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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 21 JULY 2018

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0b9v782)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b0b9zfwn)
Picnic Comma Lightning, Final Fantasies

An innovative examination of the nature of reality in the 21st century by award-winning author Laurence Scott - part personal memoir, part philosophical exploration. Read by Stephen Mangan.

In today's final episode, he explores the vogue for obsessive personal accounting - taking in fit-bits, Scrooge, posts about death on the internet, and the author's sense of his own parents' presence after their death, a benign haunting.

Laurence Scott says, "Any fluctuating, quantifiable thing - daily footsteps, calories burnt, number of re-tweets, YouTube views, Airbnb reviews, crypto-currency values - invites an obsessive and solipsistic sort of accountancy. We 're regularly provided with new ways to think about our lives numerically, giving us a model for our realities that favours concretion over abstraction, quantity over quality. We can now track so many aspects of life that they stream like stock prices along the bottom of our minds. As a consequence, we 're spending more and more time locked in the existential counting house, poring over ledgers that could only possibly be of interest to ourselves..."

Laurence Scott is a writer, broadcaster, academic and a Senior Lecturer in English and Creative Writing at Arcadia in London. He is author of The Four-Dimensional Human: Ways of Being in the Digital World, which was shortlisted for the 2015 Samuel Johnson Prize, won the Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Prize, and was named the Sunday Times Thought Book of the Year. In 2011 he was named one of ten New Generation Thinkers by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the BBC.

Read by Stephen Mangan
Adapted by Elizabeth Burke
Produced by Alexandra Quinn
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b9v784)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b9v786)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b9v789)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0b9v78c)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0bbml6n)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b0b9v78f)
Last chance at justice

A listener on half a decade of trying to find out what happened to his teenage sister.
Colin Frost, the brother of Elsie Frost, has one last shot at getting information.
ipm@bbc.co.uk
Presented by Eddie Mair and Luke Jones
Produced by Cat Farnsworth.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0b9v78h)

The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b0b9z6bf)
The Great Exhibition of the North

Helen Mark explores landscapes of the future, of the imagination and of the past, at the Great Exhibition of the North, which is centred in Newcastle and Gateshead. It's a three-month celebration of the impact of northern England's creators, inventors, artists and designers.

Helen meets environmental artist Steve Messam to hear his sound sculpture 'Whistle', a series of steam engine whistles echoing around the city walls. There's Naho Matsuda whose 'data poetry' is created by people's interaction with the cityscape and displayed on a split-flap display board at the Theatre Royal in Newcastle. Helen will follow one of GetNorth's story trails with the multi-award winning author David Almond and investigate public transport of the future with Sophie Connor of Ryder Architecture. And she'll find out how local children respond to highlights of the exhibition.

Producer Mary Ward-Lowery.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0b9v78k)
Farming Today This Week: Intensive Farming

Caz Graham hosts a discussion on the subject of intensive livestock farming with a panel of experts. What might look like cramped and cruel living conditions to some, often pass every health and welfare check with flying colours. But some consumers don't always feel comfortable about the way we keep animals on farms. Farming Today reports from a large dairy farm where cows live indoors all year round and never set foot in a field; a beef unit with over a thousand animals which supplies a major supermarket and a large broiler farm where chickens are grown for meat and kept in huge barns. Peter Stevenson from Compassion in World Farming; Professor David Main of the Royal Agricultural University in Cirencester; and Dr Siobhan Mullan from the Bristol University Veterinary School discuss the issues raised.

Presented by Caz Graham

Produced by Alun Beach.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0b9v78m)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0bbml6q)

News and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0b9v78q)
Mark Gatiss

Mark Gatiss talks about return of The League of Gentlemen, his passion for painting, and why he's drawn to the artist John Minton. Joining him are history teacher and performance poet Jaspreet Kaur, Francoise Malby-Anthony, who runs a game reserve which she set up with her late husband 'Elephant Whisperer' Laurence Anthony; and thriller and Batman writer Gregg Hurwitz.

Robert Winston is Chairman of the Genesis Research Trust, which campaigns to improve IVF and increase funding for research into infertility and baby loss. He shares his Inheritance Tracks ahead of the 40th anniversary of the first IVF baby. He has chosen the second movement from Beethoven's Seventh Symphony, performed by the London Symphony Orchestra and conducted by Edouard van Remoortel and the opening of J S Bach's Christmas Oratorio, recorded by the Choir of Trinity College Cambridge and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, conducted by Stephen Layton.

Reporter JP Devlin has been out to speak to the people of Hadfield, the filming location for The League of Gentlemen.

Mark Gatiss' documentary John Minton: The Lost Man of British Art will be on BBC Four in mid August. The League of Gentlemen Tour has 50 dates all over the UK and starts on August 6 in Barnstaple.

Francoise Malby-Anthony's book An Elephant In My Kitchen is published on 26 July.

Presenters Aasmah Mir and Rev. Richard Coles
Producer Claire Bartleet.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0bbml6s)
Series 21, Latitude Festival

Jay Rayner and his panel of culinary experts are under canvas at Latitude Festival. Zoe Laughlin, Tim Hayward, Andi Oliver and Jordan Bourke answer the audience questions.

The panellists give their best cooking tips for camping, chat British vodka with the Head Distiller of Adnams, and debate the optimum amount of potatoes for a perfect dauphinoise.

Also, they learn how a pizza oven is built and suggest their favourite food-themed songs.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Hester Cant

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0bbml6v)

Kate McCann of the Telegraph looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The Prime Minister narrowly escapes defeat on a critical trade bill, and a row ensues over how the voting this week was conducted. How difficult is it to lead a party in these circumstances? Plus referendums - how do they work best?
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0b9v78v)
Warfare - the Soundtrack of their Lives

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b0b9v78y)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0bbml6x)
Thousands of disabled ESA claimants to receive back payments in full

Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) will now be fully backdated to 2011 and paid to thousands of ill and disabled claimants who were previously underpaid, according to a written statement this week from the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, Esther McVey. Those underpayments were caused by a DWP error made when people were being moved from older incapacity benefits to ESA between 2011 and 2016. There are two types of ESA, a failure to assess additional income meant people were placed on the wrong one and lost out as a result. The government's original decision to backdate the payments to 2014 was legally challenged by the Child Poverty Action Group. Guest: Martin Williams, Welfare Rights Adviser, CPAG.

Professor Nick Hopkins, Law Commissioner for property, family and trust law outlines Law Commission proposals to make it easier to buy the freehold to a house in England and Wales.

As NS&I prepares to cut the interest rate on its Direct ISA from 1 percent to 0.75 percent from September, where can cash savers find higher rates? Guest: Anna Bowes, Director at independent savings advice website savingschampion.co.uk.

How should the scheme that compensates customers when banks, building societies, credit unions or financial firms fail be funded? Mark Neale, Chief Executive of the Financial Services Compensation Scheme and Martin Bamford, Chartered Financial Planner at Informed Choice discuss.


SAT 12:30 Where's the F in News (b0b9zg8s)
Series 1, Episode 1

An energetic, intelligent female-anchored show with a female panel - using the events, trends and talking points they think should really be top of the news agenda in a series of fresh and funny challenges.

Host Jo Bunting is joined by a panel of women including London Hughes, Zoe Lyons and Doctor Janina Ramirez.

Jo Bunting is a producer and writer of topical comedy and satire, with credits including Have I Got News For You, the Great British Bake Off spin off show An Extra Slice with Jo Brand, and the successful topical chat show That Sunday Night Show presented by Adrian Chiles on ITV. Jo was a guest interviewer on Loose Ends for several years and a panellist on Loose Women.

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0b9v792)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0b9v794)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b0b9zgcz)
Sharan Burrow, Tobias Ellwood MP, Jess Phillips MP, Tim Stanley.

Edward Stourton presents political debate from the Crescent Theatre in Birmingham with the General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation Sharan Burrow, Defence Minister Tobias Ellwood MP, the Labour MP Jess Phillips and the historian and Daily Telegraph columnist Tim Stanley. The panel discuss the issue of privacy and the media related to Sir Cliff Richard's court case and the BBC, Brexit, Should there be a second referendum? is Donald Trump a Soviet agent? And has Labour strengthened the definition of anti-semitism?

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0b9v79b)

Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b0bbmnn2)
Master of the Mint

By David Ashton. The creator of the Victorian detective series, McLevy, returns with a new hero in the unlikely guise of the 17th century scientific genius, Isaac Newton. After 30 years as a Cambridge academic, Newton takes up a new post at the Royal Mint in the Tower of London. Soon he's diving into notorious drinking dens and interrogating prisoners in jail in pursuit of a counterfeiting gang. But can he catch the ringleaders before their criminal plans trigger a huge financial crash that threatens to topple the Government.

Producer/ director: Bruce Young.


SAT 15:30 Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island (b0b9wnmc)
Series 3, Wide East Anglian Sky

Music writer Laura Barton visits four locations in Britain and listens closely to the music found in different landscapes. Today - Norwich.

John Betjeman wrote, "What would you be, you wide East Anglian sky / Without church towers to recognise you by?"

But in the shadow of the Anglican Cathedral, Laura discovers that music and mischief seem to go hand-in-hand. She talks with Jenny and Rosa of celebrated teen pop duo Let's Eat Grandma about clapping songs and messing about by the river, electronic music composer Emma Catnip (AKA Catnip and Claws) about mischievous monks and the sound of bouncing balls in the underpass and, in their downtime after Evensong, members of the girls' choir at the Cathedral.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0b9v79d)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Takeover Week 2018

The musician and campaigner Charlotte Church discusses the impact of secondary school education on young people. She's joined by Laverne Antrobus, consultant child and educational psychologist, Carolyn Roberts, the Head teacher of Thomas Tallis School in Greenwich and Bill Lucas Professor of Learning at the University of Winchester.

Arianna Huffington is best known for being the founder of Huffington Post which she sold for three hundred million pounds. One the topics from her Woman's Hour programme was whether we are living in an 'age of outrage'? Zoe Williams The Guardian columnist and author of Get It Together: Why we Deserve Better Politics, and Pauline Pearce a community campaigner discuss.

The Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin, the first woman since 1660 to be appointed Chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons, talks about the sacrifices and the legacy of women from the Windrush generation with Catherine Ross, the founder of the National Caribbean Heritage Museum, Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff journalist at Gal Dem magazine and with Professor Heidi Mirza Visiting Professor Race, Faith and Culture at Goldsmiths College.

The reality TV star Katie Price wants to know why there are not more rides suitable for disabled children at theme parks. Dawn Childs, the Group Engineering Director for Merlin Entertainments and Paul Kelly the CEO of the British Association of Leisure Parks, Piers and Attractions discuss.

Baroness Helena Kennedy, barrister and Labour peer in the House of Lords tries to discover the best way to keep children safe and protected online. She's joined by Baroness Beeban Kidron, the founder of 5 Rights an initiative which outlines a standard for how children are treated in a digital world, and parent Natalie Hoole.

And we hear from Alexander McClean from the African Prison Project about the work he's doing to help women and children living in prisons in Africa.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed
Edited by Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0b9v79g)
Saturday PM

Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b0b9zbpq)
Advertising

The UK has been a global leader in the Advertising Industry since the end of the last century. But like many businesses it's now facing disruption from technology. Pop up banners on the internet and social influencers are cheaper and more immediate. Evan Davis and guests discuss whether a data driven approach to advertising will eventually kill creativity.

GUESTS

Sir John Hegarty, Co-Founder BBH

Rohan Midha, Managing Director, PMYB

Rory Sutherland, Vice-chairman, Ogilvy

Producer: Julie Ball.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0b9v79j)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0b9v79l)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b9v79n)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0b9v79q)
Dick and Dom, Alex Wheatle, Charlie Murphy, Tai Shan Schierenberg, Gengahr, Laura Cortese & The Dance Cards.

Clive Anderson and Tom Allen are joined by Dick and Dom, Tai Shan Schierenberg, Alex Wheatle and Charlie Murphy for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Gengahr and Laura Cortese & The Dance Cards.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b0bbmp89)
Jacob Collier

The vocalist, multi-instrumentalist and YouTube star Jacob Collier has some very famous fans.

Music industry titan Quincy Jones described him as an absolute genius and asked to work with him.

But Jacob declined his invitation and suggested instead if they could just be friends.

He wanted to make his first album on his own terms. The gamble paid off as he went on to win two Grammy awards.

And now, at just 23 years old, he is performing his own Prom at the Royal Albert Hall.

