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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 10 APRIL 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00rthpl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00rqqpj)
Graham Robb - Parisians

Episode 5

"The idea was to create a kind of mini Human Comedy of Paris, in which the history of the city would be illumined by the real experiences of its inhabitants."

So says the author Graham Robb about his new book 'Parisians'. And a whole host of characters walk, scuttle jump, run and flounce across his pages, beginning with the French Revolution and ending in more current times. These inhabitants are natives and visitors, and it is the likes of Charles Axel Guillaumot, Marie Antoinette, Alexandrine Zola, Adolf Hitler and Charles de Gaulle who lighten and darken the city's streets
in five episodes for BOOK OF THE WEEK. The series narrator is Stephen Boxer.

In this final episode, we witness gunshots at Notre Dame, which heralds decades of danger for
a new French leader... Reader Stephen Boxer.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00rthpn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00rthpq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00rthps)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00rthpv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00rthpx)
Daily prayer and reflection with Andrea Rea.


SAT 05:45 Ankle High History (b00j5tfc)
Episode 1

Scotland has a lost archaeological history - the ruins of thousands of townships and buildings which have never been recorded on any map, yet which tell the tale of life in a period of dramatic change. Mark Stephen follows attempts to uncover those stories before the buildings fade from the landscape.

On the Balmoral Estate, Mark meets a ranger who was astounded to learn that what he though was just a pile of stones was in fact the remains of a once-thriving farming township. And he follows a drovers road between two glens, discovering the remnants of a lost way of life.

Producer Monise Durrani.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00rthpz)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00rv546)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00rv548)
Northumberland Castles

Matt Baker visits Alnwick Castle in Northumberland, home to the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland where he meets the Duchess, Jane, and Frenchman, Christian Perdrier. After spending 12 years at Disneyland Paris, Christian has joined Jane at Alnwick to 'awaken a sleeping beauty' that he says is Alnwick and the castle that towers over this market town in Northumberland surrounded by an unspoilt landscape. Matt is shown around the famous Alnwick Garden, created by Jane herself and set around a cascading fountain. This is the only place in the world to have a section devoted entirely to a poison garden, where every plant grown is a potential killer and is also home to the world's largest tree house.
Leaving Alnwick Matt meets folk singer-songwriter, Jez Lowe, born and raised in the North East who draws inspiration from the daily lives of the people and places of the area for his music. Matt then travels on along the coastline to the imposing Bamburgh Castle which stands on an outcrop of volcanic rock. This medieval fortress has around 4,000 years of continuous occupation and since 1996 the Bamburgh Research Project has been working on the castle, unearthing many exciting finds including the 7th century Bowl Hole cemetery.
Finally Matt heads south where, in stark contrast to the grandeur of Alnwick and Bamburgh, he arrives at the iconic ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle. Dunstanburgh is the largest in Northumberland and here Matt meets poet and historian, Katrina Porteous whose work is inspired and influenced by the Northumberland coast, and the cultural and natural history of the area. Over the course of a year, Katrina visited Dunstanburgh Castle several times in all weathers, observing its seasonal changes. The result was the epic poem, 'Dunstanburgh' which draws on the history and local legends of the castle.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00rv54b)
Farming Today This Week

The UK flower industry is worth £2.2 billion. But only 10% of what is sold is home grown. The climate and cost of labour in Britain means many roses bought from florists and supermarkets are imported from South America. Charlotte Smith visits one of the few British rose farmers in Staffordshire to find out how they do it. And ask if more producers can capitalise on this market.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00rv57c)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00rv57f)
With John Humphrys and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00rv58n)
Fi Glover is joined by writer Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall. The poet is Luke Wright.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00rv58q)
Sandi Toksvig meets Paul Smith, Head of The Millenium Seedbank at Wakehurst Gardens in Sussex and horticultural expert Mark Griffiths. Together they explore the world looking for seeds to bring back to the UK for classification, analysis and planting. Sandi also meets Sofia Koutlaki, a writer and linguist, who tells her about exploring Iran. Plus travel writer Nick Maes discusses his recent visit to the Musandam peninsula, very near to Iran but a world away in The Strait of Hormuz.


SAT 10:30 The Ambassador's Reception (b00rv5dc)
"Being thrown out of the US embassy in Ankara with Arthur Miller - a voluntary exile - was one of the proudest moments of my life."

In March 1985 Harold Pinter and American playwright Arthur Miller took a trip to Turkey that culminated in their being thrown out of the American Ambassador's dinner party held in Arthur Miller's honour. They were not in Turkey for a play or a literary event but to draw attention to the ruthless limits being set on freedom of expression in Turkey at that time, and the many writers languishing in prison.

"Mr. Pinter, you don't seem to understand the realities of the situation here. Don't forget, the Russians are just over the border. You have to bear in mind the political reality, the diplomatic reality, the military reality."

Writer and journalist Maureen Freely retraces their footsteps and takes us on a journey across Istanbul into the homes and meeting places of the Turkish literati who in the 1980s were oppressed, imprisoned and tortured for their opinions. Until then the world had turned a blind eye to their plight. Did Pinter and Miller's trip draw attention to a regime that was cruelly persecuting its people or were hopes raised only to be quashed again with the realisation that military strategy was more important to the world than human rights?

Evoking images of country full of promise yet stunted by doubt and distrust Maureen hears from painters, writers, and publishers - those who remember the trip vividly, those who were locked up for speaking their mind, and the new generation of authors. She finds out whether Turkey is a better, safer and freer place to be a writer today than it was in the spring of 1985 or whether having an opinion that deviates from the official line remains a dangerous path to tread.

Producer: Gemma Newby

An All Out production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2010.


SAT 11:00 The Heckler (b00rv5df)
Episode 1

A quirky, irreverent guide to the weekly events of the election. As the campaign begins, Gordon Brown proclaims that he's from a middle class family, while David Cameron insists that it's all about the 'great ignored'. What does it all mean? 'The Heckler' explores the nature of political reality in a surreal campaign. with one of Britain's leading philospophers, Alain de Botton, and ponders what the public really want from next week's Prime Ministerial debate with football pundit Hunter Davies and TV soapwatcher Gareth McClean. Plus why the parties' slogans sound so familiar, and how to make sense of the blizzard of economic statistics swirling around the campaign. Presented by Clive Anderson, without any loose ends or unreliable evidence.

Producers: Peter Mulligan / Leala Padmanabhan.

Editor: Martin Rosenbaum.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00rv5dh)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00rv5dk)
On Money Box this week

Individual Savings Accounts come under scrutiny as low interest rates take their toll on cash savings.

One building society plans to turn away customers who want to take money out at the counter, in favour of those paying in.

The programme also looks at the news that 150 million pounds will be refunded to customers who have been encouraged to switch their pension from one provider to another since April 2006.

And the pros and cons of investing in the emerging market of China.

All that and more on Money Box with Paul Lewis.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b00rth3n)
Series 30

Episode 6

The Now show 6/6

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a satirical look through the week's news, with help from Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, Mitch Benn and Mark Watson.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00rv6n6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00rv6n8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00rth3q)
Jonathan Dimbleby is the guest of the Eden Valley Hospice in Cumbria with questions from the audience for the panel including: Andy Burnham MP, Secretary of State for Health; Eric Pickles MP, Conservative Party Chairman; Jo Swinson MP, Liberal Democrat spokesperson for Foreign Affairs and Daily Mail political columnist Peter Oborne.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00rv6nb)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00rv6nd)
The Believers

The Believers.
Liverpool, 1963. The Merseybeat boom is about to take off. And with it, The Believers, a Christian pop band determined to spread the Word. If only they were all singing from the same hymn sheet. Comedy drama by acclaimed screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce.
James..................................Ray Quinn
Debbie.................................Samantha Robinson
Billy.....................................Kieran Lynn
Warren..............................John Biggins
Reverend Michaels.............Rufus Wright
Elder Wardle......................Gary Bleasdale
Jenny................................Alison Pettitt
Other parts played by Joanna Monro, David Seddon, Laura Molyneux, Jill Cardo and Keely Beresford.
Original music by Carl Hunter and Mel Bowen
Directed by Toby Swift

***************************

Frank Cottrell Boyce is probably best known for films like '24 Hour Party People', 'A Cock & Bull Story', 'Hilary & Jackie', 'Welcome to Sarajevo' and 'Butterfly Kiss'. He won the CILIP Carnegie Medal in 2004 for 'Millions', his first novel, which was subsequently filmed by British director Danny Boyle. Another novel, 'Framed', was shortlisted for the Whitbread Book of the Year, the Carnegie Medal and then adapted by Frank for BBC Television. His first theatre play, 'Proper Clever', was written for the Liverpool Playhouse as part of the 2008 European Capital of Culture Year. That year Frank also wrote a series of 5 radio dramas, 'One Chord Wonders', about the punk generation 30 years on.

The music for the production was written by Carl Hunter (bass player of The Farm) and Mel Bowen. It was performed by Dave Lovelady (drums/backing vocals), Billy Kinsley (bass/backing vocals), Dave Morgan (lead guitar/backing vocals), Chay Heney (rhythm guitar) and Beverley Keenan (backing vocals) with additional guitars from Carl Hunter and Mel Bowen. Billy and Dave were in The Merseybeats and The Fourmost respectively, two of the most significant bands that emerged as part of the Merseybeat scene.


SAT 15:30 Smash Hit of 1453 (b00rt921)
In the musical powerhouse of Europe in the 15th century, one tune caught the imagination of the court composers. This was The Armed Man (or in its original French "L'Homme Arme"). A rousing first line warns that "the armed man must be feared" and goes on to tell everyone to arm themselves with a coat of mail. The musician and broadcaster Rainer Hersch unpicks the facts we know of the tune and its words, making his way through 40 odd church masses by as many composers, who used the melody as a base.

Early music specialists Catherine Bott and Andrew Kirkman think the original song may have been a warning against the threat of the warring Turks, following the fall of Constantinople in 1453, but it could equally have been a popular children's or even a pub song. Whatever its origin it became literally the "Smash Hit" of that time, but then, like much of pop music, it just went out of fashion and disappeared.

Rainer leaves the 15th century behind to find out why the song suddenly burst back into life in the 20th century. Christopher Marshall heard it in his New Zealand school and composed a lively piece for wind band. Karl Jenkins came across it during the Kosovo crisis 10 years ago, and composed his popular Mass for Peace. This begins with the sounds of an approaching army, with the original tune bursting out at the climax. The Master of the Queen's Music, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, encountered it while studying in Italy, and composed a theatre piece where it becomes anything from a hymn to a foxtrot. And this year the folk-group Mawkin:Causley released their first album and turned it into a fast-moving riff, which gets audiences on their feet.

Rainer traces the journey of the tune and the words, as it appears in these very different musical clothes.

The producers are Richard Bannerman and Merilyn Harris, and it is a Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00rv6wn)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Presented by Jenni Murray.

Next month's general election will see a record number of MPs leaving Westminster. Ann Widdecombe looks back at her parliamentary career on the Conservative benches, while the independent Labour MP Clare Short reflects on her role in Tony Blair's government and the fall out over the war with Iraq.

How far would you go to get your message across? Last week one woman launched a billboard poster campaign showing her in her bra and using the phrase "Hello Boys" in a direct appeal to political party leaders, hoping to get their attention and help for those with autism on their election manifestos. We've also seen Cancer Research launch a campaign featuring naked celebrities - men and women - to grab our attention. Polly Tommey talks about why she made her advert, and Professor Angela McRobbie and Joseph Petyan from the advertising agency JWT debate whether baring the flesh still sells.

Monday's Woman's Hour was dedicated to the idea of home, and we look at retirement - when you're no longer tied to a job or a school, the world's your oyster - but where to go? Will you take up residence in that granny flat your children offered? Or do you want to enjoy the peace of an empty nest? Jane Garvey talks to Ian Whitwham, a retired teacher who abandoned city life for a quiet sea-side retreat. Annie Evans lives in town and shares her home with four generations of her family.

One in four women will be affected by domestic violence at some point in their life, and there is an incident reported every minute. Recent Home Office data and early evaluation studies of an innovative multi-agency approach to tackle severe domestic abuse show a possible £740 million a year saving from the public purse. The same report shows that up to 60% of victims report no further violence after a multi-agency risk assessment conference. Woman's Hour looks at how this method works, why it has been so successful and why there are concerns about future funding.

Carol Ann Lee talks about her biography of Britain's most notorious female killer, Myra Hindley.

And what our love affair with mobile technology is doing to our relationships. The Blackberry, the i-phone and other portable internet devices make it possible to communicate with anyone at any time - but do they stop us from communicating to those closest to us? Broadcaster Lowri Turner and Writer Andrew Clover discuss.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00rv6wq)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00rv6ws)
Are there too many bureaucrats? Pen-pushers speak up for themselves. And: "This is all very Shakespearian, isn't it?" A wife describes her brilliant husband's descent into violent dementia. With Jennifer Tracey and Eddie Mair.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00rv6wv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00rv6wx)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00rv6wz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00rv6x1)
Peter Curran is enjoying the Good Life as he talks to Felicity Kendal, leading lady in Bernard Shaw's most provocative of plays, Mrs Warren's Profession.

From one esteemed actress to another, The First Lady of Brookside and The Royle Family - Sue Johnston talks about her role in BBC One's latest drama, A Passionate Woman.

And never short of an opinion is the award winning journalist and Daily Mail columnist Richard Littlejohn, who rails against the absurdities of life in modern Britain, from health and safety to human rights, in his latest book, Littlejohn's House of Fun.

Nikki Bedi joins the Loose Ends stable and talks to the former boxer, model and actor Gary Stretch who leads a cast including Christopher Lee, Vinnie Jones, Sadie Frost and Stephen Rea, in his latest action film, The Heavy.

Comedy from Eric the Submariner who weaves many a yarn from his days in the Navy from his current show, Eric's Tales of the Sea.

And blending the contemporary with choral tradition, there's music from the London Community Gospel Choir. Having opened FA Cup Finals and performed with Madonna, Paul McCartney and Gorillaz, they sing a couple of tracks in the Loose Ends studio from their album, Glorious.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00rv8ws)
Julius Malema

Mary Ann Sieghart profiles Julius Malema, the controversial President of the African National Congress Youth Wing. He's an influential and popular figure within the ANC, feared by some whites, but ridiculed by others, who deride his volatile and sometimes abusive public appearances. Following the murder of Eugene Terre'Blanche, he's the most talked about figure in South Africa. He's certainly divided public opinion at a tense political moment and some believe that he may continue to strengthen his influence within the ANC, eventually becoming a future leader.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00rv8wv)
Tom Sutcliffe is joined by novelists Catherine O'Flynn and Dreda Say Mitchell and literary critic John Carey to review the cultural highlights of the week including The Infidel and Mark Haddon's play Polar Bears

Written by David Baddiel and directed by Josh Appignanesi, The Infidel stars Omid Djalili as a not particularly observant Muslim whose world is turned upside down when he discovers that not only is he adopted but he's also Jewish.

The narrator of Damon Galgut's novel In A Strange Room embarks on three different journeys during the course of the book - in his native Southern Africa, in East Africa and in India. His role on each journey is different - The Follower, The Lover and The Guardian - yet despite his best intentions each journey ends in failure.

Polar Bears is the first stage play by Mark Haddon, best known as the author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. It concerns Kay (Jodhi May), a would-be children's writer who is bipolar, and the effect that her mental illness has on those closest to her, including her philosopher husband (Richard Coyle) and her mother (Celia Imrie).

In an occasional series in which we invite one of reviewers to select a cultural sacred cow for ritual slaughter, Catherine O'Flynn argues the case against Orson Welles's supposed masterpiece Citizen Kane.

Lagos is one of the fastest growing cities in the world and already has a population of 16 million, three quarters of whom live in slums. BBC2's three part documentary series Welcome To Lagos provides a snapshot of life on the margins of a 21st century 'megacity'.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00rv8yk)
Ask the Fellows That Cut the Hay

In this week's Archive On Four, historian Alan Dein celebrates the centenary of his mentor George Ewart Evans, collector of Suffolk farming tales. Evans began by chatting to his neighbours over the fireside in the 1950's and transcribing stories about poaching shepherding, smuggling and ditching.

The talk was of a hardscrabble life, of leaky roofs and meals of pea soup and pollard dumplings and beef only at Christmas with occasional festivities like the Whitsun fair.

With the help of BBC producer David Thomson, Evans recorded many of these tales and they were broadcast on the Third Programme.

