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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 APRIL 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000463x)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (m000463z)
Michael Tippett

Episode 5

The music of the British composer Michael Tippett - including the oratorio A Child of Our Time, five operas, and four symphonies - is among the most visionary of the 20th Century, but little has been written about his extraordinary life. In this new, first complete biography, arts writer and broadcaster Oliver Soden weaves a century-spanning narrative of epic scope and insight.

Soden has been given unprecedented access to unpublished letters and manuscripts, and has recorded interviews with Tippett’s friends and colleagues. He paints a portrait of a powerful intellect and infectious personality - charming, with a consuming interest in other people, stubborn and great fun.

But he also uncovers the sorrows and secrets that Tippett stowed away beneath his cheerfulness, not least the darker reaches of some tempestuous and often tragic love affairs that sometimes blurred the lines between the professional and the personal.

Tippett’s was a long, exciting life - and woven through it all is his amazing, varied music, as beautiful as it is challenging, and the eclectic supporting cast of his friends, colleagues and lovers. His was truly a life of the 20th Century - but one that can also shine a light on the 21st.

The final episode, the 'Grand Old Man of Music'. A critical analysis of Michael Tippett’s late years of life and music, a period of renewed lyricism.

Abridged by Elizabeth Burke
Produced by Pippa Vaughan
Read by Oliver Soden featuring Derek Jacobi and Nicholas Boulton
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0004641)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0004643)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0004645)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0004647)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0004649)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Juanita Francis, Praise and Worship leader and Youth Pastor at Ruach City Church, London.

Good morning.

Well I was on the phone making myself a cold drink, reached into the freezer for some ice, grabbed what I thought to be an ice cube, and dropped some in my glass. As I picked up the glass. I then heard God say the words; "Pay Attention!" Now I grew up in a Pentecostal church where I believe we can hear God’s voice in our everyday life, and that’s really important.

So rather than picking up an ice cube I realised I had actually picked up a piece of frozen broccoli and dropped it in my glass. It was in a similar bag and even felt similar, so it was funny at first. And then I felt like I heard God say; “how many times have you been distracted that you've picked something up you weren’t meant to??!!” The problem wasn't the glass, or the broccoli the problem was the fact I wasn't "PAYING ATTENTION".

I wonder if a similar lack of attention could be behind certain parts of the Easter story? The same people crying hosanna on Jesus’ arrival to Jerusalem, were the ones who later shouted crucify him…Imagine. I wonder if they had paid more attention might they have realised that in front of them was the very answer to their cry. Yet still they chose Barabas instead of Jesus. The crowds couldn’t see this righteous man didn’t deserve to die. Yet still we have an incredible miracle of this season in Good Friday that brings us into Easter Day.

Dear Lord, help us to "PAY ATTENTION”, so that we have our eyes open - both literally and spiritually.

Amen.


SAT 05:45 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (m000458p)
Series 13

An Instrumental Case

“We play many musical instruments in our family. Lots of them produce the same pitch of notes, but the instruments all sound different. Why is this?” asks Natasha Cook aged 11, and her Dad Jeremy from Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

For this instrumental case Hannah and Adam are joined by the Curious Cases band - Matt Chandler and Wayne Urquhart - to play with today's question.

Bringing the science we have acoustic engineer and saxophone player Trevor Cox. Plus materials expert Zoe Laughlin demonstrates a selection of her unusual musical creations, including a lead bugle.

Presenters: Adam Rutherford, Hannah Fry
Producer: Michelle Martin


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0004dtw)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (m00046sd)
Jallianwala Grove: Remembering the 1919 massacre in Amritsar

The first memorial to remember the Jallianwala Bagh massacre of 1919 has been created in Britain by a Sikh charity group. A hundred years ago, Brigadier General Reginald Dyer and his men opened fire and shot at thousands of unarmed people who had gathered at Jallianwala Bagh, a walled garden area in the city of Amritsar, India. Hundreds were shot dead, making this one of the darkest days in British colonial history.
Broadcaster and author Anita Anand has grown up knowing about this tragic event, as her own grandfather Ishwar Das Anand was in Amritsar that day. She meets Chan Chowdhry, the general secretary of The Pothohar Association UK, who came up with the idea to plant 1650 trees for the 100th year. For Chan, it was important to create a living breathing memorial.
This newly planted woodland memorial known as ‘Jallianwala Grove’ is now part of the National Forest in an area known as Eastern Old Parks, which lies on the outskirts of the historic town of Ashby-de-la Zouch in Leicestershire. Chan sees for the first time the completed woodland memorial and tells Anita why it’s important to mark this awful tragedy in the English landscape.
Anita also speaks to the National Forest's Chief Executive John Everitt, who explains the long established tradition of planting a tree to remember, commemorate or celebrate.
The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Readings by Anita Anand 'The Patient Assassin'.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0004dty)
Farming and Climate Change

According to Government figures, 10% of the UK's greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture. But farmers and researchers across the country are trying all sorts of things to reduce those emissions.

Charlotte Smith visits a mixed farm in Oxfordshire, run by Adam Twine. He is the founder of the Farm Carbon Cutting Toolkit, which aims to help farmers reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. He is trying all sorts of things to reduce the emissions from his farm including feeding his livestock on forage rather than imported feed, using low emission fertiliser and building wind turbines and solar panels for renewable energy.

We have a report from a dairy farm using a special feed additive made from garlic and citrus which has cut their methane emissions by 30%. We also visit the James Hutton Institute in Scotland to hear about research in to reducing the use of nitrogen fertiliser.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Heather Simons


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0004dv0)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m0004dv2)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0004dv4)
Patti Boulaye

Patti Boulaye is a British-Nigerian singer, actress and artist. She recalls coming to London aged 16, and appearing on the west end stage in shows from HAIR to Carmen Jones, and talks about her new one woman show Aretha and Me.

Creative movement director and choreographer Yami ‘Rowdy’ Lofvenberg won the UK Hip Hop Championships in 2010, and worked on the London 2012 opening ceremony. She was adopted from Colombia and grew up in Sweden, and she describes the difficulties growing up and returning to her birthplace.

Landscape designer Adam Frost started his career with an apprenticeship with North Devon Parks Department. He has won seven Gold Medals at the Chelsea Flower Show and he explains how to build a garden from scratch.

Christopher Somerville has written about his favourite cathedrals. He describes how his fascination with these great structures started while visiting Wells Cathedral at the age of six.

Presented by Aasmah Mir and Luke Jones.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Beverley Purcell


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0004dv6)
Bristol

Jay Rayner takes his culinary panel to Bristol. Niki Segnit, Jordan Bourke, Andi Oliver and Sophie Wright answer the audience’s questions.

The panellists suggest the best techniques for glazing a sticky ham, give wedding cake flavour ideas and discuss Easter feasts. They also consider if there is such a thing as too many condiments in the cupboard.

Joining the panellists, Nick Saltmarsh of Hodmedod's discusses lentils and pulses, and Fozia Ismail from The Matatu Kitchen talks about Somali food traditions.

Producer: Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Hester Cant

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Forum (m0004dv8)
Cambodia's ancient Khmer Empire

Around the twelfth and thirteenth century CE, Angkor was thought to be one of the world's biggest cities. Its massive temple complex at Angkor Wat covered hundreds of acres adorned with majestic towers, terraces and waterways: symbols of the might of the Khmer kings who ruled the region. Angkor Wat attracts millions of tourists every year and has pride of place on the Cambodian national flag but there's much more to Angkor and the Khmer civilisation than its temples.
Bridget Kendall talks about Khmer history with David Chandler, Emeritus Professor of history at Monash University in Melbourne; architectural historian Dr. Swati Chemburkar from the Jnanapravaha Arts Centre in Mumbai; anthropologist Dr. Kyle Latinis from the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore and former Dean of the University of Cambodia; and art historian Dr. Peter Sharrock from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.

Photo: Angkor Wat temple complex. (SERENA/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0004dvb)
Fictions and Factions

Volodymyr Zelensky played a President in more than 50 episodes of TV comedy - but does that mean he can do the job in real life? Jonah Fisher reflects from Kiev on a surreal election campaign - and catches up with a box set.

Kate Adie introduces this and other stories from correspondents and reporters around the world.

India's election, the largest in the world - and thus the largest ever held - is also under way. While covering this extraordinary exercise of democracy, Rajini Vaidyanathan met one man in the Himalayas who has an enduring faith in the electoral process. He's 102 years old and has voted in every Indian election since independence.

Jonathan Griffin loves the soul-shaking sound of South African music - and recently heard songs of freedom, defiance and rivalry during a political debate near Johannesburg, where the contingents competed with vocals as well as rhetoric.

There's not much arable soil in the United Arab Emirates - but plenty of sand and sunshine - so the government's keen to bolster food security by growing more and importing less. Georgia Tolley tastes the fruits of high-tech agriculture, coaxed from a desert greenhouse.

And Stephen McDonell reveals an unsuspected side of Beijing - beyond its vast official spaces and political power plays. The city is also home to a raucous, ramshackle, rebellious underground live music scene. But in the face of rising rents and increasing red tape, how long can its live-bands play on?


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0004dvd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0004dvg)
The psychology of fraud

Criminals fraudulently stole £1.2 billion last year from our bank accounts according to the industry body UK Finance.

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg - the true scale of financial fraud is hard to put a figure on. As many as four out of five people who have been stung don't report it.

Fraud is an epidemic that’s seemingly out of control.

In this programme, Iona Bain asks why do we fall for fraudsters?

How do they manage to dupe us into hitting the transfer button on fraudulent transactions worth thousands of pounds? Can understanding this give us more of a fighting chance against them? And what’s the role of technology in all of this - both as a catalyst and as a possible cure?

Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m000463f)
Series 99

Episode 2

The fire at Notre Dame Cathedral, the threat of a Measles outbreak and the Extinction Rebellion protests are among the stories covered in this week's News Quiz.

Host Miles Jupp is joined by Zoe Lyons, John Robins, Hugo Rifkind & Danielle Ward for Radio 4's long-running topical quiz.

Zeb Soanes reads the news.

The chair's script was written by Madeleine Brettingham, Lucy Clarke and Laura Major, with additional material by Catherine Brinkworth, Kat Sadler and Esyllt Sears.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd
A BBC Studios Production


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0004dvj)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News (m0004dvl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m000463m)
Andrew Bridgen MP, Claire Fox, Stephen Gethins MP, Lisa Nandy MP

Shaun Ley presents topical debate from the Radio Theatre at London Broadcasting House with Conservative backbench MP Andrew Bridgen MP, Director of the Academy of Ideas Claire Fox, the SNP's Spokesman on Foreign Affairs and Europe Stephen Gethins MP and Labour MP Lisa Nandy.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0004dvn)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Classic Serial (b00fnbf3)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Episode 1

Adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic tale set in 15th-century Paris, dramatised in a collaboration between the BBC and Graeae, the disabled-led theatre company. Starring deaf actor David Bower, artistic director of Signdance Collective.

Quasimodo, the deformed bell ringer, hides away in the bell tower of Notre Dame Cathedral, friendless and ashamed of his appearance. When the bewitching gypsy Esmeralda arrives in Paris, Quasimodo falls in love with her from afar.

Quasimodo ...... David Bower
Esmeralda ...... Candis Nergaard
Frollo ...... Kevin Doyle
Madame Poutine ...... Susan Twist
Madame La Fayette ...... Rita May
Phoebus ...... Joseph Kloska
Mikael Leduc ...... Roger Morlidge
George ...... Garry Robson
Guillaume ...... Terence Mann

Written by Alex Bulmer
Directed by Polly Thomas


SAT 15:30 The Psalms (m0004dvq)
Episode 2

Some of the most beautiful poetry in the Bible is in the Book of Psalms. In four special programmes for Easter, Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons reads from the King James Version.

The Psalms show a whole range of human emotions. Here we find hymns, laments and songs of thanksgiving, offering a space for reflection and contemplation, addressing a wide range of subjects from love to politics and from history to faith.

In the second programme, Jeremy Irons begins with Psalm 34 and finishes with Psalm 44, 'My tongue is the pen of a ready writer'.

Produced by Susan Roberts


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0004dvs)
Women in Sudan, Game of Thrones, Nurse Molly Case, Top Girls

The photo of a young Sudanese woman chanting on top of a car went viral and became an iconic image in the protests against Omar al-Bashir’s rule. What role have women played in the protests? And what is the current status of women in the country? CNN correspondent Nima Elbagir in Khartoum and Associate Fellow, Chatham House and former British ambassador to Sudan Rosalind Marsden discuss.

The nurse and spoken word artist Molly Case on her book How to Treat People – A Nurse at Work.

How can we live an environmentally friendly life? Dr Tara Shine and Madeleine Murray, who run Change by Degrees, a sustainability consultancy that offers advice to business and communities, and environmental journalist, Lucy Siegle offer for some tips on the ways we can live better, greener lives.

Top Girls, the iconic feminist play by Caryl Churchill is currently on stage at the National Theatre in London. Lucy Black, Liv Hill and Katherine Kingsley, three actors from the cast discuss why the play made such an impact when it was first performed in 1982 and why it is still relevant today.

It's the final season of Game of Thrones - three fans Danielle Ward, Georgia Humphrey and Ruth Websdale tell us why the series appeals to female viewers.

The Shatila Refugee camp in the south of Beirut was originally built in 1949 to house Palestinian refugees. Following the outbreak of civil war in Syria in 2011 tens of thousands of Syrian refugees have fled to Lebanon many of them also taking refuge in the Shatila Camp. The publisher and author Meike Ziervogel talks about the work she is doing with 100 Syrian refugee women who have set up The Shatila Studio, a bespoke needlework business that is attracting orders from outside the camp.

BLACKPINK made history by becoming the first female K-Pop band to perform at the festival, Coachella. With a world tour set for this year and their single ‘Kill This Love’ climbing the charts in the UK and the US, it looks like they might be poised to break the western pop music market. We discuss the role of women in K-Pop, both as performers and as fans. And what’s behind the ‘girl crush’ concept? K-Pop dance instructor Tammy Jane Mejia, music journalist Biju Belinky and Dr Haekyung Um from the University of Liverpool discuss.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Dianne McGregor


SAT 17:00 PM (m0004dvv)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Inquiry (m0004dvx)
How is space changing earth?

Many nations have now entered the space race. China first sent a man into space in 2003 and in the last few months made a successful, unmanned, landing on the far side of the moon. This was a world first. India has its own record. A few years ago it launched more satellites into space, in one go, than any other nation. Nigeria is talking about sending an astronaut into space. And Kyrgyzstan is developing its first satellite, built entirely by female engineers. The Inquiry explores what lies behind all this activity. Is the power of national prestige giving way to different goals; education, economic progress and human rights?

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Rosamund Jones

This edition of The Inquiry was first broadcast in March 2019 on the BBC World Service.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0004dvz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0004dw1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0004dw3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0004dw5)
Prue Leith, Danielle de Niese, Deborah Frances-White, Samson Kayo, K.O.G & The Zongo Brigade, David McAlmont, Scottee

Clive Anderson and Scottee are joined by Prue Leith, Danielle de Niese, Deborah Frances-White and Samson Kayo for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from K.O.G & The Zongo Brigade.

Producer: Tim Bano


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0004dw7)
Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar

As Libya edges towards civil war, Becky Milligan looks at the life of the man behind the most recent conflict, which began with his military assault on the city of Tripoli.

Known as "The Strongman", Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar comes from a family of soldiers and as a young man admired his fellow army student Muammar Gaddafi, who would later denounce him after their disastrous defeat in a war in Chad.

He was given refuge by the Americans and ended up living for twenty years in Langley, Virginia, home of the CIA, before returning to Libya, with the self-proclaimed aim of saving the country from extremists.