Presenter: Mark Coles
Producers: Ben Crighton and Clare Spencer.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0b9v79s)
Allelujah!, Clock Dance, Liverpool Biennial 2018, The Receptionist, Mark Kermode's Secrets of Cinema

Alan Bennett's new play Allelujah! opens at the Bridge Theatre in London directed by Nicholas Hytner, with music by George Fenton and choreography by Arlene Phillips. It stars Deborah Findlay, Rosie Ede, Sacha Dhawan, Manish Gandhi and Simon Williams. The Beth, an old fashioned cradle-to-grave hospital serving a town on the edge of the Pennines, is threatened with closure as part of an NHS efficiency drive. Meanwhile, a documentary crew eager to capture its fight for survival follows the daily struggle to find beds on the Dusty Springfield Geriatric Ward, and the triumphs of the old people's choir.

Pulitzer Prize winning writer Anne Tyler's new novel Clock Dance tells the life story of Willa Drake and her decision late in life to take on the care of a 9 year old child. Anne Tyler is an American novelist, short story writer, and literary critic. She has published over 20 novels, the best known of which are Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant (1982), The Accidental Tourist (1985), and Breathing Lessons(1988). All three were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with Breathing Lessons winning the prize in 1989.

The tenth edition of the Liverpool Biennial includes more than 40 artists from over 22 countries. In the words of the lead curators, "The Biennial asks Beautiful world, where are you?" - a question derived from a 1788 poem by the German poet Frederich Schiller. Artists include Agnes Varda, Inci Eviner, Holly Hendry, Duane Linklater, Taus Makhacheva, Annie Pootoogook, Joyce Wieland and Rehana Zaman and their works ares spread across the city including public spaces, civic buildings and the city's leading art venues.

Taiwanese writer/director Jenny Lu's film debut feature film The Receptionist is a drama based on an illegal massage parlour in London and follows the lives of the employees and clients as seen through the eyes of a Taiwanese graduate employed as a receptionist.

In a new five part documentary series on BBC Four, Mark Kermode's Secrets of Cinema, film critic Mark Kermode presents a fresh and very personal look at the art of cinema by examining the techniques and conventions behind some classic genres: romcoms, heist movies,coming-of-age stories, science fiction and horror.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0bbmthw)
That's Edutainment!

Are the values of education and entertainment truly compatible? Matthew Sweet asks if learning can or should be fun.

When we watch a high-end TV documentary do we learn anything? Or do we simply think we have? With lessons from the archive, this is an hour long look at the links between education and fun.

We attend Radio 4's King Street Junior for a historical re-enactment and go down Sesame Street, an early example of edutainment that worked. A 1970's adult education series called On the Move, with a young Bob Hoskins playing a removal man who has trouble reading and writing, helped enormous numbers of people with literacy problems. It accidentally became cult viewing in the process.

The same cult status was accorded to the first late night Open University broadcasts, although the values of good television and undergraduate teaching initially clashed, sometimes about the appropriate colour of shirts.

In his capacity as academic, Matthew talks to Dr Fern Riddell, whose PhD he supervised. Fern chose broadcasting and writing rather than lecturing or teaching as a career and she explains how injecting historical authenticity into TV dramas like Ripper Street might help us see past eras more clearly, if backed by the right research.

And, with the help of Harvard Professor of Education Meira Levinson, Matthew wonders whether Homer Simpson is an appropriate vehicle for the study of philosophy.

Meanwhile, are some of the ideals of Public Service Broadcasting changing in the digital age? Nowadays the strictly educational programmes like OU material and schools broadcasting are no longer part of the general broadcasting landscape, meaning we're less likely to stumble upon them. Put Public Service Broadcasting into a popular search engine and you might not end up learning about the BBC mission statement, but something completely different.

A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Tommies (b05vx1bv)
25 May 1915

by Michael Chaplin
Series created by Jonathan Ruffle.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

Through it all, we follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Today Mickey Bliss is in London, taking time out from signals training at Aldershot to look up an old friend who might finance his much-needed overhearing device. But he also encounters someone much closer.

Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: David Hunter.


SAT 21:45 In Therapy (b081qxpv)
Series 2, Richard and Louise

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. We join Susie in her consulting room, where she meets a different client each day.

Today, Susie meets Richard and Louise. They are new parents struggling to make things work.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed Jerusalem) and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learned about the characters' lives, backgrounds, and reasons for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on concealed microphones at Susie's surgery.

Throughout the encounters in this series, we get to hear the therapist at work, experiencing what it's like to eavesdrop on the most intimate of exchanges.

To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, giving us an insight into her role as a therapist and shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Psychotherapist: Susie Orbach
Louise: Liz White
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0b9v79v)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b0b9951v)
Margaret MacMillan, Managing the Unmanageable

Historian Margaret MacMillan assesses how the law and international agreements have attempted to address conflict. Speaking to an audience at the Northern Irish Parliament Buildings at Stormont in Belfast, Professor MacMillan outlines how both states and the people have sought to justify warfare - from self-defence to civil war - focusing on examples from Irish and British history. The programme, including a question and answer session, is presented by Anita Anand.

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Hugh Levinson.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b0b9wbf6)
Series 8, Merton College, Oxford

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from Merton College Oxford with specialist subjects including History, Biology and Classics and questions ranging from the Rhine Maidens and deponent verbs to Barbie and starfish legs.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Newcastle, Dundee, Hertfordshire, Sheffield and Brunel.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b0b9vgdx)
Billy Letford

Roger McGough is joined by Billy Letford, who shares a selection of his favourite poems from the Poetry Please archive of listeners' requests. His choices include Robert Louis Stevenson, Jen Hadfield, Emily Dickinson and Tom Leonard.

Billy Letford comes from Stirlingshire and worked in various jobs including his family's roofing business in his twenties. His debut collection Bevel was published in 2012, and his second, Dirt, was published in 2016, both by Carcanet Press.

Producer: Eliza Lomas.



SUNDAY 22 JULY 2018

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0bbn6lj)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Poet and the Echo (b0b9zg8n)
Nest Eggs

Writers choose poems as inspiration for new stories.

Nest Eggs

A teacher encourages his pupils to take imaginative flight in David Almond's story inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson's poem.

Writer... David Almond
Reader... Simon Donaldson
Producer... Eilidh McCreadie

A BBC Scotland production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6ll)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0bbn6ln)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6lq)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0bbn6ls)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0bbndyn)
St Michael's, Angersleigh

Church bells from St Michael's, Angersleigh.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b0bbmp89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0bbn6lv)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0bbn6lx)
Trial and Error

Writer and priest Malcolm Doney examines the process of trial and error. He believes it's at the very root of how we find out about the world, how we mature, form relationships, and develop philosophies and religious beliefs.

Although some theologians from different traditions disagree on its meaning, it can be argued that the spirit of experimentation can be seen in the biblical book of Genesis when Adam and Eve taste the forbidden fruit.

Malcolm also considers the process of trial and error in the arts, examining the experimental work of artists, writers and musicians like the composer Terry Reily. These artists push the barriers in their work and appear to be driven by the need to discover something new.

Trial and error is also at the very heart of the scientific method, a process which originated in the 17th Century. Malcolm observes that testing must be rigorous, a belief held by one of the fathers of the scientific method, Ibd al-Haythem, who said, "man must make himself an enemy of all that he reads, and attack it from every side." Malcolm notes that, while proof is hard to come by in maths and science, it's even less obvious in the areas of philosophy, spirituality and religion.

Malcolm deduces that living experimentally is an exercise in faith. There is research, calculation, observation - and, out of all that, a theory is formed. He concludes that when people practice trial and error in their own lives it has to be something they have faith in - otherwise why would they invest their energy?

Presenter: Malcolm Doney
Producer: Jonathan O'Sullivan
A TBI production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0bbnlyq)
Gloucestershire Cheese-Rolling

Rod Smart and his family make traditional Single and Double Gloucester Cheese on their small dairy farm in Gloucestershire. It takes months of work to create the finished product. But after all that, some of his cheeses end up being thrown down a steep hill and chased after by people from all over the world in one of Britain's most eccentric traditions - Cheese-Rolling.

Producer: Heather Simons.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0bbn6lz)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0bbn6m1)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0bbn6m3)
Empire of the Sikhs, Pakistan elections, Consecrated virgins

Poonam Taneja reports on the Empire of the Sikhs exhibition, a rare collection of stunning objects and works of art that reveal the remarkable story of the Sikh Empire and the European and American adventurers who served it.

BBC Religious Affairs Editor Martin Bashir looks ahead to this week's review by the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse (IICSA) of the case of Peter Ball, the former Bishop of Gloucester, who was imprisoned in 2015 for abusing young men.

Following the publication of new Vatican guidelines on what it means to be a consecrated virgin, Edward Stourton speaks to Elizabeth Rees who explains what life is like as a consecrated woman.

Secunder Kermani reports on the influence of Sufi mystics on the outcome of the upcoming Pakistan elections.

Jasvinder Sanghera tells Edward Stourton why her forced marriage campaign group Karma Nirvana is handing out spoons at a school to help tackle the summer holiday spike in forced marriage cases.

Following a debate in the House of Lords of a bill calling for civil partnerships to be extended to siblings living together, we hear from one person living in a 'platonic partnership' about why they believe this is a matter of correcting a serious injustice.

Do Christians and atheists have more in common than is commonly thought? Krish Kandiah thinks so and says why in his new book Fatheism. He's joined by Andrew Copson, Chief Executive of Humanists UK. to discuss the current climate of conversation between believers and non-believers.

Producer

Catherine Earlam
Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Series Producer

Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b0bbnlys)
The Eve Appeal

Broadcaster Rachael Bland makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of The Eve Appeal

Registered Charity Numbers: England & Wales) 1091708, Scotland SC042612.
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'The Eve Appeal'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'The Eve Appeal'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0bbn6m5)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0bbn6m7)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0bbnlyv)
Mary Magdalene

The importance of Mary Magdalene in the gospel accounts is marked by their writers' frequent references to her, and although the Bible offers little biographical detail, the hints at a personal story of dramatic transformation continue to fascinate and inspire. On her feast day, a live service from Bangor Cathedral both celebrates her role in Christ's story and explores the inspiration she offers us today.

The choir of Bangor Cathedral, directed by Paul Booth, leads worship with music including Calon Lan (Pure Heart), the best known of the hymns by Welsh bard Daniel James (Gwyrosydd), and the anthem The Doctrine of Wisdom by William Mathias; as well as Come Down O Love Divine (Down Ampney) and We Have A Gospel To Proclaim (Fulda). The service is led by the Dean of Bangor, the Very Rev'd Kathy Jones and the preacher is the Rt Rev'd Andy John, Bishop of Bangor.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b0b9zvtf)
Brexit and Illiberal Europe

John Gray argues that in the Brexit debate, few Remainers seem to have noticed the illiberal and fragmented Europe that has recently come into being.

"Illiberal forces are advancing across the European continent", he writes, with hard right politics strengthening their hold in many countries.

He says the idea that staying in the European Union is a way of protecting liberal values is simply an "illusion".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b0bbnlyx)
Stephen Gregory Tweet of the Day Takeover Week 2

Horror novelist and keen bird watcher Stephen Gregory returns for a second instalment selecting favourite episodes from the Tweet of the Day back catalogue. As a keen birdwatcher all of his novels have some elements of an ornithological theme. With either birds in the title such as Wakening the Crow from 2014, or have birds as subject to build the tension into his world of macabre such as The Waking That Kills featuring swifts and the folklore that provided inspiration. His first novel The Cormorant based on observing cormorants in Wales received the 1987 Somerset Maugham Award. In this episode Stephen recalls how he and his wife loved to watch swiftlets nesting underneath their house in Brunei, or the hornbills that visited the garden in the afternoons.

You can hear more thought's from Stephen via the Tweet of the Week podcast available on the Radio 4 website.

Producer by Maggie Ayre.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0bbn6m9)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0bbn6mc)

Alice struggles to come to terms with recent events, and Jennifer's heart breaks.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0bbnlyz)
Baroness Newlove

Baroness Newlove is the Victims' Commissioner for England and Wales. She became a campaigner after her husband, Garry Newlove, was murdered by several youths in 2007. Born in Salford in 1961 she grew up in a working class family. Having left school at sixteen she became a copy typist at a magistrate's court and later a committal court assistant. She met Garry when she was 20 and they married and had two daughters. In 1992, when he was just 32, Garry was diagnosed with stomach cancer. He survived and the couple went on to have a third daughter.