Evans came from a Welsh mining village and he sympathised with the labourers' stories about the tyranny of the trinity of the parson, squire and farmer. He was a sympathetic listener who asked allowed his community to speak for itself and he captured the stories of people whose traditions had been unbroken for generations, who worked on the land before mechanisation and who believed in magic and folk wisdom and had intuitive understanding of working with animals.

Evans' eleven books about the working lives and folk stories of Blaxhall are a portrait of every facet of his village and paved the way for books and programmes, both fiction and not fiction, about British agricultural life.

Alan Dein talks to people who remember him in the village of Blaxhall and to his son Lord (Matthew) Evans and youngest daughter Susan as well as historian Owen Collins.

A WHISTLEDOWN PRODUCTION FOR BBC RADIO 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00rql6h)
Samuel Richardson - Clarissa: The History of a Young Lady

Freedom Regained

4/4 Freedom Regained
Clarissa has fled from the cruel, rapacious Lovelace and, befriended by his erstwhile friend Belford and the kindly Mrs Smith, and completely broken in body and spirit, she hopes only for reconciliation with her family; while an unrepentant Lovelace seeks once again to find her and conquer her soul.

Robert Lovelace ..... Richard Armitage
Clarissa Harlowe ..... Zoe Waites
Sally ..... Sophie Thompson
Dorcas ..... Lisa Hammond
Belford ..... Adrian Scarborough
Anna ..... Cathy Sara
Mrs Sinclair ..... Miriam Margolyes
Du Blanc ..... Stephen Critchlow
Mrs Smith ..... Linda Broughton
Colonel Morden ..... Julian Rhind-Tutt

Written by Samuel Richardson
Dramatised by Hattie Naylor

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey Production.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00rv8ym)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b00rtcqy)
Clive Anderson brings together some of the country's top judges and lawyers to discuss the legal issues of the day.

The first programme explores the often controversial interface between English law and religious belief.

Disputes in which articles of faith clash with the law of the land have arisen over the carrying of sacred knives, employment law, adoption, gay rights and cremation.

One of the first acts of the new Supreme Court was to rule that one of Britain's most successful faith schools had racially discriminated against a 12-year-old boy who was refused admission because the school did not recognise him as Jewish.

And the Government's attempts to strengthen the country's equalities legislation provoked the Pope to call on bishops to fight measures which could force churches to hire homosexual and transgender employees.

When individuals choose to have their disputes resolved in religious courts, such as Sharia or Beth Din, what kind of oversight should the secular courts of the United Kingdom exercise?

This programme explores the extent to which secular law accommodates the "irrationality" of religious belief. Should it be more accommodating as the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams has suggested?

The producer is Brian King. This is an Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b00rrljw)
Series 24

2010 Heat 3

Paul Gambaccini chairs the general knowledge music quiz from Manchester.

The questions cover every aspect of music - from the classical repertoire to world music, show tunes, film scores, jazz, rock and pop.

The three contestants from Scotland and the North of England are:

Douglas Macleod
Alastair Gillies
Alan Shutt

Producer: Paul Bajoria

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2010.


SAT 23:30 The Poetry Olympian: Michael Horovitz at 75 (b00rqlc6)
The British Beat poet and musician Michael Horovitz is 75 on April 4th 2010, and in this lively celebration of a lifetime's idiosyncratic poetry output, his admirer, music lecturer and writer Simon Warner, makes the case that no-one has had a greater influence on the development of British poetry over the last 50 years. Describing himself as a 'poet, singer-songwriter, jazz and blues Anglo-saxophonist', Horovitz has spent decades publishing and promoting the verse of the English underground, often at his own expense and in the face of establishment indifference. In fact, his efforts are little less than the seeding ground of the spoken word tradition in the UK, and he has been, and continues to be, an inventive and indefatigable champion of well-known and up-and-coming poets and musicians.

His notion that poetry should be seen and heard, often with music has been shared and developed in collaboration with notable musicians from Stan Tracy to Damon Albarn, as well as a couple of generations of poetry performers, from Adrian Mitchell, John Cooper Clarke and Jean 'Binta' Breeze to John Hegley, Patience Agbabi and Francesca Beard.

His influence on publishing has been as significant as his impact on performance. In 1959 he launched New Departures, which first published works by Beckett, Burroughs, Ginsberg and others in the UK. The magazine grew into a famously anarchic and energetic touring show, Live New Departures, which brought poetry, music, visual art and performance to venues all over Britain during the counterculture explosion of the 1960s. He played a key part in the 1965 International Poetry Incarnation at the Albert Hall, and since 1980 he has organised a a number of Poetry Olympics events that have showcased, and continue to do so, inventive and inspiring collaborations between poets and musicians.

Music lecturer and writer Simon Warner charts the impact of this energetic and eccentric provoker of the establishment over five decades and talks to those who have worked with him, supported him and been supported by him over the years, including poets Pete Brown, Roger McGough, John Hegley, Valerie Bloom and Libby Houston, musicians Laurie Morgan and Damon Albarn, and writer Barry Miles.



SUNDAY 11 APRIL 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00rv94b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b009psnp)
What I Learned from the Metaphysical Poets

Get Lost

WHAT I LEARNED FROM THE METAPHYSICAL POETS: continuing our series of short stories inspired by the lives and work of the seventeenth century poets John Donne, George Herbert and Andrew Marvell.

"GET LOST" by Michéle Roberts, read by Joanna Tope.

George Herbert's poem "Prayer" provides the inspiration for tonight's story, in which a woman - grieving the death of her mother - walks for miles through the empty Sunday streets of London, before coming to rest in All Saints Place, a peaceful public garden surrounded by a square of eighteenth century houses.

Michéle Roberts is the author of twelve highly acclaimed novels, including DAUGHTERS OF THE HOUSE which won the WHSmith Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize (1992). Half-English and Half-French, she is an acclaimed poet and short story writer with several collections of both in print.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00rv9kr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00rv9kt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00rv9kw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00rv9ky)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00rv9l0)
The sound of church bells.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00rv8ws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00rv9l2)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00rv9z6)
Moving On

In Something Understood this week Mark Tully explores the physical and emotional upheaval of moving home. Widely recognised as one of the most stressful of life's experiences, moving can be difficult and traumatic, but it can also be an opportunity to de-clutter, reflect and start afresh.

The producer is Eley McAinsh, and this is a Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00rvb0s)
With no land or agricultural background, how will Gareth Barlow make it as a farmer? Charlotte Smith meets Gareth as he strives to launch a career doing what he loves. With a small flock of 20 Hebridean Sheep living on land borrowed from his neighbour, Gareth tells Charlotte that he longs to have a farm he can call his own.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00rvb0v)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00rvb0x)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00rvx9l)
In this weeks programme -

The three main party leaders have been setting out their stalls in the Christian press - what do they have on offer? Which Christians are they likely to appeal to?
And if you're wondering what the point of voting is - ask the Sudanese who are going to the polls on Sunday for the first time in twenty five years.

A rare edition of the work of the fourth century Saint, Augustine, is being auctioned by Sotheby's - but it's the annotations by an unknown Protestant reformer twelve hundred years later that will attract the bidders.

And coming to city cinemas around the country - A film about the Carmelite Sisters of Notting Hill in which not much happens and little is said - Is the silent movie making a comeback? You can find out more about the film by going to www.nogreaterlove.co.uk

E-mail: sunday@bbc.co.uk

Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00rvx9n)
Opportunity International

Donations to Opportunity International should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Opportunity International. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Opportunity International with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: England & Wales (1107713)Scotland (SC039692.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00rvx9q)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00rvx9s)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0084xjt)
Dr Tina Beattie of Roehampton University travels to Kolkata to explore the legacy of Mother Teresa, reflecting on how she lived out her faith amidst profound spiritual darkness in this, the centenary year of her birth. Producer Mark O'Brien (revised repeat). E-mail sunday.worship@bbc.co.uk.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00rth9p)
Simon Schama celebrates the distinctive history and culture of New Zealand and regrets any renewed talk of joining forces with Australia. While recognising the attractions of Australia's strong economy and way of life, he applauds the political traditions of New Zealand which was the first country to give women the vote and enshrined in law the rights of Maoris. The resulting society, more equal than many, should, he believes, be cherished and preserved.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00rvx9x)
This week on BH, the latest on the death of Polish President Lech Kaczynski and other high-ranking members of the Polish government in a plane crash in Russia. The Polish Ambassador to London joins us.

Peter Hennessy and Anthony Howard are here to sift through archive of elections past and to try and shed some light on the current contest. The main parties are still arguing over whether cuts to public services can be avoided, so we ask: can we afford the public sector we have? And for those of you starting to panic at the tide of election talk; never fear- we have some places of safety throughout the programme.

After the news that Dawn French and Lenny Henry are divorcing after 25 years of marriage, we hear how it feels to leave a marriage that has lasted that long. And given the rising death toll in Afghanistan, do our soldiers have to be braver now than a generation ago?

And reviewing the papers this week were Britain editor of The Economist Merril Stevenson, founder and CEO of JojoMamanBebe Laura Tenison and writer and broadcaster Sir Christopher Frayling.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00rvxbp)
For detailed synopsis see daily episodes

Written By: Joanna Toye
Directed By: Julie Beckett
Editor: Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ... Patricia Greene
David Archer ... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer ... Helen Monks
Tom Archer ... Tom Graham
Jennifer Aldridge ... Angela Piper
Alice Aldridge ... Hollie Chapman
Lilian Bellamy ... Sunny Ormonde
Jolene Perks ... Buffy Davis
Fallon Rogers ... Joanna Van-Kampen
Eddie Grundy ... Trevor Harrison
Ed Grundy ... Barry Farrimond
Neil Carter ... Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ... Charlotte Martin
Chris Carter ... Will Sanderson-Thwaite
Mike Tucker ... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker ... Rachel Atkins
Brenda Tucker ... Amy Shindler
Jazzer McCreary ... Ryan Kelly
Alan Franks ... John Telfer
Jude ... Piers Wehner
Paul ... Michael Fenton Stevens.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b00rvxzc)
Brideshead Revisited

In this episode of The Reunion, Sue MacGregor brings together the cast, the producer and the director of the iconic TV drama Brideshead Revisited.

Brideshead became one of the most popular TV shows ever made when it first aired on ITV in the autumn of 1981. It made household names of its stars Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews and starred two of the greatest actors of the twentieth century, Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud.

Based on the best-selling novel by Evelyn Waugh and adapted by John Mortimer initially and then also Derek Granger, it told a poignant story of forbidden love and religious faith set prior to the Second World War. The size and scale of the series was unprecedented. To make eleven fifty minute episodes, shot entirely on film and all on location was a huge undertaking. And no expense was spared with glamorous costumes, vintage cars and exotic locations including Venice, Malta and the QE2. It was one of the most expensive ITV serials ever made and set the benchmark for others to follow, notably Jewel in the Crown in 1985.

Sue is joined around the table by: Jeremy Irons, who played the narrator of the story Charles Ryder; Anthony Andrews, who was Sebastian Flyte; Claire Bloom, who played Sebastian's mother Lady Marchmain; the series' director Charles Sturridge; Derek Granger the producer; and Diana Quick who was Lady Julia Flyte, Sebastian's sister.

A WHISTLEDOWN Production for BBC Radio 4. The producers are Sarah Cuddon and David Prest.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b00rv4f3)
Series 5

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Phill Jupitus and Catherine Tate are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Hats, Pigeons, Hairdressers and Admiral Lord Nelson.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

The producer is Jon Naismith, and this is a Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00rvy23)
Jake's Sustainable Fish

Artist Jake Tilson began writing a seafood cookbook as an attempt to overcome his squeamishness about fish. It worked - he's now passionate about cooking and eating fish. But midway through the process he hit a black hole - it might be healthy and taste great, but with the vast majority of fisheries in the world fully or over exploited, should we be eating fish at all? His previous exhibition, A Net of Eels, has convinced him that he had eaten his last eel: would fish prove to be the same?

Answering that question took Jake on a journey through hundreds of scientific papers and books by the world's experts, visiting fish markets and talking to fish buyers around the world. His quest culminated at the Seaweb Seafood Choices Summit earlier this year, the world's biggest annual seafood gathering, where industry, science, fishermen, NGOs, government, and the odd chef, were all brought together in Paris to discuss sustainable seafood and good practice.

Through the fish market of Rungis, the streets of Paris, and the conference halls, Jake asks the experts what they mean by "sustainable fishing", and how cooks everywhere can find it, speaking to conference keynote speaker Professor Daniel Pauly, the community supported fishery from Maine, and UK restaurateur Caroline Bennett owner of sushi restaurant Moshi Moshi.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00rvy25)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00rvy27)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00rth3g)
Gardeners' Question Time introduces a new series: 'Listeners' Gardens'. Here, members of the panel visit four very different gardeners at home, offering them advice on their gardening projects. We revisit our four participants, bringing you updates on their progress.

The first part of 'Listeners' Gardens' comes from a garden in Sherwood, near Nottingham. The gardener is setting out from scratch and has a limited space to work with. What creative suggestions do the panel have to offer?

This week's Question and Answer session is recorded with the Radcliffe Gardening Club in Nottinghamshire. The panel are Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and Pippa Greenwood. Eric Robson is in the chair.

The producer is Lucy Dichmont. This is a Somethin Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Escape to the Country (b00rvzb9)
William Wordsworth and the Sublime Landscape

How Wordsworth expressed a sense of nature's powers in his poetry that has influenced thinking about the countryside ever since.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00rvzbc)
Book 3: Smiley's People

Part 1

Simon Russell Beale stars as the intelligence officer George Smiley in a three-part dramatisation by Robert Forrest of John le Carre's classic novel, first published in 1979 and the third in the celebrated 'Karla Trilogy' following 'Tinker, Tailor, Solder, Spy' and 'The Honourable Schoolboy.'

Part 1: At the end of 'The Honourable Schoolboy', in the mid-1970s, as a ruthless new broom swept through the secret corridors of Whitehall, spymaster George Smiley quietly left the Circus and vanished into private life. But a year or two later, when a veteran Russian emigre general is found dead on Hampstead Heath, Smiley is called out of retirement to exorcise some Cold War ghosts from his clandestine past. What follows is Smiley the human being at his most vulnerable, and Smiley the case officer at his most brilliant; and it takes to a thrilling conclusion his career-long, serpentine battle with the enigmatic and ruthless Russian spymaster Karla.

Ann Smiley ..... Anna Chancellor
Oliver Lacon ..... Alex Jennings
Chief Superintendant ..... Stephen Critchlow
Lauder Strickland ..... David Bannerman
Mikhel ..... Nigel Anthony
Mostyn ..... David Seddon
Old woman ..... Joanna Monro
Postman ..... Michael Shelford
Girl ..... Keely Beresford
Stella ..... Alison Pettitt
William ..... Piers Wehner

Producer Patrick Rayner

This episode is available until 3.00pm on Sunday 2nd May as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00rvzmz)
Mariella Frostrup visits Dublin for an in-depth conversation with Roddy Doyle, winner of the 1993 Booker Prize. His latest novel The Dead Republic completes a historical trilogy telling the story of Henry Smart, a former IRA member forced to leave Ireland and flee to America. Doyle talks about his approach to twentieth-century Irish history, and takes Mariella to the GPO, scene of the 1916 Easter Uprising, to explain how this bloody stand-off left its mark on his work.

Producer: Thomas Morris.


SUN 16:30 Lost Voices (b00rzllj)
Series 2

ASJ Tessimond

Poet Brian Patten returns with the stories of four more undeservedly forgotten poets. ASJ - Arthur Seymour John - Tessimond - known to his friends as Tessy - died less than fifty years ago but the details of his life are now almost entirely consigned to oblivion. But his poetry lives on, largely in anthologies or as requests on Poetry Please, and Brian Patten was determined to find out as much as he could for Radio 4 about the man who wrote some beautiful poetry about love. And cats. And, oddly, Luton.
For a man who never found the love he dreamed of, he was conspicuously tenacious in looking for it - but, as a Tessimond researcher explains in Lost Voices this afternoon, he had a fatal tendency to seek love from unsuitable women - chorus girls and nightclub hostesses. Nevertheless, Tessimond is clearly a man who inspired affection and by the end of this afternoon's programme Brian himself has developed a soft spot for "Tessy." The poems are read by Nigel Anthony.

Written and presented by Brian Patten. Produced by Christine Hall.


