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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 FEBRUARY 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00qxfpg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qsvj7)
The World in the Age of Confucius (500 - 300 BC)

Chinese Bronze Bell

This week Neil MacGregor is exploring the emergence of sophisticated new powers across the world 2500 years ago, from the Parthenon in Greece, to the great empire of Cyrus in Persia and the forgotten people of the Olmec in Mexico.

Today he arrives in China at the time of Confucius. He explores the Confucian view of the world with a large bronze bell - with help from the writer Isabel Hilton and the percussionist Evelyn Glennie. Confucius believed in a society that worked in harmony. How do his teachings go down in China today?


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qxfpj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qxfpl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qxfpn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00qxfpq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qxfps)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Canon Patrick Thomas.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00qxfpv)
The news programme that starts with its listeners. A weekly companion to the nightly PM, the expertise of the Radio 4 audience shapes the programme. Presented by Jennifer Tracey and Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00qxfpx)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00qxywy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00qxyx0)
Series 14

The Cotswolds - Cranham

Clare Balding explores the joys of group walking.

Clare joins the volunteers from the Holst Birthplace Museum who take her from Cranham through the Cotswolds, a landscape that inspired Holst to compose some of his best known and loved pieces.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00qxzzg)
Farming Today This Week

1.4 billion pounds was spent on ethnic food last year in the UK. One farmer, Surinder Pal, is hoping to cash in on this growing market on his farm in Shropshire. He grows an array of vegetables and herbs that would be more at home on a farm in warmer sunnier climes. Charlotte Smith meets Surinder in his vast coriander field.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00qxzzj)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00qxzzl)
With Justin Webb and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00qy01t)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. Fi Glover is joined by actor Anthony Head. With poetry from Murray Lachlan Young.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00qy01w)
Zoologist and conservationist Mark Carwardine talks to John McCarthy about his life travelling to film, photograph and write about creatures which inhabit the deepest oceans or the dustiest plains. In 1990 he went in search of animals nearing extinction with Douglas Adams and more recently with Stephen Fry and, as an occasional leader of wildlife expeditions, he shares his thoughts on the ethics of animal tourism, ecology and the environment.

John also meets Robin Bayley, who went to Mexico in search of traces of his great grandfather who went to work there and, according to family legend, consorted with bandits and had to hot-foot it back to Britain during the revolution of 1910. Robin not only finds the pleasures of rural Mexico but more than he bargained for in terms of family history. And Mexican author and British resident Chloe Aridjis tells John about her perspective on her homeland from Europe and whether Mexico's Spanish heritage makes it in any sense culturally European.


SAT 10:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b00qy1k5)
Series 3

Gigi

In April 1959 the musical Gigi, starring Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier and Louis Jourdan, won nine Oscars including the Best Picture Award, breaking the previous record of eight awards which went to Gone With The Wind in 1940. Paul Gambaccini discovers how the combination of Gallic charm and memorable songs, including The Night They Invented Champagne, Gigi and I Remember It Well, sanitised Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette's risque novella for the big screen.

Considered to be the last of MGM's great musicals, Gigi tells the story of a young girl being groomed as a courtesan, and the movie's producers battled with the censors to get it made. Director Vincente Minnelli's lavish film, which was shot mostly in Paris, sugar-coated the subject matter, and Caron's gamine performance melted Hollywood cinemagoers.

The programme also explores how Gigi represented the passionate early days of the on-off American love affair with France - a relationship that has come under strain in recent years following the war in Iraq.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00qy21m)
A look behind the scenes at Westminster with Ben Brogan.

Gordon Brown's a bully, according to a new book by journalist Andrew Rawnsley. Downing Street has strongly denied the allegation. But it has dominated the political scene this week. The Prime Minister's long time supporter, Geoffrey Robinson, and a former Downing Street insider, reflect on the pressures of the top job.

The allegations are in part based on anonymous sources. The Guardian's Michael White and Newsweek's Stryker McGuire describe how journalists and figures from the political world work together.

What seems to have stopped the Tories' progress in the polls? Michael Heseltine and newly-selected Tory candidate, Nadhim Zahawi, wonder if the party is attacking Labour hard enough and if the message on the doorstep is clear.

This week's new guidelines on assisted suicide are not enough, according to campaigners who want to make it legal. But the opposition to any such move is fierce. Two peers, Margaret Jay and Ilora Finlay, take sides.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00qy21p)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00qylpq)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00qx5rc)
Series 70

Episode 8

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Susan Calman, Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton and Victoria Mather.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00qylpt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00qylpw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00qx5rf)
Ed Stourton chairs the topical debate from Wirral. The panellists are home secretary Alan Johnson, Liberal Democrats' home affairs spokesman Chris Huhne, deputy leader of Plaid Cymru Helen Mary Jones and Iain Duncan Smith, former Conservative leader and chairman of the Centre for Social Justice.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00qynb4)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00qynvv)
Othello

Lenny Henry stars in Northern Broadside's version of Shakespeare's great tragedy of love turned sour by unfounded jealousy. Othello's descent into deluded rage is orchestrated by the dazzling villainy of his lieutenant Iago.

(Original stage production created by Northern Broadsides and West Yorkshire Playhouse and staged in London by Sonia Friedman Productions)

IAGO ..... Conrad Nelson
RODERIGO ..... Matt Connor
BRABANTIO ..... Geoff Leesley
OTHELLO ..... Lenny Henry
CASSIO ..... Richard Standing
DUKE / GRATIANO ..... David Beckford
SENATOR / LODOVICO ..... Simon Holland Roberts
DESDEMONA ..... Jessica Harris
MONTANO ..... Andy Cryer
EMILIA ..... Sara Poyzer
HERALD / GENTLEMAN ..... Chris Pearse
BIANCA ..... Victoria Gee

Director: Barrie Rutter
Producer: David Hunter

Music arranged by Conrad Nelson and performed by the cast.


SAT 16:30 Woman's Hour (b00qynvx)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Weekend Woman's Hour with Jane Garvey. John Barrowman on his music, sexuality, and being Captain Jack; Booker prize-winning author Hilary Mantel on writing and the fascination of the supernatural; the political agenda of the baby-boomer generation; and the life and death of Lady Jane Grey.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00qynvz)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00qx454)
Evan Davis asks his panel of top business guests where they draw the line when it comes to outsourcing. They also discuss the future of publishing.

Evan is joined by Ronan Dunne, chief executive of mobile phone company O2 UK; Stevie Spring, chief executive of magazine publisher Future Plc; and Ananda Mukerji, chief executive of outsourcing company Firstsource.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00qynw1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00qynw3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qynw5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00qyqw6)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive is joined by the satirist Rory Bremner, talks survival with the actor Max Beesley and celebrates 35 years in poetry with Pam Ayres.

Allegra McEvedy talks about marital skirmishes in the kitchen with Christopher Hirst, author of Love Bites.

Comedy from Loose Ends' favourite outlaw country music legend that is Wilson Dixon.

Music comes from Los Angeles Local Natives and Lou Rhodes.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00qyqw8)
Sir Gus O'Donnell

Mary Ann Sieghart profiles the Cabinet Secretary Sir Gus O'Donnell, a key figure in the controversy over Gordon Brown's alleged bullying of Downing Street staff. It's said that Britain's most senior civil servant is not a typical Whitehall mandarin. He gives straight answers and didn't go to Oxbridge. Can a man with such influence stay clear of the political storm?


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00qyqwb)
Tom Sutcliffe is joined by novelist Louise Doughty, writer Paul Morley and broadcaster Richard Coles to review the cultural highlights of the week.

Rose Tremain's novel Trespass, set in the Cévennes mountains in southern France, is about two pairs of siblings - Anthony and Veronica Verey, who are outsiders from England and Aramon and Audrun Lunel, who've lived in the area all their life. Anthony is hoping to start a new life in France, Aramon hopes to start a new life by selling Anthony his house. But a lot of things are where they shouldn't be - Audrun's modest bungalow encroaches on Aramon's land in a way that threatens his dreams of a big sale while Veronica's lover Kitty finds Anthony's invasion of their life together unbearable.

Jean-Pierre Jeunet's new film Micmacs opens with a bang - literally - as a French soldier detonates a land mine in a remote African desert. His death deprives Bazil (Dany Boon) of his father, but Bazil's experience of collateral damage isn't over. One night he gets in the way of a stray bullet from a gang shoot-out and ends up living on the street. He is adopted by a group of oddities and eccentrics who occupy a sort of Womble burrow in a city scrapyard. One day, on a Parisian street, he recognises the logos of the companies that manufactured the landmine and the bullet and decides to take revenge on the men who have ruined his and other's lives.

When Ibsen's play Ghosts was first performed in London in 1891, one critic described it as 'a loathsome sore unbandaged'. While Ibsen's acknowledgement of the hypocrisy that kept respectable society in place may not have quite the same capacity to shock today, hypocrisy itself is still alive and well. Iain Glen directs himself in the production that has just opened at the Duchess Theatre in London. He plays the role of Pastor Manders while Lesley Sharp is Mrs Alving. When her son Oswald returns to the family home for a ceremony to commemorate an orphanage in his late father's name, Mrs Alving discovers the true nature of Oswald's inheritance from the dissolute Captain Alving.

The Henry Moore exhibition at Tate Britain openly sets out to change the sculptor's reputation, to restore some of the shock that his art had before his popularity put a Moore sculpture in every new town plaza. To that end the curator, Chris Stephens, has restricted himself to the early part of Moore's career, stopping his selection of more than 150 sculptures and drawings in the mid 1960s. The exhibition begins with Moore's interest in primitivism, explores the sexual and erotic components of his work and also attempts to make the case that his many Mother and Child studies are much less reassuring and tender than we now assume.

Five Days first appeared on BBC1 in 2007 to considerable critical acclaim. Gwyneth Hughes's police drama unwound over five consecutive nights. Now she returns with a second series which follows the same pattern - five days from a police investigation broadcast over the course of a week. It begins with PC Laurie Franklin (Suranne Jones) taking her mother to a hospital appointment, a journey which is interrupted by someone jumping in front of their train. That same morning a baby is abandoned at the hospital. Could the two events be linked?


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00qyqwd)
Hurry Up Please, It's Time

From Falstaff at The Boar's Head to John Self at The Shakespeare in Martin Amis's Money, English literature and the pub are intertwined. It started in a pub - Chaucer's pilgrims setting out from The Tabard in Southwark - and has been waiting to be chucked out ever since. Robert Hanks presents an elegy for pubs in literature and an exploration of what the smoking ban, the gastro pub and the five quid pint are going to do to writing.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00qs5kh)
Plantagenet: Series 1

Lionheart

Series of plays by Mike Walker, inspired by Holinshed's Chronicles, charting the early years of the Plantagenet dynasty.

