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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 MAY 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00s9xzq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00sbmjw)
Jenny Uglow - A Gambling Man: Charles II and the Restoration

Episode 5

After The Great Fire of London in 1666, rebuilding work began with a vengeance. But elsewhere, all is not well and Charles is about to take the biggest gamble of his life.

Written by Jenny Uglow
Read by Michael Maloney
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00s9xzs)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00s9xzv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00s9xzx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00s9xzz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00s9y01)
Presented from Wales by the Rev. Peter Baker.


SAT 05:45 A View Through a Lens (b00gq4nb)
Series 1

Shadows

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison offers a personal view of life as he finds himself in isolated and often dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife.

2/3. SHADOWS: Squat on a tiny platform 30 metres off shore, John waits for young black-footed albatrosses to embark on their first flight from the shore. Below him in the water, shadows are patrolling back and forth, waiting for the birds to land on the waves.

Sound recordist is Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00s9y03)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00s9zfq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00s9zqg)
The Forest of Bowland

Helen Mark is in Lancashire to explore the Forest of Bowland, an area often described as England's last great wilderness. Helen meets members of the Pendle Forest History Group, who strongly believe that the history of the area in which they live has more to offer than stories of witches, and who have been unearthing more about the rural heritage of their landscape. Helen then joins ornithologist, Stephen Murphy who gives her an insight into the life of the 'breathtaking' Hen Harrier, the iconic bird which is Bowland's emblem. Will Helen be lucky enough to be able to spot just one of the ten male Hen Harriers in England today?

At Halstead's Farm near Slaidburn, Helen meets up with Helen Wallbank who has been unearthing and recording the ancient limekilns along the Hodder Vally, a feature of the landscape all around which can tell so much about the history of the rural communities of Bowland. And as the day draws to a close, Helen joins David Fisher in caves and along riverbanks searching for some of the 10 species of bats that inhabit this Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Producer: Helen Chetwynd.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00s9zqj)
Farming Today This Week

For more than five years now, farmers have been joining two schemes which have specifically paid them to bring in more wildlife, and use their land more sustainably. The Entry Level and Higher Level Stewardship Schemes give farmers a list of the things they can do to encourage insects, bees and birds. Recently, Natural England warned that nearly 500 plants and animals have become extinct in England, and virtually all of these have been lost within the last two centuries. On Farming Today This Week, Charlotte Smith visits a Worcestershire farm run by The Wildlife Trust in partnership with a conventional dairy farmer. Charlotte investigates whether farms are doing enough to encourage wildlife onto their land and asks what part does growing food play in all of this.
Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anna Varle.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00s9zql)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00s9zqn)
With Evan Davis and John Humphrys. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00s9zqq)
Fi Glover is joined by restaurateur Prue Leith OBE, and poet, Elvis McGonagall. There's a couple who live in houses next door to each other, and a man who found an entire set of tickets to the 1966 world cup and knew that the owner was untraceable. JP Devlin has been sent to the Ashmolean museum in Oxford to mingle with the crowds and Sir Max Hastings does his Inheritance tracks.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00sb0gs)
John McCarthy meets Anil Ananthaswamy a science writer who has visited many of the world's most inaccessible observatories and telescopes. These are often sited in remote places to avoid light pollution or cosmic interference so his travels have taken him to the South Pole, the Atacama Desert, half a mile underground in Minnesota and the middle of a frozen Lake Baikal. And he has encountered the particular breed of technologists who don't mind being cut off from the rest of the world for up to eight months at a time.

John also talks to travel journalist Juliet Rix who enthuses about the Neolithic temples in Malta and Gozo which predate the Egyptian pyramids by a thousand years. Although discovered a hundred years ago and forming a fascinating part of Malta's rich history they remain under-visited by tourists to the islands.

Producer: Harry Parker.


SAT 10:30 Big in Bangalore, Big in Beijing (b00sb0gv)
Episode 2

Rajan Datar follows Iron Maiden to India to seek out opportunities for Western music.

Are the new economies of India and China ripe for Western music acts to exploit? Rajan heads to Beijing to find out why China is another market western bands are targeting. With a growing, affluent middle class bands ranging from Mumford and Sons to Shakira are heading to the Far East in the hope of breaking this huge country.

However, touring China is not an easy proposition for bands.

On his travels Rajan discovers a litany of problems for bands trying to become popular in China. Tickets can often be expensive, especially if a band is not popular enough to play stadium venues. Then there is Government censorship - one festival had to drop all the foreign artists on the bill after it was discovered one of the bands, The Buzzcocks, once had some songs banned in the UK back in the 1970s.

Then there is the local police who can cancel gigs on a whim and an audience who have few cultural links to the West and are still relatively isolated from Western culture.

Rajan also discovers why the Icelandic singer Bjork has made touring China even harder for Western bands, and hears from the strange French band trying to tour this huge country, complete with all their instruments and equipment, using the rail network.

Producer: Tim Mansel

A Bite Yer Legs production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2010.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00sbgtc)
Jackie Ashley of The Guardian reports on a tumultuous week in politics when hundreds of newly-elected MPs arrived at Westminster after the indecisive result of the general election. But, with a hung parliament, were they in government or opposition?

Negotiations between the main parties ended with David Cameron and Nick Clegg forming a Conservative/Liberal Democrat coalition.

For Labour, Gordon Brown bade an emotional farewell to Downing Street and David Miliband was first to declare in the race to become the party's next leader.

In this programme:

* The senior Conservative MP, Michael Fallon, and Labour's Kevin Brennan ask how far coalition government means an end to tribalism in politics

* The Lib Dem historian, Duncan Brack, and the party's former chief executive, Lord Rennard, savour the week when Lib Dems finally reached government

* Two Labour MPs, Mary Creagh and Meg Hillier look forward to the Labour leadership election

* And two newcomers to Westminster who triumphed over Labour - the Lib Dem's Ian Swales, who took Redcar, and the Conservative, Penny Mordaunt, who took Portsmouth North - describe their first week.

Producer: Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00sb0gx)
A British army General tells us how he took a gamble, and saved an African nation.

The children thrown into prison in Turkey on terrorism charges.

And our correspondent pays tribute to the glories of New Zealand...

Ten years ago this month, Britain fought a short, sharp and very successful war. British soldiers routed a ragged band of guerrillas in Sierra Leone. The crushing of the militants rescued the nation -- ending years of appalling violence. But it's now emerged that the British intervention wasn't the result of cold, calculation at the highest levels of government in London. As Alan Little explains, it was much more about one man .....an army General far from home...making an extraordinary and fateful decision.....

The people of Turkey have much to be pleased about. The economy's holding together quite nicely in these difficult times. Meanwhile Turkey's becoming an increasingly influential player no the regional stage. But in some ways the country is still troubled by the legacy of a conflict between the state and its Kurdish minority. Many thousands died in the chronic violence that used to wrack south-eastern Turkey. And as Jonathon Head has been finding out, in the lingering tension, more than three-hundred children have found themselves behind bars..

Our correspondent Nick Thorpe has been reporting from the Balkans for about twenty-five years now. He's watched wars and revolutions transform the region, and he has an extraordinary knowledge of its history, politics and economics. But those hard realities are not the whole story of life in the Balkans. From the realm of myth and legend, there's also a rich store of folktales. And on his endless travels, Nick kept stumbling across one particular character..

About a month ago one of our editors here at Bush House announced that he was leaving. He'd decided to emigrate to New Zealand..and few of us could blame him. He was off to a peaceful, prosperous, friendly corner of the world -- famous for its outdoor lifestyle and spectacular scenery. Like anywhere else, it has it's social problems, and sometimes it's accused of being a little sleepy.a little dull, perhaps. But not many countries have a better image than New Zealand. And as far as Nick Bryant is concerned, the reality doesn't let you down...


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00sb0gz)
In this week's programme, Paul Lewis and guests examine the personal finance aspects of the coalition government's agreement, and the National Landlords' Association voices its opposition to proposed changes to capital gains tax.

What is a fair charge for using the internet or your mobile phone abroad? A listener tells Money Box he was shocked to find he had been billed more than £7,000 by his internet provider when he was stuck in Italy for five days because of the travel disruption caused by the volcanic ash cloud.

And Paul Lewis finds out why interest rates on overdrafts are at a 10-year high, according to Moneyfacts research.

Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00s9xwy)
Series 71

Episode 5

Sandi Toksvig presents another episode of the ever-popular topical panel show. Guests this week are Phill Jupitus, Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton, and Susan Calman.

Produced by Sam Bryant.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00sb0h1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00sb0h3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00s9xx0)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the live debate from the University of Brighton. On the panel. the former Labour minister, Roy Hattersley; the former Conservative minister, Douglas Hurd; the Liberal Democrats' Simon Hughes MP; and the newly elected Green Party MP, Caroline Lucas.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00sb0h5)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00sb0h8)
The Jubilee Singers

Writer Adrian Mitchell's drama about the extraordinary Jubilee Singers of Fisk University, Tennessee, who in the years immediately after slavery brought their great 'Sorrow Songs' from the plantations to Europe.

The late Adrian Mitchell, who died suddenly in 2008, was a much loved and revered poet, playwright and human rights campaigner. He was inspired to write this musical play by the true story of the Welsh journalist who toured with the black American Jubilee singers in their first European tour in the late nineteenth century.

The singers enchanted Queen Victoria and Gladstone, and Swing Low Sweet Chariot was heard in England for the first time when they sang it to packed concert halls throughout the country. Mitchell's play was conceived for the theatre but it has not yet had a stage production; this is its premiere; adapted for radio under the guidance of Adrian's widow Celia Mitchell.

The play stars London black gospel choir Nitrovox, with Musical directors Felix Cross and Allyson Devenish and a stellar black cast; Adjoa Andoh, Felix Dexter, Nadine Marshall, Tanya Moodie, Alibe Parsons, Clive Rowe and Ray Shell are joined by Jonathan Pryce who plays the Welsh journalist captivated by a completely new kind of song. He hears each singer's own story and begins to be entranced by one of them in particular, though their love appears to have no future, developing as it does under the shadow of war in Europe, and the inevitable barriers which nineteenth century culture placed between men and women of different race.

Cast
Adjoa Andoh
Felix Dexter
Nadine Marshall
Tanya Moodie
Alibe Parsons
Clive Rowe
Ray Shell
Jonathan Pryce

Producer: Marilyn Imrie
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 The Music Group (b00s97gt)
Series 4

Episode 5

The Thick of It's 'glummy mummy' Nicola Murray - better known as actress Rebecca Front - joins journalist James Brown and novelist Robert Hudson to explain why they've brought a slice of Sixties musical theatre, a punk rock rap record and a song about imminent environmental apocalypse to be scrutinised by the group this week.

Rebecca reveals how Sammy Davis Jr has helped her children's swimming lessons, and James tells tales of what happened when he visited some hip hop superheroes in the Hollywood Hills. Robert wonders why his father didn't give it all up for music and The Free Electric Band.

With Phil Hammond.

The music choices are:
The Rhythm of Life by Sammy Davis Jr
Sabotage by The Beastie Boys
We're Running Out by Albert Hammond

Producer: Tamsin Hughes
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00sb0nb)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Including a visit to the newly reopened Florence Nightingale Museum to cast new light on the lady with the lamp. Following a week of high level political compromise, former British Ambassador to the US Sir Christopher Meyer discusses what it takes to be a good negotiator. We discover the secret life of whales, and look at why Glee clubs are taking off in schools around Britain. There's debate over whether it can ever be acceptable to smack your child. And who exactly was Maid Marian - where did she originate and how has she changed in line with women's emancipation? Plus, pets - do they bring families together or cause more trouble than they're worth?


SAT 17:00 PM (b00sb2rm)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00sb2rp)
iPM, the programme that starts with its listeners. This week, Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey hear tales from the sleep deprived. We hear from the listener who stayed awake for 5 days to co-ordinate a rescue mission on Everest. And reporter Chris Vallance tries going without sleep the hard way.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00sb2rr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00sb2rt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00sb2rw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00sb2ry)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive is joined by The Man with the Golden Flute, Sir James Galway, as he tours the UK in celebration of his 70th birthday.

Award-winning actress Tamzin Outhwaite talks about her lead role in London West End's latest smash musical, Sweet Charity.

Democracy on Trial. not trouble for Cameron and Clegg already, but the latest series from Michael Portillo for Radio 4, exploring the roots and history of democracy.

Plus there's comedy from Tom Allen from his solo show, Women!

Music from country, folk and jazz Canadians Po' Girl and JT Nero.

Producers: Sukey Firth and Ben Toone.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b00sb2s0)
Series 8

Double Dip

Writer Neil Brand responds to the crisis in the Eurozone.

As the Greek economic crisis risks plunging the entire eurozone into meltdown, an Athens family go to hilarious lengths to conceal their wealth from revenue-hungry tax authorities.

Nicholas ..... Stephen Critchlow
Sofia ..... Anna Savva
Illiana ..... Lydia Leonard
Joe ..... Lloyd Thomas

Director: Peter Kavanagh.

To complement Radio 4's news and current affairs output, this weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. Each week we broadcast a 15 minute stand-alone piece of fiction created from scratch in the days leading up to transmission. The form and content is entirely led by the news topic so you can expect drama in a number of different guises, as well as poetry and prose.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00sb2s2)
Tom Sutcliffe and his guests Kevin Jackson, Linda Grant and Tom Dyckhoff review the week's cultural highlights including Robin Hood and Ray Robinson's novel Forgetting Zoe

Russell Crowe stars in Ridley Scott's film Robin Hood which strips away some of the mythology from the familiar story

In Ray Robinson's novel Forgetting Zoe a young man leaves his remote Arizona ranch home and abducts a 10 year old girl from a village in Newfoundland. The book explores the bond of intimacy that develops between captor and captive.

The play A Thousand Stars Explode in the Sky is, unusually, a collaboration between three playwrights - David Eldridge, Robert Holman, and Simon Stephens. The universe is going to end in three weeks and a family regroups for a final reunion.

Martin Amis's classic novel Money has been adapted for BBC2 by Tom Butterworth and Chris Hurford. It stars Nick Frost as the odious John Self, set on a downward trajectory by his lust for money.

Collect 2010 is the Craft Council's annual international art fair for contemporary objects. It acts as a marketplace for the best of contemporary crafts and a survey of what's happening globally in the field

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00sb2s4)
Unsung Heroes

Tucked out of sight in the pit of Covent Garden, the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House accompanies every world class performance presented on that stage. What does that glittering world look like from down there? Sarah Lenton, using a mixture of archive and new interviews with the musicians, follows the orchestra's fortunes from Handel's time to now.
We find out what it's like never to see a show, how to avoid flying daggers, why old London County Council drainpipes are indispensible to Tosca and where the brass players disappear to in very long breaks.
Supplementing the player's view of life is audio archive from the ROH and the BBC, including Thomas Beecham (who calmly extended one morning rehearsal to midnight,) Darcey Bussell, ("it is this battle between you" on the conductor versus the dancer,) and John Copley (on working on Tosca with Maria Callas.)

Producer: Philippa Ritchie.


SAT 21:00 Laurie Lee - Cider with Rosie (b00757rv)
Episode 2

In the second of two episodes dramatised by Nick Darke, young Loll experiences his first taste of the adult world.

