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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 30 JUNE 2018

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0b7cjnl)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b0b7hk4t)
In Montparnasse, Episode 5

Sue Roe charts the birth of Surrealism in this racy, rackety Paris quartier:

Salvador Dali arrives in Paris with Luis Bunuel, they will release the infamous film Un Chien Andalou. After that, Dali meets Gala Eluard and romance follows. And, finally, the Surrealist legacy beyond 1930..

Reader Tracy Ann Oberman

Producer Duncan Minshull.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b7cjnp)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b7cjnr)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b7cjnt)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0b7cjnw)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0b7hxn6)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Ann Easter.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b0b7cjny)

A listener closes his bookshop after 40 years on the high street. We have an update on the ashes Sheila has been keeping in her broom cupboard. Plus Zeb Soanes has Your News. Get in touch ipm@bbc.co.uk or @bbcipm

Presented by Luke Jones and produced by Kate Collins.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0b7cjp1)

The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b0b7hf86)
Humphry Repton and his Red Books

On the bicentenary of Humphry Repton's death Helen Mark finds out all about the landscape gardener and his red books. Humphry Repton is the last English landscape designers of the eighteenth century, often regarded as the successor to Capability Brown. He created over 400 designs across Britain and Ireland and it was Repton who coined the phrase 'landscape gardener'.
His trademark was the red book in which he kept detailed designs and sketches. However, as Helen discovers in Norfolk where several of his designs are, the red book for his very first commission Catton Park is missing. She meets Gill Renouf, Chair of Friends of Catton Park, can she shed any light? And just how important were these red book to find out Helen goes to Sheringham Park, Repton's favourite work designed towards the end of his career and talks to Sally Bate, Vice Chair of Norfolk Garden Trust. Finally, onwards to Cromer, Northrepps where Helen meets Simon Gurney who has something very special to show Helen -the red book for Northrepps which Simon has been using to restore his Repton landscape.
So maybe with all this focus on Humphry Repton on his bicentenary year which the Garden Trust is leading, perhaps the mystery of the missing Catton Park red book might finally be solved.
The producer is Perminder Khatkar.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0b7cjp9)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0b7cjpc)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0b845dw)

News and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0b7cjpf)
Bryn Terfel, Judy Murray, Frank Gardner, Rai Rafiq, Edwina Brocklesby

Aasmah Mir and the Rev Richard Coles host and perform with opera star Bryn Terfel. He's appearing in the title role in Falstaff at the Royal Opera House.

Edwina "Irongran" Brocklesby, tells how she took up marathons, triathlons and Iron Man racing in her 50s. She's still going strong at 75 and wants to spread the message that exercise helps physical and mental health whatever your age.

BBC Security Correspondent Frank Gardner talks about his latest thriller, Ultimatum, set in Iran.

Rai Rafiq tells how she came from Zanzibar as a child, to become co-host of one of the UK's most respected podcasts - Mostly Lit.

And to mark the start of Wimbledon fortnight, Judy Murray gives track she inherited and the song she'll pass on to the next generation in Inheritance Tracks.

Also: Edwina Brocklesby's grandmother - Nan - cooked for Winston and Clementine Churchill at No 10 Downing Street during World War Two. Her mousseline pudding was almost the death of her and Britain's wartime leader during the Blitz. We want to hear stories about your grandmother - inspiring, heroic or just funny.
EMAIL saturdaylive@bbc.co.uk
TWEET #bbcsaturdaylive
TEXT: 84844 (Texts will be charged at your standard message rate. Check with your network provider for exact costs.)

PRESENTERS: Aasmah Mir & Rev Richard Coles
PRODUCER: Paul Waters.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0b7cdnz)
Series 21, Bournemouth

Jay Rayner and his culinary panel kick off the series in Bournemouth. Dr Annie Gray, Tim Hayward, Sophie Wright and Tim Anderson answer the questions from the audience.

One of the oldest British blueberry farms is in Bournemouth and, with the help of the current plantation manager, the panelists delve into the best ways to use the juicy, seasonal fruit.

With expert advice from Una McCormack, they discuss culinary influences in Tolkien's writing and the best food scenes in the Hobbit. They also help audience members with culinary queries ranging from how to reduce mess when frying to the best way to use an allotment glut of strawberries.

Produced by Miranda Hinkley
Assistant Producer: Hester Cant

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0b845dy)

Peter Oborne of the Daily Mail asks if the brakes are coming off on public spending. Should the Speaker, John Bercow, stand down? What's it like to resign as a minister? And words that politicians wish they'd never said.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0b7cjph)

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b0b7cjpk)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0b845f0)
Hope for victims of push payment bank fraud

More bank fraud victims might be able to take their unresolved complaints to the Financial Ombudsman under proposals put out for consultation this week by the regulator the FCA. It would apply in cases where people are tricked into transferring money to accounts controlled by criminals and is known as 'push payment fraud.' At the moment they don't have the same rights as other fraud victims because they have authorised the payments. Guest Hannah Nixon, Managing Director, Payment Systems Regulator.

An earmarked tax fund is one of the recommendations from a joint select committee report into the long-term funding of adult social care in England. Health and Social Care Committee member Andrew Selous outlines why a 'Social Care Premium' is needed, while Gemma Tetlow, Chief Economist at the Institute for Government, highlights the issues that can arise when taxes are ring-fenced.

A study claims that owning a home is now cheaper than renting in every part of the UK. However there are reasons why not all renters who want to buy will be able to secure a mortgage. Guest: Graham Sellar, Head of Mortgage Business Development for Santander Mortgages which compiled the research.


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (b0b7hxfl)
Series 18, Episode 4

The topical satirical show that mixes political vituperation with media mauling and celebrity savaging.

Britain tries to cope with an onslaught of good sporting news and relentlessly pleasant weather. And explores the new ways in which Boris Johnson manages to disappear at crucial moments.

The series is written by Private Eye writers Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, together with Tom Coles, Ed Amsden, Sarah Campbell, Laurence Howarth, James Bugg, Laura Major, Max Davis and others.

The series stars Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis MacLeod, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey.

A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0b7cjpw)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0b7cjpy)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b0b7hpqm)
Sir Alan Duncan MP, Liam Halligan, Gina Miller, Baroness Smith of Basildon

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Redborne Upper School and Community College in Ampthill in Bedfordshire with Europe Minister Sir Alan Duncan MP, Telegraph columnist Liam Halligan, businesswoman Gina Miller, and Shadow Leader of the House of Lords Baroness Smith of Basildon.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0b7cjq0)

Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b081jn4t)
The Thrill of Love

Maxine Peake plays Ruth Ellis, the last woman to be hanged in Britain.

Starring alongside a cast that includes Siobhan Finneran and Joe Armstrong, Amanda Whittington's hit stage transfer imagines the role played by the women close to Ruth during the months between Ruth's murder of her lover David Blakely and her subsequent death by hanging.

Framed with interviews and laced with the music of Billie Holiday, this is an intimate, evocative and thought provoking drama directed by Kate Chapman.

Writer Amanda Whittington
Director Kate Chapman
Producer Justine Potter
Executive Producer Melanie Harris
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Music by Billie Holiday

A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Tales From the Stave (b0b7f614)
Series 17, Debussy: La Mer

Claude Debussy, who died a hundred years ago, has often been described as an impressionist composer. If that label has any validity then it's best applied to his orchestral masterpiece La Mer. Completed in 1905 it's three movements are the composer's attempt to capture the impact of the shifting power of the sea. The minutely detailed and busy manuscripts are held at the Bibliotheque Nationale de France and Frances Fyfield and her team including the leading French conductors Francois Xavier Roth and Brian Schembri, along with Professor Barbara Kelly are given the chance to see it by the library's head of music Mathias Auclair.
The astonishing precision of the penmanship and the attention to detail which goes into creating the sweep and impressionistic sensations of waves, wind and spray are alive on every page.

Producer: Tom Alban.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0b7cjq2)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Celebrating women and activism, Author Lore Segal, Teenagers' partners staying over.

Celebrating women and activism. In a poll, conducted by ComRes for Woman's Hour we asked you about your attitudes to activism, campaigning and public life. Today we hear from three women activists, Mary Barton an animal rights campaigner, Grace Campbell co-founder of the Pink Protest and Harriet MacKenzie-Williams an anti-fracking campaigner about what motivates them and how far they would be willing to go.

We look at the Truth Project set up by the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse. We hear from the journalist Shiori Ito who went public with rape allegations last year in Japan about why she wants change the culture there.

Next month Zimbabwe has its first election since Robert Mugabe was forced out of power last November. Only a third of current MPs are women, is this an opportunity for more women to enter the political sphere?

Plus, how do you get rid of 'stuff' that had sentimental value to a deceased partner without feeling guilt? Lore Segal tells us about her autobiographical novel 'Other People's Houses' about how she fled the Nazi's aged just 10 on the Kindertransport bound for Britain.

And what do you do when your teenager asks if their boyfriend or girlfriend can stay overnight?

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Beverley Purcell

Guest' Emma Lewis
Guest; Dru Sharpling
Guest; Bryony Farrant
Guest; Mary Barton
Guest; Grace Campbell
Guest; Harriet MacKenzie-Williams
Guest; Roslyn Henry
Guest; Susannah Walker
Guest; Shiori Ito
Guest; Lore Segal
Guest; Shingai Nyoka
Guest; Panashe Chigumadzi.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0b7cjq4)
Saturday PM

Luke Jones with coverage and analysis of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b0b7rnjq)
Should CEOs have term limits?

In some countries politicians have fixed term limits. What would happen if the same principle applied to CEOs? On average bosses in the UK stay for just under six years. But founder chief executives stay much longer. Evan Davis and guests discuss whether chief executives know when their time is up?

Guests:

Martin Gilbert, co-ceo, Aberdeen Standard Investments.
Margaret Heffernan, author and entrepreneur
Catherine Bright, a leadership consultant with Spencer Stuart.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0b7cjqc)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0b7cjqf)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b7cjqh)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0b7cjqk)
Barry Humphries, Michael Palin, Kelli O' Hara, Cherrelle Skeete, Calypso Rose, Dinosaur, Nikki Bedi, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Barry Humphries, Michael Palin, Kelli O'Hara and Cherrelle Skeete for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Calypso Rose and Dinosaur.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b0b845h0)
Matteo Salvini

Since Matteo Salvini was sworn in as Italy's Interior Minister his controversial stance on immigration, Roma people and the European Union has made the headlines.

The press has dubbed him the European Donald Trump and commentators say he could pose a threat to the existence of the European Union as we know it.

This week he was in the news again, for refusing to allow another migrant rescue ship to dock in Italy and for his radical proposals to crack down on migration.

But his perfect day would be a much quieter one, in the Italian mountains with his TV host partner and a fishing rod in hand.

Presenter: Helen Grady
Producer: Clare Spencer
Researcher: Bethan Head
Editor: Emma Rippon.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0b7cjqm)
Leave No Trace, Rip It Up, One For Sorrow, Tim Winton, Bedtime Stories For The End Of The World

Leave No Trace is a film about love and survival. A father and daughter living in idyllic remote Oregon woodlands come up against authorities who decide their life can't continue as it has done . Directed by Debra Granik (Winter's Bone)
The story of the evolution of Scotland's pop music scene is told in a new exhibition; Rip It Up at The National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.
One For Sorrow is a new play at London's Royal Court Theatre by Cordelia Lynn, about a family who invite a stranger into their home following a terrorist attack
Australian novelist Tim Winton's new novel The Shepherd's Hut is about a dysfunctional 15 year old boy on the run when he believes he'll be convicted for his father's death
A new podcast - Bedtime Stories For The End Of The World - invites some of the UK's top poets to re-tell some of their favourite myths, fairytales and legends.