The family lived in an area of Warrington which was experiencing an increase in anti-social behaviour. In August 2007, Garry went outside to investigate a disturbance and was viciously attacked by some youths in front of his three daughters. Three days later, the decision was taken to switch off his life support. Three youths were subsequently found guilty of Garry's murder and in the wake of the family's experience, Helen set up an initiative called Newlove Warrington to provide support to the young people in the area.

She was given a peerage in 2010 and sits on the Conservative benches. She took up various roles in support of victims in the House of Lords, culminating in her appointment as Victims' Commissioner, a post she took up in 2013. She is currently in her second term and will be serving in the post until 2019.

Helen remarried in 2012.

Presenter: Kirsty Young
Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b0bbn6mf)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b0b9wbfb)
Series 69, Episode 4

The antidote to panel games pays a return visit to the Wyvern Theatre in Swindon. Old-timers Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Rory Bremner and Pam Ayres with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell attempts piano accompaniment.
Producer - Jon Naismith.
It is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0bbnlz1)
Richard Corrigan: A Life Through Food

Richard Corrigan's is a story of Ireland, the story of a turning point in British food culture and the story of a deep connection to the land and its produce. But most of all it is the story of a man committed to his principles in a notoriously unforgiving industry. He is a rare voice of authenticity from the kitchen and one of our most important chefs.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Siobhan Maguire.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0bbn6mh)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0bbn6mk)

News with Jonny Dymond including Labour's Brexit policy and the Pakistan elections.


SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (b0bbnlz3)

In the latest programme of the monthly series, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from writers and journalists around the United Kingdom that reflect the range of contemporary life in the country.

The BBC's Social Affairs Correspondent, Michael Buchanan, tells the story of a man, now in his fifties, who discovered only after the funeral of the woman he thought was his mother, that he was adopted and that his birth mother was seeking to find him. Sally Green, the children's and young adults author, explains the appeal of taking part in the weekly Warrington parkrun over 5 kilometres (three miles). Datshiane Navanayagam talks to one family about the scourge of homelessness among those in full-time work. Chris Bowlby journeys on what remains of the route of the Stockton to Darlington railway - England's first public steam-powered track - and reflects on the current state of train services in north-east England. And Mary-Ann Ochota, a keen hill-walker, travels to the Isle of Skye for her latest challenge - the ascent of the Inaccessible Pinnacle - and finds its name all too apt.

Producer Simon Coates.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0b9zg8l)
Latitude Festival

Peter Gibbs and the team are at Latitude Festival in Suffolk. Pitching up their tents and propping up the cider van bar this week are Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew, and James Wong.

The panellists spend the programme roaming the grounds of the festival answering questions from the postbag as they go. They debate the best water to use in a hosepipe ban, what could be stunting the growth of a whole varied vegetable plot, and whether or not asparagus can be propagated.

They also advise on how to cut back a large grass garden, offer planting suggestions for a highly-scented garden, and suggest ways in which gardeners can encourage nocturnal wildlife onto their plots.

Elsewhere on the site, Matt Biggs holds court in the GQT travelling potting shed and Peter Gibbs catches up with Hektor Rous, the guardian of Henham Park, to find out what it's like to have 4000 people in your back garden.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hester Cant

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0bbnlz5)
Omnibus - Being Who You Are

Fi Glover introduces conversations about standing your ground, whether that's against racist or homophobic expectations, or simply dealing with your mother teaching your class. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b0bbnrcr)
To the Ends of the Earth: The Man Who Would Be King

by Rudyard Kipling, adapted by Mike Walker.

Part of Radio 4's series of classic tales of adventure and peril: To The Ends of the Earth.

Kipling's chilling cautionary tale set deep in the Hindu Kush mountains.
Dan and Peachey are two con men with an insane and dangerous plan: they want to conquer a remote region of what is now Afghanistan.

Adapted by . . . . Mike Walker
Director . . . . Abigail le Fleming.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0bbnrct)
Daisy Johnson, The literary appeal of the Fens, Book festival etiquette

Daisy Johnson talks to Mariella Frostrup about moving from short stories to long form with her debut novel Everything Under.
Stella Tillyard joins Daisy to discuss what makes the English Fens such a tempting landscape for novelists.
Publisher at Hodder non-fiction, Drummond Moir recommends a powerful new novel based on real events by Miriam Toews
And crime fiction critic for the Telegraph Jake Kerridge discusses the current state of literary festivals.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0bbnrcw)
Imtiaz Dharker

Roger McGough is joined by Imtiaz Dharker, with a selection of her favourite poems from the Poetry Please archive of listeners' requests. This week her choices include requests from some special listeners with whom she was on tour recently, Carol Ann Duffy and Jackie Kay as well as poems from Helen Mort, Liz Berry and Clare Shaw.
Imtiaz Dharker is a poet, artist and documentary film-maker. Awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in 2014, recipient of the Cholmondley Award and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Her most recent collection is Luck is the Hook (Bloodaxe Books UK). Her poems are on the British GCSE and A Level English syllabus. She has been Poet in Residence at Cambridge University Library, for Thresholds, and has recently completed a series of poems based on the Archives of St Paul's Cathedral. She has had ten solo exhibitions of drawings in India, London, New York and Hong Kong.
'If there were to be a World Laureate, then for me the role could only be filled by Imtiaz Dharker.' Carol Ann Duffy

Producer: Sarah Addezio.


SUN 17:00 World Questions from Zimbabwe (b0bdb70g)

In a highly charged debate, an audience of Zimbabweans debates the upcoming presidential elections, land reform, the economic crisis and the legacy of the former President, Robert Mugabe.

Allan Little chairs the public debate with Paul Mangwana of Zanu PF, Welshman Ncube of the MDC Alliance, Fadzayi Mahere – independent parliamentary candidate, and Trevor Ncube – the journalist and publisher.

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A supporter of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party waves the flag of Zimbabwe. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 17:40 Profile (b0bbmp89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6mm)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0bbn6mp)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0bbn6mr)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0bbn6mt)
Adrian Chiles

Presenter and broadcaster Adrian Chiles' picks this week include conflict resolution, the pursuit of happiness and how being good looking is really great because people think you're a good person too. He finds out why there's no longer much Balti to be had in his beloved Birmingham's Balti triangle, there's a lesson in how to kiss boys from Jackie magazine, what we can learn from the Portuguese about tackling drug addiction, and a rendition of three Lions sung in Russian.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0bbnrcy)

Pip is in trouble, and Neil finds himself torn.


SUN 19:15 Believe It! (b08lhg9p)
Series 3, Knight Fever

The third series of Jon Canter's not quite true autobiography of Richard Wilson. Believe what you like!

Richard was unwell last year. He had a heart attack. But now he's recovered and is fighting fit. With a new lease of life - he considers those things most likely to make him happy in the future. What's on his bucket list? Get a Knighthood of course!

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Natural Histories: Short Stories (b06rxgtf)
Series 1, A Total Neanderthal

Lionel Shriver reads her short story commissioned as part of the collaboration between Radio 4 and the Natural History Museum. She was taken behind the scenes at the museum, and that inspired this story. A modern woman falls for one of the few of our remaining genetic close relatives, because he has all the masculine qualities that in male homo sapiens in the West are dying out.. Producer Beth O'Dea.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b0b9zvtc)
Cliff Richard vs the BBC, Brexit coverage, Accents in politics

Roger Bolton hears listener views on the Sir Cliff Richard verdict and finds out about the new wave of World Service podcasts. BBC News executive James Stephenson discusses the corporation's Brexit coverage and Chris Mason talks about accents in politics.

This week, a legal ruling awarded Sir Cliff Richard £210,000 in damages against the BBC with the judge saying some of the news coverage of a police raid on Sir Cliff's home infringed his privacy rights in a "serious" and "somewhat sensationalist" way. Citing concerns with the precedent set down in the case, the BBC has stated that it is considering an appeal. We hear listeners' views.

Brexit has been a constant feature in the Feedback inbox and, this week, listeners have been asking why the BBC hasn't put more resources into investigating what they see as Brexit "scandals". Roger puts those concerns to the BBC's News Editor, James Stephenson.

Death in Ice Valley, an investigative podcast that looked into the death of an unidentified woman in Norway in 1970, has been downloaded and streamed more than 2.7 million times. It's the BBC's most successful new podcast launch. BBC World Service Podcast Editor Jon Manel, who commissioned the series, joins Feedback to discuss how his network is looking to reach new audiences.

And a recent Radio 4 documentary looked at accents and politics, asking Could the PM Have a Brummie Accent? It caught the imagination of many Feedback listeners. Chris Mason, BBC Political correspondent and Yorkshireman, talks about why he took on the topic.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b0b9zvt9)
Oliver Knussen CBE, Barbara Harrell-Bond OBE, Sam Chisholm, Steve Ditko, Anna Sándor de Kénos

Pictured: Oliver Knussen

Julian Worricker on:

British composer and conductor, Oliver Knussen, described as a towering figure in contemporary music....

Barbara Harrell-Bond, who founded and then directed the Refugee Studies Centre at Oxford University....

The media executive, Sam Chisholm, who drove the development of multi-channel television in Britain....

Steve Ditko, the American artist and writer best known as co-creator of the Marvel Comics superheroes Spider-Man and Doctor Strange...

and the last Transylvanian aristocrat to have lived through the communist purges, Anna Sandor de Kenos.

Archive clips from: Jonathan Ross in Search of Steve Ditko, BBC Four, 16/09/07; Music Matters, Radio 3, 09/07/18; Horizon: Exodus, BBC Two, 06/03/95; Breakfast Time, BBC One, 05/01/89.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0bbml6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0bbnlys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b0b9wcdr)
Trump and Trade

In 2016, during the American presidential election campaign, Edward Stourton travelled to the rustbelt of the United States to report on the new political power of Protectionism.
Now, as Donald Trump seems poised for a trade war on two fronts - with China and Europe - he asks how far the American president will go to put "America First".

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Hugh Levinson.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0bbn6mw)

Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Moth Radio Hour (b0bbnydf)

True stories told live in the USA.


SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b0b9zvtf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]



MONDAY 23 JULY 2018

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0bbn6qv)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b0b9yx40)
Beauty - Ugliness

Beauty and ugliness - to what extent are our ideas about physical perfection culturally and socially constructed? Laurie Taylor talks to Gretchen Henderson, Lecturer in English at Georgetown University & author of a study of perceptions of ugliness throughout history and to Heather Widdows, Professor of Global Ethics at the University of Birmingham, whose latest book explores the radical transformation of the status of beauty and the increasing emergence of a global ideal.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0bbndyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6r1)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0bbn6r3)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6r5)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0bbn6r7)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0bcr156)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0bbn6r9)
Fish rescue, Crop irrigation, Rural tourism

Thousands of fish are having to be rescued because their habitat is drying up, and Ben Godfrey's been out with the Environment Agency to see how this is done.

The hot weather is also affecting crop growth, and as herb and Spinach grower Mark Bowyer tells Caz Graham this means increasing irrigation, a later harvest and lower yields. Tim Hess, a water expert from Cranfield University explains the ways in which drought can affect farmers.

All this week the programme is looking at rural tourism, and Professor Nick Evans from the University of Worcester has completed research on this area, and says that although farms are still a draw for tourists they're not always interested in the business of farming.

Producer: Toby Field.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0bbn6rc)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09by75m)
Paul Evans on the Carrion Crow

On the eve of Halloween, the silence of a graveyard is broken by the raucous calls of an inky black Crow "Throwing her voice as if coughing up a bone" says Paul Evans in the first of four specially commissioned Halloween tales.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Derek Wood.


MON 06:00 Today (b0bbn6rf)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Bringing Up Britain (b0bbnz03)
Series 11, Parenting in the Smartphone Age

Since 2007, when Apple released the first iPhone, a generation of teenagers have grown up with a phone almost constantly in their hand. According to one Facebook executive, millennials look at their phones on average more than 150 times a day.

It seems that every day brings new headlines on smartphone addiction and the impact on our children. So how concerned should we be? With teens reporting issues such as cyber bullying and body dysmorphia linked to social media use, do we need to 'do something' about the effects of smartphones on children?

Mariella Frostrup is joined in the studio by Giles Dilnot from the Office of the Children's Commissioner, child psychotherapist Julie Lynn Evans, social media guru Ben Anderson from the Self Esteem Team, technology evangelist turned tech addiction campaigner Belinda Parmar and Andy Robertson - a journalist specialising in video games and families, to discuss how to parent in the smartphone age.

