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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 02 MARCH 2019

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0002spy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (m0002sq0)
War Doctor

Episode 5

David Nott, the vascular surgeon reads from his memoir about his experiences of taking time off from his work for the NHS to volunteer in some of the world's most brutal war zones. Today, finding a place of safety is paramount.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0002sq2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0002sq4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0002sq6)
The latest shipping forecast


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0002sq8)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0002sqb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Gemma Simmonds from the Congregation of Jesus

Yesterday the Archbishop of Canterbury invited hundreds of clergy to Lambeth Palace to mark the 25th anniversary of women’s ordination in the Church of England. The Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches do not ordain women, but the rite of Christian baptism reminds us that every baptised person shares in the threefold ministry of Jesus as priest, prophet and king.

The Latin word for priest is pontifex, which means bridge-builder. One explanation for the role of a priest is of someone who acts as a bridge between human beings and God, offering our prayer and praise to God and through sacramental signs and the preaching of the word, pointing to the grace and blessing which God pours out on the world. A priest helps to reveal the sacred within the ordinary: water, oil, bread and wine become sacred signs. In the same way we can discover for ourselves or help other people discover the godliness and God-givenness of ordinary, daily living: our work, our gestures of love and nurturing, our enjoyment of life, our suffering.

A prophet invites and challenges others to recognize God’s power within all creation and to live in right relationship to it. Those who cry out in favour of the poor and vulnerable, in defence of the fragile cosmos and all it contains, who challenge cruelty and violence and complacency are fulfilling a prophetic role. Anyone who upholds the dignity of human life is reminding us that we are all members of a royal family: the children of God.

We pray that Jesus who was priest, prophet and king may bless each of us as we share in those ministries within our daily lives, drawing our world closer to our loving Creator.

Amen.


SAT 05:45 iPM (m0002sqd)
Should I have to quit my job?

Listener, Alex, has a son with autism who's in a mainstream school. She explains how, after a difficult week, she was told to rethink how much she works in order to spend more time with her son.

Paddy O'Connell - presenter of BBC Radio 4's Broadcasting House - reads our Your News bulletin.

iPM is the programme that starts with your story - email iPM@bbc.co.uk.

Presented by Becky Milligan. Produced by Cat Farnsworth.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0002ykx)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m0002r6p)
Series 41

Long dresses, cloaks and bonnets. Cumbria.

Why climb a snowy Cumbrian hill in a long dress, cloak and bonnet? Clare Balding finds out.

It's all down to Dorothy Wordsworth, the sister of poet, William. In her own right Dorothy was a writer and a pioneering walker. Just over 200 years ago she and her friend, Mary Barker, became the first women to both climb and write about Scafell Pike in the Lake District. This wouldn’t have been easy in their long dresses, cloaks and bonnets. To mark this achievement the artist Alex Jakob-Whitworth and some friends decided to follow in Dorothy’s footsteps. They dressed in period costume and tried to get to the top of England’s highest mountain. It wasn't easy, as they tell Clare on today's walk, which starts in Seathewaite in Borrowdale and progresses up to Stockley Bridge, through the snowline, and beyond.

Alex took on this challenge as part of a bigger project. If you are reading this on the Radio 4 webpage, you can scroll down the page to the 'related links' section to discover more about Alex, Harriet and The Wordsworth Trust.

Producer: Karen Gregor


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0002ykz)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0002yl3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (m0002yl7)
News headlines and sport.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0002ylc)
Jo Malone and the Inheritance Tracks of Shakin' Stevens

Richard and Aasmah are joined by Jo Malone CBE, who left school aged 15 with no qualifications and became a scent supremo and one of the UKs best known entrepreneurs. We also have comedian aka 'Badman' Humza Arshad who made his success online, took it mainstream and has written his first children's book: Little Badman and the Killer Aunties. There is Ishbel Holmes whose difficult upbringing prompted her, aged 21, to cycle the world rescuing street dogs and Saturday Live listener Catherine Spencer who got caught up in a coup in Kenya. Plus: the Inheritance Tracks of Shakin' Stevens who chooses Brother Can You Spare A Dime performed by Ronnie Lane's Slim Chance and We’ll Meet Again performed by Johnny Cash.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Eleanor Garland


SAT 10:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (m0002ylk)
It Happened One Night

It happened one night in February 1935 that a film, that had been largely ignored by the critics, romped for the first time in Oscar history to all five top awards. In this final programme in the current series, Paul Gambaccini tells the story of the triumph of “It Happened One Night”. It was the ‘sleeper hit’ of 1934, that captured for its stars Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable the Oscars for best acting, and for its director, the soon-to-be legendary Frank Capra, the best director gong. The story of how and why Colbert almost missed the Tinseltown ceremony and Clark Gable only made the film because his boss wanted to punish him are two of the surprising twists in the story of this Depression-era classic romantic comedy.

Producer: Simon Elmes


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0002ylr)
Paul Waugh of HuffPost reviews the week's events in Westminster.
The Editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0002yly)
Correspondents around the world tell their stories and examine news developments in their region


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0002ym4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0002ycr)
The loan charge : Mel Stride interview

Financial Secretary to the Treasury Mel Stride speaks to Paul Lewis about the forthcoming loan charge. The measure, which comes into force in April, aims to stop disguised remuneration schemes which can be used for tax avoidance purposes.

People who have been tricked into authorising payments to bank accounts run by fraudsters stand a much better chance of being reimbursed in future. A new code has been published by the Payment Systems Regulator and agreed by the industry. It includes measures to do more to protect bank and buidling society customers from criminals including reimbursing them in all but exceptional circumstances. The code, which is voluntary, comes into effect on May 28th. Guest: Hannah Nixon, Managing Director, Payment Systems Regulator.

Money Box listener David Hardie runs a small printing business. He recently received a letter from HMRC informing him that from next month he must submit his VAT return digitally. It's part of the wider government Making Tax Digital (MTD) initiative to shift people away from paper-based record keeping. The software used has to be MTD compatible so David is now paying for a new accounts program. Tim Woodgates, a tax adviser and chartered accountant with Moore Stephens, suggests ways in which small businesses can be MTD compliant while keeping costs down.

We hear a cautionary tale of what can happen when the terms and conditions of a guarantor loan are not scrutinised by the friend or relative being asked to pay off the debt if the original borrower defaults. Followed by Sara Williams, founder of the Debt Camel blog and Nick Beal Chief Regulatory and Public Affairs Officer at Amigo Loans in a wider discussion on guarantor loans.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Charmaine Cozier
Editor: Richard Vadon


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (m0002sp9)
Series 54

Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical stand-up and sketches.

This week we look to kick the news can down the road whilst enjoying some unseasonably warm weather. We hear Heidi Regan's take on climate change, Ian Moore takes his French Citizenship test and Jess Robinson pays tribute to our new queen...

It was written by the cast, with additional material from Ed Amsden, Tom Coles, Mike Shephard, Catherine Brinkworth and Kai Samra.

The song was written and arranged by Jess Robinson, Matthew Crosby and Michael Roulston.

The producer was Adnan Ahmed. And it was a BBC Studios production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0002ymb)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (m0002ymj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0002sph)
Liz Truss MP, Rachel Reeves MP, Heidi Allen MP, Costas Lapavitsas

Jonathan Dimbleby presents topical debate from the Fisher Theatre in Bungay, Suffolk with a panel including the Independent Group's Heidi Allen MP; Costas Lapavitsas, former Syriza politician and now Professor of Economics at SOAS in London; the Labour MP Rachel Reeves, chair of the Business Committee; and Chief Secretary to the Treasury Liz Truss MP.
Producer: Kirsten Lass


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0002ymr)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (m0002ymy)
China Towns

Episode 5

Inspired by the novels of Arnold Bennett, an epic tale of money, passion and defiance set in the Staffordshire potteries. Dramatised for radio by Lin Coghlan and Shaun McKenna

Love and desire come to the Five Towns. Tellwright discovers life still has the capacity to surprise and Hilda Lessways chooses adventure over security. It’s the 19th Century and the Industrial Revolution is at full throttle. Only the ruthless thrive in this uncompromising world.

Ephraim Tellwright . . . Neil Dudgeon
Darius Clayhanger . . . Tim McInnerny
Edwin . . . Cameron Percival
Hilda Lessways . . . Lucy Doyle
George Cannon . . . Gunnar Cauthery
Sarah Gailey . . . Clare Corbett
Florrie . . . Helen Monks
Ruth . . . Rebekah Staton
Ingpen . . . Don Gilet
Janet . . . Saffron Coomber
Titus Price . . . Michael Bertenshaw
Mr Boutwood . . . Tony Turner
Station Guard . . . Sam Dale

Incidental music arranged by Colin Guthrie and performed by Colin Guthrie, Peter Ringrose and Ian Conningham.

Produced and directed by Marion Nancarrow


SAT 15:30 Quirke's Cast and Crew (m0002r3x)
Series 2

Foley Artists

If a foley artist does their job well, you’ll never notice them while you’re watching a movie. They are the people who add the sound of everything from footsteps and rattling jewellery to jail cells being slammed shut and guns being loaded once the filming’s over. And it’s not just viewers who don’t realise that such sounds are in fact created later on, as Antonia Quirke discovers in this final part of ‘Cast and Crew’ - sometimes even actors don’t know that the footsteps they hear in the final movie aren’t their own. She visits ace foley artist Ruth Sullivan in a dedicated foley studio and watches on as Ruth records the sounds of a football match using a boxing glove and some mint leaves. We hear from one of the masters of foley - Walter Murch - about his work on The Godfather, and Antonia meets Barnaby Smyth, who recently donned his ballet shoes to create the sounds for the forthcoming biopic about Rudolf Nureyev, ‘The White Crow’.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0002yn4)
Weekend Woman's Hour - 02/03/2019

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Dianne McGregor
Editor:Jane Thurlow


SAT 17:00 PM (m0002ynb)
Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (m0002r7c)
Magazines

There are more than two-and-a-half thousand consumer and business magazine titles on sale in the UK. What is the appeal of magazines and how does the business endure in spite of falling advertising revenues and declining circulation figures?

GUESTS

Wolfgang Blau, President, Conde Nast International

Terri White, Editor-in-Chief, Empire Magazine

Rebecca McGrath, Senior Analyst, Media, Mintel


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0002ynm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0002ynt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0002yny)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0002yp2)
Steven Knight, Sophie Thompson, Shaun Williamson, Elf Lyons, 10cc, Dhafer Youssef, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson is joined by Steven Knight, Sophie Thompson, Shaun Williamson and Elf Lyons for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from 10cc and Dhafer Youssef.

Producer: Sukey Firth


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0002yc8)
An insight into the character of an influential person making the news headlines


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (m0002yp8)
What They Had, Dressed, Renaissance Nudes, Maggie Gee, Mother Father Son

Hilary Swank stars in What They Had; a film which deals with the effects Alzheimer's Disease can have on the family of a loved one
Dressed was a big hit in Edinburgh last year, winning a Fringe First Award. It investigates the healing power of clothes. Following a traumatic experience, a young woman decides to create her entire wardrobe of clothes herself as her own way of coping
The latest exhibition at London's Royal Academy looks at Renaissance Nudes. Transferring from The Getty Centre in LA, it has many extraordianry works which have never come to the UK before.
Blood is Maggie Gee's new novel. About a deputy head-teacher on the run after her father has been found badly beaten and bloodied. He had plenty of people who loathed him but his daughter Monica falls under suspicion
It's more than 3 decades since Richard Gere made a TV series. In Mother Father Son on BBC2, he plays the patriarch of a super-powerful media mogul with personal family problems

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Rosie Boycott, Tom Dyckhoff and Muriel Zagha. The producer is Oliver Jones


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (m0002ypg)
Walking the Wild Mind

Singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega explores Lou Reed's complexities with New Yorkers who knew him well.

Suzanne first saw Lou Reed perform when she was a student in New York. In that first concert she saw him intimidate and upset the audience in the first half of the show but, after the interval, he was another performer entirely. This was Lou bestowing all his charisma and talent to fans.

She explores the two sides of Lou Reed in a programme celebrating the imminent unveiling of his archive. Lou's widow, artist and musician Laurie Anderson, has donated it to the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

Suzanne Vega lived a couple of blocks away from Lou and Laurie and often visited them at their country home. She wanted to get him know him better, but it was obvious that he needed to protect himself. Now, Suzanne talks to other New Yorkers who knew and worked with him.

Few got to see all sides of Lou Reed. Poet Anne Waldman talks about how seriously he took his poetry and songwriting. His second wife Sylvia Reed also describes his love of literature. Biographer Anthony De Curtis talks about the R and B music Lou loved all his life. Music entrepreneur Michael Dorf, shared with Lou his love of Jewish celebrations. Garland Jeffreys, a musician who knew Lou from university days to his death in 2013, describes their love of doo wop on Brooklyn street corners. He also witnessed Lou's rage at his father.

Throughout the programme, Suzanne asks her interviewees to bring objects that remind them of Lou or talk about an item in the archive. Along with producer Judith Kampfner, she has an exclusive sneak peek at some of the archival gems - the jewel, an exclusive for the BBC, is the opening of an iconic song from a 1965 demo.

Presenter: Suzanne Vega
Producer: Judith Kampfner
Executive Producer: Jeremy Mortimer

A Corporation for Independent Media production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Drama (b0blhfps)
Get Carter: Nights at the Circus

Episode 2

By Angela Carter
Adapted by Lucy Catherine

The fantastical story of Sophie Fevvers - aerialist extraordinaire and star of the circus. Hatched from an egg, Fevvers is part woman, part bird - if you believe her. Having fallen under her spell, journalist Jack Walser follows Fevvers' tour across Russia, determined to discover the truth.

This new adaptation of Angela Carter’s penultimate novel tells the story of the extraordinary, raucous, and often raunchy,` life of Sophie Fevvers, a winged circus performer. The 1984 novel not only won the James Tait Black memorial prize (Britain's oldest literary prize) when it was first published, but also won the Best of the James Tait Black prize in 2012.

Award-winning screenwriter and playwright Lucy Catherine has adapted the novel for audio. Previous work for BBC Radio include The Master and Margarita, Roald Dahl’s Boy and Going Solo, Frankenstein and long-running serial Gudrun. Award-winning comedian, actor and writer Roisin Conaty plays the Cockney Venus, Sophie Fevvers.