Producers Smita Patel & Tural Ahmedzade
Editor Andrew Smith


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m0004dw9)
Sweet Charity, Machines Like Me, Smoke and Mirrors: The Psychology of Magic, Loro

Josie Rourke returns to the work of Cy Coleman, who wrote the music for City of Angels; with the Broadway classic Sweet Charity. With choreography from the world-renowned Wayne McGregor, Rourke reunites with Anne-Marie Duff as Charity, and Arthur Darvill makes his Donmar debut as Oscar, for her farewell production as Donmar Artistic Director. During Sweet Charity, multiple guest actors will play the role of Daddy Brubeck including Shaq Taylor, Adrian Lester, Le Gateau Chocolat, Beverley Knight and Clive Rowe.

Ian McEwan’s subversive and entertaining new novel Machines Like Me poses fundamental questions: what makes us human? Our outward deeds or our inner lives? Could a machine understand the human heart? Machines Like Me occurs in an alternative 1980s London, where Britain has lost the Falklands war, Margaret Thatcher battles Tony Benn for power and Alan Turing achieves a breakthrough in artificial intelligence. The novel's narrator Charlie drifts through life making his money by playing the stock market when he becomes involved in a menage a trois with a difference - one of the three is one of the first synthetic humans. It is not long before this strange love triangle inhabiting an even stranger alternate reality have to confront some profound moral dilemmas.

Smoke and Mirrors The Psychology of Magic at the Wellcome Collection in London explores how magicians have achieved astonishing feats of trickery by exploiting the gap between what we think we perceive and what we actually perceive. Recently scientists have begun to appreciate this ability as a powerful tool for the study of human psychology. This research has emerged from an extraordinary history that stretches back to the 19th century, where a fascination with the paranormal coincided with the birth of science as a profession and the flourishing of the entertainment industry.

Italian writer/director Paolo Sorrentino’s new film Loro - which means "them" - focuses on the controversial life of the former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi around the time of the “bunga-bunga” parties and the earthquake in L’Aquila.

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Geoffrey Durham, Naima Khan and Stephanie Merritt. The producer is Hilary Dunn.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0002rq8)
The Risk Makers

No one should take a risk without thinking about the possible future outcomes but who do you trust; your gut instinct or someone who will tell you they know what is going to happen? The trouble with humans and the future is that we are all suckers for a good story. In The Risk Makers Professor David Spiegelhalter looks at the track record of experts and finds it to be only slightly better than ' a dart throwing monkey'. With prediction it's data from the past that forms the best guide to the future. Gambling firms and the insurance industry understand this and base their businesses on numbers not rumours. However, the rest of us are often reluctant to engage with data and what it can tell us. Mixing archive with fresh interviews Professor Spiegelhalter discovers there is a personality type best suited to predictions,- so called foxes- although we rarely hear from them because they are often drowned out by 'hedgehogs'. Beware, though, an over reliance on data; like the ancient oracles, the usefulness depends on what you ask and how you interpret the replies. David meets with an academic who is an expert on Greek oracles but who also advises businesses about the future, a Lord who is one of the nation's foremost political and football pundits, the man who ran GCHQ for three years and the insurance executive whose job is to imagine possible malign futures and price them. The Risk Makers concludes if you want to know about the future, don't trust someone who tells you they know what will happen. Trust in data- of course but mix in humans too, lots of them – just make sure there are more 'foxes' than 'hedgehogs'!


SAT 21:00 The University Time Bomb (m0004gy7)
Omnibus

Universities in England are steeling themselves for a big hit on their finances. A recent ruling on how the government records student loans is set to add £12 billion to the deficit - and a wholesale rethink of how we finance over 18s education is needed to help balance the books.

In this two-part series, the BBC's Education Editor, Branwen Jeffreys, investigates what this will mean for the future of Higher and Further Education in England.

Have we reached "peak university"? Are caps on student numbers inevitable? And could any tightening of the purse strings mean some colleges and universities will go bust?

Presenter: Branwen Jeffreys
Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m0004dwc)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:15 FutureProofing (m00045b3)
Home

How the home will be disrupted and transformed by radical technological change.

Our homes may experience more disruption than anywhere else because of the forces unleashed by technological change. The notions we have about home - a private, secure, stable place where you can shut out the world and just be yourself - are under threat from technology and economic change.

From the internet of things and the Smart Home, to the complete rejection of any permanent fixed abode, FutureProofing hears how our ideas about home will be transformed in the 21st century.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (m00047tb)
Heat 4, 2019

(4/17)
Who was the first ever elected head of government to give birth while in office? Which city was once nicknamed Copperopolis? Which two seas are linked by the Suez Canal? Russell Davies has these and many other general knowledge questions on his cards in today's contest, which will determine who takes the fourth of the automatic places in this year's semi-finals.

As always, a listener also stands a chance of winning a prize if his or her questions succeed in Beating the Brains.

Today's competitors are:

'Dennis' Dennis, a resting academic from London
Matthew Ledbury, a writer and lecturer from Oxford
Alan Franklin, a retired librarian from Fulham in London
Helen Waters, a social care administrator from Ipswich.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 A Psalm for the Scaffolder (m00046q8)
Geoffrey Faber prize-winning poet Kim Moore invites us into her life as a writer. She focuses on her working class background and long held desire to follow her scaffolder-dad to work and become poet in residence among the scaffolders.

She shares her love of music and years spent working as a trumpet teacher, and how her tender, atmospheric poetry grapples with the transformations that affect both body and mind during a violent relationship.

This picture of Kim's life and the poetry it informs takes shape alongside a portrait painted by Claire Eastgate as part of her project, Painting the Poets, giving us a unique opportunity to listen in on the intimacies of the painter-sitter relationship.

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4



SUNDAY 21 APRIL 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0004dwf)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0004dwh)
Rise Above It by Kiare Ladner

In acclaimed writer Kiare Ladner's funny and touching story, Melody takes part in a most unusual yoga class and discovers something new about her mother.

Kiare Ladner was shortlisted for the 2018 BBC National Short Story Award with Cambridge University for Van Rensburg's Card. Her debut novel, Nightshift, will be published in late 2019. Her short stories have appeared in several anthologies including Lightship Anthology 1, New Contrast and Wasafiri. Kiare was born in Pretoria, South Africa, and is now based in the UK.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0004dwk)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0004dwm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0004dwp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0004dwr)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0004dwt)
Notre-Dame Cathedral

A special Bells on Sunday for Easter, following the fire which broke out in Paris’s Notre Dame cathedral on April 15th. As part of the 850th anniversary celebrations there, the cathedral received a renewed peal of bells. That was in 2013, when this recording was made.

Now after the fire, to the dismay of many Parisians, the bells must be silent for a time. Exactly 24 hours after the fire broke out, more than 100 cathedrals across France tolled their bells in solidarity, as did many British towers a few days later.

The New York Times commented that Emmanuel, the grande dame of Notre Dame’s bells, which has marked so many events great and tragic, will yet lead the majestic chorus again. Maybe not this Easter. But soon.


SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (m00045b7)
The Uncertainty of Mary

"I knew in my soul this was the end, waiting to hear the words "your son has died"”. Alison Cope, whose son Joshua was stabbed to death, reflects on a mother's grief.

Producer: Dan Tierney


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m0004dww)
The latest national and international news headlines.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (m0004dwy)
In My End Is My Beginning

Mark Tully strikes a valedictory note as he introduces the last original edition of Something Understood. He takes as his theme T S Eliot’s line from Four Quartets - "In my end is my beginning".

This Easter programme weaves together ideas of death and resurrection, cycles of change and cyclical time and the pain and the joy of moving on into the unknown.

There are readings from Eliot, Vera Brittain, Simone Weil and Brendan Kennelly, with music including a Resurrexit by Berlioz, a salsa from Willie Colon and a medieval rondo by Marchaut.

Readers: Paterson Joseph, Emma Fielding and Frank Stirling
Presenter: Mark Tully
Producer: Frank Stirling

A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 Sunrise Service (m0004dx0)
Easter is a festival of light – people stumbling upon a gloriously empty tomb as the day began, and light spilling into hearts and minds. Baptist minister the Revd Richard Littledale tells the Easter story as the sun rises. With Jesus, light came into the world as never before. Blind men saw, dead men walked, a world of muted colour was splashed with God’s sparking light. But that was after Calvary – the brightest light extinguished on the darkest day. Death now gives way to victory. Producer: Andrew Earis.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0004dx2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0004dx4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0004dx6)
The origins of the date of Easter, Cardinal Vincent Nichols and the fire at Notre-Dame Cathedral

Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0004cq9)
Habitat for Humanity

Dr Jan Eldred, a volunteer with the charity, makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Habitat for Humanity

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Habitat for Humanity’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Habitat for Humanity’.

Registered Charity Number: 1043641 (England & Wales) & SC048638 (Scotland)


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0004dx8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0004dxb)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0004dxd)
Jesus Christ is risen today!

Easter fanfares and the pomp and pageantry of Easter Day in a celebration of the Eucharist live from Southwell Minster. The Minster choir sings popular Easter hymns and carols including: Jesus Christ is risen today; Alleluia, alleluia, hearts to heaven and voices raise; and Thine be the Glory. The preacher is the Bishop of Southwell and Nottingham the Right Reverend Paul Williams, and the celebrant is the Dean, the Very Reverend Nicola Sullivan. The Cathedral Choir and English Pro Musica Brass Ensemble are directed by Simon Hogan, Assistant Director of Music, and the organ is played by Paul Provost, Rector Chori. Producer: Ben Collingwood.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b01s6y1h)
Cuckoo - Male

David Attenborough narrates the first in a new series of short stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs, beginning with the Cuckoo. After spending winter in Africa, the migratory urge propels the Cuckoos northwards. And for many of us their return is a welcome sign that spring is well and truly here.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0004dxg)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0004dxj)
Writer ….. Adrian Flynn
Director ….. Rosemary Watts
Editor ….. Jeremy Howe

Ben Archer ..... Ben Norris
Tony Archer .... David Troughton
Tom Archer .... William Troughton
Chris Carter .... Wilf Scolding
Ruairi Donovan .... Arthur Hughes
Alan Franks ..... John Telfer
Eddie Grundy .... Trevor Harrison
Will Grundy .... Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy .... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy .... Barry Farrimond
Shula Hebden Lloyd .... Judy Bennett
Elizabeth Pargetter .... Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter .... Toby Laurence
Lily Pargetter .... Katie Redford
Johnny Philips ..... Tom Gibbons
Fallon Rogers ..... Joanna Van Kampen
Natasha .... Mali Harries
Russ .... Andonis James Anthony
Tim Oatey .... Carl Prekopp
Jakob .... Paul Venables
Sadia .... Simran Kular


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (m0004dxl)
Gulf War Aircrew POWs

Sue MacGregor brings together the RAF men who were captured and tortured by the Iraqis during the first Gulf War.

In August 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait. Despite UN sanctions and attempts at diplomacy, President Saddam Hussein ignored the deadline to remove his troops. Operation Desert Storm, made up of forces from a large coalition of nations, began with a massive air offensive in the early hours of 17th January.

The RAF crews, flying Tornado aircraft from bases in Bahrain and Saudi Arabia, had a particularly dangerous mission. Flying at low level, they targeted the airfields and runways, aiming to ground the Iraqi air force. The tactic took its toll and four planes were brought down very quickly after the start of the war.

The pilot and navigator crews were captured by the Iraqis and held in appalling conditions - kept in solitary confinement, beaten and starved. Flight Lieutenant John Peters recalls how hearing the screams of other men was almost more frightening than being beaten yourself. Flight Lieutenant Robbie Stewart describes sitting with a plastic bowl on his head, trying to avoid flying debris as the allies unwittingly bombed the prison. During one raid, Peters took advantage of the chaos to shout to his navigator John Nichol, “I bet you’re not a fat bastard anymore!”

It was Peters and Nichol who, unwillingly, provided one of the most memorable images of what has since become known as the first television war. On pain of death, they appeared with other POWs on Iraqi television, condemning the war.

Joining Sue to recall their ordeal and its implications are airmen John Nichol, Robbie Stewart, John Peters, and his wife Helen, who was at home looking after a young family and waiting for news.

Producer: Kate Taylor
Series Producer: David Prest

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0004dxn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (m00047tp)
Series 22

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Lou Sanders, Frankie Boyle, Henning Wehn and Lucy Porter are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Germany, babies, trousers and beards.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0004dxq)
Top Banana: The Future of the World's Most Popular Fruit

Dan Saladino meets the scientists working on the future of a truly global food, the banana.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0004dxs)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0004dxv)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (m0004dxx)
In the latest programme of the monthly series, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from journalists and writers reflecting the range of contemporary life across the United Kingdom.
Shabnam Grewal grew up near Southall where, forty years ago, the New Zealand-born teacher, Blair Peach, was hit on the head by a police officer and later died. He was taking part in a protest against racism. The west London suburb had already witnessed the racially motivated murder of an Asian teenager. She remembers the tension and fears of the time and reflects on them in the company of her young son.
BBC News presenter, Tanya Beckett, has found herself part of a "Lady in the Van"-style drama - only in her case it's been a man in his fifties and a caravan. She muses on the unexpected connections she's forged with her unconventional neighbour amid the demands of contemporary living for them both.
Martin Bashir, the BBC's Religion Editor, found himself being asked about the meaning of Easter and has discovered that pondering a long-held guilty secret has helped him explain the most important festival in the Christian calendar.
Jane Labous in Dorset takes the plunge and goes mermaiding in Blandford Forum and finds out how the swimming craze that involves donning a fin and a tail is found empowering by women swimmers of different ages.
And Dan Whitworth, reporter for Radio 4's Money Box programme, prepares to return home to Sheriff Hutton in North Yorkshire and enjoy the spectacle of the flowers which are synonymous with spring and indicate the thriving nature of the village.
Producer Simon Coates


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0004dxz)
Correspondence Edition - Oxford Botanic Garden

Eric Robson is at the Oxford Botanic Garden for a correspondence edition of the show. Pippa Greenwood, James Wong and Matt Biggs answer questions from the GQT inbox, postbag and social media.

The panellists discuss Maple tree tapping, give suggestions for plants to grow next to Fuchsia magellanica and talk about propagating a Goat Willow. Thye also offer advice on how to ward off midges and recommend tomatoes to grow later in the season in a greenhouse.

Between answering questions, the panellists are shown around the historical Oxford Botanical Gardens by Deputy Director Dr Chris Thorogood.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Jemima Rathbone

A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0004dy1)
Sunday Omnibus - Wheelchairs, Eyesight and being HIV Positive

Fi Glover presents the omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen with three conversations - between friends about a state-of-the-art wheelchair; cousins with serious sight issues; and two 17 year old girls who are both HIV positive.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Mohini Patel


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00frpx4)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Episode 2

Adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic tale set in 15th-century Paris, dramatised in a collaboration between the BBC and Graeae, the disabled-led theatre company. Starring deaf actor David Bower, artistic director of Signdance Collective.

Quasimodo ...... David Bower
Esmeralda ...... Candis Nergaard
Frollo ...... Kevin Doyle
Madame Poutine ...... Susan Twist
Madame La Fayette ...... Rita May
Phoebus ...... Joseph Kloska
Mikael Leduc ...... Roger Morlidge
George ...... Garry Robson
Guillaume ...... Terence Mann

Writer, Jack Thorne
Producer, Susan Roberts


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0004cqc)
Ali Smith, Easter eggs in fiction, Cate Blanchett's Books to Live By

Ali Smith discusses Spring, the third instalment of her seasonal quartet, which she's written at speed to reflect current events.

John Mullan and James Smythe explore the best examples of hidden messages and jokes, or 'Easter Eggs', in fiction.

And Cate Blanchett invites Mariella to explore some of the books that have shaped her, as part of the podcast series Books to Live By.


SUN 16:30 The Psalms (m0004dy3)
Episode 3

Some of the most beautiful poetry in the Bible is in the Book of Psalms. In four special programmes for Easter, Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons reads from the King James Version.