Producer: Sarah Shebbeare.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b0bbnz20)
Where the Line is Drawn, Episode 1

Raja Shehadeh is an award winning Palestinian writer, lawyer, and founder of the human right's organisation, Al Haq. In Where the Line is Drawn he reflects on his forty year friendship with Henry, a Jewish Israeli. As idealistic young men when they first meet in 1977, they connect over shared interests in literature, writing and walking. As the years pass, their friendship is challenged by history, politics, enmity and violence, but it also points the way to a common future. Raja Shehadeh's books include Occupation Diaries; Language of War, Language of Peace and Palestinian Walks which won the 2008 Orwell Prize. He has contributed to The New York Times, The Guardian and Granta.

Read by Peter Polycarpou who was recently nominated for an Olivier Award for best supporting actor in a play category. Other recent theatre credits include the Donmar theatre's production of City of Angels, and Guys and Dolls at the Chichester Festival Theatre. Television credits include Tyrant, Hustle and Eastenders and he has been heard in numerous audio dramas.

The music is Reem Kelani's Sprinting Gazelle.

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0bbn6rh)
Turntablist Shiva Feshareki, Nadine Dorries, Climate change

Shiva Feshareki is a British-Iranian experimental composer and turntablist. Her work blends together sounds of classical and dance music. Shiva will be performing at the BBC Proms for the first time, celebrating and representing experimental electronic music.

We meet the presenters of a new podcast celebrating women who are tackling climate change: the first female president of Ireland Mary Robinson and Maeve Higgins, a writer and comedian.

Nadine Dorries is a Conservative MP, but Westminster politics are a far cry from the lives of Rosie and Sarah, the heroines of her new novel., 'Shadows in Heaven'. Nadine joins Jane to discuss her passion for writing about women determined to survive.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Rachel Humphreys.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbnzzx)
Five Days Which Changed Everything, Episode 1

By Jo Clifford.

An autobiographical drama about love, loss and the unexpected moments of grace that preserve us.

It's festival time on the streets of Edinburgh, a time John and Susie usually relish. But this year, over the course of several days, their world will be turned upside down.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b0bbnzzz)
Weathering Windrush

Having worked for London Transport and had four children here, Lloyd was completely unprepared to find himself on the wrong side of what was to become an unfolding immigration nightmare. Within weeks he lost his job, was told that he was ineligible for benefits or even health care: eventually he was forced out of his home through mounting debt and started sleeping in hospital waiting rooms and in the foyer of the local YMCA. He feared that he would be deported back to Jamaica - a country he left at eleven, when he came to join parents who had made a new life in London.

Lloyd is one of many who have suffered through the Government's 'hostile environment policy,' which requires employers and other bodies to demand evidence of citizenship. Although he had held a British passport, he had lost it and his original landing card proving his legitimate entry into the country had been destroyed. The result was that he could not even return to the Caribbean for his mother's funeral and he has lost everything he built up in this country. Now he is starting from scratch, with a temporary place in a hotel and a promise that he will be given citizenship. The Untold follows his efforts to rebuild his life.

Produced by Sue Mitchell and Viv Jones.


MON 11:30 The Quanderhorn Xperimentations (b0bbp001)
Series 1, Fear! Terror! Gut-wrenching Horror! Arg Arg. Please!

It's 1952, as usual.

Having fired the Dangerous Giant Space Laser at the alien vessel containing his crew, Quanderhorn (James Fleet) creates "improved" duplicates of them all as replacements.

Meanwhile the originals - having luckily escaped the blast by triggering the Mercurian metadrive thanks to an astonishingly angry outburst from Guuuurk (Kevin Eldon) - find themselves marooned in a strange forest which the Martian deduces is somewhere in the Crab Nebula.

The professor receives a dire warning from his future self, as an ancient alien ziggurat emerges at Piccadilly Circus Tube Station - just by the chocolate machine. He hastens to London to investigate with his new assistants.

Our heroes are slightly surprised when a number 43 bus to Highgate Woods arrives unexpectedly and they race to Piccadilly Circus to confront the professor and their doppelgangers.

But Prime Minister Churchill (John Sessions) has plans of his own to deal with Quanderhorn, and summons up his crack Lab Busting bomber squadron.

The Quanderhorn Xperimentations - an adventure beyond human understanding.

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b0bbn6rk)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b0b69ybp)
23 July 1918 - Emily Colville

On this day in 1918, an outbreak of flu was reported at a PoW camp in Bramley, affecting a third of the 3,000 prisoners, while in Devon, Emily Colville goes to the fair.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b0bbn6rm)
Clothes sizes, Mobile phone charges, Island electricity

Online fashion retailers are facing an increasing number of returns from customers who buy the wrong size garments. We've been to see the researchers working on new sizes for better fitting clothes.

People have been landed with huge bills for mobile phones they say they've hardly used from a company previously fined for mis-selling. We've been investigating.

And ten years after people on one Scottish island got their own green power system going, we hear why more islands could now follow their lead.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0bbn6rp)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0bbn6rr)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 The Genius of Accidents (b0bbp79p)
Series 1, Viagra

Viagra was supposed to be a treatment for the heart condition angina, but during clinical trials an unexpected side effect was noticed by the young male participants. Telling the story of this unexpected discovery, presenter Adam Hart speaks with the Pfizer scientists Sir Simon Campbell and Dr Peter Ellis who were part of the team that noticed the unusual side effects, and brought Viagra forward as a treatment for erectile dysfunction. Sex journalist Alix Fox discusses the importance of this little blue pill to patients. This is the story of the accident that changed sex.

Producer: Rory Galloway.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0bbnrcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b0bbp79r)
Undeniably Keith

A warm, funny, contemporary love story with a twist by Lucy Gannon (creator of Soldier, Soldier, Peak Practice and Bramwell).

Recently widowed Rose (DOON MACKICHAN), arrives in a small village in bleak winter frost to try to start a new life. The first person she meets is retired policeman Keith (KEVIN WHATELY), who lives at Winterspite cottage on the ridge. Rose tries not to think she's in a psychological thriller with a messy end. And then she starts receiving poems. Really, really terrible poems. They'd be very funny, if they weren't quite so terrible - and they're from Keith.

By Lucy Gannon
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b0bbp79t)
Series 8, University of Sheffield

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Sheffield with specialist subjects including Archaeology, Dental Hygiene and Dental Therapy, and Civil Engineering and the questions ranging from Blockchain and Xerostomia to Big Shaq and Slime.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Merton College Oxford, Dundee, Hertfordshire, Newcastle and Brunel.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0bbnlz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Anatomy Lesson (b0bbp7cc)

Rictus, 2015 (detail)

Artist Ken Currie's paintings of the human body have been described as 'arresting and intensely visceral'. Now he accepts an invitation from Sue Black, Professor of Anatomy and Forensic Anthropology, to examine for himself the reality of the human body. Ken takes a journey to Brussels to look at the famous painting by Jacques-Louis David, 'The Death of Marat', and on to Dundee to witness the actual nature of flesh and bone at the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, Dundee University.

Producer Mark Rickards.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b0bbp7sr)
Series 18, Invasion

Invasion!

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by comedian Phill Jupitus, bat expert and ecologist Professor Kate Jones and forensic botanist Dr Mark Spencer to look at the problems caused by alien invasions, although not of the little green men kind. They look at why such innocent and innocuous sounding plants such as floating pennywort strike terror and fear in the heart of environmentalists up and down the country, and how clever microbes and diseases are able to jump from animals such as bats to humans causing devastating consequences.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 17:00 PM (b0bbn6rt)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0bbn6rw)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b0bbp9q9)
Series 69, Episode 5

The godfather of all panel shows pays a visit to the Playhouse Theatre in Oxford. Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by programme stalwart Jeremy Hardy with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell accompanies on the piano.
Producer - Jon Naismith.
It is a BBC Studios production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0bbp9qc)

Rex comes to the rescue, and Phoebe smells a rat.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0bbn6ry)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbnzzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Silence and the Scream (b0bbp9qf)

Donegal is an Irish county where silence is a virtue. You can find it in the desolate landscape, the big skies and far horizons - but silence can be found in the people too. Maybe it's discretion or reticence. It could be shyness or a kind of wisdom.

So when radical free-thinking commune, The Atlantis Foundation, set up home in the remote Donegal village of Burtonport in the mid-1970s, it seemed like an unlikely choice of location.

Led by charismatic Englishwoman Jenny James and inspired by an experimental brand of counter-cultural psychology, the foundation practised 'primal scream' therapy. This was about letting it all out, yelling; shouting; shrieking to release deep rooted fears in the most challenging and visceral way. The locals simply called them the Screamers.

Author and Donegal native Garrett Carr was a boy when he first heard of the Screamers. His family would lower their voices when mentioning them. While he found the name unnerving, Garrett was intrigued. On the coast near his home, he liked to imagine he could hear their cries echoing across the water.

Now Garrett is returning to Donegal to find out who the Screamers were, what they wanted and if they ever managed to find it. Most of all he wants to know what happened when the quiet restraint of his local community was confronted by the outward abandonment of the Atlantis Foundation.

Garrett is going home to discover what happens when silence meets scream.

Producer: Conor Garrett.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0bbp9qh)
What's Fair?

As well as marking the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service, this year marks a similar milestone in adult social care. But whereas our notions of fairness in treating those who fall ill are simple and straightforward - free to those who require care at the point of delivery in the NHS - with social care it is different: means testing remains the device by which assistance with care is decided. When it comes to helping the aged and the infirm, then, we struggle with decidedly different ideas of fairness - and have done so since the advent of National Assistance - the forerunner of today's social care - in 1948.

What should the individual contribute and how much should the state provide? What ideas of fairness properly apply in providing social care? And how can agreement on them be reached?

Paul Johnson - the director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, the respected economic research body - asks why politicians should find it so difficult to agree on simple ideas of equity and fairness in this area. From Labour's so-called "death tax" in 2010 to the Conservatives' alleged "dementia tax" last year, attempts to come up with ways to reform a system that is widely considered to have broken down, have collapsed in failure and left both main parties reluctant to get their fingers burnt again with proposals for change.

So with the pressures on available services continuing to grow as the proportion of the population that is elderly rises and its needs become more specialised and as numbers of working age adults with social care needs increase, Paul Johnson considers what principles a fair social care system should enshrine and what likelihood there is that policies to give effect to them will be implemented.

Editor Hugh Levinson.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b0b9249m)
Willow

Brett Westwood embraces the Willow. A tree celebrated across cultures for its beauty and versatility, it's the tree we've hugged closer than any other. Brett learns from Joan Armatrading how the willow can take away our pain, and visits the willow fields of the Somerset levels, where tall-growing willows sway like a bamboo forest.

As it weeps by our waterways and whispers in our hedgerows, it's given us endless laments, has been used by witches for magic wands and broomsticks, and has been turned into everything from charcoal to coffins, to painkillers.

Natural Histories - the only programme where Monet and Shakespeare meet The Wicker Man and folk-rock supergroup Steeleye Span.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


MON 21:30 Bringing Up Britain (b0bbnz03)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0bbn6s0)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0bbpb82)
Clock Dance, Episode 1

By Anne Tyler

The new novel about family and self-discovery by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Tyler.

In today's episode, it is 1967 and eleven year old Willa has to deal with a domestic crisis.

Read by Barbara Barnes

Abridged by Sian Preece

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


MON 23:00 A Place Called Home (b0901fqp)
Series 1, Frances Barber in Wolverhampton

Award winning political interviewers Alice Thomson and Rachel Sylvester take leading figures from politics, business and the arts back to their childhood towns and cities.

The actress Frances Barber, whose work ranges from the RSC to Doctor Who, Inspector Morse and Silk, grew up on a Wolverhampton estate. Her father ran a betting shop and her mother was a school dinner lady. She was one of six children, and the only one to go to grammar school and university.

Frances explores the Wolverhampton of her childhood, where Enoch Powell was her MP, and discusses how her own left wing and pro-European views were shaped by her upbringing and the place where she grew up.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0bbn6s2)

News from Westminster.



TUESDAY 24 JULY 2018

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0bbn6tw)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b0bbnz20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6ty)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0bbn6v0)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6v2)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0bbn6v4)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0bcsk4f)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0bbn6v6)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09fjk67)
Fyfe Dangerfield on the Golden Oriole

As a child, musician Fyfe Dangerfield learnt bird calls from a sound tape borrowed from the library, meaning he was able to hear before seeing a golden oriole in the French countryside.

Producer Mark Ward
Photograph Martin IG.


TUE 06:00 Today (b0bbn6v8)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b0b995kj)
Margaret MacMillan, War's Fatal Attraction

Historian Margaret MacMillan looks at representations of war: can we really create beauty from horror and death? Speaking at the Canadian War Museum, she discusses the paradox of commemoration. She questions attempts to capture the essence and meaning of war through art. The programme is presented by Anita Anand in front of an audience and includes a question and answer session.