SUN 17:00 Iraq's Forgotten Conflict (b00rt9rm)
Edward Stourton tells the story of Iraq's religious minorities, which are facing extinction from targeted killings and forced exile.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00rv8ws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00rvzn3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00rvzn6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00rvzn8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00rvznb)
John Waite makes his selection from the last seven days of BBC Radio

I've Never Seen Star Wars - Radio 4
Mark Steel's in Town - Radio 4
Musical Journey to South Africa - With Lenny Henry - Radio 4
Crossing Continents - Radio 4
What Would Jesus Eat? - Radio 4
Ruby Murray - The Secret Story of Curry - Radio 4
Between Ourselves - Radio 4
A Small Piece of Silence - Radio 4
In Tune - Radio 3
Open Book - Radio 4
Parisians - Radio 4
The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Radio 4
In Search of My Lizard Brain - Radio 4
Smash Hit of 1453 - Radio 4

It's a three pipe problem for John Waite in his Pick of the Week this Sunday/tomorrow/ tonight. Radio 4 has a new Sherlock Holmes mystery - the mystery being, Conan Doyle didn't write it. John also uses all his investigative powers to expose how you can get "lizard brain", why you drink lager with curry, and how to prop up Paris to prevent it falling in a hole. Plus why Leonardo da Vinci was a Renaissance Rick Stein. Join John for his Pick of the Week - the game's afoot this Sunday evening at six-fifteen/ tomorrow evening at six-fifteen/ this evening ast six-fifteen.

PHONE: 0370 010 0400
FAX: 0161 244 4243
Email: potw@bbc.co.uk or www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/potw.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00rvzqz)
Jennifer is unimpressed to find that Alice and Chris have stayed in Alice's holiday cottage, and moved the new guests into Kate's place. She tells Alice off, and makes a point by refusing to drive Alice up to the house to get some milk from Home Farm's fridge.

Alice doesn't care, as it means that she gets to spend another whole week with Chris. She goes to the shop and buys all the ingredients for a slap-up brunch.

David tells Jill that Pip has been sulking ever since Jude set off to Newquay. Jill makes an effort to talk to Pip, and offers to drive her to Grange Farm for her species count for college. When Pip complains to Jill about not being allowed to go away with Jude, Jill tries to make her see things from David and Ruth's point of view.

Later, Jill tells David that she doesn't think she made much of an impact - but she reminds him of what Phil used to say: "this too shall pass.".


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00rvzr1)
David Willis takes a look at the creative packaging that can make it or break it, in America. He talks to author David Remnick about his new biography, "The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama." The book illuminates the ways that the 44th American President crafted his image and landed in the spotlight of the political stage.

As British leaders prepare to step into their first televised debates there is much that can be learned from America about what to avoid in order to come out on top while under the bright television lights.

Award-winning film producer Jerry Weintraub talks about how to spot a winner among a sea of possibilities. From "Karate Kid," to "Ocean's Eleven," "Ocean's Twelve," and "Oceans Thirteen," the successful film producer knows what works and what doesn't in this nation of dreamers.

And Americana takes a trip up the northeast coast, to Maine. The last remaining U.S. sardine factory will package its last fish despite efforts to keep the factory running after all these decades.

Email - americana@bbc.co.uk
Twitter - @bbcamericana.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b008kjrs)
Treasure Island

The Treasure Hunt

John le Carre reads one of the greatest of all adventure stories, Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. Abridged in 5 parts by Katrin Williams.

When a mysterious sailor dies in sinister circumstances at the Admiral Benbow inn, young Jim Hawkins stumbles across a treasure map among the dead man's possessions. But Jim soon becomes only too aware that he is not the only one who knows of the map's existence, and his bravery and cunning are tested to the full when, with his friends Squire Trelawney and Dr Livesey, he sets sail in the Hispaniola to track down the treasure horde.

With its swift-moving plot and memorably drawn characters - Blind Pew and Black Dog, the castaway Ben Gunn and the charming but dangerous Long John Silver - Stevenson's tale of pirates, treachery and heroism was an immediate success when it was first published in 1883 and has retained its place as one of the greatest of all adventure stories.

John le Carre is well-known as a superb reader of his own work and has received high praise for his recent readings for BBC Radio - The Tailor of Panama in 1997, Single & Single in 1999, The Constant Gardener in 2001 and Absolute Friends in 2004. In 2002 he read Robert Graves' Goodbye To All That for BBC Radio 4. Treasure Island provides ample opportunity for le Carre to show off his talents as a performer, as he animates a cast of characters from pompous members of the landed gentry to vicious pirates.

The producer is David Blount. This is a Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00rtg8f)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00rth3j)
This week's programme includes obituaries for the performer and impresario Malcolm McLaren, the actor and political activist Corin Redgrave and the South African white supremacist leader Eugene Terreblanche.

Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols on band manager and punk rock pioneer Malcolm McLaren.

The South African white supremacist Eugene Terre'Blanche is remembered by documentary film maker Nick Broomfield.

We hear how Corin Redgrave emerged from the shadow cast by his famous actor father to become a powerful voice on both dramatic and political stages.

And Sir Alec Bedser, the England bowler who claimed 236 Test wickets.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00rv5dk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00rvx9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00rtfhg)
Life Cycle

Life Cycle

Britain is experiencing a two-wheeled revolution. Folding bikes, e-bikes, tricycles, recumbents, fixies, cargo bikes, bamboo bikes - the bicycle is being reinvented and demand is so great that many manufacturers are struggling to keep up. Amid burgeoning sales of bicycles and accessories, are we witnessing a genuine cultural shift towards two wheels or will this turn out to be just another fad? Peter Day meets some of the businesses and innovators hoping pedal power is here to stay.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00rw05g)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00rw05j)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster.


SUN 22:45 What the Election Papers Say (b00rwmzd)
Episode 3

BBC Radio 4 brings back a much loved TV favourite - What the Election Papers Say. It does what it says on the tin. Each programme will see a leading political journalist take a wry look at how the broadsheets and red tops treat the biggest stories of the campaign. Hear all about it - with Deputy Editor of the London Evening Standard Sarah Sands.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00rth3l)
Tilda Swinton discusses her film career with Francine Stock, including her latest, I Am Love, which was 11 years in the making.

Co-creator of The Office, Stephen Merchant talks about his latest collaboration with Ricky Gervais, Cemetery Junction.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00rv9z6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 12 APRIL 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00rw6ky)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00rtbg8)
The idea that modernity leads to a lessening religious belief is being abandoned by theorists in America and Europe. Figures like Richard Dawkins and AC Grayling argue that increasingly religion seeks to impinge on science, and now the first systematic study of European cultural groups predicts that fundamentalists of all religions are out-breeding moderates and atheists, and will eclipse them quite soon. In Israel the Ultra Orthodox will form the majority as soon as 2050. Since the birth rate of secular people in the West is way below replacement level (2.1), and the birth rate of religious fundamentalists of practically any stripe is far above (roughly between 5 and 7.7 children per mother), through the sheer force of demography, academic Eric Kaufmann claims they will become a much bigger force in the Western World. Is that inevitable? Should people be worried?
Laurie Taylor discusses the anxieties of atheists and the predictions of demography with three theorists of different perspectives.: The Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University, Tariq Ramadan; Eric Kaufmann, Reader in Politics at Birkbeck College and author of Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth? and Rebecca Goldstein, philosopher and author of 36 Arguments for the Existence of God; A Work of Fiction.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00rv9l0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6n3)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00rw75f)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6rn)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00rw6vn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00rw78g)
with the Revd Dr Leslie Griffiths.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00rw7dl)
Europe's largest dairy farm is put on hold and local residents breathe a sigh of relief. And for the first time in 17 years, sales of organic food have fallen. Also, rural tourism is worth around £17 billion pounds a year to the UK economy, and is so important to the rural economy that some farmers are choosing to invest more into leisure than in food production. Caz Graham visits Cobble Hey Farm which is perched on a hill in Forest of Bowland in Lancashire. The farm houses a national collection of geraniums and farmer Edwina Miller is as busy tending the tourists that come to see them and the other plants on show in their cottage garden, as her husband and sons are with the livestock.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00rxdr6)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00rw7hw)
With Justin Webb and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00rxdr8)
Andrew Marr talks to playwright David Hare about his forty years in the theatre, to musician Laurie Anderson about her new multimedia work 'Delusion', to political commentator Danny Finkelstein about apathy and to journalist Alex Bellos about the importance of maths and our need to understand numbers.
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00rw7hy)
Douglas Rogers - The Last Resort

Episode 1

1/5

The Last Resort by Douglas Rogers read by Jack Klaff. Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions. The author tells the story of his parents fight to stay on their backpacker lodge in Zimbabwe despite the political upheaval of the last decade. When he hears the news of the death of the first white farmer, Rogers is concerned for his parents safety but when he returns home to visit them, nothing has prepared him for what he finds.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00rw8n2)
Woman's Hour presented by Jane Garvey.

As Jane Austen's bicentenary decade begins, a new permanent exhibition celebrating her life opened on Saturday at Winchester Cathedral. Next year marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Sense and Sensibility - the first of an incredible collection of novels that have secured Jane Austen's place as one of the most prominent writers in the history of English literature. She died at the tragically young age of 41 in Winchester in 1817 and is buried in the cathedral there. Now, a permanent exhibition next to her grave will tell her life story and display Austen memorabilia that has rarely been seen until now. Charlotte Barnaville [Winchester Cathedral's Marketing Officer] , Elizabeth Proudman [Vice Chair of the Jane Austen Society], and Rebecca Vaughan (whose one-woman show Austen's Women opens at the Leicester Square Theatre London on 20th April) join Jane Garvey to discuss the life of one of Britain's best loved authors.

As students in their final year begin to prepare for their exams and the search for jobs, Woman's Hour looks at the role of Internships. Once an informal way of gaining work experience they are now seen as an essential rung on the ladder to employment. The experience can be mixed since many organisations only offer unpaid Internships leaving the Intern to juggle part-time jobs to pay living expenses and travel. Unequal access is also an issue where those with friends or family connections or parents wealthy enough to support them are at an advantage. Jane Garvey hears the experience of a student who did two unpaid Internships, and speaks to Gus Baker from InternAware, Heather Collier Director of the National Council for Work Experience and Anne Minto OBE, HR Director of Centrica who works closely with the CBI's Education Task Force to plug gaps between higher education and work

Younee is a classically trained pianist from Seoul, South Korea, whose eclectic style encompasses jazz, rock and pop. She began playing the piano at the age of three in her kindergarten, and initially found composing songs a welcome relief from the strict regime of study imposed by her parents. She spent the next 20 years perfecting her classical performance in music academies, but the desire to experiment led her to explore classical improvisation, and pop and jazz songwriting. Her debut Western album, 'True to You', was created via Skype with the legendary London-based producer/composer Richard Niles. Younee joins Jane for a live classical performance - with a twist.

And in a follow up to the Woman's Hour Bank Holiday special on Home and what it means to you we hear some of your views.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rwppj)
Sarah Siddons: Life in Five Sittings

Episode 1

1/5

Clare Higgins and Carl Prekopp star in this brutally honest, passionate true story of the compelling, disturbing and tempestuous love affair between the greatest actress of her time, the legendary Sarah Siddons and the renowned artist, Tom Lawrence. A young teenager when he first paints Siddons, Lawrence falls hopelessly in love with her. Plagued by self-doubts, she resists his advances. To 'escape' her clutches but also to be nearer to her, Tom woos her daughters. When they die, Sarah accuses him of killing them by the demonic force of his adoration. Knowing they should stay apart, over the years they continue to meet and draw strength from each other. Every time she visits, she also sits for Tom enabling him to trace her decline in his art. Theirs is a relationship rich in nuance and subtlety in which two people share intimacies, aspirations, confidences, fears and doubts.

Sarah ..... Clare Higgins
Tom ..... Carl Prekopp

Writen by David Pownall.

The director is Martin Jenkins, and this is a Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 Overexposed (b00q3cm3)
Back in 1990, a small group of photojournalists set out to witness world events. They went to Yugoslavia, Angola, Rwanda and Iraq.

Two were shot dead, and everyone was changed.

All of the contributors, including the presenter Miles Warde, were students at the London College of Printing. They went to work for Reuters, the Observer and the New York Times, and won numerous awards, including the Pulitzer, World Press Photo and several Emmys. They began work in an era when access was still easy, and the dangers perhaps not fully understood.

"While I was doing this course I did a work placement and stayed in touch with the picture editor. So when the war started in former Yugoslavia, I went to see him. He gave me the accreditation, he gave me the film and I drove to war in my little Renault Five."

The programme follows up what happened next, providing an intimate, authoritative account of life as a photojournalist.

Contributors include James Hill, Gary Calton, Sandra Balsells, Paul Lowe - the current course director of the LCC - and Colin Jacobson, former picture editor at the Independent Magazine.

Producer: Miles Ware

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


MON 11:30 Thinking of Leaving Your Husband? (b00rxf3w)
Lobster Thermidor

Sarah's first experience of internet dating has gone horribly wrong, but undeterred she continues to use the site, and receives a proposal from a high court judge to go out and eat lobster thermidor with him. Meanwhile her ex-schoolfriend, Tania, is treating her less like a friend and more like some sort of hired servant; she is instructed to look after a consignment of pedigree cats that Tania proposes to sell at a huge profit. Some relief comes in the form of an unexpected visit from her two self-centred but irrepressible nieces Lucy and Ellie. The second episode of a comedy drama by Charlotte Cory starring Henry Goodman and Lia Williams.

Cast:
Sarah ... Lia Williams
Malcolm - and all Sarah's internet dates ... Henry Goodman
Mother ... Miriam Margolyes
Tania ... Frances Barber
Lucy ... Eleanor Butters
Ellie ... Hayley Roberts
Susie ... Elyse Blemmings

Sound Design: Lucinda Mason Brown
Original Music: David Chilton

Director: Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00rwpw1)
Julian Worricker finds out why extra bright headlights are such a problem for one taxi driver that he started a petition against cars being fitted with them.

At the moment food waste may well end up in landfill. With the introduction of new feed-in tariffs, (meaning that you can now earn money for generating green power), councils across the country are keen to exploit the potential of food waste as a new source of energy.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00rwpwy)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00rwq99)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00rvzqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00rxh66)
Homestead

Our Afternoon play follows one family whose dream of a new life in the country becomes a nightmare. When Daniel Brennan is forced to sell up his city home and move to a small holding in the country he hopes it will be a new start and a chance to create a new home for his family. However their reception from the local village is far from warm and, as a campaign of intimidation is directed at the family, they begin to wonder whether they have made the right decision. How can they fit in to their new community and who among their neighbours can they trust?

Join us this afternoon at two fifteen for our afternoon play, 'Homestead' by Francis Turnly.

Homestead
By Francis Turnly

Daniel Brennan and his family downsize to a small farm holding in the country. Struggling to fit in, their hopes of a new start are dashed when a campaign of intimidation is directed at them. Who can they trust?

Daniel ... Stuart Graham
Kate...Zara Turner
Cassie...Hannah R. Gordon
Sean.....Des McAleer
Eamon.....Ian Beattie
Declan....Shaun Blaney
Auctioneer / PSNI officer....Patrick Fitzsymons
Conor....Kieran Lagan
Dermot....Robert Taylor

Producer/Director - Heather Larmour

When Daniel Brennan's business collapses owing to the current economic climate he realises he will no longer be able to afford his house in Belfast and that he and his family will have to downsize to a more modest property. Attending a property-auction in the hope of finding a suitable house in the city; Daniel recklessly bids for a small farm holding in the country. Maybe this will be the change his family needs: a chance for a new start.

His wife Kate and daughter Cassie are less than enthusiastic, especially when they discover their new home is in the middle of nowhere and in need of substantial repair. But that soon becomes the least of their worries, as their reception in the local village is, at best, frosty.
Then unsettling things begin to happen around the farm: graffiti appears on the walls in the dead of night; supplies are stolen; a dead fox is left on the porch. Who is doing this and why? Despite their best efforts to fit in, the campaign of intimidation continues. Is there anyone in the village they can trust, and can they stop it before things really get out of hand?

A chilling story of how one family's rural dream becomes a living nightmare.

Francis Turnly's work for R4 includes the Saturday Play 'Pressing the Flesh' (shortlisted for the Richard Imison Award) and an episode of the acclaimed detective series 'Baldi'. He has written 'Lullaby,' a 30 minute supernatural drama for BBC7 and most recently for R4 the Saturday Play 'Point of Departure'. Francis's theatre plays include 'Breathing', 'Descent', 'Hiding' and 'Bogpeople'.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00rv8yk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Soundscape: The Lion Pride (b00j62b7)
Episode 1

After a successful night's hunting, Beberu the old pride male, and his family, are gathered together, unaware of two nomadic males nearby.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00rvy23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Click On (b00rxh71)
Series 6

Episode 3

Exploring the different ways the digital world is changing our lives.