The Psalms show a whole range of human emotions. Here we find hymns, laments and songs of thanksgiving, offering a space for reflection and contemplation addressing a wide range of subjects from love to politics and from history to faith.

In the third programme, Jeremy Irons begins with Psalm 55 and finishes with Psalm 107, 'They that go down to the sea in ships ... '.

Produced by Susan Roberts


SUN 17:00 The Populist Curtain (m00045lq)
Poland and Hungary

In 1946, Winston Churchill coined a memorable phrase: “From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an iron curtain has descended across the continent,” he said. Today the Soviet Union has gone, but populist parties are in government in every country along the route of the Iron Curtain, as defined by Churchill. In this series, political scientist Yascha Mounk travels that route, and finds out what is changing under these new governments in smaller cities, far away from the capitals. He speaks to supporters and opponents of the populist parties and builds up a complex picture of Europe in a time of flux.

Yascha begins in the north in the Polish city of Szczecin (Stettin) – where Solidarity was originally created. Today the PIS party governs the country, with its appeal to traditional religious values and social conservatism. Critics say it is attacking independent institutions, especially the judiciary. Szczecin saw vigorous protest against a law restricting abortion. He stays on the former Eastern side of the curtain by travelling on to Sopron, Hungary – the site of the picnic which led to the first mass breach of the Iron Curtain, then to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Victor Orban’s Fidesz party is accused of attacking civil society and the freedom of the press in his pursuit of an “illiberal democracy” – but there are forces fighting back locally.

Producer: Kate Lamble


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0004dw7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0004dy5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0004dy7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0004dy9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0004dyc)
Lindsey Chapman

The best of BBC Radio this week with Lindsey Chapman.

The basket of audio treats on offer this Easter Sunday includes formidable flying insects, the art of vouging, curious soundscapes, and a visit from Jeremy Irons.

We ask the big questions - are you a fox or a hedgehog – or maybe just a mole reading a diary?

From new beginnings to euphoric endings, we journey through the sound of the underground, explore how technology is changing how we see, and celebrate the life of an English composer – all in the Line of Duty.

So hold on to your bonnet …

Producer: Stephen Garner
Production support: Dave James


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0004dyf)
Tom is backed into a corner and Elizabeth makes a breakthrough.


SUN 19:15 Rumblings from the Rafters (b07jwt65)
Edible Dormouse and Peacock Butterfly

An Edible Dormouse played by Hugh Dennis and a Peacock Butterfly played by Amanda Abbington reveal the truth about life in an old attic in a house in Amersham in the last of three very funny tales, written and introduced by Lynne Truss, with additional sound recordings by Chris Watson.

The Edible Dormouse is no Common Dormouse. He is Russian and extremely serious-minded. He is obsessed with answering the question, "Why are we here?" both the philosophical question and the literal one. No answer satisfies him. So he has reached his own conclusion, which involves secret agents and a submarine. "I may be rare, cute-looking, and of indisputable foreign origin, but I am not stupid." He is planning a meeting with his fellow Edible Dormice to discuss their next move. He knows this won't be easy. The others think he is mad. Top of the agenda is what they should call themselves. "Imagine how it feels to be one of the only zoological species in existence whose very name says, "Have you ever thought of eating me?"

The Peacock Butterfly is youthful, intelligent, and ever so concerned with being brave and sensible about mortality. Having been born the previous year, she is re-visiting the attic before dying. "I remember when I first came in, I thought hello, this wouldn't be a bad place to pop off, when the time comes." But trying to be brave about her inevitable end is much harder than she expects, "Well, I'm sorry to say that for some completely inexplicable reason I totally lost it at the sycamore! I mean what's wrong with me? " But as she settles down to die, a sudden thought changes everything ...

Edible Dormouse: Hugh Dennis
Peacock Butterfly: Amanda Abbington
Written and introduced by Lynne Truss
Wildlife sound recordings Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.


SUN 19:45 Life at Absolute Zero (m0004dyh)
Series 4

Braking Distance

The last of three stories by Lynne Truss set in the windy seaside town of Meridian Cliffs. When a member of Team Raptor is caught cheating at the local Quiz Night in the George Hall, there are unexpected consequences for Team Vincible.

Directed by Kate McAll
A Pier production by BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Poetry Please (m0004dyk)
Ben Okri

Poet and Booker prize winner Ben Okri joins Roger McGough to talk about his selection of poetry from the listener request database. Derek Walcott, Jackie Kay and WB Yeats all make an appearance, and the writer reads some of his own work. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0004635)
David Thouless, Nadja Poderegin, Ian Cognito, Dr Michael O’Donnell, Les Reed

Pictured: Nadja Poderegin

Julian Worricker on:

David Thouless, whose work in the world of quantum mechanics earned him a share of the Nobel Prize for Physics.

The Serbian actress, Nadja Poderegin, who went from 'Bond girl' on screen to be a publisher and novelist.

Stand-up comedian, Ian Cognito, whose act was much loved on the comedy circuit but never allowed on TV.

Michael O'Donnell, who combined a medical background with a career in journalism and broadcasting, notably on Radio 4.

And the songwriter Les Reed, who co-wrote memorable songs for the likes of Englebert Humperdinck and Tom Jones.

Interviewed guest: Michael Thouless
Interviewed guest: Professor Andy Schofield
Interviewed guest: Tanya Firth
Interviewed guest: Toby Hadoke
Interviewed guest: Dr Harvey Marcovitch
Interviewed guest: Laurie Taylor
Producer: Paula McGinley

Archive clips from: Profile, Radio 4 09/10/2016; From Russia With Love, directed by Terence Young, Eon Productions 1963; Goldfinger, directed by Guy Hamilton, Eon Productions 1964; Comic To Comic: Ian Cognito, Radio 4 Extra 07/04/2012; Stop The Week, Radio 4 14/11/1987; O'Donnell Investigates, BBC Two 19/09/1988; Midweek, Radio 4 11/12/2002; Relative Values, Radio 4 30/08/1988; The Songwriters: Les Reed, Radio 2 18/11/1975; Les Reed Interviewed By Debbie Greenwood, Radio 2 29/03/1988.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0004dvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0004cq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (m00046sx)
Behind the Facades

The relationship between landlord and tenant is an important, often unseen, dynamic that most of us don’t give much thought to. And yet, it's reshaping high streets up and down the country.

High rents are blamed for the collapse of so many retailers - they appear unsustainable yet they are the vehicle through which much of our pension wealth is invested.

In this programme, Ruth Alexander looks at different models of ownership: from the big financial institutional investors through to the original aristocratic landowner and asks how - in the turmoil created by the rapidly changing retail environment - these landlords are facing up to a new reality.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Alex Lewis


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0004dym)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m00046sg)
Yentl reunion, Styx

Antonia Quirke reunites three cast members of Barbra Streisand's cult classic Yentl - Kerry Shale, Danny Brainin and Gary Brown. And in a radio exclusive, they sing the song that was cut from the final version. Super-fan Liza Ward explains why she has seen Yentl between 50 to 100 times and how she can remember every line of dialogue.

Styx is an ethical thriller, in which a single-handed yachtswoman come across a sinking ship full of refugees, but is told by the coastguard not to intervene. Director Wolfgang Fischer reveals the moral dimensions of his drama and discusses the difficulties of filming on the high seas.

Acting coach Martin Ledwith reveals the secrets of his job and why it doesn't involve telling actors how to act.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (m0004dwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 22 APRIL 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0004dyp)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m000459n)
Detective fiction - homicide and social media

Detecting the social – how the changing nature of crime stories illuminates shifts in society. Also, homicide confessions on social media. What does it mean when killers confess online? Laurie Taylor is joined by Mary Evans, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the LSE and Elizabeth Yardley, director of the Centre for Applied Criminology at Birmingham City University.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0004dwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0004dyr)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0004dyt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0004dyw)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0004dyy)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0004dz0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Juanita Francis, Youth Pastor at Ruach City Church, London.

Good morning. One night, I was driving around my old neighbourhood where I grew up. I've been there a couple of times. And I usually smile because I think about all the cool memories as a child – but then I tend to get frustrated as I also remember some old memories that I would rather forget.

I drove past my house one particular time and it reminded me of one night when I was a teenager, I was in a really dark place due to a difficult experience I had been through and I remember kneeling by my bed crying out to God. Although I remembered the pain, I sat and realised where I am today and that I got through that phase of depression. Jesus cared and loved me so much that he chose to hear my cry that night. I actually began smiling and thanking God knowing that my testimony is now helping others! This was the house I started writing my songs, learning to play piano, and even playing the violin, which happened to be purple by the way , this was also the same road where I had my first mini driving lesson with my mum who was probably kind of a bit frightened as I parked the car.

As I drove I realised what I thought was my end was actually my beginning and although the journey to today hasn't been straight forward, I realised I would've missed out on so much had things not been difficult before it got better.

Paul’s second letter to Corinthians says; "Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; and behold, all things are become new.”

Let’s pray . Dear God help me to see every pain of my past and unpleasant memory as a vehicle to encourage and uplift someone else. Help me to not live in my past but use it as a stepping stone to your future.

Amen


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0004dz2)
The last mud-horse fisherman

Britain's last mud-horse fisherman Adrian Sellick is facing an uncertain future. He's catching less shrimp than ever before and there's no-one to take over this iconic trade.

The mud-horse is a simple wooden sled tied together with rope which Adrian uses to get across the treacherous mud flats of the Bridgwater Bay in West Somerset, collecting Skate, Bass, Dogfish and Shrimp from his nets. Toby Field speaks to Adrian about his work and with fish and shrimp stocks dwindling asks what keeps him going.

Toby also meets Adrian's Dad, Brendan Sellick, who remembers a time when Shrimps were plentiful and being sold in large quantities to restaurants and shops in the surrounding area. In the fish shop that adjoins their house Adrian and Brendan process the day's catch and reflect on what the future might hold for an ancient craft that has occupied five generations of their family.

Presented and produced in Bristol by Toby Field.


MON 05:56 Weather (m0004dz4)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01s8qh4)
Wood Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the wood warbler. Their song has been described as "a spinning coin on a marble slab" and you're most likely to hear this chorister in oak or beech wood.


MON 06:00 Today (m0004dz6)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0004dz8)
Life in the wilderness

We underestimate how difficult it is to live in remote areas, says travel writer Dan Richards. He tells Kirsty Wark how he trekked to high mountain huts and distant snowy cabins for his new book, Outposts. Richards followed in the footsteps of Virginia Woolf, Roald Dahl and Jack Kerouac, who all found inspiration in the wilderness. But just as Kerouac went temporarily mad living on a remote mountainside, so today’s tourists in the Scottish Highlands and Nordic isles underestimate “hard nature’s indifference”.

Icelandic model turned sheep farmer Heida Asgeirsdottir knows how challenging countryside life can be. After an early career as a model in New York, she returned to Iceland to take over her parents’ sheep farm in a region of volcanoes and elemental storms. But even this distant region needs modern power and infrastructure, and this means a new hydro-electric plant whose owners want to flood her farm.

A family feel stuck in the middle of nowhere in Chekhov’s searing play Three Sisters. Rebecca Frecknall is directing a new production at the Almeida Theatre, exploring the thwarted ambitions and dreams of a provincial Russian town. Sisters Irina, Olga and Masha long to return to Moscow, but become bogged down in dead-end jobs and trapped by mortgages and marriage.

Chekhov’s play could easily be set in a British town today, says Sarah O’Connor from the Financial Times. She looks at the stark problems facing our seaside resorts and post-industrial towns. In her Orwell Prize-winning study of Blackpool, she challenged the idea that our seaside towns lack aspiration and are destined to fail. Now she explains why terms like “the Left Behinds” are dangerously misleading.

Producer: Hannah Sander


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (m0004dzb)
Losing Earth

The Activist and the Scientist

Nathaniel Rich tells the story of how climate change could have been stopped in the 1980s and why it wasn't.

In 1979, the science of climate change was known – what was happening, why it was happening, and how to stop it. In the US, over the next decade a variety of activists, scientists and politicians worked tirelessly to safeguard the environment but despite their efforts they couldn't. Losing Earth is American novelist Nathaniel Rich’s account of the decade when the world came tantalizingly close to signing binding treaties that could have made a difference.

Read by Kyle Soller, the recipient of this year's Olivier award for best actor.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0004dzd)
True Crime Under Investigation

We are currently experiencing a boom in true crime, with countless TV documentaries about cases like the Yorkshire Ripper, the murder of Jill Dando, the disappearance of Madeleine McCann and podcasts such as Serial, The Teacher’s Pet and My Favourite Murder. Not only are women usually the victims of these infamous crimes, but they are also the main consumers of the genre. So why are we so fascinated by true crime? Jane speaks to criminologist Dr Gemma Flynn, ex-police officer and Crimewatch presenter Jacqui Hames, All Killa No Filla podcast host Rachel Fairburn and to magazine editor Julia Davis, whose latest title Crime Monthly hit the news stands last month.

What is the appeal of reflecting on the grisly detail of violent crime? And how do we ensure that the victims and survivors are not ignored in the clamour to analyse a killer's motives or pathology? Jane speaks to Mo Lea who survived a brutal attack for which Peter Sutcliffe is the prime suspect, and to Carol Ann Lee who has written the book Somebody's Mother, Somebody's Daughter which highlights the stories of the women who's lives were devastated by Sutcliffe.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Laura Northedge

Interviewed Guest: Dr Gemma Flynn
Interviewed Guest: Julia Davis
Interviewed Guest: Jacqui Hames
Interviewed Guest: Rachel Fairburn
Interviewed Guest: Mo Lea
Interviewed Guest: Carol Ann Lee


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004dzg)
Ordinary Heroes

Episode 1

A contemporary drama serial following two uniformed police officers, Nisha and Scott, as they patrol the streets of London on foot during a single nightshift. This is policing at the sharp end. Anything can happen. And, of course, it does.

New recruit Scott can't wait to lock up some bad guys. Fresh out of police training college, he is a little frustrated to be puppy-walked by a female officer. Not that Scott is sexist or a misogynist (he loves his girlfriend and adores his mum), it's just that he craves the company and approval of other guys. He also suffers from White Knight syndrome and has a tendency to see women as damsels in distress. You see, when Scott was twelve, his dad died saving a family in a horrific motorway crash. It's a legend that Scott is desperate to live up to.

The last thing Nisha needs is a White Knight - and she's the total opposite of a damsel in distress. The experienced beat cop has been there, done that and received a commendation for bravery. She's charmed by Scott's boyish enthusiasm, he's a good-hearted soul, and she decides not to burst his balloon - he can find out the hard way that the job is much more about dealing with the sick and the vulnerable than tackling armed robbers.

Nisha joined the police because she thought the job would suit her - she's always had an enquiring mind and she likes dealing with people - but also because, after Stephen Lawrence, she felt that the Metropolitan Police needed people like her. She has faced hostility from friends and family but she's stuck to her guns.

What Nisha doesn't know is that tonight is a night she'll never forget. Because, while Scott and Nisha are - among other things - dealing with a paranoid schizophrenic teen who may have stolen a dog, a group of people are climbing into a van in a London suburb. And they're planning mass murder.

Cast:
Police Constable Nisha Hussain - Nisha Nayar
Police Constable Scott Knight - Joel Phillimore
Haneefa Khan - Susannah Fielding
Zeenat Khan - Gurkiran Kaur
John Baker - Lloyd Warbey
Tariq Dewan - Devesh Kishore

Written by Paul Marquess and Sally Tatchell
Series Creator Paul Marquess
Sound Designer Simon Morecroft
Composer Adam Welsh
Police Adviser Steve Ainscough
Cultural Adviser Rashad Ali, ISD Fellow
Producer Claire Fryer
Executive Producers Paul Marquess and Eoin O’Callaghan
Director Marina Caldarone

A PGM TV production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:00 The Fast and the Curious (m0004dzj)
Tom Heap sets off on a guilt trip road trip to find out why people like him won't give up the things they know are destroying the planet.

