Directed by Kirsty Williams


MON 11:00 The Untold (m00066xz)
Can I say bye to Dad?

Hayley is a self-confessed Disney addict and at 25 is adamant it’s not just for kids – regularly posting on her YouTube channel about her love for it all.

She was working at Disney World in Florida when she got a call to say her 60-year-old dad has a rare form of dementia. Two years on and his condition has worsened at a time when Hayley is thinking about moving back to the US.

“I have to treat him as two separate people - my dad is gone but Kevin is still here. I love the old him so much but he's now hard to love.”

Over the course of a year we hear how Hayley deals with her dad’s decline – something she finds hard for her friends to relate to - as she battles with the decision of whether or not to go back to her dream job.

If she goes it could be the last time she sees her dad. Can she say goodbye to him?

Producer: Daniel Rosney


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m00066x9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m00066y5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m00066y9)
The Prostrate Years

Episode 1

The sixth and final instalment of Adrian Mole’s diaries by Sue Townsend, one of our most celebrated comic writers.

It starts in 2007 when Adrian has reached the age of 39. Having fallen into debt, Adrian and his wife Daisy are forced to move into a semi-detached converted pigsty next door to his parents.

Adrian worries that the passion has gone out of his relationship and that his five-year-old daughter Gracie is turning into a tyrant. On top of this, he is having to empty his bladder several times in the night - and getting a doctor’s appointment is far from easy.

In an interview, Sue Townsend once said that The Prostrate Years was her favourite of the Adrian Mole books. Having suffered significant health problems herself, she wanted to write about serious illness while maintaining her inimitable sense of humour.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m00066yf)
Care Quality Commission, Host your own movie, Flood insurance

In an exclusive broadcast interview, we speak to Kate Terroni, the new chief inspector of adult social care at the Care Quality Commission. She was previously Director of Adult Services in Oxfordshire and co-chair of the national workforce network at ADASS - the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. She talks to Winifred Robinson, about her experience in the care system and what she hopes to achieve in her new role.

We report on how some film fans are organising their own screenings of their favourite movies at local cinemas and selling tickets online. Our reporter, Andrew Fletcher, visits a multiplex cinema in central Manchester where movie fans have used crowdfunding to get their favourite film on the big screen.

We look at how the threat of flooding because of climate change is pushing up insurance premiums for some customers. We hear from a man whose home insurance rocketed from £328 a year to more than £2000, after his insurer changed his risk profile from low to significant. We also speak to Graeme Trudgill from the British Insurers Brokers Association about how people in a flood risk zone can find affordable insurance.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Tara Holmes


MON 12:57 Weather (m00066yh)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m00066yk)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars (m00066ym)
WWII and Germany

As the dusts of the Great War settled in 1919, the victorious Allied Powers of Britain, France and the United States gathered together in Paris to build a new, peaceful world. In this series, former BBC Diplomatic Editor Bridget Kendall explores how their decisions would influence a century of global conflict.

Kings, prime ministers and foreign ministers with their crowds of advisers rubbed shoulders with journalists and lobbyists for a hundred causes, from Armenian independence to women's rights. For six extraordinary months the city was effectively the centre of world government as the peacemakers wound up bankrupt empires and created new countries.

In this opening episode Bridget examines the treatment of Germany at the Paris Peace Conference. Blamed for the outbreak of the war and not given a seat at the table at the palace of Versailles where the conference was held. The Treaty of Versailles, when agreed, lumped Germany with economic reparations, forced disarmament and reduced territories. Following these punitive measures, the next decades of German history include the rise of Nazism and the outbreak of another World War. Were the seeds sown at Versailles?

Featuring contribution from Professor Margaret MacMillan, author of 'Peacemakers: Six Months that Changed the World' and Professor Richard Evans, University of Cambridge and author of 'The Third Reich Trilogy'.

Producer: Sam Peach


MON 14:00 The Archers (m00066v6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m00066yq)
Our Trees

Chestnuts on A roads, sycamores down alleys, rowans on roundabouts, and avenues of lime. Why do people care so much about urban trees? Perhaps they want to save the trees because the trees save them?

Frances Byrnes' docu-drama, narrated by Robert Glenister, weaves the voices of Sheffield's tree campaigners into a dark contemporary fairytale.

The poem Heartwood, a charm-against-harm, was written for Sheffield's trees by Robert MacFarlane.
Cellist Tim Smedley played A Song For The Birds by Pablo Casals. The programme also features a recording of the same piece by Sheku Kanneh-Mason.

Sound Design: David Thomas
Director: Kate McAll

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (m00066ys)
Semi-Final 2, 2019

(14/17)
The second set of semi-finalists who've come through unscathed from this year's heats face Russell Davies's questions on everything from physics and anatomy to ballet and television comedy, as they bid for a place in the 2019 Final.

Competing today are
Bob Currie, a legal investigator from Stockport
Caroline Latham, a teacher from Romford
Roger Look, a consultant clinical psychologist from Kenilworth in Warwickshire
Paul Millgate, a former banker from Petts Wood in Kent

As always they'll also face a challenge from a Brain of Britain listener hoping to win a prize by outwitting them with questions of his or her own devising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m00066t7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 New Weird Britain (m00066yw)
Coastal Underground

Music journalist John Doran travels the country in search of the musicians of New Weird Britain, an underground movement which is blossoming in the margins of Britain.

Artists of all stripes have been driven out of the city centres by soaring rent prices and hit hard by the dwindling revenues of the digital economy. A new wave of musicians are splintering away from convention to stage bizarre one-off performances that fly in the face of austerity. They live off-grid, building their own instruments out of electronic junk, staging strange rituals with priests smeared in clay or performing with a team of dancers dressed as anatomically correct vaginas which squirt cream over the audience.

In this episode, John Doran heads to the ultimate edgelands of Britain, to hear from the musicians who have sought out refuge in the broad horizons of the coast. In Kings Lynn we hear from the transgressive performance artist Cosey Fanni Tutti, one of the founding members of the radical group Throbbing Gristle from the late 1970s, to understand how New Weird Britain can also be seen as a response to the current political turmoil. We also interrogate what the idea of Britain means to this community of artists in 2019.

Other contributors include Rhodri Davies, Kemper Norton, Jennifer Lucy Allen, Hannah Catherine Jones, Jennifer Walshe and Lee Patterson.

Produced by Alannah Chance
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4

Photo: Rhodri Davies
Image credit: Kuba Ryniewicz


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m00066yy)
Series 17

Cameo

Social media is about stories, and what's more interesting - to you at least - than telling your own?

When you post, you're building a narrative: this is who I am and this is what I like.

You're creating your very own movie, pulling in a range of characters. Then you've got stage sets and let's not forget the bit parts; those people who dip in and out of your life and provide endless story fodder.

But what happens when you discover that it's you who has in fact been cast in the cameo role in someone else's social media story?

We hear from the unwitting extras: from the seat mates on a plane caught in a publicity storm after a woman posted about the apparent beginning of their great romance, to a man who helped his neighbour and ended the subject of her tweets.

So what does this mean for personal autonomy, having a voice, and the limits of the stories we can or should tell online? Does the digital world blur the boundaries between what stories are yours to tell?

Aleks Krotoski explores the tension between entitlement and a feeling of voicelessness.

Producer: Caitlin Smith


MON 17:00 PM (m00066z0)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m00066z2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (m00066z4)
Series 71

Episode 1

The 71st series of Radio 4's multi award-winning ‘antidote to panel games’ promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the Dome in Doncaster where Tim Brooke-Taylor and Tony Hawks are pitched against Pippa Evans and Richard Osman, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Studios production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (m00066z7)
There's good news for Ed and Emma, and Jill has a favour to ask.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m00066z9)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m00066xs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 My Name Is... (m00066zc)
Rod - I'm a childless man

Rod is fighting to break the culture of silence around male fertility.

Rod Silvers and his wife tried to have a child through IVF, a process that was ultimately unsuccessful. After that experience, Rod went in search of stories about people like him - childless men - and found nothing. Now he's on a mission to raise awareness about what it's like to be a man without kids. 



He talks with producer Meara Sharma about his own struggle to open up, as well as with Robin Hadley, a social gerontologist who focuses on involuntarily childless men; Jessica Hepburn, author of The Pursuit of Motherhood and founder of Fertility Fest; and Sheryl Homa, a clinical scientist with a special interest in male fertility. 