Laurie.................Tim McInnerny
Mother................Niamh Cusack
Young Loll...........Sunny Leworthy
Rosie..................Emily Parrish

with Jennifer Compton, Paul Currier, Lisa Kay, Briony Fforde, Daniel Clifford, Jed Blacklock, David Goodland, Bill Wallis, Paul Dodgson, June Barrie, Chris Grimes, Megan Melish, Laura Beckett, Luke Glastonbury-Cole, Buster Reece, Alex Smith, Leanne French, Villagers of Slad and Rodborough.
Music by Paul Burgess
Directed by Viv Beeby and Jeremy Howe
Repeated Saturday 9.00 p.m.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00sb91f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Devil's Advocate (b00s9f92)
Terrorism

Two guest speakers are invited to turn their established views on their head and debate the contrary position.

The motion is: "Terrorism can only truly be defeated by ignoring it in our everyday lives."

The debate will explore the strategies and ideologies behind the war on terror: is it real or a construct made by governments, and if so for what gains?

Speaking in favour of the motion is former Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon, who spent almost six years in the Ministry of Defence during Tony Blair's time as Prime Minister and was responsible for much of the government's response to terrorism threats after 9/11.

Speaking against the motion is Jamie Bartlett from the think tank DEMOS, who in the past have argued that the state have overreacted to terrorism.

Richard Hollingham presents.

The programme is recorded in front of an invited audience at Judge Business School in Cambridge.

Producers: David Prest and Rose de Larrabeiti
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b00s97hj)
Series 24

2010 Heat 8

(8/13) Paul Gambaccini chairs the penultimate heat of the 2010 tournament. Three amateur music enthusiasts face Paul's questions on a wide variety of musical topics, from the baroque to rock. This week's competitors come from London, Worthing and Hale in Cheshire. As always, there'll be musical extracts and clues to suit every taste.

Producer Paul Bajoria

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


SAT 23:30 Back to the Hellespont (b00s8f1x)
It is 200 years since the poet Lord Byron swam the Hellespont, commemorating the feat in a poem and setting off a mania for swimming throughout Europe. He said it was his proudest moment.

His talent for swimming was one of the qualities that made him a legend and wherever he swam became almost a sacred spot. On the shore of the Bay of Spezzia, where Shelley drowned, stands a plinth dedicated to "Lord Byron, Noted English Swimmer and Poet". Note which comes first!

Comedian and Channel swimmer Doon Mackichan takes a look at the man and the event through his poetry and journal entries, comparing Byron's swim with the experiences of some of the swimmers who turn up every year for a race across this historical channel that separates Europe and Asia. Organised by the Canakkale Rotary Club, it is one of the highlights of the wild water swimming calendar.

Byron was inspired by Leander who, according to Ovid, nightly swam the strait to visit his beloved Hero and, after hours of love making, swam back home again. No slouch in the sack himself, Byron marvelled that Leander's conjugal powers were not "exhausted in his passage to Paradise".

Swimming gave Byron, lame as he was, some of the most exhilarating moments of his life. Only in swimming was he able to experience complete freedom of movement and freedom was a state he aspired to in all things - political and sexual.

How many of today's swimmers have been inspired by Byron to put pen to paper? The programme set them a challenge and you can hear some of the best entries alongside Byron's own effort.

The producer is Merilyn Harris, and this is a Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 16 MAY 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00sb9fr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b00bf6mn)
Anger

Kinetic

Andy McNab's 'Kinetic' takes us on a personal journey from a turbulent childhood into the army and ultimately into battle, where geopolitical anger is reduced to man against man.

Read by the author.

Part of a series in which five writers from a range of backgrounds shed light on an aspect of anger in a mix of fiction, memoir and thought pieces.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00sb9ft)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00sb9fw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00sb9fy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00sb9g0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00sb9g2)
The bells of the Parish Church of St Mary, Bishopstoke in Hampshire.


SUN 05:45 It Happened Here (b00sb9g4)
Lancaster House

In the concluding programme of his series showing how key political events have been shaped by where they took place, Peter Hennessy, the leading historian of post-war Britain, visits Lancaster House in central London.

This imposing town house overlooking Green Park has been the venue for successful talks on a range of post-imperial problems, most notably the agreement leading to black majority rule in Rhodesia and the subsequent creation of the independent state of Zimbabwe. But it has also been important in the modern history of Northern Ireland and in the continuing conflict in Afghanistan.

The programme traces the history of the Lancaster House Agreement on Rhodesia in 1979 involving in particular Lord Carrington, then British foreign secretary; Ian Smith, then Rhodesian prime minister; and the joint leaders of the Patriotic Front fighting against white minority rule - Robert Mugabe, leader of ZANU and later elected Zimbabwean president - and Joshua Nkomo, founder of ZAPU.

Peter Hennessy shows how Lancaster House itself played a decisive part in the final agreement, paving the way for elections in 1980, and how its association with these successful negotiations ensured that it played a part in international diplomacy in subsequent decades.

Producer: Simon Coates.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00sb9g6)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00sb9g8)
The Problem with Passion

Mark Tully asks what the self-help manuals really mean when they advise us to "discover our passion" if we want to live a fulfilled life. Is this advice well-founded, rooted in the spiritual notion of vocation, or rather a route to self-obsession and confusion?

Producer: Eley McAinsh
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00sb9gb)
Community Farm

A community farm in Sheffield who met online, rented land from a farmer and learned the hard way how to grow their own and keep bees, pigs, ducks and chickens. Caz Graham helps plant out the crops at Loxley Valley community farm, meeting some of the 20 families who farm there. They met on the Landshare website, and with help from the Soil Association and others, realised they could grow more and learn faster if they joined forces. Produced by Melvin Rickarby.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00sb9gf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00sb9gh)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00sb9gk)
Edward Stourton with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, familiar and unfamiliar.

On this week's Programme Edward Stourton talks to the Archbishop of York John Senatamu - and asks what values he thinks should under pin the new coalition government.

As the BBC's A History of the World series resumes on BBC Radio 4 tomorrow Andrew Motion talks to Edward Stourton about a wooden carving he acquired in New Delhi which helps him to be creative. And Charles Carroll visits a house in Northampton to see an ancient pot which was put in the house to stop witches and evil spirits entering.

As three muslim MPs enter Westminster for the first time Trevor Barnes reports on what difference will this make for the Muslim community and for women in particular? Will they feel more empowered and better represented in British politics?

A new book on Cardinal John Henry Newman, who is to be beatified by the Pope in Coventry this September is creating a bit of a stir but why is it proving to be controversal? Edward Stourton discusses it with the author John Cornwell and Jack Valero - Press officer for the Beatification of Cardinal Newman.

This week the Pope admitted for the first time that the Roman Catholic Church must accept responsibilty for the child sex abuse scandal that has engulfed it, earlier in the week the Archbishop of Vienna accused the vatican of blocking investigations into sex abuse. Eamon Duffy talks to Edward.

E-mail: sunday@bbc.co.uk

Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00sb9gm)
Brake

Jacqueline Wilson presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Brake.

Donations to Brake should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Brake. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Brake with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 1093244.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00sbbjs)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00sbbjv)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00sbbjx)
A service of Anglican Morning Prayer from St Mark's Church of Ireland in Portadown, County Armagh.
The Preacher is the Rector, Canon Jim Campbell and the service is led by Rev Carmen Hayes.
Music director: Stuart Nelson
Organist: Philip Elliott.
Producer: Bert Tosh
www.bbc.co.uk/religion.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00s9xx2)
Britain's New Politics

Simon Schama reflects on the political dramas following the general election and favourably compares the British system for a swift handover of power to the cumbersome American one. He praises the party leaders for managing, ultimately, to rise above the usual partisan rhetoric, and looks forward to a new politics in the spirit of Thomas Paine.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00sbbjz)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00sbbk1)
For detailed synopsis, see daily episodes

WRITTEN BY ..... CAROLINE HARRINGTON
DIRECTED BY ..... KATE OATES
EDITOR ..... VANESSA WHITBURN

JILL ARCHER .....PATRICIA GREENE
KENTON ARCHER ..... RICHARD ATTLEE
DAVID ARCHER ..... TIMOTHY BENTINCK
RUTH ARCHER ..... FELICITY FINCH
PIP ARCHER ..... HELEN MONKS
JOSH ARCHER ..... CIAN CHEESBROUGH
ELIZABETH PARGETTER ..... ALISON DOWLING
PAT ARCHER ..... PATRICIA GALLIMORE
HELEN ARCHER ..... LOUIZA PATIKAS
TOM ARCHER ..... TOM GRAHAM
BRIAN ALDRIDGE ..... CHARLES COLLINGWOOD
JENNIFER ALDRIDGE ..... ANGELA PIPER
MATT CRAWFORD ..... KIM DURHAM
LILIAN BELLAMY ..... SUNNY ORMONDE
FALLON ROGERS ..... JOANNA VAN KAMPEN
JOE GRUNDY ..... EDWARD KELSEY
EDDIE GRUNDY ..... TREVOR HARRISON
SUSAN CARTER ..... CHARLOTTE MARTIN
MIKE TUCKER ..... TERRY MOLLOY
VICKY TUCKER ..... RACHEL ATKINS
BRENDA TUCKER ..... AMY SHINDLER
JAZZER McCREARY ..... RYAN KELLY
JUDE SIMPSON ..... PIERS WEHNER
PAUL MORGAN ..... MICHAEL FENTON STEVENS
HARRY MASON ..... MICHAEL SHELFORD.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00sbbk3)
Rob Brydon

The comedian and actor Rob Brydon joins Kirsty Young on Desert Island Discs.

Growing up in Port Talbot, South Wales, he discovered performing when he was a teenager and says he came alive when he was on stage: so much so that he left school with only a couple of O Levels. For years, he made a comfortable but unfulfilling living recording voice-overs and working on a television shopping channel. He always dreamed of working in comedy, though, and eventually it was 'Marion and Geoff' and then 'Gavin and Stacey' that made him a household name.

Record: Born to Run - Bruce Springsteen
Book: Collected works of Dylan Thomas
Luxury: A guitar.


SUN 12:00 The Museum of Curiosity (b00s92p7)
Series 3

Episode 1

Prepare to have your synapses twisted into a string theorist's nightmare, as Professor Lloyd and his new curator, the startlingly insightful comedian Jon Richardson, hurriedly throw the dust covers off the Museum's clump of empty plinths for a brand new series of the BBC's most improving comedy panel show.

This week, fantasy novelist Sir Terry Pratchett offers them a Secret And Personal Extra Day Of The Week; cosmologist and author Marcus Chown donates a bizarre but plausible scientific theory of the afterlife known as the Enigma Point; and Shappi Khorsandi has somehow finds herself in a position to offer none other than Charlie Chaplin.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00sbbk5)
Soft Drinks

Sheila Dillon investigates the latest trends in the world of soft drinks and asks why a number of cities in the United States are trying to tax sugary drinks?

The City of Philadelphia, along with New York and Pittsburg, is attempting to levy a tax on so called sugar sweetened beverages. The Deputy Mayor of Philadelphia and Health Commissioner, Dr Donald Schwartz believes the link between sugary soda drinks and obesity is strong enough to justify a 2 cents per ounce tax to reduce consumption. A vote on the tax will take place at the end of May.

The American Beverage Association, which represents Pepsico and Coca Cola, strongly disagrees with the soda tax. It argues that it is not the solution to America's obesity problem and has spent millions of dollars lobbying Congress to convince policy makers to reject the idea.

Here, the Food Standards Agency is taking a different approach. It is working with the soft drinks industry to try and remove sugar from the regular brands of soft drink. So far only Pepsico has said it will commit to a 4% sugar reduction target. Sheila asks which of these two strategies will bring the greatest health benefits?

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00sbbk7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00sbbk9)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00s9xwr)
A correspondence edition presented by Eric Robson with Anne Swithinbank, Bunny Guinness & Pippa Greenwood. How good are supermarket bedding plants? We also bring you an update on our tomato trials at Sparsholt College.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Escape to the Country (b00sbcdh)
Gertrude Jekyll and the Suburban Countryside

How gardens became more than just lawns and borders, and transformed instead into a microcosm of the natural world.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00sgzm0)
Now, Voyager

A dowdy, frustrated spinster from a wealthy New England family, living with her overpowering mother in the stiflingly repressive Boston of the inter-war years, suffers a nervous breakdown after an unhappy love affair.

Partially restored under the wise guidance of a psychiatrist, she is urged by her fashionably elegant sister-in-law to have a beauty makeover and to undertake a Mediterranean cruise. Physically transformed, she meets on board an architect, Jerry Durrance, with whom slowly, as she gains confidence in her new image, she falls in love. But he is married with children he loves, and the affair cannot have a happy ending.

Circumstances lead her to form a special bond with his vulnerable 12-year-old daughter, and finally she settles for a loving relationship with him and the child. The famous last line, of both the film and the book, is: "Jerry, don't let's ask for the moon. We have the stars!"

Cast
Charlotte ..... Sarah Lancashire
Jerry ..... Anthony Head
Mother ..... Joan Plowright
Lisa ..... Lysette Anthony
Jaquith ..... John Rowe
Dora ..... Debora Weston
Mack ..... Sam Douglas
Giuseppe ..... Nunzio Caponio
Tina ..... Elisha Mansuroglu
Miss Trask ..... Joanna McCallum
Lloyd ..... Jon Glover
Hilda ..... Alice Hart

Based on the novel by Olive Higgins Prouty.
Dramatised by Neville Teller.
Directed by Andy Jordan.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00sbcj1)
Mariella Frostrup talks to the Australian novelist Christos Tsiolkas, whose debut The Slap won the 2009 Commonwealth Writers Prize. The book tells the story of a father who rashly smacks a child who is not his own at a family barbecue - and the drastic consequences of that event. The author talks about the incident that prompted the novel, and reflects on his experience of multicultural Australia.

A new series of novels about the teenage years of Sherlock Holmes, authorised by the author's literary estate, is launched this month. Mariella is joined by the media lawyer Duncan Lamont and the critic Peter Kemp to discuss the rights and wrongs of writing a book using another author's hero.

And D J Taylor offer's a Reader's Guide to the work of J B Priestley, a hugely successful and prolific writer who was once removed from the BBC airwaves for being too popular.

Producer: Thomas Morris.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00sbcj3)
Roger McGough introduces requests for poems learnt by heart while at school. Including classic works by AA Milne, Thomas Hardy and 'Anon'.


SUN 17:00 Bagram Airbase (b00sbckp)
Hilary Andersson investigates numerous allegations of the recent abuse of prisoners held at the US military's Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan. The old Bagram Internment Facility, notorious for torture under President Bush, has been replaced by a brand new prison called Parwan where conditions are significantly better under President Obama. However many prisoners say that before they are transferred to the new prison they were abused in a separate, top secret detention site on the airbase.
Prisoners who spoke to the BBC call the secret site the "Black Jail" and say there they were subjected to sleep deprivation, prolonged isolation and extremes of cold.

The US military authorities deny the existence of this site and say detainees in Afghanistan are all treated humanely and in accordance with the law.

Hilary also investigates the cases of two men who were catpured by British forces in 2004 and then transferred to Bagram, even though there was evidence that they were at risk of torture there. She discovers that one of the detainees has become mentally unstable since his arrest. Why did the British government do this and why is it not seeking the men's release?