Nights at the Circus forms part of a season of dramas on BBC Radio 4 and Radio 3 that celebrates the writing of Angela Carter. The season includes The Bloody Chamber; Carter's unmade screenplay The Christchurch Murder; and An Evening With Angela Carter on BBC Radio 3 - two new productions of Carter’s radio plays, Vampirella and Come Unto These Yellow Sands.

Sophie Fevvers . . . . . Roisin Conaty
Lizzie . . . . . Elizabeth Counsell
Jack Walser . . . . . Ryan Whittle
Mignon . . . . . Carys Eleri
Colonel Kearney . . . . . Stewart Wright
Samson/Kidnapper . . . . . Joe Sims
Princess . . . . . Clare Cage
Lamarek/Grand Duke . . . . . Richard Elfyn

The piano was played by David Thomas.

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (m0002ypn)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m0002r18)
The Morality of Disobedience

At the end of a landmark Vatican summit on paedophilia in the Catholic Church, Pope Francis had strong words for guilty clergy, describing them as "tools of Satan." Campaigners, though, are looking for the devil in the detail of the Pope’s proposals. Some of them are saying that the Church has now simply lost its claim to moral authority. Has it? Or, in our understandable revulsion to this scandal, do we risk overlooking what institutional religion might still have to offer? The loss of trust in institutions is also part of a wider cultural story that’s been playing out in the West for nearly a century, and that’s the story of the decline of obedience. For many, this is something to be celebrated, a recognition of the dignity of the individual, the primacy of personal sovereignty. For others, it has created a moral relativism that is making people more self-absorbed and selfish, and that will tear society apart. Cardinal John Henry Newman (who is about to be canonised) once said: "I shall drink … to Conscience first, and to the Pope afterwards." Should we have a duty to anything other than our own conscience? If so, what else should demand a claim on our obedience? Many who applaud the civil disobedience of school pupils leaving lessons to join climate protests are appalled by the rise of recreational drug-taking, yet both are acts of rebellion. Individual disobedience can be harmful to ourselves and others, but mass disobedience can change the world. Does our culture value obedience too highly, or not highly enough?

Producer: Dan Tierney


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (m0002rk6)
Programme 9, 2019

(9/12)
If you can explain why Martin Amis's first protagonist might be bigger than both Jim Cartwright's first play and the performer once known as Clementine Campbell, you could steal a march on today's participants in radio's most notorious quiz.

Tom Sutcliffe welcomes back the teams from the Midlands and the South of England. It's Stephen Maddock and Elizabeth-Jane Burnett against Paul Sinha and Marcus Berkmann. The last time these pairs met, the Midlands scored a narrow victory, so the South will be going all out for revenge today. As usual they'll not only have to work out what the clues refer to, but how they fit together - and the more hints they need from the chairman the fewer points they'll get for their efforts.

Tom will also reveal the solution to the teaser question he left dangling at the end of the previous edition.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (m0002rmr)
Don Paterson

Roger McGough talks to prize winning poet Don Paterson as he chooses poetry requested by listeners, including work by Robert Frost, Paul Muldoon and Alice Oswald. Produced by Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 03 MARCH 2019

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0002ypv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0002snx)
The Eighth Jew

A freak accident turns the world of an historian upside down and shows the effect that obsession can have on those closest to us.

Reader ..... Lolita Chakrabarti
Writer ..... Sheena Kalayil
Producer ..... Claire Simpson

A BBC Scotland production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0002yq3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0002yq9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0002yqg)
The latest shipping forecast


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0002yqn)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0002yd0)
Bells on Sunday from the Monastery of the Transfiguration on the Solovki Islands in the Arctic Ocean.

Bells on Sunday features a carillon from the most northern monastery in the world, the Monastery of the Transfiguration on the Solovki Islands in the Arctic Ocean. During the Soviet period, the monastery was suppressed and turned into a gulag. The bells have been restored since the collapse of Communism in the 1990s.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0002yc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (m0002y9s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (m0002y9v)
Keeping a Mind Open

Mark Tully debates the pros and cons of an open mind - in life, in politics, in philosophy.

Keeping an open mind lies at the heart of Something Understood - or so Mark suggests. There may, however, be advantages to having a closed mind from time to time - to maintaining unswerving resolution and decisiveness, to wearing metaphorical blinkers to maintain a necessary focus.

Mark Tully examines the cases for and against keeping a mind open at all times with readings from the work of philosophers Eric Hoffer and Bertrand Russell, verse from 13th century mystic Rumi, and music by Arvo Part and Bengali singer Paban Das Baul.

The readers are Jasper Britton, Adjoa Andoh and Francis Cadder.

Presenter: Mark Tully
Producer: Frank Stirling

A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 The Living World (m0002y9x)
The Green Isle

The Island of Islay is probably best known for the production of fine peaty whiskies. Yet each winter thousands of geese and other northern birds find refuge on this Scottish island. It also has Britain's most thriving colony our rarest corvid the choughs. In 1987 Michael Scott headed over to Islay for Living World to see for himself why this island attracts more than its fair share of birds. Here he joined Dave Dick and Peter Moore from the RSPB.

In the 30 years since the programme was first broadcast, there have been many changes on Islay which allows wildlife presenter Lindsey Chapman to revisit this Living World and gently update the story for today's audience.

Producer Andrew Dawes


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0002y9z)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0002yb1)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0002yb3)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme, presented by Emily Buchanan


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0002yb5)
FareShare

Jay Rayner, food writer and presenter of Radio 4's 'The Kitchen Cabinet' makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity FareShare.

To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘FareShare’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘FareShare’.

Registered Charity Number: 1100051


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0002yb7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0002yb9)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0002ybc)
Celebrating 25 years of Women's Ordination

On 12th March, 1994, 32 women became the first to be ordained as priests in the Church of England. Twenty-five years on the Archbishop of Canterbury leads a service from the Chapel of Lambeth Palace bringing together curates, priests and bishops from around the country to reflect on the experience of women in ministry.

With the Revd Dr Isabelle Hamley, Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury. Music from St Martin's Voices and organist, Polina Sosnina, directed by Emily Dickens.

Producer: Katharine Longworth


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0002spk)
Calling a spade a spade

Tom Shakespeare on why we’re in urgent need of a bit of plain speaking.

"I don't mean here to exalt the obnoxious, the downright rude", he writes, "but while civility is a virtue, I think we could do with a little more directness".

Producer: Adele Armstrong


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (m0002ybf)
Geoff Samples Dupont's Lark

For wildlife sound recordist Geoff Sample the strange sound of Dupont's lark is something of an enigma, as despite recording half a dozen birds he has never actually seen one.

You can hear more from Geoff in his Tweet of the Week omnibus, available as a download from the website, or on BBC Sounds

Producer : Andrew Dawes


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0002ybh)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0002ybk)
Writer ….. Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti
Director ….. Jeremy Howe
Editor ….. Jeremy Howe

Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer ….. Buffy Davis
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Pat Archer .... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Jennifer Aldridge ….. Angela Piper
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Emma Grundy .... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy .... Barry Farrimond
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Johnny Phillips ….. Tom Gibbons
Roy Tucker .... Ian Pepperell
Lee .... Ryan Early
Tim .... Carl Prekopp


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (m0002ybm)
Trevor Sorbie, hairdresser

Trevor Sorbie is known as an innovative hairdresser and is the founder of the charity, MyNewHair.

Born into a family of hairdressers – both his father and grandfather were barbers – he spent the first decade of his life in Scotland before the family relocated to Essex. His first ambition was to become an artist, but when he left school aged 15 with no qualifications after being bullied, his father suggested that he could help out at his barbershop. Within three months, Trevor was cutting hair and found that he loved it.

Five years down the line, however, he decided to learn about cutting women’s hair and following his training, his first job was at a Vidal Sassoon salon. He would later go on to work at both John Frieda and Toni & Guy, before launching his own salon with his business partner in 1979. He invented several iconic haircuts of the era, including the Wedge and the Chop, and he came up with the technique of scrunch drying. His innovative styles won him the British Hairdresser of the Year award four times.

In 2006, he set up his charity MyNewHair to teach hairdressers how to cut and style wigs after his sister-in-law lost her hair in the course of her cancer treatment. Since then, he has trained nearly a thousand hairdressers. He was the first hairdresser to be awarded an MBE by the Queen in 2004.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Cathy Drysdale


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0002ybp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m0002rkl)
Series 83

Episode 4

Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Lee Mack and Zoe Lyons join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

A BBC Studios Production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0002ybr)
Why is CBD on everyone's lips?

CBD Gummies, CBD croissants, CBD coffee, CBD pesto, CBD beer... CBD is everywhere.

Presenter Charlotte Smith tells the story of how this oil from cannabis that doesn’t get you high is becoming the biggest buzzword in food and drink from its beginnings in the US with the legalisation of medical cannabis through to the proliferation of products on the market today that claim to help with everything from pain to public speaking. Can it live up to the hype? Charlotte heads to the UK's first cannabis-infused restaurant, Brighton's Canna Kitchen, to try it for herself.

Producer: Tom Bonnett


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0002ybt)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0002ybw)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell


SUN 13:30 The Invention of... (m0002yby)
Britain

Anglocentrism... or why Britons Never Will Be Slaves

In AD 937 a mighty battle, like something from Game of Thrones, took place somewhere on the British Isles. Nobody is exactly sure where. On one side there was the king of the Scottish highlands, the king of Strathclyde, and the king of Dublin as well. On the other, Athelstan, bracelet-bestower, baron of barons, lord among earls. It was England against the rest.

In part two of the Invention of Britain, Misha Glenny explores the role of England in the history of these islands - from the battle of Brunanburgh to the conquest of Ireland and Wales. There are location recordings in Anglesey, Caernarfon, Edinburgh and beyond. Contributors include Tom Holland, Suzannah Lipscomb, Diarmaid MacCulloch, Sara Elin Roberts, Dafydd Iwan and Joan Redmond. This episode travels as far as the English Civil War, better known these days as the War of the Three Kingdoms

Presenter Misha Glenny is a Sony award winning reporter and the author of McMafia. Miles Warde is the series producer of How to Invent a Country which also includes programmes on Germany, Spain, Italy and Brazil.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0002snv)
Glasgow

Eric Robson and the panel are in Glasgow. Christine Walkden, Neil Porteus and Bob Flowerdew answer the horticultural questions.

This week, the panellists debate how to keep slugs out of the kitchen, the best composters, and reducing plastic use in the garden.

They also diagnose a sickly Camellia, advise on propagating a Daphne Bholua, and suggest the best long-life cut flowers.

Outside of the hall, Christine Walkden visits Horatio's Garden at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (m0002yc0)
Love, Death and ADHD

Married couple Mash and Jen compare notes on culture and community in their home town of Nelson in Lancashire. Bronagh and Claudine bring dark humour and a lot of love to a conversation about preparing for death. And Roy and Sarah consider the impact ADHD has on both teens and adults.

Fi Glover presents another omnibus edition of the series that proves it’s surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Julia Johnson


SUN 15:00 Drama (m0002yc2)
China Towns

Episode 6

Inspired by the novels of Arnold Bennett, an epic tale of money, passion and daring to dream set in the Staffordshire potteries. Dramatised for radio by Shaun McKenna and Lin Coghlan.

Industrial action brings Bursley to a standstill. Against this backdrop of defiance, Edwin declares his love for Hilda but a secret threatens their chance of a life together. Happiness is hard won in the Five Towns but easily snatched away.

Ephraim Tellwright . . . Neil Dudgeon
Darius Clayhanger . . . Tim McInnerny
Edwin . . . Cameron Percival
Hilda . . . Lucy Doyle
Janet . . . Saffron Coomber
Ruth Tellwright . . . Rebekah Staton
Constance . . . Bryony Hannah
Mr Povey . . . Lewis Bray
Ingpen . . . Don Gilet
Aunty Hamps . . . Carolyn Pickles
Big James . . . Ian Conningham
Cassie . . . Jeanette Percival
Titus Price . . . Michael Bertenshaw
Dr Heve . . . Tony Turner
The Striker . . . Christopher Harper

Incidental music arranged by Colin Guthrie and performed by Colin Guthrie, Peter Ringrose and Ian Conningham.

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (m0002yc4)
Simon Mawer - Tightrope

Simon Mawer talks about Tightrope, an espionage story featuring the enigmatic agent Marian Sutro which is set during World War II and the years into the Cold War.

Tightrope opens as Marian returns to England having survived Ravensbruck concentration camp. She had been parachuted into France by the Special Operations Executive and captured by the Germans in Paris. As peace comes Marian finds it impossible to adjust and find a role for herself. Then, enemies become friends, friends become enemies as an iron curtain is drawn across Europe. Spies are in demand. It is in the clandestine and secret world of the new espionage that Marian finds purpose and is recruited by the Soviet Union.

Mawer's evocation of poor, battered post-war London, still a drab city of thick and clammy fogs won praise from critics, who also likened Marian to James Bond – both in terms of bravery and promiscuity. Marian walks the tightrope between the people in her life who have sent her into danger, those whom she must fear, and those she seeks to protect.

Tightrope won the Walter Scott Prize for historical fiction 2016.

Presented by James Naughtie and including questions from an audience of readers.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

April's Bookclub Choice : The Age of Wonder by Richard Holmes (2008)


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (m0002yc6)
Caroline Bird

Roger McGough is joined by the poet Caroline Bird, who shares a selection of her favourite poems from the Poetry Please archive of listener requests. Her choices include poems by Selima Hill, Ada Limon, Tomas Transtromer, Luke Kennard, Carolyn Forche and Terrance Hayes.

Caroline Bird is a poet and playwright. She has five collections of poetry published by Carcanet. Her most recent collection, In These Days of Prohibition, was shortlisted for the 2017 TS Eliot Prize and The Ted Hughes Award. A two time winner of the Foyles Young Poets Award, her first collection Looking Through Letterboxes was published in 2002 when she was 15. She won a major Eric Gregory Award in 2002 and was shortlisted for the Geoffrey Dearmer Prize in 2001 and the Dylan Thomas Prize in 2008 and 2010. She was one of the five official poets at the 2012 London Olympics. She is currently working on her sixth poetry collection.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0002r50)
The Compensation Catch

If you’ve been the victim of sexual or violent crimes then you can apply for compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA).

During 2017-2018, the government funded scheme paid out over £154 million to help people rebuild their lives.

But for some victims it’s not straightforward.

Solicitors and charities argue that inflexible rules exclude too many people from successfully making a claim, including those who apply more than two years after a crime happens, and those who have an unspent conviction of any kind.

Even where people are eligible for compensation, are they always getting what they deserve?