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Hugh Levinson.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b0bbq1ly)
Where the Line is Drawn, Episode 2

Raja Shehadeh, the award winning Palestinian writer, lawyer, and founder of the human rights organisation, Al Haq, visits Jaffa, the city from which his father was exiled during the Nakba in 1948 when 750,000 were forced from their homes with the end of the British Mandate and the creation of Israel. It's now 1978 and he is staying with Jewish friends who moved into one of the old Arab houses in Jaffa. He is curious about their choice of home. Read by Peter Polycarpou.

The music is Reem Kelani's Sprinting Gazelle.

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0bbn6vb)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbphc5)
Five Days Which Changed Everything, Episode 2

By Jo Clifford.

An autobiographical drama about love, loss and the unexpected moments of grace that preserve us.

It's festival time on the streets of Edinburgh, a time John and Susie usually relish. But this year, over the course of several days, their world turns upside down.

On Sunday Susie's vision blurs, on Monday her head aches, and then she has a fit in her sleep...

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b0bbphc7)
Dung Beetle

Brett Westwood explores how our idea of the dung beetle has morphed over the ages.

The most sacred symbol in Egyptian ideology, the scarab beetle was also the butt of Classical Greek jokes, the inspiration for anti-conceptual art, the go-to filthy vermin for use in moralising fables and more recently the source of celestial wonder for poets.

Brett visits an enormous scarab sculpture at the British museum with entomologist Richard Jones, who has brought along his collection of favourite shiny bugs. Biologist and cartoonist Jay Hosler explains why his character Sisyphus is the wisest creature in his graphic novel Clan Apis. Dr Rachel Murray from the University of Bristol reveals the entomologist Fabre's influence on DH Lawrence's Ladybird. Producer Simon Bell explains just how much baby elephant manure it takes to film a dung beetle and Billy Childish revels in the elementary appeal of a creature that sculpts, rolls, battles over and eats poo.

Producer: Ellie Richold.


TUE 11:30 Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island (b0bbphc9)
Series 3, Pirates and Agitators

The music writer Laura Barton heads west to listen to the music of Bristol. Surrounded by hills and divided by the River Avon, she finds a city where music is made with the roguishness of pirates and agitators.

In the south of the city, Laura's invited into the tranquil new home of Invada Records, the studio of music producer and Portishead instrumentalist Geoff Barrow. Down on the Harbourside, neo-soul singer China Bowls busks with the band Snazzback and talks to Laura about the sense of freedom moving back to Bristol has given her music. Japanese-born artist Yoshino Shigihara has similarly found a home there, drawing energy for her band Yama Warashi from the nearby M32 motorway and late night reggae sessions in St Paul's. Laura finds Tom Friend leafing through the Bristol section in his record shop, Friendly Records, on North Street. Together they try to put their finger on the source of the "Bristol sound". And Joe Talbot, the singer in post punk band IDLES, muses on how the city's lines, tunnels and hills have led to a more accepting place to live and make music today.

Produced by Andrea Rangecroft
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b0bbn6vd)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b0b69yg9)
24 July 1918 - Cathy Lawrence

On this day in 1918, The Times reported a decline in pauperism of nearly 10% over the year, while on Dartmoor, Cathy Lawrence has nothing left.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b0bbn6vg)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:56 Weather (b0bbn6vj)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b0bbn6vl)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 The Genius of Accidents (b0bc6hqx)
Series 1, The Big Bang

Evidence for the Big Bang at the start of the universe was discovered by accident, using technology developed to record radio waves from space, that were themselves found by accident. Adam Hart explores serendipity in radio astronomy with Professor Nial Tanvir of Leicester University, and Professor Sarah Bridle of Manchester University, in a story involving not a small amount of pigeon poo, and a persistent odd noise detected from space.

Producer: Rory Galloway.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0bbp9qc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b07m5jw4)
Poetry in Motion

We hear the thoughts of five people sitting near each other on a train travelling to Manchester. They all get on alone but they all leave a little less so. By award-winning playwright, Katie Hims.

Valerie ..... Rachel Davies
Leonard ..... Alan Williams
Karla ..... Karla Crome
Reece ..... Ashley Kumar
Bridie ..... Adie Allen
Cashier ..... Kirsty Oswald
Train Announcer ..... Nick Underwood
Director ..... Mary Peate
Writer ..... Katie Hims.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0bbml6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Making History (b0bbphcc)
The End of Steam. St Edmund. Southall Youth Movement

Tom Holland is joined by the history podcaster and stand-up comedian Iszi Lawrence.

In Britain's recent past, a long hot summer has often coincided with racial unrest on our streets - 1981 is perhaps the most notable example. But while we remember events in Brixton, Toxteth and Tottenham, have we forgotten the tensions in Southall during the 1960s and 70s which, some argue, paved the way for better race relations in the UK? Lovejit Dhaliwal visits a Heritge Lottery project in Southall re-examining the importance of the town's Youth Movement.

King Edmund of East Anglia lost his life in a period of our history when the country we now know as England was still being defined. He was our patron saint until the 14th century but now he's largely forgotten - and so his is resting place. Historian Dr Francis Young has a hunch that he's still in Bury St Edmunds, not in a church but under a tennis court.

Fifty years ago, a programme that some know as 'dieselisation' reached its climax on Britain's railways and saw the end of steam in public service. Many mourn the passing of steam trains but, as Helen Castor found out on a trip to Swindon, keeping these beasts going was dirty, dangerous and laborious.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Inside the World of the Frequent Flyer (b09tcnm5)

Up in the air with the frequent flyers who'll go to extreme lengths to achieve airline status and rack up air miles. Are they playing the system - or is the system playing them? Georgie Glen narrates their stories

Many hardcore frequent flyers will stop at nothing to achieve the privileges which go with airline status, planning convoluted multi-leg journeys to maximise their points. It's a whole sub-economy - a parallel currency which the airlines control, and which the frequent flyers seek to exploit.

The consequence is a life which is spent perpetually in transit, on airplanes and in airport lounges. We hear what motivates these individuals, what they gain and what they lose from spending so much of their lives up in the air.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b0bbphcf)
Anne-Marie Duff and Louise O'Neill

Harriett Gilbert is joined by Anne-Marie Duff and Louise O'Neill to discuss favourite books.


TUE 17:00 PM (b0bbn6vn)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0bbn6vq)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Jake Yapp's Media Circus (b0bbq1gm)
Series 1, Daytime TV

Jake Yapp applies his sharp satirical eye to the modern media, exploring its strengths, weaknesses and idiosyncrasies through stand-up, sketch and music.

Episode 1 - Daytime TV

Jake turns his focus to the Daytime TV schedule. Exploring its most common tropes and iterations while attempting to explain why he finds so much of it unwatchable.

Written, performed and composed by Jake Yapp
Starring George Fouracres and Emily Lloyd-Saini
Additional material by Robin Morgan
Produced by Joe Nunnery
A BBC Studios Production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b0bbq1gp)

There's a shock for Anisha and an emotional farewell at Home Farm.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0bbn6vs)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbphc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b0bbq1gr)
Counting the Cost: Antidepressant Use in Children

More antidepressants than ever before are being prescribed to young people in Britain, despite fears that they can cause harm in some cases.

What are the driving factors behind the increase? Is there any merit to claims the drugs are ineffective - and, in some cases, have serious side effects in children? And is the NHS providing the proper support to young people affected by mental illness who are turning to medication to cope?

This, however, is not the first time a surge in the rate of antidepressants being prescribed to young people has been deemed a cause for concern. In 2005, in response to public concern, prescription guidelines were introduced. They included step-by-step instructions for medical professionals who treat patients under 18 years of age; providing, for the first time, standard treatment protocols. In turn, the number of antidepressants being prescribed across the UK declined for a period. But, now, some thirteen years later, the numbers have surpassed pre-NICE guidelines levels - and show no signs of slowing. And there's evidence that the guidelines themselves are being ignored in some cases.

Paul Connolley investigates the causes and risks of an increasing reliance on medication.

Reporter: Paul Connolley
Producer: Carl Johnston
Editor: Gail Champion.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0bbn6vv)

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b0bbq1gt)

Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.


TUE 21:30 Enlightenment After Dark (b092t33j)
Series 1, Digital

In Enlightenment After Dark Allan Little hosts a series of discussions in the spirit of the Scottish Enlightenment. Tonight Allan talks to Professor Jon Oberlander of Edinburgh University and tech philosopher Tom Chatfield about the digital world.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0bbn6vx)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0bbq1gw)
Clock Dance, Episode 2

By Anne Tyler

A new novel about family and self-discovery by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Tyler.

In today's episode, it is 1977 and Willa and her boyfriend come into conflict with Willa's parents and Willa makes an impulsive decision.

Read by Barbara Barnes

Abridged by Sian Preece

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b0bbp7sr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0bbn6w2)

News from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 25 JULY 2018

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0bbn6xz)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b0bbq1ly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6y1)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0bbn6y3)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn6y5)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0bbn6y7)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0bcsktv)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0bbn6y9)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tr6m)
Cormorant

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Cormorant. Although cormorants are common on rocky and estuarine shores, increasingly they are breeding inland in tree colonies - where branches whitened by their droppings are a giveaway in summer.


WED 06:00 Today (b0bbn6yc)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 A Life's Work (b0bbq3vp)
Series 1, Female Police Officers

'A Life's Work' is a new series in which Paddy O'Connell brings together three people, from three different generations, who have dedicated their lives to the same profession.

This first programme features women who have chosen to enter a man's world where they have won the right to face equal danger and equal criticism whilst standing on 'the thin blue line' to defend our rights and our responsibilities.

Today, Paddy is joined by three female police officers whose combined experience covers nearly half a century of change and they talk about how their own personal stories reflect the changes that have affected the community they serve.

Contributors:

Former Detective Chief Inspector Jackie Malton became a police officer in 1970 and eventually joined the Flying Squad. She was also the inspiration behind DCI Jane Tennison, played by Helen Mirren in Prime Suspect.

Sara Thornton is Chair of the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) and the former Chief Constable of Thames Valley Police.

PC Danielle Hibbert has been a police officer for four years and works with the British Transport Police.

Producer: Helen Lee.


WED 09:30 Unforgettable (b07pj826)
Series 1, Robbie Stamp/Douglas Adams

Robbie Stamp has an imagined conversation with his late business partner and friend, Douglas Adams.

The last time Robbie talked with Douglas for real was the day before the author's sudden and unexpected death in 2001. He admits to constantly chatting to Douglas in his head since then - but this edition of Unforgettable is the first time he hears Adams respond in his own words.

In a moving interaction between the living and the archive, the subjects range from the new internet, via the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, to the benefits of seeing the world from the point of view of someone else, or even a different species.

Robbie explains how interested Douglas Adams would have been in the technological hardware and software which allows this new conversation to happen, and imagines the fun he would have had with it.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Assistant Producer: Philippa Geering
Producer: Adam Fowler
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0bbr042)
Where the Line is Drawn, Episode 3

Raja Shehadeh, the award winning Palestinian writer, lawyer, and founder of the human rights organisation, Al Haq recollects a humiliating experience on his way home to Ramallah. Read by Peter Polycarpou.

The music is Reem Kelani's Sprinting Gazelle.

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0bbn6yf)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b0bbr044)
Five Days Which Changed Everything, Episode 3

By Jo Clifford.

An autobiographical drama about love, loss and the unexpected moments of grace that preserve us.

It's festival time on the streets of Edinburgh, a time John and Susie usually relish. But this year, over the course of several days, their world turns upside down.

On Monday Susie had a fit in her sleep. On Tuesday they scanned her brain and found a tumour. Today they'll find out whether it's benign or not.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b0bbr046)
Lesley and Alan - Growing Down

Successful cancer treatment at least gives hope that you'll grow better and stronger; with dementia there is no such hope. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Silence and the Scream (b0bbp9qf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Jack & Millie (b0bbr048)
Series 1, Special Lunch

Jack and Millie have a son. And Melvin has an app. And Melvin's wife Delphine has a dog. And Daniel Craig has both his eyebrows.

A Special Lunch turns into a Totteridge tale of decking, Bond, beef tomahawks and a married lifetime's-worth of verbal sparring.

So Millie's son Melvin has given her a new tablet with a voice recorder?

So suddenly Jack and Millie have decided to record everything that happens to them? And for this, we should be grateful?