Producer: Caroline Finnigan.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b00sb2s0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00sbcpy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00sbcq0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00sbcq2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00sbcq4)
James Walton makes his selection from the last seven days of BBC Radio

In Pick of the Week, James Walton travels from Burma to Orkney, from the outer reaches of the universe to a small record shop in Manchester. He hears perhaps the best song ever written about bidding for a toaster on eBay and has a ringside seat for the fights between Rupert Murdoch and the printworkers, Tippi Hedren and Alfred Hitchcock and of course the big one: Mark Lawson versus Russell Crowe. So, seconds out for Pick of the Week.

Last Orders At the Spinning Disc - Radio 2
Greed All About It - Radio 4
Front Row - Radio 4
Today - Radio 4
Global Perspective - World Service
The Museum of Curiosity - Radio 4
Democracy on Trial - Radio 4
Comprehensively Eton - Radio 4
Mark Steel's In Town - Radio 4
Keep Calm and Carry on - The Vera Lynn Story - Radio 2
The Tudor Tarantino - Radio 4
The Donor Trail - Radio 4
Why Go? - Radio 4
So Wrong it's Right - Radio 4
The Shuttleworths - Radio 4

PHONE: 0370 010 0400
FAX: 0161 244 4243
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw
Producer: Cecile Wright.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00sbcvn)
Alistair is trying to get more takers for the single wicket, as they are a dozen short for the competition. Brenda tells him she and Tom can't play this year; Tom's too busy and she's just started a new job in Leicester. Alistair tries to persuade Ed to enter, but after commenting on Harry's crafty move in putting down the Bull as his Ambridge address, he also says no. Alistair hopes that Harry's new blog about the single wicket might inspire more entrants.

Vicky is still looking for buyers for the veal calves but hasn't got any definite orders, other than the interest from Grey Gables. Ed wants to her to give up the idea. Vicky agrees that Ed shouldn't take on any more calves at the moment, and if the present seven calves sell at a shortfall she'll make up the money herself, but she wants to try other avenues before throwing in the towel. Ed reluctantly agrees. Vicky sets up a meeting with Tom to pitch her ideas.

Matt, who gets out of prison this week, apologizes to Lilian. He's not trying to steamroller her about the business and he's looking forward to coming home to her.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00sbcvq)
Americana, presented by Matt Frei from Washington DC,

So Wall Street needs new rules: This week Matt hears from Elizabeth Warren, Gottlieb Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She's devoted much of the past three decades to studying the economics of middle class families. Now she talks about her achievements as chair of the five-member Congressional Oversight Panel created to oversee the implementation of the $700 billion bank bailout..

Also - one of America's most celebrated composers John Adams joins us. The master of the minimalist, he makes the case for leaving popular culture at the door.

Director Neil N. LaBute is with us too - perhaps best known for films like 'The Shape of Things', 'Death at a Funeral' and 'In the Company of Men'. On Americana he reveals what reactions he hopes to provoke with his latest project; a TV series about white supremacists.

And the food critic Todd Kliman pops the cork on America's best keep vineal secret. Once the favourite tipple of Presidents and the envy of European vintners, the Norton grape is coming back at last, albeit quietly.

Our email is americana@bbc.co.uk - and follow us on twitter @bbcamericana.


SUN 19:45 Book at Bedtime (b00s5ncd)
A Perpetual Love Affair

Jan Morris's Venice

Henry James felt that the inevitable relationship with Venice was "a perpetual love affair", and certainly many writers have found that to be true.

In today's piece about the city, travel writer Jan Morris notes particularly the children of Venice - and the cats. The reader is Selina Cadell, and the programme is abridged and produced by Christine Hall.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00sbhzw)
The election is over and Radio 4's schedules are almost back to normal. A panel of listeners discuss the extensive radio coverage with one of the editors responsible.

Also on the programme, with Radio 4's The Complete Smiley almost coming to an end, Roger Bolton meets the star of the series - Simon Russell Beale.

Producer: Brian McCluskey
A City Broadcasting production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00s9xwt)
On Last Word this week:

Peter Heathfield. As General Secretary of the National Union of Mineworkers he stood four square behind Arthur Scargill - who pays tribute - during the strike of the 1980s.

Also the singer and actress Lena Horne who rose above racial discrimination to become an international star.

The ultra Orthodox Rabbi Moshe Hirsch, who was strongly opposed to Zionism and the state of Israel and became an advisor to Yasser Arafat.

Marguerite Garden the fourteen year old girl who carried secret messages for the French resistance and saved the lives of many British airmen.

And Peter O'Donnell who created the cartoon adventures of Modesty Blaise - the daring action woman with fans around the world.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00sb0gz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00sb9gm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00sf8r9)
Not Just Silicon

Silicon Valley California is the place where for the past fifty years new enterprise has thrived more effectively than anywhere else in the world. So how is the Valley tackling recession?

Peter Day hears from some brand new companies trying to reshape the future in the same old vigorous way.

Producers: Sandra Kanthal and Neil Koenig.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00sbpk1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00sbpk3)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b00sgy8m)
Episode 1

BBC Radio 4 brings back a much loved TV favourite - What the Papers Say. It does what it says on the tin. In each programme a leading political journalist has a wry look at how the broadsheets and red tops treat the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond. This week Kevin Maguire of The Daily Mirror takes the chair and the editor is Catherine Donegan.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00s9xww)
The star of Gigi, Leslie Caron, discusses her star spangled career with Francine Stock.

Memorable as the unmarried mother in the groundbreaking British drama The L-Shaped Room, Caron discusses working with Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire and Cary Grant in the golden age of Hollywood.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00sb9g8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 17 MAY 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00sbqjs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00s9f5l)
Evacuation

In 1939 over three quarters of a million unattended schoolchildren left Britain's towns for the supposed safety of the countryside. They were the first wave of evacuees and they stunned their rural hosts with their combination of lice, bedwetting, bad table manners, dirtiness, inadequate clothing and malnutrition. For the first time the realities of urban deprivation were brought out of the shadows of the city and into the light of public opinion. What effect did the experience have on social policy in Britain? Laurie Taylor talks to John Welshman, the author of a new book Churchill's Children: The Evacuee experience in war time Britain and also to the social historian Selina Todd.
Also on the programme the extraordinary enthusiasm for the barbecue which gripped America in the years after the war. Laurie talks to Tim Miller about the birth of what has become known as 'Patio Daddy-o'.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00sb9g2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqr7)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00sbr18)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqt5)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00sbr4p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00sbr6r)
Presented from Wales by the Rev. Peter Baker.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00sbr8k)
Charlotte Smith examines DEFRA's £3 billion budget, and looks where cuts might fall. Former MP Michael Jack has spent years scrutinising DEFRA, and suggests its 10,000 staff may be trimmed.
And as apple trees continue to blossom, Farming Today visits a champion cider maker, who explains the challenge of growing champion apples.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00scgxt)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00sbryx)
With Justin Webb and John Humphrys. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00scgxw)
On Start the Week, with Andrew Marr, the historian and former advisor to Margaret Thatcher, Norman Stone, gives his personal take on the winners and losers of the Cold War. The journalist, Ben Judah witnessed the toppling of the President of Kyrgyzstan last month and reflects on the fate of this former Soviet state. The Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor explores what historical objects can tell us about leadership and the divisions of power, and Marina Warner looks back at the art and music that expresses a genuine dialogue between East and West.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbryz)
Empire Builders (300 BC - AD 10)

Head of Alexander

Another chance to hear the first programmes in the second part of Neil MacGregor's global history told through objects from the British Museum. This week Neil is exploring the lives and methods of powerful rulers around the world 2000 years ago, asking what enduring qualities are needed for the perfect projection of power.

Contributors include the economist Amartya Sen, the politician Boris Johnson, political commentator Andrew Marr and the writer Ahdaf Soueif.

Neil begins by telling the story of Alexander the Great through a small silver coin, one that was made years after his death but that portrays an idealised image of the great leader as a vigorous young man. Neil then considers how the great Indian ruler Ashoka turned his back on violence and plunder to promote the ethical codes inspired by Buddhism. Neil tells the life story of Ashoka through a remaining fragment of one of his great pillar edicts and considers his legacy in the Indian sub-continent today. The third object in today's omnibus is one of the best known in the British Museum, the Rosetta Stone. Neil takes us to the Egypt of Ptolemy V and describes the astonishing contest that led to the most famous bits of deciphering in history - the cracking of the hieroglyphics on the Rosetta Stone. An exquisite lacquer wine cup takes Neil to Han Dynasty China in the fourth programme and the omnibus concludes with the 2000 year old head of one of the world's most notorious rulers - Caesar Augustus.

Producers: Anthony Denselow and Paul Kobrak.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00sbvvr)
How do we view women who leave their children? We talk to two authors who've written about it. Jane Ashley, one of Laura Ashley's daughters, worked for Laura Ashley for twelve years from the age of 18, helping to create their iconic image through her photographs. She talks about her new exhibition, the early days with Laura Ashley, and her current work for the Laura Ashley Foundation. British jails are failing to investigate serious allegations of male rape according to Stephen Shaw, the prisons' ombudsman - we discuss the issue with two experts and hear from the mum of a man who claims he was raped whilst in jail. And you can hear the music of the jazz harpist Lucinda Belle.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00sbvwb)
The Rabbit House

Going Underground

Laura Alcoba was the daughter of members of the Montoneros, a militant left-wing organisation engaged in a bitter and violent conflict with the military government in Argentina in what later came to be called the 'dirty war' of the 1970s.

Her memoir of living through this turbulent time is a powerful and moving account of political upheaval seen thorugh the eyes of a young child, who knows enough to be frightened, but not enough to understand. With her father in prison, she and her mother move into a safe house in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, where they run a rabbit breeding business as a cover for the backroom operation of the Montoneros' clandestine printing press, turning out copies of their revolutionary newspaper for distribution all over the city.

The seven year-old Laura is brought up among secrecy, subterfuge and silence, and learns very early the importance of keeping hr muth shut, and the danger of loose talk or careless behaviour. But there's also love and laughter in the Rabbit House, and a comforting sense of loyalty and friendship - which she only later discovers to have been betrayed most horribly.

Laura Alcoba's story of living through violence and political turbulence is about the Argentina of only thirty years ago, and she speaks for a generation who carry the scars of that time. The emotions she remembers from her childhood are those still felt by children all around the world living on the front line of fear, violence and uncertainty as adults wars rage around them. Laura Alcoba now lives in Paris.

Adult Laura: Saira Todd
Young Laura: Bethan Barke
Mother: Jenny Coverack
Father: Jay Villiers
Grandmother: Merelina Kendall
Grandfather: Rod Beacham
Diana: Lisa Coleman
Engineer: Vincenzo Pellegrino
Chicha: Sonia Elliman
Shopkeeper/Guard: Charlotte Ellis

Producer: Sara Davies

The Rabbit House by Laura Alcoba is translated by Polly McClean and dramatised for radio by Sheila Yeger.


MON 11:00 The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll (b00s77wp)
Bob Dylan's biographer Howard Sounes casts new light on a song that has haunted two families for nearly 50 years - Dylan's account of the killing of a black hotel worker.

"The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll" is part of both the history of folk music and the Civil Rights struggle, so familiar to Dylan fans that it is almost the stuff of legend, so shocking in content that it seems like a story from the days of slavery.

Yet this crime took place less than 50 years ago, and only few miles from where a black president sits in the White House.

On the evening of Friday 8 February 1963, William Zantzinger, 24-year-old owner of an old-style tobacco plantation, turned up drunk at a charity ball in Baltimore, Maryland. Hattie Carroll was one of the African-Americans serving the guests at a time when America was still segregated.

Zantzinger yelled at Carroll for not pouring his drink quickly enough and tapped her with his walking cane. Carroll collapsed and died of heart failure. She was 51 years old, and left 9 orphaned children, not ten as Dylan sang. Dylan was correct however in reporting that Zantzinger was lightly treated - he received six months for manslaughter.

Who was William Zantzinger and what is known about his victim? Howard Sounes, author of the celebrated Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan, introduces us to witnesses to the crime; we hear dialogue from the trial; and gain a fuller appreciation of killer and victim from their surviving friends. Sounes even locates Zantzinger's cane, an astonishing find which the presenter likens to handling John Dillinger's pistol.

We also hear Zantzinger's voice, cursing Dylan unrepentantly, in what is believed to be his only recorded interview before his recent death.

Producer: Sara Parker

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2010.


MON 11:30 Rudy's Rare Records (b00nfqzj)
Series 2

Daddy Cool

When his teenage son won't be seen in public with him, Adam is determined to prove that he's got what it takes to be cool.

And his elderly dad, Rudy, is on hand to give some unexpected advice.

Sitcom by Danny Robins, set in the finest, feistiest, family-run record shop in Birmingham.

Adam ...... Lenny Henry
Rudy ...... Larrington Walker
Richie ...... Joe Jacobs
Tasha ...... Natasha Godfrey
Clifton ...... Jeffery Kissoon
Doreen ...... Claire Benedict
DJ Karel ...... Andrew Brooke
Tunde ...... Femi Elufowoju
Rapper ...... Doc Brown.

Additional material by Doc Brown and Leah Chillery.

Producer: Lucy Armitage

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2009.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00scbg4)
The mental health charity Mind tells us about its new survey which shows support in the workplace for employees with mental health problems is wanting. Julian Worricker also talks to a small business which is having to cut the opportunities it provides to people with mental health issues because of the impact of the recession.

Also on the programme, the Australian motorcycle club for the over 50s which has now been set up in the UK; and the food writer Stefan Gates tells us why, despite their bad reputation, some food additives and e-numbers might actually be good for us.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00scbj7)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00scbpp)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Counterpoint (b00scgxy)
Series 24

2010 Heat 9

(9/13) The ninth and last heat of the 2010 contest comes from Manchester. Paul Gambaccini welcomes three contestants from Scotland and the North of England to the general knowledge music quiz. One of them will win the last remaining place in the semi-finals, which begin next week. The musical extracts in the programme encompass classical composers old and modern, jazz, rock and pop, and musical theatre.

Producer Paul Bajoria

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2010.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00sbcvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00s9zkd)
The End of the World

by Danny Brocklehurst

It's 1983: the Cold War is raging; Thatcher is in goverment; Britain is in recession and seventeen year old Simon Miller, living in the shadow of Sellafield is haunted by fears of nuclear holocaust. When he falls in love with Tasha, a beautiful anti-nuclear activist, he sees his chance to make a difference.

Simon............. Bryan Dick
Tasha..............Olivia Hallinan
Jo-Jo...............Jake Norton
Kenneth..........Neil Dudgeon
Liz................. Jacqueline Leonard
Mickey........... Aidan Parsons
Iain................ John Catterall
Tina................Emma Hartley-Miller
Teacher... .......Balvinder Sopal
Sergeant.........Russell Richardson

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00sb2s4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Running Away (b00f37gc)
Shami Chakrabarti

Shami Chakrabarti, director of the pressure group Liberty, heads for the British Film Institute to indulge in her favourite form of escape.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00sbbk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Traveller's Tree (b00schhd)
Series 6

Rail Holidays

Katie Derham looks at the growing number of environmentally savvy travellers considering rail holidays as their first choice.