Prince Richard has become heir apparent, but in the face of Henry II's refusal to acknowledge his position, he turns to the Crusades.

Queen Eleanor ...... Jane Lapotaire
Richard ...... Ed Stoppard
King Henry II ...... David Warner
William Marshall ...... Stephen Hogan
King Philip ...... John Biggins
Saladin ...... Raad Rawi
El-adel ...... Khalid Laith
Baldwin ...... Ewan Hooper
Prince John ...... Neil Stuke
Hugh ...... Philip Fox
Robert of Champagne ...... Rhys Jennings
Conrad ...... Piers Wehner

With Bruce Alexander and Joseph Cohen-Cole

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00qyrsl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00qvnjk)
How much should the personality of our leaders influence our vote? Politics has always been about making a connection with the voter, but with the prime minister and party leaders giving increasingly personal interviews and a US presidential-style TV debate on the cards, is politics turning into the X Factor? Have spin doctors destroyed politics or are we part of the problem? Are we increasingly unwilling to devote the time and intellect, to engage fully with political debate and the tough moral and ethical choices that poses?

Witnesses:

George Pascoe Watson, former political editor of The Sun, now partner at Portland Public Relations.

Mark Vernon, co-editor Citizen Ethics

Iain Dale, political blogger

Mehdi Hasan, senior editor The New Statesman.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b00qtsnp)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes.

With Mary Beard, Marcel Theroux, Arthur Smith and Ariel Leve. The reader is Peter Jefferson.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00qs5lz)
Roger McGough is joined by poet Tony Harrison for a new reading of Newcastle is Peru, and introduces poems by Frances Horowitz and the winner of the BBC Wildlife Poet of the Year competition, Heather Reid.



SUNDAY 28 FEBRUARY 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00qysrw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Lent Talks (b00qvpf0)
Will Self

Series of talks by eminent thinkers exploring how faith and religion interact with a variety of aspects in society.

Novelist Will Self reflects on the relationship between art and religion.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qyt4h)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qyt4k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qyt4m)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00qyt4p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00qyt4r)
The sound of bells from St Lawrence Church, Towcester, in Northamptonshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00qyqw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00qyt4v)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00qyt4x)
Drudgery Divine

Scholar and priest Teresa Morgan explores some of the many ways in which we see work - as a necessary evil, an act of love, a right, a gift and an expression of faith. With readings from the Bhagavad Gita, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Virgil, and music by Peggy Seeger, Robert Fayrfax and Vaughan Williams.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b00qyvdk)
Crayfish

Surprisingly the British Isles are home to seven species of crayfish. Only one, the white clawed crayfish, is indigenous; once a common sight along British rivers, it is now endangered, due partly to the release of its North American cousin into British rivers 30 years ago. Lionel Kelleway travels to Somerset to investigate the plight of our largest freshwater crustacean and to see a project to try and save the crayfish in the wild.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00qyvdm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00qyvdp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00qyvdr)
Edward Stourton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qyvdt)
TB Alert

Jeremy Paxman appeals on behalf of TB Alert.

Donations to TB Alert should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope TB Alert. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide TB Alert with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 1071886.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00qyvdw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00qyvdy)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00qyvf0)
People on the Edge of His Pain

The second in a series of services for Lent.

Live from Calvary Baptist Church in Cardiff.

Led by Rev Dr Craig Gardener. Preacher: Rev Dr Karen Smith.

Musical Director: Kelvin Thomas. Accompanist: Jonathan Davies.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00qx5rh)
Lisa Jardine: The Power of Memory

The late historian Lisa Jardine presented many editions of A Point of View. As a tribute, this is another chance to hear her reflections on the importance for history of the recording of personal memories and her regrets that her mother could no longer recall her own fascinating life.
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00qyvf2)
On BH this week, we have the latest on the devastating earthquake in Chile, and the fears for a resulting tsunami in the Pacific Ocean. We hear from Chile, New Zealand and Japan.

Also, following criticism of Birmingham social services in the tragic case of Khyra Ishaq, we speak to a frontline social worker about the dilemmas of the job. Our reporter Terry Stiastny delves into the world of 19th century anarchist terrorism and asks; why are the names of those who helped the security services still kept secret? And in the week that it was announced that General Motors will no longer be making the Humvee, we take one out for a spin.

The Sunday papers were reviewed by comedian Bridget Christie, chair of the Arts Council England Dame Liz Forgan and author Michael Dobbs.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00qyvf4)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00qyvf6)
June Spencer

Kirsty Young's castaway is actress June Spencer.

She is one of the best-loved matriarchs in broadcasting. As Peggy Woolley in The Archers, she's the only original member of the cast still in the show. It's 60 years this spring since the pilot episodes were first broadcast and, although she is now aged 90, June has no plans to retire. She says, 'It's a great bonus for me that The Archers has run as long as it has, and I've gone along with it.'

Record: Concierto de Aranjuez played by John Williams
Book: Three Men in a Boat, by Jerome K Jerome
Luxury: A Scrabble board.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00qtt8c)
Series 56

Episode 8

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with Graham Norton, Sue Perkins, Paul Merton and Tony Hawks. From February 2010.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00r33sd)
New World Cheese

Sheila Dillon speaks to people around the world risking everything for the cause of good cheese. One is Australian Will Studd. He faced the prospect of jail in a protest to overturn a ban on raw milk cheese being made and imported into the country. He was among thousands of cheese enthusiasts who had gathered in northern Italy for an event set up to celebrate small-scale producers from all over the world.

As well as meeting pioneering producers from Australia and America, Sheila talks to campaigners from former communist countries in eastern Europe who have to use the black market to buy and sell artisanal cheeses. This is the only way they believe food traditions can be kept alive.

Should we care about these cheese struggles in far off places? Sheila is joined by cheese expert Juliet Harbutt who argues that we should.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00qyvfb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00qyw6w)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 Portraying the Poor (b00qyw6y)
In Print

The first of two programmes about the image of poverty and of the working class that's been created by writers (Part 1) and by films and TV (Part 2).

Whether it's Friedrich Engels's report on the Salford slums in the 1840s through to George Orwell's account of his expeditions to Wigan and the hop-fields of Kent, our picture of the poor has been painted by members of the middle class.

Paul Mason asks whether this outsider's view gives us a full and fair account - or whether it says more about the attitudes of the literary class than about the poor themselves.

Interviewees include Orwell's biographer DJ Taylor; Polly Toynbee (author of "Hard Work: Life In Low-Pay Britain") and Michael Collins (author of "The Likes Of Us - A Biography Of The White Working Class").

Producer Peter Everett.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00qx5r5)
Peter Gibbs chairs the popular horticultural forum, which joins the fuschia fanatics of Camborne in Cornwall.

Matt James visits the UK's only tea plantation and Matthew Wilson visits gardening celebrity Christine Walkden.

Includes gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Head to Head (b00k8g51)
Series 1

Episode 4

Edward Stourton presents a series celebrating great debates, combining archive of rare discussions between key figures with analysis by a panel of experts.

Norman Mailer and Marshall McLuhan clash over the electronic age. Has technology set man free or alienated individuals and led to a fragmented society?


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00qzd3b)
Plantagenet: Series 1

John, By the Grace of God

Series of plays by Mike Walker, inspired by Holinshed's Chronicles, chronicling the early years of the Plantagenet dynasty.

The fourth son of Henry II never expected to succeed to the English throne. When he does, he reveals a talent for making enemies.

Queen Eleanor ...... Jane Lapotaire
King Richard ...... Ed Stoppard
King John ...... Neil Stuke
William Marshall ...... Stephen Hogan
Prince Arthur ...... Ryan Watson
Queen Isabelle ...... Emerald O'Hanrahan
King Philip ...... John Biggins
Saladin ...... Raad Rawi
El-Adel ...... Khalid Laith
Doctor/Langton ...... Ewan Hooper
Girard ...... Joseph Cohen-Cole
De Roche ...... Bruce Alexander
Fitzwalter ...... Piers Wehner
Will Marshall ...... Rhys Jennings
Prince Henry ...... Bertie Gilbert

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00qzdvz)
Mariella Frostrup talks to American writer Joshua Ferris about his new book The Unnamed, in which a man has an unusual illness. He he cannot stop walking and the medical profession cannot help. The character is fervent in his belief that he is not mentally ill and the book charts the effect of his symptoms on his body, on his family and on his life as he is literally forced to walk away from everything and everyone.

After the credit crunch comes 'crunch lit'. While bankers may no longer be writing large cheques, many of them are using the opportunity provided by redundancy to write about their experience of working in the city. Alex Preston is the first trader to write a novel about the credit crunch and Geraint Anderson, who pens columns under the pseudonym City Boy, discuss the issues involved in writing about the city from the inside. What do the bankers' books tell us about the excesses of city life that we didn't know already?

And 71 years after the end of the Spanish Civil War - which featured in books by Ernest Hemingway and George Orwell - Spanish writers are at last writing about the conflict that tore the country apart. Galician writer Manuel Rivas, whose latest book Books Burn Badly, tells the story of the mass book burnings that took place in his native city of Corunna at the start of the civil war, is joined by Professor Amanda Hopkinson to discuss the ways in which Spanish writers are addressing the past, asking whether it is healing of old wounds or reviving ancient bitternesses.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00qzdw1)
Roger McGough introduces requests for poems including An Overworked Elocutionist by Carolyn Wells, in which a confused boy struggles to master a maelstrom of famous first lines. The readers are Kate Littlewood, Jon Strickland, Bonnie Hurren and Zahra Barri.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00qvm9h)
Concerns over child courts

CAFCASS, the family courts' advisory service, is again facing claims that it is failing the vulnerable children it is supposed to protect. Seven years after reporting that the organisation was in crisis, Jenny Cuffe returns to ask why the service is still facing a backlog of urgent cases and unprecedented delays.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00qyqw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00qzf0d)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00qzf0g)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qzf0j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00qzf0l)
John Waite makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio

Othello - Radio 4
The Ballet Russes In England - Radio 4
And The Winner Is - Radio 2
Costing The Earth - Radio 4
PM - Radio 4
Yesterday in Parliament - Radio 4
Soul Music - Radio 4
Hurry Up Please it's Time - Radio 4
Last Orders - Radio 4
From Gameboy to Armageddon - Radio 3
Elvis In Prestwick - Radio 4
Chris Evans - Radio 2
Desert Island Discs - Radio 4
After the Accident - Radio 4
Good Golly, Bad Golly - Radio 4
World Routes - Radio 3.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00qzf70)
Helen and Pat discuss Helen's forthcoming appointment at the fertility clinic. Helen declines Pat's offer to accompany her; she needs to seem capable of having a baby on her own. Pat's excited by it and Helen's very grateful for Pat's support.