Tom loves his powerful car. Despite a pretty thorough knowledge of the science of climate change and the contribution that his petrol-powered Subaru makes to a warming world he doesn't want to give it up. He's not alone. Most of us have dirty pleasures we have no intention of foregoing, whether that's eating meat, buying fast fashion or flying to our favourite holiday destinations.

So what will make Tom and people like him change their behaviour for the sake of the planet? Tom hits the road to find out, dropping in on people who have influenced his thinking on the environment. There's food writer and cook, Jack Monroe who has helped make veganism a pleasure rather than a pain. There's John Browne, the oil company CEO who tried to push BP, Beyond Petroleum, Christiana Figueres, the diplomat who persuaded Presidents and PMs to sign up to carbon reductions. And there's the Bishop of Salford who thinks we should heed the Gospels and accept that personal sacrifice is essential to save the world.

Producer: Alasdair Cross


MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m0004dw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0004dzm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004dzp)
Adrian Mole and The Weapons of Mass Destruction

Episode 6

The fifth book in our series of readings from Adrian’s diaries, written by Sue Townsend. It starts in 2002 and covers the controversial period of the Iraq War.

Adrian is 34, working in a bookshop in Leicester and about to become the proud owner of a trendy loft apartment. His single status is about to change too, putting further strain on his already stretched finances. As war looms, Adrian is unwavering in his support for Prime Minister Tony Blair and military action, even though his eldest son Glenn is facing deployment to the Gulf.

Sue Townsend was born in Leicester in 1946. She left school at 15 and was a single parent with three young children by the age of 23. Like Adrian, she wrote in secret for many years, and acknowledged that they often shared the same views - Adrian "C’est moi," she once said.

First published in 1989, Adrian Mole’s diaries were instant bestsellers and Adrian, the remarkably resilient underdog, quickly became a national treasure. While recording the experiences of one individual and showcasing Sue's fearless and razor sharp wit, the diaries also illustrate how socio-political matters of the time affected the lives of ordinary people.

Copyright Siegfried Sassoon by kind permission of the Estate of George Sassoon

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0004dzr)
Care-home evictions, Self-defence classes, Pollen forecasts

You and Yours has been given access to new figures showing that more than 2000 people have been given notice to leave their care homes in the past year - some of them because their relatives complained about their care. The Care Quality Commission has shared new data with You and Yours, 18 months after it told this programme it would start collecting figures on how many families were banned from visiting their relatives and the number of residents evicted because of a complaint about the standard of care. Our disability reporter Carolyn Atkinson investigates.

We reveal how the number of people taking up martial arts and self defence classes has more than doubled in the last 18 months. Since the start of 2017, people taking up self defence classes has gone from just under 6000, to over 12,000 this year - and it's expected to grow. That's according to the British Martial Arts and Boxing Association, one of the largest martial arts organisations in the UK. According to many of their members, people are eager to take up self defence classes - because of the reported rise in knife crime across England and Wales. However, official prevention advice from the police is to run away - so how prepared can people really be?
We also speak to Giovanni Soffietto, director of the British Martial Arts and Boxing Association.

Following warnings of a so-called "Pollen Bomb" exploding over large parts of the country this Bank Holiday weekend, our reporter, Bob Walker, goes to Worcester where all the UK's pollen forecasts are made. He speaks to Dr Beverley Adams-Groom, a hay fever expert and pollen forecaster.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Tara Holmes


MON 12:57 Weather (m0004dzt)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0004dzw)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 The Art and Science of Blending (m0004dzy)
Whisky

Blending is a distinctly human act: other creatures don’t experiment in this way. So in this series we’re looking at four blended products – whisky, tea, perfume and champagne – to find out why we blend things, and why some blends work when others don’t. What do we hope to gain? What do we fear losing? And is blending an art … or a science? Barry Smith, a philosopher, tries to answer these questions by consuming rare teas, fine whiskies and perfect champagnes … so that you don’t have to.

In this programme he heads to Scotland to discover the secrets to blending whisky.


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0004dyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m0004f00)
The Ferryhill Philosophers

Google Grief and All The Gold Of Darius

By Michael Chaplin. Hermione and Joe confront the complexities and joys of friendship and love in both their lives and face up to commitments.

Alun Armstrong and Deborah Findlay star once again as the unlikely duo of ex-miner and Durham University philosopher facing life’s big questions together.

Cast:
Joe Snowball ... Alun Armstrong
Hermione Pink ... Deborah Findlay
Gloria ... Tracy Whitwell
Lucy ... Lauren Kellegher
Peter ... Dean Bone

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (m0004f02)
Heat 5, 2019

(5/17)
Russell Davies is joined by another four competitors at the Radio Theatre in central London as the quest continues for 2019's Brain of Britain. Today's Brains will need to know about the stories of Hemingway, the characters in Waiting for Godot, the teams in the 2018 World Cup and how to make eggs Benedict.

They are:
Allen Clarke, a retired air traffic control engineer from Southampton
Steve Goddard, a lecturer in French from Oxford
Rob Hemming, an author from Evesham in Worcestershire
David Sherman, a hospital administrator from Chelmsford.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0004dxq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Beyond Belief (m0004f05)
Amritsar Massacre

A hundred years after the Amritsar Massacre, when troops under British command fired on a unarmed crowd of Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims, this programme explores what led to the massacre and why it became a catalyst for the end of British colonial rule and the rise of Indian nationalism. Ernie Rae is joined by Dr Vinita Damodaran, Professor of South Asian History, University of Sussex, Amandeep Singh Madra, Co-author of “Eyewitness at Amritsar: A Visual History of the 1919 Jallianwalla Bagh Massacre" and author and historian William Dalrymple.

Producer: Catherine Earlam


MON 16:30 The Psalms (m0004f07)
Episode 4

Some of the most beautiful poetry in the Bible is in the Book of Psalms. In four special programmes for Easter, Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons reads from the King James Version.

The Psalms show a whole range of human emotions. Here we find hymns, laments and songs of thanksgiving, offering a space for reflection and contemplation addressing a wide range of subjects from love to politics and from history to faith.

In this final programme, Jeremy Irons begins with Psalm 115 and finishes with Psalm 150, including Psalm 137, 'By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion'.

Produced by Susan Roberts


MON 17:00 PM (m0004f09)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0004f0c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (m0004f0f)
Series 22

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Richard Osman, Holly Walsh, Luisa Omielan and Jack Dee are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as names, frogs, paper and parrots.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0004f0h)
The pressure piles on Mia, and Alan offers some words of encouragement.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0004f0k)
A Celebration of the Pub in Culture

We consider the connection between the public house and the arts. Why do pubs make such great settings, provide so much inspiration and serve as great venues for the arts?

Al Murray ponders the longevity of his pub landlord and what this character allows him to explore about Britishness, as literary journalist Suzi Feay considers the representation of pubs in books and TV.

Musician Eliza Carthy remembers her first ever public performance in The Bay Hotel in Robin Hood’s Bay, where she was a regular at the folk club there, while crime novelist David Mark tells us how he finds inspiration from the host of intriguing characters he meets down his local, the Samson Inn in Gilsland, Cumbria.

But, as pubs continue to be in decline – 25% of pubs have closed since 2001 - we consider how some hostelries are reinventing themselves as cultural destinations. Dawn Badlands runs The Inn Crowd, a project which supports rural pubs to host spoken word performances, and Adam Lacey is manager of The Old Joint Stock, a Birmingham pub with its own 100 seater theatre.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Hannah Robins


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004dzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 My Name Is... (m0004f0m)
My name is Katie

Forty year old Katie gambled over £50,000 in one night. in this programme she investigates how online gambling companies routinely break the regulations supposed to protect people like her.

Katie was a successful accountant working in the City of London, but she started using cocaine to stay awake to cope with the workload. After being signed off work from stress, her drug use increased. While unemployed she started gambling online after seeing advertisements on television.

The regulations say gambling companies should check the incomes of customers, and step in when they display online signs of problem gambling. This includes using a range of credit cards and playing all night – all things Katie did as she gambled away £125,000 with two gambling firms; all on credit cards. With one she lost £50,000 in a single night.

After rehabilitation Katie got hold of her account data from the gambling firms. She believes it proves how the gambling companies broke the rules and it also shows transcripts of the manner in which they spoke about her. Katie told the regulator, the Gambling Commission, about her case, but so far has heard nothing about what they are doing.

With the help of BBC Producer, Lydia Thomas, Katie wants to talk to the Gambling Commission, and she wants to meet the gambling companies who so far have refused to comment on her case. She also meets with politicians who are making promises to tighten gambling laws – Katie wants to know….when will they finally do it?


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m00046ry)
Restoring Brazil's National Treasure

Brazilians wept when their 200-year-old National Museum went up in flames last September. Twenty million items, many of them irreplaceable, were thought to have been reduced to ash when it was gutted by a massive fire. Staff said the loss to science and history was incalculable - and the tragedy, possibly caused by faulty wiring in the long-underfunded institution, led to much national heart-searching about the country's commitment to its heritage. The museum, housed in Brazil's former Imperial Palace in Rio de Janeiro, held unique collections of fossils, animal specimens, indigenous artefacts, as well as Egyptian and Greek treasures - and the oldest human skull found in the Americas.
Some scientists, who saw their entire life's work go up in flames, were in despair - but others vowed to work to rebuild and restock the museum. Now, months on, painstaking archaeological work in the debris has uncovered items that can be restored, while other specialists are setting out on expeditions to acquire new specimens. Tim Whewell reports from Rio on the agonies - and occasional small triumphs - of the slow, exhausting effort to bring a great national institution back to life.


MON 21:00 Patient Undone (m00045kt)
Professor Deborah Bowman reveals how a diagnosis of cancer has transformed her view of medical ethics and what it means to be a patient.

As Professor of Ethics and Law at St George's, University of London, Deborah has spent the past two decades teaching and writing about medical ethics, the moral principles that apply to medicine.

It’s taken her down countless hospital corridors, to the clinics and the wards where medical ethics plays out in practice, behind closed doors, supporting healthcare practitioners and their patients to negotiate uncertainty and conflict.

This is the field of clinical ethics and, each time, the ‘patient’ has been central to her response.

Yet in the autumn of 2017, everything changed. Deborah was diagnosed with breast cancer and it signalled the beginning of her undoing, not just personally but professionally too, playing havoc with what she thought she knew about clinical ethics.

Patient autonomy - literally ‘self-rule’- is one of its cornerstones - a patient’s right to make decisions about their healthcare. So what does autonomy mean if the ‘self’, she thought she knew, was so changeable and confusing?

Deborah returns to the Royal Marsden Hospital where she is a patient, to explore this - with both her personal and professional hats on.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0004dz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0004f0q)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


MON 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004dzp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (m0004f0s)
Mastertapes on Tour: Richard Hawley at the Crucible

In a special edition of MASTERTAPES, guitarist, singer-songwriter and producer, RICHARD HAWLEY welcomes John Wilson to the Crucible in his home town of Sheffield.

Throughout his 33 (and a third?) year career as a musician (he first recorded a John Peel session at the age of 19, with his band, Treebound Story), Sheffield has always played an influential part in Richard Hawley's song-writing. His 2001 album, Late Night Final, was named after the cry of vendors selling the Sheffield Star evening newspaper on the streets, and all his solo albums since, from Lowedges and Coles Corner to Truelove’s Gutter and Hollow Meadows, immortalized Sheffield landmarks.

At the end of a busy year , in which he worked on four film soundtracks, recorded a new album and debuted his first stage musical - "Standing at the Sky’s Edge" at Sheffield’s Crucible Theatre (featuring a mix of his old and new songs), Richard Hawley looks and plays his way back over a 33 (and a third?) year career as a musician (he first recorded a John Peel session at the age of 19, with his band, Treebound Story).

Performances include what was the world premier of 'My Little Treasures' from Richard's new album, as well as a version of 'Open Up Your Door' from the stage musical "Standing At The Sky's Edge" sung by Maimuna Memon and accompanied by Will Stewart.

Playing with Richard Hawley are Shez Sheridan on guitars, Jon Trier on piano and Clive Mellor on harmonica.

Producer: Paul Kobrak



TUESDAY 23 APRIL 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0004f0v)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (m0004dzb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0004f0x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0004f0z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0004f11)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0004f13)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0004f15)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Juanita Francis, Youth Pastor at Ruach City Church, London.

Good morning.

Recently I was reflecting on a music session I took part in and was overwhelmed mostly with joy of hearing some of the music come alive from pen and paper to the reality of a live performance. I was passionate about music in school I studied it but allowed fear and what I was hearing to persuade me to leave this journey to someone else who I thought might be more suited.

But as I was reflecting on my drive home I kept hearing this melody from "Little drummer boy" over and over again At first I didn't get it. I was like it's not Christmas . Then I began to hear the rest of that verse; “A song, a song high above the trees, with a voice as big as the sea, with a voice as big as the sea.” Then God began to speak to me – which I’m familiar with in my Christian faith.

He said ”your biggest problem is that you’re hearing from your perspective” and so He repeated it again; "Do you hear what I hear" My challenge was to embrace what God himself heard through my songs, my worship and my singing instead of what I was hearing from within myself.

Often we can discount or discredit ourselves because we don't feel like we sound right or have the right package, just like I did. We can even allow what others have said to alter our journey, our decisions or moving into what God has ordained for our lives all because of what we have unhelpfully “heard!” Romans 10:17 says this faith comes by hearing the word of God.

So let’s pray. Dear God, let us be challenged to hear what you hear.

Amen


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0004f17)
Horse-track systems, Public on farms, Leigh Court Farm

Chris Loughlin runs Leigh Court Farm near Bristol, including a 10 acre field where he currently grows vegetables - his tenancy agreement is coming to an end and the National Trust who own the land now wants to encourage livestock in the area. Mr Loughlin tells Heather Simons that if he loses the field his business may not survive. Charlotte Smith asks Mark Harold from the Trust what their plans are and how they balance farming and conservation in these situations.

With the weather warming Farming Today is looking at all the ways farmers encourage the public to come onto their land - visits, weddings, glamping, and even renting office space. Charlotte asks Cath Crowther from Bidwells what farmers have to consider before opening up their premises.

Horses spend a lot of time standing around in fields, but Anna Louise Walter has been to find out about the Track System which encourages horses to move around to the benefit of both the animal and the environment.

Producer in Bristol: Toby Field


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01s8vcs)
Nightingale Part 1

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the nightingale. (Part 1 of 2) A bird whose song of rich crescendos of pure whistles and breathless phrases is hailed as one of the most complex and beautiful in the bird world and quite different to its plain brown appearance.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0004f19)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (m0004f1c)
Brexit, Offa and Charlemagne

Jonathan Freedland compares Brexit today with tensions between King Offa of Mercia and Charlemagne, King of the Franks in the 790s


TUE 09:30 The Genius of Accidents (b0bbp79p)
Series 1

Viagra

Viagra was supposed to be a treatment for the heart condition angina, but during clinical trials an unexpected side effect was noticed by the young male participants. Telling the story of this unexpected discovery, presenter Adam Hart speaks with the Pfizer scientists Sir Simon Campbell and Dr Peter Ellis who were part of the team that noticed the unusual side effects, and brought Viagra forward as a treatment for erectile dysfunction. Sex journalist Alix Fox discusses the importance of this little blue pill to patients. This is the story of the accident that changed sex.