Anne McElvoy's guests are Patrice Lawrence, Emma Jane Unsworth and Peter Ross. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0b845s5)
UK Confidential: The Birth of the NHS

On the 70th anniversary of the NHS, Martha Kearney offers a fresh perspective on its creation as she opens up the files held at The National Archives and delves into the secret government papers of the time.

Home Intelligence reports were compiled from the censorship of the post, letters to the BBC and conversations in pubs as reported by regional intelligence officers. They urged ministers to reflect public fears of any "shilly-shallying" over the implementation of the Beveridge Report in 1942.

Verbatim notes from cabinet discussions divulge the tension within the war time Conservative dominated coalition government over its public stance on the report: "We didn't come into this Government on the basis only of dealing with War."

In 1945, after a Labour landslide at the first post-war General Election, the new left-wing firebrand health minister Aneurin Bevan ushers in major changes, while pushing back against cautious cabinet colleagues. "Here is our chance to do something big," he says, "Are we to sacrifice that chance for fear of the parish pump?"

After a very public spat between Bevan and the British Medical Association, the NHS is born on 5th July 1948. However, funding challenges immediately befell the service and the cabinet's attempts to deal with it are revealed: "We did stop one Dane from getting an artificial leg for nothing."

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Tommies (b04nrwp2)
11 November 1914

By Nick Warburton.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

Through it all, we follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Indira Varma, Lee Ross and Sam Rix star in this story, as Mickey finds himself at Ypres with the exhausted British Expeditionary Force, and no one to defend a vital breach in line, at Nonne Bosschen copse.

Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: Jonquil Panting.


SAT 21:45 The Listening Project (b08lk3jr)
The Listening Project One Thousand, Psychological Insights

Susie Orbach, who will deliver The Listening Project Lecture at the British Library, explores the archive's insights into contemporary emotional life, in the company of Fi Glover. Part of a celebration of the delivery of the thousandth conversation to the British Library and examination of the value of this unique archive from the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, now and in the future.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0b7cjqp)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b0b7f390)
Margaret MacMillan, War and Humanity

Is war an essential part of being human? Are we destined to fight? That is the central question that historian Professor Margaret Macmillan addresses in five lectures recorded in the UK, Lebanon and in Canada. In her series, called The Mark of Cain, she will explore the tangled history of war and society and our complicated feelings towards it and towards those who fight.

She begins by asking when wars first broke out. Did they start with the appearance of homo sapiens, or when human beings first organised themselves into larger groupings such as tribes, clans, or nations? She assesses how wars bring about change in society and, conversely, how social and political change influences how wars start and are fought. And she discusses that dark paradox of war: that it can bring benefits and progress.

The programme is recorded before an audience at the BBC Radio Theatre in London and includes a question and answer session chaired by Anita Anand.

Margaret MacMillan is emeritus professor of international history at Oxford University and professor of history at the University of Toronto. She says: "We like to think of war as an aberration, as the breakdown of the normal state of peace. This is comforting but wrong. War is deeply woven into the history of human society. Wherever we look in the past, no matter where or how far back we go, groups of people have organised themselves to protect their own territory or ways of life and, often, to attack those of others. Over the centuries we have deplored the results and struggled to tame war, even abolish it, while we have also venerated the warrior and talked of the nobility and grandeur of war. We all, as human beings, have something to say about war."

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Hugh Levinson.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b0b7dlw4)
Series 8, Newcastle University

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from Newcastle University with specialist subjects including Physiological Sciences, Sociology and Media and Communication and questions ranging from Bach and benzene rings to Mills and Boon and Mick Jagger.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Merton College Oxford, Dundee, Hertfordshire, Sheffield and Brunel.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b086l9h6)
Series 8, Tom Pickard and Denise Riley

New year, new poems, veteran poets: Tom Pickard and Denise Riley. Paul Farley opens up the Echo Chamber. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 01 JULY 2018

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0b85lng)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (b0b7hq2z)
The Gleaning

In Alison MacLeod's specially commissioned short story past and present are intimately linked under Brighton's summer skies by the English painter, John Constable. Tristan Sturrock reads.

Alison MacLeod is a novelist and short story writer. Her most recent collection is All the Beloved Ghosts. Her most recent novel, Unexploded was long-listed for the 2013 Man-Booker Prize for Fiction. Her short fiction has been awarded The Society of Authors' Olive Cook Award and shortlisted for The BBC National Short Story Award and The Sunday Times EFG International Short Story Award. MacLeod is Professor of Contemporary Fiction at the University of Chichester, UK.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b85lnp)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b85lp3)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b85lpk)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0b85lpp)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0b86470)
All Saints Church, East Meon

Church bells from All Saints Church, East Meon.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b0b845h0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0b85lpt)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0b85lpy)
It's a Secret

Is a secret always dishonest? Is transparency always advisable? Can keeping a confidence lead to greater openness? Mark Tully looks at the positive and negative power of secrets, in conversation with the physicist Dr Patricia Lewis, Research Director for International Security at the think tank Chatham House.

Mark explores the subject further through the music of Camille Saint-Saens and Geoffrey Burgon, and with readings from WH Auden and AE Housman.

The readers are Paapa Essiedu and Emily Bowker.

Producer: Frank Stirling
Presenter: Mark Tully

A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 The Living World (b0b86472)
Blackbirds

Possibly our most familiar songster,a blackbird singing high up on a rooftop is one of the real pleasures of living cheek by jowl with the natural world. These woodland edge members of the thrush family have over centuries become a garden specialist, enriching a morning walk or evening spent after work listening to the mellifluous tunes of the male blackbird. For this Living World nature presenter Lindsey Chapman relives the magic Lionel Kelleway discovered in the Hopetoun Estate near Edinburgh in Scotland.

Beginning early in the morning, Lionel meets up with Will Cresswell a behavioural ecologist and discuss what is going on by this competitive singing between male blackbirds. In spring through to early summer, blackbirds can sing throughout the day and, which is not common in song birds, sing into the night. This energy sapping process is to proclaim their territorial rights to any other birds attempting to move in. Of course the song is only the beginning of the fascinating process of the breeding cycle and the creation of next generation of blackbirds. Along the way to unpick this story Lionel and Will look for evidence of nests to discuss breeding success, the risk the eggs and chicks face from predation, and why territories are important.

In this episode, Lindsey Chapman will bring this story up to date since this programme was first broadcast, offering some recent updates into one of our most familiar and recognisable birds.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0b85lq0)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0b85lq2)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0b85lq4)
Chester Mystery Plays, Chief rabbi, Is the NHS a religion?

Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b0b86474)
Faith & Belief Forum

Mamataj Begum, a beneficiary of the charity Faith & Belief Forum, makes the Radio 4 Appeal on their behalf.

Registered Charity Number: 1173369
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Faith & Belief Forum'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Faith & Belief Forum'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0b85lq6)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0b85lqd)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0b86476)
O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing: The Hymns of Charles Wesley

"Methodism was born in song", so begins the Preface to the 1933 Methodist Hymn Book. The ability to communicate vast theological concepts in an appealing and accessible manner through hymns has firmly established hymnody as a central tenet of the Methodist movement. And this all began with one of the earliest leaders, Charles Wesley, arguably one of the greatest hymn-writers of all time with more than 6000 hymns to his name.

In live worship from Halifax Minster, Halifax Choral Society brings new life to some of Charles Wesley's lesser known or forgotten texts as well as his more familiar hymns. The choir, directed by John Pryce-Jones celebrates its 200th anniversary this year and is accompanied by organist David Houlder.

The service is led by the vicar, the Revd Canon Hilary Barber and the preacher is the Revd Julie Lunn, Lecturer in Practical and Social Theology at Nazarene Theological College, Manchester.

Producer: Katharine Longworth.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b0b7hpqp)
The Past

Will Self argues that the past is not "a foreign country". He says we often have delusions about the past because of our "failure to grasp how our present shapes our hindsight".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b0b866zv)
Lindsey Chapman Tweet of the Day Takeover, 1 of 2

With a life long passion for the natural world, actor, television and radio presenter Lindsey Chapman begins her two week take over of the Tweet of the Day airwaves. As a BBC Unsprung presenter before choosing some of her favourite birds from the extensive back catalogue, Lindsey recalls how she is absolutely fascinated by the symbiotic relationship between the natural world and our own cultural and artistic heritage. Birds are a constant reminder of how these two worlds overlap, from the musicality of the dawn chorus to the brushstrokes of a swift wheeling by on the wind.

Lindsey introduces the first five species she has chosen for the listener this week, from alpine swift to icterine warbler, here on Radio 4, from Monday through to Friday at 05.58.

You can hear more thoughts on Lindsey's passion for wildlife, including her love of gannets in the Tweet of the Week omnibus podcast, which can be found on the Radio 4 website, or can be found on the BBC iplayer Radio App by searching search for Tweet of the Week.

Producer : Andrew Dawes.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0b85lqj)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0b85lql)

Anisha drops a bombshell, and Kate causes uproar.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0b866zx)
Guy Singh-Watson

Guy Singh-Watson is an organic farmer and founder of Riverford, a major British supplier of organic vegetables through a box delivery scheme. Born in 1960 and the youngest of five children, his parents became tenant farmers in Devon in 1951. He describes himself as "a proper little farm boy", and spent his free time outside, clambering up trees, catching rabbits, rearing his own pig and helping on the farm.

Severely dyslexic, he disliked school, but thanks to an aptitude for performing well in exams, he won a place at Oxford University to read Agricultural and Forestry Science, graduating with a First. He briefly joined the family farm, but left to become a management consultant in London and then New York, returning to the farm in 1986. He started cultivating vegetables on three acres of land with a wheelbarrow and a borrowed tractor, and found his niche, moving from three to 18 to 50 acres quite rapidly.

Initially, Guy sold to supermarkets, but became convinced that there must be a better way of getting his produce to customers, and set up a veg box scheme in 1993. His company now delivers to around 50,000 homes a week and had a turnover of £56.7 million in 2017.
Guy has four grown-up children from his first marriage and an eight-year-old step-daughter from his second marriage to Geetie Singh.

Presenter: Kirsty Young
Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b0b85lqq)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b0b7dq0g)
Series 69, Episode 1

The 69th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the City Varieties Music Hall in Leeds where regulars Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Tony Hawks and Caroline Quentin, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith.

It is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0b86702)
The Eatwell Guide

Sheila Dillon questions whether the government's Eatwell Plate that's issued to the medical profession and used as public guidance for a balanced diet could actually be harming us. An increasing number of medics are abandoning the plate because they say it still promotes dangerously high levels of starchy carbohydrates and processed foods that contain high levels of the sugars that cause many of today's chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra author of the Pioppi diet is campaigning to change the official advice and says that a healthy diet and lifestyle are the key to reducing disease and the need for medication, but he says that vested interests from the food and pharmaceutical industries make some of these healthier choices more difficult to achieve. Dr David Unwin is a GP who has seen a huge spike in patients presenting with Type 2 Diabetes since he began practicing forty years ago. He advises lifestyle changes that include abandoning the Eatwell Guide and cutting out the starchy carbohydrates, processed foods and sugars and has seen a reversal of the disease in a significant number of patients.
Sheila also visits Tameside Hospital in Greater Manchester which is overhauling its canteen food and vending machine produce to reduce processed carbohydrates and sugary drinks and snacks. In celebration of the 70th anniversary of the NHS the hospital will go completely sugar free on July 4th.
Is it time to revise the Eatwell Guide and what will it take to do so?

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0b85lqv)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0b85lqx)

Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Divine Power: The Search for the Dalai Lama (b0b86bpq)

Cambridge anthropologist David Sneath examines the past, present and future of the institution of the Dalai Lama. He reports from the Himalayan foothills of India, home of the exiled Tibetan leader.

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet is one of the world's most famous religious figures. He has tens of thousands of followers around the world, even though his image and name is banned in his native Tibet.