Tony tells Pat the whole thing's a bad idea although he'll support Helen. But he's worried because he watched Jennifer struggle as a single parent for years. When Pat points out that Jennifer made a success of her life, Tony says she still missed out on a lot and he wonders whether Helen realises that you can't have everything.

Ruth tells Jill that Usha's finding it hard sleeping alone while Alan's camping out. When Jill says she knows what she means, Ruth apologises, but Jill's fine; she doesn't want people watching what they say around her.

David's edgy when Pip's late back from lunch with Jude, telling Ruth he's a bad influence. Pip's upset when Jill gives her Phil's piano music and says Jude's been a great support. Jill suggests it might help things if David and Ruth met Jude. Later, Jill encourages David and Ruth to invite Jude round. They might be surprised. Pip seems receptive when Ruth suggests Tuesday for tea.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00qzf72)
Americana: Presented by David Willis in Washington, DC.

As American politicians debate healthcare reform in Washington DC, Americana hears from a few people in Baltimore who feel left out in the cold.

After a week of pure political threatre, David Willis heads to the briefing room of the White House's West Wing. Political analyst Marc Ambinder shares an insider's view of how the big decisions are made and declared to the world.

From Texas - writer Mary Karr discusses her personal journey from health to alcoholism and back again.

And we've a view of the United States from Cuba, courtesy of an interloper called Matt Frei.

Finally, Washington's elite haven't yet found a cure for America's healthcare problems, but throughout time they've found ways to cure their personal ailments. David Willis visits the neighbourhood apothecary to learn the remedies sought out by George Washington, Abe Lincoln and others.

Our email is "americana@bbc.co.uk" and for a daily dose you can follow us on Twitter #bbcamericana.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00qzfhp)
Jennings' Little Hut

The Difficult Guest

Mark Williams reads one of Anthony Buckeridge's classic school stories, abridged in five parts by Roy Apps.

Jennings and Darbishire try to play the perfect hosts, but the General's grandson gives them the slip.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00qx1m9)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00qx5r7)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, marking the lives of Alexander Haig, Cy Grant, Geoffrey Woolley and Allan Wicks.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00qylpq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qyvdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00qttpp)
Failing Better

Mistakes often provide the best lessons in life, so why are they so undervalued? Michael Blastland explores our attitude to failure and the impact it has on politics.

We may accept, in our personal lives, that 'to err is human'. But, when it comes to politicians, we enjoy pouring scorn on those who make mistakes: we relish the cock-up, the blunder and the humiliating U-turn. But what effect does this bloodthirsty approach have on policy-making?

Michael talks to former cabinet minister Estelle Morris about her experience of dealing with mistakes in government. We also hear from former civil servant Paul Johnson and from David Halpern - a former prime-ministerial advisor who helped create The Institute for Government.

Michael goes in search of inspiration from two professions which, far from seeking to bury mistakes, see them as opportunities to learn. He speaks to surgeon and writer Atul Gawande and he visits RAF Cranwell, where mistakes made by airman are seen as 'clues'. He also talks to philosopher Susan Wolf about blame and 'moral luck' and he interviews the editor of The Spectator magazine, Fraser Nelson.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00qzfhr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00qzfht)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including It Happened Here.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00qx5r9)
Amelie and Delicatessen director Jean Pierre Jeunet reveals why he thinks all his films are the same, and why his latest MicMacs is no exception.

Poet Ian McMillan reviews the Keats biopic Bright Star.

Colin Shindler reports from the cinemas of February 1960.

Francine Stock embarks on the first leg of her national tour of local cinema.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00qyt4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 01 MARCH 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00qzg9k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00qvnjf)
CP Snow first used the phrase 'corridors of power' in his book Homecoming in 1956. It soon became a cliché, conjuring up a world of officialdom, hierarchy, whispers and secret machinations. The advent of open plan, with its airy atriums and glass walls, was supposed to put pay to all that, ushering in a new sense of democracy to the work place. However, research from Rachel Hurdley reveals the hidden values of corridors. The chance meetings, gossip and confrontations which actually undermine hierarchy will all be lost if we fail to appreciate the seemingly unimportant passage between doors. She discusses her research with Laurie Taylor and with the architect Jeremy Till.

Simon Duncan, Professor of Comparative Social Policy at the University of Bradford, talks about the phenomenon of Living Apart Together - or 'LAT' - a form of relationship which keeps partners out of each other's living space.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00qyt4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qzgh0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qzgk2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qzgn8)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00qzgql)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qzgt1)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Canon Patrick Thomas.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00qzgyh)
UK food exports have grown by 19 per cent during the recession. Charlotte Smith finds out that exports of cheese, pork and beer contribute to a market worth 14 billion pounds a year. And wheat for pasta is now being grown in England. A visit to a Cornish pasta producer reveals what it takes to match the Italians.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00qzvdc)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00qzgyy)
With Evan Davis and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00qzvdf)
Anthony Julius tells Andrew Marr how far he thinks anti-Semitism pervades English culture*, while Alexander McCall Smith argues against the hegemony of the English language, in favour of Scots. Jonathan Safran Foer explores what we eat and why and whether meat is murder and Graciela Chichilnisky explores the links between danger, risk, climate change and changing behaviours.

* In the course of this critical discussion about if and when anti-Zionist opinions may be characterised as anti-Semitic there was reference to Mr George Galloway. We are happy to make it clear that we did not intend to suggest that Mr George Galloway is in fact anti-Semitic.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00qzh56)
Patti Smith - Just Kids

Episode 1

Patti Smith reads from her new memoir of her life in New York in the late 1960s and 1970s.

In 1966, Patti is living in South Jersey with her family and seems destined to become a schoolteacher.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qzkkw)
Helena Bonham Carter; Felicity Aston

Helena Bonham Carter on Alice in Wonderland, her wacky dress-sense and unusual living arrangements. Plus, adventurer, Felicity Aston on her women's expedition to the South Pole.


MON 10:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjr4)
1. Voices From the Other Side

Alison Hart is a professional medium, an awkward, obese, disorganised woman, but with a gift for empathy and a good platform technique.

Her familiar spirits are figures from her chaotic childhood, principal among them a small, foul-mouthed circus performer with disgusting personal habits called Morris who is her unpleasant and bitter spirit guide.

To try and create some order in her messy existence she has taken on an assistant, the highly efficient but essentially heartless Colette, who, although she is a regular witness to Alison's gift, is nevertheless a profoundly sceptical companion. The two of them are bound together by a need that neither wants to recognise.

Hilary Mantel's blackly comic novel about a professional medium with a troubled past.

Dramatised in ten parts by Caroline Harrington.

Alison ...... Alison Steadman
Colette ...... Rosie Cavaliero
Morris ...... Bill Wallis

Director: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


MON 11:00 The New Global Indians (b00r0p2b)
Indians Shining

Mukti Jain Campion examines how Indians have moved so rapidly from running cornershops to running corporations.

The phenomenal rise of the 'new global indians' started slowly 20 years ago but has really taken off in the past 10 years. Equipped with the English language and higher degrees from top universities, their ambitions go far beyond being call centre operators or back office workers for the west. Instead they're making it big as entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and as analysts and bankers on Wall Street and Canary Wharf, buying up British businesses and running global companies.

A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Sneakiepeeks (b00p8dkd)
Storm Warning

Beagle Team are tasked with the surveillance of a Russian billionaire. The nation's security and gas supply are at stake.

Comedy by Harry Venning and Neil Brand about a team of inept, backstabbing surveillance operatives.

Bill ...... Richard Lumsden
Sharla ...... Nina Conti
Mark ...... Daniel Kaluuya
Captain Le Clerc ...... Kevin Eldon
Bolkonski ...... Shaban Arifi
Boris ...... John Biggins
Russian Girls ...... Alex Tregear/Kate Layden
Russian Crew ...... Nigel Hastings/Ewan Hooper.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2009


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00qznr1)
Council spending cuts, the AA move into home repairs, and reducing the stigma of dementia.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00qzp7v)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00qzp89)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Quote... Unquote (b00r0qh9)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes.

With Ken Bruce, Valerie Grove, Ben Goldacre and Kwame Kwei-Armah.

The reader is Peter Jefferson.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00qzf70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00r0qhc)
Ashes to Antarctica

By Jim Eldridge. Widow Jill Foster is determined to scatter her husband's ashes on the wastes of Antarctica to commemorate the work he did there years ago. She sets off with her sister on a tourist cruise, only to find that attitudes have changed radically, and it will be more difficult than she thinks to fulfil her task.

Jill ...... Carolyn Pickles
Liz ...... Deborah McAndrew
Emilie ...... Yolanda Vazquez
Geoffrey ...... Mark Carey

Directed by Peter Leslie Wild.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00qyqwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 The Generation Gap (b00qzrl7)
Series 2: Sex

Agony Aunts

Series of programmes in which two people from different generations discuss a topic that reveals the changing nature of Britain.

The theme of the second series of five programmes is Sex.

Irma Kurtz, the original Cosmopolitan agony aunt, talks to her younger counterpart Simone Bienne, who works as a sex and relationship expert for various publications. How has the nature of problems changed?

A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00r33sd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00r0qw1)
For St David's Day, Ernie Rea and guests discuss whether patron saints are still important cultural icons. What do their stories tell us about ourselves and our history? Do we have the right saint for each nation and is there a place for a patron saint of the UK?


MON 17:00 PM (b00qzrn6)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qzrs8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00r0qw3)
Series 56

Episode 9

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game, recorded at the University of Derby. Panellists Tony Hawks, Justin Moorhouse, Josie Lawrence and Dave Gorman speak on subjects including the people you find in a student bar and the art of studying.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00qzrj5)
Tom helps Brenda distribute the milk round leaflets. Roy's had to go into work because Oliver's doing a bad job of covering for Caroline. Brenda's surprised Helen's going ahead with having a baby. If she had Helen's opportunities, she wouldn't be saddling herself with a child. Disturbed by Brenda's attitude, Tom tentatively asks Brenda if she wants children. She replies some day but not just yet.

Usha and Alan try to snatch some intimate time, as Usha's been missing Alan at night, but when they keep getting interrupted by the phone they agree that maybe it wasn't meant to be.

Lilian's surprised when Matt's brother Paul turns up unexpectedly, saying his Mum has died. She's supportive when he talks about how upset he is, even though his Mum was a difficult woman and preferred his brother. Lilian tells him that Tony was always her Dad's favourite. Paul admires Matt's strength when Lilian tells him how cold his mother was towards Matt. As Paul leaves, he thanks Lilian for her help. She's sorry there's nothing she can do about Matt, but Paul is understanding. Lilian asks him to let her know if there's anything else she can do.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00r0qw5)
Mark Lawson reports on Hollywood's current appetite for apocalyptic visions. Julian Hendy on his film which attempts to uncover the scale of killings by the mentally ill in Britain. Plus an interview with novelist Joanna Trollope.