Rail travel has been a favoured choice for thousands of holidaymakers for many years, and the popularity of the railway holiday is growing and growing. New high-speed lines are opening around the world, and the scenic railway tour business is experiencing a boom.

We hear from Nick Southgate about his metaphysical perspective of rail travel, and joining Katie in the studio are guests Anthony Lambert, travel writer and journalist and Mark Smith, founder of rail travel information station 'The Man in Seat Sixty-One'.

We also hear a listener report from Richard Biddlecombe taking a Grand tour around Europe, and from travel writer Melissa Shales as she attempts to traverse the continent of Africa by rail.

Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown and Just Radio co-production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 17:00 PM (b00sccg7)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00sccnh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b00schhg)
Series 3

Episode 2

While Jon Richardson is detained by the volcano Eyjafjallajokull, John Lloyd is joined by emergency guest curator Dave Gorman to welcome poet Ruth Padel, Madness frontman Suggs and Bo Selecta comedian Leigh Francis, who are offering us the Great Exhibition of 1851, a tiger reserve and some Spidermans, and all for public display.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00scbqg)
Jazzer is helping Tom with the busy and backbreaking work of moving the pigs and pig arks. Jazzer is still annoyed about Harry taking part in the single wicket competition. He thinks he's too big for his boots. Jazzer also moans about the fact that he's now got people to sponsor him for charity. Tom isn't sympathetic. Jazzer should take him on at cricket or shut up.

Vicky pitches her veal and ham pie idea to Tom. She could supply the veal, he could supply the pork and make the pies. Tom says he'll look at the figures and think about it.

Paul comes to see Lilian, the day before Matt comes out of prison. He desperately tells her that he loves her. Is there any chance that she loves him? Lilian sadly turns him down. She admits that she has feelings for him, but her future lies with Matt. Paul leaves, wishing her all the luck in the world.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00scct8)
Novelist David Mitchell; Keane; and a review of Money

With Mark Lawson. The author David Mitchell, whose previous novels Cloud Atlas and number9dream were shortlisted for the Booker, discusses his latest: The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, set in Japan at the turn of the nineteenth century.

Tom Chaplin and Richard Hughes from the band Keane speak about the release of their new EP Night Train, the introduction of guitars into their music and their feelings about David Cameron using one of their tracks as walk-on music.

An adaptation of Martin Amis' cult novel Money is the latest instalment from BBC Two's 1980s season. Nick Frost and Jerry Hall star in the satirical take on greed, excess and ambition. Hermione Lee reviews.

Producer Georgia Mann.


MON 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbryz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


MON 20:00 Tiger v Dragon (b00schhj)
China's String of Pearls

This is the Asian century. It will be increasingly dominated by two countries that share nearly half of the world's population: India and China. But the hype around the economic growth of these two Asian giants, lumped hopefully together as "Chindia," has obscured some much darker truths.

In this provocative series of programmes, Mukul Devichand travels across frontiers, from the controversial new ports China is building in the Indian Ocean to the poor interior villages of these continent-sized countries. He examines whether China's authoritarianism may in fact be doing much more for the poor than India's sometimes bloody democracy. He also looks at how the old nationalist rivalries mingle with the intense hunger for oil and other natural resources. Far from the dream of a co-operative "Chindia," there's a risk India and China may well end up at odds with each other in what some have called an Asian cold war.

Part 2: China's String of Pearls

India and China are newly rising powers but also old military rivals, ancient civilisations which have stared at each other across the bitterly disputed Tibetan plateau for millenia. As the world's most populous nations now enter an era of rapid growth, they have renewed their diplomatic and trade ties. But how will the old acrimony shape the new faultlines of power in Asia and the wider world?

In the second programme of the series, Mukul Devichand travels from India to China via the network of new ports China is building in countries around India. In the chaotic port city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, he speaks to Naval officers and Chinese workers about the "String of Pearls" -- deep sea ports that China is now helping to build and which some accuse of having a dual military use.

On the other side, frustrated Chinese voices claim their generosity and their country's rise to world power status is being deliberately misunderstood. The concluding episode of Tiger v. Dragon questions key Chinese, Indian and American figures about the way in which the new world order is being shaped in Asia, and asks what it means for us all.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00s9g08)
The Pakistani Taliban

The Pakistani army has quashed the Taliban in tribal areas such as Swat by the use of military force. But has the problem of militancy been resolved? And how serious is the threat from Islamist insurgents in the heartlands of Pakistan, particularly the Punjab?

Owen Bennett-Jones investigates the appeal of these movements to young Pakistanis. How much are they about fundamentalist Islam? And how much are they a reaction to grievances about land, jobs and poverty?
Owen travels across the country, meeting both feudal landowners and the young Punjabis who are attracted by the lure of militancy.

Presenter: Owen Bennett-Jones
Producer: Shelley Thakral.


MON 21:00 Material World (b00s9gbn)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. This week the dangers of deep water exploration. How do engineers drill wells into the rock below the sea bed? How do they overcome the different currents that drag the mile long steel tube in different directions?

The maths behind electoral reform - is there such a thing as a fair voting system?

The fourth of our finalists from our science talent search "So you want to be a scientist?" meets her mentor and decides on how best to track snails from her garden.

And fifty years of the laser - what will be next fifty bring - we find out if nuclear fusion is a reality?

The producer is Ania Lichtarowicz.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00scgxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00sccwh)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00scd2g)
Will Thailand's crackdown on protestors turn more bloody?

How easy is it to cancel government spending projects?

Could Democrats lose Arkansas in primaries tomorrow?

And is the Chinese housing bubble about to burst?

With Robin Lustig.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00scd77)
No And Me

Episode 6

13-year-old Lou has developed an unlikely friendship with a homeless young woman called No. Lou's parents have agreed to meet No with a view to taking her in. But No is in a bad way.

Emerald O'Hanrahan reads from this tale of adolescence and homelessness, set in contemporary Paris.

Written by Delphine de Vigan
Read by Emerald O'Hanrahan
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00s93v1)
Michael Rosen on the world of words and the way we use them. This week, the language of football. As the World Cup approaches, has football chatter become more important than the sport itself?

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.


MON 23:30 When Real Women Wore Minis and Real Men Drove Them (b00k7c1x)
Francesco da Mosto celebrates the original Italian Job film from 1969 and explores the movie's enduring popularity.



TUESDAY 18 MAY 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00sbqjj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbryz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqp5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00sbqt7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqr9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00sbr1b)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00sbr4r)
Presented from Wales by the Rev. Peter Baker.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00sbr6t)
As Natural England look at reintroducing Sea Eagles in East Anglia, farmers consider keeping lambs in polytunnels, to protect them from the birds of prey. Anna Hill reports, and travels to the north Norfolk coast, to look at how DEFRA spends money on protecting fragile coastline.

Also, as the average age of a farmer rises every year, there's a need for new, young blood to come into the industry. Farming Today meets agriculture students from the Duchy College in Cornwall, to discover their plans for the future.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00sbr8m)
With Sarah Montague and John Humphrys. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Democracy on Trial (b00scjdz)
Episode 2

Michael Portillo goes back in time to trace the difficult and often dangerous journey the democratic ideal has taken to arrive at the version we recognise today.

Although the democratic experiment began in fifth century BC Athens, it wasn't without its critics at the time and it didn't survive. Despite Roman talk of "the people", the form of government that Plato and Pericles would recognise lay largely untouched until the Renaissance - and even then it was dismissed as a route to chaos and mob rule. Michael Portillo looks back at the statebuilders of the England, France and America as they grappled with the problems of how to enfranchise the people.

The story of compromise, confusion and conflict that surrounds the ideal of democracy back then helps us understand its frailties now, as well as the difficulties that can arise when countries rush to adopt this complicated and unruly form of government.

Producer: Philip Sellars.


TUE 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz1)
Empire Builders (300 BC - AD 10)

Pillar of Ashoka

The history of the world as told through objects at the British Museum arrives in India over 2000 years ago. Throughout this week Neil MacGregor is exploring the lives and methods of powerful new leaders.

Today he looks at how the Indian ruler Ashoka turned his back on violence and plunder to promote the ethical codes inspired by Buddhism. He communicated to his vast new nation through a series of edicts written on rocks and pillars. Neil tells the life story of Ashoka through a remaining fragment of one of his great pillar edicts and considers his legacy in the Indian sub-continent today. Amartya Sen and the Bhutanese envoy to Britain, Michael Rutland, describe what happened when Buddhism and the power of the state come together.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00sbtm7)
Presented by Jane Garvey.

Why aren't there more women in the judiciary? President Obama announced last week that he is nominating U.S. Solicitor General Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court. Her appointment would mean that there would be three women sitting in the American Supreme Court. But in the UK only one woman sits in the Supreme Court and the judiciary remains an overwhelmingly male institution. So why are there still so few women in senior positions and what can be done to make posts more representative of gender? Jane visits the Women's Library in London which has opened up its archives to artists for the first time. As the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority launch a review into the shortage of donor eggs in the UK, we ask whether women should be able to sell their eggs? And how do you help a child cope with bullying or bereavement, alcoholism or abandonment? There are now many children's stories which address such issues and Julia Eccleshare and Damian Kelleher make their recommendations.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00sbvvt)
The Rabbit House

The Reunion Doll

Laura Alcoba's powerful and moving account of a growing up as the child of militant members of the Montoneros during Argentina's 'dirty war' in the 1970s.

Young Laura is staying with her grandparents, while her father 's in prison and her mother goes into hiding. It's been two months since she's seen them. After a visit to her father in prison, Laura goes with her grandparents to meet her mother in a busy square, to be confronted by a woman with heavily dyed hair she barely recognises who takes her off to buy another doll. Each time she and her parents are reunited after a period apart, Laura gets a doll, and she's beginning to build up quite a collection.

Adult Laura: Saira Todd
Young Laura: Bethan Barke
Mother: Jenny Coverack
Father: Jay Villiers
Grandmother: Merelina Kendall
Grandfather: Rod Beacham
Diana: Lisa Coleman
Engineer: Vincenzo Pellegrino
Chicha: Sonia Elliman
Shopkeeper/Guard: Charlotte Ellis

Producer: Sara Davies

The Rabit House by Laura Alcoba is translated from the French by Polly McLean, and adapted for radio by Sheila Yeger.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b00scjnb)
Series 1

Episode 7

The Black Bear of North America is a common species; over a million of them roam the forests of the mid west and eastern states. The perception of bears in the United States and Canada is mixed. To some people bears are revered as an emblem of wildness, perhaps as much as the Bald Eagle. To others bears are dangerous and a nuisance. For sure, Black and Brown [Grizzly] bears are different characters. And only recently, has the more gentle Black Bear been taken off the vermin list of America and been reclassified as "big game" - this new classification reduces the hunting season for bears from any-time of year to a six week window.

Saving Species will be following the science and fortunes of Black Bears over the year and in this week's programme we have our first report from the wildwoods of Minnesota and a guaranteed close encounter with this much misunderstood bear.

We broadcast another edition of our "Memories are Made of This" - these are your memories of past abundances of British wildlife. This week you remember when Lapwings were considerably more numerous than today.

And we'll be talking to the British Trust for Ornithology about their ongoing work retrieving the data loggers they fitted to Nightingales last year. Where Nightingales go to winter, surprisingly, is still a mystery. Maybe we will find out in this programme.

Kelvin Boot will be on the show as ever with a global news roundup of other wildlife news.

Presented by Brett Westwood
Produced by Mary Colwell
Editor Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 Young, Gifted and Black (b00scjx2)
Adjoa Andoh reflects on the brief but highly influential career of the African American playwright and social activist.

In 1959, Hansberry became the first black woman to have a play produced on Broadway and the youngest recipient of the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. An eloquent and impassioned orator for civil rights, Lorraine Hansberry quickly became one of the most famous women in the country.

Friend to the likes of Paul Robeson, James Baldwin and Nina Simone, who composed 'To Be Young, Gifted and Black' in her honour, Hansberry's prescient speeches and artfully constructed drama played a key role in the ongoing civil rights struggle.

In this programme we hear from her sister Mamie Hansberry, poet and playwright Jackie Kay, Chicago Southside historian Timuel Black and theatre directors Michael Buffong and Paulette Randall.

Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00scbds)
The dust has settled, the new government's in place. Time now to focus on the big issue: how to deal with the massive deficit? We'll get more details in the Emergency Budget on 22nd June. But the coalition government has already said spending cuts, not tax increases, will be the main focus in trying to reduce the UK's huge annual borrowing - expected to reach £163 billion this year. If you work in the public sector - health, education, the armed forces - what kind of an impact will planned cuts have on your job? If you're in business is this the right way forward? How do you get spending down year on year without the risk of sending the UK economy back into recession? Share your ideas by calling us on 03700 100 400 or email youandyours@bbc.co.uk.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00scbg6)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00scbj9)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 The Music Group (b00b529t)
Series 2

Episode 5

Comedian and GP Dr Phil Hammond asks three guests to play the track of their choice. With Nick Clegg, Kate Adie and Robin Denselow.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00scbqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00scv5n)
Sean Grundy - The Recordist

By Sean Grundy

An illicit affair proves both destructive and a useful teaching aid. Starring John Gordon Sinclair, Sharon Horgan and Gemma Jones.

Stuart is a freelance surveillance expert who teaches covert 'information gathering' to new Intelligence recruits. As part of his work he 'bugs' friends & family, including his wife, Penny. When he discovers that she's having an affair with a man called Neil, his work colleague, Ren, offers her own skills in 'enhanced interview techniques' to help, but Stuart declines. He realises that the secret affair could make an engaging teaching aid. Initially, his students are slightly unsettled but very intrigued. The affair becomes the main focus of the curriculum, and the group study how to 'bug' all manner of difficult situations, such as an impromptu hotel room, a car in a field, busy nightclub, and hot-air balloon. But Penny feels terrible about the affair and Stuart discovers emotions deeply buried and things soon spiral out of control.

'The Recordist' is a dark, offbeat comedy, looking at the price love pays for clear acoustics in Dolby NR.

Cast:

Stuart - John Gordon Sinclair
Penny - Sharon Horgan
Ren - Gemma Jones
Neil - Ed Weeks
Reese - Fergus Craig
Munro - Nick Mohammed
Penny's Mum - Phyllida Nash

Directed / Produced by Alison Crawford.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00scv5q)
Vanessa Collingridge returns with a new series of Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

This episode features the nineteenth-century Somerset boot-maker who helped improve the lives of millions of amputees and changed the course of medical history; and in the North West a literary scheme that is using historical fiction to help readers unlock the past. But is there a temptation for a good story to get in the way of historical facts?

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00scvdq)
Why, Robot?

The Melancholy

A story by Toby Litt inspired by Issac Asimov's three laws of robotics.

It is 2068 AD. Local application 13/13 has disappeared mysteriously on Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. In her official report, Chief Engineer Chandi Kane arrives at an all-too-human set of conclusions.

Writer Toby Litt was born in 1968 and grew up in Bedfordshire. In 2003, he was named one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. His eleventh novel, King Death, will be published in May 2010.

Written by Toby Litt
Read by Indira Varma

Producer - Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 Running Away (b00f671m)
Andrew Sachs

Actor Andrew Sachs needs little persuasion to take a well-earned break from penning his autobiography and enjoy a grand day out at the zoo - and a stroll down memory lane.