Applications to the CICA can be made without the help of a solicitor but File on 4 investigates whether victims without legal advice may be being deprived of their entitlement.

Serious questions are also being asked about the effect on vulnerable applicants when the CICA puts an award into a legal trust and dictates exactly how the money will be spent.

A government review into the scheme is currently underway and is set to report back later this year but in the meantime, is it fair to those whose lives have been affected by abuse or violence – or is it penny-pinching to save public money?

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Emma Forde
Editor: Gail Champion

Photo credit: Education Images\Getty


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0002yc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0002ycb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0002ycd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0002ycg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0002ycj)
Testament

The best of BBC Radio this week
Photograph credit: Iza Viola


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0002ycl)
Tom is left disappointed and Jolene struggles under the weight of criticism.


SUN 19:15 Clare in the Community (b08587nz)
Series 11

You Take the High Road

It's the social work event of the year and Clare Barker is giving the keynote speech; it's the biggest moment of her career. Provided she can actually get there for it. Back at home Brian and Nali have been taken in by Ray after a barbecue got out of hand. His housekeeping leaves a bit to be desired as far as Nali's concerned.

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Each week we join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios production.


SUN 19:45 Blackwater (m0002ycn)
Episode 9

A multi-voiced dark story about secrets and lies in a small town.

Golden girl Zoe’s been dead for ten years, her body dragged from the river Black after a night out to celebrate the end of school. But now a woman who says she’s Zoe has turned up in her hometown of Blackwater, on the Irish border, with no memory of the last decade. She claims she woke up in a forest nearby, bruised and bleeding, and doesn’t know where she’s been all this time. What happened to her? Is she really Zoe? If so, who’s in her grave?

Paul, a local boy whose band were playing in the venue where Zoe was last seen, went to prison for her murder. Now he’s out, but he’s lost everything and is shunned in the town. The people of Blackwater were easily convinced that a black boy murdered Zoe, and the evidence did stack up – but if she’s not even dead, then how did he get convicted? Did someone deliberately frame him? He’s determined to find out the truth and clear his name. But does he really know nothing about what happened?

Could it be that everyone involved with the case is hiding something? There’s Zoe’s uncle Phil, a former detective superintendent with an explosive secret. There’s Steve, the police officer who found ‘Zoe’s’ body in the river Black, and sent Paul to prison for her murder. And there’s Zoe’s friend Danny, who wasn’t were she said she was on that night ten years ago. When Paul and Zoe collide, they realise they’re the only ones who can help each other. As they sift through their conflicting memories of that day ten years ago, they start to discover that not everyone is happy Zoe’s back from the dead.

Richard Clements ….. Steve
Roisin Gallagher ….. Danny

Claire McGowan ..... Writer
Celia De Wolff ..... Producer


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0002sp1)
Explaining Brexit

Roger Bolton talks to the Editorial Director for BBC News, Kamal Ahmed, about his approach to Brexit coverage, producers Jonquil Panting and Beth Eastwood reflect on the making of Test Case about Debby Purdy, and there's the second part of an interview with Radio 4's Commissioning Editor for the Arts, James Runcie.

How is the BBC responding to listener's thoughts on the way Brexit is covered in the news? The new Editorial Director for BBC News, Kamal Ahmed, explains how he wants to put the public at the heart of setting the agenda in Brexit: Our Stories.

The landmark case of Debbie Purdy had a profound influence on discussions around assisted dying within the UK. Jonquil Panting and Beth Eastwood discuss how they combined drama and discussion to tell her story in Test Case: Debbie Purdy.

Last week we heard from BBC Radio 4's part-time Commissioning Editor for the Arts, James Runcie. In this week's second part of the interview, James gives his thoughts on arts coverage aimed at attracting younger audiences.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Robert Nicholson
Executive Producer: Deborah Dudgeon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0002snz)
André Previn KBE, John Haynes OBE, Tony Mendez, Lady Grantchester

Pictured: André Previn

Matthew Bannister on

André Previn, the conductor and pianist whose repertoire ranged from the classics to film and jazz music. He took part in a celebrated sketch with Morecambe and Wise.

John Haynes, publisher of the Haynes manuals which gave amateur mechanics a step by step guide to repairing their cars.

Tony Mendez, the CIA operative who smuggled American diplomatic staff out of Tehran disguised as a film crew. The story later became the Hollywood film Argo.

Lady Grantchester, who played a key role in the success of the Littlewoods retail and football pools empire.

Interviewed guest: Edward Seckerson
Interviewed guest: Annette Haynes
Interviewed guest: Peter Earnest
Interviewed guest: Professor Peter Toyne
Interviewed guest: John Suenson-Taylor, Lord Grantchester
Interviewed guest: James Suenson-Taylor
Producer: Neil George

Archive clips from: Desert Island Discs, Radio 4 18/08/1996; How to Write an Instruction Manual, Radio 4 21/08/2009; Argo, directed by Ben Affleck, Warner Bros./GK Films/Smokehouse Pictures 2012.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0002ycr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0002yb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (m0002rks)
Irish Questions

Voters and politicians in Britain claim to be perplexed that economic and political relations between the UK and the Republic of Ireland seem to be decisive in determining the course of Brexit. They shouldn't be, argues Edward Stourton. A glance at the history of the countries' relations since the Acts of Union in 1800 helps to explain the situation.
From at least the time of Catholic Emancipation in the 1820s, political, social, cultural and economic issues on the island of Ireland have influenced and shaped politics at Westminster. The point is that MPs and others at Westminster have seldom appreciated this and therefore underestimated the power of that history to affect the course of a contemporary issue like Brexit.
Looking at a range of issues from Emancipation, the 1840s Irish potato famine, Catholic clerical education, the campaign for Home Rule leading ultimately to the War of Irish Independence in the twentieth century and the bloody establishment of the Irish Free State, as well as the Troubles and the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, Edward Stourton explores the way in which issues in Ireland have determined British politics. He considers especially what lessons these episodes may hold for today's Westminster politicians and how to imagine the Anglo-Irish future.
Among those taking part: Lady Antonia Fraser, Professor The Lord Bew, Professor Sir David Cannadine, Professor Roy Foster, Professor Marianne Elliott, Fintan O'Toole and Declan Kiberd.
Producer: Simon Coates


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0002yct)
Preview of the week's politics with politicians, pundits and experts.


SUN 23:00 Radiolab (m0002ycw)
Series 5

Laughter

Radiolab asks what makes us laugh – and does humour have that much to do with it? With Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich.

Aristotle thought that laughter is what separates us from the beasts, and that a baby does not have a SOUL, until the moment it laughs for the first time. Historian Barry Sanders, author of Sudden Glory, says that according to Aristotle, this moment of "human ensouling" is supposed to happen when a baby is 40 days old. We follow radio producer Amanda Aronczyk as she tests this theory on her newborn baby.

Then we go to Bowling Green State University in Ohio, to tickle rats with psychobiologist Dr. Jaak Panksepp. It's his notion that laughter is found all across the animal kingdom. Boom, Aristotle! Then Dr. Robert Provine, author of Laughter: A Scientific Investigation, shows us chimps who seem to be laughing. And we travel to Tanzania to investigate an outbreak of contagious laughter.

Radiolab is a Peabody-award winning show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and the human experience.

Hosts Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich investigate a strange world.

First broadcast in the USA in 2008.



MONDAY 04 MARCH 2019

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0002ycy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m0002r0w)
Skateboarding - Parkour

Skateboarding and parkour: Laurie Taylor explores lifestyle sports in the hyper regulated city. Iain Borden, Professor of Architecture and Urban Culture at UCL, considers the origins, history and thrill of skateboarding. They're joined by Thomas Raymen, Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Plymouth, who followed a group of Newcastle free running enthusiasts, from wall to rooftop, and probed the contradictions between transgression and conformity to the values of consumer capitalism.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0002yd0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0002yd2)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0002yd4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0002yd6)
The latest shipping forecast


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0002yd8)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0002ydb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Gemma Simmonds from the Congregation of Jesus

In an interview given on March 4th 1966, John Lennon remarked that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus. His comment provoked no very immediate response in England but in America it resulted in ‘Burn the Beatles’ protests and radio stations taking their music off the air. Lennon went on to say, ‘Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me.’

Lennon’s comment doesn’t necessarily insult Jesus himself or his Christian followers, but his remark about the disciples bears consideration. He was right that Jesus chose as his disciples men and women who were as ordinary as they come. The Gospels present them as having little understanding either of his teaching or of the significance of his life and death. It wasn’t until after his resurrection that they began to understand the full impact of what Jesus’ coming on earth meant. It was a lifelong process for them to assimilate for themselves God’s overwhelming love for the human race in sending his Son to save us. Lennon accused the disciples of twisting the message of Jesus. But the Gospels and Letters that they left us offer us the possibility of meeting Jesus in our turn and falling in love with him as they did, overpowered by his love for them. When we take up this offer, Jesus need have no fear of being overtaken in the popularity stakes by anyone.

Lord Jesus, you love the world with an overwhelming love. Help us to know you more clearly, love you more dearly and follow you more dearly day by day.

Amen.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0002ydd)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


MON 05:56 Weather (m0002ydg)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x45bg)
Sand Martin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the sand martin. The flickering shapes of sand martins over a lake or reservoir are a welcome sign of spring. After winging their way across the Sahara Desert, the first birds usually arrive in the UK in March. They're smaller than house martins or swallows, and they're brown above and white below with a brown band across their chest. Often you can hear their dry buzzing calls overhead before you see them.


MON 06:00 Today (m0002z80)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0002z82)
Language and Culture

Andrew Marr discusses the complex interplay between language and culture. The prize-winning American author Jhumpa Lahiri has spent many years living in Italy immersing herself in the language. She has brought together 40 short story writers – many translated into English for the first time – in a collection that reflects the regional landscapes, private passions and political events of her adopted country over the past century.

April De Angelis is a writer steeped in translation and adaptation: she brought Elena Ferrante’s novels of Neapolitan life to the stage. And she is now involved in the English National Opera’s production of The Merry Widow – a French comic play re-imagined by an Austro-Hungarian composer.

The power of translation is explored in a new exhibition at the Bodleian Library curated by the academic Katrin Kohl. At the centre is the story of the Tower of Babel, an origin myth in the Bible which explains why people speak different languages. Kohl argues that studying how a story is translated from one language to another allows us to glimpse the rich diversity of life and culture around the world.

Many people now rely on computers to translate from one language to another. The mathematician Marcus du Sautoy looks at how AI is being programmed to be creative in language and the arts, and what that means for the human touch.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (m0002z84)
Walter Gropius: Visionary Founder of the Bauhaus

Developing a Vision

Eleanor Bron reads Fiona McCarthy’s biography of the Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius.

Gropius was a man of extraordinary charisma. For more than twenty years, from 1910 to 1930, he was at the very centre of European modern art and design. His buildings are still strikingly experimental, his influence on post-war architecture in America and internationally was enormous. As the founder and director of the Bauhaus, he invented a form of creative education that influenced art schools worldwide. But the Bauhaus was more than an art school - it was the birth of a whole new philosophy of art.

The Bauhaus stood for delight, experiment and creative freedom. Gropius gathered talents, including Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky, into an art school that became an alternative way of life. Once Hitler came to power in 1933, Gropius' situation became increasingly untenable. The Nazis opposed everything the Bauhaus stood for. Gropius' beliefs and his affiliations left him little choice but to leave Germany. His story is one of exile in a century of buffeting and conflict.

In this entertaining biography, Fiona MacCarthy argues that Walter Gropius's visionary ideas still influence the way we live, work, and think today.

Episode 1:
Walter Gropius begins to develop his vision for a new modern architecture. Through his first major commission, the Fagus shoe factory, he creates a “palace of beauty” for workers, using glass in an entirely new way so that the building appears to float in space. He also meets Alma Mahler, wife of the famous composer Gustav Mahler. The first evening they meet, they fall madly in love, and their affair, passionate and tortured, will become a defining influence in his life.

Reader: Eleanor Bron
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Executive Producer: Joanne Rowntree
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0002z86)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002z88)
A Small Town Murder

Episode 1

Meera Syal stars as family liaison officer Jackie Hartwell.

Nobody seems to mind when notorious mobster Jimmy Reid goes missing in suspicious circumstances. He’s an out-and-out villain who’d get kicked out of hell for bad behaviour – a West Midlands millionaire made rich from a successful career in every aspect of organised crime, and a man made infamous by the cruelty of his tactic.

If someone has finally done him in, what’s not to like?

However, it’s down to Jackie Hartwell to remain impartial and support his wife and daughter as much as she can. And who knows, maybe they’ll have something that might help the investigation.

But Jackie soon realises she’s being lied to - and not just by the victim’s family. It’s also her fellow police officers who are being economical with truth.

Cast:
Jackie................Meera Syal
Peter..................Mathew Marsh
Dee.....................Ayesha Antoine
Angela................TBA

Written by Scott Cherry
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:00 Am I Too Old to Drive? (m0002z8b)
Political reporter Julia Langdon was so concerned about her elderly father’s driving that she reported him to the DVLA to try to get his licence taken away. Now, septuagenarian Julia asks if we need to change the law and force the over 70s to have their driving assessed officially.

Interviewees include:
Ben Brooks-Dutton, whose wife was killed by an elderly driver;
Dr Charles Musselwhite of Swansea University who says the old are less dangerous than the young;
Darren Shirley of The Campaign For Better Transport who explains that isolation and loneliness are the consequences for the elderly in a car-based society.

Julia Langdon was Fleet Street's first female Political Editor and has been a Lobby Correspondent for over 40 years.

Producer: David Morley
A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:30 Alexei Sayle's The Absence of Normal (m0002z8d)
Banner Bright

Episode 2: Banner Bright

Alexei Sayle’s The Absence of Normal is a series of dark comic plays narrated by Alexei Sayle and adapted from his original short stories.

Banner Bright is the story of a group of left wing radicals who meet during the occupation of a Lancashire university in 1968 and come to believe they can change the world with an inspirational protest banner.

Starring Ben Crompton, George Fouracres, Kath Hughes, Tim Key and Nimisha Odedra
Written and adapted for radio by Alexei Sayle
Produced by Joe Nunnery
A BBC Studios Production


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0002z8g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Golden Child (m0002z8j)
6 Genius

Don Warrington continues Claire Adam's heartrending and lyrical debut set in 1980s Trinidad about betrayal, love and impossible choices.