MON 19:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Food Fights (b00r3r0k)
Indonesia

Bill Law investigates the causes and consequences of the great global land grab, as richer nations and multinational corporations acquire vast tracts of land in developing countries.

Bill weighs up the pros and cons of Indonesia's palm oil revolution. The country leads the world in palm oil production and the world is hungry for it; check any food label and as likely as not palm oil will turn up as one of the ingredients. Low-cost, high-yield palm oil has transformed Indonesia creating wealth and a new middle class. But in the process, it has carved up huge swathes of rainforest.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00r3r5h)
Tea Party Politics

Tea party politics is sweeping across America. Not genteel chat over cucumber sandwiches but a right wing protest movement against big government and high taxes, now widely regarded as the most vibrant political force in the United States. Author and journalist Gary Younge investigates the tea party movement. He finds out what sparked this grass roots insurgency, who the supporters are and assesses the potential impact of the tea party movement.

Gary is invited to a tea party rally in Little Rock Arkansas where he meets supporters who are angry with the political establishment particularly the Republican party. "If the Republican Party does not pay attention to the tea party folks, they're not going to win the next election", one delegate told Gary. "We have to change the Republican Party and get more conservative, instead of the direction they've been trying to go over the last few years, which is leaning towards the middle". The impetus for the launch of the tea party movement a year ago was the recent financial crisis and frustration at the bank bail-outs while ordinary people were losing their jobs, homes and savings. David Frum, a former speech writer for George W Bush tells Gary that the frustration with the Republican Party began much earlier.

Over the last year the tea party movement has made its presence known with huge protests across the country. If 2009 was the year tea part activists got angry, 2010 is the year they get political. Now supporters have their eye on the mid-term elections later this year. Gary meets Rand Paul, an eye surgeon who is standing in the Senate elections. A few months ago he was a rank outsider. Today, after some intense campaigning and the endorsement of Sarah Palin he is the front runner. In several other campaigns the tea party movement is making an impact. Ring wing pollster Frank Luntz warns supporters not to jeopardise their chances of success by getting too angry and stubborn. Publisher and commentator Andrew Neil, who has long had a foot on either side of the Atlantic, tells Gary that there's a popular strand to American history and American politics which doesn't exist in the UK and which allows a phenomena like the tea party movement to merge: "I think it's the size of America and the diversity of America", Neil says, "that allows for grass root movements to grow up and become independent of New York or Washington".

Contributors:

Andrew Neil, Publisher and Commentator
Frank Luntz, Right wing pollster
David Frum, Author, journalist and former speech writer for George W Bush
Rand Paul, candidate for Senate in Kentucky, USA.


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00r0qw9)
The Big Clean Up

When Corby Borough Council was ruled to be negligent in its efforts to clean up the site of the town's enormous steelworks, a shiver ran through the building industry.

For a decade builders have been urged to build new homes, offices, schools and hospitals on brownfield land. It meant that ex-industrial eyesores were cleaned up and it saved greenfield land from the bulldozers.

Last summer's court judgement opened the way for families who believe their children were born with birth defects because of airborne contamination from the Corby development to seek compensation. As a result groups opposing development on their local patch of contaminated land have been given powerful ammunition.

Alice Roberts visits development sites across the country to ask what impact the Corby decision will have on Britain's building industry. Will it be cheaper and safer for risk-averse councils and developers to turn their attention back to greenfield land?

She visits Britain's biggest building site to see how the Olympic Delivery Authority is using cutting-edge techniques to clean up this enormous site and travels to Bishopton near Glasgow where the proposed development of a former armaments factory has split the community.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00qzvdf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00qzrw5)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qzsqd)
News from a global perspective with Ritula Shah.

Rescue efforts continue in Chile.

Sterling falls on election fears.

Afghan child migrants seek asylum in the UK.

Lord Ashcroft admits to being a 'non-dom'.

The Indians who believe they are a lost tribe of Israel.

Radovan Karadzic takes the stand at his Hague trial.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qzswk)
Trespass

Episode 1

Sara Kestelman reads from the new and disturbing novel by Rose Tremain. Set in the Cevennes, an untamed area of southern France where traditions and secrets run deep, it is the story of two very different sets of siblings.

Veronica and Anthony are privileged, cultured and English. Aramon and Audrun are French, rooted in the old stone mas and the land around it that their family have cultivated for generations, and in their shared and violent past. When these two very different worlds collide, a chain of events is set in unstoppable motion.

Alone in Pimlico, Anthony has a moment of self-knowledge: the best is over. Meanwhile, above a river bank in southern France, a little girl is screaming.

Abridged by Sally Marmion.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b00p93sw)
How's My Driving?

Having a driving licence used to be proof you'd grown up and could move about on your own; now it is almost a guilty pleasure.

Dominic Arkwright borrowed a car to get to the studio to meet entrepreneur Alison Larkman (who walked), broadcaster Chris Serle (on his motor scooter) and actor Patrick Field (bike, train and bike) to consider the point of driving in the 21st century.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qzszt)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Susan Hulme.



TUESDAY 02 MARCH 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00qzg5c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00qzh56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qzg9m)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qzgh2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qzgk4)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00qzgnb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qzgqn)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Canon Patrick Thomas.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00qzgwc)
Anna Hill takes a slippery walk through fields in East Anglia and hears surprising statistics which show that despite the snowfall, the winter has been drier than normal. Also on a watery note, Anna explores whether fields should be deliberately flooded to protect towns and cities from flooding. And we meet the West Country sausage maker who has found a new market selling bangers to China.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00qzgyk)
With James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b00r5yxf)
Football Goal Disputes

Between 1880 and 1890, the game of football was transformed by a growing professionalism. Suddenly disagreements which had previously been settled in a gentlemanly way between captains were becoming rancorous. Professional teams who were now paying wages and getting crowds of several thousands wanted to win. The goalposts needed changing and in came the cross tape. But that wasn't good enough, so the cross bar was installed. Then came referees to make the decisions previously agreed by captains. But when, on 26 October 1889, a game between Everton and Accrington at the Anfield ground in Liverpool descended into a near riot over a disputed goal, an engineer in the crowd thought he had the answer. John Alexander Brodie's Goal Net was patented a year later. He met the Football Association and, after some initial trials, they decided that the net was a very good way of assisting referees and encouraged all clubs to use them.

So what holds back today's authorities from using the modern camera technology that might have changed Ireland's fate in the recent World Cup play-off? There was another disputed goal at the African Cup of Nations, Cameroon losing out on that occasion. Rugby has adopted cameras and a fourth official with access to the pictures, cricket is moving that way and tennis has taken up the referred line call.

So should football take the Long View and use the available technology or is the reticence to do something more indicative of our culture and time? Are we as ready as the Victorians to accept the new?


TUE 09:30 When I Grow Up (b00r0rdl)
Episode 3

Forty years ago 14,000 youngsters across Britain were asked to write about where they saw themselves in the future - their jobs, family lives, belongings, living environments and leisure pursuits. Those essays have now been followed up by the Nuffield Foundation as a way of finding out how far ambition at an early age shapes what happens in later life.

This is the first time that media access has been granted to those who have taken part in their research. As well as evidence of ambition the essays offer lovely detail about how the eleven year olds imagined life would be at 25, with one writing: "my husband would have just won £200 so we decided to go to the moon for our holiday while we had not got any children."

The series covers the following five areas: jobs, family lives, living environments, leisure pursuits and belongings that they imagined owning when first studied. The findings suggest that children who are ambitious go on to enjoy greater success than those with lower aspirations. Once background and ability were accounted for, children did better if they set themselves lofty goals.

It reveals that, even if a child is economically disadvantaged or less able, having high ambitions at around the time they leave primary school means that they are significantly more likely to have a professional job, though not necessarily the one that they predicted.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00r2jkd)
Patti Smith - Just Kids

Episode 2

Patti Smith reads from her new memoir of her life in New York in the late 1960s and 1970s.

In 1967, Patti is hungry, homeless and penniless, until a chance encounter in a bookstore changes her life for ever.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qzkk6)
Julianne Moore; Carly Simon

Singer Carly Simon performs live and talks about her career and music. Plus, actor Julianne Moore on relationships, and her children's book, Freckleface Strawberry.


TUE 10:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjr6)
2. Colette's Story

Colette is an event organiser whose marriage to dull, conventional Gavin ends after she has the strange experience of holding a phone conversation with Gavin's mother, whom she later discovers is dead.

Colette's interest in the paranormal leads her to a Psychic Extravanganza in Windsor where professional medium Alison is performing, and to a subsequent consultation where Alison drops a bombshell about her father and then makes her a surprising job offer.

Hilary Mantel's blackly comic novel about a professional medium with a troubled past.

Alison ...... Alison Steadman
Colette ...... Rosie Cavaliero
Gavin ...... Mark Meadows
Natasha/Renee ...... Adrienne O'Sullivan

Dramatised by Caroline Harrington.

Director: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


TUE 11:00 The New Global Indians (b00r0rkn)
Uniquely Indian?

In the week that President Obama visits India to strengthen ties that he hopes will help improve America's economy, there's another chance to discover why, despite being home to the highest number of illiterate people in the world, India produces so many numerate and ambitious graduates that are highly sought after by global companies. This confident and outward-looking Indian elite can now be found in countless top executive roles in multinational corporations (eg PepsiCo, Kraft, Google, Citigroup, Chevron, Deutschebank) and as global entrepreneurs. But what makes them so uniquely successful?

Many people point to the phenomenal success of the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT) which select the brightest and the best of India's students through intense competition and launch them into the international arena. At the IIT Kanpur campus Mukti Jain Campion watches the multinational company recruitment of last year's graduates. In Chicago she attends the annual global conference of the Indian Institutes of Technology alumni and hears of their wide-ranging achievements. How do they see their Indian-ness contributing to that success? And what lessons can they offer for Brits and Americans trying to maintain their previous pre-eminence in the global marketplace?

Originally broadcasted in March 2010.

Presented and Produced by Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:30 The Ballets Russes in England (b00r0rzl)
What Did Diaghilev Do for Britain?

Jane Pritchard, dance curator at the Victoria and Albert Museum, explores our ongoing love affair with Diaghilev's Ballets Russes.

Without Diaghilev, British ballet would be unrecognisable. All three of our major dance companies were founded by his protegees.

A Loftus Audio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00qznd3)
Your views on proposed cuts to BBC radio and online with Kelvin MacKenzie.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00qznr3)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00qzp7x)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Soul Music (b00r0smn)
Series 9

Mendelssohn Violin Concerto

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

When Mendelssohn wrote his Violin Concerto in 1844 he could hardly have imagined how famous and well loved it would become. In this programme, people tell how it has played an important part in their lives.