Older childless men are often met with confusion and embarrassment, seen as socially impotent or even a cause for suspicion. A former market trader, Rod has taken on these attitudes as an actor and writer. His short film, England Expects, uses football as a metaphor for the feelings of hope, loss, and expectation that surround the IVF process. His play, Terry and Jude, explores the lives of two older childless men.



Produced by Meara Sharma

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Analysis (m00066zf)
Can computer profiles cut crime?

David Edmonds examines how algorithms are used in our criminal justice system, from predicting future crime to helping decide who does and doesn’t go to prison.

While police forces hope computer software will help them to assess risk and reduce crime, civil rights groups fear that it could entrench bias and discrimination.

Analysis asks if these new computer tools will transform policing - and whether we need new laws to regulate them.

Contributors
Archive from Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network
Jonathan Dowey, business intelligence manager, Avon and Somerset Police
Hannah Couchman, Advocacy and Policy Officer, Liberty
Professor Lawrence Sherman, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge
Bryanna Fox, Associate Professor of Criminology University of South Florida
Dame Glenys Stacey, The Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation
Jamie Grace, Senior Lecturer in Law, Sheffield Hallam University

Producer: Diane Richardson
Editor: Jasper Corbett


MON 21:00 Names in the Sky (m00060w0)
How do you remember lives lost far too young? Pioneering sound artist Justin Wiggan creates a 'sonic memory garden' at Ty Hafan Children's Hospice in Wales. He combines the thoughts of parents with everyday sounds of the hospice in a specially composed soundscape. In the playroom, children are acting out an underwater adventure. In the garden, a little group are playing on the swings. But the heavy paraphernalia of life-limiting illness is everywhere; suction machines, oxygen machines. tubes. The project is unbearably sad. But it's also inspirational.

Composer/Sound Artist: Justin Wiggan
Producer: Adele Armstrong


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m00066xb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m00066zj)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m00066y9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Spain's Lost Generations (m0003jr1)
The Missing Children

Lucas Laursen investigates Spain’s missing children from the Franco era and decades after.

He meets several families looking for children that hospital officials told them had died - but who may have been actually taken and given or sold to other families. There are thousands of such claims currently wending through Spanish court but, on their own, almost none have enough detail to understand what really happened.

Lucas examines whether the theft of babies was a series of isolated cases or whether, as some maintain, these were crimes against humanity - systematic and targeted against a particular group.

A government forensic toxicologist says there is no evidence for a trafficking plot, pointing to over one hundred court ordered exhumations and a report before the European Parliament. But Lucas moves from doubt about the so-called stolen babies scandal to a conviction that many of Spain’s institutions - including hospitals, the Catholic Church and the government - failed thousands of newborns and their families.

He talks to renowned former judge Balthazar Garzon, who argues for the implementation of a bill which would commit Spain to helping families find missing loved ones. This bill is now in jeopardy, since Spain’s government called elections during the recording of this programme.

He analyses the ways in which the Amnesty Law – which offered immunity from crimes committed during the Civil War and the dictatorship of Francisco Franco – slowed the fight against baby trafficking in Spain. He looks at the ideologies of the dictatorship that first legalised taking babies from their parents for political, religious and gender-related reasons, and which may have contributed to illegal trafficking for decades after.

Producer Anna Scott-Brown
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m00066zl)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



TUESDAY 25 JUNE 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m00066zn)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (m00066xg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m00066zq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m00066zs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m00066zv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m00066zx)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m00066zz)
Good Morning
There’s an ancient Jewish text about the things that really matter:
The following have no upper limit: kind deeds, hospitality, caring for the sick, helping the poor set up home, accompanying the dead to their resting place, sincere prayer, making peace between people, and the study of Torah, God’s teaching.
The rabbis placed these words at the beginning of the daily service, to remind us about what’s truly important in life.
Today we live in a social media world where it’s easy to feel that what counts is popularity: how many friends we have on Facebook, how often our sound-bite gets retweeted. When no one responds, it hurts. This creates a new kind of loneliness, a modern way of feeling a failure, causing anxiety and depression.
Though we know it makes no sense, we can easily be seduced into living from our Smart Phone instead of our heart.
But the things which truly matter haven’t changed. Visit a cemetery and the epitaphs don’t read: he got a hundred What’s Apps an hour. They say: ‘He always cared for others’; ‘She had a loving heart’.
So I’m glad to be reminded every morning that I don’t have to tick the achievement boxes or win the smartness stakes. I have to try to be kind and attentive, to bring healing where life has brought hurt. I need to do my best to be generous – to everyone.
These are not things which can be quantified; they’re both too ordinary and too important.
God, help us appreciate the value of everyday goodness and kindness.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0006701)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkyht)
House Crow

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the house crow, native of southern Asia. Leggier and longer-billed than the slightly larger European carrion crow and having a charcoal grey bib and collar and raucous call, these are common birds in towns and villages from Iran through India to Thailand. As scavengers they eat almost anything, which is how they've come to live alongside us. We provide water as well as food and have introduced the birds into areas of the Middle East and Africa. Although they don't fly long distances, the crows often hop aboard ships and arrive in foreign ports. Ship-assisted house crows have the potential to spread around the globe, a beautiful example of avian exploitation of human activity.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0006748)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m000674n)
Plastic pollution with Richard Thompson

A Professor of Marine Biology who was not particularly academic at school, Richard Thompson went to university after running his own business selling greetings cards for seven years. When the rest of the world was waking up to the harm caused to marine life by larger plastic items, such as plastic bags, he searched for tiny fragments of plastic, some no bigger than a human hair; and found them in oceans and on beaches all over the world. He has spent decades studying the harm these micro-plastics might cause to marine life and is concerned. His work on plastics in cosmetics led to a UK ban on micro-beads in shower gels and exfoliating scrubs. And he advised government to ban single use plastic bags from supermarkets. Rather than demonize plastic, however, he believes we need to learn to love it more. Often plastic it is the best material for the job. Now we need to make sure that all plastic products are designed so that they can be easily recycled at the end of their useful life.
Producer: Anna Buckley


TUE 09:30 One to One (m000674v)
Emma Freud talks to Emily Maitlis

Broadcaster, columnist and producer Emma Freud dreamed of being a news journalist. She felt she never had the courage to pursue it, but still wonders if she had what it takes. Emma talks to Newsnight's Emily Maitlis about the adrenaline of the job; whether she ever has self-doubt - and what really drives her.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (m0006775)
Modern Nature

Episode 2

2019 marks 25 years since the death of director, writer and artist Derek Jarman. Modern Nature is Jarman’s chronicle of life in his remote cottage on the barren coast of Dungeness in the years after his HIV diagnosis. Facing an uncertain future, Jarman found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. Some perished beneath wind and sea-spray while others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

Modern Nature is both a diary of the garden and a meditation by Jarman on his own life: his childhood, his time as a young gay man in the 1960s and his renowned career as an artist, writer and film-maker. It is at once a lament for a lost generation, an unabashed celebration of gay sexuality, and a devotion to all that is living.

Rupert Everett knew Jarman personally and features in the diaries. The programme was recorded on location at Prospect Cottage, Jarman's former home, at the very desk where much of Modern Nature was written and features a rich soundscape of the house and area where it was recorded alongside a soundtrack of music taken from works by Benjamin Britten.

Today Jarman looks back on life in 60s London and pays a nocturnal visit to Hampstead Heath.

Rupert Everett has performed in many prominent films including The Madness of King George (1994), Shakespeare in Love (1998), Inspector Gadget (1999), Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) and The Happy Prince which he wrote and directed (2018).

Programme image: Derek Jarman outside Prospect Cottage in Dungeness courtesy of photographer Howard Sooley.

Written by Derek Jarman
Read by Rupert Everett
Produced, abridged and directed by Simon Richardson


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006757)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0006764)
Why Mummy Drinks

Episode 2

2/5

By Gill Sims. Dramatised by Christine Entwisle.

Ellen is a stressed-out working- mum. She’s got high hopes of having a perfect life, but the gulf between her aspiration and her reality is an ever-widening chasm of chaos. But this is the year that everything will change…for sure.