Paul, the misunderstood son, labelled from birth, is still missing. As the hours turn into days, Clyde thinks back to the boys' first days at school, and his very different plans from his twin boys...

Reader: Don Warrington
Writer: Claire Adam
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Justine Willett


MON 12:18 You and Yours (m0002z8l)
Radio 4's consumer affairs programme.


MON 12:57 Weather (m0002z8n)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (m0002z8q)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 The Secret History of a School (m0002z8s)
The Secret History of a School

Episode 6

Alan Johnson, the former Education Secretary, tells the story of English education over the last 140 years through the prism of one school - St Michael and All Angels in Camberwell.

Over the decades, the school has undergone many transformations, including names, in response to changes in policy, but its purpose has remained constant - to provide decent and free education to local children.

The story is told through original documents – from headmasters’ logs and inspection reports – and the testimony of the children and teachers who went there. It is as much a social history of inner-city life down the ages as it is a study of our attempts to educate the children of poor families.

Episode 6:
St Michael and All Angels Secondary Modern changes its name to Archbishop Michael Ramsey when it opens in 1974 as a comprehensive on a newly developed, purpose-built site. A super-school, it's an amalgamation between and neighbouring Archbishop Temples school and the existing St Michael's, offering pupils new opportunities through the comprehensive system.

In the past, St Michael’s pupils would have taken CSEs (the Certificate of Secondary Education) which was introduced in 1965 for pupils considered less academic, many of whom were leaving school without qualifications. Alan Johnson considers the pros and cons of the more liberal comprehensive system. He uncovers the original foundation stone and meets former pupils and teachers, including those from St Michael's who benefited from the opportunity to go on to sixth form, and then to university.

Presenter: Alan Johnson
Producer: Sara Parker
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0002ycl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Tumanbay (m0002z8v)
Series 3

Accidental Hero

General Qulan (Christopher Fulford) travels to the provinces in the hope of raising an army to defend Tumanbay and encounters Fatima (Tara Fitzgerald), a provincial governor’s wife, who has a score to settle with the great commander.

In Tumanbay, a coup is underway and Sultana Manel (Aiysha Hart) and her lover Alkin (Nathalie Armin) face a grim future. Meanwhile, the slave merchant Heaven (Olivia Popica), having been captured by the Balarac at sea, is recruited as reader to the blind Grand Master (Anton Lesser), a position that gives her access to ancient scrolls that appear to unlock profound secrets to the world.

Cast:
Fatima........Tara Fitzgerald
Gregor........Rufus Wright
Manel........Aiysha Hart
Grand Master, Amalric........ Anton Lesser
Cadali........Matthew Marsh
Bavand........Peter Polycarpou
Alkin........Nathalie Armin
Herod........Amir El-Masry
Heaven........Olivia Popica
General Qulan........Christopher Fulford
Frog........Finn Elliot
Akiba........Akin Gazi
Balarac Sergeant........Alexander Arnold

Tumanbay is created by John Scott Dryden and Mike Walker and inspired by the Mamluk slave rulers of Egypt.

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam

Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound Recording by Joe Richardson
Additional Music by Jon Ouin

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Scott Dryden
Written by Mike Walker and Directed by John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m0002z8x)
Programme 10, 2019

(10/12)
Today sees the last appearance in the current series of the teams from Wales and Scotland, with Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards taking on Val McDermid and Alan McCredie. Unusually for both of these teams they have only won one match each so far this season, so they can both be forgiven if slight panic is setting in at this late stage.

Tom Sutcliffe asks the questions, which include the usual healthy scattering of ideas from Round Britain Quiz listeners hoping to trip up the regular panellists. The more clues the teams need from Tom, the more points he'll dock when assessing the final scores.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0002ybr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Art of Now (m0002z90)
A New School for New Orleans

Clara Amfo travels to New Orleans to meet the staff and artists from The Embassy, a dynamic, groundbreaking music studio in the 8th and 9th Districts. Based in one of the city’s most deprived areas, the studio works with music artists of all kinds to develop creative and professional skills.

Clara discovers an evolving model for musical learning developing in the face of escalating cuts to education, welfare and social investment - in a city still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Katrina 14 years ago. In a place that relies so heavily on its musical history for tourism, is there hope for some of its hardest-hit communities to create a new musical identity?

Initially based solely around music, the team behind The Embassy has since responded to the needs of the community with its 24 Carrot Garden project, and now a new project - The Material Institute - being developed in conjunction with UK-based architecture, art and design collective Assemble.

The Embassy’s program director Aimée Toledano balances the challenge of providing meaningful artistic development for those using the Embassy with the much wider obstacles that come with trauma, violence and an uncertain future.

Clara hears the stories of the New Orleans residents finding identity, hope and practical skills from a dynamic approach to creative development and learning.

Produced by Tayo Popoola
A Boom Shakalaka production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m0002z92)
Series 16

Crutch

Aleks Krotoski explores the way in which digital crutches are used every day.


MON 17:00 PM (m0002z94)
PM at 5pm: interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0002z96)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (m0002z98)
Series 83

Episode 5

Tony Hawks, Josie Lawrence, Gyles Brandreth & Angela Barnes join Nicholas Parsons for the panel game where the challenge is to speak without repetition, deviation or hesitation.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd
A BBC Studios Production


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0002z3x)
Tony has grave concerns and Hannah is forced to make a sacrifice.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0002z9b)
Live daily magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002z88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Deported (m0002z9d)
What’s it like to be deported or forcibly removed from the UK? Recorded over the past year, these are the stories of three people sent to Nigeria, a country they left many years ago, and what happens to them once they arrive.

Fola was training to be a nurse and married to a British citizen, but when the marriage broke down her right to remain was stopped. After thirteen years in the UK, she was removed to Nigeria. Is she able start a new business there after so many years away?

Shams was born in Nigeria and came to the UK when he was ten years old to join his family. He went to school in England but, after serving a prison sentence, was deported to Lagos as a foreign national. Can Shams stay in contact with his young son and daughter in England and earn a living in an unfamiliar city where unemployment is high?

Jessica came to the UK as a student and lived in Scotland. When she was unable to extend her visa, she was forcibly removed to Lagos after thirteen years living in the UK. With £10 cash on her when she arrived in Lagos, and all her belongings still in Glasgow, can Jessica, who has a serious health condition, build a new life in Nigeria?

Producer: Jo Wheeler
A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4


MON 20:30 Analysis (m0002z9g)
Deliberative Democracy

Is there a better way to heal political divides - through panels of ordinary citizens? Sonia Sodha asks if the idea of citizens' assemblies, which have been used around the world to come up with solutions to polarising issues. Proponents argue that they avoid the risks of knee-jerk legislation, winner-takes-all outcomes or the pull of populism. Many in the Republic of Ireland believe that deliberative democracy was crucial in reforming the law on abortion without causing major political upheavals. Could this method still come up with a better way forward for Brexit?
Producer: Maire Devine


MON 21:00 #OurBoysAsWell (m0002r3v)
With “toxic masculinity” high on the agenda, are we are now viewing boys as potential perpetrators of sexism and violence? Is this fair - and what should we be teaching them?

After #MeToo with phrases like “toxic masculinity” on everyone's lips, are we now beginning to view boys as potential perpetrators of sexism and violence? If so, what effect is it having on them? How do we teach boys positive behaviour and prevent them repeating the mistakes of previous generations, without also making them feel that they are being vilified as emerging men?

Producer Emma Kingsley, herself a mother of sons, explores this delicate balancing act. She talks to one of her boys and meets boys and girls at Moreton School near Wolverhampton to hear their views. She meets developmental pyschologist Dr. Brenda Todd from City University, London to talk about how problematic ideas around boyhood can develop from an early age. She speaks to Dan Bell from the Men and Boys Coalition who has concerns about how current debates impact on boys and she also hears from feminist writer Victoria Smith about how she balances awareness of toxic masculinity with being the mother of sons.

We hear how boys are being guided towards constructing new models of behaviour with a glimpse into a workshop run by David Brockway of the Good Lad Initiative at Wetherby Senior School in London.

Also taking part in the programme are Dr. Michael Ward from Swansea University who has researched how place impacts on young men's identity, anthropologist Samuel Veissière from McGill University who has researched toxic masculinity and Courtney Hartman, CEO of the company Free to be Kids whose clothing reflects anxieties about the perception of boys.

Produced and presented by Emma Kingsley


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0002z82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0002z9k)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Golden Child (m0002z8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


MON 23:00 When Greeks Flew Kites (m0002z9m)
The Shame Game

Shame is back.

This month, Sarah Dunant delves into the long and deep history of shame, exploring how it has shaped our lives and behaviour at every point in history. Whether it’s thieves on display in the medieval stocks or the forcible head-shaving of French women suspected of fraternising with the Nazis, shame has always been at the centre of society’s attempts to regulate itself.

But the potency of this most raw of emotions can sometimes prove a double-edged sword.

Oxford Brookes' Professor David Nash explains how shaming rituals and "rough music" were a widespread and common feature of European community life right up to the nineteenth century.

Dr Mary Flannery of Oxford University describes how medieval women were instructed and encouraged to feel shame in order to shape their behaviour, and looks at the example of "Jane Shore" and her notorious walk of shame.

The extraordinary and troubling public shaming and shaving of thousands of woman accused of collaboration in occupied France is explored by Charlotte Walmsley.

And the lifelong historian of shame, Peter Stearns at George Mason University in Virginia considers the history of corporate shaming and what happens when people (and presidents) just won't feel shame.

At a time when shame is back as a force on the public stage, but also an apparently alien concept to some of our political leaders, Sarah looks to the history of shame to think about how we might wield or be wary of it today.

Readers: Karina Fernandez
Producers: Natalie Steed and Nathan Gower
Executive Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0002z9p)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



TUESDAY 05 MARCH 2019

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0002z9r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (m0002z84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0002z9t)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0002z9w)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0002z9y)
The latest shipping forecast


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0002zb0)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0002zb2)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Gemma Simmonds from the Congregation of Jesus

Depending on where you live today is Shrove Tuesday, Pancake Day, Mardi Gras or Carnivale. All these words denote the preparation for the penitential Christian season of Lent during which people traditionally abstained from all meat, eggs and dairy products, finishing up left over eggs, fat and milk by cooking pancakes or doughnuts. In places like Venice and New Orleans carnival has become a festive time with little sense of penance to follow. The French city of Rouen is in Normandy, famous for its butter. The city’s 15th-century Gothic Butter Tower, was financed by donations from wealthy citizens paying the church for permission to eat dairy products during Lent. It took 21 years to build, and the tower is very high so one imagines that a lot of butter was consumed in that time.

Penance is not all about mortifying the flesh, however. The word has the same Latin root as penitence or repentance, the desire to be forgiven. Jesus’ miracles of healing were often accompanied by the words, ‘Go in peace. Your sins have been forgiven’. The Hebrew Scriptures tell us that God has thrown away all our sins behind his back, and removed them as far as the East is from the West.

Forgiveness and absolution from our faults is God’s gift to anyone who truly desires it. To know that we are loved and forgiven sinners and that nothing we can do can ever separate us from God’s love is worth an entire butter mountain, let alone a tower.

Loving God, you forgive every sinner who turns to you. Help us to see ourselves with your truthful but loving eyes so that we can learn to forgive ourselves as you forgive us.

Amen.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0002zb4)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxg2)
Variable Pitohui

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the poisonous variable pitohui from New Guinea. This jay sized, black-and-tan bird hides a dark secret. Named for their voice, pitohui is a representation of their song and 'variable' refers to their plumage colour which varies across their range. What is striking about this bird is that it is poisonous: its skin and feathers contain powerful neurotoxic alkaloids similar to those of South American poison-dart frogs. For the pitohui, this chemical defence is unlikely to be fatal to predators which prey on them; rather it discourages further attacks. People who've handled have suffered burning sensations in the mouth, numbness in fingers and bouts of sneezing. It is not recommended.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0002z2x)
News and current affairs including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m0002z2z)
2018 Nobel Prize winner, Donna Strickland, on laser physics

When the first laser was built in 1960, it was an invention looking for an application. Science fiction found uses for these phenomenally powerful beams of light long before real world applications were developed. Think Star Wars light sabres and people being sliced in half. Today lasers are used for everything from hair removal to state of the art weapons. Working with her supervisor Gerard Mourou in the 1980s, the Canadian physicist, Donna Strickland found a way to make laser pulses that were thousands of times more powerful than anything that had been made before. These rapid bursts of intense light energy have revolutionised laser eye surgery and, it’s hoped, could open the doors to an exciting range of new applications from pushing old satellites out of earth’s orbit to treatments for deep brain tumours. Donna tells Jim Al-Khalili why she wanted to work with lasers and what it feels like to be the first woman to win a Nobel Prize for Physics in 55 years.
Producer: Anna Buckley


TUE 09:30 One to One (m0002z31)
Rachel Johnson talks to Absent Mothers: Sarah

Rachel Johnson is fascinated how mothers are often judged more harshly for their parenting choices than men. She meets Sarah, who chose to live away from her two children for some months in order to deal with her drug-taking.
This is something Rachel knows something about as her own mother left the family home during an episode of mental illness when she was a child. Rachel explores the effect of this separation on both the children and the mother.
Produced in Bristol by Sara Conkey


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (m0002z33)
Walter Gropius: Visionary Founder of the Bauhaus

Alma Mahler

Eleanor Bron reads Fiona McCarthy’s biography of the Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius.

Gropius was a man of extraordinary charisma. For more than twenty years, from 1910 to 1930, he was at the very centre of European modern art and design. His buildings are still strikingly experimental, his influence on post-war architecture in America and internationally was enormous. As the founder and director of the Bauhaus, he invented a form of creative education that influenced art schools worldwide. But the Bauhaus was more than an art school - it was the birth of a whole new philosophy of art.

The Bauhaus stood for delight, experiment and creative freedom. Gropius gathered talents, including Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky, into an art school that became an alternative way of life. Once Hitler came to power in 1933, Gropius' situation became increasingly untenable. The Nazis opposed everything the Bauhaus stood for. Gropius' beliefs and his affiliations left him little choice but to leave Germany. His story is one of exile in a century of buffeting and conflict.

In this entertaining biography, Fiona MacCarthy argues that Walter Gropius's visionary ideas still influence the way we live, work, and think today.

Episode 2:
Just as Walter Gropius was beginning his professional career, he met Alma Mahler, wife of the famous composer Gustav Mahler and the femme fatale of avant-garde Vienna. Gropius was enormously attractive to women - dancing together the night they met, it seems that within minutes he and Alma were totally in love. But inevitably, Gustav Mahler discovers his wife’s unfaithfulness. There is a showdown, and he forces Alma to choose. She chooses her husband, but the lovers cannot give each other up.