Violinist Daniel Hope tells how he got caught practising this concerto secretly locked in the bathroom at school. Harry Atterbury remembers hearing the Mendelssohn for the first time on the night before a Second world War air raid which turned his life upside down. Composer Stephen Pratt describes discovering that his father had played this concerto to cheer fellow soldiers in the jungle in Burma, and explains how this inspired him to write his own violin concerto.

To find out more about Stephen Pratt's Violin Concerto, go to:

http://www.liverpoolphil.com./1132/rlpo-recordings/stephen-pratt-lovebytes.html

The recording of the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto featured in this programme was by violinist Maxim Vengerov with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra conducted by Kurt Masur. Teldec 4509-90875-2.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00qzrj5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00r0smq)
Ronald Frame - Pinkerton

By Ronald Frame.

In the new immigrant community of 1840s America, Scotsman Allan Pinkerton turns detective when an influx of counterfeit dollars threatens the local economy.

Allan Pinkerton ...... Forbes Masson
Joan Pinkerton ...... Rachel Ogilvy
John Craig ...... Sam Dale
Mrs O'Riordan/elderly Woman ...... Marcella Riordan
Nathan Madison/ Croupier/Elderly Man ...... Robert Jezek
Lisl ...... Alison Pettitt
Jack Paige/Police Officer ...... John Biggins
Wolf/Bank Teller/Dr Morgan ...... Bruce Alexander

Directed by David Ian Neville.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00r0sms)
The new series kicks off with a remarkable revelation about how our minds might be controlled by parasites within our brains. Are we really just vehicles for their survival? Inundation by the sea is often portrayed as the end to any agricultural soil. Yet many parts of the world successfully grow all sorts of crops on land reclaimed from the sea. Is the salination really as serious as it is made out to be? Why does wood buried deep inside a living tree emerge in so many different colours, and do hibernating animals have some mechanism to stop their limbs seizing up after months of inactivity? Why, too, is the Richter scale logarithmic and is there something special about logs that allows us to understand them more easily?

Join Richard Daniel and his guests - ecologist Dr Lynn Dicks of Cambridge University, forest ecologist Dr Nick Brown of Oxford University and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00r0tbs)
Bath Festival Stories by Candlelight

Stowmont, by Sadie Jones

Bath Festival Stories by Candlelight

The first in a series of supernatural tales commissioned by Radio 4 for last year's Bath Literature Festival

1/3 : Stowmont by Sadie Jones, read by John Telfer.

An 18th century story about a man and the architect he employs, who are forced to shelter for the night from a snow storm in the house they have resolved to pull down and replace. In spite of their rationalism, and beyond their comprehension, the past asserts itself over their will.

Producer Christine Hall.


TUE 15:45 The Generation Gap (b00qzrj7)
Series 2: Sex

Gay Protest

Series of programmes in which two people from different generations discuss a topic that reveals the changing nature of Britain.

The theme of the second series of five programmes is Sex.

82-year-old gay rights campaigner Antony Grey was a pioneer. His counterpart is Bobby, a 22-year-old volunteer who goes into schools to help combat homophobic bullying. Laws about homosexuality may have changed, but have attitudes?

A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b00r0tvc)
The Key Policies on Justice

Clive Coleman and a panel of politicians examine some of the key policies on justice.

Interviewees:

Charles Falconer QC, the former Lord Chancellor

Edward Garnier QC, the Shadow Attorney General

David Howarth, Liberal Democrat Shadow Justice Secretary.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00r0tvf)
Ken Arnold and Jay Griffiths

Museum curator Ken Arnold and writer Jay Griffiths join Sue MacGregor to discuss favourite paperbacks by Ben Goldacre, Edmund Gosse and John Berger

Bad Science by Ben Goldacre
Publisher: Fourth Estate

Father and Son by Edmund Gosse
Publisher: OUP

Hold Everything Dear: Dispatches on Survival and Resistance by John Berger
Publisher: Verso Books

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00qzrl9)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qzrn8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b00d3rvq)
Role Playing

Special edition of Steve Delaney's comedy vehicle, recorded at the Edinburgh Festival.

Arthur's attempts to find a bargain in the classifieds doesn't quite go to plan, as his ever-ringing doorbell leads to confusion on all fronts. But Count Arthur Strong will be able to gather his thoughts in time for his role-playing engagement at the hospital, won't he?

With Steve Delaney, Sue Perkins, Alastair Kerr, David Mounfield.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00qzr71)
Susan's delighted when Peggy offers her a month's salary on top of her redundancy as a token of appreciation for Susan's hard work and the difficult situation she's been in. Later Susan tells Ruth she should have known Peggy wouldn't let her down.

David's not happy when Pip's late home for tea and despairs when she texts saying she and Jude are not coming after all. Jude's car's broken down. Ruth and David agree that Pip's bottled it but Ruth cautions against confronting Pip. They're just going to have to be a bit cleverer about it.

Lilian visits Matt in prison. He's irritated when she suggests sending a condolence card to Paul; he's never met the bloke. When Lilian points out they share a mother, Matt says she was only his mother in a technical sense. Matt worries about his impending confiscation hearings. They could take everything. When Lilian says she's got more than enough for both of them, Matt says he doesn't want her money, but it means the world to him that she's offered. He's lucky to have her.

Later, Paul texts Lilian to say his Mum's funeral is next Thursday. Lilian wonders to herself what she's supposed to do about it.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00qzrsb)
As he turns 80, photographer Lord Snowdon looks back over six decades of capturing images of the royals and the rich and famous, as well as his extensive career in photojournalism.

The new psychological thriller Case 39 sees Renee Zellweger as a social worker getting too involved with a young mysterious patient, with terrifying consequences. Matt Thorne reviews.

Actor David Morrissey, renowned for screen roles in dramas including Blackpool, State Of Play and The Deal, and currently starring in Five Days on BBC One, discusses his feature film directorial debut Don't Worry About Me, set in his home town of Liverpool.

Bestselling author of The Cutting Room, Louise Welsh discusses her new book Naming The Bones.


TUE 19:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00r0vxg)
Computing calamities

As ministers decide whether a 12-billion-pound NHS computer project in England offers value for money, Gerry Northam asks if some major IT projects could be scrapped by a new government looking for big spending cuts.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00r0vxj)
Lord Low of Dalston, vice principal of RNIB, talks about the recent amendment to the Equality Bill, which strengthens the Bill to give blind and partially-sighted people the right to access printed information.

Ian Wood is a wheelchair user who is also visually impaired. He seeks advice on how best to indicate his dual disability from Dr Lin Berwick, who is herself totally blind and has been a permanent wheelchair user for 45 years. Lin's response was that Ian should not move himself around in his chair as she feared for his safety and other people suing him if he hit anyone. Ian feels he still has enough sight for this not to be an issue and is interested to hear from other people in a similar situation for their advice.

Mani Djazmi reports on a Goalball awareness-raising game between members of the Saracens professional rugby team and the Great Britain women's goalball team.


TUE 21:00 Am I Normal? (b00r66v6)
Series 7

Bullying

When does anger or teasing become bullying and who decides? Vivienne asks if the definition of bullying is now so wide that it has become meaningless. Did the overuse of the term lead to Gordon Brown hitting the headlines?


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b00r5yxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00qzrsd)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qzsb4)
News from a global perspective with Ritula Shah.

Reports of looting in epicentre of Chile's earthquake, Concepcion.

One of the killers of toddler James Bulger is back in prison.

Election debates between party leaders are announced.

Is IT in schools effective?

Effect of Balkans arrests on Bosnia.

Muslim leader issues fatwa against suicide bombing.

Electric bicycles in Beijing.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qzsqg)
Trespass

Episode 2

Sara Kestelman reads from the new and disturbing novel by Rose Tremain. Set in the Cevennes, an untamed area of southern France where traditions and secrets run deep, it is the story of two very different sets of siblings.

Veronica and Anthony are privileged, cultured and English. Aramon and Audrun are French, rooted in the old stone mas and the land around it that their family have cultivated for generations, and in their shared and violent past.

Suddenly appalled by his lonely life in London, Anthony seeks refuge with his beloved sister in southern France and there discovers a renewed hope. Meanwhile Aramon Lunel has his own plans - but not ones that his sister may be so taken with.

Abridged by Sally Marmion.


TUE 23:00 Fabulous (b00r0w3b)
Series 3

Episode 4

Sitcom by Lucy Clarke about a woman who wants to be Fabulous but can't cope.

Faye is still engaged to a man she is roughly 65 per cent sure she should marry - 66 per cent on a good day.

With her wedding day imminent, Faye is having serious doubts - about getting married, and about whether or not Denise should live. It is the morning after her hen night and Faye cannot remember what happened. Everyone seems really annoyed with her and somehow she has acquired Mark Lamarr's phone number.

With Daisy Haggard, Katy Brand, Olivia Colman, Anne Reid, Sally Grace, Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Alison Pettitt, Rufus Wright, David Armand, Bradley Ford, Nigel Hastings, Mark Lamarr.

Music by Osymyso.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qzswm)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



WEDNESDAY 03 MARCH 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00qzg5f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00r2jkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qzg9p)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qzgh4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qzgk6)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00qzgnd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qzgqq)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Canon Patrick Thomas.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00qzgwf)
Protestors against what could be Western Europe's largest dairy farm demand planners give them more time to have their say.

Bad weather is causing anxiety for sugar beet farmers in East Anglia.

Anna Hill hears how live pigs are being exported to China.


WED 06:00 Today (b00qzgym)
With James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00r0wtq)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests Suzi Brent, Assaf Gavron, Adam Coleman and Alison Chitty.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00r2jf3)
Patti Smith - Just Kids

Episode 3

Patti Smith reads from her new memoir of her life in New York in the late 1960s and 1970s.

In 1969, Patti and Robert Mapplethorpe have moved to the Chelsea Hotel, Brooklyn - a magnet for artists, writers and musicians.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qzkk8)
Ellie Goulding; Childbirth risks

Ellie Goulding plays live. Plus, the commercialisation of divorce; and have we become too scared of childbirth?


WED 10:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjr8)
3. An Evil Thing

Colette decides Alison should publish a book, and starts to interview her on tape. She soon realises she's taken on more than she might want to know.

Alison's memories of her childhood in Aldershot turn out to be profoundly disturbing. Her mother arranged abortions for other women, but couldn't get rid of her own child, and may well have offered her to a succession of detestable petty thieves and abusers. They lived in squalor, Alison was neglected, and her school life and subsequent jobs were messed up by interfering spirits. She was rescued by a neighbour, Mrs Etchells, who claimed to be her grandmother, and who introduced her to the psychic world.

Hilary Mantel's blackly comic novel about a professional medium with a troubled past.