As the Dalai Lama prepares to celebrate his 83rd birthday, David Sneath travels to Dharamsala in the foothills of the Himalayas in India. He meets the present Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, in his residence overlooking the plains of India and talks to leading members of the Tibetan community in exile.

David explores the colourful history of the Dalai Lama from the 14th Century. He describes the significance of Mongolia in the creation of the Dalai Lamas. He looks at the traditional role of the Dalai Lamas inside Tibet and considers the extraordinary transformation of the current Dalai Lama, as he became the rallying point for exiled Tibetans following the Chinese military takeover of Tibet in the late 1950s.

The present Dalai Lama has wide-ranging interests - from environmental issues to women's rights. He takes a passionate interest in science and in promoting secular ethics and interfaith dialogue around the world. He is famed for his humour and for his work as a scholar monk with a rigorous and sometimes austere spiritual regime.

There is much speculation on whether the title of Dalai Lama might end with the current incumbent. He has both hinted that there will be another Dalai Lama and also suggested that the title might finish with him. Either way, the death of the present Dalai Lama would almost certainly cause anguish around the world and provoke new conflict with China. The Chinese controversially chose their own version of Tibet's second most prominent religious figure - the Panchen Lama - even though the Tibetans had already selected someone else. That Tibetan choice, Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, has mysteriously disappeared.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0b7hq2x)
Culpepper Community Garden

Eric and the panel are at the Culpepper Community Garden in Islington, North London. Anne Swithinbank, Christine Walkden and Matt Biggs answer the audience questions.

This week the panellists suggest fruiting plants that might not be as tempting to light-fingered passers-by as strawberries, offer reasons why one audience member's rosemary plants keep dying, and reel off some plants that would be happy on a hot, windy roof top.

They also advise on best-practice for sharpening tools, diagnose a struggling Wisteria, and help out questioners having difficulties with pigeons and moss in their gardens.

Anne Swithinbank visits the V&A Museum in London to investigate the long-standing connection between horticulture and fashion.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0b86bpv)
Omnibus - Health Care

Fi Glover introduces conversations about treatment, between patients and between nurses, and a reflection on healthcare before the NHS, from the first NHS-born baby and her sister in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b0b86bpx)
Castle of the Hawk, Hawk Rising

Hawk Rising: In 13th century Brugg on the Swiss border, a mysterious stranger arrives at the Castle of the Hawk. He is to be tutor to the son of Duke Rudolf of Habsburg but soon finds himself unwillingly joining the Prussian Crusade. Rudolf is determined to be elected Holy Roman Emperor, and for his son to follow suit, but that needs the support of the Pope and the Pope supports the crusade.

Mike Walker's epic chronicle of the Habsburg dynasty which was to rule most of Europe - as well as much of the New World - for 600 years.

Sound design Nigel Lewis
Director Alison Hindell

BBC Cymru Wales production.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b0b86bpz)
Colm Tóibín - Brooklyn

Colm Tóibín discusses his best-selling novel Brooklyn with James Naughtie and a group of invited readers.

Brooklyn follows the fortunes of a young Irish woman Eilis Lacey as she leaves home to make a new life in 1950s New York. Arriving in a crowded lodging house in Brooklyn, Eilis can only be reminded of what she has sacrificed and left behind. Just as her homesickness abates and she takes tentative steps towards friendship, and perhaps something more, Eilis receives news which sends her back to Ireland where she will be confronted by a terrible dilemma.

In Bookclub Colm Tóibín talks about the ongoing emigration from Ireland, especially at times of economic downturn and how Irish emigrants view home; and he notes how the tides have turned with the country receiving new immigrants from the eastern countries of the European Union in recent years.

Brooklyn was nominated for the Man Booker Prize and won the Costa Novel Prize in 2009.

This edition continues a summer of editions celebrating Bookclub's 20th anniversary.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Colm Tóibín
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

August's Bookclub choice : The Lives of Others by Neel Mukherjee (2014).


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0b86bq1)
Henry Normal

Roger McGough is joined by writer, poet and BAFTA winning TV and film producer, Henry Normal, who shares a selection of his favourite poems from the archive of listeners' requests. Henry talks about the moment he began writing poetry as a young man after seeing an inspiring performance by an emerging young poet named, Roger McGough. Reunited here they share their love of poetry. Henry's choices include Adrain Henri, Jackie Kay, Carol Ann Duffy and Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Producer: Sarah Addezio.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b0b7fj3g)
Falling Short - Fake News and Financial Markets

If fake news is poisoning public debate, then what is it doing to the financial markets?

Short-sellers - investors who bet on a company's shares falling, not rising- have a mixed reputation. For some they play a vital role, exposing weak companies - and can make big profits as a result. But others accuse them of using fake information to deliberately damage otherwise healthy businesses.

File on 4 looks into the hidden world of the short sellers, the researchers who give them the information to make their bets and the companies who fall victim to what they publish. Are the shorters overstepping the stock market's rules on fairness and transparency?

Reporter: Geoff White
Producer: Rob Cave
Editor: Gail Champion.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b0b845h0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0b85lqz)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0b85lr1)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b85lr7)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0b85lr9)
Liz Barclay

In this week's programme we feature artists of all sorts... landscape gardeners, painters, ephemeral artists working with sugar and musicians from classical composer Claude Debussy to the amazing Grace Jones.
We celebrate the NHS at 70, enjoy drama in high places and sneak in some enthusiastic football commentators. You may have missed it but apparently the reigning champions are out of the World Cup!

Producer: Kay Whyld
Production Coordinator: Helen Surtees.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0b86bq3)

Jennifer struggles to keep the peace, and Ruth takes the plunge.


SUN 19:15 Gaby's Talking Pictures (b0b86bq5)
Series 1, Episode 4

Gaby Roslin hosts the funny, entertaining film quiz with impressions by Alistair McGowan and Ronni Ancona. This week, team captains John Thomson and Ellie Taylor are joined by special guests Rachel Parris and Stephen Tompkinson.

Presented by Gaby Roslin
Team Captains: John Thomson and Ellie Taylor
Impressionists: Alistair McGowan and Ronni Ancona
Created by Gaby Roslin
Written by Carrie Quinlan and Barney Newman
Produced by Gordon Kennedy, Gaby Roslin and Barney Newman
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Natural Histories: Short Stories (b06psk5q)
Series 1, Fortifications

AL Kennedy reads her story commissioned as part of the collaboration between Radio 4 and the Natural History Museum. She was taken behind the scenes at the museum, and that inspired this story. A professor remembers her younger self, and how she went diving underwater for coral.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b0b7hqm0)
BBC Sounds, Reith Lectures, 'Gove in Government'

Roger Bolton with first reactions to the new BBC Sounds app. Also, Reith lecturer Margaret MacMillan reflects on her task and Mary Ann Sieghart discusses her documentary Gove in Government.

Michael Gove is not just a favourite target for satirists, he has also long been one of the most controversial ministers in government. A new documentary, presented by his former Times colleague Mary Ann Sieghart, examined him not in terms of what his policies have accomplished, but by considering his exceptional record of getting those policies enacted in the first place. But many Feedback listeners have taken issue with this approach. Mary Ann discusses the programme and responds to the comments.

BBC iPlayer Radio is popular with listeners - but it's not long for this world. This week, the BBC launched its long term, if currently unfinished, replacement - BBC Sounds. Dan Taylor-Watt, the head of iPlayer and BBC Sounds, answers listener questions about the new app and explains where it fits into the BBC's push for younger listeners.

And this year's Reith lecturer is the Canadian historian Margaret MacMillan, who is focusing her talks on the topic of war and society. With the first in the series already a hit with Feedback listeners. Professor MacMillan joins Roger to share what it's like to take on the prestigious role of Reith lecturer.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Will Yates
Executive Producer: Katherine Godfrey

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b0b7hq31)
Joe Jackson, Paul Lamplugh OBE, Myrtle Allen, Daisy Kadibil, Paddy Feeny

Photo: Joe Jackson

Matthew Bannister on

Joe Jackson who drilled his children into becoming the Jackson Five, but was accused of abusive and violent behaviour by his most successful son, Michael.

Paul Lamplugh, whose daughter Suzy was abducted and never found. He worked with his wife to campaign for greater safety for women working alone.

Myrtle Allen, the chef who pioneered farm-to-table cooking at her family home in Ireland and became the country's first woman to win a Michelin star.

Daisy Kadibil whose one thousand two hundred mile walk across Australia inspired the film Rabbit-Proof Fence.

And Paddy Feeny who presented Top of the Form and sport on the BBC World Service for more than thirty years.

Archive clips from: Woman's Hour, Radio 4 17/04/2006; The Best Dishes Ever, BBC Two 18/02/2016; Saturday Kitchen Best Bites, BBC Two 23/03/2014; The Best Dishes Ever, BBC Two 18/02/2016; MasterChef, BBC One 07/07/1991; Rabbit-Proof Fence, BBC One 26/12/2008; Top of the Form, Radio 4 22/12/1981.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0b845f0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0b86474)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b0b7f15s)
Can Technology Be Stopped?

Can the Big Four - Amazon, Google, Facebook and Apple - be reined in and forced to play by the rules society sets, rather than imposing their own standards on society? It seems like news breaks every few weeks that reveal how the technology on which we increasingly depend - smartphones, search engines, social media - is not as passive as many of us thought. Big data, fake news, extremism, Russian trolls: with little or no regulatory supervision, the big tech companies are changing the world and disrupting our lives. Yet governments seem to have little power to respond. The tech giants look too big, too international and too hard to pin down.

So is it time to disrupt the disrupters? Journalist and writer Jamie Bartlett asks how we can regulate big tech. He meets the regulators who are daring to reclaim power, and assesses the challenges involved in imposing rules on an industry which is deeply complicated, ever changing and supranational. Do governments have the resources to reassert sovereignty over something which has become so embedded in our culture? And how would society change if they did?

Producer: Gemma Newby.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0b85lrc)

Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b0b7hfpk)
Bill Nighy

Francine Stock enters The Bookshop with Bill Nighy and follows the trail of a father and daughter who live rough in a national park in Oregon. They're the subject of Leave No Trace, directed by Debra Granik, who reveals the true story behind her award-winning feature film.

Neil Brand reveals how composer John Williams made us believe that Superman could fly, just by changing key.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0b85lpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 02 JULY 2018

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0b85lz3)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b0b7hbc0)
Gangs and spirituality

Gangs, spirituality and desistance from crime - what leads people away from criminality? Laurie Taylor talks to Ross Deuchar, Director of the Interdisciplinary Research Unit on Crime, Policing and Social Justice at the University of the West of Scotland. His new study draws on in-depth interviews with male gang members and offenders and spans three continents, focusing on the USA, Scotland, Denmark and Hong Kong. They're joined by Ruth Armstrong, Senior Research Associate in the Institute of Criminology at the University of Cambridge and author of a study exploring the role of fatalism in offenders' relapses into crime. A final guest, Shadd Maruna, Professor of Criminology at the University of Manchester, asks if the future of desistance lies in its transformation into a social movement.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0b86470)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b85lz5)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b85lz7)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b85lz9)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0b85lzc)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0b8l9cz)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Ann Easter.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0b85lzf)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0b85lzh)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x45pj)
Alpine Swift

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the alpine swift. Alpine swifts are impressive anchor-shaped birds, the colour of coffee above and milk-white below. In the UK Alpine swifts are annual visitors, appearing in Spring, but they don't breed here. They spend the winter in Africa and on their journey north in spring some birds overshoot their breeding areas. Alpine swifts can be seen as they arc through the skies and because they travel so fast they can turn up almost anywhere from central London to Shetland.


MON 06:00 Today (b0b85lzk)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0b85lzm)
British culture and European influence

Britain has imported its culture from Europe for generations. Andrew Marr presents a special edition from Hatchlands Park in Surrey, home to the Cobbe Collection of musical instruments including pianos owned by Chopin, Mahler and Marie Antoinette.