Reader: Eleanor Bron
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Executive Producer: Joanne Rowntree
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0002z36)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002z38)
A Small Town Murder

Episode 2

Meera Syal stars as family liaison officer Jackie Hartwell.

Nobody seems to mind when notorious mobster Jimmy Reid goes missing in suspicious circumstances. He’s an out-and-out villain who’d get kicked out of hell for bad behaviour – a West Midlands millionaire made rich from a successful career in every aspect of organised crime, and a man made infamous by the cruelty of his tactic.

If someone has finally done him in, what’s not to like?

However, it’s down to Jackie Hartwell to remain impartial and support his wife and daughter as much as she can. And who knows, maybe they’ll have something that might help the investigation.

But Jackie soon realises she’s being lied to - and not just by the victim’s family. It’s also her fellow police officers who are being economical with truth.

Cast:
Jackie................Meera Syal
Peter..................Mathew Marsh
Dee.....................Ayesha Antoine
Angela................TBA
Claire...................TBA

Written by Scott Cherry
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:00 Don't Log Off (m0002z3c)
Series 9

A Sense of Belonging

Alan Dein connects with strangers across the world, exploring the things that unite people across cultures and borders.

Today, Alan reaches out to people in Afghanistan, the Philippines, Sierra Leone and beyond - exploring what it means to belong.

He hears people yearning for a better life elsewhere - and those determined to make a go of it where they are.

Producer: Laurence Grissell


TUE 11:30 Moving Pictures (m0002z3g)
A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat

Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link (below) to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts and Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

The new series starts with a closer look at a pointillist masterpiece - George Seurat's A Sunday on La Grande Jatte (The Art Institute of Chicago). Painted in the 1880s, it depicts a group of day-tripping Parisians enjoying the sunshine by the river Seine. Each is a character in search of a story - the boater smoking his pipe, the shop-girl with her novels, the elderly invalid, shivering despite the sun, and the soldiers, standing to attention.

Cathy takes a wander in the park and hears how Seurat created his shimmering, glimmering, light-filled work.

Interviewees: Gloria Groom, Leah Kharibian, Colin Jones, Colin Wiggins.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Georges-Pierre Seurat. A Sunday on La Grande Jatte (1884–86). The Art Institute of Chicago.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0002z3j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Golden Child (m0002z3l)
7 The Before and After

Don Warrington continues Claire Adam's heartrending and lyrical debut set in Trinidad about betrayal, love and impossible choices.

Paul, the son who has caused Clyde and Joy no end of problems, is still missing. But today we finally learn what happened to him down by the riverbank...

Reader: Don Warrington
Writer: Claire Adam
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Justine Willett


TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m0002z3n)
Radio 4's consumer affairs programme.


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0002z3q)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0002z3s)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 The Secret History of a School (m0002z3v)
The Secret History of a School

Episode 7

Alan Johnson, the former Education Secretary, tells the story of English education over the last 140 years through the prism of one school - St Michael and All Angels in Camberwell.

Over the decades, the school has undergone many transformations, including names, in response to changes in policy, but its purpose has remained constant - to provide decent and free education to local children.

The story is told through original documents – from headmasters’ logs and inspection reports – and the testimony of the children and teachers who went there. It is as much a social history of inner-city life down the ages as it is a study of our attempts to educate the children of poor families.

Episode 7:
As Archbishop Michael Ramsey Comprehensive (AMR) gains in reputation through the 70s and 80s, one of its pupils, Richard Weight, becomes the first to gain an Oxbridge place at Trinity College Cambridge. Alan Johnson goes back to Trinity with Richard to find out how he coped with being a South London boy in its rarefied academic atmosphere.

Richard's family story illustrates how the Butler Act 1944 changed lives. His grandmother was a domestic servant in a stately home and his mother was one of the so-called Butler girls who gained a place at grammar school before going onto university. She encouraged Richard to even greater success.

This was AMR’s golden years - and not just academically, but also in sport with talented footballers like Tony Gale. He left school at 16 and was signed by Fulham. The 80s were a time of change and nowhere more so than in education. But Margaret Thatcher’s Britain was also a time of civil unrest in inner cities. The Brixton riots were virtually on AMR’s Camberwell doorstep.

Presenter: Alan Johnson
Producer: Sara Parker
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0002z3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m0002z3z)
Bathwater

Bathwater explores poet Vicky Foster's real-life experiences of what happens when violence spills over into family life. What's the impact on a son of having a violent father he never really knew? How does society view those whose partners are violent?

'Do I walk like him? Do I talk like him? Is my body the same shape?

Written and performed by Vicky Foster
With Finlay McGuigan as Joseph

Sound score composed and played by Broken Orchestra - Pat Dooner and Carl Conway-Davis
Bathwater is a BBC Drama North production, directed by Susan Roberts


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m0002z41)
Series 18

The Descent

Falling space debris sparks an adventure across continents - and underpants dangling from a tree push a woman into a downward spiral. Josie Long presents short documentaries and adventures in sound about The Descent.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m0002z43)
Hit the Gas!

From the cattle shed to the racetrack, ammonia is having a moment. In the wrong place it's a dangerous pollutant, in the right place it's a clean fuel for your car. Ella McSweeney and Peter Hadfield report on the two faces of the gas chemists know as NH3.

The increasing global demand for milk means more big dairy herds. More cows means more dung and urine. Mixed together they produce ammonia gas which contributes to urban air pollution and destroys sensitive habitats. In Ireland scientists have spotted big problems in peat bogs. The mosses which help create the carbon-grabbing peat are dying off in areas down-wind of dairy, pig and chicken farms. Farmers are being asked to change the way they store and spread their slurry, but it could be too late for some of the island's most vulnerable bogs.

Meanwhile, in Australia they're exploiting some interesting properties of ammonia. Environmentally-friendly hydrogen-powered cars have been around for years but they've failed to take off because hydrogen is costly and awkward to transport. By contrast, ammonia is very simple to move around from refinery to fuel station. Splitting the N from the H is straightforward, giving drivers a source of fuel that emits only water from the exhaust pipe.

So can ammonia complete its journey from environmental villain to green hero?

Producer: Alasdair Cross


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (m0002z45)
The Family Drug and Alcohol Court

We visit a problem-solving court in Coventry. Joshua Rozenberg speaks to judges, social workers and a mother whose drug addiction put her at risk of losing her children.
Producer: Neil Koenig


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m0002z47)
Lemn Sissay and Mick Herron

Harriett Gilbert talks about books with poet Lemn Sissay and writer Mick Herron. Lemn chooses Booker prize winner The Life and Times of Michael K by JM Coetzee, Harriett's good read is Great Granny Webster by Caroline Blackwood and Mick loves John Steinbeck's novel set on Cannery Row, Sweet Thursday. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0002z49)
PM at 5pm: interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0002z4c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Small Scenes (m0002z4f)
Series 4

Episode 4

Award-winning sketch series set to music and starring Daniel Rigby, Mike Wozniak, Cariad Lloyd, Henry Paker and Freya Parker. This week a man discovers that his real name is Ian and his life starts to spiral into chaos. Meanwhile, a young woman exposes a dark conspiracy at the heart of West End musicals.

Written by Benjamin Partridge, Henry Paker and Mike Wozniak, with additional material from the cast.

Produced by Simon Mayhew-Archer.

A BBC Studios production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0002z4h)
Will learns the truth and Justin turns the tables


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0002z4k)
Live daily magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002z38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m0002z4m)
Winging It?

The UK's Military Flying Training System trains pilots on aircraft from fighter planes to navy helicopters. It takes years for trainees to get their wings. But delays in the system, mean many pilots and crew are 'on hold', waiting months, often years to take to the skies.

File on 4 investigates the reasons for the hold ups. What's the impact of these delays on the public purse and on our military capability?

The government's promising a beefed up armed forces, including two new Typhoon squadrons and F35 jets. Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson says the UK needs to be ready to use 'hard power' or risk being seen as little more than a paper tiger. But with the MoD's flying training still not at full throttle, will a lack of pilots undermine our military capability?

Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Mick Tucker
Editor: Gail Champion


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0002z4p)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (m0002z4r)
Dr Mark Porter goes on a weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m0002z2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0002z4t)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Golden Child (m0002z3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


TUE 23:00 Date Night (m0002z4w)
Episode 1

Semi-improvised comedy show written and performed by Marc Wootton with Catherine Tate, Monica Dolan, Katherine Parkinson, Hammed Animashaun, Ellie White and Jamie Demetriou. Together they portray a series of couples all embracing the modern phenomenon of date night.

DATE NIGHT, noun: A pre-arranged occasion when a couple who have been together for a long time commit to a regular night out in order to keep their relationship alive.

The series follows a collection of couples who are desperately trying to keep their relationship functioning by creating a weekly date night intervention. For some, the relationship is already broken, for others it's their pre-emptive strike in the hope of new-found longevity. More often than not, the stakes are high, involving children, careers and homes.

Date Night is written and created by Marc Wootton whose previous credits include High & Dry (Ch4), La La Land (Showtime), Shirley Ghostman (BBC) and My New Best Friend (Ch4).

Cast:
Richard/Barry/Patrick/Terry ….. Marc Wootton
Maddy ….. Katherine Parkinson
Rita ….. Ellie White
Carol ….. Monica Dolan
Terri ….. Catherine Tate
Narrator ...... Fi Glover

Sound Designers: David Chilton and Lucinda Mason Brown
Assistant Producer: James Peak
Producer: Anna Madley

A Black Hat production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0002z50)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 06 MARCH 2019

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0002z52)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (m0002z33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0002z54)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0002z56)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0002z58)
The latest shipping forecast


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0002z5b)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0002z5d)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Gemma Simmonds from the Congregation of Jesus

Today is Ash Wednesday and the beginning of the Christian season of Lent. Many mark this day by a religious ritual in which they have ashes sprinkled on their foreheads while the priest recites, ‘Remember that you are dust, and unto dust shall you return’. These words are intended to remind human beings that we are not the centre of our own universe. We are created by God out of nothing for a purpose and we need to develop a proportionate sense of our place in the great cosmic scheme of things.

While a chaplain in London University I attended an Ashing Service and came out of it, feeling rather pleased to have begun the penitential season. My pleasure was cut down to size when I met a student in the corridor who pointed out to me, in embarrassed tones, that I had a great smudge of dirt on my forehead. ‘Yes I know’, I said, ‘it’s Ash Wednesday’. The student looked bewildered for a moment, searching for the meaning of Ash, and then said, ‘You know, I’ve been thinking about giving up smoking too’.

Lent is a preparation for Easter. It reminds us to think and pray especially about what Jesus paid for our salvation – the price of his own life. We are made in God’s image, precious and beautiful in God’s eyes, whatever we may have done with our lives. Each of us is the treasure, the pearl of great price for which Jesus was willing to pay all that he had. If we are made of dust it’s the same dust that the stars are made of.

Jesus our loving God, help us to begin Lent knowing how much you treasure us, and praising you for saving the world.

Amen


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0002z5g)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b092p0hy)
Samuel West on the Collared Dove

Actor Samuel West laments how the beautiful collared dove is saddled with a morose call that sounds like the chant of a bored football fan echoing down own our streets.

Producer: Tom Bonnett
Picture: Pat Adams.


WED 06:00 Today (m0002zbv)
News and current affairs including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (m0002zbz)
Series 7

06/03/2019

Only Artists brings two artists together to talk freely about their creative work.


WED 09:30 How to Disagree: A Beginner's Guide to Having Better Arguments (b0bf84n2)
Episode 5

Timandra Harkness explores the best ways to disagree with other people - constructively.

In this programme she examines how we argue over personal preferences, and asks why we really try so hard to find and present reasons for what we want to do or believe. And she has a disagreement over the merits of disagreement.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (m0002zdm)
Walter Gropius: Visionary Founder of the Bauhaus

The First World War

Eleanor Bron reads Fiona McCarthy’s biography of the architect and visionary founder of the Bauhaus, Walter Gropius.

In this third episode, Gropius’ professional career is interrupted by the outbreak of war. On 1st August 1914, he was immediately called up, and sent straight into action in the mountains of Alsace where the German Army were locked into long battles with the French. His letters from the front reveal his anger at the widespread loss of human life and the sheer incompetence of his superiors. He was decorated as a war hero but his nerves were shattered, and what he called "the screaming jeebies" never really left him.

As he fights at the front, Gropius begins to formulate plans for the school that evolved into the Bauhaus, a school for an ideal future in which art, craft and technology were fused. The Bauhaus stood for delight, experiment and creative freedom.

Meanwhile, his love affair with Alma Mahler continues and, after Gustav Mahler’s death, Walter and Alma marry. They have a child, but Alma takes a lover and her second child is clearly not Walter’s. As he realises what has happened, Gropius "crumpled as though struck by lightning".

Reader: Eleanor Bron
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Executive Producer: Joanne Rowntree
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0002zc3)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (m0002zc5)
A Small Town Murder

Episode 3

Meera Syal stars as family liaison officer Jackie Hartwell.

Nobody seems to mind when notorious mobster Jimmy Reid goes missing in suspicious circumstances. He’s an out-and-out villain who’d get kicked out of hell for bad behaviour – a West Midlands millionaire made rich from a successful career in every aspect of organised crime, and a man made infamous by the cruelty of his tactic.

If someone has finally done him in, what’s not to like?

However, it’s down to Jackie Hartwell to remain impartial and support his wife and daughter as much as she can. And who knows, maybe they’ll have something that might help the investigation.

But Jackie soon realises she’s being lied to - and not just by the victim’s family. It’s also her fellow police officers who are being economical with truth.

Cast:
Jackie................Meera Syal
Peter..................Mathew Marsh
Dee.....................Ayesha Antoine
Angela................TBA
Claire...................TBA

Written by Scott Cherry
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (m0002zc7)
The Kidney Donor

When Gill offered her friend Claire a kidney, both women were disappointed to discover that they were not compatible. But a paired donation scheme, matching three donors with three recipients, offered hope. This is a warm and funny chat about friendship, flattery and the surgery that changed both their lives.