Producer: Rory Galloway.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (m0004f1f)
Losing Earth

At the Pink Palace

Nathaniel Rich's account of the years 1979-1989 when the first attempts were made to halt climate change. It's 1980 and in Florida two dozen experts are gathered at a coastal hotel in a bid to come up with legislation to tackle global warming. Read by Kyle Soller

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0004f1h)
Mental Health Problems and Relationships, British Charcuterie, Unconscious Bias

If you have a common mental health problem such as depression or anxiety what effect does it have on your relationship? What should you expect from your other half? Equally, if your partner has depression, what is the best way to support them? Linda Gask has had 30 years of clinical practice experience as a psychiatrist in the NHS. Poorna Bell is a journalist and author. She has written about her late husband’s struggle with depression and suicide. Nicole Krystal Crentsil is the co-founder of Black Girl Festival and a public speaker on culture. Nicole has spoken openly about her own mental health and the importance of a strong relationship. Alan Phillips has experienced severe depression in the past - his wife Karen has been hugely supportive.

Henrietta Green, founder of British charcuterie Live, tells Tina why British charcuterie is worth sampling and celebrating.

In her new book Biased - The New Science of Race and Inequality, Jennifer Eberhardt, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University, draws on years of research looking at how unconscious racial bias is ever present in our lives and tells us what we can do to counter it.

Presenter: Tina Daheley
Interviewed guest: Poorna Bell
Interviewed guest: Nicole Krystal Crentsil
Interviewed guest: Alan Phillips
Interviewed guest: Karen Phillips
Interviewed guest: Linda Gask
Interviewed guest: Henrietta Green
Interviewed guest: Jennifer Eberhardt
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004f1k)
Ordinary Heroes

Episode 2

A contemporary drama serial following two uniformed police officers, Nisha and Scott, as they patrol the streets of London on foot during a single nightshift. This is policing at the sharp end. Anything can happen. And, of course, it does.

New recruit Scott can't wait to lock up some bad guys. Fresh out of police training college, he is a little frustrated to be puppy-walked by a female officer. Not that Scott is sexist or a misogynist (he loves his girlfriend and adores his mum), it's just that he craves the company and approval of other guys. He also suffers from White Knight syndrome and has a tendency to see women as damsels in distress. You see, when Scott was twelve, his dad died saving a family in a horrific motorway crash. It's a legend that Scott is desperate to live up to.

The last thing Nisha needs is a White Knight - and she's the total opposite of a damsel in distress. The experienced beat cop has been there, done that and received a commendation for bravery. She's charmed by Scott's boyish enthusiasm, he's a good-hearted soul, and she decides not to burst his balloon - he can find out the hard way that the job is much more about dealing with the sick and the vulnerable than tackling armed robbers.

Nisha joined the police because she thought the job would suit her - she's always had an enquiring mind and she likes dealing with people - but also because, after Stephen Lawrence, she felt that the Metropolitan Police needed people like her. She has faced hostility from friends and family but she's stuck to her guns.

What Nisha doesn't know is that tonight is a night she'll never forget. Because, while Scott and Nisha are - among other things - dealing with a paranoid schizophrenic teen who may have stolen a dog, a group of people are climbing into a van in a London suburb. And they're planning mass murder.

Cast:
Police Constable Nisha Hussain - Nisha Nayar
Police Constable Scott Knight - Joel Phillimore
Haneefa Khan - Susannah Fielding
Zeenat Khan - Gurkiran Kaur
John Baker - Lloyd Warbey
Jez Randall - Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong
Tariq Dewan - Devesh Kishore

Written by Paul Marquess and Sally Tatchell
Series Creator Paul Marquess

Sound Designer Simon Morecroft
Composer Adam Welsh
Police Adviser Steve Ainscough
Cultural Adviser Rashad Ali, ISD Fellow

Producer Claire Fryer
Executive Producers Paul Marquess and Eoin O’Callaghan

Director Marina Caldarone

A PGM TV production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:00 The Bubble (m0004f1m)
Social media, especially Twitter has changed the way we consume the news. Articles, commentaries and opinions are put into our news feeds by the people we choose to follow. We tend to only follow the people we agree with and like, and block and unfollow the people we disagree with. We're creating our own echo chambers and social media bubbles.

These bubbles are making us more polarised than ever, and we’re less likely to listen to views that are different from ours. Are we missing out on hearing the other side, because we're not hearing why they think the way they do?

In this programme, for two weeks, two people with opposite views swap Twitter news feeds. One Labour voting Remainer, and one Conservative Leaver. They’ll keep audio diaries using their smartphones documenting what they’re consuming. Are they angry at what their opposite is consuming? Will it change their viewpoint on politics and world events?

At the end of the experiment they’ll meet each other for the first time to discuss what they learned. Will they confront each other, or will they be ashamed of themselves? Will they be disappointed by how the opposite side thinks or will they learn from each other?

Presenters: Joanna Fuertes and Cameron Bradbury
Producer: Lydia Thomas


TUE 11:30 The Art of Now (m0004f1p)
Race and Fashion

Deputy Editor of Elle Magazine UK, Kenya Hunt, celebrates the work of black designers in fashion and investigates how the fashion world is grappling with conversations around race.

Kenya meets different generations of black designers, exploring their creative processes and inspirations, alongside the challenges they face in building their careers. She speaks to established innovator and curator Duro Olowu, the London-based Nigerian-Jamaican designer who is one of a few black designers to have achieved luxury level success. He shares insights into his career, how he has changed the way fashion collections are presented and the importance of remembering black British fashion designers.
 
Kenya also talks to emerging designer and filmmaker Bianca Saunders, whose debut collections have met with international critical acclaim. She discusses the inspirations for her work and the challenges of growing an independent fashion label.

Recent years have seen as increase in representation of black models in fashion, off the runway and away from editorial pages, but there has still been recurring racist imagery from leading global design houses, and few black designers showcase their collections on runways. However, Edward Enninful has set a new tone as Editor of British Vogue, and Virgil Abloh has become the artistic director at Louis Vuitton.

With leading voices from different parts of the industry, including the veteran activist and model Bethann Hardsion, Kenya explores the opportunities for continued change in the sector.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0004f1r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004f1t)
Adrian Mole and The Weapons of Mass Destruction

Episode 7

The fifth book in our series of readings from Adrian’s diaries, written by Sue Townsend. It starts in 2002 and covers the controversial period of the Iraq War.

Adrian is 34, working in a bookshop in Leicester and about to become the proud owner of a trendy loft apartment. His single status is about to change too, putting further strain on his already stretched finances. As war looms, Adrian is unwavering in his support for Prime Minister Tony Blair and military action, even though his eldest son Glenn is facing deployment to the Gulf.

Sue Townsend was born in Leicester in 1946. She left school at 15 and was a single parent with three young children by the age of 23. Like Adrian, she wrote in secret for many years, and acknowledged that they often shared the same views - Adrian "C’est moi," she once said.

First published in 1989, Adrian Mole’s diaries were instant bestsellers and Adrian, the remarkably resilient underdog, quickly became a national treasure. While recording the experiences of one individual and showcasing Sue's fearless and razor sharp wit, the diaries also illustrate how socio-political matters of the time affected the lives of ordinary people.

Copyright Siegfried Sassoon by kind permission of the Estate of George Sassoon

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0004f1w)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0004f1y)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0004f20)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 The Art and Science of Blending (m0004f22)
Tea

Blending is a distinctly human act: other creatures don’t experiment in this way. So in this series we’re looking at four blended products – whisky, tea, perfume and champagne – to find out why we blend things, and why some blends work when others don’t. What do we hope to gain? What do we fear losing? And is blending an art … or a science? Barry Smith, a philosopher, tries to answer these questions by consuming rare teas, fine whiskies and perfect champagnes … so that you don’t have to.

In this programme he uncovers the secrets to blending tea.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0004f0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b08n3lxs)
The Progress of the Soul of Lizzie Calvin

THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUL OF LIZZIE CALVIN

In poet John Donne's great unfinished work of the same name , he plays with the ancient idea of the transmigration of souls, that a spirit might be reincarnated in many different lives. For contemporary poet Michael Symmons Roberts, the idea of making a new 'Progress of the Soul' has long been an ambition. Both poets have serious fun with this idea, imagining a soul passing, dissatisfied with each successive form of life, through a fantastical range of insects, plants, fish, animals and on, trying to reach its ultimate fulfilment as a human being.
The soul , played by Glenda Jackson is the driving voice of the drama - key narrator and storyteller. Beginning in the body of Lizzie Calvin, a minister in waiting , the soul journeys through different forms of life, from a flea on a dogs back to a mandrake . This is a new radio poem that is irreverent and serious, lyrical and disturbing, witty and heart breaking . It ultimately questions the idea of the soul, what its relevance is in contemporary society .

Written by Michael Symmons Roberts
Sound producer Steve Brooke
Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (m0004dv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m0004f24)
Could Britain Feed Itself?

Could Britain feed itself? Tom Heap assesses how much more of our own food we could potentially produce. Currently we import nearly half - 30% from the EU but in a time of growing population and political change could we step up our home grown fare? He asks about the innovative technology helping farmers make smart use of the land they have, visits labs to ask what changes we might need to allow and sizes up our allotments, gardens and window boxes to see if we could be more productive at home. With some theoretical ideas and practical realities he aims to give you food for thought.

Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (m0004f26)
Biscuit Names

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright look into the weird and wonderful world of biscuit names while munching some in the studio with Anastasia Edwards, author of Biscuits and Cookies, A Global History. Why is it a Garibaldi and how about a Jammie Dodger?
Producer Beth O'Dea


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0004f28)
Series 48

Malcolm Lowry, writer, nominated by Ian McMillan

Matthew Parris meets the poet Ian McMillan to find out about the life of his literary hero Malcolm Lowry.
Ian first discovered this twentieth century writer's work as a young sixth former searching for literary inspiration. He stumbled by chance upon the writer's most famous novel, Under the Volcano, and Lowry's lyrical lines have remained with Ian ever since.
Joining Matthew and Ian to discuss the life of this Merseyside writer is the artistic director of Liverpool's Bluecoat Theatre, Bryan Biggs. Together, they discuss the biography of this complex and intense man, a life that was full of sea-voyaging, shack-dwelling and heavy drinking.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair


TUE 17:00 PM (m0004f2b)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0004f2d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b07j4qx6)
Series 7

Chris Packham

Naturalist Chris Packham reads from the nature diaries he kept as a teenager, and is interviewed by Rufus Hound about his formative years - which were mostly spent up trees, looking for birds.

A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0004f2g)
Natasha finds herself in demand and Jill shares a tender moment.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0004f2j)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004f1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Populist Curtain (m0004f2l)
Austria and Italy

In 1946, Winston Churchill coined a memorable phrase: “From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an iron curtain has descended across the continent,” . Today the Soviet Union has gone, but populist parties are in government in every country along the route of the Iron Curtain, as defined by Churchill. In this series, political scientist Yascha Mounk travels that route, and finds out what is changing under these new governments in smaller cities, far away from the capitals. He speaks to supporters and opponents of the populist parties and builds up a complex picture of Europe in a time of flux.

In this episode, Yascha stays in countries which were on the West of the former Iron Curtain. Graz in Austria is the birthplace of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Here, populists have been brought into the fold – with the coalition between the centre-right Austrian People's Party and the far-right Freedom Party of Austria running the country. But Graz subverts expectations: the Communist Party is locally strong here too. His journey ends in the Italian city of Trieste, which was contested city after both WWI and WWII. Here Italy’s peculiar coalition between the Five Star and Lega parties is accused of attacking minorities and immigrants. Will Italy’s numerous smaller opposition parties manage to unite against the coalition?

Producer: Kate Lamble


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0004f2n)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (m0004f2q)
When ex-footballer Clarke Carlisle went missing in 2017 he believed everyone would be better off without him. We hear from him and his wife about recovery from the brink of suicide


TUE 21:30 The Long View (m0004f1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0004f2s)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


TUE 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004f1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Fred at The Stand (m0004f2v)
Series 2

Micky Bartlett, Jay Lafferty, Stuart Mitchell and Andy Askins

Fred MacAulay is back at The Stand Comedy Club in Glasgow doing what he does best - making people laugh.

This new series brings another selection of some of the best of stand-up comedians working in the UK right now. Some you’ll know and some you won’t - yet.

This show sees Micky Bartlett share his opinions on Northern Irish politics as well as living with a partner for the first time, while Jay Lafferty speaks for a generation that didn't grow up with dating apps. Stuart Mitchell has changed his life by appearing to be a serial killer and, to close the show, one of the most respected stand-up comedians in the country - the outstanding Andy Askins.

Fred At The Stand is the closest thing your ears are going to get to an actual night in a comedy club.

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0004f2x)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



WEDNESDAY 24 APRIL 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0004f2z)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (m0004f1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0004f31)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0004f33)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0004f35)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0004f37)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0004f39)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Juanita Francis, Youth Pastor at Ruach City Church, London.

Good morning.

Did you know that God has given us all gifts or skills, some more than others but our habit is that sometimes when we become comfortable in a gift, we can tend to neglect anything else. I did just that.

Some time ago I was sitting at a lunch with a friend and when he asked me how my singing was going. I chuckled and told him “c’mon you know I don’t do that anymore.” And he pulled out his phone looked up a Bible passage on it from the first letter of Timothy chapter 4. It says; "Neglect not the gift that is in thee, which was given thee by prophecy. Meditate upon these things; give thyself wholly to them; that thy profiting may appear to all." As soon as I heard that I was silent. I was actually convicted. I had been happy to dance and exercise other gifts because I had mastered those gifts and was confident in them. As for singing and songwriting I didn’t even consider it a gift at all.

He continued, “Now you got to work on it with the same passion as you did the other gifts.” So I did. I joined my church praise and worship team, sang a couple of solos, became a praise and worship leader, and even put out an album/ and out of that I became confident because I was giving it time.

So what am I saying? To those who don't use their gifts due to fear or feeling incapable. First let me say this God has not given us the spirit of fear but of peace, love and a sound mind. We have to understand we have the responsibility to the gift God has bestowed upon us.

So let’s pray I pray that we walk in what God has called us to, no ifs or buts. Be all God has called us to be!

Amen.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0004f3c)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sby02)
Nightingale

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the extraordinary duet between cellist Beatrice Harrison and a nightingale recorded live as an outside broadcast and the first broadcast of any wild animal not in captivity.


WED 06:00 Today (m0004f3f)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 New Ways of Seeing (m0004f3h)
Machine Visions

How is technology changing the way we see? The artist James Bridle reimagines John Berger’s Ways of Seeing for the digital age, assessing the reliability and power of images.

“The camera, by making the work of art transmittable, has multiplied its possible meanings and destroyed its unique original meaning.” (John Berger)

In 1972, Berger’s seminal TV series and book changed perceptions of art and set out to reveal the language of images.

Of course, that was before the internet, smartphones, and social media took hold.

How do we see the world around us now? And, who are the artists urging us to look more closely?

James Bridle writes about the development of technology on our lives. His work has been exhibited at the V&A, the Barbican, in galleries worldwide, and online. In this series of four programmes, he updates Berger’s Ways of Seeing, inviting contemporary artists to explore how the technology we use every day has transformed the ways in which we see and are seen.

In this second episode, Machine Visions, James reveals the true meaning of images today. In an era of face-swap and video generation technologies, fake news and conspiracy theory, how has digitisation altered the nature, reliability and power of images? Artists Trevor Paglen, Hito Steyerl, Constant Dullaart and Adam Harvey explore how digital images have become so much more than mere pictures.

Producer: Steve Urquhart
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4


WED 09:30 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (m0004f3k)
Series 13

The Lunar Land Pt 1

A double episode to mark the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, and the first humans to walk on the Moon.

Harley Day emailed curiouscases@bbc.co.uk to ask “Why do we only have one Moon and what would life on Earth be like if we had more? I'll be over the moon if you can help me solve this mystery.”

In this first episode, Hannah and Adam Featurinlook at how the Moon was formed and why we only have one. g Maggie Aderin-Pocock space scientist and author of 'The Book of the Moon' and cosmic mineralogist Sara Russell from the Natural History Museum.