In this week's programme, Simon Cox discusses the importance of open data, and finds out what happens when fridges get smart. Plus a look at the computer technology aiding crime scene reconstruction, and Australia's controversial internet filter.


MON 17:00 PM (b00rwqg2)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00rwt6x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b00rxh88)
Series 5

Episode 3

Programme 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Fred MacAulay, Susan Calman, Liza Tarbuck and Charlie Brooker are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Skiing, Elephants, Chocolate and Cleopatra.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

The producer is Jon Naismith, and this is a Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00rwqbx)
Pat and Tony discuss Brenda's recent job application. Pat's worried that it will put a strain on Brenda and Tom's relationship, but Tony assures her that they are a strong couple. Tony mentions that he met Kirsty's friend, Patrick, and invited him to look at the wetland system. Pat quickly picks up on his ulterior motive, and warns him not to attempt matchmaking his daughter in an attempt to put an end to her plans for motherhood

Jazzer is unimpressed when he is forced to take Harry out on three milk rounds this week. Harry is keen, asking intelligent questions and coming up with suggestions like improving the website and running a blog. But Jazzer finds his new colleague deeply irritating.

When they get to the Bull, Jazzer is quick to send Harry on another delivery to keep him out of Fallon's way. Jazzer complains to Fallon that Harry is too keen for his own good, but he's got a plan to bring him down. He intends to put him in the path of Mrs Baker and her snappy terrier tomorrow. Maybe then he'll give the bright ideas a rest.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00rwt7m)
Mark Lawson meets American comedy performer and actress Tina Fey, who famously impersonated the Republican vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Tina Fey stars with Steve Carell in the new film Date Night.

Mark also has the verdict on Cemetery Junction, the new film from the creators of The Office, Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant.

As Holby City celebrates its 500th episode Mark speaks to actor Amanda Mealing, Executive Producer John Yorke and Justin Young, who is one of the writers on the show.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rwppj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Anatomy Of... (b00rxj4x)
Mental Illness

From the makers of the Sony award-winning Anatomy of a Car Crash, the series that dissects those often neglected everyday dramas that change ordinary lives forever.

The story of Angela, who was sectioned under the Mental Health Act. In 2005, Angela was busy and successful, working for an NHS Trust as well as running three parenting groups. As she pushed herself harder and harder, though, her behaviour started to become increasingly bizarre, leading family and colleagues to worry about her mental health. Following a psychotic episode at home, Angela was sectioned and admitted to hospital.

The programme traces Angela's experiences, speaking to her family and friends about the impact of late onset bipolar disorder on their lives. Those who cared for her in hospital recall Angela's slow path to recovery.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00rtd48)
Pentecostalists in Central America

In the past few decades, Central America has been in the grip of what has been described as the largest mass conversion in history - the explosive growth of Pentecostalism across Latin America. The take-up of this new faith in both Guatemala and El Salvador is now estimated at over 40%.

Film maker Steve O'Hagan travelled through those countries to ask why the people there are reaching out to this new religion, after 400 years of rule from the Vatican.

From the space-age opulence of the biggest church in all of Latin America on the outskirts of Guatemala City, to the rapidly mushrooming micro-churches operating out of back rooms and alleyways of the working class suburbs of San Salvador, Steve O'Hagan searches for the reasons why Pentecostalism - a faith associated with wealth, televangelists, and the North American Right - has proven so successful here.

Increasingly from the margins of the society, the Catholics of Liberation Theology continue to dedicate themselves to their work. In the mountainous former rebel strongholds of El Salvador, Steve meets a Belgian priest who ministered to the guerrillas throughout the 12-year civil war and today is still tending his flock.

But in a surprising coda, we discover that perhaps the spirit of Liberation Theology will live on in its theological 'conqueror'. Some Pentecostal groups in El Salvador are beginning to cast off the right-wing tendencies of their past, and pick up the torch of liberation first lit by the Catholics decades earlier.

Producer: Lucy Ash.


MON 21:00 Material World (b00rtf9l)
As colour returns to gardens across the country after the long cold winter, Quentin Cooper hears how records from two and a half centuries of nature-watching reveal the gradual advance of spring, and what this says about climate change.

Also in the programme, the UK team who have built a tsunami simulator to see how buildings can best resist the powerful seawaves created by earthquakes.

Nanoelectronics are brought a step closer with a new kind of digital logic.

And we hear from more potential participants in Radio 4's "So You Want to be a Scientist" talent search.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00rxdr8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00rwtdb)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00rwtfq)
National and international news and analysis.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00rwwsd)
Naomi Alderman - The Lessons

Going Up

Rory Kinnear begins reading the Orange New Writer's Award Winner, Naomi Alderman's, second novel, 'The Lessons', a story of ambition, friendship, betrayal and desire. Today: James goes up to Oxford but finds her beauty only skin-deep.

Reader Rory Kinnear
Abridger Sally Marmion
Producer Di Speirs

The Lessons is the second novel from Naomi Alderman, winner of the Orange New Writer's Award and Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. Set among the dreaming spires of Oxford, it follows the progress of a gilded group of under-graduates drawn together by their dazzling and mercurial fellow student Mark Winters. Fuelled by his trust-fund they live a charmed life of learning and parties and love-affairs. But university is no grounding for real life and none of the friends will be prepared, some years later, when tragedy strikes.

The Lessons is a novel about friendship, ambition, betrayal and desire, and the fact that only life can teach the lessons you really need to learn.

Naomi Alderman won the Orange New Writers Award for her first novel Disobedience and has subsequently been named as the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. She is a graduate of Lincoln College, Oxford.

Rory Kinnear, fresh from playing Angelo at the Almeida and about to play Hamlet at the National Theatre studied at Balliol College, Oxford and reads his first Book at Bedtime.

ProducerDi Speirs.


MON 23:00 The Vote Now Show (b00ry8mk)
Series 1

Episode 1

Punt and Dennis present a nightly satirical round up of election news and comment from comedians, journalists and commentators. Recorded in front of an audience at the Radio Theatre about 4 hours before transmission, this is a very topical comedy show.


MON 23:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b00h3wlv)
Series 2

The Godfather and The Godfather Part II

And the Academy Award Goes To... The Godfather & Godfather II. Another chance to catch Paul Gambaccini's series on Oscar-winning films and what they can tell us of the culture and times that gave birth to them.

To kick off the series he explores the potboiler novel that spawned not only one of the most violent 'family' movies ever, but also led to an even more successful sequel. An offer that can't be refused..



TUESDAY 13 APRIL 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00rw6hc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00rw7hy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6l0)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00rw6vq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6n5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00rw6rq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00rw75h)
Daily prayer and reflection with Andrea Rea.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00rw78j)
The local National Farmers Union chairman criticises campaigners fighting to stop Europe's largest dairy farm being built in Lincolnshire. Developers have pulled the plans which could have seen 8100 cows producing milk in the village of Nocton as early as this Autumn. Farming Today hears how the NFU believes those opposed to the idea have a misguided and outdated view of modern farming.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00rw7dn)
With Justin Webb and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Between Ourselves (b00ryf18)
Series 5

Episode 4

Gay ministers, Martin Reynolds and Clare Herbert, talk to Olivia O'Leary about whether the church accepts their sexuality and how open they can be about their personal life. How do they reconcile the fact that if they win the acceptance they crave, it may split the church they love?

Producer: Sara Conkey.


TUE 09:30 A Musical Trip to South Africa - with Lenny Henry (b00ryf1b)
Episode 3

Lenny meets the Queen of Gospel, the mega-recording artist Rebecca Malope, he is blown away by a choir in Soweto and the choir boy who's now South Africa's sexiest singing star.

The producer is Susan Marling, and this is a Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00rzlth)
Douglas Rogers - The Last Resort

Episode 2

2/5

The Last Resort by Douglas Rogers read by Jack Klaff. Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions. The author tells the story of his parents fight to stay on their backpacker lodge in Zimbabwe despite the political upheaval of the last decade.

Returning home for a visit, Douglas discovers that though the tourists have long gone, 'Drifters' has acquired a new set of customers.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00rw8mr)
Presented by Jane Garvey. As the Victoria and Albert Museum opens an exhibition devoted to the Hollywood actress Grace Kelly who became Princess of Monaco - Jane Garvey meets the curator Jenny Lister and biographer Sarah Bradford.

Continuing the series of Woman's Hour interviews with women standing down from parliament - Jane talks to Ann Cryer. First elected Labour MP for Keighley in 1997 Ann Cryer was the first MP to raise the issue of forced marriage and became a key campaigner promoting legislation to protect young women from being forced to marry against their will.

Last week on Woman's Hour we heard from independent Labour MP Clare Short and former Conservative minister Ann Widdecombe.

Kishwar Desai was the head of a TV channel in India and produced and presented programmes. Now she has written her first novel, a thriller, set in the Punjab. She joins Jane to discuss some of the issues explored in the book - the killing of baby girls, police corruption and the book's rather unconventional heroine: a gin-drinking, chain- smoking, 45 year old unmarried social worker.

And Philosopher Alain de Botton and agony aunt and writer Virginia Ironside debate gratitude and saying thank you.
Most religions encourage you to express gratitude but in secular societies there's far less emphasis on saying thank you. How important is it to teach children to say thank you? If gratitude isn't forthcoming, what does it feel like not to receive it? And are people who express gratitude or have a grateful disposition generally happier than ungrateful people?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlvb)
Sarah Siddons: Life in Five Sittings

Episode 2

2/5

Clare Higgins and Carl Prekopp star in this brutally honest, passionate true story of the compelling, disturbing and tempestuous love affair between the greatest actress of her time, the legendary Sarah Siddons and the renowned artist, Tom Lawrence. A young teenager when he first paints Siddons, Lawrence falls hopelessly in love with her. Plagued by self-doubts, she resists his advances. To 'escape' her clutches but also to be nearer to her, Tom woos her daughters. When they die, Sarah accuses him of killing them by the demonic force of his adoration. Knowing they should stay apart, over the years they continue to meet and draw strength from each other. Every time she visits, she also sits for Tom enabling him to trace her decline in his art. Theirs is a relationship rich in nuance and subtlety in which two people share intimacies, aspirations, confidences, fears and doubts.

Sarah ..... Clare Higgins
Tom ..... Carl Prekopp

Written by David Pownall.

The director is Martin Jenkins, and this is a Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b00ryf1d)
Series 1

Episode 2

This is the week we launch "Memories Are Made of This". We go out and invite those who can remember the wildlife around them in the 1940's and 1950's. "Memories" is not so much about nostalgia but much more about past abundances of species. Was there a time in living memory when wild flowers were truly numerous and swallows darkened the sky? This week we kick off with memories of daffodils and hedgehogs.

And Hugh Warwick, a hedghog expert, is in the studio. Our anecdotal research indicates there are less hedgehogs being seen in Britain and even less road kills being seen. What does this say about hedgehog populations? We'll find out.

Also in this programme we get very close to displaying Red-Crowned Cranes, the national bird of Japan. Julian Hector interviews Mark Brazil during late winter in Hokkaido, a time when the cranes are as raucous as they are flamboyant with their displays, calls and dances. Japanese cranes have a big relevance to the UK too as conservationists seek to re-introduce our own [once extinct] crane species from a German wetland to the Somerset Levels in Southern England. We'll be following that re-introduction in a future programme.

As with every week, we'll have a wildlife news round-up, this week gathered by Kelvin Boot and we'll work with our associates in The Open University to see who is sharing what observations about biodiversity on their interactive website iSpot.

Presented by Brett Westwood
Producer: Kirsty Henderson
Editor: Julian Hector.


TUE 11:30 OedipusEnders (b00ryf1g)
Who were the Chorus in Coronation Street? How has Oedipus influenced EastEnders? And what is Medea doing in The Bill?

On the face of it, they couldn't be more different. Greek tragedy, we're told, is right at the top of the dramatic hierarchy; TV soaps are the definition of low-brow. Not so, says comedian, telly addict and closet classicist Natalie Haynes.

As she discovers, the two forms have rather more in common than stereotype might have us believe. Soap and Greek tragedy alike focus relentlessly on families under pressure. Both see it as their job to confront their fellow citizens with social taboos. And both are noted for competing keenly to win the praise of mass audiences.

Natalie starts by spending an evening watching 'EastEnders' with Tim Teeman, who has written many articles on soap - and who recently noticed the storylines start to become unmistakably Greek.

She soon finds out that this is no coincidence. One of the most controversial, high-impact 'EastEnders' storylines of the last few years was a conscious take on Sophocles' 'Oedipus' - as she discovers when she meets John Yorke, former Executive Producer on 'EastEnders' and now Head of BBC Drama Production, and Dominic Treadwell-Collins, Series Story Producer on 'EastEnders'.

Dominic Treadwell-Collins also explains how the story-lining team seriously considered having one of the central EastEnders characters re-enact Euripides' 'Medea': they discussed having her punish her adulterous husband by murdering their children.

In the end they decided this was too extreme. But Natalie visits the set of 'The Bill', to talk to Series Story Editor Kara Manley, who explains how and why they have drawn specifically on 'Medea' to create a forthcoming episode.

Along the way, Natalie hears from Phil Redmond, the creator of 'Brookside', and soap writers and story-liners who have worked on a wide range of soaps. She discovers that Aeschylus and Sophocles are often present in spirit at script conferences, as story teams exhort each other to "make it more Greek".

And she finds out what happened when one writer on the defunct Channel 5 soap 'Family Affairs' spotted that a story-line was identical to Euripides' 'Hippolytus'. He started to work references to Euripides into the script, only to find his bosses were less than amused.

Meanwhile, Barrie Rutter, Artistic Director of Northern Broadsides Theatre Company, who is currently touring a production of 'Medea', tells Natalie there is no connection at all between the two genres.

But Edith Hall, Professor of Classics and Drama at Royal Holloway, University of London, explains what she thinks is behind all this. Hall argues that the rising power of women has fuelled both the rise of the soap and, over the last forty years, the biggest revival of Greek tragedies since the plays were written.

Both forms, she argues, boast an unusually strong set of roles for women, and were seized on from the late 1960s onwards as an antidote to other, more male-focussed forms of drama. In contrast to much earlier TV drama, Aeschylus and 'EastEnders' alike, she argues, don't see the home as a place of safety, with the drama happening beyond. They see the home itself as a place of danger.

With: Ryan Craig, Professor Edith Hall, Dr Paula James, Kara Manley, Sean O'Connor, Phil Redmond, Barrie Rutter, Tim Teeman, Dominic Treadwell-Collins, John Yorke.

Producer: Phil Tinline
(repeat).


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00rwpt5)
The man who blew the whistle on Bernard Madoff's massive fraud spent nearly a decade warning the US financial regulator that Madoff was conning investors out of billions of dollars. Why did no one listen? He'll be telling Julian what it was like uncovering the biggest financial scam in history and about his frustration at being ignored by Wall Street's watchdog

Plus - a compulsory English qualification that's valid one day and invalid the next. We look at the new Home Office rules confusing would-be British citizens.

And is it time to call it a day on 5-a-day? New research shows the British public is eating fewer vegetables despite millions of pounds being spent on the five-a-day campaign.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00rwpw3)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00rwq77)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.

Includes Election Call with Alex Salmond of the Scottish National Party and Plaid Cymru leader Ieuan Wyn Jones.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00rwqbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00ryf1l)
Highgate Letters

By Jeff Young

A quirky and darkly comic drama - inspired by a true story - about life in the ghetto aka Highgate, North London.

Joe lives in Highgate but is originally from Liverpool, he's married with a six year old daughter, Megan. Megan is Joe's best friend, well his only friend really. When Joe's daughter chalks on the pavement it creates near-war with the chairman of the resident's committee, Mervyn Dawson, and Joe.

Joe ..... Conrad Nelson
Suzanne ..... Sophie Thompson
Megan ..... Lauren Mote
Mervyn ..... Malcolm Raeburn
Marsha .....Maggie Fox
Postman ..... Greg Wood
Cop ..... Dermot Daly

Produced and directed by Pauline Harris.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00ryfkt)
Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00ryfxj)
Young Turks

The Happiness of Blond People

Award winning writer Elif Shafak's story, The Happiness of Blond People, finds a father attempting to change his family's fortunes by altering his image, but events do not go according to plan. The reader is Philip Arditti.