Fi Glover presents another edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Julia Johnson


WED 11:00 From Sensuality to Puritanism: How Muslim Cultures turned Grey (m0002zc9)
The rise of Islamist Puritanism

Writer and Broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown continues her charting of the shift from vibrancy to puritanism in Islamist culture, focusing on key events in the 20th century, as the colonial powers lost their world dominance and increasingly emboldened Islamic countries sought to re-affirm their religious and cultural identities. Yasmin asks if it was inevitable that this would lead to more Puritanical societies with women suffering ever greater restrictions. She hears from scholars, historians and those who witnessed these changes in Iran, Egypt and even in the UK, and she challenges the notion that a Puritanical approach to Islam is a sign of strength. The increasing power of Saudi Arabia and Iran, the fundamentalist events that shook both nations and lead to an increasingly hard line approach to religious identity throughout the Muslim world, are discussed alongside signs that the tide may yet turn.

Producer: Tom Alban


WED 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (m0002zcc)
Star Trap

Episode 1

Bill Nighy returns as actor-cum-amateur-sleuth Charles Paris in Jeremy Front's new dramatisation of Simon Brett's novel.

Charles, bit part actor and amateur sleuth, finally gets the chance to be in a West End musical, but Charles' suspicions are roused when the number of accidents looks like more than bad luck...

At home, Charles' 'semi-detached' wife Frances is approaching a big birthday and she's drawn up a bucket list of things to do before it's too late.

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Chris Watt ..... Nigel Lindsay
Nina Lamb ..... Clare Corbett
Trevor Rhodes ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Mark Spelthorne ..... Christopher Harper
Izzy ..... Franchi Webb
Ged ..... Ronny Jhutti
TV Announcer ..... Carolyn Pickles
Director ..... Mary Peate
Producer ..... Sally Avens

Jeremy Front (Jack and Millie, Magnificent Women, Sword of Honour) continues his hugely successful adaptations of Simon Brett's novels starring Bill Nighy (Marigold Hotel, Dad's Army) as Charles Paris; Suzanne Burden (Fresh Meat, Tis Pity she's A Whore) as Frances - Charles ex-wife from whom he's never been able to detach himself - and Jon Glover (Episodes, Hitchhikers) as Maurice - Charles' long suffering agent.


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0002zk2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Golden Child (m0002zcj)
8 The Plan

Don Warrington continues Claire Adam's heartrending and lyrical debut set in Trinidad about betrayal, love and impossible choices.

As Paul is driven away by the kidnappers, he knows that he's going to have to look after himself...

Reader: Don Warrington
Writer: Claire Adam
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Justine Willett


WED 12:18 You and Yours (m0002zcl)
Radio 4's consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (m0002zcn)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (m0002zcq)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 The Secret History of a School (m0002zcs)
The Secret History of a School

Episode 8

Alan Johnson, the former Education Secretary, tells the story of English education over the last 140 years through the prism of one school - St Michael and All Angels in Camberwell.

Over the decades, the school has undergone many transformations, including names, in response to changes in policy, but its purpose has remained constant - to provide decent and free education to local children.

The story is told through original documents – from headmasters’ logs and inspection reports – and the testimony of the children and teachers who went there. It is as much a social history of inner-city life down the ages as it is a study of our attempts to educate the children of poor families.

Episode 8:
In 2007, Michael Dosunmu was shot and killed at home in his bed. It was a case of mistaken identity. The 15-year old was a popular pupil at Archbishop Michael Ramsey (AMR) comprehensive and his murder came as a terrible shock to all in the school.

In this episode, Alan Johnson goes through the Southwark News archives and considers the impact on AMR of violence and gangs in the surrounding neighbourhood. He looks at how headteacher after headteacher tried to keep these problems outside the school gates with measures such as an on-site police officer and two undercover police officers posing as students in the sixth form, as well as providing discipline, inspirational role models and opportunities such as the benefits of technology college status.

Presenter: Alan Johnson
Producer: Sara Parker
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0002z4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b08hpbx3)
The Ferryhill Philosophers

Political Obligations and the Occasional Toke

By Michael Chaplin. Joe's forced to uncover his neighbours' illicit activities and confront old betrayals from the 1984 miner's strike as he clashes with a police officer and his own daughter. Hermione forces them all to find a way forward.

Alun Armstrong and Deborah Findlay star as the e- Durham miner and the University philosopher who together bring human compassion and philosophy to bear in facing up to some of life's hardest dilemmas.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0002zcv)
Paul Lewis and a panel of guests answer calls on personal finance.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (m0002z4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m0002zcx)
Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0002zcz)
A topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (m0002zd1)
PM at 5pm: interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0002zd3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Tudur Owen - Where on Earth is Anglesey? (m0001f1l)
Episode 2

What do CenterParcs, Sky Sports and The Royal Horticultural Society all have in common? They’ve all accidentally omitted Anglesey from their official maps of the UK in the recent past.

It seems that despite being the largest island in the Irish Sea and the largest island of Wales, Anglesey remains a mystery to most and so one man is going to have to work his socks off to put it firmly back on the map.

Hosted by Wales and Anglesey’s very own favourite stand-up, Tudur Owen, this programme is one man’s mission to both rejoice in and roast the island he calls home.

In Episode 2 Tudur introduces us to the people of Anglesey and asks if it's fair to call them a rather unique bunch.

Written by Tudur Owen with additional material by Gareth Gwynn. Also featuring Gareth Pierce and Lisa-Jên Brown.

Recorded at Canolfan Beaumaris on Anglesey.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0002zd5)
Kenton drops a bombshell and Emma finds herself caught in the middle


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0002zd7)
Live daily magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002zc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m0002zd9)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Anne McElvoy, Claire Fox, Matthew Taylor and Melanie Philips.


WED 20:45 The New Age of Capitalism (b0bk1v9w)
Trillion Dollar Companies

Should we be concerned about the size and power of the tech giants? Both Amazon and Apple have become the first companies in history to be valued at more than a trillion dollars each. There are fears this dominance, particularly by technology companies including Facebook and Google, could lead to monopolies which hurt consumers. The advent of these trillion dollar valuations comes as a growing number of critics begin to ask if it is time for regulators to step in and either cut the technology firms down to size, or break them up altogether. Adam Lashinsky, author of 'Inside Apple', joins Barry Lynn, executive director of the Open Markets Institute to debate whether the market or the government will decide the future of these companies.
Presenter: David Grossman
Producer: Matthew Chapman


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m0002z43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Only Artists (m0002zbz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0002zdc)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Golden Child (m0002zcj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


WED 23:00 Life on Egg (m0002zdf)
Series 2

Storm

A heavy storm leaves The Egg short of food. And the prisoners short of patience. So Harry and his team think up ways to distract them.

Starring:
Harry Hill as Governor Harry
Karen Bartke as Anne
Marek Larwood as Peter
Gyles Brandreth as Prisoner Brandreth
and
Daniel Maier as Tim the helicopter pilot

Written by Daniel Maier

Produced by Sam Michell

A BBC Studios Production


WED 23:15 Terry Alderton: More Crazy Now (b0858v5w)
A Lot of Thoughts

Terry Alderton flexes his comedy muscles with more craziness and nonsense. Street Kid, Victor, Ed and The Bear all return for the last in the current series.

It’s more Terry, more crazy and happening right now.

Written by and starring Terry Alderton
Featuring Johnny Spurling
Additional material from Johnny Spurling and Richard Melvin
Produced by Johnny Spurling and Sean Kerwin
Executive Producer: Richard Melvin
A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0002zdh)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



THURSDAY 07 MARCH 2019

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0002zdk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (m0002zdm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0002zdp)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0002zdr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0002zdt)
The latest shipping forecast


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0002zdw)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0002zdy)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Gemma Simmonds from the Congregation of Jesus

Most of us at some time will have reached for painkillers in the form of 'Aspirin', which was patented by German chemist Felix Hoffmann in 1899. Hoffmann’s remedy was certainly a more reliable and less toxic treatment than much of the dubious ‘snake oil’ medicine on sale at the time, such as the Celebrated Egyptian Oil invented for sufferers of stomach cramps and cholera by the unfortunately named Dr. Bonkers. And it was less drastic than the morphine commonly prescribed for teething babies, or the opium for curing coughs, cocaine for toothache or arsenic and mercury that people took before the advent of penicillin. We have many causes to be grateful for those whose scientific research and endeavours brought us to the age of proven, effective remedies and reliable painkillers.

But there are some pains that no medicine can cure: the pain of loss, of heartache, of loneliness, the breakdown of relationships and the many different sorrows that life can bring. For these the greatest painkiller is love. We may not be able to cure another’s sorrows, but our loving kindness with friend and stranger can offer strength and help them to bear their troubles. Love is a remedy that needs no patents or research: only a willingness to shoulder others’ burdens for a while. It can’t be bottled, but it can be given freely.

O God, you are the source of all love. Your Son Jesus gave us a new commandment to love one another as He loves us. Help us to know and experience your love for us, so that each day we in turn can offer love to those in any kind of need.

Amen.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0002zf0)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sxv25)
Red-necked Nightjar

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the nocturnal red-necked nightjar of the Spanish countryside. Like others in the family, red-necked nightjars are nocturnal birds which feed on large insects, snapping them up with huge bristle-lined mouths. A summer migrant, the red-necked nightjar breeds mainly in Spain, Portugal and North Africa. It is closely related to the common European nightjar, but it sounds very different. By day they hide on the ground among scrub where their cryptic patterns provide excellent camouflage. They're the colour of mottled bark and as you'd expect from their name, have a rusty-red collar. As the sun sets, they emerge from their hiding places to glide and turn on slender wings through scrub and pinewoods, occasionally warning rivals by clapping their wings together over their backs with a sound like a pistol-shot. Between bouts of moth-chasing, they settle on a pine branch and pour forth their repetitive, but atmospheric song.


THU 06:00 Today (m0002zq4)
News and current affairs including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0002zq6)
William Cecil

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the impact on the British Isles of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, the most powerful man in the court of Elizabeth I. He was both praised and attacked for his flexibility, adapting to the reigns of Protestant and Catholic monarchs and, under Elizabeth, his goal was to make England strong, stable and secure from attack from its neighbours. He sought control over Ireland and persuaded Elizabeth that Mary Queen of Scots must die, yet often counselled peace rather than war in the interests of prosperity.

With

Diarmaid MacCulloch

Susan Doran

and

John Guy

Producer: Simon Tillotson


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (m0002zq8)
Walter Gropius: Visionary Founder of the Bauhaus

The Bauhaus

Eleanor Bron reads Fiona McCarthy’s biography of the Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius.

Gropius was a man of extraordinary charisma. For more than twenty years, from 1910 to 1930, he was at the very centre of European modern art and design. His buildings are still strikingly experimental, his influence on post-war architecture in America and internationally was enormous. As the founder and director of the Bauhaus, he invented a form of creative education that influenced art schools worldwide. But the Bauhaus was more than an art school - it was the birth of a whole new philosophy of art.

In episode 4, Gropius begins to create the Bauhaus out of the ruins of the aftermath of the First World War. The Bauhaus stood for delight, experiment and creative freedom. Gropius gathered talents, including Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky, into an art school that became an alternative way of life.

Soon, the Bauhaus students had become a cohesive group, united by the feeling that they were fighting for the same ideals in opposition to the largely uncomprehending world around them. They staged spectacular parties, with elaborate costumes and wild dancing. But for many local citizens, these strangely dressed groups of students seemed alarming. At a time of escalating anti-Jewish prejudice, it was suspected that many of them were Jewish.

Local complaints focussed on the parties on the river where men and women could be viewed "without any bathing costumes whatsoever and in places accessible to everyone. This infringement of decency represents a danger to morals, especially for young people." And as the Nazi party became a serious force, attacks on the Bauhaus increased to such an extent that the teachers and students were forced to resign.

Reader: Eleanor Bron
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Executive Producer: Joanne Rowntree
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0002zqb)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002zqd)
A Small Town Murder

Episode 4

Meera Syal stars as family liaison officer Jackie Hartwell.

Nobody seems to mind when notorious mobster Jimmy Reid goes missing in suspicious circumstances. He’s an out-and-out villain who’d get kicked out of hell for bad behaviour – a West Midlands millionaire made rich from a successful career in every aspect of organised crime, and a man made infamous by the cruelty of his tactic.

If someone has finally done him in, what’s not to like?

However, it’s down to Jackie Hartwell to remain impartial and support his wife and daughter as much as she can. And who knows, maybe they’ll have something that might help the investigation.

But Jackie soon realises she’s being lied to - and not just by the victim’s family. It’s also her fellow police officers who are being economical with truth.

Cast:
Jackie................Meera Syal
Peter..................Mathew Marsh
Dee.....................Ayesha Antoine
Angela................TBA
Claire...................TBA

Written by Scott Cherry
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m0002zqg)
Correspondents around the world tell their stories and examine news developments in their region.


THU 11:30 Singing the Stones (m0002zqj)
Kirsti Melville hears from indigenous people about the importance of the ancient rock carvings and songlines in Murujuga or the Dampier Archipelago in Australia.

It's been described as "the largest outdoor art gallery on the planet". The rock carvings here on the Dampier Archipelago tell the story of fifty thousand years of human existence - of how the Yaburara people who created the art lived and how the world changed around them. Kirsti discovers how the carvings act as the "score" for one of the earliest songlines, starting here in Murujuga – the indigenous people's name for the Dampier Archipelago and Burrup Peninsula - and travelling right through to Uluru, the heart of Australia.

The Yaburara people carved more than a million drawings into the red rocks. They give a detailed record of both sacred and secular life. There are flightless birds, fish and turtles, giant kangaroos, creation spirits, complex human figures and the, now extinct, thylacine. The rock art is profoundly connected to beliefs and ceremonies still practiced today.

But, over the past fifty years, this immense site of human history has been threatened by massive industry. Within a stone’s throw of this ancient rock art there are petrochemical plants, a giant gas hub and one of Australia’s busiest ports.

Now, after years of lobbying, Aboriginal traditional custodians, archaeologists and government are, for the first time, working together to push for World Heritage listing. Will this sacred site finally receive the protection it deserves?

Produced by Kirsti Melville
An ABC and Cast Iron Radio Production for BBC Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0002zql)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Golden Child (m0002zqn)
9 The Wrong Boy

Don Warrington continues Claire Adam's heartrending and lyrical debut set in Trinidad about betrayal, love and impossible choices.

Today, finally the ransom demand comes. But have the kidnappers got the right boy?

Reader: Don Warrington
Writer: Claire Adam
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Justine Willett


THU 12:18 You and Yours (m0002zqq)
Radio 4's consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (m0002zqs)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (m0002zqv)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 The Secret History of a School (m0002zqx)
The Secret History of a School

Episode 9

Alan Johnson, the former Education Secretary, tells the story of English education over the last 140 years through the prism of one school - St Michael and All Angels in Camberwell.