TUE 16:00 It's My Story (b00scvqh)
The Girl in the Picture

Kim Phuc, subject of an iconic picture from the Vietnam War, tells her story as she's reunited with the ITN reporter who helped save her life 38 years ago.

The image of a nine year old girl screaming as she ran naked down a road in Trang Bang after suffering extreme burns in a Napalm chemical attack became one of the most famous photographs of the Vietnam War. But what happened to the 'Girl in the Picture'?

In an emotional meeting, former ITN reporter Christopher Wain - who helped to save her life that day - is reunited with Kim for the first time in 38 years.

They recall the events of June 8th 1972 and Kim hears for the first time the lengths to which Chris went to get her life-saving treatment.

She tells how Nick Ut's Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph has helped and haunted her in equal measure. She explains how she was recruited as a 'symbol of war' before finally escaping Government control by fleeing to Canada.

She managed to live a normal life for a while but was discovered by the press again in the 1990s. She soon realised she had to take control of the photograph and decided to use her fame to help others by establishing a charity for child victims of war called 'The Kim Phuc Foundation'.

The burns Kim suffered in 1972 left her scarred for life and still take their toll on her body. She's in constant pain and has to take regular breaks. But it doesn't stop her living a busy life.

As part of the programme, Kim also meets Ali Abbas, who lost both his arms and sixteen members of his family in the Iraq War. The pair share their experiences and Kim offers him advice on living a normal life and finding a way to forgive.

The programme is presented by Christopher Wain.

Producer: Ashley Byrne.
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00scvqk)
Series 21

Carl Sagan

Physicist Brian Cox tells Matthew Parris how Carl Sagan's Cosmos tv show changed his life.

As a young boy of 13, Brian Cox stared at his television screen every Wednesday evening, as Carl Sagan took him on a journey across the Cosmos. The programme was a ground-breaking piece of television by a brilliant young scientist who could be inspiring and infuriating in equal measure.

Sagan was a complex character. Driven to succeed, he came from a relatively poor background to become a millionaire, and one of the most influential scientists of his era. His popularity left him open to both criticism and jealousy amongst his colleagues, and whilst he was passionate about the need to educate the populace, he could also be arrogant and dismissive of his fellow scientists.

So just how good a scientist was he, and what is his legacy?

Producer: John Byrne.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00sccf0)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00sccg9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Baggage (b00lymqf)
Series 4

You're a Long Time Dead

Comedy series by Hilary Lyon, set in Edinburgh.

It's summer and all change all-round. Caroline struggles to come to terms with Ruth now being her dad's lover, and agonises over Roddy's shock proposal - the end of an era beckons.

Caroline ...... Hilary Lyon
Hector ...... David Rintoul
Ruth ...... Adie Allen
Nicholas ...... Moray Hunter
Roddy ...... Robin Cameron
Gladys ...... June Watson

Directed by Marilyn Imrie.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00scbpr)
Pip's chemistry exam is looming and it's going to be a tough one. David tries to encourage her to be positive and take some proper breaks from revision. David is irritated. After he's backed down and let Jude come to Brookfield again, Jude still texts Pip from the farm gate and gets her to come out to him, rather than knocking on the door.

Joe and Eddie are continuing to take backhanders at the livestock market, but the fact that Eddie is doing more than the usual amount of favours for people has come to the notice of the senior auctioneer, Jonathan Bailey. David warns him that his card has been marked and Bailey will be keeping a close eye on him. Eddie thanks him for the warning. He'll stick to the rules in future.

Lilian picks Matt up outside the prison gates. He's glad to be out and insists on buying some of his favourite cigars on the way home to Ambridge. Lilian prepares a sumptuous lunch but initially Matt feels awkward to be back in the Dower House. However, Matt is happy to be with Lilian, and she is happy to have her Tiger again.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00sccnk)
Monty Python's Eric Idle; pianist Louis Lortie; Bad Lieutenant

Eric Idle discusses the forthcoming tour of the musical Spamalot and his comedic oratorio Not the Messiah, based on Monty Python's Life of Brian.

Antonia Quirke reviews Bad Lieutenant, the new film from Werner Herzog, which stars Nicolas Cage. Set in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Bad Lieutenant follows the story of a cocaine-addicted policeman who abuses his status.

French-Canadian pianist Louis Lortie explains how he prepares to play all 27 of Chopin's Etudes at the Norfolk and Norwich festival.


TUE 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Bagram Airbase (b00sbckp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 17:00 on Sunday]


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00scvy1)
Cathy Yelf from the Macular Disease Society welcomes plans by Dept of Health to issue results of trials using drug Avastin on AMD. Dr Mike Tobin has been studying a group of blind people with Retinoblastoma - a form of eye cancer which usually occurs in children under 5. Dr Tobin's research indicates that Retinoblastoma people tend to be brighter and more successful than people without the condition. Dr Tobin suggests in his paper that the reason for the higher IQ and significantly higher level of intelligence is to do with the faulty Retinoblastoma gene and wants a geneticist to follow up his research.
Mani Djazmi returns to meet the Thrive gardeners to see how their plants are growing, in the hope that they will be ready and accepted for the Chelsea Flower Show.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00scvy3)
How much water should we drink?

Messages around how much water we should drink are often confusing. Dr Mark Porter unpicks the myths. He finds that optimum fluid intake varies greatly from one person to the next and discovers the best way of establishing what's right for you.

Mark talks to Bridget Benelam, nutrition scientist and author of a new report into hydration and health; Dr Nick Sculthorpe, Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology at the University of Bedfordshire; Detlef Bockenhauer, Consultant Paediatric Nephrologist at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London; John Brewer, Professor of Sport at the University of Bedfordshire, and Tom Sanders, Professor of Nutrition & Dietetics at Kings College Hospital London.

Producer: Erika Wright.


TUE 21:30 Democracy on Trial (b00scjdz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00scctb)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00sccwk)
British Airways and the Unite union are back in court, debating the legality of strike action.

In Westminster, it's the first session of the new parliament.

A car bomb in Kabul kills 18 people, including 5 US servicemen.

With David Eades.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00scd2j)
No And Me

Episode 7

The arrival of No in the Bertignac household has had a surprising effect on Lou's mother. Emerald O'Hanrahan reads from this tale of adolescence and homelessness, set in contemporary Paris.

Written by Delphine de Vigan
Read by Emerald O'Hanrahan
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 So Wrong It's Right (b00scw1t)
Series 1

Episode 2

Charlie Brooker presents the new comedy panel show that seeks the best in wrong answers. He plunders his guests' pasts and creativity over a series of rounds in which panellists have to be wrong to be right.

Comedians Lee Mack, Josie Long and Tom Basden are the guest panel for this edition. Their worst experiences on public transport and the wrongest ideas for high concept restaurants are up for comedy discussion.

Plus Lee Mack takes Charlie to task over his chief modern pleasure - the social network Twitter.

Producer: Aled Evans
A Zeppotron production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Cadbury is Our Longbridge (b00rblc1)
Episode 1

Miles Warde tells the inside story of the closure of Cadbury's Somerdale factory near Bristol. Two years in the making, the series reveals how Somerdale became caught up in a global story.

Cadbury first announced the closure of this historic site at the end of 2007. Miles follows the protests, the frustrations, and the raised hopes of a workforce who believed that Kraft's takeover meant their jobs could be saved. Production is now largely moving to Poland instead.



WEDNESDAY 19 MAY 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00sbqjl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqp7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00sbqt9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqrc)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00sbr1d)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00sbr4t)
Presented from Wales by the Rev. Peter Baker.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00sbr6w)
On the eve of the Devon County Show, how do agricultural events remain relevant? Agricultural shows attracted six million visitors last year, but they have had to adapt and move with the times. And one farmer in Yorkshire tells us how vital DEFRA money for animal disease protection is to his livelihood and he's hoping that the budget won't be cut by the new government.
Presenter: Anna Hill; Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


WED 06:00 Today (b00sbr8p)
With Sarah Montague and John Humphrys. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00scw2q)
This week Libby Purves is joined by Anna Carter, Nicolai Lilin, Michael Holding and Jennie Buckman.

Anna Carter runs Carter's Steam Fair which she helped set up with her late husband John over thirty years ago. It started when he began collecting old fair equipment which had become unfashionable or derelict. Sadly he died ten years ago but Anna decided to carry the tradition on with the help of her family. The fair travels around London and South East, as far as Weston Super Mare, for seven months a year.

Nicolai Lilin gained his 'education' as a member of the Siberian Urkas, a self contained criminal fraternity in Eastern Europe. His upbringing was defined by an elaborate set of rituals and a strict code of honour. By the age of six he had been given his first knife and by the age of twelve he had been convicted of attempted murder. Now living in Italy, he combines being a novelist with working as a tattoo artist. His latest book 'Siberian Education' is published by Canongate.

Michael Holding is the legendary West Indian fast bowler, one of the fastest the world of cricket has ever seen. He went by the haunting nickname of 'Whispering Death', claiming 249 Test wickets. He's now a highly respected pundit for Sky Sports. His autobiography 'No Holding Back' is published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson.

Jennie Buckman is a playwright and theatre director and former Head of Acting at RADA. In July 2007 she started a new theatre company 'Standing on the Shoulders of Giants'. For her latest work, she has reinvented the story of Pandora's Box with five original plays inspired by real life stories and contemporary feelings about the contents of the box. PANDORA is on at the Arcola Theatre.


WED 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz3)
Empire Builders (300 BC - AD 10)

Rosetta Stone

Today's programme finds Neil MacGregor in the company of one of the best known inhabitants of the British Museum - the Rosetta Stone. Throughout this week he is exploring shifting empires and the rise of legendary rulers around the world over 2000 years ago and here he takes us to the Egypt of Ptolemy V. He tells the story of the Greek kings who ruled in Alexandria. He also explains the struggle between the British and the French over the Middle East and their squabble over the stone. And, of course, he describes the astonishing contest that led to the most famous decipherment in history - the cracking of the hieroglyphics on the Rosetta Stone. Historian Dorothy Thompson and the writer Ahdaf Soueif help untangle the tale.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00sbtm9)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Caroline Lucas, the UK's first ever Green MP on her breakthrough into Westminster. Actress Miranda Raison talks about her role as Jo Portman in the hugely popular BBC One drama series, Spooks, and her latest venture in which she takes on the role of Anne Boleyn, Henry VIIII's notorious second wife, in two different very productions at the Globe. We look at gender teaching in schools and hear from Sierra Leone's First Lady Sia Korome.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00sbvvw)
The Rabbit House

The Rabbits Arrive

Laura Alcoba's powerful and moving story about her childhood in Argentina during the violent years of the 'dirty war' in the 1970s.

Laura and her mother move into a new safe house, with a couple called Diana ('Didi') and Daniel ('Cacho'), who are also members of the Montoneros militant group, although both lead outwardly respectable lives. This is the house the Montoneros have chosen for their clandestine printing press, which will be operated under the cover of a rabbit breeding business.

Laura watches as the Engineer arrives each morning in a van with a blanket over his head to build a false wall which will hide the press, and once the rabbits arrive she's thrilled to be entrusted with a job of her own to help with the distribution of the Montoneros' clandestine newspaper. But as the stakes grow higher, her silence becomes more important to the operation.

Adult Laura: Saira Todd
Young Laura: Bethan Barke
Mother: Jenny Coverack
Father: Jay Villiers
Grandmother: Merelina Kendall
Grandfather: Rod Beacham
Diana: Lisa Coleman
Engineer: Vincenzo Pellegrino
Chicha: Sonia Elliman
Shopkeeper/Guard: Charlotte Ellis

Producer: Sara Davies

The Rabbit House by Laura Alcoba is translated by Polly McClean and dramatised for radio by Sheila Yeger.


WED 11:00 Day One in Number 10 (b00slbzh)
Episode 2

What happens on a Prime Minister's first day in Number Ten? Who does he see? What decisions await him? What is everyone else in Number Ten doing? In Part 2 of Day One in Number Ten, Peter Hennessy speaks to people close to this change of government, on how it has gone, and what lessons we might learn.

And he hears what happens in Number Ten after the first few, frantic hours. What is in the first briefings on foreign and defence policy? How do you make successful institutional change at the heart of government? And what if you are hit by an immediate crisis - caused by terror or industrial action?

Peter also discusses, with those who have been there over the years, the difficult personal aspect to this rapid change at the top. A joyful Day One for the new PM can also be a painful final day for the person who has just lost their job, and potentially for the civil servants who have worked closely with them for many years.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 11:30 Miracles R Us (b00scx37)
Flux

Caroline is running Household Solutions on her own from the student rooms she is renting - just leaflets through doors, offering a family back-up service.

After a chance meeting, Sylvia is sure she could be helpful to the business. Caroline is sure she couldn't.

Sylvia persists and, against her better judgement, Caroline gets drawn in. Can they manage to turn their service into a good business?

Sitcom in four parts by Lesley Bruce.

Sylvia ..... Anna Massey
Caroline ..... Deborah Findlay
Tanya ..... Alison Pettitt

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2010.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00scbdv)
Winifred Robinson and her guests discuss Ireland's reponse to the recession, how are they coping and what lessons can the UK learn from their experience as we approach a similar period of austerity.

And we hear from the campaigners trying to save Sheffield's first dedicated cutlery works, part of the city's unique industrial heritage, and now under threat of closure.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00scbg8)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00scbjc)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00scxbn)
Steve discusses paywalls with Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger and Sunday Times editor John Witherow, in front of an audience in the Radio Theatre.

This is a subject every newspaper editor's considered: whether to charge people who want to read their websites. "Because news costs, because quality costs... because free isn't sustainable, because free is too expensive" - the words of Les Hinton, chief executive of the Wall Street Journal's publisher, part of News Corp.

At the Guardian, Alan Rusbridger has ruled out paywalls and warned that rushing to introduce them could see the industry "sleepwalk into oblivion". The Daily Mail has said "readers will not pay to consume general news on the web".

Rupert Murdoch disagrees. He is already charging online readers of the Wall Street Journal and, from June, The Times and The Sunday Times will start charging £1 a day, or a weekly subscription, for access to their websites. The Sun and the News of The World will follow. The Sunday Times will get its own dedicated website in a move editor John Witherow describes as "a hugely significant moment for the paper".

Who is right? And, as some claim, does the survival of the free press rely on Rupert Murdoch's plans succeeding?


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00scbpr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Brief Lives (b00scxbq)
Series 3

Episode 4

By Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly
Last in the current series of legal dramas set in Manchester. Frank is chipper; he's finally got his own parking space at the local nick. Life doesn't get any better.

Frank .....David Schofield
Debbie ..... Emma Atkins
Sarah ..... Tracey- Ann Oberman
Doug ..... Eric Potts
Lilah ..... Pavla Beier
Kyle ..... Greg Wood
Policeman ..... Robert Garrett

Producer Gary Brown.
Original music by Carl Harms.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00scxbs)
MONEY BOX LIVE

Vincent Duggleby and guests will be here to answer your mortgage questions on Money Box Live.

Lending conditions are improving for buyers with smaller deposits and some lenders are cutting the cost of fixed and tracker mortgages.

Despite the improvement, the Council of Mortgage Lenders has warned that mortgage rationing could continue for many years unless the new government helps lenders raise finance.