Alison ...... Alison Steadman
Colette ...... Rosie Cavaliero
Morris ...... Bill Wallis
Emmie ...... Katharine Rogers
Keith ...... Simon Armstrong
Mrs McGibbet ...... Sheila Hannon
Mrs Etchells ...... June Barrie

Dramatised in ten parts by Caroline Harrington.

Director: Sara Davies.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


WED 11:00 The New Global Indians (b00r0rkq)
Payback

Mukti Jain Campion examines how Indians have moved so rapidly from running cornershops to running corporations.

On his recent trip to Washington the Indian prime minister described it as his country's brain gain: the increasing number of successful expatriate Indians who are returning to India to start businesses and run philanthropic projects. In this programme returnees talk about why India is now so attractive to them, and we discover the impact they are making on their country; for example, with social projects such as Akshaya Patra, the world's biggest midday meals programme which feeds a million poor school children a day.

A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b00r0xt1)
Series 3

The Lenzie Splicer

Sitcom written by and starring Sanjeev Kohli and Donald McLeary, set in a Glasgow corner shop.

Dave is thrown into turmoil after an old school friend appears in the shop.

Ramesh ...... Sanjeev Kolhi
Dave ...... Donald McLeary
Sanjay ...... Omar Raza
Alok ...... Susheel Kumar
Father Henderson ...... Gerard Kelly
Ted ...... Gavin Mitchell
Michael Binfield ...... Sylvester McCoy
Mrs Armstrong ...... Maureen Carr

A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00qznd5)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson. Disability and hate crime, money transfer site owners prosecuted, and Tom Conti on parking.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00qznr5)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00qzp7z)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00r0xt3)
Steve Hewlett gets to the heart of the BBC Strategy Review with the man who wrote it, John Tate. He used to work for the Conservative Party and wrote reports for the shadow cabinet. What was his original vision, and was it affected by the BBC power brokers fighting to protect their interests?

Media commentator Dan Sabbagh looks at the way the BBC story has been covered.

Adam Boulton is Sky News's political editor and he will chair one of the prime ministerial debates in the run-up to the election. The three candidates say they are looking forward to it but, with all the rules and restrictions, is he?

Why are there so many true life stories in today's newspapers and magazines, and where do they come from? Natasha Courtney-Smith runs a website to draw in readers' stories - Talktothepress.co.uk - and she shares some of the secrets of her trade.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00qzr71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00r0xt5)
Shakespeare's Vortigern and Rowena

Comedy by Melissa Murray. In 1796, at Drury Lane theatre, Richard Sheridan puts on a guaranteed hit: a production of a 'lost' Shakespeare play. What could possibly go wrong?

Sheridan ...... Lorcan Cranitch
Kemble ...... Alex Jennings
Stage Hand ...... Ben Crowe
Henry ...... Rufus Wright
Samuel ...... Bruce Alexander
Mrs Powell ...... Joanna Monro
Mrs Jordan ...... Alison Pettitt
Actor ...... David Seddon

Producer Marc Beeby.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00r0xzq)
Vincent Duggleby and guests answer calls about ISAs and tax-free savings.

Guests:

Mark Dampier, head of research at Hargreaves Lansdown
Rachel Thrussell, principal consultant at Moneyfacts
John Douglas, senior financial consultant at Finesco Financial Services, Independent Financial Advisors.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00r0tbv)
Bath Festival Stories by Candlelight

The Ghost Writer by Amanda Craig

Bath Festival Stories by Candlelight

The second of a series of supernatural tales commissioned by Radio 4 for last year's Bath Literature Festival.
2/3 The Ghost Writer by Amanda Craig, read by John Telfer

Justin Vest, critically-acclaimed but poorly-selling novelist, is staying temporarily in the home of the late, wildly successful, very pink and fluffy writer Arabella Fysshe. At first glance they don't have much in common - for a start, he's alive and she isn't - but Arabella has some unfinished business with the world.

Producer Christine Hall.


WED 15:45 The Generation Gap (b00qzrj9)
Series 2: Sex

Beauty Queens

Series of programmes in which two people from different generations discuss a topic that reveals the changing nature of Britain.

The theme of the second series of five programmes is Sex.

Lesley Langley, who was Miss UK and crowned Miss World in 1965, compares notes about her experiences with the 2010 Miss England, Katrina Hodge, who is known as Combat Barbie as she is a lance corporal in the army.

A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00r0ymj)
Fetching water, cleaning knives, shovelling out a privy, setting fires - how did servants make sense of the tough menial duties in the 18th-century home? During that time they made up the largest occupational group in the British state, and the historian Caroline Steedman argues that servants' resentments and personal philosophies had a huge impact on the development of the English character and the British nation state. Laurie Taylor discusses a neglected corner of social history with Caroline Steedman and Amanda Vickery.

Laurie also hears about the working class at Britain's elite universities; Diane Reay tells him about her research into state-educated working-class children studying at Oxbridge.


WED 16:30 Am I Normal? (b00r66v6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00qzrlc)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qzrnb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Write Stuff (b00r0yml)
Series 12

JD Salinger

James Walton takes the chair for the game of literary correctness. Team captains John Walsh and Lynne Truss are joined by Tibor Fischer and Peter Kemp. The author of the week and subject for pastiche is JD Salinger, and the reader is Beth Chalmers.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00qzr73)
Kathy and Pat are at the village hall for the community shop meeting. Pat comments that Susan should be in a good mood after Peggy's generous offer and the dairy work Pat's offered her. Kathy worries that Kenton's not mourning Phil but feels left out when Pat tells her Kenton was touched at being left Phil's atlas. He hadn't told Kathy about it.

Brian tells the committee that hopefully the shop will open in June. Pat announces that Susan's agreed to be shop manager for two mornings a week and will cover the post office weekday afternoons. Along with Kathy, Susan will also order stock for the shop. Lynda and Kathy will be organising volunteer rotas, with Susan's help to train them up. Oliver updates everyone on fundraising. They're likely to get a grant to help them raise the money they need. There's been a lot of interest in buying shares for the shop, plus donations. When discussion turns to village fund-raising, Pat suggests putting on a talent show although Lynda dreads to think what it will be like without her direction.

Helen's has her appointment at the fertility clinic and is delighted to hear that she's been accepted for treatment. She rushes off to ring Ian.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00qzrsg)
Jerry Dammers, co-founder of ska band The Specials, discusses the latest project with his jazz fusion group, The Spatial AKA Orchestra, and his feelings about The Specials re-forming without him.

Liam Neeson and Julianne Moore star in Atom Egoyan's film Chloe, about a wife who hires another woman to test her husband's fidelity. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews.

Author Barry Miles on postwar British counter-culture.

As the V and A Museum opens an exhibition of objects and artworks from Horace Walpole's Strawberry Hill, John Wilson gets a sneak preview of Walpole's neo-gothic castle which is undergoing a nine-million-pound restoration.


WED 19:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjr8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00r0ymn)
Michael Buerk chairs a debate on the moral questions behind the week's news. Claire Fox, Matthew Taylor, Melanie Philips and Clifford Longley cross-examine witnesses.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b00r0yq3)
Andreas Whittam Smith

Series of six talks by eminent thinkers exploring how faith and religion interact with a variety of aspects in society.

Financial journalist Andreas Whittam Smith explores the temptations of the financial world.


WED 21:00 The Big Bang: What Happened Next (b00qvpb9)
More than a year after Big Bang Day, Geoff Watts visits CERN in Geneva to discover what the last year has held for the Large Hadron Collider and the biggest scientific experiment ever undertaken.

After the fanfare of the first switch-on of the so-called Big Bang Machine back in September 2008, and the subsequent breakdown, what has been happening in the intervening months? Are scientists now finally ready to start probing some of the great unanswered questions about the universe, and is the largest machine ever built finally ready to take on the challenge?


WED 21:30 Michael Foot: Champion of the Left (b00rl86v)
Donald MacIntyre, former political editor of The Independent, presents a special programme on the political life and career of Michael Foot, former leader of the Labour Party, whose death was announced earlier today. Featuring Michael Foot in interview and at party conferences, as well as Neil Kinnock, Shirley Williams, Enoch Powell, Paul Foot, Barbara Castle and Denis Healey.


WED 21:58 Weather (b00qzrsj)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qzsb6)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

William Hague on the Lord Ashcroft affair.

The Greeks announce austerity measures.

Remembering Michael Foot.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qzsqj)
Trespass

Episode 3

Sara Kestelman reads from the new and disturbing novel by Rose Tremain. Set in the Cevennes, an untamed area of southern France where traditions and secrets run deep, it is the story of two very different sets of siblings.

Veronica and Anthony are privileged, cultured and English. Aramon and Audrun are French, rooted in the old stone mas and the land around it that their family have cultivated for generations, and in their shared and violent past.

Anthony's dream expands and his hopes rise. But high in the hills, at the Mas Lunel, Audrun is realising the full devastation her brother's greed may bring.

Abridged by Sally Marmion.


WED 23:00 Earls of the Court (b00r0yt2)
The Eklov Experience

Comedy drama series by Will Adamsdale and Stewart Wright about two Australians down on their luck in London.

Now living with his girlfriend, Johnno is steadying himself for a couples' day out. But his sofa-crashing best mate Lloydie has other plans

Lloydie ...... Stewart Wright
Johnno ...... Will Adamsdale
Nadine ...... Keely Beresford
Security ...... Rufus Wright

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


WED 23:15 The News at Bedtime (b00pftgs)
Series 1

Episode 7

Twin presenters John Tweedledum and Jim Tweedledee present in-depth news analysis covering the latest stories happening this 'once upon a time'.

It's New Year's Day and riot police are called in as the Teddy Bears try to have their picnic.

With Jack Dee, Peter Capaldi, Joseph Cohen-Cole, Kate Leyden, Lewis MacLeod, Lucy Montgomery, Vicki Pepperdine, Dan Tetsell.

Written by Ian Hislop and Nick Newman.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qzswp)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



THURSDAY 04 MARCH 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00qzg5h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00r2jf3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qzg9r)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qzgh6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qzgk8)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00qzgng)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qzgqs)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Canon Patrick Thomas.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00qzgwh)
Rural life is under threat as young people leave for the cities according to a new report. For the first time in 12 years, commercial GM crops will be grown in the EU. And the Welsh Lamb export market has grown by 10 percent and is now worth £100 million. Charlotte Smith finds out how it has been so successful.