Well Yes! Because this is a new comedy show written by Jeremy Front (writer of the Charles Paris mysteries for Radio 4) and starring Jeremy Front and Rebecca Front as Jack and Millie Lemman, an older couple who are fully engaged with contemporary life while being at war with the absurdities of the modern world.

Cast:
Jack..........................Jeremy Front
Millie.......................Rebecca Front
Melvin......................Harry Peacock
Delphine..................Jenny Bede

With special guest:
Bruv............................Tayla Kovacevic-Ebong

Written by Jeremy Front
Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b0bbn6yh)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b0b69zht)
25 July 1918 - Kitty Lumley

On this day in 1918, a German barber, Emil Theuergarten was imprisoned for posing as a Belgian, while in Devon, there's a quiet gathering at Halecot Farm.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b0bbn6yk)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0bbn6ym)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b0bbn6yp)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 The Genius of Accidents (b0bc6hf4)
Series 1, The Coelacanth

The coelacanth is a fish that, until 1938, was only known from the fossil record until a young South African curator named Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer found one - only just deceased - on the deck of a fishing boat. Presenter Adam Hart speaks with ichthyologists and curators who knew Marjorie, putting together the story of how a curious mind, determination and a bit of luck saved this 'living fossil' for science.

Producer: Rory Galloway.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b0bbq1gp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0bbr3zl)
Rhoda and Pete Get Back On the Scene

Recently-widowed Rhoda and Pete are determined never again to commit to a life-partner. Their children, Mari and Seb, have other ideas and set up a date between the two wilful oddballs. Are they courting disaster?

Written by Ross Dunsmore
Percussion by Laurence South and Buster Birch
Directed by Peter Kavanagh

First-time writer for radio Ross Dunsmore's play 'Milk' headlined the Traverse Theatre's season for the 2014 Edinburgh Festival.
'Rhoda and Pete... ' looks at the communication problems faced by young people today in their search for love.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b0bbn6yr)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b0bbq1gt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0bbr3zn)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b0bbn6yt)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (b0bbn6yw)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0bbn6yy)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Josh Howie's Losing It (b07sz52p)
The Travel System

New sitcom in which stand-up comic Josh comes to terms with the impending birth of his first child.

In this third episode, Josh attempts to buy a pram on the cheap while also trying to convince his mechanic to give him a good deal.

Written by Josh Howie
Produced by Ashley Blaker

A Black Hat production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0bbr3zq)

Toby has an announcement to make, and Alice attempts to be diplomatic.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b0bbn6z0)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbr044)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b0bbr3zs)

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Claire Fox, Giles Fraser, Shiv Malik and Tim Stanley.


WED 20:45 Why I Changed My Mind (b0bbr7xd)
Series 4, Gisela Stuart

Dominic Lawson hears from people who have changed their mind in a fundamental way on issues of great public significance.

The former Labour MP Gisela Stuart was ardently pro-EU and built a political career helping to promote British membership. But she changed her mind about the whole enterprise and became a key national leader of the Leave campaign to take Britain out of the EU. In this programme she reveals the true story of how her views were transformed and she then faced the uncomfortable challenges of campaigning for an issue that set her against friends, colleagues and family.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


WED 21:00 In Their Element (b0bbrc0r)
Series 3, Fluorine: Chemistry's Tiger

Many chemists have lost their lives trying to isolate the periodic table's most chemically reactive element - hence the nickname "the tiger of chemistry". Fluorine can react with almost all elements. As an acid, hydrofluoric acid, it will dissolve glass. Yet chemists have been able to tame the beast - creating remarkable and safe uses for it by utilising its reactive nature that lets it make strong bonds with other chemicals.

One in five medicines contain fluorine atoms, including one of the most widely used antidepressants Prozac, fluorinated anaesthetic, cancer medication, the cholesterol regulating drug Lipitor and the antibacterial Cipro. Though perhaps it is most famous for being added to toothpaste in the form of fluoride and in some places, drinking water. Fluoride protects our teeth from decay. But despite the benefits, it has a history of receiving a bad press. During the cold war, false allegations were made that adding fluoride to the water supply was a communist plot designed to weaken the American people. Stanley Kubrick satirised these fears in the film Dr. Strangelove in 1964.

The suspicion around fluoride has not gone away and many people feel negatively towards any tinkering with something as fundamental as our water supply. Professor Andrea Sella from University College London examines the effects of fluorine and looks to current and future uses of the element that chemists clearly respect - but no longer fear.

Producer: Louisa Field.


WED 21:30 A Life's Work (b0bbq3vp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0bbn6z2)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0bbrdx7)
Clock Dance, Episode 3

By Anne Tyler

A new novel about family and self-discovery by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Tyler.

In today's episode, it is 1997 and Willa's life is about to change forever.

Read by Barbara Barnes

Abridged by Sian Preece

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


WED 23:00 Bunk Bed (b0bbrdx9)
Series 5, Bunk Bed with sleepover guest Jane Horrocks

Everyone craves a place where their mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air. Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, your tired mind can wander.

The acclaimed Bunk Bed, written by and featuring Patrick Marber and Peter Curran, returns for with a dozy vengeance. Recorded in the dark and in real beds, tonight BAFTA-winning actor Jane Horrocks sleeps over on the pull out bed and discusses the curse of a happy childhood and David Bowie - and also does her impression of a neighing horse that once brought unwanted attention from a stallion.

"A welcome comfort against the gathering storm clouds" - The Spectator

"Funny, strange, enchanting, and beautifully put together" - The Observer

"You'll with love it or hate it...but stick with it; it's gold" - Sunday Telegraph

"Bunk Bed on Radio 4 is beloved by broadsheet critics, but don't let that put you off" - Metro

Producer: Peter Curran
A Foghorn production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Sindhustan (b0bbrdxf)
Series 1, Fruits of Labour

Episode 4 - Fruits of Labour

Stand up comedian Sindhu Vee looks at being a parent in a multi-generational family.

Children are great. I mean soooo boring. But great! Born in India, educated in Delhi, Toronto, Chicago and Oxford, married to a Dane, and with three London born kids still living at home (and calling her mate) former investment banker Sindhu Vee has a unique perspective on parenting. At least the dog - a giant Labrador from Wales - understands her.

Written and performed by Sindhu Vee
Script Editor ............................. Robin Morgan
Producer ................................... Victoria Lloyd

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:30 Caribritish: Children of Windrush (b0b53b00)
Part 1

In the first of a two part series, journalist Hugh Muir examines Carib-British identity through the descendants of Windrush.

Seventy years ago, 492 men and women disembarked at Tilbury dock from the Empire Windrush. We have seen the photos and the newsreels. But what happened next? What do we know about the families they built here, the children and grandchildren? Did the Caribbean culture they brought with them endure, or are their children and grandchildren in all ways British?

Hugh Muir explores the lives and identities of British Caribbeans in the UK.

There are almost 1 million people in the UK who identify as having Caribbean or mixed Caribbean heritage. Through the stories and memories of Hugh's family and others, he tries to understand how a British Caribbean presence and identity was formed over three generations.

This first episode is set between two homes - that of Hugh's dad, William Edward in rural Aberdeen, south west Jamaica, and the traditional Caribbean front room of the 1960s and 70s. It was in this symbolic space that many West-Indian parents, including Hugh's now ageing and frail father, paraded the beliefs and values they sought to pass down to subsequent generations - religious values, work ethic and aspiration. It was where children absorbed their parents' culture via the radiogram, blues parties, prayer gatherings and stories of "back home".

But passing the torch from conservative parents with a sense of Empire and notions of the Motherland to children forced to navigate Britain as it was, while forming their own identities, was not an easy process. There was conflict inside and outside the home and a struggle with the authorities, which continues to this day with the Windrush immigration scandal.

And yet there emerged from that process an explosion of vital and distinct British Caribbean culture - lovers rock, the soundsystem, a look, and a vocabulary that helped the Windrush children stamp their imprint on British society and pave the way for the next generation.

A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.



THURSDAY 26 JULY 2018

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0bbn70y)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0bbr042)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn710)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0bbn712)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn714)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0bbn717)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0bcskvy)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b0bbn719)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0952pgw)
David Rothenberg on the Mocking Bird

David Rothenberg grew up in Connecticut at a time when mockingbirds moved north filling the air with a kaleidoscope of calls, as he explains for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tim Dee.


THU 06:00 Today (b0bbn71c)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Sweet Reason (b0bbslsr)
Series 1, 26/07/2018

Evan Davis looks for reasonable ways to address the most divisive of issues.


THU 09:30 Unforgettable (b07pjkht)
Series 1, Rodnell Collins/Malcolm X

Rodnell Collins has an imagined conversation with his late uncle, Malcolm X. Using archive clips, they are reunited in the Boston home they used to share.

As a young boy, Rodnell would sit in the living room of the house listening to the adults talk into the small hours, under strict instructions from his mother Ella to be seen and not heard.

Now he takes the opportunity to bring his own opinions to the table and to interact with Malcolm X's words as spoken before his assassination in February 1965. The dialogue is infused with irony as Rodnell compares his own experience of being a black Muslim in America today with that of his uncle's fight for civil and human rights in the early 1960s.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Assistant Producer: Philippa Geering
Producer: Adam Fowler
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b0bbslst)
Where the Line is Drawn, Episode 4

Raja Shehadeh, the award winning Palestinian writer, lawyer, and founder of the human rights organisation, Al Haq, remembers a terrifying night time drive. Meanwhile, tense times lie ahead for Raja and Henry as the new millennium dawns. Read by Peter Polycarpou.

The music is Reem Kelani's Sprinting Gazelle.

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0bbn71f)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbslsw)
Five Days Which Changed Everything, Episode 4

By Jo Clifford.

An autobiographical drama about love, loss and the unexpected moments of grace that preserve us.

It's festival time on the streets of Edinburgh, a time John and Susie usually relish. But this year, over the course of several days, their world turns upside down.

On Monday Susie had a fit in her sleep. On Tuesday they scanned her brain and found a tumour. On Wednesday they confirmed the tumour was malignant. Believing Susie has only days to live, the family prepare to say goodbye.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b0bbslsy)
Not Making Babies in South Korea

Why does South Korea have the lowest fertility rate in the world?
The average South Korean woman is expected to have 1.05 children in her life - exactly half the rate needed to maintain a population. That means a shrinking workforce paying less taxes and more elderly people who will need expensive care. South Korea's government has pumped tens of billions of pounds into dealing with the problem over the past decade, but the fertility rate is still going down. In this whodunnit, Simon Maybin finds out who's not doing it - and why.
Producer: John Murphy
Presenter: Simon Maybin.


THU 11:30 Great Exhibition of the North (b0bbsqvz)
Design

The Great Exhibition of the North is devoting a considerable amount of space and energy to promoting the region's proud connection with design, born out of its long manufacturing history in textiles and ceramics, for example, and being taken forward today by designers working in digital and virtual spaces as well as with more traditional materials.

Steph McGovern heads out to meet some of those designers, including leading figures in their respective industries as well as students whose degree show forms part of the Great Exhibition, and who will soon be setting out to make an impression in the professional world themselves.

Steph speaks with the designers at Hedgehog Lab who lead the field in virtual reality design, and who have created a virtual historical tour of the area on the back of Stephenson's Rocket. She also meets master tailor Brita Hirsch and Professor Kate Fletcher, to hear how Hirsch's Great Northern Cloth embodies some of the sustainable ideas that inform the modern design world across the board.

Steph also takes up the challenge laid down by the Exhibition organisers to design her own new product as part of the Get North Design Trail - and speaks with concept artist Matt Walker, whose many designs for TV and film include the Dr. Who sonic screwdriver, about how beauty and art are always vying with utility and function in all great design products.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b0bbn71h)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b0b69zkj)
26 July 1918 - Howard Argent

On this day in 1918, the German army was forced to retreat towards Épernay, while in Staverley Court, there's cause for celebration.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b0bbn71k)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0bbn71m)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b0bbn71p)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 The Genius of Accidents (b0bc6hh0)
Series 1, Jet Streams

Before the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883, nobody knew about the invisible streams of air in the middle atmosphere that are important for air travel and meteorology. Adam Hart explores the archives of the Royal Society in London to reveal a story of how global observations of the atmospheric effects caused by the ejected smoke from Krakatoa unexpectedly revealed the presence of the jet streams.

Producer: Rory Galloway.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0bbr3zq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b07m7qhz)
The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, This Is Not a Rubbish Boy

A new two-part dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's latest No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency book, 'The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine'. Mma Ramotswe and Mma Makutsi return to Radio 4 for a new two-part adventure based on the popular novels set in Bostwana, dramatised by the author.