The Happiness of Blond People is the first in the short story series, Young Turks, which marks Istanbul's tenure as European City of Culture. The three stories explore Turkey's contemporary literary scene by showcasing the work of some of the nation's newest and youngest generation of writers.

The writer: Elif Shafak is an award-winning bestselling writer whose novel The Bastard of Istanbul was long listed for the Orange Prize. In the novel Shafak describes the massacres of Armenians as genocide, an opinion which led to her prosecution by the Turkish governemnt for insulting Turkishness.

The producer is Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 15:45 Soundscape: The Lion Pride (b00j62jv)
Episode 2

Beberu, the old pride male, is chased out of his territory by two nomadic males which then kill the cubs and mate with the lionesses.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b00ryg40)
Chris Ledgard goes to Soho to meet the people that work in voiceoverland. He hears the American actor Kerry Shale dubbing over Peter Kay's voice for a cartoon about to be exported to the States. He talks to the people who produce the messages that we hear when we 'phone our banks. He asks a voiceover talent agent (whose own voice people who watch The Weakest Link will recognise) about the changes that have occurred in the industry over the years and he explores what it is that makes a particular voice grab our attention.
Producer Sarah Langan.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00ryg42)
Series 21

Robin Hood

Clive Stafford Smith is a lawyer working for human rights both in Britain and abroad - he campaigns for the rights of prisoners on death row in the US and in Guantanamo Bay. His nomination for a life worth celebrating is at first surprising - it's the entirely fictitious Robin Hood. But, he argues in conversation with medievalist Professor Stephen Knight, the myth has a lot to teach us about the way we treat each other. The presenter is Matthew Parris.

Produced by Christine Hall.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00rwqfr)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00rwt4d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Baggage (b00lgm1t)
Series 4

Ashes to Auld Reekie

Comedy series by Hilary Lyon, set in Edinburgh.

It is a year since Caroline's best friend, Fiona, died, but an unexpected visitor, a skinny dip in a Highland loch and an illicit kiss mean that scattering her ashes doesn't quite go according to plan.

Caroline ...... Hilary Lyon
Fiona ...... Phyllis Logan
Ruth ...... Adie Allen
Roddy ...... Robin Cameron
Gladys ...... June Watson
Nicholas ...... Moray Hunter

Directed by Marilyn Imrie.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00rwq9c)
Jazzer puts his plan into action, sending Harry to ring Mrs Baker's doorbell to ask her if she wants any cream. Jazzer gleefully hears incessant barking but when the noise subsides he goes to investigate. To Jazzer's annoyance, Harry seems to have won over both Mrs Baker and her dog.

Jazzer's bad mood increases when he goes to the supermarket cafe to see a girl he met in a bar last night, only to discover that she doesn't actually work there, and gave him the wrong phone number.

Peggy visits Jack and bumps into Ted. She is wrongfooted when Ted innocently asks her out to lunch and she makes a hasty exit.

Ruth figures Pip's still sulking about not being allowed to go to Newquay. Pip tells Izzy she's worried Jude and his mates are bringing girls back from the pub for parties. Izzy suggests that Pip lie to her parents and go to Newquay to check on him. She'll cover for her.

Ruth's pleased to learn that Pip's going to stay at Izzy's, and doesn't twig that Pip's sudden graciousness is all a ploy.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00rwt6z)
Warwick Davis, who has appeared in Willow, Return of the Jedi and the Harry Potter films, talks to John Wilson about the pressures of being one of world's leading short actors.

The verdict on Boogie Woogie, a comedy set in London's contemporary art scene with an ensemble cast featuring Gillian Anderson, Heather Graham, Christopher Lee and Joanna Lumley.

Will Anderson, series producer of Welcome to Lagos, a three part observational TV documentary, discusses how he attempted to capture life in the world's fastest growing megacity.

As increasing numbers of stand-up comedians are able to sell out arena-sized venues, Stephen Armstrong tries to explain the phenomenon and asks if comedy finally is the new rock and roll?

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Freed Radicals (b00ryjfw)
After the London bombs in July 2005 hundreds of dangerous extremists were convicted of terrorist related offences across the UK. Five years on, many are now being released from prison. But are Government "de-radicalisation" and rehabilitation programmes proving successful or does the answer lie within the Muslim community itself?

Reporter: Mobeen Azhar

Producer: Gail Champion.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00ryk66)
Peter White goes to New York to talk to the State Governor David Paterson, who is visually-impaired. The Governor tells Peter that as he cannot read large amounts of printed material, his aides record the newspapers onto a voice-mail system for him each morning and he accesses the information by listening to it.
Governor Paterson says that his parents sent him to a mainstream school which meant that he didn't learn Braille or use any equipment to assist him. He said it was easier to keep a low profile and not draw attention to himself. This meant he was not used to mixing with blind people. When Peter asked him how he responded to claims by some blind Americans that he denied his blindness, he told the story of how a woman had once challenged him about this at a talk he gave. She said that whilst he was prepared to acknowledge that he was black, he seemed less inclined to accept his blindness. Although Mr Paterson said he was angry with the woman for a few days after the event, he did look into the mirror and saw which of his eyes was blind.
Peter asked Governor Paterson why he doesn't use any assistive technology and he said he's been too busy with work to have time to learn how to use it.
However, when he stands down from his current role, he plans to take some time and get some IT sorted for himself.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00ryk68)
Diabetic Feet

Diabetes is the cause of 100 amputations every week in the UK. One of the commonest consequences of diabetes is restriction of blood flow to different organs and parts of the body. With reduced blood flow in the feet, sufferers are at considerable risk of developing dangerously infected ulcers. If the ulcers are not caught in time, many patients have to lose their feet or legs in order to save their lives

In this edition of Case Notes, Dr Mark Porter visits the specialist diabetic foot clinic at King's College Hospital in London. There he talks to doctors, surgeons and foot specialists about the risks of life-threatening complications of diabetes in the feet, and hears about the various treatments and surgical operations which are helping to reduce the number of amputations for their patients. Mark also talks to patients about their experiences of the insidious threat from foot ulcers and how they've been treated.


TUE 21:30 Between Ourselves (b00ryf18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00rwt9f)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00rwtdd)
The Conservatives launch their election manifesto: but will it 'seal the deal'?
Cuban hairdressing salons to be handed over to employees.
Is Kyrgyzstan on the brink of civil war?


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00rwx27)
Naomi Alderman - The Lessons

An Invitation

Rory Kinnear reads the Orange New Writer's Award Winner, Naomi Alderman's, second novel, 'The Lessons', a story of ambition, friendship, betrayal and desire. Today: Second Term: Struggling with loneliness and injury James is befriended first by Jess, then Mark - who issues an invitation too extraordinary to refuse.

Reader Rory Kinnear
Abridger Sally Marmion
Producer Di Speirs

The Lessons is the second novel from Naomi Alderman, winner of the Orange New Writer's Award and Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. Set among the dreaming spires of Oxford, it follows the progress of a gilded group of under-graduates drawn together by their dazzling and mercurial fellow student Mark Winters. Fuelled by his trust-fund and resident in his Georgian mansion, they live a charmed life of learning and parties and love-affairs. But university is no grounding for real life and none of the friends will be prepared, some years later, when tragedy strikes.

The Lessons is a novel about friendship, ambition, betrayal and desire, and the fact that only life can teach the lessons you really need to learn.

Naomi Alderman won the Orange New Writers Award for her first novel Disobedience and has subsequently been named as the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. She is a graduate of Lincoln College, Oxford.

Rory Kinnear, fresh from playing Angelo at the Almeida and about to play Hamlet at the National Theatre studied at Balliol College, Oxford and reads his first Book at Bedtime.


TUE 23:00 The Vote Now Show (b00ryk6b)
Series 1

Episode 2

Punt and Dennis present a nightly satirical round up of election news and comment from comedians, journalists and commentators. Recorded in front of an audience at the Radio Theatre about 4 hours before transmission, this is a very topical comedy show.


TUE 23:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b00h9dkm)
Series 2

Shakespeare in Love

Continuing with his look at Oscar-winning films and what they tell us about the society that gave birth to them, Paul Gambaccini turns to Shakespeare in Love which won the Oscar for Best Picture, despite being a comedy, and for Best Supporting Actress, despite its recipient Judi Dench's appearance in the film being one of the shortest to win an award.



WEDNESDAY 14 APRIL 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00rw6hf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00rzlth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6l2)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00rw6vs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6n7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00rw6rs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00rw75k)
Daily prayer and reflection with Andrea Rea.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00rw78l)
Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer: Fran Barnes.


WED 06:00 Today (b00rw7dq)
With John Humphrys and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00ryk6j)
This week Libby Purves is joined by James Rado, Bert Trautmann, Patricia Hammond and Rupert Thomson.

James Rado is an actor, writer and composer, who is probably best known as the co-author, along with Gerome Ragni, of the 1967 groundbreaking American tribal love-rock musical HAIR. A celebration of life, love and freedom, and a passionate cry for hope and change, HAIR features the songs 'Let The Sun Shine In' and 'Aquarius'. Now the 2009 Tony-Award-winning production opens in London with the entire Broadway cast at the Gielgud Theatre.

Bert Trautmann is known for being the Manchester City goalkeeper who broke his neck in an FA Cup final and famously played on. But his early life is no less extraordinary. He grew up in Nazi Germany and fought for them during the World War Two. In 1945 he was captured and sent to a British POW camp in Cheshire where he discovered a new way of life and embraced England as his new home. He worked on a bomb disposal unit in Liverpool and became an amateur footballer before becoming Manchester City's celebrated goalkeeper. 'Trautmann's Journey - From Hitler Youth to FA Cup Legend' by Catrine Clay is published by Yellow Jersey Press.

Patricia Hammond is a Canadian born mezzo-soprano. A a professional singer, for the last six years she has sung in care homes for the elderly. Her work has caught the eye of Sony Music, who invited her to be the only contemporary artist to appear on 'Down Memory Lane' a collection of songs from the 1940s and 1950s.

Rupert Thomson is a novelist. In his first non-fiction book, 'This Party's Got To Stop', he focusses on 1984 and the death of his father when he and his two brothers return to the family home to confront their grief and each other. This Party's Got To Stop is published by Granta.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00rzlt5)
Douglas Rogers - The Last Resort

Episode 3

3/5

The Last Resort by Douglas Rogers read by Jack Klaff. Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions. The author tells the story of his parents fight to stay on their backpacker lodge in Zimbabwe despite the political upheaval of the last decade.

Despite having tried to avoid the senior government minister in his area for years, Douglas's father now needs to see him badly and is introduced to a soldier who, he is told, can help.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00rw8mt)
Presented by Jenni Murray. Fatima Bhutto's new memoir "Songs of Blood and Sword: A Daughter's
Memoir" describes what it was like growing up as part of a powerful Pakistani family and what happened following the killing of her father in 1996.

As wild garlic comes into season - there's live cooking in the studio as Jane Baxter, head chef at the Field Kitchen restaurant at Riverford Organic Veg* Farm in Devon, and Gilli Allingham owner of the Really Garlicky Company in Scotland discuss how to recognise wild garlic, what makes it different from the bulbs we usually buy in the shops and what recipes to use it for.

Why women should value their "Erotic Capital". In a recent article Dr Catherine Hakim, a sociologist at the London School of Economics, coined the term 'erotic capital' to describe that crucial combination of physical and social attractiveness which makes some people particularly desirable. She claims it should be recognised as a new fourth category of personal asset (alongside economic, cultural and social capital). She argues it can be as important as educational qualifications. Kate Smurthwaite - a contributor to the F-Word blog debates this with her.

And as the Sudanese elections are extended Katie Whittacker reports on the changing lifestyles of women in the traditional cattle camps area of Southern Sudan.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlzb)
Sarah Siddons: Life in Five Sittings

Episode 3

3/5

Clare Higgins and Carl Prekopp star in this brutally honest, passionate true story of the compelling, disturbing and tempestuous love affair between the greatest actress of her time, the legendary Sarah Siddons and the renowned artist, Tom Lawrence. A young teenager when he first paints Siddons, Lawrence falls hopelessly in love with her. Plagued by self-doubts, she resists his advances. To 'escape' her clutches but also to be nearer to her, Tom woos her daughters. When they die, Sarah accuses him of killing them by the demonic force of his adoration. Knowing they should stay apart, over the years they continue to meet and draw strength from each other. Every time she visits, she also sits for Tom enabling him to trace her decline in his art. Theirs is a relationship rich in nuance and subtlety in which two people share intimacies, aspirations, confidences, fears and doubts.

Sarah ..... Clare Higgins
Tom ..... Carl Prekopp

Written by David Pownall.

The director is Martin Jenkins, and this is a Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 Good King George (b00ryklb)
Next month marks the centenary of the accession of King George V in May 1910. This programme presents a re-evaluation of his reign.

George V is sometimes caricatured as a blimpish boor, interested mainly in shooting and stamp collecting. But he helped to secure stability through some of the most turbulent events in our history -- the constitutional crisis over the Budget; Irish Home Rule; the Great War; the Russian revolution; the General Strike; the depression. He can be seen as the first monarch to understand the true constitutional function of the monarchy and its potential role in uniting a disparate people. He was the first monarch to broadcast to the nation and the empire, and he was a conscientious figurehead in the First World War. During the first Labour government in history he was welcoming and even handed, and later he played a key role in securing Ramsay MacDonald's place as Prime Minister of the National Government of 1931. At his jubilee in 1935 he was feted by all classes and seemed genuinely surprised by his own popularity and touched by the warmth of the celebrations. He embodied Bagehot's dictum about the benefits of a family on the throne.

Yet George was not without his faults, he was old fashioned, set in his ways, obsessed by protocol and by correct dress to an extent that seems ridiculous now. He did not have a good relationship with his son and heir, the Prince of Wales, later Edward VIII; he could be a martinet, he could be bad tempered.

The programme interviews George V's biographer, Kenneth Rose; Sarah Bradford, the biographer of George's younger son, the future George VI, as well as historians of the period, an expert on the King's shooting prowess, and an expert on his stamp collection . It also reveals the true story behind the King's most famous exclamation "Bugger Bognor!"

Presenter Simon Heffer. Producer Chris Bond.


WED 11:30 House on Fire (b00q439k)
Series 1

Emergency

"EMERGENCY"

Another visit to Hogarth Road, where Matt and Vicky continue in their attempts to live together in tranquillity - a tranquillity guaranteed to be disturbed when the bills don't get paid. Is life worth living when the phone gets cut off?

Vicky - Emma Pierson
Matt - JODY LATHAM
Col. Bill - RUPERT VANSITTART
Donny - Sebastian Cardinal

With Fergus Craig & Colin Hoult

Directed by Clive Brill & Dan Hine
Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00rwpt7)
Athletes changing nationality - Is the growing trend of athletes changing their nationality to fly a flag of convenience endangering the poorer nations? Should more be done to prevent it?

Nursery food - A big survey from the Local Government Organization has found that nurseries serve too much fruit and vegetables and not enough carbohydrates for growing toddlers. They're calling for more guidelines.

Palm oil processing - Europe's first sustainable palm oil refinery opens in Liverpool in a development that environmentalists and industry hope will accelerate the move away from deforestation to sustainable product.

Organic food slump - The Soil Association has reported a 12.9 per cent drop in organic food and drink sales in 2008. Should we be surprised? Organic food sales have been falling for years.

Small plate dining - Across the country, in an increasing number of restaurants, portions are getting smaller as are the plates they're being served on. It's called "small plate" dining and it originated in Spain.

Sewing cafes - The idea of the Sweat Shop Cafe is that you drop by for a coffee, a piece of chocolate cake and a spin on a sewing machine.

Tweeter ads - We look at how Tweeting is going to change now that adverts have been allowed on this social networking site.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00rwpw5)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00rwq79)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.

Includes Election Call. You can put comments to Caroline Lucas from the Green Party.

The number to call is 03700 100 444. Lines are open from 11.30 on the day of the programme.
Calls cost the same as calls to 01 or 02 numbers, and mobile charges may vary.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00rwq9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00ryklg)
Michael Butt - Albert Speer's Walk Around the World

Patrick Malahide stars as Albert Speer or Prisoner Number Five, as he was known throughout his twenty years in Spandau Prison. Michael Butt's play 'Albert Speer's Walk Around the World' takes us on the imaginary journeys Speer devised to engage his mind and keep him from despair. A sympathetic American guard orders him travel books from the library and he plots his routes methodically. But he can't escape from the demons of guilt about Nazi war crimes. Sometimes the scenes he witnesses on his trips are exhilarating; sometimes the people are seductive but sometimes he is glad to be disturbed by the prison guard yelling for him to get back into his tiny cell where he is forbidden to look out of the window. Of the other six inmates, he is closest to Rudolf Hess (Jack Klaff) who he sees as vulnerable and wants to protect, whereas Admiral Karl Donitz (Nicholas Woodeson) constantly baits him and tries to pull rank with him. Donitz can't forgive Speer for his admission of guilt at the Nuremberg Trials.