THU 06:00 Today (b00qzgyp)
With James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00r2cn4)
The Infant Brain

Melvyn Bragg and guests Usha Goswami, Annette Karmiloff-Smith and Denis Mareschal discuss what new research reveals about the infant brain.For obvious reasons, what happens in the minds of very young, pre-verbal children is elusive. But over the last century, the psychology of early childhood has become a major subject of study. Some scientists and researchers have argued that children develop skills only gradually, others that many of our mental attributes are innate. Sigmund Freud concluded that infants didn't differentiate themselves from their environment. The pioneering Swiss child psychologist Jean Piaget thought babies' perception of the world began as a 'blooming, buzzing confusion' of colour, light and sound, before they developed a more sophisticated worldview, first through the senses and later through symbol. More recent scholars such as the leading American theoretical linguist Noam Chomsky have argued that the fundamentals of language are there from birth. Chomsky has famously argued that all humans have an innate, universally applicable grammar.Over the last ten to twenty years, new research has shed fresh light on important aspects of the infant brain which have long been shrouded in mystery or mired in dispute, from the way we start to learn to speak to the earliest understanding that other people have their own minds. With:Usha Goswami, Professor of Education at the University of Cambridge and Director of its Centre for Neuroscience in Education Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Professorial Research Fellow at the Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development at the Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck College, University of LondonDenis Mareschal, Professor of Psychology at the Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development at Birkbeck College, University of London.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00r2jf6)
Patti Smith - Just Kids

Episode 4

Patti Smith reads from her new memoir of her life in New York in the late 1960s and 1970s.

In 1975, Patti recorded her debut album Horses. It's a landmark in rock music - but the cover is just as iconic.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qzkkb)
Pauline Prescott; Rose Tremain

Pauline Prescott on her life with John. Plus novelist Rose Tremain on how she writes.


THU 10:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjrb)
4. Death of a Princess

Colette is woken one night by Alison getting news from beyond of Princess Diana's fatal car crash.

The tragic accident means business will be heavy for all the psychics at the Psychic Fair in Nottingham, and they're not helped by Alison's disgusting spirit guide, Morris, who is more than usually irritating, patrolling the motorway services, desperate to find his mates, and interfering with Alison's friend Mandy.

As Alison becomes more disturbed by the darker side of her job, Morris finds his old mate Aitkenside, a development that throws Alison into despair.

Hilary Mantel's blackly comic novel about a professional medium with a troubled past.

Alison ...... Alison Steadman
Colette ...... Rosie Cavaliero
Morris ...... Bill Wallis
Mandy ...... Adrienne O'Sullivan
Silvana ...... Jacqueline Tong

Dramatised by Caroline Harrington.

Director: Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00r2bqb)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.

The programme has been removed from this page following a complaint by the Band Aid Trust, which was upheld by the BBC's Editorial Complaints Unit. (Link below)


THU 11:30 Capturing America: Mark Lawson's History of Modern American Literature (b00r2cm3)
Landscapes, Interiors, Underworlds

Mark Lawson tells the story of how American writing became the literary superpower of the 20th century, telling the nation's stories of money, power, sex, religion and war.

John Updike, author of the Rabbit quartet of novels, always remembered being inspired by the 1960s Pop Art of Andy Warhol and others: an attempt to catch the visual reality of modern America. Updike responded by trying to achieve something similar in fiction, depicting the lives of people from places and backgrounds which had often been ignored. Richard Ford (The Sportswriter trilogy), John Irving (The Cider House Rules), Marilynne Robinson (Housekeeping, Gilead) and Jonathan Franzen (The Corrections) also reflect on this mission to describe the external and internal nature of life in the United States in all its regional and personal variety.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00qznd7)
Almost 64,000 expatriates living on the continent claimed winter fuel allowance last year but are such payments justified? Government advice on winter fuel payments.

New research suggests that only a third of 11 to 17-year-olds who download ringtones, games and music videos have any idea how much they cost.

Spike Hudson is a former heroin addict who had lived rough and been to prison. Now he is helping others like him to escape homelessness.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00qznr7)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00qzp81)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00r0qw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00qzr73)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00r2cm5)
Final Demands

A Call From The Coast

Series of plays by Frederic Raphael reuniting the characters from his novel The Glittering Prizes, which followed the fortunes of scholarship boy Adam Morris and his contemporaries at Cambridge University in the early 1950s. Decades have passed, and we now catch up with Adam and his friends (and enemies) in the days of John Major's government.

Adam is now a successful novelist and screenwriter, and his daughter Rachel is living in California with his old classicist friend Bill Bourne. But Bill is now terminally ill, and Adam faces the prospect of a trip to Los Angeles that will turn out to have some unexpected consequences.

Adam Morris ...... Tom Conti
Barbara Morris ...... Barbara Kellermann
Rachel Morris ...... Flora Montgomery
Mike Clode ...... Mark Wing-Davey
Jason Singer ...... Simon Greenall
Clifford Ayres ...... Colin Macfarlane
Samantha Sabatini ...... Laurence Bouvard
Joann ...... Lachele Carl
Frank Skipton ...... Kenneth Danziger
Mitchell Ambrose ...... Ben Onwukwe

Produced by Jo Wheeler

Directed by Pete Atkin

An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b00qxyx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qyvdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00r0tbx)
Bath Festival Stories by Candlelight

The Whisper by Diana Evans

Bath Festival Stories by Candlelight

The last in a series of supernatural tales commissioned by Radio 4 for last year's Bath Literature Festival.

3/3 : The Whisper by Diana Evans read by Syan Blake

Rachel is a burden to her neighbours, but she carries her own burden too.

Producer Christine Hall.


THU 15:45 The Generation Gap (b00qzrjc)
Series 2: Sex

Underwear and Sex Shop Entrepreneur

Series of programmes in which two people from different generations discuss a topic that reveals the changing nature of Britain.

The theme of the second series of five programmes is Sex.

Jane runs an underwear shop in a seaside town, and has recently started stocking sex toys for the older generation. Her son helps out in the shop, and they discuss attitudes to sex across the generations.

A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00qzdvz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00r2cm7)
The science of earthquakes. After the powerful Chilean earthquake and the devastating events in Haiti, Quentin Cooper talks to scientists who try to make sense of it all. The Chilean event was the fifth most powerful on record, but the far weaker Haitian one was among the most deadly. Earthquakes this century have killed three quarters of a million - far more than projected - yet as the Chilean quake has shown, if buildings are well constructed and people are well prepared, casualties do not have to be astronomical.


THU 17:00 PM (b00qzrlf)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qzrnd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Another Case of Milton Jones (b00r2cm9)
Series 4

Test Pilot

Written by Milton with James Cary ("Think The Unthinkable", "Miranda")

In this episode, Milton's a daredevil test pilot and Top Gun who gets tangled up in a fiendish plot to replace the turkey twizzler... So if you find yourself daydreaming about owls, dodos, Papua New Guinea, a helicopter made of spoons and a comfy pillow made of chicken giblets then you've quite definitely caught "Another Case Of Milton Jones"

He's joined in his endeavours by his co-stars Tom Goodman-Hill ("Camelot"), Dave Lamb ("Come Dine With Me") and Ingrid Oliver ("Watson & Oliver").

Britain's funniest Milton and the king of the one-liner returns with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes for a series of daffy comedy adventures

Each week, Milton is a complete and utter expert at something - Top Gun aviator, Weatherman, Billy Elliot-style dancer, World-beating cyclist, mathematical genius and Extreme Travel Entrepreneur ...

... and each week, with absolutely no ability or competence, he plunges into a big adventure with utterly funny results...

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners" - The Guardian
"King of the surreal one-liners" - The Times
"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00qzr75)
Usha, armed with an inflatable mattress, visits Alan in his tent in the Memorial Gardens watched by Josh and Jamie hidden in a hedge. As Usha and Alan cosy up, they hear giggles outside. Alan investigates and sees two kids running off. Alan and Usha laughingly agree to resume things when the coast is clear.

Oliver's disappointed to hear there were complaints about his slow service last night when Grey Gables was a waiter short. Jennifer and Lilian have a meal there where they also comment on Oliver's friendly but slow service. When Lilian notices a disgruntled man at the next table heading off towards the kitchen, she warns Oliver, who manages to head off the diner off and placate him.

Lilian admits to Jennifer that she didn't tell Matt about Paul's visit. When Jennifer warns Lilian about getting too involved with Paul, Lilian says she's already agreed to go to the funeral as she's trying to keep the door open for Matt. She tearfully says how much she misses him. Service is so slow that they cancel their starters. This doesn't surprise Ian who tells Oliver that if he wasn't the co-owner of the hotel, he'd tell him where to put the starters!

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00qzrsl)
Kim Cattrall and Matthew Macfadyen star as Noel Coward's glamorous warring couple in a new production of Private Lives, directed by Richard Eyre. Sarah Churchwell reviews.

ABBA's Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, the songwriters of the musicals Chess and Mamma Mia!, discuss preparations for a one-night-only UK concert performance of their musical Kristina.

The Jewish Museum in London's Camden Town has just undergone a 10-million-pound renovation. John Wilson visits the museum as they put the finishing touches to the redevelopment, and meets comedian and writer David Schneider, who has created an interactive Yiddish karaoke feature for the museum.


THU 19:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjrb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b00r0tvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00r2cmc)
Evan Davis asks his panel of top business guests whether the pace of business life has sped up. They also discuss the power of advertising; is it true that the more you spend the more you get?

Evan is joined by the chief executive of WPP Sir Martin Sorrell, chairman of Interbrand Rita Clifton and managing partner of private equity firm ISIS Wol Kolade.


THU 21:00 The Moral Code (b00r2cmf)
Is a sense of morality hard-wired in the brain, or is it a product of our environment and upbringing? Adam Rutherford investigates the new science of morality and the suprising evidence that we may be born with some kind of innate moral code.

He talks to the scientists using some very modern techniques to study an age-old question and hears what philosophy and religion think about the idea that our sense of right and wrong may be written in our genes.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00r2cn4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00qzrsn)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qzsb8)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qzsql)
Trespass

Episode 4

Sara Kestelman reads from the new and disturbing novel by Rose Tremain. Set in the Cevennes, an untamed area of southern France where traditions and secrets run deep, it is the story of two very different sets of siblings.

Veronica and Anthony are privileged, cultured and English. Aramon and Audrun are French, rooted in the old stone mas and the land around it that their family have cultivated for generations, and in their shared and violent past.

Faced with losing all she holds dear, Audrun makes a fateful decision. Meanwhile Anthony finds the perfect place to live out the final chapters of his life.

Abridged by Sally Marmion.


THU 23:00 Sarah Millican's Support Group (b00r2cy5)
Series 1

3. 'I'm a clown with a secret'.

'I'm a clown with a secret'

'Do age-gap relationships work:?

'Is 65 in slippers the new 30 in a suit?'

Sarah Millican plays a life counsellor and modern-day agony aunt tackling the nation's problems head on, dishing out real advice for real people.

Assisted by her very own team of experts.