Over the decades, the school has undergone many transformations, including names, in response to changes in policy, but its purpose has remained constant - to provide decent and free education to local children.

The story is told through original documents – from headmasters’ logs and inspection reports – and the testimony of the children and teachers who went there. It is as much a social history of inner-city life down the ages as it is a study of our attempts to educate the children of poor families.

Episode 9:
It's 2010 and there's criticism from deputy head Katharine Birbalsingh at the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham that schools are failing poor and black pupils. Her comments, calling for more robust discipline and traditional teaching methods, may have gone unnoticed in South London but for the fact she’d just joined the senior leadership team of St Michael and All Angels. (The school had reverted to its earlier name a couple of years previously when it had gained academy status.) Ms Birbalsingh’s speech was another nail in the coffin for the school's reputation - driven home by a hostile media.

In this penultimate episode, Alan Johnson examines punishment from Victorian times to the present day and meets children only too happy to push the boundaries. He looks at attempts to rescue the two consecutive schools on the site from special measures, falling rolls and poor reputation. Changing the name or even the leadership team wasn’t enough, even the best-ever recorded GCSE results and a glowing Ofsted report failed to save the school.

Presenter: Alan Johnson
Producer: Sara Parker
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0002zd5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (m0002zqz)
First Do No Harm

Elaine

A double bill of dramas looking at the crisis facing the NHS, both for those trying to challenge its workings from without and within. Elaine Newton's husband died while under NHS supervision, but attempting to clarify the faults that led to the tragedy brings the fury of the community down on her head.

Cast
Elaine ...... Rosie Cavaliero
Greg ...... Michael Bertenshaw
Rhys ...... Joel MacCormack
Caz ...... Jade Croot
Niall ...... Joseph Ayre
Joy ...... Kelly Williams
Maggie ...... Clare Corbett
DJ ...... Don Gilet
Lenny ...... Sam Dale
Keith ...... Christopher Harper
Jane ...... Sarah Ovens
Dave ...... Ronny Jhutti
Martha ..... Franchi Webb

Written by ..... Al Smith
Directed by ..... Jessica Dromgoole
Produced by ..... Jessica Dromgoole & Sally Avens


THU 15:00 Ramblings (m0002zr2)
Series 41

A Cow Parsley Tattoo - Cambridgeshire

The writer, Emma Mitchell, takes Clare Balding for a walk around the woods at the back of her house in Cambridgeshire and explains why exposure to the natural world can have a mood-lifting effect on us all.

While acknowledging that she relies on antidepressants and talking cures to prevent her depression from becoming overwhelming, she says that walking several times a week, even on days when she feels well, has a cumulative effect and helps to make the dips in her mood less vertiginous.

She says “For me, taking a daily walk among plants and trees is as medicinal as any talking cure or pharmaceutical”. But it’s not just because she has a “fondness for looking at bonny bosky views” rather, she says “I am experiencing real physiological responses that affect my body and mind”.

As they walk, Emma explains to Clare why they both feel their stress levels falling... it’s not just the physical act of walking, it could be, partly, because they’re breathing the volatile compounds and oils emitted by the plants and trees that surround them. Emma discusses this and other ideas that she explores in her book The Wild Remedy.

She also talks about her cow parsley tattoo...

If you're reading this on the Radio 4 webpage, please scroll down for photos from the walk of hibernating ladybirds, Annie the Lurcher and Emma's tattoo...
There is also a link to the Woodland Trust page for Reach Wood, where we walked. Also more detail on Emma's book.

NB: Details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 566 065.

Producer: Karen Gregor


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0002yb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (m0002yc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m0002zr4)
Captain Marvel

With Antonia Quirke.

Indie darlings Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck reveal why they decided to make a blockbuster movie, Captain Marvel.

In the latest instalment of his series on movie scores that were last minute replacements, Neil Brand takes us behind the scenes of Chinatown.

In a new series of Pitch Battle, The Film Programme asks writers to nominate a novel that should be adapted for screen but hasn't yet received the movie treatment. Poet Bridget Minamore is the first contender and her pitch is heard by film industry insiders Clare Binns of Picturehouse, development consultant Rowan Woods and Lizzie Francke of the BFI


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0002zr6)
Adam Rutherford investigates the news in science and science in the news.


THU 17:00 PM (m0002zr8)
PM at 5pm: interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0002zrb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 The Wilsons Save the World (m0002zrd)
Series 2

You Can’t Do That Anymore

Mike Wilson has some key loves in his life – his sourdough starter, his wife and children (obviously), but also the cult rock group of his formative years - The Smiths. Jangly and heartfelt it’s perfect music for the tortured soul; albeit one with a comfortable and privileged life. Until that is, Cat comes crashing in with her questions. Are some of Morrissey’s more recent statements problematic and if so, can we separate the arts from the artist? What else can’t we enjoy anymore? A rummage through his parent’s attic suggests LOTS, it turns out. Mike’s dilemma contorts him with anxiety as the family pick their way through this new minefield. Can we ‘offset’ liking problematic things?

Mike…Marcus Brigstocke
Max…Kerry Godliman
Cat..Mia Jenkins
Lola…India Brown
Jennifer...Vicki Pepperdine
Phillip…Rupert Vansittart
Writers...Marcus Brigstocke and Sarah Morgan
Producer...Julia McKenzie
A BBC Studios production


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0002zrg)
Roy expresses concern and Alice struggles to manage a social situation


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0002zrj)
Live daily magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002zqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (m0002z45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m0002zrl)
Evan Davis chairs a round table discussion providing insight into business from the people at the top.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0002zr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0002zq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0002zrp)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Golden Child (m0002zqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


THU 23:00 Where's the F in News (m0002zrr)
Series 2

Episode 1

An energetic, intelligent female-anchored show with a female panel - using the events, trends and talking points they think should really be top of the news agenda in a series of fresh and funny challenges.

Host Jo Bunting is joined by a panel of women including Gemma Cairney, Julia Hartley-Brewer and comedians Jayde Adams and Zoe Lyons.

Jo Bunting is a producer and writer of topical comedy and satire, with credits including Have I Got News For You, the Great British Bake Off spin off show An Extra Slice with Jo Brand, and the successful topical chat show That Sunday Night Show presented by Adrian Chiles on ITV. Jo was a guest interviewer on Loose Ends for several years and a panellist on Loose Women.

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0002zrv)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



FRIDAY 08 MARCH 2019

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0002zrx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (m0002zq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0002zrz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0002zs1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0002zs3)
The latest shipping forecast


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0002zs5)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0002zs7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Gemma Simmonds from the Congregation of Jesus

Today aviation history celebrates Frenchwoman Raymonde de Laroche, the first woman to gain a pilot’s license in 1909. Her anniversary coincides with the establishment in 1975 of United Nations International Women’s Day, to commemorate the historic struggle to improve women’s lives.

In 2nd century France, St. Irenaeus of Lyon wrote, ‘The glory of God is a living human being; and the life of human beings consists in beholding God.’ This has sometimes been translated as, ‘the glory of God is a human being fully alive’. Human beings of both genders become fully alive when they have educational, medical and social access to all that enables them to flourish and achieve their full potential. This is still not the case for so many, so today we re-commit ourselves to achieving a more just and equal world. But equality on its own isn’t enough. Human beings were made in order to be in relationship with God their Creator.

If Irenaeus is right that our human life consists in seeing God, then it’s important that we also have a sense of being held in God’s gaze. This is a God who looks on each one of us: male and female, rich and poor, good and bad, and loves us with a total and everlasting love. If we can become convinced of this then the sky really will be the limit.

Creator God, you look on each one of us with eyes of tender and unconditional love. May we never lose sight of you, but secure in that love, grow daily into the person you dream that we can be.

Amen.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0002zs9)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0423fpl)
Whimbrel

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the whimbrel. Whimbrels are sometimes known as 'seven whistlers' from the number of notes in their call and in parts of the English midlands these sounds in the darkness gave rise to a folk tale about the six birds of fate which flew around the heavens seeking the seventh. When they were all reunited, went the story, the world would end. Mercifully, it wasn't true but it was our ancestor's way of interpreting the mystery of nocturnal migration.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0002zzl)
News and current affairs including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0002ybm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (m000301j)
Walter Gropius: Visionary Founder of the Bauhaus

Exile

Eleanor Bron reads Fiona McCarthy’s biography of the Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius.

Gropius was a man of extraordinary charisma. For more than twenty years, from 1910 to 1930, he was at the very centre of European modern art and design. His buildings are still strikingly experimental, his influence on post-war architecture in America and internationally was enormous. As the founder and director of the Bauhaus, he invented a form of creative education that influenced art schools worldwide. But the Bauhaus was more than an art school - it was the birth of a whole new philosophy of art.

In the final episiode, the rise of the Nazi party forces Gropius into exile. Nazi artistic censorship extended to architects as well as artists whose work was considered un-German - that is to say, purist and functional in appearance, as opposed to traditional and countrified, in tune with the Nazi mythology of nationhood. Gropius may not have been Jewish, but his views on architecture were becoming increasingly unacceptable. At the end of 1933, he saw his opportunity to leave Germany, and requested an official permit to work - as he claimed - temporarily in England. The permit was granted.

Walter Gropius and his wife Ise arrived in London on October 18th, 1934. But they were faced with a very different scene from the one they had known in continental Europe. As a British journalist commented at the time, "We do not understand the modern movement and we do not like it." Commissions were not forthcoming and the couple were very short of money. And so, just over two years later, Walter Gropius accepts an offer from Harvard University to become a Professor of Architecture.

Once he reached America, Gropius managed to reinvent himself, not so much as an architect but as a philosopher, an educational sage. Over the next thirty years he became an enormously influential figure. He also designed the Pan Am building, an opulent tower block on Park Avenue, a vast minimalistic structure of glass, bronze and polished granite.

Reader: Eleanor Bron
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
Executive Producer: Joanne Rowntree
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0002zzs)
The programme that offers a female perspective on the world


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002zzv)
A Small Town Murder

Episode 5

Meera Syal stars as family liaison officer Jackie Hartwell.

Nobody seems to mind when notorious mobster Jimmy Reid goes missing in suspicious circumstances. He’s an out-and-out villain who’d get kicked out of hell for bad behaviour – a West Midlands millionaire made rich from a successful career in every aspect of organised crime, and a man made infamous by the cruelty of his tactic.

If someone has finally done him in, what’s not to like?

However, it’s down to Jackie Hartwell to remain impartial and support his wife and daughter as much as she can. And who knows, maybe they’ll have something that might help the investigation.

But Jackie soon realises she’s being lied to - and not just by the victim’s family. It’s also her fellow police officers who are being economical with truth.

Cast:
Jackie................Meera Syal
Peter..................Mathew Marsh
Dee.....................Ayesha Antoine
Angela................TBA
Claire...................TBA

Written by Scott Cherry
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:00 Remorse: A Sorry Story (m0002zzx)
Vikram Dodd investigates the role remorse plays in criminal sentencing.

The philosopher Adam Smith famously said that of all the sentiments that can enter a man's breast, remorse is the most dreadful. But Adam Smith never had to look in the eye of the man or woman who has just been convicted of a crime and work out how much, if anything, to reduce a sentence to take account of their expression of remorse. Was it genuine? Or were they empty words in a cynical attempt to game the criminal justice system?

Guardian crime correspondent Vikram hears how the currency of remorse has increased with the introduction of Sentencing Guidelines that were intended to introduce more consistency and transparency into sentencing decisions. Sentencing judges are now required to explain the role remorse has played in calculating a sentence.

Remorse has also gained profile in the public perception of justice. Court reporters will often quote what the judge said about remorse for news bulletins and, in the highest profile cases police, prosecutors and families line up to comment on the judge's assessment of the perpetrator's remorse.

The programme explores how an accused might show remorse, who measures it and what is known about the connection between remorse and reoffending. While the public might reasonably get an impression that remorse plays a big part in keeping someone in or out of jail, what difference have the sentencing guidelines made in practice?

Produced by John Forsyth
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:30 What Does the K Stand For? (b08c0rr5)
Series 3

The Riot

Travel back in time to the 1980's for this sitcom about comedian Stephen K Amos's teenage years growing up gay, funny and black in South London. This week the Amos household are caught up in the Brixton riot.
Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.
Starring Ellen Thomas, Laurie Kynaston, Stephen K Amos, Bola Okun, Emerald Crankson, Karen Bartke and David Sterne.
Produced by Paul Sheehan.
Production Coordinator Beverly Tagg.
A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m00030fk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Golden Child (m0003001)
10 A Good Father

Don Warrington reads the final part of Claire Adam's heartrending and lyrical debut set in Trinidad about betrayal, love and impossible choices.

Clyde is desperately trying to raise the ransom money for Paul. But without the money put aside for his 'golden child' Peter, will it be enough?

Reader: Don Warrington
Writer: Claire Adam
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m0003003)
Radio 4's consumer affairs programme.


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0003005)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0003007)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The Secret History of a School (m0003009)
The Secret History of a School

Episode 10

Alan Johnson, the former Education Secretary, tells the story of English education over the last 140 years through the prism of one school - St Michael and All Angels in Camberwell.

Over the decades, the school has undergone many transformations, including names, in response to changes in policy, but its purpose has remained constant - to provide decent and free education to local children.

The story is told through original documents – from headmasters’ logs and inspection reports – and the testimony of the children and teachers who went there. It is as much a social history of inner-city life down the ages as it is a study of our attempts to educate the children of poor families.

Episode 10:
In the final episode of the series, Alan Johnson visits a brand new academy on the site, Ark All Saints.

The Ark All Saints Academy opened in 2013, when the previous St Michael's was demolished. Gleaming glass and modern brick, it is built with pupil safely in mind. There are no hidden spaces, even the toilets and lockers face out onto the corridors. It is built on a quadrangle system to give 360 degree sight lines for staff to check for trouble, and a large pastoral team are on hand to sort out any problems in or out of class.

In lessons, discipline and attention is focused with clicking and clapping, which give approval and reward correct answers and good behaviour. Even the distinctive purple uniform is cherished by pupils, who are called "scholars". If they misbehave badly enough, the jacket and tie are taken away until the scholar is ready to be part of the school community again. After school, staff make sure the children get home safely, standing at the bus stop in their hi-vis jackets and patrolling the estates.