Episode 1: This is Not a Rubbish Boy
Mma Ramotswe has to come to terms with one of the most difficult situations that she has ever faced - taking a holiday.

Written and dramatised by Alexander McCall Smith.
Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b0bbsrpp)
The Boat Builders of Pin Mill

Writer Jonathan Gornall has attempted to row across the Atlantic twice. On the second attempt he nearly drowned but his relationship with the sea has continued. Today he spends his time at Pin Mill in Suffolk where he has just built a small sailing boat for his daughter and he hopes the boat will teach her to love the sea too. Helen Mark meets him and the boat building community who live beside the River Orwell to discover the great history of sailing which remains at the heart of Pin Mill today.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0bbnlys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b0bbnrct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b0bbt611)

News and insights from the film world.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b0bbn71r)

Adam Rutherford investigates the news in science and science in the news.


THU 17:00 PM (b0bbn71t)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0bbn71w)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Joe Lycett's Obsessions (b0bbt613)
Series 1, Janice Connolly and Nick Owen

Joe Lycett explores the nation's weird and wonderful obsessions by getting to know a selection of famous and not so famous guests, this week recorded in Birmingham. Joining Joe on the sofa this episode, comedian Janice Connolly shares her collection of de-cluttering books, whilst broadcasting legend Nick Owen introduces Joe to Luton Town FC. Joe also welcomes members of the public to share their secret passions, as well as this week's VOP (very obsessed person), Liz West a Guinness World record holding Spice Girls memorabilia collector.

Joe Lycett's Obsessions was written and performed by Joe Lycett, with material from James Kettle and additional material from Laura Major and Mike Shepherd. The production coordinator was Hayley Sterling. The producer was Suzy Grant and it was a BBC Studios production.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0bbt615)

Lily comes clean, and Emma is left disappointed.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b0bbn71y)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbslsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b0bbt617)

Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b0bbt619)
Mud, music and queues for beer - Do festivals make any money?

Evan Davis hosts the business conversation show.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b0bbn71r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Sweet Reason (b0bbslsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0bbn721)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0bbt61c)
Clock Dance, Episode 4

By Anne Tyler

A new novel about family and self-discovery by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Tyler.

In today's episode, it is 2017 and an unexpected phone call changes the course of Willa's life.

Read by Barbara Barnes

Abridged by Sian Preece

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


THU 23:00 The Missing Hancocks (b08k2ctk)
The Racehorse

The Missing Hancocks recreates those episodes of the classic Hancock's Half Hour that have been wiped or lost from the archive. Something else has gone missing in this episode from the second series - the lad 'imself, who had absconded to Rome. In 1955, he was replaced for the first three episodes by the Goon Show's Harry Secombe. In this recreation, he has been replaced by Andy Secombe - Harry's son. Not heard since then, this is a real piece of comedy history.

The first modern sitcom, Hancock's Half Hour made stars of Tony Hancock, Sid James and Kenneth Williams, and launched Ray Galton and Alan Simpson on one of the most successful comedy-writing partnerships in history. But 20 episodes of the show are missing from the BBC archives. Now, after two highly successful series, another five of those episodes have been lovingly re-recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio Theatre.

Tonight's episode: The Racehorse. With Tony Hancock indisposed, Harry Secombe has 10 bob left so Bill decides to spend it on a racehorse. The fact that it only has three legs doesn't deter Sid from entering it in the Britannia Steeplechase.

Written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, and with the classic score newly recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, the show stars Andy Secombe, Kevin Eldon, Simon Greenall, Robin Sebastian and Susy Kane. The Racehorse was first broadcast on the 3rd May, 1955.

Produced by Ed Morrish & Neil Pearson.

Written by Ray Galton & Simpson

Music recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Levon Parikian.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


THU 23:30 Caribritish: Children of Windrush (b0b5xh1t)
Part 2

In the second part of his exploration into British Caribbean identity, journalist Hugh Muir meets the grandchildren of the Windrush pioneers.

They are born here to parents born or brought up in Britain, they speak with British accents and the island rivalries of their grandparents are long gone. So how Caribbean do they feel - if it all?

Through conversations with young British Caribbeans, including his daughter Ruby and the producer Zakia Sewell, Hugh asks whether the Windrushers' attitudes and culture still serve this young generation navigating modern Britain.

Today, there are young British Caribbeans working in all areas of public life - in the arts, in business, education and the civil service. Many are living out the dreams of their grandparents. Hugh meets members of Young Identity, a spoken-word collective from Manchester, who are proud to hear their grandparents' patois infiltrating British language and music. He also talks to Nicholas Daley, a mixed-heritage fashion designer who takes cues from the dashing Windrushers in their sharp suits and hats.

While the Windrush look and language might provide inspiration for some, for others the traditional values of the grandparents are a hindrance. Selina Stone, a theology lecturer, wants her Pentecostal church to address more of the difficult issues facing her generation. For Craig Pinkey, a criminology lecturer and youth worker, there's an unconscious bias in the workplace and for the young Caribbeans he works with in inner city Birmingham, it's poverty and alienation.

On his journey, Hugh meets Tia Simon Campbell and Naeem Davis who run a queer club night called BBZ, something their more conservative grandparents would never have imagined. But like many of their peers, they still identify with their Caribbeaness. Although they've only ever visited the sunny islands, they feel a huge gratitude for the hard work and endurance of the Windrushers who set out to create a better life for their descendants.

Produced by Zakia Sewell
A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 27 JULY 2018

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0bbn73x)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b0bbslst)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn73z)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0bbn741)

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0bbn743)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0bbn745)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0bcskx1)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0bbn747)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0n4w)
Raggiana Bird-of-Paradise

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the displaying Raggiana bird-of-paradise from Papua New Guinea. An explosion of colour flashes across the tree canopy of a rainforest: male Raggiana birds-of-paradise, one of the most spectacularly coloured birds in the world, are displaying to one another. The Raggiana or Count Raggi's bird-of-paradise is Papua New Guinea's national bird and it's easy to see why. His yellow head and green throat are eye-catching enough but even more flamboyant are the long tufted flank feathers which he can raise into a fan of fine reddish-orange plumes. Males gather at traditional display sites quivering these enormous flaming plumes like cabaret dancers as they cling to an advantageous branch. The urgency of their display is underlined by frantic calls which echo through the canopy, in the hope he can impress the much plainer female to mate with him.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0bbn749)

News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0bbnlyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b0bbtbcn)
Where the Line is Drawn, Episode 5

Raja Shehadeh, the award winning Palestinian writer, lawyer, and founder of the human rights organisation, Al Haq receives shocking news and he comes to a new understanding about the value of his friendship with Henry. Read by Peter Polycarpou.

The music is Reem Kelani's Sprinting Gazelle.

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0bbn74c)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbtbcq)
Five Days Which Changed Everything, Episode 5

By Jo Clifford.

An autobiographical drama about love, loss and the unexpected moments of grace that preserve us.

It's festival time on the streets of Edinburgh, a time John and Susie usually relish. But this year, over the course of several days, their world turns upside down.

On Monday Susie had a fit in her sleep. On Tuesday they scanned her brain and found a tumour. On Wednesday they confirmed the tumour was malignant and likely to kill Susie within days or weeks. On Thursday the family said their goodbyes. Today is Friday, 15 years later...

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


FRI 11:00 Economics 101 (b0bbtbcs)

Martin Wolf argues that, to be a truly democratic and prosperous society, we need a new and comprehensive movement devoted to public engagement with economics.

In 2008, following the deepest financial crisis Britain has ever faced, the Queen asked how it was possible that nobody in the government or the City had been able to see the crash coming.

A group of eminent economists responded to her question in a letter, arguing, "Everyone seemed to be doing their own job properly on its own merit. And according to standard measures of success, they were often doing it well. The failure was to see how collectively this added up to a series of interconnected imbalances over which no single authority had jurisdiction."

The economists' letter does little to reassure the reader about avoiding another crash in the future. Worse still, it implicitly endorses the dominant view that our economy should be managed and maintained by a small group of technocrats, serving the public interest.

Financial Times chief economics commentator Martin Wolf mounts a challenge to this belief. He explores why economics education and engagement falls so far behind other disciplines, and shows how we could begin to mount a nationwide renewal.

He speaks to figures such as former US treasury secretary Larry Summers, Nobel prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, chief economist at the Bank of England Andy Haldane, economist Wendy Carlin, journalist Robert Peston, and politicians John McDonnell and Liz Truss.

An SPG production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b07wt5tq)
Series 11, The Reboot

Episode 1: 'The Reboot'

Ed Reardon is back, and this time in slightly unfamiliar territory as he has entered the groves of academe and returned to full-time education at 'Uni'. He's doing a three-year course in, well he's not entirely sure, but at the end he'll get a BA with the chance of a two-year MA add-on. The fact that he'll have warm, comfortable accommodation for the foreseeable future, a student loan to pay the rent and that he'll reach 65 by the time he's finished the course and therefore passed the age of paying back the fees has nothing to do with his decision to study. No, this is all to do with making up for lost time when his studies were cut short in his youth following expulsion from school.

Of course, as with all students nowadays Ed will need to boost his loan by earning extra cash so he'll still be pestering his agent, Ping for writing opportunities and so it is as we renew our acquaintance with Ed, and trusty companion Elgar, that we find him reimagining a series of children's books and giving them a savvy post-modern twist for a "cool hundred each" whilst trying to keep up with the other students and their love of coffee shop loyalty cards, seminar satisfaction surveys and certain daytime TV programmes.

The regular cast are joined this series by guests including Sylvestra Le Touzel, Nicholas Farrell and Maya Sondhi.

Cast list ep 1

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas
Produced by Dawn Ellis.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b0bbn74f)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b0b69zmf)
27 July 1918 - Cora Gidley

On this day in 1918, it was reported that a quarter of a million Americans had embarked for France, while in Staverley Court, all thoughts are on just one boy.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b0bbn74h)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0bbn74k)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b0bbn74m)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 The Genius of Accidents (b0bc6hkl)
Series 1, CRISPR

Having a fast and easy way to cut out and replace genes could revolutionise areas of biology as diverse as medicine and agriculture. And the discovery of the gene editing tool using CRISPR-cas9 makes that revolution a present reality. But the teams that revealed this gene editing tool piece by piece were not looking for anything to do with genetic engineering: instead they were curious to know more about how bacterial immunity works. Presenter Adam Hart speaks with Professor Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, and Dr Rodolphe Barrangou of North Carolina State University to reveal the story of how scientific curiosity can accidentally change the world.

Producer: Rory Galloway.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0bbt615)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b07m7z0w)
The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine

A new two-part dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's latest No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency book, 'The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine'. Mma Ramotswe and Mma Makutsi return to Radio 4 for a new two-part adventure based on the popular novels set in Bostwana, dramatised by the author.

Episode 2: The Woman Who Walked in Sunshine
Mma Ramotswe is technically on holiday from the Agency but that does not stop her from stepping in to rescue an orphaned boy, or from taking on an important case.

Written and dramatised by Alexander McCall Smith
Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0bbtddp)

Horticultural panel programme.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (b0bbtdkv)
As I Walked Out One Morning in May

Death meets the Lady in this short ghostly story written and narrated by Paul Evans. Inspired by a 19th Century ballad, the death of a witch, local folklore and the sounds of a woodland. The singer is Elizabeth Counsell. Wildlife sound recordings Chris Watson. Produced by Sarah Blunt.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b0bbtftv)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b0bbtftx)

Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b0bbtftz)
Stuart and Kate - A Shared Grief

When Kate's husband suddenly dropped dead, his friends also suffered; they dealt with their grief by supporting Kate and the children. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b0bbn74p)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0bbn74r)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Where's the F in News (b0bbtfv1)
Series 1, Episode 2

An energetic, intelligent female-anchored show with a female panel - using the events, trends and talking points they think should really be top of the news agenda in a series of fresh and funny challenges.

Host Jo Bunting is joined by a panel of women including Sindhu Vee, Felicity Ward, Andi Oliver and MP Jess Philips.

Jo Bunting is a producer and writer of topical comedy and satire, with credits including Have I Got News For You, the Great British Bake Off spin off show An Extra Slice with Jo Brand, and the successful topical chat show That Sunday Night Show presented by Adrian Chiles on ITV. Jo was a guest interviewer on Loose Ends for several years and a panellist on Loose Women.