Frederic Chopin had a pan-European career. He swapped his native Poland for Paris, fled to Mallorca in search of sunshine and inspiration, and toured Britain twice, complaining bitterly about the 'crafty' locals and 'dreadful' British weather. But he had a huge impact on the musical scenes he left behind. Paul Kildea charts Chopin's journey across Europe. Sitting at the keys of Chopin's own piano, Kildea explains how this visionary composer shaped Romanticism.

European composers and performers in Britain faced a tougher reception in the wake of two world wars. In her new book, Singing in the Age of Anxiety, Laura Tunbridge depicts the contradictions of a generation that viewed Wagner as a cultural high-point - but decried all things German as enemy propaganda. At the same time radio and gramophones dramatically altered the way people heard and responded to music.

The digital world offers vast new audiences, but also brings new challenges to those in the arts. Munira Mirza is Director of HENI Talks, an online platform that aims to share cultural information and understanding with much wider audiences. By combining leading experts and world-famous works such as the Mona Lisa, she wants to take art outside the gallery. As former Deputy Mayor for Culture in London, Mirza envisages a future in which we have a truly international cultural scene.

Producer: Hannah Sander.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b0b86qyz)
Buzz, Episode 1

Dr Thor Hansen on the nature and necessity of bees.

Bees are like oxygen - ubiquitous, essential and, for the most part, unseen. While we might overlook them, they lie at the heart of relationships that bind the human and natural worlds. Dr Hanson takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young.

From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They have given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing.

Dr Thor Hanson is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Switzer Environmental Fellow and an award winning author and biologist. His other books include The Triumph of Seeds, The Impenetrable Forest, Feathers and the illustrated children's favorite, Bartholomew Quill. His writing has been translated into more than ten languages and has earned many accolades, including The John Burroughs Medal, the Phi Beta Kappa Award, the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize and two Pacific Northwest Book Awards.

Read by Elliot Levey
Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0b85lzy)
The women of world music, Barrister Sarah Langford and #NHS70

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b86qz1)
Ground Control, Episode 1

by Colin Bytheway

Tess is married to a real live hero, Scott Carter, an astronaut aboard the International Space Station. What an honour for her. Or is it? Is she always going to be simply Mrs Scott Carter? A comedy drama chronicling the ultimate long distance relationship.

Director ..... Sally Avens.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b0b86qzf)
In the Driving Seat

Beth has vision in just one eye. Gary is her driving instructor. Can she pass her test?

Gary is a former medical rep turned driving instructor who became bored teaching 'ordinary' pupils. He now specialises in lessons for people with particular challenges, whether they have autism, or a missing limb, or - in Beth's case - just one useful eye.

Beth's in her early 20s and has Stickler syndrome, a condition which led to the retina in her right eye detaching when she was 11 years old. That eye has almost no useful vision, certainly nothing that helps when it comes to driving. Beth first took lessons when she was 18, but her instructor made her feeling too nervous to continue. She thought she would never drive. But then she found Gary. With his vast well of patience, not to mention his car which is kitted out with all kinds of accessories including a huge panoramic mirror, her confidence has improved to the point where she can take her test. Beth's life is about to completely change: she's starting university in a new city and her partner works away from home, so she needs the independence that driving bring. But will she pass?

Producer: Karen Gregor.


MON 11:30 The Quanderhorn Xperimentations (b0b86qzl)
Series 1, Mummy! My Donkey's Head Is Exploding

It's still 1952.

It's always still 1952.

The crew of Professor Quanderhorn (James Fleet) are about to have their space craft shredded like a savoy cabbage by a massive gravitational wave. Only Martian hostage Guuuurk (Kevin Eldon) can save them.

But will the self-declared "miserable coward and despicable turncoat" risk his life and even his very sanity by mind-leaping into Quanderhorn's "son", Troy (Freddie Fox), a half-insectoid, touted as "a major breakthrough in Artificial Stupidity".

Meanwhile, behind the Post Office in the nearby village, a glowing, throbbing meteorite is exuding a strange influence on the local inhabitants.

When Dr Janussen (Cassie Layton), Guuuurk, Troy and even Quanderhorn himself appear to be possessed by an alien intelligence, Brian (Ryan Sampson) is faced with a perilous dilemma.

And who is that peculiar hot chestnut seller, who bears a startling resemblance to Prime Minister Churchill (John Sessions)?

The Quanderhorn Xperimentations - an adventure beyond human understanding.

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b0b85m04)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b0b66529)
2 July 1918 - Klaus Hofstädter

On this day in 1918, the Allied countries launched an intervention into the Russian Civil War, and all is not quiet in Deanscombe Quarry.

Cast
Klaus Hofstädter ..... Atilla Akinci
Moses Wickens ..... Ed Gaughan
Hector Gidley ..... Brian Protheroe
Isaac Cox ..... James Lailey
Ludwig Huber ..... Marcel Hagen

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b0b85m07)
Click-and-ride buses, Renters, Power of attorney

News and discussion of consumer affairs. Could a new 'click-and-ride' service roll back the decline in bus use and has buying a home slipped down a millennial's 'to-do' list.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0b85m09)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0b85m0c)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 National Health Stories (b0b86qzs)
Scandal

In a series tracing decisive moments in the life of our National Health Service, medical historian Sally Sheard reveals how the little-known campaigner Barbara Robb exposed glaring gaps in the care of the mentally ill, forgotten in the vast long-stay institutions.

'Mental hospitals', as they were then called, had long been out of sight and out of mind, a low priority in the cash-strapped NHS.

Health Minister Enoch Powell's famous 'Water Tower' speech, in 1961, announced the mass movement of long-stay patients into the community. His optimism for this plan was buoyed by the new generation of psychiatric drugs developed in the fifties.

But nothing changed, until Barbara Robb went to one long-stay institution to visit an acquaintance. She was so horrified by the conditions there that she took up the fight for its voiceless patients.

Her campaign triggered a nationwide investigation, supported by NHS whistle-blowers and patients' families, forcing the government to bring in regular hospital inspections. Robb's legacy also lives on in the more open culture in the NHS that she brought about.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0b86bq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0b86qzv)
Series 4, Episode 6

It's the 1980s and Brian Oldman is back in jail for a crime he didn't commit. He suspects, but cannot prove, that Joseph Oldman, now Joseph Olinska MP, was the perpetrator.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

The characters are based on GF Newman's novels.

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b0b86r8n)
Series 8, University of Hertfordshire

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Hertfordshire with specialist subjects including Aerospace Engineering, English Language and Communication and Computer Sciences, and questions ranging from DOS Commands and derivatives to Captain Hook and why eating detergent is wrong.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Merton College Oxford, Dundee, Newcastle, Sheffield and Brunel.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0b86702)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 I Was... (b0b86ryg)
Series 5, I Was Philip Larkin's Magician

Andrew McGibbon talks to Edwin Dawes, biochemist and beloved magician to Philip Larkin.

Edwin Alfred Dawes arrived at the University of Hull to establish its Biochemistry department in 1963. There he met Larkin, the poet and university librarian. They became good friends and Edwin became chairman of the library committee, working under Larkin.

But Edwin had a parallel professional interest in magic and conjuring, and Larkin was spellbound with Edwin's sleights of hand and magic skills.

Edwin wrote many notable books on biochemistry and continues with his magic, having been awarded the Gold Medal from the Magic Circle for "exemplary service to the Society or exceptional magical ability or both". He is only the ninth recipient of this award since 1926.

As well as library and magic commitments, Edwin's biochemistry department at Hull University took the lead in researching bioplastics in the early 1970s, which led to the commercialisation of Biopol, a biodegradable plastic polymer chain that can be used to make disposable plastic items, a discovery later sidelined but now the subject of renewed interest.

Written and presented by Andrew McGibbon

Producer: Nick Romero
A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b0938k8z)
Khadijah

It is said that behind every great man there is a great woman. The Prophet Muhammad was married many times; but for 25 formative years, he remained faithful to one woman, Khadijah. She is widely recognised as the First Muslim and her story may be surprising to many non-Muslims. She was a successful business woman. She was considerably older than Muhammad, and it was she who proposed to him. She must have been a formidable presence. There are many debates about the place of women in the Muslim world; could Khadijah be an appropriate role model for Muslim women today? Joining Ernie Rea to discuss Khadijah, are Fatima Barkatulla an Islamic scholar who has recently written a children's book about Khadijah; Rania Hafaz, Senior Lecturer in Education at Greenwich College and Fellow of the Muslim Institute; Asad Zaman, a Manchester based Imam; and Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic and Inter Religious Studies at the University of Edinburgh.

Producer Amanda Hancox.


MON 17:00 PM (b0b85m1b)

Jonny Dymond with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b85m1j)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b0b86z4n)
Series 69, Episode 2

The 69th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the City Varieties Music Hall in Leeds where regulars Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Tony Hawks and Caroline Quentin, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith.

It is a BBC Studios production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0b86z4q)

Tom searches for direction, and Rex is torn.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0b85m1s)
Maxine Peake, Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, Summer reads recommendations

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b86qz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Mind the Gap: Britain's Transport Divide (b0b86z4s)
Buses

Mind The Gap: Britain's Transport Divide. For more than 30 years buses in the UK have run under two systems. In London, a powerful transport authority commissions and pays for bus routes it deems necessary. Outside the capital it is up to the bus companies which routes they run and to local authorities which gaps to fill, if they are able. In the first of two episodes on Britain's transport divide, public transport user and non-driver Lynsey Hanley rides the bus and speaks to bus users in one of the UK's most isolated communities- which is bounded by not one but two motorways- visits the English city least well served by public transport and hears from the local authority that tried and failed to regain control of its buses. She finds a country where in one corner there is a world class public bus system and the rest; where there isn't and concludes this is not merely a matter of inconvenience.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0b86z4v)
The Middle East Conundrum

Edward Stourton asks if there any chance of a long-term solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Tensions have been rising following the move of the US Embassy to Jerusalem and the deadly clashes at the border between Israel and Gaza. The peace process - if it exists at all - seems to be in deep freeze. The idea of a two-state solution does not appear to be getting any closer, while a one-state solution would effectively mark the end of a Jewish state. Does Israel have a long-term strategy?
Producer: Ben Cooper.


MON 21:00 Storm and Stress: New Ways of Looking at Adolescent Mental Health (b0b7f4m9)
How to Help

Nearly all the young people with mental health issues that we've interviewed for this series agree the transition from child to adult mental health services is incredibly traumatic.

In the 3rd part of our series Mental Health Researcher Sally Marlow, from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King's College London, looks at new ideas around continuity of care.

We visit an experimental inpatients service for people ranging from early teens to their mid 20s. Its one of a kind and this service is not based in the UK, but in Germany.

December 2017 saw the publication of government plans for adolescent mental health in a green paper, 'Transforming children and young people's mental health provision'. While being welcomed as a step in the right direction, the green paper has also been criticised for not going far enough, only making a tiny increase in access to treatment for young people with mental illness.

Another criticism of the green paper is that too much of the responsibility for adolescent mental health shifts to schools. Teenagers spend much of their time at school, its is a formative environment, but without additional funding and adequate evidence based mental health interventions can schools really be the key? We visit one school at the vanguard and look at how they are bringing together education with awareness and action on mental health.

Producer: Julian Siddle.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0b85lzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0b85m21)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0b86z4x)
The Shepherd's Hut, The Day the Old Life Ended

Adam Fitzgerald reads the new novel by the acclaimed author Tim Winton. Set in Western Australia, this is a heartwrenchingly brutal and yet lyrical tale of survival in the outback featuring the irrepressible Jaxie Clackton. Still in his teens, damaged, sullen and angry, Jaxie's life has always been harsh. He's grown up in a world of knives and guns, hunters and drinkers. But things are about to change for Jaxie. But then, you must always be careful what you wish for...