As tensions build in the house, Ellen starts spending time with the hot new dad at the school gates.

Cast:
Ellen … Gabriel Quigley
Simon … Stuart McQuarrie
Louisa … Maryam Hamidi

Directed by Kirsty Williams


TUE 11:00 America's Child Brides (m0006789)
A tense debate is taking place in states across America. At what age should someone be allowed to marry? Currently in 48 out of 50 states a child can marry, usually with parental consent or a judge's discretion. In 17 states there's no minimum age meaning in theory a two year old could marry. But there's a campaign to change the law and raise the minimum age of marriage to 18 without exceptions across all American states. But changing the laws state by state is not as easy as one may think. There's resistance and raising the minimum age to 18 has often been blocked by legislators.

Jane O'Brien speaks to child brides, the campaigners pushing to make it illegal and the people who say that the laws don't need to change.

Producer: Rajeev Gupta
Editor: Amanda Hancox


TUE 11:30 The Art of Now (m000678d)
Migraine

Sound artist Alice Trueman writes a specially commissioned musical score to explore migraine attacks and their possible link to creativity.

Attempts to describe migraine have been made in visual arts and literature but here, for the first time, Alice Trueman creates a piece of sonic art - a musical evocation that unlocks the nature of the attack. A migraineur herself, Alice's music underscores the sensory disorientation and sense of altered reality experienced by many sufferers during a migraine, initiating non-sufferers into this other-worldly experience.

Central to the soundscape are the first hand experiences of migraine sufferers celebrated for their creative work, including artist JJ Ignatious Brennan, writer Lydia Ruffles and sculptor David Stephenson. While none welcome the migraine muse, some acknowledge its role in their creativity – a possibility that is explored with expert neurologist and historian of medicine, Dr Mark Weatherall.

Migraines are often described as an "invisible illness", taking place entirely within the sufferer's own private sensory sphere. Art of Now: Migraine brings these experiences out of the sufferer’s darkened room and into the open for all to understand.

Musicians:
Jude Rees - Woodwind and Saxophone
Alice Trueman - Violin
Joe Geoghan - Guitar

Composer: Alice Trueman
Producer: Anna Scott-Brown

An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000678j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000676s)
The Prostrate Years

Episode 2

The sixth and final instalment of Adrian Mole’s diaries by Sue Townsend, one of our most celebrated comic writers.

It starts in 2007 when Adrian has reached the age of 39. Having fallen into debt, Adrian and his wife Daisy are forced to move into a semi-detached converted pigsty next door to his parents.

Adrian worries that the passion has gone out of his relationship and that his five-year-old daughter Gracie is turning into a tyrant. On top of this, he is having to empty his bladder several times in the night - and getting a doctor’s appointment is far from easy.

In an interview, Sue Townsend once said that The Prostrate Years was her favourite of the Adrian Mole books. Having suffered significant health problems herself, she wanted to write about serious illness while maintaining her inimitable sense of humour.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000678n)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m000678r)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m000678t)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars (m000678w)
Poland

As the dusts of the Great War settled in 1919, the victorious Allied Powers of Britain, France and the United States gathered together in Paris to build a new, peaceful world. In this series, former BBC Diplomatic Editor Bridget Kendall explores how their decisions would influence a century of global conflict.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m00066z7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b08r1n6t)
After Independence

When black civil servant, Charles, tries to persuade white landowner, Guy, to sell his farm, he meets a family at breaking point. The white farm owners in Zimbabwe have seen their neighbours intimidated, attacked and bought out, and now Guy's farm, Independence, is next. May Sumbwanyambe's play is inspired by real events in the late 1990's when white-owned farms in Zimbabwe were seized by thousands of war veterans. Adapted from Papatango Theatre's recent award-winning stage production.

Director: George Turvey
Producer Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m000678y)
Press Record

The sounds of an empty apartment, the last tape of a loved one, the bootleg VHS tapes that helped inspire a musical movement and an erotic audio audition are at the heart of this edition of Short Cuts. Josie Long presents short documentaries and adventures in sound about significant recordings that have impacted people's lives.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 The Invention of... (m0002yby)
Britain

Anglocentrism... or why Britons Never Will Be Slaves

In AD 937 a mighty battle, like something from Game of Thrones, took place somewhere on the British Isles. Nobody is exactly sure where. On one side there was the king of the Scottish highlands, the king of Strathclyde, and the king of Dublin as well. On the other, Athelstan, bracelet-bestower, baron of barons, lord among earls. It was England against the rest.

In part two of the Invention of Britain, Misha Glenny explores the role of England in the history of these islands - from the battle of Brunanburgh to the conquest of Ireland and Wales. There are location recordings in Anglesey, Caernarfon, Edinburgh and beyond. Contributors include Tom Holland, Suzannah Lipscomb, Diarmaid MacCulloch, Sara Elin Roberts, Dafydd Iwan and Joan Redmond. This episode travels as far as the English Civil War, better known these days as the War of the Three Kingdoms.

Presenter Misha Glenny is a Sony award-winning reporter and the author of McMafia. Miles Warde is the series producer of How to Invent a Country which also includes programmes on Germany, Spain, Italy and Brazil.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (m000671m)
Joshua Rozenberg presents Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion on matters relating to law.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m000674d)
Nicci Gerrard and Gary Younge

Novelist Nicci Gerrard and journalist Gary Younge join Harriett Gilbert to talk about their favourite books. Gary chooses Brown Girl, Brownstones by Paule Marshall, the story of Barbadian immigrants living in Brooklyn in the 1930s and 40s. Nicci's favourite is Lolly Willowes by Sylvia Townsend Warner, a novel which takes a surprising turn halfway through and provokes a debate about the merits of sleeping in ditches. Harriett's selection is Calypso by David Sedaris, in which the American humorist introduces us to his family, a group of people almost as eccentric as he is.
Join us on Instagram @goodreadbbc
Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0006790)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006792)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Heresy (m000675p)
Series 11

Episode 3

Victoria Coren Mitchell presents another edition of the show which dares to commit heresy.

Evelyn Mock, Andrew Hunter Murray and David Baddiel discuss Eurovision, public apologies and climate change.

Produced by Victoria Coren Mitchell and Daisy Knight
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000675v)
Jim reaches the end of his tether and Susan tries to get to the truth.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0006760)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0006764)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m0006768)
Beyond Grenfell: The Cladding Lottery

Last month, the government announced a £200 million pound fund to remove and replace Grenfell style cladding on 170 privately owned tower blocks.
But there are many more high rise residential buildings covered in other types of cladding which are also flammable and not covered by the bailout.

One of the most widely used is High Pressure Laminate or HPL which is currently undergoing fire safety tests ordered by the government. Some experts say the cladding is very likely to fail the test.

File on 4 speaks to the families facing bills of more than 20 thousand pounds to remove HPL cladding and make their homes safe. They live in fear of a fire breaking out and since the hazard is no fault of their own, they believe the developers, the building owners or the Government should pay the cost of putting it right.

Public buildings, such as hospitals, are also having to pay to remove dangerous cladding. Eight hospitals had the same Aluminium Composite Material or ACM cladding as Grenfell tower. Only one has completed the work, while others are still taking it down or have closed wards while they decide how to deal with the problem.

The programme hears concerns that the disruption could have compromised patient safety.