Speer was Hitler's chief architect and his very efficient Minister for Armaments and War Production. In prison, he is rigorously self-disciplined and sets himself a tough regimen. Prison rules are strict but even as they relax and prisoners start to talk to each other, Speer keeps aloof. To distract himself nine years into his sentence, he designs and creates a garden in the spacious yard of Spandau and is particularly fond of his rockery and flowers. As an architect, he enjoys working out how the great buildings he visits were created and planning his routes so that he when he sets off, he will see and hear and meet the people he has carefully researched. However thoughts come unbidden and there is one judgemental voice in his head that travels everywhere with him.

Technical production: Peregrine Andrews
Director/Producer: Judith Kampfner
Exec Producer: Jill Waters
This is a Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00ryklj)
Vincent Duggleby and guests are on hand to answer your questions on renting and letting.
You can call the programme when lines open on Wednesday at 1330 GMT.
The number is 03700 100 444.
Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.
Producer: Lesley McAlpine.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00ryfxl)
Young Turks

The Smell of Fish

In Hikmet Hükümenoglu's darkly comic story, The Smell of Fish, Cemile Abla finds an innovative but troubling way of dealing with unwanted marriage proposals. The reader is Sirine Saba.

The Smell of Fish is the next in the short story series, Young Turks, which marks Istanbul's tenure as European City of Culture. The three stories explore Turkey's contemporary literary scene by showcasing the work of some of the nation's newest and youngest writers.

The writer:
Hikmet Hükümenoglu was born in Istanbul in 1971. After studying Physics and Management at university, he worked in the finance sector. He eventually abandoned the corporate world for literary pursuits. He has published three novels. Hükümenoglu also writes short stories and dabbles in electronic music.

The translators are Amy Spangler and Mustafa Ziyalan.
The abridger is Richard Hamilton.
The producer is Elizabeth Allard.


WED 15:45 Soundscape: The Lion Pride (b00j62jx)
Episode 3

Kidogu the male cub is reunited with his mother. As the weeks pass, he is introduced to the rest of the pride and joins them after a successful night's hunting.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00rykll)
Uninterrupted birdsong, the sound and smell of softly percolating coffee, old ladies cycling to communion through the morning mist, the Sunday papers in bed - all these textures and tastes of the British weekend could be under threat according to a new report called A Lament for the Lost Weekend. Jill Ebrey spoke to people whose work brought them out of the house at the end of the week and found that, despite days off midweek, losing Saturday and Sunday had a serious impact on the quality of their lives. Could the British weekend be under threat? Are we aware of what else we might lose when we remove the restrictions that Sunday in particular makes on our activities? Laurie Taylor discusses the changing place of the weekend in British society with Jill Ebrey of Warwick University and Richard Reeves from Demos.

Also, the motivations of people who educate their children at home: There are anything from 20,000 to 50,000 families in the UK who educate their children at home. Who are they? Why do they choose to shoulder the burden of teaching their children themselves and how do they go about it? Ruth Morton discusses the study she recently presented at the British Sociological Association annual conference.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b00rykld)
Mark Damazer has announced that he is to stand down as controller of Radio 4, a job that has been described as "the toughest on the airwaves". With the Telegraph's radio critic Gillian Reynolds, Steve Hewlett will be asking which challenges Mark Damazer met and which he ducked.

Following the Conservative manifesto launch, shadow Jeremy Hunt discusses the Conservative policy on the media. He is Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media & Sport. In following programmes, Don Foster of the Liberal Democrats and Ben Bradshaw of Labour will be discussing their parties' policies.

And a look behind the scenes at College Green, opposite the Houses of Parliament, where a tented village has grown up for television crews covering the election.


WED 17:00 PM (b00rwqft)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00rwt4g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b00rykln)
Series 2

Wilmslow

Second series of the show where comedian Mark Steel visits some of our lesser known towns to discover what makes them distinctive.

In this second episode Mark Visits Wilmslow in Cheshire and gets to grips with Footballers Mansions, 3D eyelashes and the rhyming Wizard of Alderley Edge.

Written and performed by Mark Steel

Producer Julia Mckenzie.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00rwq9f)
While feeding Grange Farm bull calves, Joe tells Nic that Jolene's recruiting for The Bull. Nic promptly applies, and Jolene welcomes her to the team. Nic agrees to come back from some training later, and Jolene asks her to do a couple of shifts next week. She's happy to, provided she can clear it with Will and sort out childcare.

As Jim looks forward to the opening of Jaxx, he tells Joe about his plans for a housewarming party at Greenacres, with the theme: The Glory that was Rome. Joe agrees to put the word around.

Pip misses the bus to Hollerton station; but Jim picks her up. Anxious to keep her cover story that she's going to visit Izzy, Pip becomes embroiled in a web of lies. Jim promises not to tell her parents that he gave her a lift.

Pip calls Jude with the surprise news that she's on her way but he doesn't show the enthusiasm Pip had hoped for. He reluctantly changes his plans, and meets her at the station, where she greets him warmly.

While eating, Pip confesses she's spent all her money on the train ticket, so Jude agrees to pay for the meal. She can pay him back next week.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00rwt71)
Singer-songwriter Joan Armatrading talks to Mark Lawson about her new album and tour.
Jude Law and Forest Whitaker star in the film Repo Men: Matt Thorne has the Front Row verdict.
Ben Bradshaw MP, Secretary of State for Culture, Media & Sport, discusses Labour cultural policy, in the latest of our interviews with the men who hope to be in the DCMS after the election.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlzb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b00ryklq)
Above the Law

Lawyers are arguing that the 3 MPs and a Peer facing charges over their expenses claims are protected from being prosecuted in the ordinary criminal courts, because of special parliamentary privilege.

This week, Clive Anderson and a panel of distinguished lawyers discuss the reasons why certain people, including MPs, judges, diplomats, heads of state and even in some circumstances criminals-turned-informants, seem to be "above the law".

Why should an MP speaking in the House of Commons be able to slander another person without fear of being sued? Why are diplomats literally allowed to get away with murder?

How and why were these long-standing legal immunities established, and can they still be justified today?

The producer is Brian King, and this is an Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 What the Election Papers Say (b00ryknl)
Episode 4

BBC Radio 4 brings back a much loved TV favourite - What the Election Papers Say. It does what it says on the tin. Each programme will see a leading political journalist take a wry look at how the broadsheets and red tops treat the biggest stories of the campaign. Hear all about it - with former Editor of the New Statesman John Kampfner.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00ryknn)
Deep Sea Treasure

Our explorations of the deep oceans have so far given us only tantalising glimpses of weird and wonderful species. A team from the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton is currently sailing through the Caribbean and the Southern Ocean on a mission to provide us with much more than a few fuzzy photos of a giant worm or an upside down prawn.

They want to tie-up the loose ends, telling us just how the many islands of life in the deep actually interact. They hope their mission will greatly aid conservation efforts and make the exploitation of the ocean's resources fairer and more sustainable.

'Costing the Earth' joins the expedition as it sails from southern Chile and launches Isis, a remote-controlled submarine armed, for the first time, with high definition cameras.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00ryk6l)
This week Libby Purves is joined by James Rado, Bert Trautmann, Patricia Hammond and Rupert Thomson.

James Rado is an actor, writer and composer, who is probably best known as the co-author, along with Gerome Ragni, of the 1967 groundbreaking American tribal love-rock musical HAIR. A celebration of life, love and freedom, and a passionate cry for hope and change, HAIR features the songs 'Let The Sun Shine In' and 'Aquarius'. Now the 2009 Tony-Award-winning production opens in London with the entire Broadway cast at the Gielgud Theatre.

Bert Trautmann is known for being the Manchester City goalkeeper who broke his neck in an FA Cup final and famously played on. But his early life is no less extraordinary. He grew up in Nazi Germany and fought for them during the World War Two. In 1945 he was captured and sent to a British POW camp in Cheshire where he discovered a new way of life and embraced England as his new home. He worked on a bomb disposal unit in Liverpool and became an amateur footballer before becoming Manchester City's celebrated goalkeeper. 'Trautmann's Journey - From Hitler Youth to FA Cup Legend' by Catrine Clay is published by Yellow Jersey Press.

Patricia Hammond is a Canadian born mezzo-soprano. A a professional singer, for the last six years she has sung in care homes for the elderly. Her work has caught the eye of Sony Music, who invited her to be the only contemporary artist to appear on 'Down Memory Lane' a collection of songs from the 1940s and 1950s.

Rupert Thomson is a novelist. In his first non-fiction book, 'This Party's Got To Stop', he focusses on 1984 and the death of his father when he and his two brothers return to the family home to confront their grief and each other. This Party's Got To Stop is published by Granta.


WED 21:58 Weather (b00rwt9h)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00rwtdg)
The LibDems seem to think so, but is honesty always the best policy?

The latest on the earthquake in China.

Mexico's new idea in the fight against drug crime.

With Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00rwx29)
Naomi Alderman - The Lessons

A Musical Box

Rory Kinnear reads the Orange New Writer's Award Winner, Naomi Alderman's, second novel, 'The Lessons', a story of ambition, friendship, betrayal and desire. Today: Hilary Term, Mark's mother arrives bringing a present but no peace of mind for her increasingly erratic son.

Reader Rory Kinnear
Abridger Sally Marmion
Producer Di Speirs

The Lessons is the second novel from Naomi Alderman, winner of the Orange New Writer's Award and Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. Set among the dreaming spires of Oxford, it follows the progress of a gilded group of under-graduates drawn together by their dazzling and mercurial fellow student Mark Winters. Fuelled by his trust-fund and resident in his Georgian mansion, they live a charmed life of learning and parties and love-affairs. But university is no grounding for real life and none of the friends will be prepared, some years later, when tragedy strikes.

The Lessons is a novel about friendship, ambition, betrayal and desire, and the fact that only life can teach the lessons you really need to learn.

Naomi Alderman won the Orange New Writers Award for her first novel Disobedience and has subsequently been named as the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. She is a graduate of Lincoln College, Oxford.

Rory Kinnear, fresh from playing Angelo at the Almeida and about to play Hamlet at the National Theatre studied at Balliol College, Oxford and reads his first Book at Bedtime.


WED 23:00 The Vote Now Show (b00ryknq)
Series 1

Episode 3

Punt and Dennis present a nightly satirical round up of election news and comment from comedians, journalists and commentators. Recorded in front of an audience at the Radio Theatre about 4 hours before transmission, this is a very topical comedy show.


WED 23:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b00hh0mr)
Series 2

Crash

And the Academy Award Goes to... Crash. For the third programme in the current series of Oscar-winning films and what they tell us of the time that gave rise to them, Paul Gambaccini tackles the film that was loved and reviled in equal measure by the very same LA society whose darker side the film set out to explore.



THURSDAY 15 APRIL 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00rw6hh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00rzlt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6l4)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00rw6vv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6n9)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00rw6rv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00rw75m)
Daily prayer and reflection with Andrea Rea.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00rw78n)
Farming Today hears how this generation are more likely to grow their own fruit and vegetables compared to those thirty years ago.The Royal Horticultural Society explains whys. And Scottish Farmers are calling for a cull on geese who they say are munching through their crops.


THU 06:00 Today (b00rw7ds)
With John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00rykqd)
The Zulu Nation's Rise and Fall

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the rise and fall of the Zulu Nation.At the beginning of the 19th century, the Zulus were a small pastoral community of a bare few thousand people in the eastern part of what is now South Africa. Their territory was limited to about ten square miles.But within a decade, led by their warrior king, Shaka, they had managed to carve out an empire with a population of many tens of thousands.Shaka was a skilled politician, successfully co-opting many neighbouring peoples into his kingdom as his conquests advanced its borders.He remains best known as a world-class military strategist, who deployed new weapons, and a devastatingly effective technique of encircling enemy troops.But the ground for the Zulus' breathtaking expansion was shaped in part by the destabilising advance of European settlers.It eventually brought the Zulu into confrontation both with the Afrikaners, as at the Battle of Blood River in 1838, and with the British.In the mid-19th century, the Zulu and the British achieved a sustained period of peaceful co-existence.But, especially after the discovery of diamonds began to transform the southern African economy, British priorities changed, and they began to push for a single confederation of the various provinces and colonies.Zululand's independence became an obstacle, and in 1879 the British invaded.On 22 January 1879, the Zulu were unable to overrun a tiny garrison of invaders at Rorke's Drift.Yet on the same day, at the Battle of Isandhlwana, they inflicted a shocking defeat on the well-armed forces of the British Empire - all the more impressive given that the Zulu soldiers were predominantly armed with spears.Nonetheless, the British invasion of Zululand was ultimately successful, and precipitated first annexation, then the kingdom's absorption into the province of Natal (today, KwaZulu-Natal).During their heyday and in the wake of their decline alike, the Zulu became the subject of much myth-making.To the British, the 'Black Napoleon' figure of Shaka, and the vivid image of a proud warrior race, made the Zulu an object of admiration, fear, and appalled fascination, even as the Army moved to subjugate them.And in the decades since the demise of their independent kingdom, the triumphs of the 19th century long remained an important element of the Zulus' collective self-image.With:Saul DavidProfessor of War Studies at the University of BuckinghamSaul DubowProfessor of History at the University of SussexShula MarksEmeritus Professor of History at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of LondonProducer: Phil Tinline.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00rzlt7)
Douglas Rogers - The Last Resort

Episode 4

4/5

The Last Resort by Douglas Rogers, read by Jack Klaff. Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions. The author tells the story of his parents fight to stay on their backpacker lodge in Zimbabwe despite the political upheaval of the last decade.

A new manager has taken over at 'Drifters,' and to the owners' amazement the clientele changes once more.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00rw8mw)
Presented by Jenni Murray.

Kim Cattrall became a household name in her forties as a result of playing the infamous Samantha Jones in the American TV series 'Sex and the City'. Her latest character is Amelia Bly, the PA and mistress to a former British Prime Minister in the film 'The Ghost'. She talks to Jenni Murray about why we all need a "professional wife" and what it was like working with director Roman Polanski. She also discusses acting in the West End as Amanda in Noel Coward's Private Lives and the forthcoming Sex and the City film.

The political parties have been unveiling their manifestos which include pledges on the economy, childcare, health and education. Rachel Sylvester, political commentator and journalist for The Times and Ceri Goddard, Chief Executive of The Fawcett Society examine what the parties will be offering women.

Constance Spry founded the Cordon Bleu cookery school and introduced an unfussy approach to flower arranging in the 1930s using twigs and vegetable leaves displayed in unconvential containers. A new biography of Spry emphasises her early life as a social reformer in Ireland and looks at the key relationships in her life and her open marriage.
Sue Shephard - author of "The Surprising Life of Constance Spry" and florist Nikki Tibbles join Jenni in the studio.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlyt)
Sarah Siddons: Life in Five Sittings

Episode 4

4/5

Clare Higgins and Carl Prekopp star in this brutally honest, passionate true story of the compelling, disturbing and tempestuous love affair between the greatest actress of her time, the legendary Sarah Siddons and the renowned artist, Tom Lawrence. A young teenager when he first paints Siddons, Lawrence falls hopelessly in love with her. Plagued by self-doubts, she resists his advances. To 'escape' her clutches but also to be nearer to her, Tom woos her daughters. When they die, Sarah accuses him of killing them by the demonic force of his adoration. Knowing they should stay apart, over the years they continue to meet and draw strength from each other. Every time she visits, she also sits for Tom enabling him to trace her decline in his art. Theirs is a relationship rich in nuance and subtlety in which two people share intimacies, aspirations, confidences, fears and doubts.

Sarah ..... Clare Higgins
Tom ..... Carl Prekopp

Written by David Pownall.

The director is Martin Jenkins, and this is a Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b00rykzx)
Greece and Ireland

Greece and Ireland were shining examples, it seemed, of what Europe could do for struggling economies.