Writer: Tim Winton is Australia's most acclaimed contemporary novelist. He has won the Miles Franklin Award four times. His books include: Shallows, Riders, Cloudstreet and Breath.
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Reader: Adam Fitzgerald
Producer: Justine Willett.


MON 23:00 A Place Called Home (b08y1129)
Series 1, David Blunkett

Rachel Sylvester and Alice Thomson meet a public figure to explore the geography of their childhood. In episode one, Lord David Blunkett takes Alice and Rachel to Sheffield. David shows the award-winning interviewing duo the places and buildings he knew as a boy, and discusses how the Labour-voting, South Yorkshire steel city became a symbol of the disenchantment which led to last year's Brexit vote.
Producer: Chris Ledgard.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0b85m2c)

News from Westminster.



TUESDAY 03 JULY 2018

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0b85m58)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b0b86qyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b85m5b)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b85m5d)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b85m5g)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0b85m5j)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0b8mc0t)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Ann Easter.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0b85m5l)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dw6yc)
Spix's Macaw

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the now extinct in the wild, Spix's macaw. The Spix's macaw was declared extinct in 2000 when the last known wild born male disappeared from its final refuge in Brazil. Fortunately this strikingly beautiful member of the parrot family survives in captivity. The Al-Wabra Wildlife Preservation centre in Qatar is providing a reservoir for an organised breeding programme which is now managed by several conservation organisations under the guidance of the Brazilian government. Soon it is hoped the bird that inspired the film Rio, can once more fly free in the wild.


TUE 06:00 Today (b0b85m5n)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b0b88hl4)
Margaret MacMillan, Fearing and Loving: Making Sense of the Warrior

Historian Margaret MacMillan asks why both men and women go to war. "We are both fascinated and repulsed by war and those who fight," she says. In this lecture, recorded at York University, she explores looks at the role of the warrior in history and culture and analyses how warriors are produced. And she interrogates the differences that gender plays in war. Anita Anand presents the programme recorded in front of an audience, including a question and answer session.

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Hugh Levinson.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0b85m5q)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b88k6g)
Ground Control, Episode 2

by Colin Bytheway

Neurosurgeon Tess Carter is tired of just being known as the wife of astronaut, Scott Carter. So she turns her attention instead to solving the mystery of an unidentified patient in a coma and her investigation turns up fresh evidence.

Director ...... Sally Avens.


TUE 11:00 Storm and Stress: New Ways of Looking at Adolescent Mental Health (b0b992l5)
Questioning Jeremy Hunt

What does the new funding announced for the NHS mean for Adolescent Mental Health?

In this programme Sally Marlow addresses some of the issues we have come across throughout the series.
Rates of mental illness amongst adolescents have risen, and yet action is severely lacking, we ask who is accountable and what are they doing?

We look to the future, how can change realistically be achieved in both the short and medium term?
It is clear the current system is broken - but how can and should adolescent health services be reorganised? Many young people in need reported the damaging effect of the chasm between adolescent and adult services, can this be done away with?

And how can the more imaginative approaches of the voluntary sector, often involving arts, music and community based support, be incorporated into mainstream NHS mental health services for young people?

We examine emerging government policy on this issue, where do our current politicians think the emphasis should go, are they really across the issues?
And what about the mental health research community, often working in both academia and treatment, how can their insight be harnessed to inform public policy? ,
As many in the series have noted, young peoples' mental health is gaining in profile, stigma is reducing, in many situations it okay for young people to admit they might have problems. And yet this still contrasts sharply with the lack of action.


TUE 11:30 The Cult of Aphex Twin (b0b88k6l)

Music writer John Doran ventures into the strange world of Richard D James. Over the course of three decades James, known to his legion of hardcore fans as Aphex Twin, has achieved the primary but evasive aim of most serious musicians - the invention, exploration and curation of a truly unique and inimitable sound.

Born in Ireland and raised in Cornwall, James was radicalised by the underground acid house phenomenon that swept UK clubs in the late 1980s but, unlike many of his peers, he seemed equally influenced by ambient, New York minimalism, power electronics, avant composition, techno, industrial and pop music.

By combining these strands, he became just about "as important as a single figure can get in electronic music" and the more that the press wanted to speak to him the more he treated their attention with a mixture of irritation, gleeful mischief and wilful myth building.

Realising that legend is often much more interesting than truth, he slowly began to construct a personal mythos that many still believe to this day. Does he really write songs while asleep after training himself in the practice of lucid dreaming? Does he drive a tank round Cornwall? Did he once live in a bank vault in the middle of the Elephant And Castle roundabout? Does he own a submarine? Does his DJ tech rider include a food processor and sheets of sandpaper? Does he move among his many fans on electronic dance music forums online, often trolling them and stirring up these very myths?

In an attempt to disentangle the man from the myth, we hear from fans such as comedian Vic Reeves and those who know him best such as musicians Tom Middleton, Leila, David Toop and Scanner.

Fan of 25 years John Doran believes that James should be seen as a Cornish folk musician. While a lot of time has been spent talking about how groundbreaking his music has been over the years, less thought has been devoted to discussing how he is also a conduit to the pre-Christian culture of the Cornish past, not just through the song names he chooses or the natural textures of plant and mineral that his music evokes, but also because he is a product of the Cornish myth-making tradition himself and part of a proud heritage that includes mermaids, giants, piskies and pobel vean.

Presented by John Doran
Produced by Barney Rowntree
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b0b85m5s)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b0b66566)
3 July 1918 - Primrose Holden

On this day in 1918, the allied forces reported the successful bombing of the railway line at Mannheim, and in Staverton Station, Primrose Holden has an unwelcome visitor.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b0b85m5v)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:56 Weather (b0b85m5x)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b0b85m5z)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 National Health Stories (b0b88lx0)
Grave

In a series tracing decisive moments in the life of our National Health Service, medical historian Sally Sheard reveals how Cecily Saunders and her modern hospice movement forced the NHS and the public to plan for a 'good death'.

Up until the 1950s, doctors focused on curing illness, not supporting people at the end of life. Cecily Saunders, a former social worker, was so appalled by the lack of medical care available for the dying, that she decided to re-train as a doctor.

While her long-term goal was to get the health service to embrace care for the dying, she began her mission outside. In 1967 the world's first modern hospice, St Christopher's, opened its doors, with funds she'd raised.

Dr Mary Baines, who joined the hospice soon after it opened, recalls how she helped Saunders turn hospice care into a respected medical discipline and bring rigour to the treatment of pain.

Meanwhile, Saunders also ensured that her 'modern hospice' movement was embraced by the NHS, pioneering home care for the dying and introducing 'palliative care' teams into hospitals.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0b86z4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0b88lx2)
Series 4, Episode 7

It's the 1980s and Brian Oldman is back in jail for a crime he didn't commit. He suspects, but cannot prove, that Joseph Oldman, now Joseph Olinska MP, was the perpetrator.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

The characters are based on GF Newman's novels.

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0b7cdnz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Making History (b0b88lzz)
The Radio Ballads, Dorothea Lange, Archaeology of the A14

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex.

A new exhibition at the Barbican in London features the photography of Dorothea Lange who is best known for her coverage of the dust-bowl depression of mid-west America in the 1930s. Many of her now iconic images were actually staged - but does that alter their historical importance? Helen takes in the exhibition with the historian of race in modern America, Dr Melissa Milewski.

The 70th anniversary of the NHS at 70 is being marked across the BBC. In one of the more unusual ideas, Radio 3 are creating a symphony from the sounds that are commonplace in the health service. The inspiration for the piece comes from the "radio ballads" back in the late fifties and early sixties, produced by Charles Parker and featuring the music of Ewan McColl. Olivette Otele is a French-African historian who had never come across these radio programmes - so what can she glean about life in Britain sixty years ago by listening to them again?

And Tom Holland has a song of the road too. He's in Cambridgeshire, in the middle of Britain's biggest archaeological dig, where the A14 meets the A1 and a new historic landscape is being revealed.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 The Wrong Job (b0b88mgg)
Square Pegs in Round Holes

Writer and broadcaster Emma Kennedy studied law and worked as a solicitor for five years before realising she was in the wrong job.

A string of studies have produced worrying evidence that Emma is far from alone - they suggest that as many as 75 per cent of British workers feel they are in jobs which don't suit them or which they simply hate.

The figures come as little surprise to psychologist Professor Sir Cary Cooper who says it's no coincidence the UK's productivity rate is one of the lowest in Europe. He says unhappiness in the workplace leads to stress, illness and a £13bn cost to the economy.

In this two-part documentary, Emma discovers what has gone wrong and examines ways to help people find jobs that better fit their skills, aptitudes and aspirations.

The first programme focuses on widespread concerns about non-existent careers advice in schools, inadequate work experience opportunities and an education system which fails to prepare students for a lifetime of work.

Emma begins her journey by visiting psychometric testing experts to find out what job she is really cut out for, and establish what part psychological testing can play in choosing work that suits us. In Emma's case, the conclusion comes as a bit of a shock.

She talks to former Education Secretary Estelle Morris who famously resigned from the post, admitting the job didn't suit her. And she meets 25-year old travel writer Emma Rosen who, after leaving university, found herself in a job she hated, so decided to explore her options by trying 25 different jobs before she was 25, with extraordinary results.

A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b0b88pl3)
Loyd Grossman and Skin

Loyd Grossman and Skin from rock band Skunk Anansie talk to Harriett Gilbert about their favourite books. Chosen books include Cakes and Ale by Somerset Maugham and The Underground Railroad by Colston Whitehead. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (b0b85m61)

Jonny Dymond with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b85m63)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b0b88pl5)
Series 8, Pippa Evans

Pippa Evans reads from her diaries, which tell of crushes, Christian camp, and her days as a Michael Palin superfan.

Presenter: Rufus Hound
Producer: Harriet Jaine

A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b0b88pl7)

There's a shock for Emma, and Adam puts his foot down.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0b85m65)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b88k6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b0b88pl9)
The Private World of the NHS

As the NHS reaches its 70th anniversary, Adrian Goldberg investigates why the very mention of the word "private" - or, even more, privatisation - in UK health care provokes fierce opposition.

No party dare publicly claim anything less than unswerving support for the NHS and its supporting mantra that health care should be "free at the point of delivery."

Yet millions of people are treated by a private dentist. Millions more think nothing of having to pay for eye tests and the spectacles prescribed by opticians who work for "for-profit" businesses. GP practices are independent-run businesses. Routine operations are often outsourced to private hospitals. Yet NHS contracts are increasingly fulfilled by private health providers. While campaigners protest, most people continue having treatment.

So what is at the root of opposition to private health care? Is it the fear of replicating the US system where ability to pay is often a condition of receiving health care? If good health care is the last standing public good is that because it's the last vestige of socialism, clung to by the left? Is there a fear that the nature of health care changes when a commercial transaction lies behind it? Do nostalgia and a notion of "fairness" play a part? And does the fear of opposition encourage a policy of reform by stealth which in turn fuels suspicion and more opposition?

Adrian's mother was a domestic at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Birmingham for more than 20 years; his first job was working for the West Midlands Regional Health Authority, while his sister is a nurse. The programme takes Adrian on a personal journey to discover the true nature of opposition to private provision. On the way he talks to patients, practitioners and experts on health provision.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0b85m67)

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b0b88plc)

Tamoxifen, the so called "statin of breast cancer prevention" is recommended for healthy women with a family history of the disease. So why are only 1 in 7 of those eligible taking it? And Mark Porter meets the team identifying women at higher risk of breast cancer by finding SNPS, spelling mistakes in genes that influence growth and survival of cancer cells.


TUE 21:30 Enlightenment After Dark (b092t4gm)
Series 1, Bodies

In Enlightenment After Dark, Allan Little hosts a series of discussions in the spirit of the Scottish Enlightenment, in historically resonant places. Tonight Allan and guests painter Ken Currie and Professor Sue Black discuss the Body in the atmospheric setting of the Old Anatomy Theatre of Edinburgh University's Medical School.