Reporter: Melanie Abbott
Producer: Paul Grant


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000676d)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (m000676j)
Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m000674n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000676n)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000676s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 A Charles Paris Mystery (b08503d4)
The Cinderella Killer

Episode 3

by Jeremy Front
Based on Simon Brett's novel

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Danny ..... Sean Baker
Tad ..... Sam Rix
Kitty ..... Kirsty Oswald
Larry ..... Nick Underwood
Waiter ..... Tom Forrister
Gloria ..... Elizabeth Bennett

Directed by Sally Avens

Just who could have shot the star of Cinderella dead? And are they the same person who is sending Charles threatening texts? There are certainly lots of suspects, a vengeful ex-wife, a stalker and a missing dancer.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000676x)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 26 JUNE 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0006771)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (m0006775)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006779)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000677f)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000677k)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000677p)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000677t)
Good Morning,
Last Sabbath we read in the synagogue how the priests kindled the lamps on the seven-branched Menorah in the Temple.
The rabbis saw this as the outward symbol of an inner truth. The lamp is the human soul and the flame is God’s sacred light.
They understood God as saying to every human being: ‘Your lamp is in my hands; my lamp is in yours’.
This represents an act of profound and absolute trust. When we hold a candle, we can protect its flame, sheltering it from wind and rain. Or we can crush the wick and kill the light.
This is no mere metaphor. We hold the lives of innumerable others, people, animals, fellow creatures, in our hands. I think of this whenever I feed the birds and young hedgehogs who live in our garden.
‘How sweet’, a friend said.
It’s not just ‘sweet’. While those birds and hedgehogs are here, their light is in my hands. They are a tiny flame of God’s light, burning in each living being.
We have entered the Anthropocene Age. The destiny of nature itself lies irrevocably in our unreliable grasp. That’s why today’s mass lobby by Faiths for the Climate and London’s first ever Climate Action Week which follow are so important.
Few of us are cruel, crushing life on purpose. But we are careless. Our habits of consumption and waste are killers. Sometimes they cost human lives; they constantly cost the lives of animals, birds, insects, forests and rivers.
We can’t escape our responsibility: we hold the light of creation in our hands.
God, make us faithful custodians of your sacred flame.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000677y)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkyn2)
Snow Goose

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the snow goose found breeding across Canada and Alaska. Although most snow geese are all-white with black wing-tips, some known as blue geese are blue-ish grey with white heads. Snow geese breed in the tundra region with goslings hatching at a time to make the most of rich supply of insect larvae and berries in the short Arctic summer. As autumn approaches though, the geese depart and head south before temperatures plummet, and the tundra becomes sealed by snow and ice. As they head for areas rich in grain and nutritious roots hundreds of thousands of snow geese fill the sky with their urgent clamour providing one of the greatest wildfowl spectacles in the world.


WED 06:00 Today (m0006746)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (m000674f)
Nina Mae Fowler meets Nick Park

The artist Nina Mae Fowler meets the animator Nick Park.


WED 09:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m000674m)
Nick Robinson talks about what’s really going on in British politics.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (m000674t)
Modern Nature

Episode 3

2019 marks 25 years since the death of director, writer and artist Derek Jarman. Modern Nature is Jarman’s chronicle of life in his remote cottage on the barren coast of Dungeness in the years after his HIV diagnosis. Facing an uncertain future, Jarman found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. Some perished beneath wind and sea-spray while others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

Modern Nature is both a diary of the garden and a meditation by Jarman on his own life: his childhood, his time as a young gay man in the 1960s and his renowned career as an artist, writer and film-maker. It is at once a lament for a lost generation, an unabashed celebration of gay sexuality, and a devotion to all that is living.

Rupert Everett knew Jarman personally and features in the diaries. The programme was recorded on location at Prospect Cottage, Jarman's former home, at the very desk where much of Modern Nature was written and features a rich soundscape of the house and area where it was recorded alongside a soundtrack of music taken from works by Benjamin Britten.

Today, as his health begins to falter Jarman is seeking funding for his film next film, to be called The Garden, and reflecting on his visits to Andy Warhol’s Factory in the New York of the 1960s.

Rupert Everett has performed in many prominent films including The Madness of King George (1994), Shakespeare in Love (1998), Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) and The Happy Prince which he wrote and directed (2018).

Programme image: Derek Jarman outside Prospect Cottage in Dungeness courtesy of photographer Howard Sooley.

Written by Derek Jarman
Read by Rupert Everett
Produced, abridged and directed by Simon Richardson


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006750)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (m0006756)
Why Mummy Drinks

Episode 3

3/5

By Gill Sims. Dramatised by Christine Entwisle.

Ellen is a stressed-out working- mum. She’s got high hopes of having a perfect life, but the gulf between her aspiration and her reality is an ever-widening chasm of chaos. But this is the year that everything will change…for sure.

Christmas is coming, and with it, Ellen’s challenging family-in-law.

Cast:
Ellen … Gabriel Quigley
Simon … Stuart McQuarrie
Louisa … Maryam Hamidi

Directed by Kirsty Williams


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m000675d)
Jean and Ruth - Being Mum

Friends look back at how their upbringings have influenced how they brought up their kids. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 My Name Is... (m00066zc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Leg Breakers (m000675l)
Looking for Love

By Tom Wainwright

Comedy-drama that follows the fortunes of Bridget, the principal of Leg Breakers School of Performing Arts, a struggling stage school for kids.

For several weeks Rachel has been making a fly-on-the-wall documentary about Bridget. Now she encourages her to start dating and we see a new side of the Leg Breakers' principal. It's a side that Rachel will wish she had never exposed.

Bridget . . . Rebekah Staton
Keith . . . Jeremy Swift
Romeo . . . Thos Wainwright
Rachel . . . Sarah Ovens
David . . . Samuel James
Henry . . . Aaron Gelkoff
Bryan . . . Elspeth Whyte
Francesca . . . Rosie Boore
Angelica . . . Amy-Jayne Leigh
Girlfriend . . . Helen Clapp
Dater . . . Christopher Harper
Dater . . . Kenny Blyth

Musical direction and accompaniment by Colin Sell.

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m000675q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000675z)
The Prostrate Years

Episode 3

The sixth and final instalment of Adrian Mole’s diaries by Sue Townsend, one of our most celebrated comic writers.

It starts in 2007 when Adrian has reached the age of 39. Having fallen into debt, Adrian and his wife Daisy are forced to move into a semi-detached converted pigsty next door to his parents.

Adrian worries that the passion has gone out of his relationship and that his five-year-old daughter Gracie is turning into a tyrant. On top of this, he is having to empty his bladder several times in the night - and getting a doctor’s appointment is far from easy.

In an interview, Sue Townsend once said that The Prostrate Years was her favourite of the Adrian Mole books. Having suffered significant health problems herself, she wanted to write about serious illness while maintaining her inimitable sense of humour.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0006763)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m0006767)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m000676c)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars (m000676h)
Vietnam

As the dusts of the Great War settled in 1919, the victorious Allied Powers of Britain, France and the United States gathered together in Paris to build a new, peaceful world. In this series, former BBC Diplomatic Editor Bridget Kendall explores how their decisions would influence global conflicts for the next hundred years.

Kings, prime ministers and foreign ministers with their crowds of advisers rubbed shoulders with journalists and lobbyists for a hundred causes, from independent nationhood to women's rights. For six extraordinary months the city was effectively the centre of world government, as the peacemakers wound up bankrupt empires and created new countries.

In this episode, Bridget follows the story of one particular lobbyist, a young hotel worker with dreams of freedom for his home country, Vietnam. Later adopting the name Ho Chi Minh, what happened to him at Versailles would set in motion half a century of war for Vietnam with the two powers of France and infamously, the United States.

Featuring contribution from Professor Margaret MacMillan, author of 'Peacemakers: Six Months that Changed the World' and Professor Mark Philip Bradley, Professor of International History at the University of Chicago.

Producer: Sam Peach


WED 14:00 The Archers (m000675v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b08sltc2)
Everybody's Got Conditions

by Sarah Wooley

1961. Tennessee Williams had just turned 50. In spite of a string of successful plays (Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, A Streetcar Named Desire), the Broadway critics had been scathing about his most recent work.

As always with a work by Williams his next play, The Night of the Iguana had star parts for women. Initially he had his heart set on Katherine Hepburn but she wouldn't sign up for a long run so the play's producer got creative and the supporting role of Maxine Faulk was beefed up and offered to Bette Davis.

Davis had been a huge Hollywood star but by 1961 was financially in trouble and looking for a comeback. She hadn't been on stage since 1929 but was still box office gold as far as the theatre was concerned. Williams had his reservations from the start but was persuaded to put them aside and rehearsals began in the Autumn of 1961 with Davis in the role. But casting Davis would prove to be the biggest mistake of Williams' career.