If you need help obtaining a mortgage or finding a better deal, the panel will be waiting for your call.

Phone lines open at 1.30 this afternoon and the number to call is 03700 100 444. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.
Producer: Diane Richardson.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00scvds)
Why, Robot?

Algorithms

Scarlet Thomas has a very different take on a brief which asked writers to use Issac Asimov's 'three laws of robotics' as the starting point for a story.

An algorithm is a step-by-step method for solving a problem. Rebecca's life is full of them. Trouble is, they tend to solve one problem while creating a new one.

Scarlett Thomas was born in 1972. Her work featured in the New Puritans anthology of 2002. Her novel 'The End Of Mr Y' was longlisted for the Orange Broadband Prize For Fiction in 2008. Her new novel 'Our Tragic Universe' will be published in May 2010.

Scarlett's previous work for Radio 4 includes 'Why My Grandmother Learned To Play The Flute' (2003) and 'Brother and Sister Foot' (2005). She teaches Creative Writing at The University of Kent.

Written by Scarlett Thomas.
Read by Siobhan Redmond.

Producer - Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 Running Away (b00fdf7k)
Nitin Sawhney

Musician and composer Nitin Sawhney escapes the dark confines of his studio to the hustle and bustle of the Science Museum and one of his favourite pastimes.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00scxbv)
Genealogical research has become a passion for a growing number of people. Programmes like Who Do You Think You Are? and websites like Genes Reunited feed a voracious interest in family origins and the lives of ancestors. But what impact does this kind of research have on the families which are being studied? Hidden pregnancies...mental illnesses...shunned relatives... Laurie Taylor talks to sociologist Anne-Marie Kramer, whose research has unveiled some of the conflicts which arise when family skeletons are dragged into the light, and to the cartoonist Martin Rowson who has performed some geneaological research of his own.
Also, how did a Danish stew of left-over vegetables and scrag end of lamb come to epitomise a proud and enduring British city culture? Ciara Kierans discusses a cultural history of Scouse.

Producer: Charlie Taylor.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00scvy3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00sccf2)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00sccgc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Heresy (b00scxbx)
Series 7

Episode 1

Victoria Coren joins forces with comedian Rufus Hound, artist Grayson Perry and newspaper columnist Julia Hartley-Brewer in challenging conventional wisdom and knee-jerk thinking.

For example, the received wisdom that 'Women look better in men's clothes than women do in women's' is rejected by Grayson Perry on the grounds that he's never been more successful with the ladies than when he's wearing a dress.

In arguing against the belief that 'an artist who doesn't make his own work is a fraud' Julia Hartley-Brewer points out that nobody ever complained that Sir Christopher Wren was never seen up a ladder laying the bricks of St Paul's Cathedral.

And all three guests dismiss the idea that spending 4.4 billion on the Large Hadron Collider is a waste of money - if only on the grounds that it may prove useful for smashing a few political leaders' heads together.

Producer: Brian King.
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00scbpt)
Josh has finished editing the cookery demonstration video he made with Jill and his teacher is pleased with the work.

Matt is reacquainting himself with village life. He's determined not to hide at the Dower House. If anyone has anything to say they can say it to his face. He receives a warm welcome from Jill and Oliver.

Jennifer and Brian go to the Dower House for pre-dinner drinks to welcome Matt back home, but the occasion is hard going. Jenny puts her foot in it about Matt's security tag and everyone struggles to keep a normal conversation going. Brian finds it all quite amusing. Later he confides to Jennifer that Matt is cagier than ever now, even though he seems rock solid with Lilian. Jennifer speculates that Lilian obviously hasn't said anything to Matt about Paul.

Tom is under pressure at work. So is Brenda, who is at a show in Birmingham all day handing out free samples of the drink they are trying to promote. When they both arrive home late to an empty fridge and therefore no tea, neither are impressed, and Brenda goes off in a huff.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00sccnm)
Picasso in Liverpool, Tosca in London and Tracey Thorn

With John Wilson. A major new exhibition at Tate Liverpool reveals Picasso as a political activist and post-war campaigner for peace. Richard Cork discusses the exhibition and the new light it sheds upon our understanding of the artist.

Tracey Thorn dominated the pop charts in the 1990s with Everything But The Girl. She talks about her new solo album, plays live in the studio and reflects on a career which started at the age of 16 with post-punk act Marine Girls, through to her time recording with The Style Council and Massive Attack.

ENO's new production of Puccini's Tosca is directed by the American soprano Catherine Malfitano, famous for playing Tosca herself in an Emmy Award-winning, real-time performance alongside Placido Domingo in Rome. Roderick Swanston reviews.

Rana Dasgupta discusses his novel Solo, which recently won the 2010 Commonwealth Writers Prize . Set in Bulgaria, the story follows a blind chemist who lives alone and tries to overcome the hopelessness of his existence through dreaming.


WED 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


WED 20:00 The World Tonight (b00sgzsy)
Special Debate

From climate change to state breakdown, from inequalities in wealth to nuclear proliferation and Islamic militancy - as the global balance of power shifts from west to the east, what role can and should Britain play in a world faced by serious global challenges?

To mark The World Tonight's 40th anniversary, Robin Lustig chairs a special debate on Britain's future role in the world with a panel of global experts at the leading foreign policy think tank, Chatham House.

With Robin Lustig are
Lord Hurd, former Foreign Secretary
Dr Robin Niblett, Director of Chatham House
Monika Griefahn, former German SPD MP
Dr Stefan Halper, University of Cambridge
Professor Kanti Bajpai, University of Oxford.


WED 20:45 I'd Like to Thank the Returning Officer (b00sbpk5)
If you're a newly-elected MP, how do you contain your joy? What do you say if you've just lost?

Phil Collins reviews fifty years of election night speeches - the moving, the inspirational, and the truly terrible. He talks to the MPs and their unsuccessful rivals who have had to give them. And as a former speechwriter himself, he offers some pointers for future candidates: who should you thank, who should you praise, and who - or what - should you just ignore? And how best to win or lose graciously?

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00scy0d)
Rare Earth Metals

Most of us may never have heard of Rare Earth Elements but these precious metals such as terbium, lanthanum and neodymium are vital to the electronics we rely on and increasingly to the green technologies we hope to utilise in the future. The automobile industry uses tens of thousands of tons of rare earth elements each year, and advanced military technology depends on these elements, too. Lots of "green" technologies depend on them, including wind turbines, low-energy light bulbs and hybrid car batteries.

97% of these elements are mined in China and as demand has skyrocketed over the last decade from 40,000 tons to 120,000 tons China has started reserving supplies for its own economic expansion. Now, it only exports about 30,000 tons a year - only a quarter of the supply the world needs now and far less than the demands of the green technologies needed for a carbon free future.

The elements themselves are abundant in the Earth's crust. New sources have been found in Greenland and Utah but extraction is difficult and demand seems certain to outstrip supply. Tom Heap searches for solutions to the looming crisis.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00scw2q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00scctd)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00sccwm)
The latest on the Euro crisis.

Activists surrender in Thailand.

And, how radical is Nick Clegg?

With Carolyn Quinn.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00scd2l)
No And Me

Episode 8

No asks Lou to come with her to find her mother.

Emerald O'Hanrahan reads from this tale of adolescence and homelessness, set in contemporary Paris.

Written by Delphine de Vigan
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by Emerald O'Hanrahan

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 The Shuttleworths (b00scy0g)
Series 5

Smells Like White Spirit

Ken Worthington needs Jon to write a catchy pop song at short notice, but John's DIY duties prove a serious obstacle. Will he be able to complete the song in time to meet Ken's deadline?

John is created and performed by Graham Fellows, and the series is produced by Dawn Ellis.


WED 23:15 One (b00n5ngh)
Series 3

Episode 2

Sketch show written by David Quantick, in which no item features more than one voice.

With Graeme Garden, Dan Maier, Johnny Daukes, Deborah Norton, Katie Davies, Dan Antopolski, Andrew Crawford and David Quantick.


WED 23:30 Cadbury is Our Longbridge (b00rf169)
Episode 2

Miles Warde tells the inside story of the closure of Cadbury's Somerdale factory near Bristol. Two years in the making, the series reveals how Somerdale became caught up in a global story.

Cadbury first announced the closure of this historic site at the end of 2007, and said that much of the production would be moved to Poland instead. Miles explores why that decision was made, and what happens in an economy where the shareholder is always put first.



THURSDAY 20 MAY 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00sbqjn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqp9)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00sbqtc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqrf)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00sbr1g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00sbr4w)
Presented from Wales by the Rev. Peter Baker.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00sbr6y)
Charlotte Smith hears why queen bees from the Isle of Mann may save others by being posted to the mainland, how a British MEP has won backing to slash the red tape farmers have to go through to please Europe and why fingers are pointed at the Rural Payments Agency to stomach a large share of any cuts DEFRA faces. Meanwhile farmers in the East Midlands are herding their sheep through brain scanners in the name of science. Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


THU 06:00 Today (b00sbr8r)
With James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00sdbw4)
The Cavendish Family in Science

From the 1600s to the 1800s, scientific research in Britain was not yet a professional, publicly-funded career.So the wealth, status and freedom enjoyed by British aristocrats gave them the opportunity to play an important role in pushing science forwards - whether as patrons or practitioners.The Cavendish family produced a whole succession of such figures.In the 1600s, the mathematician Sir Charles Cavendish and his brother William collected telescopes and mathematical treatises, and promoted dialogue between British and Continental thinkers. They brought Margaret Cavendish, William's second wife, into their discussions and researches, and she went on to become a visionary, if eccentric, science writer, unafraid to take on towering figures of the day like Robert Hooke.In the 1700s, the brothers' cousin's great-grandson, Lord Charles Cavendish, emerged as a leading light of the Royal Society.Underpinned by his rich inheritance, Charles' son Henry became one of the great experimental scientists of the English Enlightenment.And in the 1800s, William Cavendish, Henry's cousin's grandson, personally funded the establishment of Cambridge University's Cavendish Laboratory. In subsequent decades, the Lab become the site of more great breakthroughs.With:Jim BennettDirector of the Museum of the History of Science at the University of OxfordPatricia FaraSenior Tutor of Clare College, University of CambridgeSimon SchafferProfessor of History of Science at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Darwin College, CambridgeProducer - Phil Tinline.


THU 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz5)
Empire Builders (300 BC - AD 10)

Chinese Han lacquer cup

In a week of programmes exploring the nature of power and the emergence of new rulers around the world 2000 years ago, Neil MacGregor takes us to Han Dynasty China. He tells the story of how the Chinese maintained loyalty and control by dispensing luxury gifts. He describes the world of the imperial Han through an exquisite lacquer wine cup that was probably given by the emperor to one of his military commanders in North Korea. The historian Roel Sterckx underlines the importance of lacquer for the period while writer Isabel Hilton looks at how the production of goods under state control has remained a consistent interest of the Chinese.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00sbtmc)
Presented by Jenni Murray. One of the cool looks of this summer is the humble pigtail. Sienna Miller, Kate Hudson and Anne Hathaway have all been spotted with a plait - but can it shake off its associations with Heidi or Pippi Longstocking to be something for grown-ups?
Opera singer Catherine Malfitano on making her UK directing debut with a new production of Tosca at the English National Opera, a role she made memorable in a live broadcast with Placido Domingo with location performances from across Rome.
With the first advertisement on how to access abortion services about to be shown on TV, we discuss one charity's campaign to encourage people to talk openly about the choices when facing an unplanned pregnancy.
The new President of the Ramblers Association is on a mission to put the passion back into walking but how do you get children to go out in the first place?


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00sbvvy)
The Rabbit House

A Dangerous Mistake

Laura Alcoba's powerful and moving account of growing up among the militant Montoneros group in the 'dirty war' in Argentina in the 1970s.

As the Rabbit House is up and running, with a clandestine printing press installed under the cover of a rabbit breeding business, the young Laura, despite being only seven, knows the importance of secrecy and silence. A visit to her father in prison proves too much for her to cope with, and her grandparents decide its too dangersous for her to go again.

Then the Engineer, who's built the complex secret mechanism fior hiding the printing press, finds Laura's school blazer with an incriminatory name tape, and accuses her of putting the entire operation in danger. Poor Laura is shattered.

Adult Laura: Saira Todd
Young Laura: Bethan Barke
Mother: Jenny Coverack
Father: Jay Villiers
Grandmother: Merelina Kendall
Grandfather: Rod Beacham
Diana: Lisa Coleman
Engineer: Vincenzo Pellegrino
Chicha: Sonia Elliman
Shopkeeper/Guard: Charlotte Ellis

Producer: Sara Davies

The Rabbit House by Laura Alcoba is translated by Polly McClean and dramatised for radio by Sheila Yeger.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00sdc12)
A lynching in a mountain village shocks Lebanon.

Lingering memories of war poison the peace in South Ossetia

Why the Chinese are pumping millions into the Bangladeshi port of Chittagong

How the "beautiful game" helped end the bloodshed in Ivory Coast.

And the autobahn churches which give Germans a chance to park and pray.

Drive inland from Beirut, and almost immediately you begin to climb. The roads take you up into Lebanon's mountainous heartland. You leave the heat and clamour of the crowded coast behind. And it's easy to imagine that in the hill villages, life will be a little gentler. But just recently..in one of those quiet communities..something dark and shockingly violent happened. And as Natalya Antilava explains, the affair has left some Lebanese believing there's something rotten in the depths of their society...

There are endless, simmering, ethnic tensions all through the Caucasus mountains. And back in 2008 there was all out war. The Georgians and the South Ossetians tore at one another. The war ended swiftly in Georgia's defeat after Russian tanks poured through the mountains and sided with the Ossetians. But although the shooting died away nearly two years ago now, Tom Esslemont says South Ossetia remains swathed in uneasy suspicions that are a legacy of the conflict.

These days you can almost feel the balance of global power shifting eastwards. For now at least, America seems economically exhausted, and mired in foreign wars. But China is on the rise in every way. We've heard on this programme how it's expanding its commercial and diplomatic influence across Africa. But it's also doing the same thing closer to home -- in South Asia. Mukhal Devichand has been watching China's wealth begin to re-shape a frontier town in Bangladesh..

The old Liverpool manager, Bill Shankly once famously said, "football isn't a matter of life or death. It's much more serious than that.!" Shankly was joking, of course. But there will be moments in the World Cup this summer when football will feel heart-stoppingly important. And it's hard to underestimate the power and influence of the game. There are places where the passion for it can almost transcend politics. One of them, as Andrew Harding has been finding out, is the West African state of Ivory Coast..

A trip down a motorway is usually a relentlessly dull affair...nothing more than a means of getting from A to B as fast as possible. It's hard to think of a less romantic, more soulless kind of journey. But that's not always the case -- at least not in Germany. In the land that first came up with the idea of motorways, there's been an effort to humanise them a little. And as Steve Rosenburg explains, a spin down the autobahn can have its distinctly spiritual moments.


THU 11:30 Peter Porter On Air (b00sg1n6)
Sean O'Brien celebrates the life and work of the late poet and broadcaster Peter Porter, with fellow-Australian poet, Clive James, novelist Julian Barnes and poet and editor of Poetry Review, Fiona Sampson.