Image: Three Oncologists (Professor RJ Steele, Professor Sir Alfred Cuschieri and Professor Sir David P Lane of the Department of Surgery and Molecular Oncology, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.), 2002
National Galleries of Scotland (c) Ken Currie.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0b85m69)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0b89h7z)
The Shepherd's Hut, I'm Not Alone in the World

Adam Fitzgerald reads the new novel by the acclaimed author Tim Winton. Set in Western Australia, this is a heartwrenchingly brutal and yet lyrical tale of survival in the outback featuring the irrepressible Jaxie Clackton. Jaxie is on the run. His violent father is dead, and, fearing fingers will point his way, he flees into the bush. With only the basics to keep him alive, he begins his long trek towards Mount Magnet, where he prays someone is waiting for him.

Writer: Tim Winton is Australia's most acclaimed contemporary novelist. He has won the Miles Franklin Award four times. His books include: Shallows, Riders, Cloudstreet and Breath.
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Reader: Adam Fitzgerald
Producer: Justine Willett.


TUE 23:00 The Brig Society (b082hzzh)
Series 4, Newspaper Editor

Extra! Extra! Brigstocke starts own newspaper shock! Read all about it on Radio 4! Plus we reveal the headline of the year that you'll never get to read.

Uh-oh - Marcus Brigstocke has decided to sort out the press as he plunges headfirst into the contents of the great British newspaper and comes up smelling of Daily Mail.

Helping him to hold the front page will be Margaret Cabourn-Smith ("Miranda"), William Andrews ("Sorry I've Got No Head") and Colin Hoult ("Derek").

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Steve Punt and Dan Tetsell. The show is produced by Marcus's long-standing accomplice, David Tyler who also produces Marcus's appearances as the inimitable Giles Wemmbley Hogg, as well as programmes including Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Cabin Pressure, Thanks A Lot, Milton Jones!, Kevin Eldon Will See You Now, Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, The Castle and John Finnemore's Double Acts.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0b85m6c)

News from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 04 JULY 2018

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0b85m89)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b0b8h74s)
Buzz, Episode 2

Dr Thor Hansen on the nature and necessity of bees.

Bees are like oxygen - ubiquitous, essential and, for the most part, unseen. While we might overlook them, they lie at the heart of relationships that bind the human and natural worlds. Dr Hanson takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young.

From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They have given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing.

Dr Thor Hanson is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Switzer Environmental Fellow and an award winning author and biologist. His other books include The Triumph of Seeds, The Impenetrable Forest, Feathers and the illustrated children's favorite, Bartholomew Quill. His writing has been translated into more than ten languages and has earned many accolades, including The John Burroughs Medal, the Phi Beta Kappa Award, the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize and two Pacific Northwest Book Awards.

Read by Elliot Levey
Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b85m8c)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b85m8f)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b85m8h)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0b85m8k)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0b8m32n)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Ann Easter.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0b85m8m)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09fy3t9)
Fyfe Dangerfield on the Bee-Eater

Musician Fyfe Dangerfield imagines his perfect outfit, a technicolour dreamcoat resplendent in the shimmering hues of the bee-eater.

Producer: Mark Ward
Photograph: Paul Miguel.


WED 06:00 Today (b0b85m8p)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Behind the Scenes (b0b89hfq)
Robert Lepage

Nick Duncalf travels to La Caserne, the headquarters of Robert Lepage's theatre company, Ex Machina in Quebec City, to observe the characteristically innovative creation of a new theatrical show from one of the world's most acclaimed directors.

Ex Machina's new theatrical presentation Slāv is a collaboration with French singer Betty Bonifassi, inspired by the traditional African-American slave and work songs collected by John and Alan Lomax during the 1930s. With just these songs as a starting point and Lepage as a creative leader and guide, Bonifassi and the cast are encouraged to come up with a narrative on stage through a form of improvised "controlled chaos", while dazzling visual effects, sound and video design are created concurrently in the same performance space. They have only a few highly-pressurised days to achieve this before presenting their work in progress to a paying audience, prior to the show itself premiering at the Montreal International Jazz Festival.

Given their subject matter, Lepage and Bonifassi are aware from the start that they may be subject to claims of cultural appropriation. With Lepage not even present for the first day of this intense five-day period of creation, even those closest to the director begin to express doubts as to whether the company can possibly have a show ready for an audience in such a short space of time.

Have Ex Machina simply bitten off more than they can chew?

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0b8h74v)
Buzz, Episode 3

Dr Thor Hansen on the nature and necessity of bees.

Bees are like oxygen - ubiquitous, essential and, for the most part, unseen. While we might overlook them, they lie at the heart of relationships that bind the human and natural worlds. Dr Hanson takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young.

From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They have given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing.

Dr Thor Hanson is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Switzer Environmental Fellow and an award winning author and biologist. His other books include The Triumph of Seeds, The Impenetrable Forest, Feathers and the illustrated children's favorite, Bartholomew Quill. His writing has been translated into more than ten languages and has earned many accolades, including The John Burroughs Medal, the Phi Beta Kappa Award, the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize and two Pacific Northwest Book Awards.

Read by Elliot Levey
Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0b85m8r)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b0b89hmf)
Ground Control, Episode 3

by Colin Bytheway

Astronaut Scott Carter is about to take his first space walk but his wife's mind is not on that;
Tess, a neurosurgeon, is more interested in solving the mystery of an unidentified patient in a coma. But is he the innocent victim she assumes?

Director ..... Sally Avens.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b0b89j6n)
Dagmar and Adam - Just William

A brother and sister share his joy at the culmination of a life-long dream: to own a Morris Minor. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Mind the Gap: Britain's Transport Divide (b0b86z4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Plum House (b0b89kbv)
Series 2, Wedding Bells

Comedy about the inept staff at a historic house.

Every year, thousands of tourists flock to the Lake District. But one place they never go is Plum House - the former country home of terrible poet George Pudding (1779-1848).

Now a crumbling museum, losing money hand over fist, it struggles to stay open under its eccentric curator Peter Knight (Simon Callow). Tom Collyer (Tom Bell) tries and fails to get the museum back on track, alongside the hopelessly out of touch deputy Julian (Miles Jupp), corner-cutting gift shop manager Maureen (Jane Horrocks), put-upon education officer Emma (Louise Ford), and enthusiastic but dim-witted caretaker Alan (Pearce Quigley).

This week, the team are preparing to host their first wedding at the museum. With a journalist coming to cover the event, it's a publicity coup for Plum House. But the groom has cold feet. Can they carry on regardless with a fake wedding? Tom is dubious - until Julian suggests he might pretend to marry Emma.

Written by Ben Cottam and Paul McKenna
Produced by Sarah Cartwright
Directed by Paul Schlesinger
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b0b85m8t)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b0b6656m)
4 July 1918 - Morris Battley

On this day in 1918, Exeter celebrated Independence Day in honour of America, while on Blackfold Farm, international relations are less cordial.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b0b85m8w)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0b85m8y)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b0b85m90)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 National Health Stories (b0b89kbx)
Cradle

In a series tracing the decisive moments in the life of our National Health Service, historian Sally Sheard looks at the arrival of the babies people never expected to see - conceived outside the human body - the miracle of IVF births.

The NHS thrives on innovation, but sometimes it needs a more personal determination to keep going in the face of years of multiple set-backs. Both doctors and women looked in vain during the 1960s and 70s for a solution to infertility. Finally in 1978 Patrick Steptoe and Bob Edwards made the key breakthrough, and Louise Brown became the first of thousands of IVF babies. Their success meant that by the 1980s there were ethical dilemmas: how to limit multiple births, like the Walton sextuplets, and whether IVF treatment was a valid part of a National Health Service.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b0b88pl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0b89kbz)
Series 4, Episode 8

It's the 1980s and Brian Oldman is back in jail for a crime he didn't commit. He suspects, but cannot prove, that Joseph Oldman, now Joseph Olinska MP, was the perpetrator.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

The characters are based on GF Newman's novels.

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b0b85m92)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b0b88plc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0b89kc1)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b0b85m94)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (b0b85m96)

Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b85m98)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b07btfg7)
Series 6, Operation Voldemort Scrape-Away

The hit series returns for a sixth series with more shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave. Written by and starring Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli.

Set in a Scots-Asian corner shop, the award winning Fags, Mags & Bags sees a return of all the shop regular characters, and some guest appearances along the way, from the likes of Julia Deakin and Mina Anwar.

In this episode, Malcolm and Ramesh's relationship steps up a gear, and Dave dips his toes into the delight of online dating apps.

Join the staff of Fags, Mags and Bags in their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built it up over the course of over 30 years and is a firmly entrenched, friendly presence in the local area. He is joined by his shop sidekick, Dave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business. Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not!

Written by Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0b89npy)

Alistair faces temptation, and Will has a change of heart.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b0b85m9b)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b89hmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b0b89nq0)

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Melanie Philips, Michael Portillo, Matthew Taylor and Claire Fox.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b0b89nq2)
Telling a Story

Richard Johnston explains how images can start conversations about research.

A Professor of Engineering at Swansea University, Richard is also the founder of the Research as Art project, which encourages researchers to share images as a way of starting conversations about their research. In this talk, recorded at the Volcano Theatre as part of the BBC's Biggest Weekend, he reveals how one particular image - and the description which came with it - changed his understanding of the real value of his initiative.

Producer: Peter Snowdon.


WED 21:00 Science Stories (b0b89nq4)
Series 7, 04/07/2018

Series looking at events and characters from science history.


WED 21:30 Behind the Scenes (b0b89hfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0b85m9d)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0b89nq6)
The Shepherd's Hut, That Was the Last Time I Saw the Place

Adam Fitzgerald reads the new novel by the acclaimed author Tim Winton, a heartrendingly brutal story of survival, solitude and friendship set the outback. Jaxie Clackton is on the run. His violent father is dead, and Jaxie's trying to get to his beloved Lee in Mount Magnet. But can he survive the gruelling journey across the bush?
Writer: Tim Winton
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Reader: Adam Fitzgerald
Producer: Justine Willett.


WED 23:00 Matt Berry Interviews... (b0b89nq8)
Series 1, Kenneth Williams

Matt Berry presents a series of interviews with the greats of the stage, screen and music world.

This week Matt Berry brings you his interview with Kenneth Williams in the vestry of Warwick Cathedral in 1979. He was returning to Warwick to play a concert of organ music and allowed Berry an interview in between playing his favourite pieces.

Written, performed and edited by Matt Berry.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

It is a BBC Studios production.


WED 23:15 Sindhustan (b0b89ttf)
Series 1, Sandwich Filling

*New Series*

Episode 1 - Sandwich Filling

Stand up comedian Sindhu Vee looks at being a parent in a multi-generational family.

Born in India, educated in Delhi, Toronto, Chicago and Oxford, married to a Dane, and with three London born kids still living at home (and calling her mate) former investment banker Sindhu Vee has a unique perspective on parenting. At least the dog - a giant Labrador from Wales - understands her.

Written and performed by Sindhu Vee
Script Editor ............................. Robin Morgan
Producer ................................... Victoria Lloyd

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0b85m9g)

News from Westminster.



THURSDAY 05 JULY 2018

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0b85mcf)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0b8h74v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b85mch)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b85mck)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b85mcm)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0b85mcp)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0b8m709)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Ann Easter.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b0b85mcr)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09m18r5)
Kathy Hinde on the House Martin

As she watches House martins land and take off from telegraph wires, audio-visual artist Kathy Hinde was struck by how they looked like notes on a musical score. This inspired a musical sculpture in which the birds compose the music!

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: Andy & Helen Holt.