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


WED 15:00 Money Box (m000676m)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m000676j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01qdzby)
Organised crime in the UK

Organised crime in the UK - how has it changed? Professor Dick Hobbs, joins Laurie Taylor, to discuss his work on 'Lush Life', a rich, ethnographic study into 'Dogtown', a composite of several overlapping neighbourhoods in East London. Looking behind the clichéd notions of criminal firms and underworlds, he finds that activity which was once the preserve of professional criminals has now been normalised. He invites us to consider whether or not the very idea of organised crime has become outdated in a predatory, post industrial world in which many fight, by illegal as well as legal means, to survive on the margins. Also, the presence and activities of Mafia style crime both in Italy, as well as in the UK. Dr Felia Allum, a Lecturer in Italian History and Politics, discusses how Italian organised crime functions outside its territory of origin. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000676t)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's Media Editor


WED 17:00 PM (m000676y)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0006772)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (m0006776)
Series 8

Episode 6

John Finnemore returns to Radio 4 with an eighth series of his multi-award-winning sketch show, joined by his regular ensemble cast of Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

In this clinically efficient episode, John does the voice, and we also hear what sort of song he could have had on the show if he'd wanted. And, well... since you ask him for a story of a breakneck race against time...

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described by The Radio Times as "the best sketch show in years, on television or radio", and by The Daily Telegraph as "funny enough to make even the surliest cat laugh". Already the winner of a Radio Academy Silver Award and a Broadcasting Press Guild award, this year Souvenir Programme won its second BBC Audio Drama award.

Written by & starring ... John Finnemore
Cast ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Cast ... Simon Kane
Cast ... Lawry Lewin
Cast ... Carrie Quinlan

Original music & piano ... Susannah Pearse
Cello ... Sally Stares
Additional musical arrangement ... Rich Evans

Production Coordinator ... Beverly Tagg
Producer ... Ed Morrish
A BBC Studios production


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0006711)
Alistair prepares for an uncertain future and Pat is forced to broach a difficult subject.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m000677b)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0006756)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m000677g)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Ella Whelan, Giles Fraser, Mona Siddiqui and Tim Stanley.


WED 20:45 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m000674m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 The Origin of Stuff (m000677l)
Wine Glass

Have you got one of those wine glasses that can hold an entire bottle of wine? Katy Brand does and she’s even used it for wine - albeit because of a sprained ankle, which would have stopped her from hobbling back and forth to the kitchen for refills.

But if we skip back a few hundred years, the wine glass was tiny. Footmen brought their masters what was essentially a shot glass. They quaffed back their wine in one. So how did we go from those dinky little things to the gargantuan goblets we have today? Is it because letting the wine breathe in a bigger glass makes it smell and taste better? Or is it a reflection of our drinking habits?

Join Katy and the show's resident public historian, Greg Jenner, is glass expert Russell Hand from Sheffield University and Barry Smith, Director for the Study of the Senses at London University.

Producer: Graihagh Jackson


WED 21:30 Only Artists (m000674f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000677q)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000675z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 The East Coast Listening Post (m000677v)
Series 2

Laugh

American reporters and sisters, Jenna and Dana Johnson, return to the UK to investigate the people of Great Britain. This week Jenna and Dana meet Mick Tanner from the historic town of Luton, who is undergoing therapy to change his laugh in the pursuit love. To meet someone new, Mick agrees to take part in a reality dating show called 'Rapid Banter'.

The East Coast Listening Post was written and performed by Celeste Dring and Freya Parker, with performances from David Elms and Nick Mohammed. The original score was composed by Owain Roberts. The script editor was Matthew Crosby. The East Coast Listening Post was produced by Suzy Grant and is a BBC Studios production.


WED 23:15 Nurse (b0787j2g)
Series 2

Episode 2

A bittersweet comedy drama about a community mental health nurse created by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings.
Written by David Cummings and Paul Whitehouse, with additional material by Esther Coles.

Liz (played by Esther Coles), the community psychiatric nurse of the title makes her rounds to visit "service users" in their homes. Most of those patients are played by comedy chameleon Paul Whitehouse himself – with supporting roles for Rosie Cavaliero, Vilma Hollingbery and Cecilia Noble.

Whitehouse brings us an obese bed-bound mummy's boy, an agoraphobic ex-con, a manic ex-glam rock star, ageing rake Herbert who hoards his house with possessions and memories, a Jewish chatterbox in unrequited love with his Jamaican neighbour, and a long-suffering carer and his Alzheimer's-afflicted mother.

There are new characters too in the guise of a self-proclaimed DJ and a Geordie struggling with his wife's job in the world's oldest profession.

We follow their humorous, sometimes sad and occasionally moving interactions with Liz, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense medication and offer support.

Nurse gives a sympathetic insight into the world of some of society's more marginalised people in a heartfelt and considered way.

Cast:
Paul Whitehouse
Esther Coles
Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Rosie Cavaliero
Sue Elliott-Nichols
Charlie Higson
Vilma Hollingbery
Jason Maza
Cecilia Noble

A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000677z)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 27 JUNE 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0006781)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (m000674t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0006783)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0006785)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0006788)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000678f)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000678k)
A spiritual comment and prayer to start the day with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000678p)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkyr5)
Greater Honeyguide

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the greater honeyguide of sub-Saharan Africa. A loud repetitive "it's - here" – "it's -here" is a sound the greater honey guide only makes to humans in an extraordinary co-operative act between humans and bird. Relatives of woodpeckers they are one of the few birds which can digest wax and also feed on the eggs, grubs and pupae of bees. A greater honeyguide knows the location of the bee colonies in its territory and is able to lead honey-hunters to them. Once it has successfully guided its helpers to a nest, it waits while the honey-hunters remove the comb. Then it moves in to snap up the grubs and wax from the opened nest. So reliable are honeyguides that the Boran people of East Africa save up to two thirds of their honey-searching time by using the bird's services and use a special loud whistle (called a fuulido) to summon their guide before a hunt.


THU 06:00 Today (m0006705)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0006707)
Doggerland

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the people, plants and animals once living on land now under the North Sea, now called Doggerland after Dogger Bank, inhabited upto c7000BC or roughly 3000 years before the beginnings of Stonehenge. There are traces of this landscape at low tide, such as the tree stumps at Redcar (above); yet more is being learned from diving and seismic surveys which are building a picture of an ideal environment for humans to hunt and gather, with rivers and wooded hills. Rising seas submerged this land as glaciers melted, and the people and animals who lived there moved to higher ground, with the coasts of modern-day Britain on one side and Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Belgium and France on the other.

With

Vince Gaffney

Carol Cotterill

And

Rachel Bynoe

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (m0006709)
Modern Nature

Episode 4

2019 marks 25 years since the death of director, writer and artist Derek Jarman. Modern Nature is Jarman’s chronicle of life in his remote cottage on the barren coast of Dungeness in the years after his HIV diagnosis. Facing an uncertain future, Jarman found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. Some perished beneath wind and sea-spray while others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

Modern Nature is both a diary of the garden and a meditation by Jarman on his own life: his childhood, his time as a young gay man in the 1960s and his renowned career as an artist, writer and film-maker. It is at once a lament for a lost generation, an unabashed celebration of gay sexuality, and a devotion to all that is living.

Rupert Everett knew Jarman personally and features in the diaries. The programme was recorded on location at Prospect Cottage, Jarman's former home, at the very desk where much of Modern Nature was written and features a rich soundscape of the house and area where it was recorded alongside a soundtrack of music taken from works by Benjamin Britten.

Today Jarman recalls his friendship with Robert Mapplethorpe and begins recording sections of his film ‘The Garden’.

Rupert Everett has performed in many prominent films including The Madness of King George (1994), Shakespeare in Love (1998), Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) and The Happy Prince which he wrote and directed (2018).

Programme image: Derek Jarman outside Prospect Cottage in Dungeness courtesy of photographer Howard Sooley.

Written by Derek Jarman
Read by Rupert Everett
Produced, abridged and directed by Simon Richardson


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m000670c)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m000670f)
Why Mummy Drinks

Episode 4

4/5

By Gill Sims. Dramatised by Christine Entwisle.

Ellen is a stressed-out working- mum. She’s got high hopes of having a perfect life, but the gulf between her aspiration and her reality is an ever-widening chasm of chaos. But this is the year that everything will change…for sure.

Simon and Ellen have fallen out over the credit card bill. Weeks later, the frostiness has still not thawed and Ellen’s reserves of optimism have run out.

Cast:
Ellen … Gabriel Quigley
Simon … Stuart McQuarrie
Sylvia … Joanna Tope
Michael … Crawford Logan

Directed by Kirsty Williams


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m000670h)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world


THU 11:30 Sketches: Stories of Art and People (m000670k)
Series 2

Inside Out

True stories of life-changing encounters with art in all its forms.