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0bbtfv3)

Contemporary drama in a rural setting.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b0bbn74t)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0bbtbcq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b0bbtghh)
Heidi Allen MP, Giles Fraser, Chi Onwurah MP, Chloe Westley

Ritula Shah presents political debate from The Parish Church of Saint Mary and Saint Nicolas in Spalding with the Conservative MP Heidi Allen , Giles Fraser priest-in-charge at St Mary's, Newington, near the Elephant and Castle, south London, the Shadow Minister for Industrial Strategy, Science and Innovation Chi Onwurah, and Chloe Westley from the TaxPayers' Alliance.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0bbtghk)

A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b0b69zwc)
23-27 July 1918

The sixth omnibus of Season 14, Needs Must When the Devil Drives, set in Devon, in the week, in 1918, when an outbreak of flu was reported at a PoW camp in Bramley, affecting a third of the 3,000 prisoners.

Cast
Emily Colville ..... Scarlett Brookes
Cathy Lawrence ..... Debbie Korley
Kitty Lumley ..... Ami Metcalf
Howard Argent ..... Gunnar Cauthery
Cora Gidley ..... Joanna Monro
Klaus Hofstadter ..... Atilla Akinci
Hetty Cox ..... Adie Allen
Daniel Marriot ..... Jonathan Bailey
Morris Battley ..... Sean Baker
Gabriel Graham ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Juliet Cavendish ..... Lizzie Bourne
Lauren ..... Lauren Cornelius
Sylvia Graham ..... Joanna David
Stallholder ..... Ryan Early
Moses Wickens ..... Ed Gaughan
Ludwig Huber ..... Marcel Hagen
Isaac Cox ..... James Lailey
Cyrus Colville ..... Anton Lesser
Victor Lumley ..... Joel MacCormack
Hardy Walsh ..... Damien Molony
Mr Buckle ..... Sean Murray
Hector Gidley ..... Brian Protheroe
Susie ..... Susie Riddell
Marieke Argent ..... Olivia Ross
Adeline Lumley ..... Helen Schlesinger
Eli Lawrence ..... Michael Shelford
Effie Taverner ..... Lizzie Stables
Bertram Colville ..... Nick Underwood
Elspeth Taverner ..... Kelly Williams
Connie Cavendish ..... Darcey Brown
Grace Cavendish ..... Grace Doherty
Teddy Lawrence ..... Florence Duncalf
Peter Lumley ..... Beatrice White

Written by Katie Hims
Story-led by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0bbn74w)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0bbtghp)
Clock Dance, Episode 5

By Anne Tyler

A new novel about family and self-discovery by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Tyler.

In today's episode, Willa has spontaneously responded to a request for help. She has travelled to Baltimore to look after her son's ex-girlfriend, who has been shot.

Read by Barbara Barnes

Abridged by Sian Preece

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


FRI 23:00 Woman's Hour (b0bbtghr)
Leadership: Civil Partnership

Lauren Laverne's guests are neuroscientist professor Sophie Scott, tech evangelist doctor Sue Black and journalist and academic Zoe Strimpel.


FRI 23:30 A Good Read (b08tcg6p)
Nathan Caton and Adam Rutherford

Harriett Gilbert talks favourite books with comedian Nathan Caton and science presenter and geneticist Adam Rutherford.
Leviathan by Paul Auster is Adam's favourite novel, in part because little happens in it..
Black and Blue: how racism, drugs and cancer almost destroyed me by Paul Canoville, the first ever black first-team player for Chelsea FC, is Nathan's recommendation.
And presenter Harriett picks I'll Sell You A Dog by the Mexican writer Juan Pablo Villalobos.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b0bbtgn7)
Judith and Penny - Vive la Difference

Friends share their experience of losing their husbands and making the best of being alone in life. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b0bbnzzx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b0bbnzzx)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b0bbphc5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b0bbphc5)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b0bbr044)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0bbr044)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b0bbslsw)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b0bbslsw)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b0bbtbcq)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b0bbtbcq)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b0bbphcf)

A Good Read 23:30 FRI (b08tcg6p)

A Life's Work 09:00 WED (b0bbq3vp)

A Life's Work 21:30 WED (b0bbq3vp)

A Place Called Home 23:00 MON (b0901fqp)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b0b9zvtf)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b0b9zvtf)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0bbtghk)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b0b9wcdr)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0bbp9qh)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0b9v79b)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b0b9zgcz)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b0bbtghh)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0bbmthw)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b0bbn71r)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b0bbn71r)

Believe It! 19:15 SUN (b08lhg9p)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0bbndyn)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0bbndyn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0bbpb82)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b0bbq1gw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b0bbrdx7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b0bbt61c)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0bbtghp)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b0b9zfwn)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b0bbnz20)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b0bbnz20)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b0bbq1ly)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b0bbq1ly)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0bbr042)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0bbr042)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b0bbslst)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b0bbslst)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b0bbtbcn)

Bringing Up Britain 09:00 MON (b0bbnz03)

Bringing Up Britain 21:30 MON (b0bbnz03)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0bbn6m9)

Bunk Bed 23:00 WED (b0bbrdx9)

Caribritish: Children of Windrush 23:30 WED (b0b53b00)

Caribritish: Children of Windrush 23:30 THU (b0b5xh1t)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b0bbslsy)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0bbnlyz)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0bbnlyz)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b0bbmnn2)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b0bbnrcr)

Drama 14:15 MON (b0bbp79r)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b07m5jw4)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0bbr3zl)

Drama 14:15 THU (b07m7qhz)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b07m7z0w)

Economics 101 11:00 FRI (b0bbtbcs)

Ed Reardon's Week 11:30 FRI (b07wt5tq)

Enlightenment After Dark 21:30 TUE (b092t33j)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0b9v78k)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0bbn6r9)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0bbn6v6)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0bbn6y9)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b0bbn719)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0bbn747)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b0b9zvtc)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b0bbtftx)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b0bbq1gr)

From Our Home Correspondent 13:30 SUN (b0bbnlz3)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0b9v78v)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0bbn6ry)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0bbn6vs)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0bbn6z0)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0bbn71y)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b0bbn74t)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b0b9zg8l)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0bbtddp)

Great Exhibition of the North 11:30 THU (b0bbsqvz)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b0b69zwc)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b0b69ybp)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b0b69yg9)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b0b69zht)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b0b69zkj)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b0b69zmf)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (b0b9wbfb)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b0bbp9q9)

In Their Element 21:00 WED (b0bbrc0r)

In Therapy 21:45 SAT (b081qxpv)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0bbn6vv)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b0bbq1gt)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b0bbq1gt)

Inside the World of the Frequent Flyer 16:00 TUE (b09tcnm5)

Jack & Millie 11:30 WED (b0bbr048)

Jake Yapp's Media Circus 18:30 TUE (b0bbq1gm)

Joe Lycett's Obsessions 18:30 THU (b0bbt613)

Josh Howie's Losing It 18:30 WED (b07sz52p)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b0b9zvt9)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b0bbtftv)

Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island 15:30 SAT (b0b9wnmc)

Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island 11:30 TUE (b0bbphc9)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0b9v79q)

Making History 15:30 TUE (b0bbphcc)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0b9v782)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0bbn6lj)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0bbn6qv)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0bbn6tw)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0bbn6xz)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0bbn70y)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0bbn73x)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0bbml6x)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0bbml6x)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b0bbn6yr)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b0bbr3zs)

Natural Histories: Short Stories 19:45 SUN (b06rxgtf)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b0b9249m)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b0bbphc7)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0b9v78c)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0bbn6ls)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0bbn6r7)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0bbn6v4)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0bbn6y7)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0bbn717)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0bbn745)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0bbn6lv)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b0b9v78y)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b0bbn6mf)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b0bbn6rk)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b0bbn6vd)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b0bbn6yh)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b0bbn71h)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b0bbn74f)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0b9v78h)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0bbn6m1)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0bbn6m7)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0b9v79v)

News 13:00 SAT (b0b9v794)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0bbnlyq)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0bbnrct)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b0bbnrct)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b0b9z6bf)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b0bbsrpp)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0b9v79g)

PM 17:00 MON (b0bbn6rt)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0bbn6vn)

PM 17:00 WED (b0bbn6yw)

PM 17:00 THU (b0bbn71t)

PM 17:00 FRI (b0bbn74p)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0bbn6mt)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b0b9vgdx)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0bbnrcw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b0bbml6n)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b0bcr156)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0bcsk4f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b0bcsktv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0bcskvy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b0bcskx1)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b0bbmp89)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b0bbmp89)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0bbmp89)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b0bbnlys)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0bbnlys)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0bbnlys)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0b9v78q)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0b9v79s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0b9v786)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0bbn6ln)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0bbn6r3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0bbn6v0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0bbn6y3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0bbn712)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0bbn741)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0b9v784)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0b9v789)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0b9v79j)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0bbn6ll)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0bbn6lq)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0bbn6mm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0bbn6r1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0bbn6r5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0bbn6ty)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0bbn6v2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0bbn6y1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0bbn6y5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0bbn710)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0bbn714)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0bbn73z)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0bbn743)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b0bbtdkv)

Sindhustan 23:15 WED (b0bbrdxf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0b9v79n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0bbn6mr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0bbn6rw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0bbn6vq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0bbn6yy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0bbn71w)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0bbn74r)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0bbn6lx)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0bbnlyv)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0bbn6m3)

Sweet Reason 09:00 THU (b0bbslsr)

Sweet Reason 21:30 THU (b0bbslsr)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b0b9wbf6)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b0bbp79t)

The Anatomy Lesson 16:00 MON (b0bbp7cc)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0bbn6mc)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0bbnrcy)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0bbnrcy)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0bbp9qc)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0bbp9qc)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b0bbq1gp)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b0bbq1gp)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0bbr3zq)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0bbr3zq)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0bbt615)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0bbt615)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0bbtfv3)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b0b9zbpq)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b0bbt619)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b0bbt617)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b0bbt611)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0bbnlz1)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0bbnlz1)

The Genius of Accidents 13:45 MON (b0bbp79p)

The Genius of Accidents 13:45 TUE (b0bc6hqx)

The Genius of Accidents 13:45 WED (b0bc6hf4)

The Genius of Accidents 13:45 THU (b0bc6hh0)

The Genius of Accidents 13:45 FRI (b0bc6hkl)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b0bbp7sr)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b0bbp7sr)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b0bbml6s)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b0bbml6s)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0bbnlz5)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b0bbr046)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b0bbtftz)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b0bbtgn7)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b0bbn6yt)

The Missing Hancocks 23:00 THU (b08k2ctk)

The Moth Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b0bbnydf)

The Poet and the Echo 00:30 SUN (b0b9zg8n)

The Quanderhorn Xperimentations 11:30 MON (b0bbp001)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b0b9951v)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b0b995kj)

The Silence and the Scream 20:00 MON (b0bbp9qf)

The Silence and the Scream 11:00 WED (b0bbp9qf)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b0bbnzzz)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0bbml6v)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0bbn6mk)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0bbn6s0)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0bbn6vx)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0bbn6z2)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0bbn721)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b0bbn74w)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b0b9yx40)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0bbr3zn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0bbn6s2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b0bbn6w2)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0bbml6q)

Today 06:00 MON (b0bbn6rf)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0bbn6v8)

Today 06:00 WED (b0bbn6yc)

Today 06:00 THU (b0bbn71c)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0bbn749)

Tommies 21:00 SAT (b05vx1bv)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b0bbnlyx)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b09by75m)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b09fjk67)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b020tr6m)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b0952pgw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04t0n4w)

Unforgettable 09:30 WED (b07pj826)

Unforgettable 09:30 THU (b07pjkht)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b0b9v78m)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b0b9v792)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b0b9v79l)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0bbn6lz)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0bbn6m5)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0bbn6mh)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0bbn6mp)

Weather 05:56 MON (b0bbn6rc)

Weather 12:57 MON (b0bbn6rp)

Weather 12:56 TUE (b0bbn6vj)

Weather 12:57 WED (b0bbn6ym)

Weather 12:57 THU (b0bbn71m)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b0bbn74k)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0bbn6mw)

Where's the F in News 12:30 SAT (b0b9zg8s)

Where's the F in News 18:30 FRI (b0bbtfv1)

Why I Changed My Mind 20:45 WED (b0bbr7xd)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0b9v79d)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0bbn6rh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0bbn6vb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0bbn6yf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b0bbn71f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0bbn74c)

Woman's Hour 23:00 FRI (b0bbtghr)

World Questions from Zimbabwe 17:00 SUN (b0bdb70g)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0bbn6rr)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b0bbn6vl)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0bbn6yp)

World at One 13:00 THU (b0bbn71p)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b0bbn74m)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b0bbn6rm)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b0bbn6vg)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b0bbn6yk)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b0bbn71k)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b0bbn74h)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b0b9v78f)