THU 06:00 Today (b0b85mct)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b0b9w0vq)
William Morris

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas of William Morris, known in his lifetime for his poetry and then his contribution to the Arts and Crafts movement, and increasingly for his political activism. He felt the world had given in to drudgery and ugliness and he found inspiration in the time before industrialisation, in the medieval life which was about fellowship and association and ways of working which resisted the division of labour and allowed the worker to exercise his or her imagination. Seeing a disconnection between art and society, his solution was revolution which in his view was the only way to reset their relationship.

The image above is from the Strawberry Thief wallpaper design by William Morris.

With

Ingrid Hanson

Jane Thomas

and

Marcus Waithe

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b0b8gwq8)
Buzz, Episode 4

Dr Thor Hansen on the nature and necessity of bees.

Bees are like oxygen - ubiquitous, essential and, for the most part, unseen. While we might overlook them, they lie at the heart of relationships that bind the human and natural worlds. Dr Hanson takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young.

From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They have given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing.

Dr Thor Hanson is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Switzer Environmental Fellow and an award winning author and biologist. His other books include The Triumph of Seeds, The Impenetrable Forest, Feathers and the illustrated children's favorite, Bartholomew Quill. His writing has been translated into more than ten languages and has earned many accolades, including The John Burroughs Medal, the Phi Beta Kappa Award, the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize and two Pacific Northwest Book Awards.

Read by Elliot Levey
Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0b85md4)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b8b04n)
Ground Control, Episode 4

by Colin Bytheway

Comedy drama chronicling the ultimate long distance relationship between Tess and her astronaut husband Scott aboard the International Space Station.
When Scott loses consciousness on his first ever space walk Tess's reaction surprises them both.

Director ..... Sally Avens.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b0b8b04q)

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 The Song Hunters (b0b0ptm1)
The Land Without Music

Singer and song collector Sam Lee celebrates the work of those who have fought to save the ancient folk songs of Britain from extinction.

In 1904, the German critic Oscar Schmitz declared that England was "the land without music". This is the story of the men and women who refused to accept this cultural slight and set out on a mission to rediscover the soul of our island. In doing so they found a river of ancient song flowing through it.

In the first episode, Sam Lee reveals that some of the early song collectors wanted to document the traditional songs before the suffocating effects of popular music extinguished their memory. Other collectors wanted to use folk melodies as inspiration for classical music that was "authentically British" in order to combat the sentiment of Europeans like Schmitz.

In the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library, Sam describes how the early collectors had to painstakingly transcribe every song by hand. The practice of collecting was eventually revolutionised when the composer Percy Grainger started using the Edison Phonograph to record his subjects in 1906. These early recordings, scratchy and distorted though they are, offer us a vital window into the past.

Legendary folk singer and collector Shirley Collins describes the differing motivations of a fresh wave of collectors whose work fuelled a second folk music revival between the mid-1940s and 1970s. Sam concludes by arguing that, while the second folk revival waned after the 1970s, the work of the song collectors has never been more vital.

Presenter: Sam Lee
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b0b85mdg)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b0b665l2)
5 July 1918 - Sylvia Graham

On this day in 1918, 1300 Boy Scouts were engaged in Peterborough to help with the flax harvest, while in Devon, a schoolboy friendship is rekindled.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b0b85mdn)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0b85mds)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b0b85mdx)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 National Health Stories (b0b8b7rb)
Unequal

In 1980 the Black Report showed that people in deprived areas had poorer health. But the government didn't accept the findings. Inequality increased throughout the decade.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0b89npy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0b8b7rd)
Series 4, Episode 9

It's the 1980s and Brian Oldman is back in jail for a crime he didn't commit. He suspects, but cannot prove, that Joseph Oldman, now Joseph Olinska MP, was the perpetrator.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

The characters are based on GF Newman's novels.

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b0b8b7rg)
Tynemouth Sea and Song

Up on the cliff tops at the mouth of the Tyne sits the imposing Tynemouth Priory and Castle. It's history stretches back to the Iron Age and it has been used by both Monks and the Military as a place to defend nation and faith. This great monastic heritage may be one reason why the songs of this region have been kept alive. Jez Lowe discovers this place became a seat of learning which meant that there was a history of print; crucially songs were recorded and not lost but also the cultural influence of Christianity from Ireland and mainland Europe gave rise to a melting pot of ideas and influences.

This melting pot of influences is evident today as Jez visits the nearby Fish Quay at North Shields. The songs, and even unique instruments, from this place mix Irish, Scottish and English sounds and themes with music from as far afield as Scandinavia. Even today you can find fishermen from places like the Philippines and the Netherlands working alongside the local boatmen. Music remains ever present in the traditions of the place and Jez explores the songs and sounds which resonate most with people who live and work at the mouth of the Tyne today.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0b86474)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b0b86bpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b0b8b7rl)
Whitney

Oscar winning director Kevin Macdonald turns his lens on Whitney Houston for his latest documentary, Whitney, only twelve months after fellow Brit Nick Broomfield did the same with Whitney: Can I Be Me. Macdonald tells Francine Stock why his documentary needed to be made.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b0b85mf7)

Adam Rutherford investigates the news in science and science in the news.


THU 17:00 PM (b0b85mff)

Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b85mfh)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 The Rest Is History (b078wsdl)
Series 2, Episode 5

Frank Skinner loves history, but just doesn't know much of it. So he's devised a comedy discussion show in order to find out more about it.

Along with his historian in residence, Professor Kate Williams, Frank is joined by a selection of celebrity guests who help him navigate his way through the annals of time, picking out and chewing over the funniest, oddest, and most interesting moments in history.

The guests are Miles Jupp and Zoe Lyons, who discuss King Arthur, Ivan the Terrible, Napoleon and Josephine, and Sir Walter Raleigh.

Produced by Mark Augustyn and Justin Pollard
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0b8b7rs)

Lily makes excuses, and Alice is on the warpath.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b0b85mfk)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b8b04n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b0b8b7rv)

Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b0b8b7rx)

Evan Davis hosts the business conversation show.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b0b85mf7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b0b9w0vq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0b85mfm)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0b8b7rz)
The Shepherd's Hut, I'm a Civilised Fella

Adam Fitzgerald continues Tim Winton's fierce yet lyrical new novel, set in Australia's unforgiving outback. Jaxie is on the run after his violent father is killed in a shocking accident. Now, fighting for survival out in the bush, Jaxie treks to Lake Balthazar in search of salt to preserve his precious meat. But is he really alone out here in the barren, desolate saltlands?

Writer: Tim Winton
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Reader: Adam Fitzgerald
Producer: Justine Willett.


THU 23:00 Richard Gadd: Daddy Diaries (b0b8b82x)

The highly anticipated Radio 4 debut of 2016's Edinburgh Comedy Award winner. Lauded for his fearless ambition and his unique, frenetic performances, Richard Gadd mixes reality and fiction in a face punch of a show.

Richard and his long suffering yet loyal producer Ben are recording their first show for Radio 4 in front of a live audience. Delayed guests, technical problems and personal issues do nothing to help Gadd cope with the difficult subject of the show. His father left him, aged twelve, and this soliloquy of love and regret blurs the lines of personal honesty and the ever important and elusive honesty in performance.

Strap in.

Written and performed by Richard Gadd
With Chris Forbes as Ben

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0b85mfp)

News from Westminster.



FRIDAY 06 JULY 2018

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0b85mk8)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b0b8gwq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0b85mkj)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0b85mkq)

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0b85mkv)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0b85ml3)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0b8mb06)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Ann Easter.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0b85ml7)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378xcd)
Icterine Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the icterine warbler. Icterine Warblers are fluent mimics and include phrases of other species in their song. Their name, icterine, is derived from ikteros, the ancient Greek word for jaundice and describes the bird's spring plumage...yellowish beneath and olive brown on top.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0b85mlf)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0b866zx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b0b8gx0f)
Buzz, Episode 5

Dr Thor Hansen on the nature and necessity of bees.

Bees are like oxygen - ubiquitous, essential and, for the most part, unseen. While we might overlook them, they lie at the heart of relationships that bind the human and natural worlds. Dr Hanson takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young.

From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They have given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing.

Dr Thor Hanson is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Switzer Environmental Fellow and an award winning author and biologist. His other books include The Triumph of Seeds, The Impenetrable Forest, Feathers and the illustrated children's favorite, Bartholomew Quill. His writing has been translated into more than ten languages and has earned many accolades, including The John Burroughs Medal, the Phi Beta Kappa Award, the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize and two Pacific Northwest Book Awards.

Read by Elliot Levey
Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0b85mlr)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b8bmq0)
Ground Control, Episode 5

by Colin Bytheway

Neurosurgeon Tess Carter is tired of conducting the ultimate long distance relationship with her astronaut husband Scott.
Instead she puts her energy into discovering the identity of one of her patients who is in a coma. And Tess now believes she knows who he is.

Director ..... Sally Avens.


FRI 11:00 Spitting Blades (b0b42t4p)

Former gang member Simeon Moore (aka Zimbo) sets out to explore, challenge and understand the complex relationship between certain urban art forms and knife violence.

The recent increase in incidents of knife crime has flooded our media, yet for Simeon such street violence is a reality that he's known for over twenty years. Among his friends, more have been injured, or even killed, through gun and knife violence than not. In his own experience, the attitudes and language depicted in certain music and films fuelled his transition from promising school boy to violent gangster and offender.

Today in the UK, a new genre of aggressive rap known as Drill is getting millions of views on YouTube and films that glamorise street life are commercially successful. Simeon questions whether this art is shaping the lives of our urban teenagers or simply reflecting a reality that resonates with them.

This is a personal quest for Simeon. A rapper himself, he worries that his past music played into the problem and he now passionately wants to be part of a positive change.

Featuring interviews with human rights activist Peter Tatchell, actor and producer Femi Oyeniran, actor Dylan Duffus and musician and academic Mykaell Riley.

Produced by Rebecca Lloyd-Evans with Simeon Moore.
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Things Can Only Get Worse (b0b8bmq2)
2001-2007

Episode 2 - 2001-2007
John O'Farrell looks back at the last 20 years in British politics, to try to make sense of where we are now. The shine had barely gone off the New Labour project when 9/11 changed everything. By the time of the 2005 election, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown were rowing so hard that Blair's purchase of two ice-creams felt significant and oddly reassuring. Iraq made the New Labour government unpopular but for Gordon Brown a bigger crisis was ahead - at the hands of, well, Gordon Brown.

written and read by John O'Farrell

Produced by Victoria Lloyd
A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b0b85mly)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b0b666cg)
6 July 1918 - Rose Fairweather

On this day in 1918, a Devon hayrick worth £50 was set alight by two boys, while at Seale Hayne, Rose finds herself burning with indignation.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b0b85mm2)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0b85mm8)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b0b85mmg)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 National Health Stories (b0b8bmq4)
Protest

In a series tracing the decisive moments in the life of our National Health Service, historian Sally Sheard explores the recurrent crises caused by lack of funding.

In 1987 a shortage of nursing staff lead to the death of a baby whose heart operation had been cancelled five times. Nearly 40 years on from the start of the NHS, the resources couldn't keep up with the demands of the patients. The government published a White Paper, Promoting Better Health, with an emphasis on getting GPs to do more prevention and increase their list size, as well as charging for eye and dental tests. Margaret Thatcher had already brought in the managing director of Sainsbury's Roy Griffiths to improve management in the NHS. By 1991 there was an internal market in the health service.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0b8b7rs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0b8bmq6)
Series 4, Episode 10

It's the 1980s and Brian Oldman is back in jail for a crime he didn't commit. He suspects, but cannot prove, that Joseph Oldman, now Joseph Olinska MP, was the perpetrator.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

The characters are based on GF Newman's novels.

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0b8bmq8)

Horticultural panel programme.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (b0b8bmqf)
The Good Son

An original short story from the Irish novelist Louise O'Neill specially commissioned by BBC Radio 4. As read by Mark Doherty (Moone Boy, Nowehere Fast, A Film With Me In It).