Each week, writer Anna Freeman presents a showcase of stories about art and people around Britain. In the first episode of a new series, Anna and the Sketches producers share stories about people stuck inside, in different ways, using art to get out.

Polly talks to Lee Cutter, who learnt to draw in jail, after a guard left a red pencil in his cell. Anna hears the story of the "agoraphobic traveller”, photographer Jacqui Kenny, who takes breathtaking shots of places she's never been using Google Streetview. Mair tells the story of Mary Lattimore, a harpist who became fascinated by the solitary life of an astronaut living on the International Space Station, after she became confined to her own head by a broken jaw.

Presented by Anna Freeman.
Produced by Mair Bosworth and Polly Weston.


THU 12:00 News Summary (m000670n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000670q)
The Prostrate Years

Episode 4

The sixth and final instalment of Adrian Mole’s diaries by Sue Townsend, one of our most celebrated comic writers.

It starts in 2007 when Adrian has reached the age of 39. Having fallen into debt, Adrian and his wife Daisy are forced to move into a semi-detached converted pigsty next door to his parents.

Adrian worries that the passion has gone out of his relationship and that his five-year-old daughter Gracie is turning into a tyrant. On top of this, he is having to empty his bladder several times in the night - and getting a doctor’s appointment is far from easy.

In an interview, Sue Townsend once said that The Prostrate Years was her favourite of the Adrian Mole books. Having suffered significant health problems herself, she wanted to write about serious illness while maintaining her inimitable sense of humour.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000670s)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m000670v)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m000670x)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars (m000670z)
Yugoslavia

As the dusts of the Great War settled in 1919, the victorious Allied Powers of Britain, France and the United States gathered together in Paris to build a new, peaceful world. In this series, former BBC Diplomatic Editor Bridget Kendall explores how their decisions would influence a century of global conflict.

Kings, prime ministers and foreign ministers with their crowds of advisers rubbed shoulders with journalists and lobbyists for a hundred causes, from independent nations to women's rights. For six extraordinary months the city was effectively the centre of world government as the peacemakers wound up bankrupt empires and created new countries.

Formed in the breakup of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the delegates from the newly created Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes presented themselves to the great powers in Paris. Their country would come to be known at Yugoslavia, but sewn into the fabric of the new state were tensions that never went away, eventually leading to the country's breakup in the 1990s.

Producer: Sam Peach


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0006711)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b08spttk)
The Len Dimension

Surreal soundscapes and black comedy from acclaimed British film director Peter Strickland, and starring Toby Jones and Belinda Stewart-Wilson.

Sometime in the early 1980s, struggling actor Len gets his first big break - a part in a public information film. But, as his insecurities take over, the part has unforeseen consequences.

A follow up to The Len Continuum, the first audio drama by film maker Peter Strickland, writer and director of Berberian Sound Studio and The Duke of Burgundy.

Sound engineer: Steve Bond
Written and Directed by Peter Strickland
Produced by Russell Finch

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0006713)
Longborough's Opera

Verity Sharp finds out how a converted cattle shed has become home to an opera festival. Builder and property developer Martin Graham decided to build his own 500-seater opera house in the village of Longborough, in the Cotswolds, so that he could stage his favourite Wagner operas, ‘The Ring Cycle’, which he first watched on the television - and became hooked. But Martin’s love for opera and classical music started when he was a little boy growing up in the village. A man named Jack started to tell him all about Beethoven and Strauss and for Martin the seeds were planted.
Verity arrives during the dress rehearsal as it’s on this day that people from the village, along with children from the local primary schools, all attend the performance. For two pupils who attend Longborough Primary School, Poppy and James, it’s going to be particularly exciting as they are going to be performing for the very first time. They are providing the screams in ‘Das Rheingold’- first of the four music dramas that make up Wagner’s ‘Ring Cycle’.
With the festival now running for over 20 years, Verity finds out what locals make of an opera house in their village and how it’s inspired and impacted the life of one photographer.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m00066sq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m00066tm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m0006715)
The latest releases, the hottest stars and the leading directors, plus news and insights from the film world.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0006717)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0006719)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000671c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My Obsession (m000671f)
Series 1

Episode 2

Paul Merton and Suki Webster star in a new episode of this warm-hearted comedy, exploring the obsessive narcissistic culture of so-called celebrity, the desire to be famous and the urge to be near it.

Surprisingly, after Sheryl broke into the hotel room of her favorite stand-up comedian Danny Heywood and castigated him for not replying to her fan mail, the pair met again and agreed to go on a proper date. All is going well until Danny spots TV producer Karen Francis. She is looking for a comedy magician to perform the “saw the woman in half" illusion.

Danny would love to perform the trick but he needs to find an assistant quickly. Much to Sheryl’s surprise, Danny asks if she’d like to become half the woman she used to be?

Then the TV producer throws a spanner into the works that could rip our would-be lovers apart forever.

Cast:
Danny – Paul Merton
Sheryl – Suki Webster
The Plumber – Terry Mynott
The Priest – Matt Addis
Karen Francis -Tilly Gaunt

Written by Suki Webster.
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m000671h)
Shula makes a desperate plea and Ben has a controversial suggestion.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m000671k)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m000670f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (m000671m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m000671p)
Evan Davis hosts the business conversation show with people at the top giving insight into what matters.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0006717)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0006707)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000671s)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000670q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Elephant in the Room (m000671w)
Episode 1

Sarah Millican hosts a new panel show using surveys to discover who is the most Average Jolene, and who is the most Maverick Matilda. This week's sparkling panel features Kathy Burke, Liz Carr, Desiree Burch and Tom Allen.

Surveys on subjects including childhood, daily rituals and favourite cheese are the basis for Sarah's questions to the panellists, discovering who is the closest to, and furthest from, the average. Surprising quirks, hilarious insights and unexpected anecdotes are revealed along the way.

The winner will be the most average. But joint winner will be the most different, the furthest from the norm.

A little bit like a dinner party, but one where you know all of the spoons.

A Chopsy production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0006722)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 28 JUNE 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0006726)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (m0006709)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000672b)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000672g)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000672m)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000672r)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000672w)
Good Morning.
My parents were both refugees from Nazi Germany. Like many Jews, this has motivated me to care for those who flee from persecution. Both the Hebrew Bible and Jewish history teach us to respect and support the stranger.
An especially trying experience for those who’ve known horrors unimaginable to most of us, is to find themselves greeted with hostile disbelief.
We owe it to those who speak from the heart, to listen with the heart.
I learnt much about listening from Refugee Tales, who campaign for an end to indefinite detention. At the heart of their work are stories. Every year they arrange a week-long walk, concluding each day with a refugee’s tale, related by a published author.
Last year I was privileged to be included. I was paired with S. It soon emerged that he spoke fluent English and had two language degrees. I was puzzled. Authors were needed to write on behalf of those still new in the language. But why did S need me?
- ‘Wouldn’t you rather write for yourself?’
- ‘No’.
Then I understood. He needed someone else to hear, a witness in solidarity, a partner in testament, to the traumas he’d suffered.
This isn’t only true for refugees. It’s what we all sometimes want: a listener who doesn’t offer trite advice, change the subject, or go on about how ‘the same thing happened to me’. We need that quiet, attentive companionship which, without words, tells us something deeper than even the best-intentioned counsel: that our story, our life, truly matters.
God, deepen our capacity to listen from the heart.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0006730)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkysz)
Vampire Finch

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

For Halloween, Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the blood sucking vampire finch. On Wolf Island in the remote Galapagos archipelago, a small dark finch sidles up to a booby with a taste for blood. Sharp-beaked ground finch is found on several islands in the Galapagos and is one of the family known as Darwin's finches. Several species of ground-finches have devolved bill sizes which vary depending on their diet and the competition for food. Usually seeds, fruits, nectar and grubs. But one sharp-beaked ground-finch has gorier ambitions. On the isolated islands of Wolf and Darwin where seeds are scarcer in times of drought this bird has taken to drinking the blood of other seabirds, especially boobies. It pecks at the bases of their feathers and greedily laps up the flowing blood. For this reason it's often known as the, the vampire finch.