Presenters: Adam Rutherford, Hannah Fry
Producer: Michelle Martin


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (m0004f3m)
Losing Earth

The Hole in the Ozone Layer

Nathaniel Rich's account about the efforts made in the 1980s to halt climate change. It's 1985 and the hole in the ozone layer leads to headlines and political action. Campaigners for a reduction in global warming learn invaluable lessons.

Read by Kyle Soller
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0004f3p)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (m0004f3r)
Ordinary Heroes

Episode 3

A contemporary drama serial following two uniformed police officers, Nisha and Scott, as they patrol the streets of London on foot during a single nightshift. This is policing at the sharp end. Anything can happen. And, of course, it does.

New recruit Scott can't wait to lock up some bad guys. Fresh out of police training college, he is a little frustrated to be puppy-walked by a female officer. Not that Scott is sexist or a misogynist (he loves his girlfriend and adores his mum), it's just that he craves the company and approval of other guys. He also suffers from White Knight syndrome and has a tendency to see women as damsels in distress. You see, when Scott was twelve, his dad died saving a family in a horrific motorway crash. It's a legend that Scott is desperate to live up to.

The last thing Nisha needs is a White Knight - and she's the total opposite of a damsel in distress. The experienced beat cop has been there, done that and received a commendation for bravery. She's charmed by Scott's boyish enthusiasm, he's a good-hearted soul, and she decides not to burst his balloon - he can find out the hard way that the job is much more about dealing with the sick and the vulnerable than tackling armed robbers.

Nisha joined the police because she thought the job would suit her - she's always had an enquiring mind and she likes dealing with people - but also because, after Stephen Lawrence, she felt that the Metropolitan Police needed people like her. She has faced hostility from friends and family but she's stuck to her guns.

What Nisha doesn't know is that tonight is a night she'll never forget. Because, while Scott and Nisha are - among other things - dealing with a paranoid schizophrenic teen who may have stolen a dog, a group of people are climbing into a van in a London suburb. And they're planning mass murder.

Cast:
Police Constable Nisha Hussain - Nisha Nayar
Police Constable Scott Knight - Joel Phillimore
Haneefa Khan - Susannah Fielding
Zeenat Khan - Gurkiran Kaur
John Baker - Lloyd Warbey
Tariq Dewan - Devesh Kishore

Written by Paul Marquess and Sally Tatchell
Series Creator Paul Marquess

Sound Designer Simon Morecroft
Composer Adam Welsh
Police Adviser Steve Ainscough
Cultural Adviser Rashad Ali, ISD Fellow

Producer Claire Fryer
Executive Producers Paul Marquess and Eoin O’Callaghan

Director Marina Caldarone

A PGM TV production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0004f3t)
Peter and Caroline - There Is No-one Else

Friends and fellow carers of adult children with special needs talk about their lives and their love of gardening on the same allotments - a sanctuary away from the demands of caring. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


WED 11:00 My Name Is... (m0004f0m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Ability (m0004f3w)
Series 2

Weekend Away

Matt is 25. He has cerebral palsy and can only speak via an app on his iPad. Everyone who cares about Matt knows that this isn't the defining thing about him. He is funny and clever and "up for stuff" - partly because he is keen to show that there's nothing he can't do, but also because, if he's honest, he's aware that he's less likely than other people to get the blame.

In this second series of the award nominated comedy, Matt is still sharing a flat with his best mate, Jess. He is still in love with her but, much as she likes him, she is still not in love with him. She does however, fancy Matt’s rubbish carer, Bob (Allan Mustafa). Well just a tiny bit anyway. Not that she would ever admit it. After all, Bob is even more lazy and useless at most things than she is.

But Bob is willing. And although domestic duties are not really his forte, he likes Matt and treats him like a real person. And over the last year or so the three of them have been through a lot together - well a lot of drinking and hangovers anyway.

Ability is the semi-autobiographical co-creation of the 2018 Britain’s Got Talent winner, Lee Ridley, otherwise known as Lost Voice Guy. Like his sitcom creation, Lee has cerebral palsy and can only speak via an app. He is - probably - the first stand up comedian to use a communication aid. Prior to BGT, Lee won the BBC New Comedy Award in 2014, has written and performed four full Edinburgh shows and has just completed a major sell out tour of the UK.

Katherine Jakeways, the co-creator and co-writer of Ability, is a multi-award nominated writer. She has written North by Northamptonshire, Guilt Trip and All Those Women for BBC Radio 4 as well as numerous radio plays. She has also written for Crackanory and The Tracey Ullman Show for TV.

The series is set in Newcastle and many of the cast last played together as children in Biker’s Grove.

Cast includes:
Matt............Lee Ridley – aka Lost Voice Guy
Bob..............Allan Mustafa
Jess..............Sammy Dobson
Matt's Inner Voice.............Andrew Hayden-Smith

A Funny Bones production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0004f3y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004f40)
Adrian Mole and The Weapons of Mass Destruction

Episode 8

The fifth book in our series of readings from Adrian’s diaries, written by Sue Townsend. It starts in 2002 and covers the controversial period of the Iraq War.

Adrian is 34, working in a bookshop in Leicester and about to become the proud owner of a trendy loft apartment. His single status is about to change too, putting further strain on his already stretched finances. As war looms, Adrian is unwavering in his support for Prime Minister Tony Blair and military action, even though his eldest son Glenn is facing deployment to the Gulf.

Sue Townsend was born in Leicester in 1946. She left school at 15 and was a single parent with three young children by the age of 23. Like Adrian, she wrote in secret for many years, and acknowledged that they often shared the same views - Adrian "C’est moi," she once said.

First published in 1989, Adrian Mole’s diaries were instant bestsellers and Adrian, the remarkably resilient underdog, quickly became a national treasure. While recording the experiences of one individual and showcasing Sue's fearless and razor sharp wit, the diaries also illustrate how socio-political matters of the time affected the lives of ordinary people.

Copyright Siegfried Sassoon by kind permission of the Estate of George Sassoon

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0004f42)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


WED 12:57 Weather (m0004f44)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0004f46)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 The Art and Science of Blending (m0004f48)
Perfume

Blending is a distinctly human act: other creatures don’t experiment in this way. So in this series we’re looking at four blended products – whisky, tea, perfume and champagne – to find out why we blend things, and why some blends work when others don’t. What do we hope to gain? What do we fear losing? And is blending an art … or a science? Barry Smith, a philosopher, tries to answer these questions by consuming rare teas, fine whiskies and perfect champagnes … so that you don’t have to.

In this programme, the link between music and blending perfume. Producer David Edmonds


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0004f2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b08n4lk6)
Where This Service Will Continue

By Katherine Jakeways

Fifteen months after they met on a train, David has come to find Suzie. Part two of the romantic comedy.

Suzie has a busy day planned - she needs to pick up the dog from the groomers, go to the chiropodists and make a trifle. But her plans are torpedoed by the arrival of David. Fifteen months ago Suzie and David sat next to each other on a train journey from London to Penzance; both married, they shared an intense and unforgettable five and a half hours. Now, out of the blue, David's landed in Suzie's life again.

A romantic comedy from writer Katherine Jakeways. The Radio Times described Katherine as the 'new Victoria Wood' saying "her character comedy is so acutely observed and so sharp that it's in danger of causing permanent injury." Starring Rosie Cavaliero (Prey) and Justin Edwards (The Thick of It).

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0004f4b)
Energy Costs

More people are switching energy supplier but complaints about the process are also rising. What's your experience and how has the latest price cap rise affected you?

Adam Shaw and a panel of guests are ready to hear your energy questions. Email moneybox@bbc.co.uk or call 03700 100 444 after 1pm on Wednesday 24 April. Standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m0004f2q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m0004f4d)
New research on how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0004f4g)
The programme about a revolution in media with Amol Rajan, the BBC's media editor.


WED 17:00 PM (m0004f4j)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0004f4l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Simon Evans Goes to Market (m0004f4n)
Series 5

Adam Smith

Radio 4's premier comedy-economics hybrid is five series old and the time is right to take a step back, and perhaps two steps up, and tackle the big, competing theories of Macro Economics. These are little short of religions to their proponents, and the figures who devised them dominate the intellectual landscape in a way that mere politicians can only dream of. These are the Big Beards, the Glinting Eyes, the Bristling Moustaches and Eyebrows of "Worldly Philosophy" and their insights, calculations and hallucinations remain as contentious today as they were when first inked into place.

In this series Simon Evans, with the help of Undercover Economist, Tim Harford will advance through the modern industrial era using three great beacons as their guide - Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Maynard Keynes - and reflect on how they continue to shape our world today.

In episode 1, Adam Smith is under Simon and Tim's jokenomics microscope. Smith, the author of The Wealth of Nations, the first modern work of economics, is still incomparably influential in Western political and economic thought. His faith and trust in the Invisible Hand remains one of the most misunderstood of all economic paradigms, and in his name to this day are committed all too visibly ham-fisted atrocities, that would make even his pale Presbyterian skin blanche.

A £20 note serves as a handy mutlimedia accompaniment to this episode.

Producer: Richard Morris
Presenters: Simon Evans and Tim Harford
Writers: Simon Evans, Tim Harford, Dan Evans and Robert Ledger


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0004cq3)
Elizabeth faces up to her troubles and an old mystery rears its head.


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0004f4r)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004f3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 FutureProofing (m0004f4t)
Apocalypse

Will 21st century technology avert or accelerate the Apocalypse?

Humanity has always featured stories and fears about the end of the world. But never before have we possessed such power to influence the dangers, manage the risks or cause such existential disaster.

Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson travel to NASA’s Los Angeles laboratory, and the site of the nuclear catastrophe at Chernobyl to understand the risks of disaster that face us in the next century. They discover how artificial intelligence might accelerate the demise of humankind, whilst also offering us a pathway to survival and redemption. And they learn how titanium wafers containing the entire library of human achievement and knowledge could safeguard our civilisation in the farthest corners of the universe.


WED 20:45 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (m0004f3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m0004f24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 New Ways of Seeing (m0004f3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0004f4w)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


WED 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004f40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Bunk Bed (m0004f4y)
Series 6

Benjamin Zephaniah

Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, your tired mind can wander away from the hurly burly of the day.

Peter Curran and Patrick Marber are joined on a mattress by poet Benjamin Zephaniah, who reveals how he nearly took a job writing verses for a Greetings card company and shares the fallout from a disastrous appearance on Mastermind.

Produced by Peter Curran
A Foghorn production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 Kieran Hodgson's Earworms (b0910mk6)
Series 1

Glazunov

Critically-acclaimed comedian Kieran Hodgson is joined by Tessa Coates and Colin Hoult, in this new series of comedy intros to the great composers. Can self-described 'music educator and inspiration' Ralph Lewis, the man behind 'Swim with Sibelius' and 'Debussy Decodes Dementia'. persuade self-confessed 'enemy of culture' Paul, that Glazunov's worth a listen?

Written and starring Kieran Hodgson
With Colin Hoult and Tessa Coates
Producer: Sam Ward
A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0004f50)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



THURSDAY 25 APRIL 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0004f52)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (m0004f3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0004f54)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0004f56)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0004f58)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0004f5b)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0004f5d)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Juanita Francis, Youth Pastor at Ruach City Church, London.

Good morning.

Picture this "Well you have weak ankles and weak wrists...you probably won't make it as a dancer!" That's what a dance teacher told me...little did I know God was teaching me a lesson to never allow someone's opinion to dictate my success! That day I worked hard in class, learnt the name of dance moves that I was doing but couldn't name, studied Martha Graham techniques, Cunningham....you name it, I was determined! Along the way there were sprains, bruises...but I made it through because I knew God had given me this gift for a purpose!

Not only did I make it through with a National Diploma in Dance but like with a photo if you scratched beyond the surface God had a bigger vision in mind. This was just a catalyst for me to go on to study dance and move up through the classes choreographing pieces because of my ability! I went on to become a teacher and start my own dance company and give back to children who had the same passion. And now I’m actually a youth Pastor.

I say this to say; Often we hear and digest everything negative that tells us why we can't be what God has called us to be!...but we serve a God bigger than "I can't because..."

God said we can do greater works (and that’s in John 14:12) That means everything Jesus accomplished on earth, in us, you and me is the ability to do greater!! So the next time someone tells you no, just smile because you know God just said yes!

Let us pray. Dear God, let us trust in you and not let others discourage us.

Amen


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0004f5g)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sby0q)
Garden Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Garden Warbler. Garden warblers aren't very well named .these are birds which like overgrown thickets of shrubs and small trees and so you're more likely to find them in woodland clearings especially in newly- coppiced areas.


THU 06:00 Today (m0004cp5)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0004cp7)
Nero

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life of Nero (37-68 AD) who became Emperor at the age of 16. At first he was largely praised for his generosity yet became known for his debauched lifestyle, with allegations he started the Fire of Rome, watching the flames as he played the lyre. Christians saw him as their persecutor, an antichrist, and the number of the Beast in the Book of Revelation was thought to indicate Nero. He had confidence in his own artistry, took up acting (which then had a very low status) and, as revolts in the empire grew, killed himself after the Senate condemned him to die as a slave, on a cross.

With

Maria Wyke

Matthew Nicholls

And

Shushma Malik

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (m0004cp9)
Losing Earth

The Summit in Noordwijk

Nathaniel Rich tells the story of the efforts made by activists, scientists and politicians to stop global warming. It's 1989 and ministers from around the world are gathered in the Netherlands for a momentous summit on climate change. A binding treaty is in sight after a decade of campaigning.

Read by Kyle Soller.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0004cpd)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004cpg)
Ordinary Heroes

Episode 4

A contemporary drama serial following two uniformed police officers, Nisha and Scott, as they patrol the streets of London on foot during a single nightshift. This is policing at the sharp end. Anything can happen. And, of course, it does.

New recruit Scott can't wait to lock up some bad guys. Fresh out of police training college, he is a little frustrated to be puppy-walked by a female officer. Not that Scott is sexist or a misogynist (he loves his girlfriend and adores his mum), it's just that he craves the company and approval of other guys. He also suffers from White Knight syndrome and has a tendency to see women as damsels in distress. You see, when Scott was twelve, his dad died saving a family in a horrific motorway crash. It's a legend that Scott is desperate to live up to.

The last thing Nisha needs is a White Knight - and she's the total opposite of a damsel in distress. The experienced beat cop has been there, done that and received a commendation for bravery. She's charmed by Scott's boyish enthusiasm, he's a good-hearted soul, and she decides not to burst his balloon - he can find out the hard way that the job is much more about dealing with the sick and the vulnerable than tackling armed robbers.

Nisha joined the police because she thought the job would suit her - she's always had an enquiring mind and she likes dealing with people - but also because, after Stephen Lawrence, she felt that the Metropolitan Police needed people like her. She has faced hostility from friends and family but she's stuck to her guns.

What Nisha doesn't know is that tonight is a night she'll never forget. Because, while Scott and Nisha are - among other things - dealing with a paranoid schizophrenic teen who may have stolen a dog, a group of people are climbing into a van in a London suburb. And they're planning mass murder.