Louise O'Neill is an Irish writer and journalist. Her first novel 'Only Ever Yours' was awarded The Bookseller's inaugural YA Book Prize 2015. Her follow up 'Asking For It' was voted Book of the Year at the Irish Books Awards 2015 and spent 34 weeks in the Irish top 10 bestseller list. It has since been adapted for stage and is being developed for screen. Her third novel 'Almost Love' was published this year to critical acclaim.

Writer ..... Louise O'Neill
Reader ..... Mark Doherty
Producer ..... Michael Shannon.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b0b8bmqj)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b0b8bmql)

Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b0b8bmqn)
Funmi and Faith - I Already Knew

A mother is surprised that her 10 year old daughter was aware that her brother has autism long before being told of his diagnosis. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, this one recorded with the help of BBC Own It.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b0b85mms)

Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0b85mmx)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (b0b8bmqq)
Series 18, Episode 5

Topical satirical impressions.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0b8bmqs)

Brian needs help, and Jazzer saves the day.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b0b85mn3)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0b8bmq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b0b8bmqv)
Martin Lewis

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Westminster Synagogue in London with a panel including the founder of Moneysavingexpert.com Martin Lewis.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0b8bmqx)

A weekly reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b0b666cj)
2-6 July 1918

The third omnibus of Season 14, Needs Must When the Devil Drives, set in Devon, in the week, in 1918, when the Allied countries launched an intervention into the Russian Civil War.

Cast
Klaus Hofstadter ..... Atilla Akinci
Primrose Holden ..... Jade Matthew
Morris Battley ..... Sean Baker
Sylvia Graham ..... Joanna David
Rose Fairweather ..... Helen Longworth
Daniel Marriott ..... Jonathan Bailey
Gabriel Graham ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Amos Rutter ..... Richard Cotton
Moses Wickens ..... Ed Gaughan
Ludwig Huber ..... Marcel Hagen
Arthur Hurst ..... Mark Heap
Jocelyn Ogden ..... Christine Kavanagh
Isaac Cox ..... James Lailey
Victor Lumley ..... Joel MacCormack
Kitty Lumley ..... Ami Metcalf
Hardy Walsh ..... Damien Molony
Cora Gidley ..... Joanna Monro
Lionel Summer ..... Geoffrey Palmer
Hector Gidley ..... Brian Protheroe
Eli Lawrence ..... Michael Shelford
Dieter Lippke ..... Joe Sims
Effie Taverner ..... Lizzie Stables
Gert Battley ..... Maggie Steed
Ivan Jackson ..... Lloyd Thomas
Elspeth Taverner ..... Kelly Williams
Charles Summer ..... Rufus Wright

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0b85mn9)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0b8bmqz)
The Shepherd's Hut, I Thought You Were the End of Days

Adam Fitzgerald continues Tim Winton's fierce yet lyrical new novel, set in Australia's outback. Jaxie is on the run after his father's violent death. But it seems he's not alone out in the unforgiving saltlands. And so now he lies in wait, desperate for water, but transfixed by the strange old man he's stumbled upon in the remote ramshackle hut.

Writer: Tim Winton
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Reader: Adam Fitzgerald
Producer: Justine Willett.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b0b88pl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0b85mnh)

News from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b0b8bmr1)
Roari and Alfi - Rainbow Flicks

Premature twins, now 11, share a love of football and play for different teams, though one plays from his electric wheelchair. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, this one recorded with the help of Children in Need.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b0b86qz1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b0b86qz1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b0b88k6g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b0b88k6g)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b0b89hmf)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0b89hmf)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b0b8b04n)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b0b8b04n)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b0b8bmq0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b0b8bmq0)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b0b88pl3)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b0b88pl3)

A Place Called Home 23:00 MON (b08y1129)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b0b7hpqp)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0b8bmqx)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b0b7f15s)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0b86z4v)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0b7cjq0)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b0b7hpqm)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b0b8bmqv)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0b845s5)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b0b85mf7)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b0b85mf7)

Behind the Scenes 09:00 WED (b0b89hfq)

Behind the Scenes 21:30 WED (b0b89hfq)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0b86470)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0b86470)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b0938k8z)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0b86z4x)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b0b89h7z)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b0b89nq6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b0b8b7rz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0b8bmqz)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b0b7hk4t)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b0b86qyz)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b0b86qyz)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b0b8h74s)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0b8h74v)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0b8h74v)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b0b8gwq8)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b0b8gwq8)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b0b8gx0f)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b0b86bpz)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b0b86bpz)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0b85lqj)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (b0b7hxfl)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (b0b8bmqq)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0b866zx)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0b866zx)

Divine Power: The Search for the Dalai Lama 13:30 SUN (b0b86bpq)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b081jn4t)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b0b86bpx)

Enlightenment After Dark 21:30 TUE (b092t4gm)

Fags, Mags and Bags 18:30 WED (b07btfg7)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0b7cjp9)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0b85lzf)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0b85m5l)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0b85m8m)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b0b85mcr)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0b85ml7)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b0b7hqm0)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b0b8bmql)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b0b7fj3g)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b0b88pl9)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b0b89nq2)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0b7cjph)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b0b8b04q)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0b85m1s)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0b85m65)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0b85m9b)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0b85mfk)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b0b85mn3)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 MON (b0b86qzv)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 TUE (b0b88lx2)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 WED (b0b89kbz)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 THU (b0b8b7rd)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 FRI (b0b8bmq6)

Gaby's Talking Pictures 19:15 SUN (b0b86bq5)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b0b7hq2x)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0b8bmq8)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b0b666cj)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b0b66529)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b0b66566)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b0b6656m)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b0b665l2)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b0b666cg)

I Was... 16:00 MON (b0b86ryg)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (b0b7dq0g)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b0b86z4n)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b0b9w0vq)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b0b9w0vq)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0b85m67)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b0b88plc)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b0b88plc)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b0b7hq31)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b0b8bmqj)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0b7cjqk)

Making History 15:30 TUE (b0b88lzz)

Matt Berry Interviews... 23:00 WED (b0b89nq8)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0b7cjnl)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0b85lng)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0b85lz3)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0b85m58)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0b85m89)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0b85mcf)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0b85mk8)

Mind the Gap: Britain's Transport Divide 20:00 MON (b0b86z4s)

Mind the Gap: Britain's Transport Divide 11:00 WED (b0b86z4s)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0b845f0)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0b845f0)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b0b85m92)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b0b89nq0)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 TUE (b0b88pl5)

National Health Stories 13:45 MON (b0b86qzs)

National Health Stories 13:45 TUE (b0b88lx0)

National Health Stories 13:45 WED (b0b89kbx)

National Health Stories 13:45 THU (b0b8b7rb)

National Health Stories 13:45 FRI (b0b8bmq4)

Natural Histories: Short Stories 19:45 SUN (b06psk5q)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0b7cjnw)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0b85lpp)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0b85lzc)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0b85m5j)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0b85m8k)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0b85mcp)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0b85ml3)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0b85lpt)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b0b7cjpk)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b0b85lqq)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b0b85m04)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b0b85m5s)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b0b85m8t)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b0b85mdg)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b0b85mly)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0b7cjp1)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0b85lq2)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0b85lqd)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0b7cjqp)

News 13:00 SAT (b0b7cjpy)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b0b7hf86)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b0b8b7rg)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0b7cjq4)

PM 17:00 MON (b0b85m1b)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0b85m61)

PM 17:00 WED (b0b85m96)

PM 17:00 THU (b0b85mff)

PM 17:00 FRI (b0b85mms)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0b85lr9)

Plum House 11:30 WED (b0b89kbv)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0b86bq1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b0b7hxn6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b0b8l9cz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0b8mc0t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b0b8m32n)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0b8m709)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b0b8mb06)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b0b845h0)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b0b845h0)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0b845h0)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b0b86474)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0b86474)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0b86474)

Richard Gadd: Daddy Diaries 23:00 THU (b0b8b82x)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0b7cjpf)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0b7cjqm)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b0b89nq4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0b7cjnr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0b85lp3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0b85lz7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0b85m5d)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0b85m8f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0b85mck)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0b85mkq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0b7cjnp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0b7cjnt)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0b7cjqc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0b85lnp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0b85lpk)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0b85lqz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0b85lz5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0b85lz9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0b85m5b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0b85m5g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0b85m8c)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0b85m8h)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0b85mch)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0b85mcm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0b85mkj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0b85mkv)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (b0b7hq2z)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b0b8bmqf)

Sindhustan 23:15 WED (b0b89ttf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0b7cjqh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0b85lr7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0b85m1j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0b85m63)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0b85m98)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0b85mfh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0b85mmx)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0b85lpy)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0b85lpy)

Spitting Blades 11:00 FRI (b0b42t4p)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0b85lzm)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0b85lzm)

Storm and Stress: New Ways of Looking at Adolescent Mental Health 21:00 MON (b0b7f4m9)

Storm and Stress: New Ways of Looking at Adolescent Mental Health 11:00 TUE (b0b992l5)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0b86476)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0b85lq4)

Tales From the Stave 15:30 SAT (b0b7f614)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b0b7dlw4)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b0b86r8n)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0b85lql)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0b86bq3)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0b86bq3)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0b86z4q)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0b86z4q)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b0b88pl7)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b0b88pl7)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0b89npy)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0b89npy)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0b8b7rs)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0b8b7rs)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0b8bmqs)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b0b7rnjq)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b0b8b7rx)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b0b8b7rv)

The Brig Society 23:00 TUE (b082hzzh)

The Cult of Aphex Twin 11:30 TUE (b0b88k6l)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b086l9h6)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b0b7hfpk)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b0b8b7rl)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0b86702)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0b86702)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b0b7cdnz)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b0b7cdnz)

The Listening Project 21:45 SAT (b08lk3jr)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0b86bpv)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b0b89j6n)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b0b8bmqn)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b0b8bmr1)

The Living World 06:35 SUN (b0b86472)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b0b85m94)

The Quanderhorn Xperimentations 11:30 MON (b0b86qzl)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b0b7f390)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b0b88hl4)

The Rest Is History 18:30 THU (b078wsdl)

The Song Hunters 11:30 THU (b0b0ptm1)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b0b86qzf)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0b845dy)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0b85lqx)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0b85m21)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0b85m69)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0b85m9d)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0b85mfm)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b0b85mn9)

The Wrong Job 16:00 TUE (b0b88mgg)

Things Can Only Get Worse 11:30 FRI (b0b8bmq2)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b0b7hbc0)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0b89kc1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0b85m2c)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b0b85m6c)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b0b85m9g)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b0b85mfp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b0b85mnh)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0b845dw)

Today 06:00 MON (b0b85lzk)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0b85m5n)

Today 06:00 WED (b0b85m8p)

Today 06:00 THU (b0b85mct)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0b85mlf)

Tommies 21:00 SAT (b04nrwp2)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b0b866zv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03x45pj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04dw6yc)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b09fy3t9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b09m18r5)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b0378xcd)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b0b7cjpc)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b0b7cjpw)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b0b7cjqf)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0b85lq0)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0b85lq6)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0b85lqv)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0b85lr1)

Weather 05:56 MON (b0b85lzh)

Weather 12:57 MON (b0b85m09)

Weather 12:56 TUE (b0b85m5x)

Weather 12:57 WED (b0b85m8y)

Weather 12:57 THU (b0b85mds)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b0b85mm8)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0b85lrc)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0b7cjq2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0b85lzy)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0b85m5q)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0b85m8r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b0b85md4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0b85mlr)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0b85m0c)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b0b85m5z)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0b85m90)

World at One 13:00 THU (b0b85mdx)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b0b85mmg)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b0b85m07)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b0b85m5v)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b0b85m8w)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b0b85mdn)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b0b85mm2)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b0b7cjny)