FRI 06:00 Today (m000671x)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m00066t3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (m0006721)
Modern Nature

Episode 5

2019 marks 25 years since the death of director, writer and artist Derek Jarman. Modern Nature is Jarman’s chronicle of life in his remote cottage on the barren coast of Dungeness in the years after his HIV diagnosis. Facing an uncertain future, Jarman found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. Some perished beneath wind and sea-spray while others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

Modern Nature is both a diary of the garden and a meditation by Jarman on his own life: his childhood, his time as a young gay man in the 1960s and his renowned career as an artist, writer and film-maker. It is at once a lament for a lost generation, an unabashed celebration of gay sexuality, and a devotion to all that is living.

Rupert Everett knew Jarman personally and features in the diaries. The programme was recorded on location at Prospect Cottage, Jarman's former home, at the very desk where much of Modern Nature was written and features a rich soundscape of the house and area where it was recorded alongside a soundtrack of music taken from works by Benjamin Britten.

Today, Jarman is supported through his hospital stay by his companion Keith Collins, also known as H.B. With his health in accelerating decline from AIDS related illnesses, Derek is forced to make some very difficult decisions.

Rupert Everett has performed in many prominent films including The Happy Prince which he wrote and directed (2018).

Programme image: Derek Jarman outside Prospect Cottage in Dungeness courtesy of photographer Howard Sooley.

Written by Derek Jarman
Read by Rupert Everett
Produced, abridged and directed by Simon Richardson


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0006725)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0006729)
Why Mummy Drinks

Episode 5

5/5

By Gill Sims. Dramatised by Christine Entwisle.

Ellen is a stressed-out working- mum. She’s got high hopes of having a perfect life, but the gulf between her aspiration and her reality is an ever-widening chasm of chaos.
But Ellen’s just discovered the app she created has made some serious money. She’s moving closer towards her dream life by the second. Surely nothing can go wrong now?

Cast:
Ellen … Gabriel Quigley
Simon … Stuart McQuarrie
Louisa … Maryam Hamidi
Sylvia … Joanna Tope
Michael … Crawford Logan
Kathy … Sally Reid

Directed by Kirsty Williams


FRI 11:00 The Secret History of Science and Religion (m000672f)
Rumours of War

Nick Spencer explores the history of the relationship between science and religion and questions the received wisdom that they have always been in conflict with one another. He tells the story of science and religion not as if they were big, abstract ideas but as it happened, through the lives and cultures of different people and different times. From Newton to Darwin via Voltaire and Descartes he examines the fault lines during times of social and political upheaval in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Contributors:
Robert Iliffe - Professor of History of Science at Oxford University and author of "Priest of Nature: the Religious Worlds of Isaac Newton";
Peter Harrison - Professor in the History of Science at the University of Queensland and author of “The Territories of Science and Religion”;
John Hedley Brooke - Historian of Science and author of "Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives";
Thomas Dixon - Professor of History at Queen Mary University of London;
Ruth Barton - Honorary Research Fellow in History at the University of Auckland and author of "The X Club: Power and Authority in Victorian Science";
Bernard Lightman - Professor of Humanities and Science and Technology Studies at York University in Toronto;
John Holmes - Professor of Victorian literature and culture at Birmingham University.

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series Editor: Christine Morgan


FRI 11:30 Mrs Sidhu Investigates (m000672j)
Mrs Sidhu's Deadly Highland Game

Episode 3: The Secret of the Unmade Bed

Meera Syal stars as the murder obsessed Indian Aunty snooping around a Highland Castle.

After a double personal disaster, Mrs Sidhu is undaunted and determined to put things right at Castle Tannoch. Her apologies soon turn to worry when another of the Castle guests pays the price for being indiscreet.

What’s left of the hunting party must accept the grim realisation they have become the quarry. Will they be picked off one by one? With another body on her hands, Mrs Sidhu realises she’s made a series of errors. The question is, will they be her last?

While Mrs Sidhu plunges ever deeper into the darkness of Castle Tannoch, Constable Williamson declares a truce with Inspector Burton and the two enjoy some time out in a steamy situation.

Cast
Meera Syal- Mrs Sidhu
Justin Edwards- Inspector Burton
Hamza Jeetooa- Tez
John Sessions- Sir Alex and Zukhov
Hilary Maclean- Jane and Kirsty
Okorie Chukwu- Robert and PC Williamson
Gordon Kennedy- Callum

Written by Suk Pannu
Recorded at Soundhouse Studios
Edited by Leon Chambers
Studio Managers - Wilfredo Acosta and Leon Chambers
Production Manager- Sarah Tombling

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Produced by Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000672n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000672s)
The Prostrate Years

Episode 5

The sixth and final instalment of Adrian Mole’s diaries by Sue Townsend, one of our most celebrated comic writers.

It starts in 2007 when Adrian has reached the age of 39. Having fallen into debt, Adrian and his wife Daisy are forced to move into a semi-detached converted pigsty next door to his parents.

Adrian worries that the passion has gone out of his relationship and that his five-year-old daughter Gracie is turning into a tyrant. On top of this, he is having to empty his bladder several times in the night - and getting a doctor’s appointment is far from easy.

In an interview, Sue Townsend once said that The Prostrate Years was her favourite of the Adrian Mole books. Having suffered significant health problems herself, she wanted to write about serious illness while maintaining her inimitable sense of humour.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000672x)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0006731)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0006733)
Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars (m0006735)
Iraq

As the dusts of the Great War settled in 1919, the victorious Allied Powers of Britain, France and the United States gathered together in Paris to build a new, peaceful world. In this series, former BBC Diplomatic Editor Bridget Kendall explores how their decisions would influence a century of global conflict.

Kings, prime ministers and foreign ministers with their crowds of advisers rubbed shoulders with journalists and lobbyists for a hundred causes, from independent nations to women's rights. For six extraordinary months the city was effectively the centre of world government as the peacemakers wound up bankrupt empires and created new countries. In this episode, Bridget examines the case of Iraq.

Producer: Sam Peach


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000671h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m0006737)
Trying It On

Join playwright David Edgar for a special Radio 4 version of his hit solo performance, fresh from the RSC and the Royal Court Theatre.

It’s 1968. David is 20 and in his second year at University. It is the height of the world-wide student revolt. The Vietnam war rages. Powell delivers his “rivers of blood” speech. Martin Luther King is assassinated. These events will define David’s politics and launch his writing career.

50 years on, the 70-year-old is confronted by the 20-year-old. Do they share the same beliefs? If not, is it the world that’s changed, or him? Why did his generation vote Brexit? Has he sold in or sold out?

David Edgar is one of our greatest living writers, who's had more than sixty of his original plays, adaptations and translations performed around the world, including for the Royal Shakespeare Company: Destiny, The Jail Diary of Albie Sachs, Maydays, The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, Pentecost, The Prisoner's Dilemma and Written On The Heart, and for the Royal National Theatre: Albert Speer and The Shape of the Table. More recent work includes his adaptation of A Christmas Carol for the RSC, and a new version of Maydays.

After 50 years of writing, Trying It On marks David’s debut as a performer.

“What makes this show radically different is its element of unextinguished hope.”
The Guardian

“As charming as it is challenging... Hugely stimulating.”
The Times

“Energised with humour and humility.”
The Stage

“Trying It On challenges us all to question our beliefs: how they originate, how they are influenced by external factors, and whether age really does mellow us.”
What’s On Stage

Trying It On was originally made with China Plate Theatre, in a production directed by Christopher Haydon. The stage version is playing at the Traverse Theatre for the Edinburgh Festival, and then tours England and Wales in the autumn. Dates include Bath, Bristol, Derby, Exeter, Kendal, London's Clapham Omnibus, Oxford, and the Universities of Aberystwyth, East Anglia, Kent, Warwick and York.

Photograph by Arnim Friess.

With thanks to Danielle Phillips.

David ..... David Edgar
Younger ..... Paul Heath

Produced by Jonquil Panting


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0006739)
Mount Stewart - The Potting Shed Sessions

Kathy Clugston presents the highlights from this year's Potting Shed Sessions. Bob Flowerdew, Matthew Pottage, Bunny Guinness, Neil Porteus, Matt Biggs, Pippa Greenwood, James Wong and Anne Swithinbank are answering the questions from this year's Summer Garden Party.