Shortly before he died last month at the age of 81, the Australian-born poet and broadcaster Peter Porter gave his final interview to fellow-poet Sean O'Brien. From high up in his Bayswater flat, he reflected on how life has changed in the sixty years that he has lived in Britain and on how his own faith in poetry has strengthened in the face of personal loss, Illness and death.

Sean has also spoken with fellow-Australian poet and broadcaster Clive James, to the novelist Julian Barnes and to the younger poet and editor of Poetry Review, Fiona Sampson. They shares memories of Porter's prodigious learning and great kindness, his love of cats, long lunches and music, while also grappling with the challenges some of his poems present.

The programme features Porter himself reading from well-known works such as An Exequy as well as from a final collection, to be published posthumously.

Producer: Beaty Rubens.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00scbdx)
Grant Shapps, Housing Minister, explains the decision behind the abolition of Home Information Packs. Young carers - two out of three say they are being bullied at school. We'll discuss the enduring appeal of department stores and hear about the radio scrappage scheme designed to help listeners move to digital radio.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00scbgb)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00scbjf)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00scy0d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00scbpt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00sdc14)
Cinders

Cinders
by Ali Taylor

Emma discovers a brilliant new talent in the unsolicited pile. A pacy comedy lifting the lid on the ethics of publishing war-torn misery memoirs.

Emma Collins ..... Claudie Blakley
Jason Barkley ..... Michael Shelford
Mariam Zohab ..... Vineeta Rishi
Holly Owen ..... Lizzy Watts
Rory Stevenson ..... Sam Dale
Claire Porter ..... Alison Pettitt
Ahmad Wali ..... Imran Khan
Robin Wright ..... David Seddon

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

When a heartbreaking memoir about life in war-torn Kabul lands on her desk, Emma thinks she's discovered a new literary sensation. Her colleagues, though, are deeply sceptical. A comedy about drawing the line.

Emma is played by Claudie Blakley, best known for her roles as Emma Timmins in Larkrise to Candleford, and as Charlotte in Pride and Prejudice.

Ali Taylor has written one other play for radio, Eight Feet High and Rising, and is currently under commission to Leicester Haymarket Theatre. His play Cotton Wool, won the 18th Meyer Whitworth Award for best play in 2009.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00s9zqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00sb9gm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00scvdv)
Why, Robot?

The Companion

Story by Anita Sullivan inspired by Issac Asimov's three laws of robotics, read by Sheila Steafel. Colin - a medically-trained, 'Companion-series' humanoid - watches over Eunice's old age with an unorthodox interpretation of 'The Three Laws of Robotics'.

Anita Sullivan lives in Sussex. Her first play for radio, commissioned by Sweet Talk, was runner up in the Richard Imison Awards. Recent work includes Homesick and Torchwood: Asylum in 2009 and The Beacon (a five-part adaptation of Susan Hill's novel) in March 2010. She has also written for theatre companies as diverse as the Royal Shakespeare Company, Plymouth Theatre Royal, Pop-Up children's theatre, Eastern Angles and Borderline. The Companion is Anita's second short story for Sweet Talk, following The Phantom Cosmonaut, part of the 'Sputnik' series, in 2007.

Written by Anita Sullivan
Read by Sheila Steafel

Producer - Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 Running Away (b00f678q)
Hugh Dennis

Tim Samuels joins five famous guests as they escape their work for a few hours. Comedian Hugh Dennis takes one of his favourite walks near his home on the Sussex Downs.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00sbcj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00sdcfc)
Quentin Cooper presents his weekly digest of science in and behind the headlines. This week he hears about the novel techniques that are being used to clean up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Richard Pike, from the Royal Society of Chemistry, tells us how these methods should work as many of them have not been tested before.

The International Day for Biological Diversity in the UK is almost upon us; joining Material World this week Dr. Bob Bloomfield from the Natural History Museum and Dr. Ben Collen, from the Zoological Society of London, to discuss how humans are impacting on species loss and to explain why biodiversity needs to be taken as seriously as climate change.

Could tree rings from conifer trees that are thousands of years old tell us what the climate used to be like? Professor Chris Turney from Exeter University has been studying these ancient trees which have been preserved in peat bogs in New Zealand.

And what is a quantum kilogram? It does not exist yet! The kilogram is the only standard unit that is still based on an artefact. Jonathan Williams from the National Physical Laboratory explains how scientists are trying to redefine the kilogram. He also tells Quentin about the importance of standard measurements in science and engineering, all this on World Metrology Day.


THU 17:00 PM (b00sccf4)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00sccgf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b00hd80x)
Series 4

Documentary

To further his career as a top celebrity, Arthur manages to persuade Geoffrey away from his duties at the church hall, to help make a documentary about Arthur himself to sell to the BBC! A visit to an old haunt proves intriguing - could the management have changed hands?

Everyday life with Count Arthur Strong is, as always, an enlightening experience! We again follow the one time Variety Star as he uncompromisingly fulfils his daily list of engagements.

Stars Steve Delaney, Alastair Kerr, David Mounfield and Mel Giedroyc.

Produced by John Leonard and Mark Radcliffe.
A Komedia Entertainment & Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00scbpw)
Alistair is still short of people to take part in the single wicket competition. Harry's online sponsorship page has proved a winner, and he has several sponsors. David thought it was too commercial but Alistair and Roy were all for the innovation.

Susan has done a handout on health and safety training for the community shop volunteers. Vicky persuades an irritated Susan to give her some training on the till, even though she's trying to close up the shop.

Tom is dismayed when he finds that there are only pizza bases and broad beans in the freezer for tea. After a lecture on getting himself organized from Roy, he decides to go to the Bull, leaving a note for Brenda to join them later. Vicky finally manages to pin Tom about the veal pie idea, but Tom has to disappoint her. The figures don't stack up for him, so the answer is no. Catching Tom at the Bull, Alistair manages to persuade him to enter for the single wicket, and Tom subsequently persuades Brenda.

Pip is working hard for her exams. David's proud of her, even when he hears about her plans for a night out with Jude after the exam tomorrow.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00sccnp)
Scott Turow; Antonio Pappano and review of Prince of Persia

With Mark Lawson, who meets the legal thriller writer Scott Turow, who is about to publish a sequel to his best-selling debut Presumed Innocent.

Actors Nigel Harman and John Light reveal how they're swapping roles on alternate nights in a new production of Sam Shepard's True West in Sheffield.

Antonio Pappano, conductor and music director of the Royal Opera House, London talks about his new television series on the history of Italian opera, and discusses the new age of arts-world austerity heralded by Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

Author and gamer Naomi Alderman reviews Jake Gyllenhaal and Gemma Arterton in the film version of Prince of Persia; and the new game from the makers of Grand Theft Auto, Red Dead Redemption.

Producer Gavin Heard.


THU 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00sdcff)
The New Tory and Lib Dem Coalition

The deal between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats to form the UK's first coalition government for almost 70 years was an historic occasion. At its height the Liberal Democrats were being wooed with offers from both sides and it was unclear who they would embrace. This week Linda Pressly speaks to those involved to get the inside story of the negotiations and how the deal was finally done.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00sdcfh)
Ticking Over

Can the Isle of Man create a revival in British watch making? Precision time pieces are proving recession proof but with so few watchmakers left in this country Peter Day finds out if we can really wind the clock back for a British tradition.
Producer: Clare Walker.


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b00scjnb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00sdbw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00scctg)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00sccwp)
European finance ministers are in crisis talks in Berlin. Can the euro be saved?

British Airways strikes can go ahead. Is it time to do a deal?

How should South Korea respond to the sinking of a naval vessel by North Korea?

With Jonty Bloom in Berlin and Robin Lustig in London.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00scd2n)
No And Me

Episode 9

After Lou's father asks No to move out, Lou and Lucas look after her in secret.

Emerald O'Hanrahan reads from this tale of adolescence and homelessness, set in contemporary Paris.

Read by Emerald O'Hanrahan
Written by Delphine de Vigan
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Produced by Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 The Music Teacher (b00sdcxq)
Series 1

Episode 3

Another week shut away in a tiny windowless practice room for music teacher Nigel Penny in this aural feast of a musical comedy written by and starring 2009 Writers' Guild Award winner Richie Webb. Featuring Vicki Pepperdine as Arts Centre Manager Belinda.

Episode 3 sees Nigel suffering his usual succession of bizarre pupils - an asthmatic flautist and a thrash metal guitarist proving particularly trying. And though Belinda is demanding to use his tiny room to hide booze from the Peruvian Pan Pipe band booked into the Arts Centre that evening, it's having to share his tiny room with an unwanted boorish guest that threatens to take the gloss off Nigel's already rubbish day.

Cast:
Nigel Penny ...... Richie Webb
Belinda ...... Vicki Pepperdine
Other roles by Dave Lamb, Jim North and Jess Robinson

Written by Richie Webb

Produced by Richie Webb
Directed by Nick Walker
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:15 My Teenage Diary (b00jn5s2)
Series 1

Shappi Khorsandi

Host Rufus Hound is joined each week by a special guest from the world of comedy to read out selected passages from their diaries.

In this episode, Rufus is joined by Iranian comedienne Shappi Khorsandi who reveals herself to be a lonely and awkward teenager, desperate to be part of a group. Listen out for Shappi's embarrassed readings of her hilarious teenage poetry.

Producer: Victoria Payne
A talkbackTHAMES production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Cadbury is Our Longbridge (b00rmthx)
Episode 3

Two years in the making, this is the inside story of how the Somerdale chocolate factory near Bristol became caught up in a huge global tale. Cadbury announced the factory was closing over two years ago, but the American food giant Kraft reckoned they could keep it open if their bid for Cadbury proved a success. Six days after winning, they announced Somerdale would shut, making employees feel they'd been made redundant all over again.

Producer Miles Warde.



FRIDAY 21 MAY 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00sbqjq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqpc)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00sbqtf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00sbqrh)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00sbr1j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00sbr4y)
Presented from Wales by the Rev. Peter Baker.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00sbr70)
A cull of badgers in England has been announced by the new coalition Government to help reduce the spread of TB in cattle which has cost the taxpayer £100million a year. Welcomed by farmers' groups and opposed by wildlife organisations Charlotte Smith speaks to Farming Minister Jim Paice about the plans, hears reaction to the news and speaks to scientists who say it could actually make the situation worse. Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00sbr90)
With James Naughtie and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00sbbk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz7)
Empire Builders (300 BC - AD 10)

Head of Augustus

Neil MacGregor concludes the first week of the second part of his global history as told through objects from the British Museum. This week he has been exploring the lives and methods of powerful rulers around the world about 2000 years ago, from Alexander the Great in Egypt to Asoka in India. Today he introduces us to the great Roman emperor Augustus, whose powerful, God-like status is brilliantly enshrined in a larger than life bronze head with striking eyes.
Neil MacGregor describes how Augustus dramatically enlarged the Roman Empire, establishing his image as one of its most familiar objects. The historian Susan Walker and the politician Boris Johnson help explain the power and methodology of Augustus.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00sbtmf)
Presented by Jenni Murray.

Film maker Lorella Zanardi joins Jenni to talk about her campaign to see 'real' women on Italian television.

Ninety years ago this month, the magazine 'Time and Tide' was published for the first time. A ground-breaking political and cultural journal that was the mouthpiece of the feminist movement during the inter war years.

The number of multiple births is rising in this country and Professor Bill Ledger claims that the problem is being caused in part by the liberal use of cheap fertility drugs. He discusses his concerns with Jenni.

Can family dynamics be affected by education? Do those who haven't been to university feel left behind by offspring or siblings who have?


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00sbvw0)
The Rabbit House

Exile and Return

Ih the last episode of Laura Alcoba's powerful and moving account of her childhood in the turbulent years of the 'dirty war' in Argentina in the 1970s, the young Laura leaves the Rabbit House and is sent to safety in France. From here, many years later, she returns to Buenos Aires to discover what happened to the house and to her friends Did and Cacho, and especially to the baby Didi gave birth to. Like many people who lived through those times, the adult Laura finds the truth of what happened hard to bear, but like the women who demonstrate each week in the main square in Buenos Aires, she finds some hope for the future alive and still defiant.

The Rabbit House by Laura Alcoba is translated by Polly McClean and dramatised for radio by Sheila Yeger.

Cast:
Adult Laura: Saira Todd
Young Laura: Bethan Barke
Mother: Jenny Coverack
Father: Jay Villiers
Grandmother: Merelina Kendall
Grandfather: Rod Beacham
Diana: Lisa Coleman
Engineer: Vincenzo Pellegrino
Chicha: Sonia Elliman
Shopkeeper/Guard: Charlotte Ellis

Producer: Sara Davies.


FRI 11:00 i-shrine (b00sdd8v)
When KJ, a 21-year-old Bath University student, fell into the river Avon last summer and drowned, the first indication some of his closest friends had was the RIP messages that started appearing on KJ's Facebook page. The site became a place for friends to visit, remember and preserve their interactions with him.

As is the case with all Facebook sites, control of the deceased account is never given to anyone else. Instead it is either shut down or "memorialized", a new Facebook procedure that removes certain details from the site and allows access only to existing friends. Richard Allan, Facebook's European Director of Public Policy, calls this "a new form of mourning".

Then there are the sites built specifically to memorialize people, the RIP sites - a growing business. Jon Davies set up muchloved.com, a free service that allows you to make a memorial website in minutes that can then grow as people contribute photos, messages and stories.

Hours before her mum died of cervical cancer, sixteen year old Sarah Phillips recorded a version of one of her favourite songs for her on her mobile phone. The recording was later shared with friends via YouTube. What Sarah and her dad didn't realise was that allowing the world access would turn this home-recording into an instant internet hit and attract a torrent of messages of shared grief.

A moving examination of death in the age of the internet.

Producer: Peregrine Andrews
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 When the Dog Dies (b00sddnk)
Series 1

Portrait of the Artist as an Old Man

Sandy's daughter Ellie is an artist but he's never liked her work. The trouble is that she never sells anything - until Sandy buys a canvas anonymously. He instantly regrets doing such a thing - what if she finds out? He must go to any length to ensure that she doesn't, even admitting to a strange predilection involving nuns...

Ronnie Corbett reunites with the writers of his hit sitcom Sorry - Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent - for a new comedy for Radio 4 about Sandy Hopper, a granddad happily growing old along with his dog Henry and his lodger, Dolores (Liza Tarbuck).

Sandy ..... Ronnie Corbett
Ellie ..... Tilly Vosburgh
Mrs Pompom ..... Sally Grace
Lance ..... Philip Bird
Dolores ..... Liza Tarbuck
Estate Agent ..... Jon Glover

Producer: Liz Anstee
A CPL production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00scbdz)
Peter White explores the pros and cons of holidaying nearer to home after claims that people are taking more holidays in the UK. A new report from 'VisitEngland' says that after sampling English holiday breaks last year, more of us are choosing them again this year. Is England and more broadly the UK all it's cracked up to be for so called 'staycationers'?

Also, the Scottish wilderness reserve hoping to introduce wolves to the land.