From the moment the Greeks entered the eurozone in 2001 the economy appeared to take off. Growth was initially fuelled by low interest rates and a burst of foreign investment. The triumphant return of the Olympics to Athens in 2004 crowned a dizzying period of success. Behind the façade a bloated public sector, tax avoidance on a grand scale and dishonest bookkeeping that misled Europe about the true state of the Greek economy told a very different story. Greece has had to go cap in hand to the European powerhouses to beg for a bailout.

In Ireland the road that was taken to economic ruin was a different one but the result the same. An economy that seemed to be the pride of Europe - the so-called "Celtic Tiger" - was in reality a house of cards. It came tumbling down under the weight of unsustainable public debt and a wildly overheated property market.

Travelling to both countries, Chris Bowlby meets the ordinary people who were caught up in the Euroland dream. They are the middle class who bought in to Europe, who believed that the way forward was secure and certain. Now many are facing tough choices that affect their homes, their families, their jobs. Their governments are implementing tough austerity programmes and raising taxes. Jobless rates are soaring and disaffected youth feel angry, ignored and alienated.

Both Greece and Ireland were diaspora countries. The brightest and the best often left in search of better lives. For a brief time at the turn of this century that picture changed. Greece and Ireland were no longer exporting their people. But with many of the benefits of European unity now at least temporarily taken away, many are thinking again about leaving.

In the streets of Athens and Dublin, in pubs and music halls, in family homes and businesses, Chris Bowlby listens to the stories of people who are facing an uncertain time. Tough new austerity measures, with massive cuts in public spending and services, cuts in their own salaries, job losses, inflation - it is altogether a far different future than the one they believed they were moving towards. And he asks whether they still believe in the European dream.

Presenter: Chris Bowlby
Producer: Bill Law.


THU 11:30 Black and White Towns (b00rykzz)
Broadcaster and journalist John Harris (author of books such as 'The Last Party: Britpop, Blair and the Demise of English Rock') tells the story of the influence of suburbs and provincial towns in English rock music.

He believes it's easy to think of rock music as an essentially urban affair: made in the heart of the cities where the right cultural forces crash into each other, and are dependent on the kind of fast-changing excitement that can only happen when millions of people live cheek by jowl.

In fact, Harris argues, much of the best English music has been rooted in the rather more staid environs of the UK's suburbs and provincial towns, soundtracking a world of privet hedges, caravans parked on driveways, and curtain-twitching intrigue. In that sense, he believes a peculiarly English set of concerns have precious little to do with rock n' roll's foundations in the USA. Forget about Elvis, Little Richard, Chuck Berry and the rest - and instead, think of a lot of our pop and rock in the same terms as, say, Philip Larkin and John Betjeman.

In this feature, John Harris travels to the places where the music was born, talks to the people who created it, and places them in a tradition that is too often ignored. In Swindon, he meets Andy Partridge of the seminal band XTC, who has always insisted on living in a place he knows drives him mad, so his creative fires don't go out. In Colchester, he delves into the experiences essayed by those Britpop pioneers Blur and hears from Damon Albarn.

In Gants Hill in Essex, he meets with Louise Wener, former lead singer of Britpop band Sleeper. For Coventry, he considers the music of The Specials and for Woking he considers that renowned suburban poet Paul Weller.

And in the unexpected rock hotbed that is Bromley, he tells the stories of a handful of local suburban refuseniks, including David Bowie and Siouxsie Sioux. To show that the tradition is still continuing, he speaks to the band Good Shoes and considers their track about living in 'Morden'.

He also contrasts this music to the poetry of John Betjeman ("Metro-land" and "Slough") and Philip Larkin ("I Remember, I Remember" which is set in Coventry; note the line "Nothing, like something, happens anywhere"), and speaks to former poet laureate Andrew Motion about what these poets have to say about the suburban condition.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00rwpt9)
UK airspace is closed completely after plumes of volcanic ash threaten flight safety. What can travellers do if they have had to change their travel plans, and when will the ash disappear? Consumer protection and the Election - The three main political parties tell us what their manifestos say on issues of consumer protection.

Why the Chinese are investing in technology that will allow them to extract uranium from waste coal ash.

On hearing news that workers at a Danish brewery have been on strike over plans to cut their daily ration of free beer, Ian McMillan stands up for the perk at work.

Holidaymakers on P&O's Oceana are angry at extra costs for medical help.

Jon Moulton, the private equity veteran who has saved Reader's Digest from administration, reveals his plans for the brand.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00rwpw7)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00rwq7c)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00rwq9f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00ryl01)
Peter Whalley - The Disappearance

By Peter Whalley

A compelling psychological thriller with fraudulent identity at its heart.

Alice moves into a converted Victorian house and rents the top floor. The landlord lives below. Both tenant and landlord are not who they say they are, and as each discovers the truth, it's clear one of them is going to die.

Martin ..... Lee Ingleby
Alice ..... Joanne Froggatt
Denise ..... Becky Hindley

Produced and directed by Pauline Harris.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00rv548)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00rvx9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00ryfxn)
Young Turks

Fig Seed

In award winning writer Feryal Tilmac's story, Fig Seed, a family attempt to put painful events behind them, but is reconciliation the answer? The reader is Rosie Hilal.

Fig Seed is the last in our series, Young Turks, which marks Istanbul's tenure as European City of Culture. The three stories in this series explore Turkey's contemporary literary by showcasing the work of some of the nation's newest and youngest generation of writers.

Feryal Tilmac was born in 1969 in Adana. Her has appeared in a number of literary magazines and journals. Her short story 'Trilobis' received first prize in the Altkitap 2006 Short Story Competition. Her first collection of short stories Mevt Tek Hecelik Uyku (Mevt: Sleep in One Syllable) was published in 2007. Tilmac received the prestigious Sait Faik Short Story Award in 2009 for her second short story collection. Fig Seed was included in the Transcript Review's New Prose from Turkey special issue (November 2009), eds. Amy Spangler & Idil Aydogan.

Translated by Ruth Whitehouse.
Abridged and produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 15:45 Soundscape: The Lion Pride (b00j62jz)
Episode 4

Now more than a year old, Kidogu is old enough to join the pride when they go hunting and he successfully targets a herd of wildebeest when he goes hunting at night.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00rvzmz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00ryl03)
Quentin Cooper reports from the Edinburgh International Science Festival on the latest discoveries and their implications.

He hears (quite literally) how engineers can now design the acoustic of a building and re-create a 3-dimensional soundscape within it.

He explores the progress that has been made towards creating artificial life and the ethical questions it raises.

And he goes to an innovative Scottish research company to shake a bionic hand - and the flesh and blood hand of its inventor.

Plus, as the judges approach their final decision next week, we hear more Shortlisted entries for 'So You Want To Be A Scientist'.

Producer: Martin Redfern.


THU 17:00 PM (b00rwqfw)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00rwt4j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Arthur Smith's Balham Bash (b00ryl05)
Series 2

Episode 1

Arthur Smith invites us into his Balham flat in south London for comedy, music and entertainment.

With his guests: John Hegley, Barbara Nice, Andrew Lawrence and Scouting For Girls.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2010


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00rwq9h)
Vicky is full of optimism, as she has another couple of meetings with eateries in Borchester, trying to sell her veal. Ed feels vindicated when she returns having had no success. As another bull calf is born, he reminds her that the problem isn't going away. But Vicky refuses to be downhearted and vows to keep trying.

Tony goes to Borchester market to sell a couple of cull cows. Eddie is glad to break the monotony of the day by having a gossip, although he's quick to appear on his best behaviour when Jonathan Bailey, the auctioneer, comes into view. Tony asks Jonathan about rumours that the market may move, but Jonathan refuses to be drawn.

Later, Eddie is mortified when some bullocks get out into the car park, because he left a gate open. The bullocks are rounded up, but Eddie still assumes Jonathan will sack him. However, Jonathan simply gives him a severe talking-to.

Later, Eddie tries to keep the events of the day from Clarrie, but she angrily tells him that Tony has already told her. She reminds Eddie that they need him to keep his job. They need the money. Chagrined Eddie promises it won't happen again.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00rwt73)
Mark Lawson has the verdict on the British premiere of a new production of the musical Hair, featuring the Broadway cast. Joan Bakewell, who saw the original staging, and Jacqueline Springer review.

Brendan Cole, one of the professional dancers from Strictly Come Dancing, discusses his new solo tour and reveals that he doesn't know if he'll be taking part in the next series of Strictly.

American writer Lorrie Moore discusses her approach to writing fiction, and reflects on her role as a soccer mom - her teenage son is a leading young soccer player in the US.

Liberal Democrat MP Don Foster, Shadow Culture, Media and Sport Secretary, discusses his party's plans for the arts.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The World Tonight (b00s37nx)
The Prime Ministerial Debates

Domestic Affairs

For the first time in a British general election the leaders of the three largest UK parties are taking part in televised debates. Radio 4 will broadcast the whole of tonight's first debate, on domestic affairs, hosted by ITV live from 8.30.

Robin Lustig will be in London with a panel of political watchers to look ahead to the issues being discussed, and afterwards from 10.00 to consider how the leaders tackled them.

Ritula Shah will be in Worcester with floating voters, who will be giving their reaction to the debate. We'll also ask if leadership debates can change history.


THU 23:00 Book at Bedtime (b00rwx2c)
Naomi Alderman - The Lessons

An Accident

Rory Kinnear reads the Orange New Writer's Award Winner, Naomi Alderman's, second novel, 'The Lessons', a story of ambition, friendship, betrayal and desire. Today: Summer Term: Gilded youth basks in golden post-exam evenings, before a visit to the country threatens to end in tragedy.

Reader Rory Kinnear
Abridger Sally Marmion
Producer Di Speirs

The Lessons is the second novel from Naomi Alderman, winner of the Orange New Writer's Award and Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. Set among the dreaming spires of Oxford, it follows the progress of a gilded group of under-graduates drawn together by their dazzling and mercurial fellow student Mark Winters. Fuelled by his trust-fund and resident in his Georgian mansion, they live a charmed life of learning and parties and love-affairs. But university is no grounding for real life and none of the friends will be prepared, some years later, when tragedy strikes.

The Lessons is a novel about friendship, ambition, betrayal and desire, and the fact that only life can teach the lessons you really need to learn.

Naomi Alderman won the Orange New Writers Award for her first novel Disobedience and has subsequently been named as the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. She is a graduate of Lincoln College, Oxford.

Rory Kinnear, fresh from playing Angelo at the Almeida and about to play Hamlet at the National Theatre studied at Balliol College, Oxford and reads his first Book at Bedtime.


THU 23:15 Scrooby Trevithick (b00rz06w)
Journalist

Scrooby Trevithick is a six part scripted comedy series written by and starring Andy Parsons following on from the first series aired on Radio 4 18 months ago - The Lost WebLog of Scrooby Trevithick.

This second series continues to follow the exploits of the hapless character of Scrooby (Andy Parsons), an enthusiastic but flawed wannabe who having returned from his wanderings is still trying to find himself by zealously posting his web diaries online.

Each episode features him attempting to make a dent in the national consciousness, and in this series, he's helped by his good friend Sasha (played by Kerry Godliman). However, his desire for success always takes him one step further than prudence dictates.

Episode 5. Journalist. In this episode, Scrooby tries to become a journalist having had a mishap with an inflatable.

The cast features a variety of talented comedians including Dara O Briain, Russell Howard, Hugh Dennis, Russell Kane, Rufus Hound, Alun Cochrane, Dominic Frisby, Paul Thorne, Martin Coyote and Barunka O'Shaughnessy.

As always, listeners are encouraged to share their comments with Scrooby at www.scroobytrevithick.com as he needs all the advice he can get.

The producer is Paul Russell, and this is an Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:45 The Cases That Changed Our World (b00nqj82)
Episode 2

Clive Coleman tells the stories of cases that shaped our lives but which are little known outside the legal world.

The curious saga of the Carbolic Smoke Ball, a bizarre Victorian quack medicine. The case established important principles about truth in advertising and the relationship between companies and their customers.



FRIDAY 16 APRIL 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00rw6hk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00rzlt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6l6)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00rw6vx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00rw6nc)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00rw6rx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00rw75p)
with the Revd Dr Leslie Griffiths.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00rw78q)
An urban paradise? Charlotte meets people growing their own veg in the heart of London and hears how the London Food Tzar, Rosie Boycott, aims to have 2012 new growing spaces by the 2012 Olympics. And forget holidays abroad or on the beach, down on the farm is the place to be! We report how rural tourism is on the rise.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00rw7dv)
With James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b00rvxzc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00rzlt9)
Douglas Rogers - The Last Resort

Episode 5

5/5

The Last Resort by Douglas Rogers, read by Jack Klaff. Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall Productions. The author tells the story of his parents fight to stay on their backpacker lodge in Zimbabwe despite the political upheaval of the last decade.

The day that Douglas's parents have been dreading finally arrives.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00rw8my)
Presented from Manchester by Sheila McClennon.

We're quite good at noticing a politician's body language - the ticks and tags which tell us how comfortable they are in their own skin. But what about interpreting their voices? The voice does not lie. It reveals much more about us than we could imagine. How you speak and the sound you make tells others a lot about who you are and it's not just about your accent. Should we be paying more attention to the way our politicians speak and not to just to what they are saying? And, is it harder for female politicians to be taken seriously because they have softer, higher voices? Mrs Thatcher famously changed her voice so, what are today's female politicians doing to ensure that they are not being let down by the way they speak? Sheila is joined by political journalist Julia Langdon and vocal coach Philippa Davies.

According to the Association of School and College Leaders, children are harder to motivate with traditional teaching methods because in the internet age they expect instant results. Children spend on average 1.7 hours a day online, 1.5 hours on games consoles and 2.7 hours watching television.So, have websites and computer games made them impatient with the pace of today's learning? Jim Smith - the author of 'The Lazy Teacher's Handbook' discusses with Simon Warr, a teacher of French and Latin at The Royal Hospital School in Ipswich.

Fran Clarke has just returned from a six month stint in Antarctica where she has been preserving objects at Captain Scott's hut. She is Collections Care Officer at Manchester's Museum of Science & Industry and used her experience of conserving industrial objects to help prevent deterioration of the Scott material. She spent three months at Scott Base conserving artifacts in an on-site laboratory then three months out in the field at Scott's hut. The temperature was 75 degrees and she lived in a tent for three months without running water, no fresh food for weeks, and with only a couple of companions. She joins Sheila to talk about the experience.

Hissa Hilal, a poet, journalist and mother of 4 in her 40s, caused a storm in the Arab world last month when she appeared on the Abu Dhabi TV talent show, Millions Poet - a kind of American style Pop Idol for poets. She was dressed in a full burqa, her face covered with only her eyes showing, but denounced some of the conservative clerics in her native Saudi Arabia for their stance on women's rights, freedom of the press and their message on terror. She received acclaim from the all-male panel of judges and from studio and TV audiences, and won a place in last week's final, coming third. Some felt she should have won and the judges weren't brave enough to allow it, but she did leave Abu Dhabi with over half a million pounds in prize money. To assess Hissa Hilal's impact in the Arab world, Sheila McClennon talks to Madawi Al-Rasheed, Professor of Social Anthropology at King's College, London.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlyw)
Sarah Siddons: Life in Five Sittings

Episode 5

5/5

Clare Higgins and Carl Prekopp star in this brutally honest, passionate true story of the compelling, disturbing and tempestuous love affair between the greatest actress of her time, the legendary Sarah Siddons and the renowned artist, Tom Lawrence. A young teenager when he first paints Siddons, Lawrence falls hopelessly in love with her. Plagued by self-doubts, she resists his advances. To 'escape' her clutches but also to be nearer to her, Tom woos her daughters. When they die, Sarah accuses him of killing them by the demonic force of his adoration. Knowing they should stay apart, over the years they continue to meet and draw strength from each other. Every time she visits, she also sits for Tom enabling him to trace her decline in his art. Theirs is a relationship rich in nuance and subtlety in which two people share intimacies, aspirations, confidences, fears and doubts.

Sarah ..... Clare Higgins
Tom ..... Carl Prekopp

Written by David Pownall.

The director is Martin Jenkins, and this is a Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 Target Practice (b00rz0k4)
RAF Holbeach is a bombing range on the Lincolnshire Wash that is used by British, American and European squadrons for training purposes. Protected in part by the military presence, the range has a curious atmosphere. Here, a team of civilian employees man the targets and look after the natural landscape. The targets themselves are a collection of old ships, armoured personal carriers and ad hoc structures made from scrap material. In the eyes of one local artist, Michael Sanders, they look like 'accidental sculptures', punching out from stark landscape of the Wash.