Cast:
Police Constable Nisha Hussain - Nisha Nayar
Police Constable Scott Knight - Joel Phillimore
Haneefa Khan - Susannah Fielding
Zeenat Khan - Gurkiran Kaur
John Baker - Lloyd Warbey
Minar Sarkar - Tripti Tripuraneni

Written by Paul Marquess and Sally Tatchell
Series Creator Paul Marquess

Sound Designer Simon Morecroft
Composer Adam Welsh
Police Adviser Steve Ainscough
Cultural Adviser Rashad Ali, ISD Fellow

Producer Claire Fryer
Executive Producers Paul Marquess and Eoin O’Callaghan

Director Marina Caldarone

A PGM TV production for BBC Radio 4


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (m0004cpk)
Bangladesh versus Yaba

Thousands of Bangladeshi addicts are hooked on Yaba - a mix of methamphetamine and caffeine. It's a powerful drug that gives big bangs for small bucks. The Yaba epidemic has ripped through the population of Bangladesh, urban and rural, poor, middle-class and rich. This is a drug that's manufactured in industrial quantities in the jungles of neighbouring Myanmar. As the economy of Bangladesh has boomed, drug lords have worked to create new markets for their product. And the Rohingya crisis - when nearly a million fled Myanmar for Bangladesh - has created further opportunities for the traffickers, as desperate refugees have been employed as drug mules. The Bangladeshi Prime Minister, Sheikh Hasina, declared a 'war on drugs' last May. Thousands have been arrested. But critics see a disturbing trend - hundreds of suspected Yaba dealers have been killed by law enforcement.

Presenter / producer: Linda Pressly with Morshed Ali Khan


THU 11:30 The Song Hunters (m0004cpm)
Suppression and Survival

Singer and song collector Sam Lee travels to Tbilisi to explore the ancient polyphonic folk songs and sacred chants of Georgia. He discovers a nation where singing is in the blood.

With some of Georgia's finest singers and musicologists as his guides, Sam is introduced to the ritualistic folk songs that are said to the control the weather and even cure the sick. He is invited to a feast, high on a mountainside above Tbilisi, where he meets the Chamgelianis - a singing family from the remote region of Svaneti who are keeping the tradition of age-old pre-Christian folk songs alive.

At the beautiful Kashveti Church in the heart of Tbilisi, Sam meets singer and ethno-musicologist John Graham who introduces him to the liturgical chanting tradition. These orthodox Christian chants feature sacrosanct melodies that are said to have been passed down by God and transmitted orally over the centuries.

Bordered by powerful neighbours including Russia and Turkey, Georgia has been attacked and invaded persistently over the centuries, its traditional songs suppressed. Sam learns that, under Soviet rule, sacred chanting was banned in Georgia and chanters threatened with exile and even death. Practitioners were forced to go underground from the early 1920s.

The tradition might have died out entirely were it not for the efforts of a single monk who buried manuscripts containing the forbidden sacred songs in order to keep them safe. Many years later, following the end of the Soviet stranglehold, the buried manuscripts were rediscovered and became the backbone of a chant revival that has seen Georgian singing spread around the world.

Presenter: Sam Lee
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0004cpp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004cpr)
Adrian Mole and The Weapons of Mass Destruction

Episode 9

The fifth book in our series of readings from Adrian’s diaries, written by Sue Townsend. It starts in 2002 and covers the controversial period of the Iraq War.

Adrian is 34, working in a bookshop in Leicester and about to become the proud owner of a trendy loft apartment. His single status is about to change too, putting further strain on his already stretched finances. As war looms, Adrian is unwavering in his support for Prime Minister Tony Blair and military action, even though his eldest son Glenn is facing deployment to the Gulf.

Sue Townsend was born in Leicester in 1946. She left school at 15 and was a single parent with three young children by the age of 23. Like Adrian, she wrote in secret for many years, and acknowledged that they often shared the same views - Adrian "C’est moi," she once said.

First published in 1989, Adrian Mole’s diaries were instant bestsellers and Adrian, the remarkably resilient underdog, quickly became a national treasure. While recording the experiences of one individual and showcasing Sue's fearless and razor sharp wit, the diaries also illustrate how socio-political matters of the time affected the lives of ordinary people.

Copyright Siegfried Sassoon by kind permission of the Estate of George Sassoon

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0004cpt)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


THU 12:57 Weather (m0004cpw)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0004cpy)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 The Art and Science of Blending (m0004cq0)
Champagne

Blending is a distinctly human act: other creatures don’t experiment in this way. So in this series we’re looking at four blended products – whisky, tea, perfume and champagne – to find out why we blend things, and why some blends work when others don’t. What do we hope to gain? What do we fear losing? And is blending an art … or a science? Barry Smith, a philosopher, tries to answer these questions by consuming rare teas, fine whiskies and perfect champagnes … so that you don’t have to.

Today, the art and science of blending champagne.

Producer David Edmonds


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0004cq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m0004cq5)
My Friend, Marie Antoinette

Intimate first-hand account of the final days of Marie Antoinette, staring Lily Loveless as young prison maid, Rosalie Lamoriere, who forms a strong bond with the tragic queen, played by Laure Stockley.

Rosalie worked in the Conciergerie Prison kitchens, shared with soldiers and guards drinking, eating and laughing raucously over the pornographic pamphlets they pass around. The pamphlet shows Marie Antoinette, legs akimbo, masturbating on a chaise longue and having sex with a pageboy. Everyone hated the "Austrian Whore". Rosalie hated her too - she believed her family was starving because of the monstrous, profligate queen.

But when Rosalie is given the task of attending to Marie Antoinette in her prison cell, she encounters a broken, sick and distraught woman, desperate for news of her children.

This powerful drama from writer Carine Adler charts an extraordinary journey for both women, as Rosalie risks her life for the Queen she once despised.

Based on memoir accounts thirty years after the execution of Marie Antoinette by the historian Lafont d'Aussonne, who interviewed Rosalie Lamoriere.

Cast:
Rosalie Lamoriere.............Lily Loveless
Marie Antoinette.............Laure Stockley
Madame Harel.............Becci Gemmell
Inspector Michonis and Fouquier-Tinville.............Ewan Bailey
Madame Richard.............Clare Corbett
Chauvau Lagarde.............Peter Hamilton Dyer
Herbert and Doctor.............Antony Bunsee

Original Music by Jon Ouin
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Produced by Emma Hearn
Written by Carine Adler
Directed by John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Open Country (m0004cq7)
George Eliot Country

‘She was a woman ahead of her time, she pushed every boundary.’

For this week’s Open County, Helen Mark heads to the Warwickshire landscape of Nuneaton where she walks in the footsteps of one of Britain’s greatest authors and through the locals who are celebrating her legacy today, Helen comes face to face with the woman herself – 200 years after her birth.

Mary Anne Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880) is best known by her pen name George Eliot. An English novelist, poet, journalist, translator, and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era, her novels reflected the landscape and the lives of those she lived amongst. 200 years on from her birth we meet the community that continue to celebrate her life today and the shifting landscape that still holds traces of Mary Anne’s rural beginnings.

Presented by Helen Mark
Readings by Eleanor Charman from Sudden Impulse Theatre
Produced by Nicola Humphries


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0004cq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0004cqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m0004cqf)
Maria Djurkovic

With Francine Stock.

Maria Djurkovic, the award winning production designer of The Hours, Billy Elliot and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, reveals the film that's been a major influence on her career, Time Of The Gypsies.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0004cqh)
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0004cqk)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0004cqm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Meet David Sedaris (m0004cqp)
Series 7

Episode 4

The globetrotting, trash-picking, aisle-rolling storyteller is back with more words of wit and wisdom.

With his sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, David Sedaris has become one of America’s pre-eminent humour writers. The great skill with which he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness proves him a master of satire and one of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today. This week, an essay from The New Yorker called Why Aren't You Laughing?

David Sedaris's first book, Barrel Fever (1994) which included The SantaLand Diaries, was a critical and commercial success, as were his follow-up efforts, Naked (1997), Holidays on Ice (1997) and Me Talk Pretty One Day (2000). He became known for his bitingly funny recollections of his youth, family life and travels, making semi-celebrities out of his parents and siblings.

David has been nominated for three Grammy Awards for Best Spoken Word and Best Comedy Album. His latest international best-selling book is a collection of stories entitled Calypso. A feature film adaptation of his story C.O.G. was released after a premier at the Sundance Film Festival (2013). He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker and has been a appearing on BBC Radio 4 since 1996.

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0004cqr)
Will thinks he's solved a problem and Freddie struggles to find his place.


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0004cqt)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004cpg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m0004cqw)
David Aaronovitch and a panel of experts and insiders present in-depth explainers on big issues in the news.


THU 20:30 In Business (m0004cqy)
Green Shoots: growing food in UAE’s deserts

Can the United Arab Emirates grow its own food? The Desert kingdoms today import 90% of their own food, at great cost. And each year consumption increases by 12%. This raises issues of food security, price and environmental damage – flying in fruit from California is not environmentally sustainable.
This is a region with little soil and few water resources. On average it rains just five days a year. So why is agriculture now considered one of the most exciting growth areas in the UAE? Farmers here depend on desalinated water from the Arabian Sea – expensive and, once again, costly to the environment. But new agricultural technologies are being developed. Starting at a small scale, can such businesses really be built up? Or are they vanity projects reliant simply on oil wealth? Georgia Tolley examines if the Emiratis can make their desert bloom and ensure their business of food production grows.

Producer: John Murphy


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0004cqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0004cp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0004cr1)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


THU 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004cpr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Alone (b0b1tblr)
Series 1

Just Say No

A sitcom, written by Moray Hunter and starring Angus Deayton, about five single, middle aged neighbours living in flats in a converted house in North London.

Mitch (Angus Deayton) is a widower and part-time therapist who is looking to put his life back together now that he is single and living - supposedly temporarily - with Will (Pearce Quigley), his younger, more volatile and unhappily divorced half-brother.

Elsewhere in the building are schoolteacher Ellie (Abigail Cruttenden) who is shy, nervous and desperately missing her ex-boyfriend, overly honest, frustrated actress Louisa (Kate Isitt), and socially inept IT nerd Morris (Bennett Arron).

In Just Say No, Mitch's inability to say no causes problems when he agrees to go for drinks with Ellie and a friend of hers, Marie (Hilary MacLean), who is keen to meet him, and then agrees also to help out Morris by making up a four for a dinner party on the same evening.

Louisa meanwhile has a big casting opportunity and, perhaps unwisely, enrols the services of Will to help her film a scene.

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0004cr3)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament



FRIDAY 26 APRIL 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0004cr5)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (m0004cp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0004cr7)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0004cr9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0004crc)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0004crf)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0004crh)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Juanita Francis, Youth Pastor at Ruach City Church, London.

Good morning.

I was driving around downtown L.A. and I saw this statue of a huge chair and being the tourist that I am I wanted to take a picture. Now in my faith I’m used to hearing God speak to me and I heard him say this; "Is this seat taken?!"

Naturally I laughed because I was thinking God was being funny! My reply was "it's not my chair so I guess you can, I don't mind!" Of course this question was actually rhetorical! Sometimes we can allow God to take the driver’s seat in some areas of our lives but not all.

I usually like to plan and have things in place but with this trip I had lots of moments where I had to go with the flow and trust in God’s plans. As God began challenging me, I realised I really wanted to share the seat with God! Sounds funny right? All God wants is for us to surrender EVERY part of our life to Him! The Gospel of Matthew says, "And, behold, there was a great earthquake: for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven, and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it."

God spoke to me through this passage; the first thing we can realise is that an angel helped to roll back the stone, and that was for Jesus. So I realised whatever in your life you find to be a tomb, that thing, that holds dead things, he has the power to roll it away and sit on it!

But the key is to let Him have a seat! It's easy to want to be in control but truth is if we were truly in charge our lives, it would be a mess. So I finish with what He said to me and challenge you, “Is this seat taken?"

Let’s pray. Dear God help me to let You take the seat in my life.
Remind me that You know my end from by beginning.

Amen


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0004crk)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sby2t)
Dartford Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Dartford Warbler. Dartford Warblers prefer Mediterranean wine-producing climates, which means ice and snow is bad news for them. The harsh winters of 1961 and 1962 reduced the population to just 11 pairs, but fortunately the numbers have since recovered.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0004f5j)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (m0004dxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (m0004f5l)
Losing Earth

The Aftermath

Nathaniel Rich tells the story of efforts made by a number of passionate activists, scientists and politicians who worked tirelessly in the 1980s to halt climate change. In this episode, Rich looks at how the fallout from the Dutch summit in 1989 continues to resonate.

Read by Kyle Soller
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0004f5n)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004f5q)
Ordinary Heroes

Episode 5

A contemporary drama serial following two uniformed police officers, Nisha and Scott, as they patrol the streets of London on foot during a single nightshift. This is policing at the sharp end. Anything can happen. And, of course, it does.

New recruit Scott can't wait to lock up some bad guys. Fresh out of police training college, he is a little frustrated to be puppy-walked by a female officer. Not that Scott is sexist or a misogynist (he loves his girlfriend and adores his mum), it's just that he craves the company and approval of other guys. He also suffers from White Knight syndrome and has a tendency to see women as damsels in distress. You see, when Scott was twelve, his dad died saving a family in a horrific motorway crash. It's a legend that Scott is desperate to live up to.

The last thing Nisha needs is a White Knight - and she's the total opposite of a damsel in distress. The experienced beat cop has been there, done that and received a commendation for bravery. She's charmed by Scott's boyish enthusiasm, he's a good-hearted soul, and she decides not to burst his balloon - he can find out the hard way that the job is much more about dealing with the sick and the vulnerable than tackling armed robbers.

Nisha joined the police because she thought the job would suit her - she's always had an enquiring mind and she likes dealing with people - but also because, after Stephen Lawrence, she felt that the Metropolitan Police needed people like her. She has faced hostility from friends and family but she's stuck to her guns.

What Nisha doesn't know is that tonight is a night she'll never forget. Because, while Scott and Nisha are - among other things - dealing with a paranoid schizophrenic teen who may have stolen a dog, a group of people are climbing into a van in a London suburb. And they're planning mass murder.

Cast:
Police Constable Nisha Hussain - Nisha Nayar
Police Constable Scott Knight - Joel Phillimore
Haneefa Khan - Susannah Fielding
Zeenat Khan - Gurkiran Kaur
John Baker - Lloyd Warbey
Jez Randall - Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong

Written by Paul Marquess and Sally Tatchell
Series Creator Paul Marquess

Sound Designer Simon Morecroft
Composer Adam Welsh
Police Adviser Steve Ainscough
Cultural Adviser Rashad Ali, ISD Fellow

Producer Claire Fryer
Executive Producers Paul Marquess and Eoin O’Callaghan

Director Marina Caldarone

A PGM TV production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:00 Call Yourself an Impartial Journalist? (m0004f5s)
Critics claim the Brexit debate has shown the mainstream media is not impartial. But Jonathan Coffey asks what impartiality is and how it functions in a polarised society.


FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b08b7wd3)
Series 6

Episode 5

John Finnemore, writer and star of Cabin Pressure and John Finnemore's Double Acts and regular guest on The Now Show and The Unbelievable Truth, returns for a sixth series of his multi-award-winning Souvenir Programme, joined as ever by Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin, and Carrie Quinlan.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described by The Radio Times as "the best sketch show in years, on television or radio", and by The Daily Telegraph as "funny enough to make even the surliest cat laugh". Already the winner of a BBC Audio Drama Award and a Radio Academy Silver Award, John was named the 2016 Radio Broadcaster of the Year by the Broadcasting Press Guild for his work on Souvenir Programme.

5/6
This week on Souvenir Programme, we take another tip Behind Closed Doors; a famous author takes drastic measures to improve his sales; and we find out what a certain celebrity is really like.

Written by & starring ... John Finnemore
Cast ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Cast ... Simon Kane
Cast ... Lawry Lewin
Cast ... Carrie Quinlan

Original music composed and performed by ... Susannah Pearse.

Production Coordinator...Sophie Richardson

Producer ... Ed Morrish

A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0004f5v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004f5x)
Adrian Mole and The Weapons of Mass Destruction

Episode 10

The fifth book in our series of readings from Adrian’s diaries, written by Sue Townsend. It starts in 2002 and covers the controversial period of the Iraq War.

Adrian is 34, working in a bookshop in Leicester and about to become the proud owner of a trendy loft apartment. His single status is about to change too, putting further strain on his already stretched finances. As war looms, Adrian is unwavering in his support for Prime Minister Tony Blair and military action, even though his eldest son Glenn is facing deployment to the Gulf.