Plus our Bipolar diarist Chris Danes reviews 'Polar Bears' - a play exploring his condition.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00scbgd)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00scbjh)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00sdgmb)
Tim Harford and the team return with the first in a new series of More or Less, looking at the maths of voting and whether the outcome of the fairest democratic model of them all - the Eurovision Song Contest - can be forecasted.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00scbpw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00ctlhm)
Left at Marrakech

In 1943, B-17 Lucky Charm takes off from Florida on its way to active service in England, embarking on an epic flight via Puerto Rico, Dakar, and Marrakech. But the crew are obliged to take on board with them two British hitchhikers who need a lift home; taciturn Lieutenant Draper and an attractive young WAAF, Charlie Bradbury.

Albie, the happy-go-lucky American gunner believes his luck's in because Charlie looks like the Lucky Charm painted on the aircraft's nose, and she seems to have taken a liking to him. As the journey begins, however, it seems that there's anything but luck on board. There must be a Jonah on board - is it Draper, or Charlie?

Left at Marrakech is based on a true story and is in the same vein as the film Ice Cold In Alex - a journey thwarted from the outset. A Nevil Shute-style adventure, with classic ingredients of matinee thrills: romance, mystery and danger.

Written by Richard Stevens; this is his third play for BBC Radio 4.

Cast:
Will Keen
Jonathan Cullen
Alan Cox
Nicholas Rowe
Ben Lewis
Clare Corbett

Producer: Fiona McAlpine
An Allegra production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00sdgmd)
Local gardening expert Carole Baxter joins Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Peter Gibbs in Aboyne, Aberdeenshire. Peter Gibbs explores woodland flora.

Producer: Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Running Away (b00f678s)
Baroness Julia Neuberger

Baroness Julia Neuberger - rabbi, social reformer and member of the House of Lords - takes a stroll through the Victorian gardens and hothouse in the heart of Royal Leamington Spa.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00sdgmg)
On Last Word this week
Major General Khattiya Sawasdipol - otherwise known as "Sae Daeng" or Red Commander. The flamboyant security chief of the red shirted anti-government protesters was shot dead in Bangkok last week.
Also Professor Richard Gregory, the eminent psychologist who increased our understanding of human perception
Hank Jones - the revered jazz pianist who played with most of the top names of the twentieth century
The political columnist Alan Watkins - one of the last greats of Fleet Street
And: never knowingly overdressed: the nude pin up of the fifties and sixties, Pamela Green.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00sdgmj)
Francine Stock reports on the British film industry during the New Labour years with director Roger Michell, Film Council Chair Tim Bevan, and novelist Deborah Moggach.

Neil Brand waxes lyrical about the music of Danny Elfman.

Haim Tabakman discusses his Israeli drama about the love that dare not speak its name, Eyes Wide Open.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00sccf6)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00sccgh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00sdgml)
Series 71

Episode 6

Sandi Toksvig presents another episode of the ever-popular topical panel show. Guests this week include Phill Jupitus and Jeremy Hardy.

Produced by Sam Bryant.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00scbpy)
WRITTEN BY ..... CAROLE SIMPSON SOLAZZO
DIRECTED BY ..... NAYLAH AHMED
EDITOR ..... VANESSA WHITBURN

JILL ARCHER ..... PATRICIA GREENE
ALISTAIR LLOYD ..... MICHAEL LUMSDEN
DAVID ARCHER ..... TIMOTHY BENTINCK
RUTH ARCHER ..... FELICITY FINCH
PIP ARCHER ..... HELEN MONKS
TOM ARCHER ..... TOM GRAHAM
BRIAN ALDRIDGE ..... CHARLES COLLINGWOOD
JENNIFER ALDRIDGE ..... ANGELA PIPER
MATT CRAWFORD ..... KIM DURHAM
LILIAN BELLAMY ..... SUNNY ORMONDE
JOE GRUNDY ..... EDWARD KELSEY
EDDIE GRUNDY ..... TREVOR HARRISON
EDWARD GRUNDY ..... BARRY FARRIMOND
SUSAN CARTER ..... CHARLOTTE MARTIN
VICKY TURNER ..... RACHEL ATKINS
ROY TUCKER ..... IAN PEPPERELL
BRENDA TUCKER ..... AMY SHINDLER
JAZZER MCCREARY ..... RYAN KELLY
PAUL MORGAN ..... MICHAEL FENTON STEVENS.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00sccnr)
News from Cannes; China Mieville; Exile on Main St reviewed; Tyler Perry

With Kirsty Lang. Film critic Kate Muir reports live from the Cannes Film Festival as it reaches its climax

Actor and director Tyler Perry is one of the highest-paid men in Hollywood and his films - such as Why Did I Get Married? and Madea's Family Reunion - consistently top the US box office with a predominently African-American, churchgoing audience. As his latest, starring Janet Jackson, receives a special screening in London, Tyler Perry discusses his rise from community theatre in Atlanta to media mogul, and the problems he still has getting cinemas to screen his films.

The re-release of The Rolling Stone's 1972 album, Exile on Main St, has shot to the top of the mid-week charts. It was famously recorded in the basement of Keith Richards' villa in the South of France. Music critic David Hepworth discusses why the album is so popular 38 years after its original release.

Novelist China Mieville talks about Kraken, his darkly-comic urban fantasy about the theft of a giant preserved squid, which provokes deadly warfare between squid-worshippers, occult villains and the Metropolitan Police's cult-squad.




Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


FRI 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00sbrz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00sdgmn)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the live debate from Gowerton School on the Gower Peninsula in Wales with questions from the audience for the panel including: John McDonnell MP, who is hoping to gain enough nominations to stand in the Labour leadership contest; Grant Shapps MP, Minister for Housing and Local Government; the Chairman of the National Trust and Guardian columnist, Simon Jenkins; and Anastasia de Waal, deputy director of the thinktank Civitas.

Producer: Victoria Wakely.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00sdgmq)
Coalitions Then and Now

In the first of ten programmes, the historian Professor Sir David Cannadine delivers his weekly view on current events. This week he recalls Britain's forgotten history of coalition government, reflecting that the so-called "new politics" has plenty of antecedents.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 15 Minute Drama (b00sdh0j)
The Rabbit House

21/05/2010

Laura Alcoba was the daughter of members of the Montoneros, a militant left-wing organisation engaged in a bitter and violent conflict with the military government in Argentina in what later came to be called the 'dirty war' of the 1970s.

Her memoir of living through this turbulent time is a powerful and moving account of political upheaval seen thorugh the eyes of a young child, who knows enough to be frightened, but not enough to understand. With her father in prison, she and her mother move into a safe house in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, where they run a rabbit breeding business as a cover for the backroom operation of the Montoneros' clandestine printing press, turning out copies of their revolutionary newspaper for distribution all over the city.

The seven year-old Laura is brought up among secrecy, subterfuge and silence, and learns very early the importance of keeping hr muth shut, and the danger of loose talk or careless behaviour. But there's also love and laughter in the Rabbit House, and a comforting sense of loyalty and friendship - which she only later discovers to have been betrayed most horribly.

Laura Alcoba's story of living through violence and political turbulence is about the Argentina of only thirty years ago, and she speaks for a generation who carry the scars of that time. The emotions she remembers from her childhood are those still felt by children all around the world living on the front line of fear, violence and uncertainty as adults wars rage around them. Laura Alcoba now lives in Paris.

Adult Laura: Saira Todd
Young Laura: Bethan Barke
Mother: Jenny Coverack
Father: Jay Villiers
Grandmother: Merelina Kendall
Grandfather: Rod Beacham
Diana: Lisa Coleman
Engineer: Vincenzo Pellegrino
Chicha: Sonia Elliman
Shopkeeper/Guard: Charlotte Ellis

Producer: Sara Davies

The Rabbit House by Laura Alcoba is translated by Polly McClean and dramatised for radio by Sheila Yeger.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00scctj)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00sccwr)
European finance ministers gather to discuss their economic woes.

We hear the unexpected consequences of GM in India.

And what's in a name? Quite a lot in the car industry.

The World Tonight, with Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00scd2q)
No And Me

Episode 10

It's decision time for Lou and No. Emerald O'Hanrahan concludes the tale of adolescence and homelessness, set in contemporary Paris.

Written by Delphine de Vigan
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne
Read by Emerald O'Hanrahan

Producer: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00scvqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Now Wash Your Hands (b00nhn21)
The story of the original Izal Medicated, in the words of people who have a soft spot for hard toilet paper. Featuring songs written by the presenter, Sally Goldsmith, and sung by a Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Sheffield and locals of the city, where the paper was originally made.

A Loftus Audio production for BBC Radio 4.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00sbvwb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00sbvvt)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00sbvvw)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00sbvvy)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00sbvw0)

15 Minute Drama 21:00 FRI (b00sdh0j)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 MON (b00sbryz)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 MON (b00sbryz)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 TUE (b00sbryz)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 TUE (b00sbrz1)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 TUE (b00sbrz1)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 WED (b00sbrz1)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 WED (b00sbrz3)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 WED (b00sbrz3)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 THU (b00sbrz3)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 THU (b00sbrz5)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 THU (b00sbrz5)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 FRI (b00sbrz5)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 FRI (b00sbrz7)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 FRI (b00sbrz7)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00s9xx2)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00sdgmq)

A View Through a Lens 05:45 SAT (b00gq4nb)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b00bf6mn)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00scvdq)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00scvds)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00scvdv)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00sbcvq)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00sb0h5)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00s9xx0)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00sdgmn)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00sb2s4)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00sb2s4)

Back to the Hellespont 23:30 SAT (b00s8f1x)

Baggage 18:30 TUE (b00lymqf)

Bagram Airbase 17:00 SUN (b00sbckp)

Bagram Airbase 20:00 TUE (b00sbckp)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00sb9g2)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00sb9g2)

Big in Bangalore, Big in Beijing 10:30 SAT (b00sb0gv)

Book at Bedtime 19:45 SUN (b00s5ncd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00scd77)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00scd2j)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00scd2l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00scd2n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00scd2q)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00sbmjw)

Brief Lives 14:15 WED (b00scxbq)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00sbbjz)

Cadbury is Our Longbridge 23:30 TUE (b00rblc1)

Cadbury is Our Longbridge 23:30 WED (b00rf169)

Cadbury is Our Longbridge 23:30 THU (b00rmthx)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00scvy3)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00scvy3)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00sgzm0)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b00scy0d)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00scy0d)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 18:30 THU (b00hd80x)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b00s97hj)

Counterpoint 13:30 MON (b00scgxy)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00s9g08)

Day One in Number 10 11:00 WED (b00slbzh)

Democracy on Trial 09:00 TUE (b00scjdz)

Democracy on Trial 21:30 TUE (b00scjdz)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00sbbk3)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00sbbk3)

Devil's Advocate 22:15 SAT (b00s9f92)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00s9zkd)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00scv5n)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00sdc14)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00ctlhm)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00sb0gs)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00s9zqj)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00sbr8k)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00sbr6t)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00sbr6w)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00sbr6y)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00sbr70)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00sbhzw)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b00sb2s0)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b00sb2s0)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00sb0gx)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00sdc12)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00scct8)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00sccnk)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00sccnm)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00sccnp)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00sccnr)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00s9xwr)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00sdgmd)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00scvqk)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00scvqk)

Heresy 18:30 WED (b00scxbx)

I'd Like to Thank the Returning Officer 20:45 WED (b00sbpk5)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00sf8r9)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00sdcfh)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00sdbw4)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00sdbw4)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00scvy1)

It Happened Here 05:45 SUN (b00sb9g4)

It's My Story 16:00 TUE (b00scvqh)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00s9xwt)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00sdgmg)

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Escape to the Country 14:45 SUN (b00sbcdh)

Laurie Lee - Cider with Rosie 21:00 SAT (b00757rv)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00sb2ry)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00scv5q)

Material World 21:00 MON (b00s9gbn)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00sdcfc)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00s9xzq)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00sb9fr)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00sbqjs)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00sbqjj)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00sbqjl)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00sbqjn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00sbqjq)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00scw2q)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00scw2q)

Miracles R Us 11:30 WED (b00scx37)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00scxbs)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00sb0gz)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00sb0gz)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00sdgmb)

My Teenage Diary 23:15 THU (b00jn5s2)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00s9xzz)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00sb9g0)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00sbr4p)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00sbr1b)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00sbr1d)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00sbr1g)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00sbr1j)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00sb9g6)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00s9y03)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00sb9gh)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00sbbjv)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00sb91f)

News 13:00 SAT (b00sb0h3)

Now Wash Your Hands 23:30 FRI (b00nhn21)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00sb9gb)

One 23:15 WED (b00n5ngh)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00sbcj1)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00sbcj1)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00s9zqg)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00s9zqg)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00sb2rm)

PM 17:00 MON (b00sccg7)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00sccf0)

PM 17:00 WED (b00sccf2)

PM 17:00 THU (b00sccf4)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00sccf6)

Peter Porter On Air 11:30 THU (b00sg1n6)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00sbcq4)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00sbcj3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00s9y01)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00sbr6r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00sbr4r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00sbr4t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00sbr4w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00sbr4y)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00sb9gm)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00sb9gm)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00sb9gm)

Rudy's Rare Records 11:30 MON (b00nfqzj)

Running Away 15:45 MON (b00f37gc)

Running Away 15:45 TUE (b00f671m)

Running Away 15:45 WED (b00fdf7k)

Running Away 15:45 THU (b00f678q)

Running Away 15:45 FRI (b00f678s)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00sb0h8)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00s9zqq)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00sb2s2)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b00scjnb)

Saving Species 21:00 THU (b00scjnb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00s9xzv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00sb9fw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00sbr18)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00sbqt7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00sbqt9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00sbqtc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00sbqtf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00s9xzs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00s9xzx)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00sb2rr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00sb9ft)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00sb9fy)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00sbcpy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00sbqr7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00sbqt5)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00sb2rw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00sbcq2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00sccnh)

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So Wrong It's Right 23:00 TUE (b00scw1t)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00sb9g8)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00sb9g8)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00scgxw)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00scgxw)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00sbbjx)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00sb9gk)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00sbbk1)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00sbcvn)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00sbcvn)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00scbqg)

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The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00scbpr)

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The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00s9xww)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00sdgmj)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00sbbk5)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00sbbk5)

The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll 11:00 MON (b00s77wp)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00scxbn)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:00 SUN (b00s92p7)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b00schhg)

The Music Group 15:30 SAT (b00s97gt)

The Music Group 13:30 TUE (b00b529t)

The Music Teacher 23:00 THU (b00sdcxq)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00s9xwy)

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The Report 20:00 THU (b00sdcff)

The Shuttleworths 23:00 WED (b00scy0g)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00sbgtc)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00sbbk9)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00scd2g)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00sccwk)

The World Tonight 20:00 WED (b00sgzsy)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00sccwm)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00s9f5l)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00scxbv)

Tiger v Dragon 20:00 MON (b00schhj)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00s9zqn)

Today 06:00 MON (b00sbryx)

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Traveller's Tree 16:30 MON (b00schhd)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00sbpk3)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b00sgy8m)

When Real Women Wore Minis and Real Men Drove Them 23:30 MON (b00k7c1x)

When the Dog Dies 11:30 FRI (b00sddnk)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00sb0nb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00sbvvr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00sbtm7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00sbtm9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00sbtmc)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00s93v1)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00scbpp)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00scbg4)

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Young, Gifted and Black 11:30 TUE (b00scjx2)

i-shrine 11:00 FRI (b00sdd8v)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00sb2rp)