Ark All Saints Academy looks like a school of the future – whether it will continue with its success, only time will tell.

Presenter: Alan Johnson
Producer: Sara Parker
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0002zrg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (m000300c)
First Do No Harm

Rhys

A double bill of dramas looking at the crisis facing the NHS, both for those trying to challenge its workings from without and within. Elaine Newton's husband died while under NHS supervision, but attempting to clarify the faults that led to the tragedy brings the fury of the community down on her head. One doctor, Rhys Thomas, tries to help her.

Cast
Rhys......Joel MacCormack
Elaine......Rosie Cavaliero
Colin......Don Gilet
Mo......Annabel Facer
Sue......Sharita Oomeer
Annie......Sarah Ovens
Karim......Ronny Jhutti
Alan......Michael Bertenshaw
Tessa......Clare Corbett
Albie......Sam Dale
Bojan......Christopher Harper
Ned......Joseph Ayre
Maz......Kelly Williams
Nadya......Franchi Webb

Written by ..... Al Smith
Directed by ..... Jessica Dromgoole
Produced by ..... Jessica Dromgoole & Sally Avens


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m000300f)
Dunvant, Gower Peninsula

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Dunvant on the Gower Peninsula - with Anne Swithinbank, Christine Walkden and Matthew Wilson.

Produced by Laurence Bassett
Assistant Producer: Hester Cant

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m000300h)
The Girl in the Painting

In Stephanie Victoire's new story, thirteen year old Eli falls for the image of a girl in a gallery:

"He fell in love with a girl in a painting. His father had taken him to the gallery to get out of the rain on one of their weekend outings. Eli was drawn to her bare shoulder.."

As the years pass, this state of affairs intensifies. But to what end?

Reader Carl Prekopp

Producer Duncan Minshull


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000300k)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (m000300m)
Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (m000300p)
Fighting for Survival

When Joel and his girlfriend Jenny planned a holiday in Kenya, they had no idea that it would turn their lives upside down. Together they describe what happened when a bullet tore through Joel's leg and Jenny's desperate struggle to save his life. It's a graphic account of the bloody aftermath of the gunshot, an emergency flight over the Rift Valley and the reality of living with a life-changing injury.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject


FRI 17:00 PM (m000300r)
PM at 5pm: interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m000300t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (m000300w)
Series 54

Episode 3

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical stand-up and sketches

Featuring Neil Delamere, Marcus Brigstocke, Flo and Joan and Gemma Arrowsmith.

Producer: Adnan Ahmed

BBC Studios Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (m000300y)
Writer ….. Keri Davies
Director ….. Julie Beckett
Editor ….. Jeremy Howe

David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Pip Archer ..... Daisy Badger
Kenton Archer ….. Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer ….. Buffy Davis
Tony Archer ….. David Troughton
Pat Archer .... Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ….. William Troughton
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ….. Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Chris Carter ..... Wilf Scolding
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Justin Elliott ..... Simon Williams
Toby Fairbrother ..... Rhys Bevan
Bert Fry ..... Eric Allan
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Will Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy .... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy .... Barry Farrimond
Elizabeth Pargetter .... Alison Dowling
Lily Pargetter .... Katie Redford
Johnny Philips ..... Tom Gibbons
Hannah Riley .... Helen Longworth
Roy Tucker .... Ian Pepperell
Natasha .... Mali Harries
Lee .... Ryan Early
Russ ..... Andonis James Anthony


FRI 19:15 Front Row (m0003010)
Live daily magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (m0002zzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0003012)
Hilary Benn MP, Kirsty Blackman MP, Merryn Somerset Webb

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Madras College in Fife, Scotland, with a panel including the Chair of the Brexit Select Committee Hilary Benn MP, Depute Leader of the SNP at Westminster Kirsty Blackman MP, and the Editor of MoneyWeek magazine Merryn Somerset Webb.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0003014)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.


FRI 21:00 The Secret History of a School (m0003016)
Omnibus (Part 2)

Alan Johnson, the former Education Secretary, tells the story of English education over almost 140 years through the prism of one school - St Michael and All Angels in Camberwell, South London.

Over the decades, the school has undergone several transformations, and changes in name , in response to changes in policy, but its purpose has remained constant - to provide decent and free education to local children.

The story is told through original documents – from headmasters’ logs and inspection reports – and the testimony of the children and teachers who went there. It is as much a social history of inner-city life through the generations as it is a study of our attempts to educate the children from some of the most deprived families.

Presenter: Alan Johnson
Producer: Sara Parker.
Executive Producer: Samir Shah

A Juniper Connect production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0003018)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Golden Child (m0003001)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m0002z47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000301b)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (m000301d)
On Not Being Inspirational

In a split-second your horizon can change forever. Dan talks to his friend Harriet about his life-changing accident and why he has no desire to be seen as 'inspirational'.

Fi Glover presents another edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

#OurBoysAsWell 21:00 MON (m0002r3v)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (m0002z88)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (m0002z88)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (m0002z38)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (m0002z38)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (m0002zc5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (m0002zc5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (m0002zqd)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (m0002zqd)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (m0002zzv)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (m0002zzv)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 WED (m0002zcc)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (m0002z47)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (m0002z47)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (m0002spk)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (m0003014)

Alexei Sayle's The Absence of Normal 11:30 MON (m0002z8d)

Am I Too Old to Drive? 11:00 MON (m0002z8b)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (m0002rks)

Analysis 20:30 MON (m0002z9g)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 10:30 SAT (m0002ylk)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (m0002ymr)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (m0002sph)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (m0003012)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (m0002ypg)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (m0002zr6)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (m0002zr6)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (m0002yd0)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (m0002yd0)

Blackwater 19:45 SUN (m0002ycn)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (m0002sq0)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (m0002z84)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (m0002z84)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (m0002z33)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (m0002z33)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (m0002zdm)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (m0002zdm)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (m0002zq8)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (m0002zq8)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (m000301j)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (m0002yc4)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (m0002yc4)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (m0002ybh)

Clare in the Community 19:15 SUN (b08587nz)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (m0002z43)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (m0002z43)

Date Night 23:00 TUE (m0002z4w)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (m0002ybm)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (m0002ybm)

Don't Log Off 11:00 TUE (m0002z3c)

Drama 14:30 SAT (m0002ymy)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b0blhfps)

Drama 15:00 SUN (m0002yc2)

Drama 14:15 TUE (m0002z3z)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08hpbx3)

Drama 14:15 THU (m0002zqz)

Drama 14:15 FRI (m000300c)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (m0002ykz)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (m0002ydd)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (m0002zb4)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (m0002z5g)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (m0002zf0)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (m0002zs9)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (m0002sp1)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (m000300m)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (m0002r50)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (m0002z4m)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (m0002yly)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (m0002zqg)

From Sensuality to Puritanism: How Muslim Cultures turned Grey 11:00 WED (m0002zc9)

Front Row 19:15 MON (m0002z9b)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (m0002z4k)

Front Row 19:15 WED (m0002zd7)

Front Row 19:15 THU (m0002zrj)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (m0003010)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (m0002snv)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (m000300f)

Golden Child 12:04 MON (m0002z8j)

Golden Child 22:45 MON (m0002z8j)

Golden Child 12:04 TUE (m0002z3l)

Golden Child 22:45 TUE (m0002z3l)

Golden Child 12:04 WED (m0002zcj)

Golden Child 22:45 WED (m0002zcj)

Golden Child 12:04 THU (m0002zqn)

Golden Child 22:45 THU (m0002zqn)

Golden Child 12:04 FRI (m0003001)

Golden Child 22:45 FRI (m0003001)

How to Disagree: A Beginner's Guide to Having Better Arguments 09:30 WED (b0bf84n2)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (m0002zq6)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (m0002zq6)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (m0002z4p)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (m0002z4r)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (m0002z4r)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (m0002rkl)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (m0002z98)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (m0002snz)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (m000300k)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (m0002z45)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (m0002z45)

Life on Egg 23:00 WED (m0002zdf)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (m0002yp2)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (m0002spy)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (m0002ypv)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (m0002ycy)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (m0002z9r)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (m0002z52)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (m0002zdk)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (m0002zrx)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (m0002ycr)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (m0002ycr)

Money Box 15:00 WED (m0002zcv)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (m0002r18)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (m0002zd9)

Moving Pictures 11:30 TUE (m0002z3g)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (m0002sq8)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (m0002yqn)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (m0002yd8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (m0002zb0)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (m0002z5b)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (m0002zdw)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (m0002zs5)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (m0002y9s)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (m0002ym4)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (m0002ybp)

News Summary 12:00 MON (m0002z8g)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (m0002z3j)

News Summary 12:00 WED (m0002zk2)

News Summary 12:00 THU (m0002zql)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (m00030fk)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (m0002ykx)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (m0002yb1)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (m0002yb9)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (m0002ypn)

News 13:00 SAT (m0002ymj)

One to One 09:30 TUE (m0002z31)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (m0002zbz)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (m0002zbz)

PM 17:00 SAT (m0002ynb)

PM 17:00 MON (m0002z94)

PM 17:00 TUE (m0002z49)

PM 17:00 WED (m0002zd1)

PM 17:00 THU (m0002zr8)

PM 17:00 FRI (m000300r)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (m0002ycj)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (m0002rmr)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (m0002yc6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (m0002sqb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (m0002ydb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (m0002zb2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (m0002z5d)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (m0002zdy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (m0002zs7)

Profile 19:00 SAT (m0002yc8)

Profile 05:45 SUN (m0002yc8)

Profile 17:40 SUN (m0002yc8)

Quirke's Cast and Crew 15:30 SAT (m0002r3x)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (m0002yb5)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:25 SUN (m0002yb5)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (m0002yb5)

Radiolab 23:00 SUN (m0002ycw)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (m0002r6p)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (m0002zr2)

Remorse: A Sorry Story 11:00 FRI (m0002zzx)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (m0002rk6)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (m0002z8x)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (m0002ylc)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (m0002yp8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (m0002sq4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (m0002yq9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (m0002yd4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (m0002z9w)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (m0002z56)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (m0002zdr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (m0002zs1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (m0002sq2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (m0002sq6)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (m0002ynm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (m0002yq3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (m0002yqg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (m0002ycb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (m0002yd2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (m0002yd6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (m0002z9t)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (m0002z9y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (m0002z54)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (m0002z58)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (m0002zdp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (m0002zdt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (m0002zrz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (m0002zs3)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (m0002z41)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (m0002snx)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (m000300h)

Singing the Stones 11:30 THU (m0002zqj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (m0002yny)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (m0002ycg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (m0002z96)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (m0002z4c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (m0002zd3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (m0002zrb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (m000300t)

Small Scenes 18:30 TUE (m0002z4f)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (m0002y9v)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (m0002z82)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (m0002z82)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (m0002ybc)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (m0002yb3)

Terry Alderton: More Crazy Now 23:15 WED (b0858v5w)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (m0002ybk)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (m0002ycl)

The Archers 14:00 MON (m0002ycl)

The Archers 19:00 MON (m0002z3x)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (m0002z3x)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (m0002z4h)

The Archers 14:00 WED (m0002z4h)

The Archers 19:00 WED (m0002zd5)

The Archers 14:00 THU (m0002zd5)

The Archers 19:00 THU (m0002zrg)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (m0002zrg)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (m000300y)

The Art of Now 16:00 MON (m0002z90)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (m0002r7c)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (m0002zrl)

The Deported 20:00 MON (m0002z9d)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (m0002z92)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (m0002zr4)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (m0002ybr)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (m0002ybr)

The Invention of... 13:30 SUN (m0002yby)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (m0002z2z)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (m0002z2z)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (m0002yc0)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (m0002zc7)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (m000300p)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (m000301d)

The Living World 06:35 SUN (m0002y9x)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (m0002zcz)

The New Age of Capitalism 20:45 WED (b0bk1v9w)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (m0002sp9)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (m000300w)

The Secret History of a School 13:45 MON (m0002z8s)

The Secret History of a School 13:45 TUE (m0002z3v)

The Secret History of a School 13:45 WED (m0002zcs)

The Secret History of a School 13:45 THU (m0002zqx)

The Secret History of a School 13:45 FRI (m0003009)

The Secret History of a School 21:00 FRI (m0003016)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (m0002ylr)

The Wilsons Save the World 18:30 THU (m0002zrd)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (m0002ybw)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (m0002z9k)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (m0002z4t)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (m0002zdc)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (m0002zrp)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (m0003018)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (m0002r0w)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (m0002zcx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (m0002z9p)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (m0002z50)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (m0002zdh)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (m0002zrv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (m000301b)

Today 07:00 SAT (m0002yl7)

Today 06:00 MON (m0002z80)

Today 06:00 TUE (m0002z2x)

Today 06:00 WED (m0002zbv)

Today 06:00 THU (m0002zq4)

Today 06:00 FRI (m0002zzl)

Tudur Owen - Where on Earth is Anglesey? 18:30 WED (m0001f1l)

Tumanbay 14:15 MON (m0002z8v)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (m0002ybf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03x45bg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04hkxg2)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b092p0hy)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04sxv25)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b0423fpl)

Weather 06:57 SAT (m0002yl3)

Weather 12:57 SAT (m0002ymb)

Weather 17:57 SAT (m0002ynt)

Weather 06:57 SUN (m0002y9z)

Weather 07:57 SUN (m0002yb7)

Weather 12:57 SUN (m0002ybt)

Weather 17:57 SUN (m0002ycd)

Weather 05:56 MON (m0002ydg)

Weather 12:57 MON (m0002z8n)

Weather 12:57 TUE (m0002z3q)

Weather 12:57 WED (m0002zcn)

Weather 12:57 THU (m0002zqs)

Weather 12:57 FRI (m0003005)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (m0002yct)

What Does the K Stand For? 11:30 FRI (b08c0rr5)

When Greeks Flew Kites 23:00 MON (m0002z9m)

Where's the F in News 23:00 THU (m0002zrr)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (m0002yn4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (m0002z86)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (m0002z36)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (m0002zc3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (m0002zqb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (m0002zzs)

World at One 13:00 MON (m0002z8q)

World at One 13:00 TUE (m0002z3s)

World at One 13:00 WED (m0002zcq)

World at One 13:00 THU (m0002zqv)

World at One 13:00 FRI (m0003007)

You and Yours 12:18 MON (m0002z8l)

You and Yours 12:18 TUE (m0002z3n)

You and Yours 12:18 WED (m0002zcl)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (m0002zqq)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (m0003003)

iPM 05:45 SAT (m0002sqd)