Sue Townsend was born in Leicester in 1946. She left school at 15 and was a single parent with three young children by the age of 23. Like Adrian, she wrote in secret for many years, and acknowledged that they often shared the same views - Adrian "C’est moi," she once said.

First published in 1989, Adrian Mole’s diaries were instant bestsellers and Adrian, the remarkably resilient underdog, quickly became a national treasure. While recording the experiences of one individual and showcasing Sue's fearless and razor sharp wit, the diaries also illustrate how socio-political matters of the time affected the lives of ordinary people.

Copyright Siegfried Sassoon by kind permission of the Estate of George Sassoon

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0004f5z)
News and discussion of consumer affairs.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0004f61)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0004f63)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The Art and Science of Blending (m0004f65)
Art or Science?

Blending is a distinctly human act: other creatures don’t experiment in this way. So in this series we’re looking at four blended products – whisky, tea, perfume and champagne – to find out why we blend things, and why some blends work when others don’t. What do we hope to gain? What do we fear losing? And is blending an art … or a science? Barry Smith, a philosopher, tries to answer these questions by consuming rare teas, fine whiskies and perfect champagnes … so that you don’t have to.

Today Barry talks to three blending experts about the art and science of blending.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0004cqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 First World Problems (b0b5t81p)
Things Fall Apart

What would happen if the UK broke apart?

In this everyday story of British folk, David and Ruth Fletcher face our next civil war.

2/5 Things Fall Apart

Now Manchester is besieged by rival forces, the Fletchers find themselves in danger. Not just from dodgy neighbours with brand new machine guns, but from inside their own family.

Martin Jameson's drama draws on detailed research from BBC correspondents to analysts, contingency planners, and those with first hand experience of the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s, to make the Fletchers' adventures a compelling account of what civil war could do to us all.

Starring Jeremy Swift and Maureen Beattie.
Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.

Script Consultants:
Tamara Kovacevic - Senior BBC journalist with first hand experience of the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s
Richard Vergette - Writer and teacher for advice on parenting a teenager with Down Syndrome

With thanks to:
Malcolm Barnard
Peter Barnes - BBC Senior Political Analyst
Louisa Brooke-Holland - Senior Research Analyst, International Affairs and Defence section, House of Commons Library
Rory Cellan-Jones - BBC Technology Correspondent
Gabrielle Garton Grimwood - Senior Research Analyst in Emergency Planning
Mike Livingstone - Former Strategic Director of Children's Services, Manchester City Council.
Jonathan Marcus - BBC Diplomatic Correspondent
Prof Bill McGuire - Professor Emeritus; Geophysical & Climate Hazards, UCL
Dr Gemma Sou - Lecturer in Disaster Studies, University of Manchester
Peter Wynne-Wilson - Course Director, Royal Birmingham Conservatoire (for advice on Birmingham and its demographics)
Imogen Woolrich and the Octagon Bridges Theatre Group,
Harri Chambers - for Welsh translations,
and Steve Pearce, Eric Bradley & John Rudin for IT advice.

Cast:

Dave Fletcher ... Jeremy Swift
Ruth Fletcher ... Maureen Beattie
Maggie Pelling ... Elizabeth Counsell
Jonny Fletcher ... Sam Barnard
Tricia Ince ... Elinor Coleman
Helena Fletcher ... Lauren Cornelius
Alex Pritchard ... Ryan Whittle
Philippa Fletcher ... Kerry Gooderson
Marli ... Ryan Baker
Roger ... Sean Murray
Steven ... Stephen Hogan
Clive ... John Lightbody
Luke ... Joseph Ayre
Writer ... Martin Jameson
Director ... Jonquil Panting
Producer ... Jonquil Panting.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0004f69)
Manchester

Eric Robson and the team are in Manchester. Matthew Wilson, Pippa Greenwood, Anne Swithinbank and Bunny Guinness answer this week’s questions from the audience.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hester Cant

A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m0004f6c)
A Traditional Sunday Roast

Written by Yvvette Edwards. Muma Rose surprises her grand-daughter, Anthea, by announcing she is in a new relationship with an octogenarian called Alfie. She wants them all to meet over a proper Sunday lunch - and Anthea must shape up.

Yvvette Edwards is a British East Londoner of Montserratian origin and, in addition to writing short stories, she is author of two novels - A Cupboard Full of Coats and The Mother. Her work has been nominated for a number of literary awards, including the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Man Booker Prize. She was a judge for the inaugural Jhalak Prize for Writers of Colour and mentors emerging writers for the National Centre for Writing.

Writer: Yvvette Edwards
Reader: Cherrelle Skeete
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0004f6f)
Radio 4's weekly obituary programme, telling the life stories of those who have died recently.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m0004f6h)
Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m0004f6k)
Helen and Stewart - The First Three Months Were Brutal

A couple talk frankly about the challenges they faced after their baby was born with a heart defect. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.


FRI 17:00 PM (m0004f6m)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0004f6p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m0004f6r)
Series 99

Episode 3

Miles Jupp is joined by Ayesha Hazarika, Andy Zaltzman, Ellie Taylor and Mark Steel for Radio 4's long-running topical panel show.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd
A BBC Studios Production


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m0004f6t)
Writer ….. Adrian Flynn
Director ….. Rosemary Watts
Editor ….. Jeremy Howe

Jill Archer ….. Patricia Greene
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Natasha Archer ….. Mali Harries
Susan Carter ….. Charlotte Martin
Chris Carter ..... Wilf Scolding
Ruairi Donovan ..... Arthur Hughes
Alan Franks ..... John Telfer
Will Grundy ….. Philip Molloy
Mia Grundy ….. Molly Pipe
Emma Grundy ….. Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ….. Barry Farrimond
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Jim Lloyd ….. John Rowe
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Elizabeth Pargetter ….. Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Peggy Woolley ...... June Spencer
Lynda Snell ….. Carole Boyd
Leonard Berry ….. Paul Copley


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m0004f6w)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0004f5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0004f6y)
Andy Burnham, Nigel Evans MP, Christine Jardine MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents topical debate from Merchant Taylors' Boys School in Crosby with a panel including the Mayor of Manchester Andy Burnham, Conservative MP Nigel Evans and Christine Jardine MP. who is the Liberal Democrats Spokesperson on Welfare and Pensions.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0004f70)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b08p55kd)
Roots and Holocaust: When TV Taught Us a History Lesson

Reflections on the extraordinary impact that two landmark TV series had on Britain forty years ago.

Black journalist Gary Younge and his Jewish colleague Jonathan Freedland had two very different upbringings. Gary grew up in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, and Jonathan in suburban North London. But a strange coincidence binds them.

At the age of 10, long before they would become colleagues and friends at The Guardian, their mothers sat them down and gave them a lesson in racism. But it didn't come from a book or documentary. It was the late 1970's and, in each case, the lesson came from a blockbuster TV mini-series. Jonathan sat and watched Roots. Gary was put in front of Holocaust - with the instruction that, "this is your story too".

This was a time when the National Front struck fear into both their homes.

Now, forty years on, they recall the impact these landmark series had on them at the time, and what TV depictions of black and Jewish people looked like before those two programmes aired - populated with stereotypes from Love thy Neighbour and The Rag Trade to the Black and White Minstrel Show and Never Mind the Fabric, Feel the Width.

Joined by Lenny Henry, Maureen Lipman, Michael Grade and the original Kunta Kinte, actor LeVar Burton, Gary and Jonathan discover how TV taught them - and Britain - about history.

Producer: Sarah Peters
Executive Producer: Iain Chambers
An Open Audio and Tuning Fork production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0004f72)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective


FRI 22:45 The Diaries of Adrian Mole (m0004f5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0004f28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0004f74)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m0004f76)
Emily and Philip - It's Just a Conversation

A couple talk about the different ways they each had of dealing with the death of their new-born baby. Fi Glover presents another conversation in a series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (m0004dzg)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (m0004dzg)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (m0004f1k)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (m0004f1k)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (m0004f3r)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (m0004f3r)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (m0004cpg)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (m0004cpg)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (m0004f5q)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (m0004f5q)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0004f70)

A Psalm for the Scaffolder 23:30 SAT (m00046q8)

Ability 11:30 WED (m0004f3w)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (m0004f2q)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (m0004f2q)

Alone 23:00 THU (b0b1tblr)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0004dvn)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m000463m)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0004f6y)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0002rq8)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (b08p55kd)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0004cqh)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0004cqh)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0004dwt)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0004dwt)

Beyond Belief 16:00 MON (m0004f05)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (m000463z)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (m0004dzb)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (m0004dzb)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (m0004f1f)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (m0004f1f)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (m0004f3m)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (m0004f3m)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (m0004cp9)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (m0004cp9)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (m0004f5l)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (m00047tb)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (m0004f02)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0004dxg)

Bunk Bed 23:00 WED (m0004f4y)

Call Yourself an Impartial Journalist? 11:00 FRI (m0004f5s)

Classic Serial 14:30 SAT (b00fnbf3)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00frpx4)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (m0004f24)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m0004f24)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (m00046ry)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (m0004cpk)

Drama 14:15 MON (m0004f00)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08n3lxs)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08n4lk6)

Drama 14:15 THU (m0004cq5)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0004dty)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0004dz2)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0004f17)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0004f3c)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0004f5g)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0004crk)

First World Problems 14:15 FRI (b0b5t81p)

Fred at The Stand 23:00 TUE (m0004f2v)

From Our Home Correspondent 13:30 SUN (m0004dxx)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0004dvb)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0004f0k)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0004f2j)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0004f4r)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0004cqt)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m0004f6w)

FutureProofing 22:15 SAT (m00045b3)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (m0004f4t)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0004dxz)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m0004f69)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (m0004f28)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (m0004f28)

In Business 21:30 SUN (m00046sx)

In Business 20:30 THU (m0004cqy)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m0004cp7)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m0004cp7)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0004f2n)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 11:30 FRI (b08b7wd3)

Kieran Hodgson's Earworms 23:15 WED (b0910mk6)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0004635)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m0004f6f)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (m00045b7)

Life at Absolute Zero 19:45 SUN (m0004dyh)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0004dw5)

Loose Ends 11:30 MON (m0004dw5)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (m0004f0s)

Meet David Sedaris 18:30 THU (m0004cqp)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m000463x)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0004dwf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0004dyp)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0004f0v)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0004f2z)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0004f52)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0004cr5)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0004dvg)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0004dvg)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0004f4b)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (m0004f6h)

My Name Is... 20:00 MON (m0004f0m)

My Name Is... 11:00 WED (m0004f0m)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 TUE (b07j4qx6)

New Ways of Seeing 09:00 WED (m0004f3h)

New Ways of Seeing 21:30 WED (m0004f3h)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0004647)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0004dwr)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0004dyy)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0004f13)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0004f37)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0004f5b)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0004crf)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m0004dww)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0004dvd)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0004dxn)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0004dzm)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0004f1r)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0004f3y)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0004cpp)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m0004f5v)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0004dtw)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0004dx4)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0004dxb)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m0004dwc)

News 13:00 SAT (m0004dvl)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (m0004cqc)

Open Book 15:30 THU (m0004cqc)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (m00046sd)

Open Country 15:00 THU (m0004cq7)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0004dvv)

PM 17:00 MON (m0004f09)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0004f2b)

PM 17:00 WED (m0004f4j)

PM 17:00 THU (m0004cqk)

PM 17:00 FRI (m0004f6m)

Patient Undone 21:00 MON (m00045kt)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0004dyc)

Poetry Please 20:00 SUN (m0004dyk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0004649)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0004dz0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0004f15)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0004f39)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0004f5d)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0004crh)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0004dw7)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0004dw7)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0004cq9)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0004cq9)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0004cq9)

Rumblings from the Rafters 19:15 SUN (b07jwt65)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0004dv4)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m0004dw9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0004643)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0004dwm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0004dyt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0004f0z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0004f33)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0004f56)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0004cr9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0004641)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0004645)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0004dvz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0004dwk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0004dwp)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0004dy5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0004dyr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0004dyw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0004f0x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0004f11)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0004f31)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0004f35)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0004f54)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0004f58)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0004cr7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0004crc)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m0004dwh)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m0004f6c)

Simon Evans Goes to Market 18:30 WED (m0004f4n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0004dw3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0004dy9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0004f0c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0004f2d)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0004f4l)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0004cqm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m0004f6p)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (m0004dwy)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (m0004dwy)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m0004dz8)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m0004dz8)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0004dxd)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0004dx6)

Sunrise Service 06:35 SUN (m0004dx0)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0004dxj)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0004dyf)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0004dyf)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0004f0h)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0004f0h)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0004f2g)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0004f2g)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0004cq3)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0004cq3)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0004cqr)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0004cqr)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m0004f6t)

The Art and Science of Blending 13:45 MON (m0004dzy)

The Art and Science of Blending 13:45 TUE (m0004f22)

The Art and Science of Blending 13:45 WED (m0004f48)

The Art and Science of Blending 13:45 THU (m0004cq0)

The Art and Science of Blending 13:45 FRI (m0004f65)

The Art of Now 11:30 TUE (m0004f1p)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (m0004cqw)

The Bubble 11:00 TUE (m0004f1m)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 05:45 SAT (m000458p)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 09:30 WED (m0004f3k)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 20:45 WED (m0004f3k)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 MON (m0004dzp)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 22:45 MON (m0004dzp)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 TUE (m0004f1t)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 22:45 TUE (m0004f1t)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 WED (m0004f40)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 22:45 WED (m0004f40)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 THU (m0004cpr)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 22:45 THU (m0004cpr)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 12:04 FRI (m0004f5x)

The Diaries of Adrian Mole 22:45 FRI (m0004f5x)

The Fast and the Curious 11:00 MON (m0004dzj)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (m00046sg)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m0004cqf)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0004dxq)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0004dxq)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (m0004dv8)

The Genius of Accidents 09:30 TUE (b0bbp79p)

The Inquiry 17:30 SAT (m0004dvx)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (m0004dv6)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (m0004dv6)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0004dy1)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0004f3t)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m0004f6k)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m0004f76)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (m0004f1c)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (m0004f1c)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0004f4g)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (m000463f)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (m0004f6r)

The Populist Curtain 17:00 SUN (m00045lq)

The Populist Curtain 20:00 TUE (m0004f2l)

The Psalms 15:30 SAT (m0004dvq)

The Psalms 16:30 SUN (m0004dy3)

The Psalms 16:30 MON (m0004f07)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (m0004dxl)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (m0004dxl)

The Song Hunters 11:30 THU (m0004cpm)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (m00047tp)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (m0004f0f)

The University Time Bomb 21:00 SAT (m0004gy7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0004dxv)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0004f0q)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0004f2s)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0004f4w)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0004cr1)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0004f72)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m000459n)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m0004f4d)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m0004f2x)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0004f50)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m0004cr3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m0004f74)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0004dv2)

Today 06:00 MON (m0004dz6)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0004f19)

Today 06:00 WED (m0004f3f)

Today 06:00 THU (m0004cp5)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0004f5j)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b01s6y1h)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b01s8qh4)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b01s8vcs)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b01sby02)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b01sby0q)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b01sby2t)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m0004dv0)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m0004dvj)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m0004dw1)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m0004dx2)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m0004dx8)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m0004dxs)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m0004dy7)

Weather 05:56 MON (m0004dz4)

Weather 12:57 MON (m0004dzt)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0004f1y)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0004f44)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0004cpw)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0004f61)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0004dym)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0004dvs)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0004dzd)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0004f1h)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0004f3p)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0004cpd)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0004f5n)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (m0004f26)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0004dzw)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0004f20)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0004f46)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0004cpy)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0004f63)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0004dzr)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m0004f1w)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m0004f42)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m0004cpt)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0004f5z)