Produced by Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000673c)
Open and Shut

By AK Turner. It appears to be a straightforward post-mortem. But mortuary attendant Cassie Raven is unconvinced.

Open and Shut is AK Turner’s second story for radio to feature Goth mortuary attendant Cassie Raven. It is also the prequel to a new series of crime novels featuring Raven which will be published in late 2020. Turner’s first crime series, published under the author name Anya Lipska, followed the adventures of Janusz Kiszka, tough guy/fixer to east London’s Polish community. Turner is a TV producer and former journalist.

Writer: AK Turner
Reader: Ellie Kendrick
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000673f)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m000673h)
The programme that holds the BBC to account on behalf of the radio audience.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m000673k)
Sujen and Lotika - Learning About You

Friends talk about how to cope with work and motherhood and careers in a new country. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m000673m)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000673p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (m000673r)
Series 19

Episode 4

This series of Dead Ringers features Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis Macleod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey,

The producer and creator is Bill Dare
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m000673t)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting

Writer, Simon Frith
Director, Tracey Neale
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
Josh Archer ….. Angus Imrie
Ben Archer ….. Ben Norris
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Pat Archer ….. Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Bert Fry ….. Eric Allan
Clarrie Grundy ….. Heather Bell
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m000673w)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0006729)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000673y)
Lord Blunkett, Lord Patten, Amanda Platell, Polly Toynbee

Jonathan Dimbleby presents topical debate from Hope Chapel in Bristol with Labour peer Lord Blunkett, Conservative peer Lord Patten, Daily Mail columnist Amanda Platell and Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0006740)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 The New Age of Capitalism (m0006742)
Nanoseconds and Megabucks

David Grossman with more stories which help explain the world of contemporary capitalism. He enters the strange world of high speed financial trading, where a millionth of a second can make the difference between fortune and failure. He learns about the increasing role of the financial sector, asking about the risks of our reliance on debt. Plus how South America tried to introduce its own brand of socialism and the growing influence and appeal of state-directed capitalism in places like China. Can free-market economies like Britain compete fairly?
Producers: Diane Richardson and Matthew Chapman


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0006747)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m000672s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m000674d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000674l)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m000674s)
Helen and Sarah – No Other Feeling Like It

Policewomen talk honestly about menopause and their employer's positive response to it. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (m00066xs)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (m00066xs)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (m0006764)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (m0006764)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (m0006756)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (m0006756)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (m000670f)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (m000670f)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (m0006729)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (m0006729)

A Charles Paris Mystery 23:00 TUE (b08503d4)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m000674d)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m000674d)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m000617f)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0006740)

A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics 19:15 SUN (b08jdz0k)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (m000676j)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (m000676j)

America's Child Brides 11:00 TUE (m0006789)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m000613h)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m00066zf)

Annika Stranded 19:45 SUN (m00066v8)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m00066ws)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0006179)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m000673y)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m00066xk)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0006717)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0006717)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m00066vk)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m00066vk)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (m0006147)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (m00066xg)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (m00066xg)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (m0006775)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (m0006775)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (m000674t)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (m000674t)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (m0006709)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (m0006709)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (m0006721)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (m000612y)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (m00066ys)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m00066sz)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (m000616t)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (m000673r)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m00066t3)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m00066t3)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b08gwy5b)

Drama 21:00 SAT (m00060x7)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m00066tk)

Drama 14:15 MON (m00066yq)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08r1n6t)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08sltc2)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08spttk)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m0006737)

Elephant in the Room 23:00 THU (m000671w)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m00066w4)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m00066vy)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0006701)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m000677y)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m000678p)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0006730)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0006169)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m000673h)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m00060y8)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m0006768)

Four Seasons 16:30 SUN (m00066tp)

From Our Home Correspondent 13:30 SUN (m00066tf)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m00066wj)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m000670h)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m00066z9)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0006760)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m000677b)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m000671k)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m000673w)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m000615x)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0006739)

Heresy 18:30 TUE (m000675p)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (m00066z4)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m0006707)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m0006707)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m000676d)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 WED (m0006776)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (m000613c)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0006165)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000673f)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (m000671m)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (m000671m)

Leg Breakers 11:30 WED (m000675l)

Living World 06:35 SUN (m00066sg)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m00066x9)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m00066x9)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000617y)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m00066xt)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m00066vh)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m00066zn)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0006771)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0006781)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0006726)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m00066vc)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m00066vc)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m000676m)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m000677g)

Mrs Sidhu Investigates 11:30 FRI (m000672j)

My Name Is... 20:00 MON (m00066zc)

My Name Is... 11:00 WED (m00066zc)

My Obsession 18:30 THU (m000671f)

Names in the Sky 21:00 MON (m00060w0)

New Weird Britain 16:00 MON (m00066yw)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m000618g)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m00066yb)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m00066vt)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m00066zx)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m000677p)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m000678f)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m000672r)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m00066sd)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m00066wl)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m00066t5)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m00066y5)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m000678j)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m000675q)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m000670n)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m000672n)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m00066w2)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m00066sl)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m00066sv)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m00066xp)

News 13:00 SAT (m00066wq)

Nurse 23:15 WED (b0787j2g)

One to One 15:15 SAT (b08bzl92)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m000674v)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (m000674f)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (m000674f)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m00066tm)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m00066tm)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0006713)

PM 17:00 SAT (m00066wx)

PM 17:00 MON (m00066z0)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0006790)

PM 17:00 WED (m000676y)

PM 17:00 THU (m0006719)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000673m)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m00066v4)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 05:45 SAT (m00060zw)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 09:30 WED (m000674m)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 20:45 WED (m000674m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m000618l)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m00066vw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m00066zz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m000677t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m000678k)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m000672w)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m00066tr)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m00066tr)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m00066tr)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m00066sq)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m00066sq)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m00066sq)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m000616b)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m00066wb)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m00066xf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0006186)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m00066y2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m00066vp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m00066zs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m000677f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0006785)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m000672g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0006182)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m000618b)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m00066x0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m00066xy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m00066y6)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m00066tw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m00066vm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m00066vr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m00066zq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m00066zv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0006779)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m000677k)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0006783)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0006788)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m000672b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m000672m)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m000678y)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m00066s6)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000673c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m00066x5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m00066v1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m00066z2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0006792)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0006772)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m000671c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000673p)

Sketches: Stories of Art and People 11:30 THU (m000670k)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b081l7w0)

Spain's Lost Generations 23:00 MON (m0003jr1)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m00066xb)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m00066xb)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m00066sx)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m00066sn)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m00066t1)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m00066v6)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m00066v6)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m00066z7)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m00066z7)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m000675v)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m000675v)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0006711)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0006711)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m000671h)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m000671h)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m000673t)

The Art of Now 15:30 SAT (m00060w4)

The Art of Now 11:30 TUE (m000678d)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m0006177)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m000671p)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 MON (m00066y9)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 22:45 MON (m00066y9)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 TUE (m000676s)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 22:45 TUE (m000676s)

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The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 THU (m000670q)

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The Digital Human 16:30 MON (m00066yy)

The East Coast Listening Post 23:00 WED (m000677v)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m000616g)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m0006715)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m00066t7)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m00066t7)

The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars 13:45 MON (m00066ym)

The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars 13:45 TUE (m000678w)

The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars 13:45 WED (m000676h)

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The History of the Treaty of Versailles - in Five Future Wars 13:45 FRI (m0006735)

The Invention of... 15:30 TUE (m0002yby)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m000674n)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m000674n)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m00066th)

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The Media Show 16:30 WED (m000676t)

The New Age of Capitalism 21:00 FRI (m0006742)

The Origin of Stuff 21:00 WED (m000677l)

The Patch 10:30 SAT (m00066wd)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (m00060vc)

The Secret History of Science and Religion 11:00 FRI (m000672f)

The Untold 11:00 MON (m00066xz)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m00066wg)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m00066tc)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m00066zj)

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The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m000671s)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0006747)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08k34n6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b01qdzby)

Time Brings Roses: A Radio Cabaret 23:30 SUN (m00040m7)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m00066zl)

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Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets 23:30 SAT (m00060xk)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04hkxj9)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m00066vf)

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World at One 13:00 MON (m00066yk)

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You and Yours 12:18 MON (m00066yf)

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