Local contractor Norman Parnell takes great pride in building and maintaining these structures, despite the fact that they are constantly damaged by artillery fire and the tide, and Holbeach employee Geoff Smith is as careful to check for damage to the electronic scoring system as he is in spotting oyster catcher eggs at the targets.

Those that work at RAF Holbeach maintain a delicate balance between protecting the environment and serving the needs of the pilots that use the range ahead of deployment. Through their eyes, we encounter a unique place where the military and natural world meet in surreal and surprising circumstances, encouraging us to reflect upon the activity of the armed forces on home soil.

The producer is Katie Burningham. This is a Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Meet David Sedaris (b00rz0k6)
Series 1

Picapocketoni; I'll Eat What He's Wearing

From Carnegie Hall to the BBC Radio Theatre - American humourist David Sedaris reads from his extensive collection of published stories and articles. In show 3 of 4: "Picapocketoni" and "I'll Eat What He's Wearing".

The producer is Steve Doherty. This is a Boomerang Plus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00rwptc)
Coronation Street star William Roache talks frankly to Peter White about his deafness. He describes how it started and how it makes him feel extremely isolated at times. We also report on Record Store Day, and a new way to search for music online called mFlow. Plus you can also hear Peter travelling around New York City in a yellow cab as he explores reports that cabbies have been overcharging tourists.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00rwpw9)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00rwq7f)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00rwq9h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00cdwqd)
Funeral Games

1968: FUNERAL GAMES
By Joe Orton

A scabrous black comedy from Joe Orton on the subject of religious hypocrisy. A play that helped create the climate of change that would end the power of the official censor over British theatre productions.

Caulfield.....Phil Daniels
Pringle.....Martin Jarvis
McCorquodale..Tony Rohr
Tessa.......Liza Sadovy
Policeman....Ben Crowe

Director: Peter Kavanagh
______________________________

This black comedy is seen by some as the linking work between Loot and What the Butler Saw. All the classic trademarks of Joe Orton's work are here - murder, macabre farce and deliberate bad taste.

This play actively contributed to the climate of change that would end the power of the official censor, the Lord Chamberlain, over British theatre productions.

Martin Jarvis and Phil Daniels both feature in this production. Jarvis plays Pringle, a preacher in a religious sect, Daniels the criminal Caulfield whom Pringle employs to investigate his wife's suspected affair. Caulfield discovers that Pringle's wife may not have been unfaithful at all - but that doesn't stop Pringle from wanting to murder her. Meanwhile, there's another body in the cellar and something rather gruesome in the cake tin.

Producer Peter Kavanagh.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00rz0kb)
This week, the panel tackle the questions posed by gardeners in West Sussex. Eric Robson chairs the discussion between horticultural experts Pippa Greenwood, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Wilson.

We introduce the second of 'Listeners' Gardens'. Here, our expert panel visit a listener's garden and advise them on their gardening projects and troubleshoot their problems. Follow the progress of these gardeners, as we revisit them over the course of the year.

The producer is Howard Shannon. This is a Somethin Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Soundscape: The Lion Pride (b00j62k1)
Episode 5

Now more than two years old, it is time for Kidogu to leave his family and find a territory of his own. An encounter with a group of elephants has tragic consequences.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00rz0kd)
On Last Word this week a leading Polish historian reflects on the death in a plane crash of the country's President and members of the political elite. Also, one of Scotland's finest singers - Kenneth McKellar's White Heather Club co-star Moira Anderson pays tribute. Anatoly Dobrynin - who as Soviet ambassador in Washington played a key role in preventing nuclear war during the Cuban missile crisis; Ed Roberts, known as the founder of the personal computing industry. He sold his company and went off to practice as a small town doctor while his employee Bill Gates made billions at Microsoft. And George Nissen - the acrobat who invented the trampoline and devoted his life to promoting its virtues.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00rz0kg)
Best-selling novelist Robert Harris talks to Francine Stock about working with Roman Polanski on The Ghost and reveals what happened when the director was arrested in the middle of post-production and how he had to edit the film in prison.

Neil Brand tells us the score about composer Malcolm Arnold.

Director Jan Dunn discusses her new film The Calling which is set in a convent and stars Rita Tushingham and Susannah York as a pair of nuns.

Producer: Stephen Hughes.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00rwqfy)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00rwt4l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00rz0kj)
Series 71

Episode 1

Sandi Toksvig presents another episode of the ever-popular topical panel show. Guests this week are Jeremy Hardy, Francis Wheen, Miles Jupp and Andy Hamilton.

Produced by Sam Bryant.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00rwq9k)
Chris marks his final days in the cottage with Alice by making her breakfast in bed. Later in the Bull, Brian reprimands Alice for abusing the cottage and using it to play house, but Alice is unrepentant. She and Chris plan a romantic quiet night in before she heads back to Southampton.

Brian is impressed to see Nic at the bar, working her first shift. He and David discuss potential plans to move the market. Planning permission for a potential new site could be a problem. Brian listens with interest.

Unaware that Pip went to Newquay to see Jude, Ruth is delighted to have a normal conversation with her daughter, as they discuss Josh's work in the milking parlour and Pip's music A-Level. But Pip fears that her lies will be uncovered when Ruth offers to pick up her make-up bag from Izzy at the supermarket. Pip actually left it in Newquay, but she manages to avoid being caught by assuring her mum that she's made plans to collect it from Izzy herself.

David is pleased that Pip seems to have got over not seeing Jude this week...


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00rwt77)
Actor Kiefer Sutherland discusses playing Jack Bauer in TV drama 24, now in its eighth and final series. The Emmy and Golden Globe award-winner also reveals that he feels some envy for his father Donald Sutherland, who worked in the golden age of Hollywood.

Ahead of tomorrow's Record Store Day, Morrissey and Paul Weller recount their record shop memories and John Wilson talks to writer David Hepworth about the past and future of the independent music store, and invites you to nominate the greatest British contenders.

Contemporary Art Iraq is the first comprehensive UK exhibition of Iraqi artwork since the first Gulf War and it opens today, despite serious difficulties in mounting the exhibition and visa problems which have prevented any of the artists themselves coming over here. Andy McCluskey reviews.

Producer Philippa Ritchie.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00rzlyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00rz0kl)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the live debate from Woldingham in Surrey with questions from the audience for the panel including: Hilary Benn, Secretary of State for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs; Liam Fox, Shadow Secretary of State for Defence; Helen Mary Jones AM, Director of Elections for Plaid Cymru; and the Liberal Democrats' spokesman on Energy and Climate Change, Simon Hughes.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00rz0kn)
A welcome slice of American pie

Simon Schama reflects on the quality of American food and eating habits and welcomes what he sees as the growing popularity of ethnic dishes and local farm produce. Excellent fresh food and good cooking has always existed, he says, in hidden pockets of the countryside but now he sees it being bought and enjoyed by more city dwellers, too.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00d4613)
They Have Oak Trees in North Carolina

They Have Oak Trees in North Carolina
by Sarah Wooley

1986; Ray and Eileen's five year old son, Patrick, vanishes in Florida.
22 years later; Clay, a good-looking American arrives in their small village claiming to be their missing son.
A suspenseful drama about a marriage in crisis, a split-second decision and the choices we make to try to ensure our future happiness.

Ray ...... Alexander Morton
Eileen ...... Ellie Haddington
Clay ...... Simon Harrison
Other parts played by Kenny Blyth and Gayanne Potter

Producer/DirectorGaynor Macfarlane.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00rwt9m)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00rwtdl)
Nick Clegg's performance in the Leaders' Debate has lifted support for the Liberal Democrats. Can he transform his party's chances in the General Election?

Planes in Europe stay grounded because of volcanic ash. How much longer could this last?

Zimbabwe's new land reform programme 30 years on from the country's independence.

With Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00rwx2f)
Naomi Alderman - The Lessons

Love Is Sacrifice

Rory Kinnear reads the Orange New Writer's Award Winner, Naomi Alderman's, second novel, 'The Lessons', a story of ambition, friendship, betrayal and desire. Today: Love is Sacrifice. James tries to pay his way, and ties himself to Mark still further, and Mark reveals a darker and more dangerous side to his character.

Reader Rory Kinnear
Abridger Sally Marmion
Producer Di Speirs

The Lessons is the second novel from Naomi Alderman, winner of the Orange New Writer's Award and Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. Set among the dreaming spires of Oxford, it follows the progress of a gilded group of under-graduates drawn together by their dazzling and mercurial fellow student Mark Winters. Fuelled by his trust-fund and resident in his Georgian mansion, they live a charmed life of learning and parties and love-affairs. But university is no grounding for real life and none of the friends will be prepared, some years later, when tragedy strikes.

The Lessons is a novel about friendship, ambition, betrayal and desire, and the fact that only life can teach the lessons you really need to learn.

Naomi Alderman won the Orange New Writers Award for her first novel Disobedience and has subsequently been named as the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. She is a graduate of Lincoln College, Oxford.

Rory Kinnear, fresh from playing Angelo at the Almeida and about to play Hamlet at the National Theatre studied at Balliol College, Oxford and reads his first Book at Bedtime.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00ryg42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Vienna and the Shadow of The Third Man (b00kp9jk)
Tour guide Dr Brigitte Timmermann uncovers Graham Greene's Vienna and takes us in the footsteps of his classic 1949 film, The Third Man. Walking through the city, she tells the stories that have fascinated generations of film buffs, from Soviet master spy Kim Philby's role in the film to tales of Sir Carol Reed and Graham Greene's late night visits to Vienna's seediest bars. With the help of fellow devotees, Brigitte explores Vienna's hidden history and examines why The Third Man has remained largely unpopular in the place which inspired it.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00rwppj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00rwppj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00rzlvb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00rzlvb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00rzlzb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00rzlzb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00rzlyt)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00rzlyt)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00rzlyw)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00rzlyw)

A Musical Trip to South Africa - with Lenny Henry 09:30 TUE (b00ryf1b)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00rth9p)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00rz0kn)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b009psnp)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b008kjrs)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00ryfxj)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00ryfxl)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00ryfxn)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00rvzr1)

Anatomy Of... 20:00 MON (b00rxj4x)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 23:30 MON (b00h3wlv)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 23:30 TUE (b00h9dkm)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 23:30 WED (b00hh0mr)

Ankle High History 05:45 SAT (b00j5tfc)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00rv6nb)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00rth3q)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00rz0kl)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00rv8yk)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00rv8yk)

Arthur Smith's Balham Bash 18:30 THU (b00ryl05)

Baggage 18:30 TUE (b00lgm1t)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00rv9l0)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00rv9l0)

Between Ourselves 09:00 TUE (b00ryf18)

Between Ourselves 21:30 TUE (b00ryf18)

Black and White Towns 11:30 THU (b00rykzz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00rwwsd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00rwx27)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00rwx29)

Book at Bedtime 23:00 THU (b00rwx2c)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00rwx2f)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00rqqpj)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00rw7hy)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00rw7hy)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00rzlth)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00rzlth)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00rzlt5)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00rzlt5)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00rzlt7)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00rzlt7)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00rzlt9)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00rvx9x)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00ryk68)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00rql6h)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00rvzbc)

Click On 16:30 MON (b00rxh71)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b00ryknn)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b00rrljw)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00rtd48)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b00rykzx)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00rxh66)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00ryf1l)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00ryklg)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00ryl01)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00cdwqd)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00rv58q)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00rv54b)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00rw7dl)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00rw78j)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00rw78l)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00rw78n)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00rw78q)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00rtg8f)

Freed Radicals 20:00 TUE (b00ryjfw)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00d4613)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00rv5dh)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00rwt7m)

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Front Row 19:15 WED (b00rwt71)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00rwt73)

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Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00rth3g)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00rz0kb)

Good King George 11:00 WED (b00ryklb)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00ryg42)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00ryg42)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00ryfkt)

House on Fire 11:30 WED (b00q439k)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00rtfhg)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00rykqd)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00ryk66)

Iraq's Forgotten Conflict 17:00 SUN (b00rt9rm)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00rth3j)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00rz0kd)

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Escape to the Country 14:45 SUN (b00rvzb9)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00rv6x1)

Lost Voices 16:30 SUN (b00rzllj)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 WED (b00rykln)

Material World 21:00 MON (b00rtf9l)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00ryl03)

Meet David Sedaris 11:30 FRI (b00rz0k6)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00rthpl)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00rv94b)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00rw6ky)

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Midweek 09:00 WED (b00ryk6j)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00ryk6l)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00ryklj)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00rv5dk)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00rv5dk)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00rthpv)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00rv9ky)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00rw6vn)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00rw6rq)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00rw6rs)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00rw6rv)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00rw6rx)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00rv9l2)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00rthpz)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00rvb0x)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00rvx9s)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00rv8ym)

News 13:00 SAT (b00rv6n8)

OedipusEnders 11:30 TUE (b00ryf1g)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00rvb0s)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00rvzmz)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00rvzmz)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00rv548)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00rv548)

Overexposed 11:00 MON (b00q3cm3)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00rv6wq)

PM 17:00 MON (b00rwqg2)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00rwqfr)

PM 17:00 WED (b00rwqft)

PM 17:00 THU (b00rwqfw)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00rwqfy)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00rvznb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00rthpx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00rw78g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00rw75h)

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Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00rw75m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00rw75p)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00rv8ws)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00rv8ws)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00rv8ws)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00rvx9n)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00rvx9n)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00rvx9n)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00rv6nd)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00rv58n)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00rv8wv)

Saving Species 11:00 TUE (b00ryf1d)

Scrooby Trevithick 23:15 THU (b00rz06w)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00rthpq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00rv9kt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00rw75f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00rw6vq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00rw6vs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00rw6vv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00rw6vx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00rthpn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00rthps)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00rv6wv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00rv9kr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00rv9kw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00rvzn3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00rw6n3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00rw6rn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00rw6l0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00rw6n5)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00rw6n7)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00rw6n9)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00rw6nc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00rv6wz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00rvzn8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00rwt6x)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00rwt4j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00rwt4l)

Smash Hit of 1453 15:30 SAT (b00rt921)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00rv9z6)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00rv9z6)

Soundscape: The Lion Pride 15:45 MON (b00j62b7)

Soundscape: The Lion Pride 15:45 TUE (b00j62jv)

Soundscape: The Lion Pride 15:45 WED (b00j62jx)

Soundscape: The Lion Pride 15:45 THU (b00j62jz)

Soundscape: The Lion Pride 15:45 FRI (b00j62k1)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00rxdr8)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00rxdr8)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0084xjt)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00rvx9l)

Target Practice 11:00 FRI (b00rz0k4)

The Ambassador's Reception 10:30 SAT (b00rv5dc)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00rvxbp)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00rvzqz)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00rvzqz)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00rwqbx)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00rwqbx)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00rwq9c)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00rwq9c)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00rwq9f)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00rwq9f)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00rwq9h)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00rwq9h)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00rwq9k)

The Cases That Changed Our World 23:45 THU (b00nqj82)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00rth3l)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00rz0kg)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00rvy23)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00rvy23)

The Heckler 11:00 SAT (b00rv5df)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b00rykld)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00rz0kj)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b00rth3n)

The Poetry Olympian: Michael Horovitz at 75 23:30 SAT (b00rqlc6)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b00rvxzc)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b00rvxzc)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b00rv4f3)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b00rxh88)

The Vote Now Show 23:00 MON (b00ry8mk)

The Vote Now Show 23:00 TUE (b00ryk6b)

The Vote Now Show 23:00 WED (b00ryknq)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00rvy27)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00rwtfq)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00rwtdd)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00rwtdg)

The World Tonight 20:00 THU (b00s37nx)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00rwtdl)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00rtbg8)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00rykll)

Thinking of Leaving Your Husband? 11:30 MON (b00rxf3w)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00rv57f)

Today 06:00 MON (b00rw7hw)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00rw7dn)

Today 06:00 WED (b00rw7dq)

Today 06:00 THU (b00rw7ds)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00rw7dv)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b00rtcqy)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b00ryklq)

Vienna and the Shadow of The Third Man 23:30 FRI (b00kp9jk)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00rw05j)

What the Election Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b00rwmzd)

What the Election Papers Say 20:45 WED (b00ryknl)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00rv6wn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00rw8n2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00rw8mr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00rw8mt)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00rw8mw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00rw8my)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b00ryg40)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00rwq99)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00rwq77)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00rwq79)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00rwq7c)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00rwq7f)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00rwpw1)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00rwpt5)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00rwpt7)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00rwpt9)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00rwptc)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00rv6ws)