Sarah ...... Sarah Millican
Marion ...... Ruth Bratt
Terry ...... Simon Daye
Judith ...... Susie Blake
Malcolm ...... Mark Heap
Helen ...... Debra Stevenson.

Written by Sarah Millican.

Producer: Lianne Coop

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qzswr)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orhcard.



FRIDAY 05 MARCH 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00qzg5k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00r2jf6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qzg9t)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qzgh8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qzgkb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00qzgnj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qzgqv)
Daily prayer and reflection with Dr Heather Payne.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00qzgwk)
The French taste for British cheese has boosted exports to 281 million pounds a year. Charlotte Smith talks to the country's biggest exporter. And a trip to the heather moorlands of Scotland reveals that, as freezing temperatures continue and snow is still waist deep, grouse are dying or fleeing due to lack of food.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00qzgyr)
With John Humphrys and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00qyvf6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00r2jf9)
Patti Smith - Just Kids

Episode 5

Patti Smith reads from her new memoir of her life in New York in the late 1960s and 1970s.

In 1986, Patti is living with her husband and son in Detroit when she hears bad news about Robert Mapplethorpe.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qzkkd)
Helen McKendry; Behavioural problems in adopted children

How should we best support parents struggling with behavioural problems in adopted children? Plus, Helen McKendry on searching for one of Northern Ireland's 'Disappeared'.


FRI 10:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjrd)
5. Escape

Alison's disgusting spirit guide Morris has been joined by Donny Aitkenside, one of the violent group of petty criminals who were in and out of the house all through Alison's abusive childhood.

Alison knows the other members of the spirit gang can't be far behind, and decides the only way to escape them is to move to a new house where they won't want to follow her. Her assistant Colette locates a suitable new development, and the move has the desired effect: Morris hates it, and announces he's leaving.

At long last, Alison thinks, she's free.

Hilary Mantel's blackly comic novel about a professional medium with a troubled past.

Alison ...... Alison Steadman
Colette ...... Rosie Cavaliero
Morris ...... Bill Wallis
Emmie ...... Katharine Rogers
Aitkenside ...... Simon Armstrong

Dramatised by Caroline Harrington.

Director: Sara Davies.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


FRI 11:00 Night Witches (b00nk0g9)
Lucy Ash tells the extraordinary but little-known tale of Russia's three all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions on the Eastern Front during Second World War. At home they were celebrated as Stalin's Falcons, but terrified German troops called them the Night Witches.

Lucy travels to Moscow and Rostov-on-Don to meet a number of these formidable women, who are now grandmothers in their 80s and 90s. She discovers that their bravery has inspired aerobatic champions, comic book artists and even a Dutch heavy metal band.


FRI 11:30 People In Cars (b00r2dp6)
Miles on the Clock

An elderly lady finds it easier to talk to her car than to people.

She always has done, as she explains to the vehicle she's in today: a stately Roller.

One of three comedies set in cars written by Simon Brett.

Valerie ...... Anne Reid
Limousine ...... John Sessions

Director: Peter Kavanagh

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2010.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00qznd9)
Tony Hall was appointed chair of the Cultural Olympiad board in summer 2009. What is he doing to save the artistic arm of the Olympics from obscurity? Flow - one of the Cultural Olympiad projects

After Liverpool's success as European Capital of Culture in 2008, the government comes up with a UK version. Stephanie Power reports.

Sports, arts and leisure groups are concerned that they will lose out as local authorities face hard times. Pauline McCole investigates.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00qznr9)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00qzp83)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00r2dp8)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00qzr75)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00r2dpb)
Final Demands

The Lesson of the Master

Series of plays by Frederic Raphael reuniting the characters from his novel The Glittering Prizes, which followed the fortunes of scholarship boy Adam Morris and his contemporaries at Cambridge University in the early 1950s. Decades have passed, and we now catch up with Adam and his friends (and enemies) in the days of John Major's government.

Back in Britain with the manuscript of Rachel's book, Adam decides to ask his and Rachel's old college mentor to give his opinion on it. The result is unsettling. He also gets an offer he'd love to be able to refuse, and spends a long car journey with a couple of his old sparring partners.

Adam Morris ...... Tom Conti
Barbara Morris ...... Barbara Kellermann
Rachel Morris ...... Flora Montgomery
Mike Clode ...... Mark Wing-Davey
Alan Parks ...... Alistair McGowan
Gavin Pope ...... Malcolm Sinclair
Lars Waring ...... Ian Kelly
Patricia Reece ...... Annabel Leventon
Sheridan Reece ...... Julian Glover

Produced by Jo Wheeler

Directed by Pete Atkin

An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00r2dpd)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and Matthew Biggs answer questions posed by the gardeners of Selly Park Garden Club in Birmingham.

Matthew Wilson meets renowned garden designer Beth Chatto as part of our Gardener's Gardener series.

Includes gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 The Generation Gap (b00qzrjg)
Series 2: Sex

Prostitution

Series in which two people from different generations discuss a topic that reveals the changing nature of Britain.

The theme of the second series of five programmes is Sex.

Helen worked as a bar hostess and prostitute in the 1970s. She talks to Maria, who is currently funding her way through university by being a sex worker. How do their experiences differ?

A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00r2fh4)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series. Marking the lives of Michael Foot, Rose Gray, Bert Bushnell, and Winston Churchill, grandson of the great wartime leader.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00r2fh6)
Leonardo DiCaprio tells Francine Stock about the details of his working relationship with Martin Scorsese.

Neil Brand tells us the score about composer Miklos Rozsa.

Andrew Collins traces the family tree of Fantastic Mr Fox.

Mia Hansen Love discusses the state of the French film industry and why it led one producer to commit suicide.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00qzrlh)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qzrng)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b00r2fh8)
Series 30

Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a satirical review of the week's news, with help from Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, Mitch Benn and Marcus Brigstocke.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00qzr77)
Ruth tells amused David that Usha's mattress deflated last night so Usha went home, telling Ruth she and tents just don't mix!

Pip's surprised when Ruth appears as Jude's dropping her off. Much to Pip's embarrassment Jude accepts Ruth's invitation to tea. Pip's even more uncomfortable when she discovers David will be there too. They've both taken the afternoon off from milking. Things are awkward at tea and afterwards David and Ruth comment on Pip's obvious adoration and Jude's immaturity. But Ruth's glad she's met Jude. If the worst is he's wet, then that's not so bad. Jude tells Pip he likes Ruth, and that David's sardonic nature is cool. Pip says not to take it personally. David's been like that ever since she started having boyfriends.

Ian moans about Oliver's skills as a waiter to Helen. Fortunately, aware of his shortcomings, Oliver was onto the agency first thing that morning. Helen tells Ian that she's pretty much good to go with her treatment. Ian's pleased when Helen says she wants him involved with the baby, as well as all her family and friends. She'll need all the help she can get. Ian's excited by it all, telling Helen he can't wait.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00qzrsq)
Hollywood film magazine editor Stephen Gaydos discusses the dramas surrounding this year's Oscars ceremony.

The human tragedy of Chernobyl lies at the heart of The Door, Oscar-nominated for Best Live Action Short Film. Irish film director Juanita Wilson discusses the difficulties of shooting in the affected area, still highly radioactive almost 25 years after the disaster.

Next week's film release, The Kreutzer Sonata, relocates Tolstoy's controversial story of a wife-murdering maniac to contemporary Beverly Hills. Tolstoy wrote the story in direct response to hearing Beethoven's Opus 47 for violin and piano, commonly known as The Kreutzer Sonata, but it was so shocking that it could not be published. Front Row investigates why with Biographer AN Wilson, violinist Daniel Hope and film maker Bernard Rose.

American Artist Jenny Holzer is known for her use of words and text in large scale LED installations and light projections, often in public places. This week Baltic Mill in Gateshead opens an exhibition of her work including LEDs alongside paintings and sculptures. Katrina Porteus reviews.

American novellist Amy Bloom talks about her new collection of short stories, Where the God of Love Hangs Out, sex for the elderly and attempts to write a musical for Barbra Streisand and Francis Ford Coppola.


FRI 19:45 Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black (b00qzjrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00r2fhb)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from the London Muslim Centre in Whitechapel, London. The panellists are the former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, shadow business secretary Ken Clarke, senior politics editor at the New Statesman Mehdi Hasan and Liberal Democrat spokesman on communities and local government Julia Goldsworthy.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00r2fhd)
In the last of her talks, Lisa Jardine reflects on the valuable example of the Nobel Prize-winning chemist Dorothy Hodgkin, who bridged the so-called divide between the arts and the sciences.


FRI 21:00 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00r2hky)
Making Us Human

Another chance to hear the Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, retell the history of human development using 100 selected objects from the Museum - from the first stone axe to the credit card. His history will cover two million years and include items that were made in every part of the globe. In this, an omnibus of the first five objects of the series, Neil begins by recalling the first object that enthralled him a young boy of eight - and Egyptian Mummy, before examining the very the earliest examples of human ingenuity from Africa, America and Europe.

Hornedjitef was a priest who died around 2250 years ago, and he designed a coffin that, he believed, would help him navigate his way to the afterlife. Little did he know that this afterlife would be as a museum exhibit in London. This ornate coffin holds secrets to the understanding of his religion, society and Egypt's connections to the rest of the world. Neil tells the story of Hornedjitef's mummy case, with contributions from egyptologist John Taylor, Egyptian author Ahdaf Soueif and Indian economist and Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen.

He then goes back goes back two million years to the Rift Valley in Tanzania, where a simple chipped stone marks the emergence of modern humans. One of the characteristics that mark humans out from other animals is their desire for, and dependency on, the things they fashion with their own hands. This obsession has long roots and Neil introduces one of the earliest examples of human ingenuity. Faced with the needs to cut meat from carcasses, early humans in Africa discovered how to shape stones into cutting tools. From that one innovation, a whole history human development springs. Neil tells the story of the Olduvai stone chopping tool, with contributions from Sir David Attenborough and African Nobel Prize winner Dr Wangeri Maathai

He then follows early humans as they slowly begin to move beyond their African homeland taking with them one essential item - a hand axe. In the presence of the most widely used tool humans have created, Neil sees just how vital to our evolution this sharp, ingenious implement was and how it allowed the spread of humans across the globe. And he tells the story of the hand axe with contributions from flint-napper Phil Harding, designer Sir James Dyson and archaeologist Nick Ashton

Next up is one of the earliest works of art. It is a carving of two swimming reindeer and it's not just the likeness that is striking. The creator of this carving was one of the first humans to express their world through art. Its place in the history of art and religion is considered with contributions from the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams and archaelogist Professor Steven Mithen

Finally, Neil heads west to North America and an object that dates from the earliest settlements there, around 13,000 years ago. It's a deadly hunting weapon, used by the first inhabitants of the Americas. This sharp spearhead lets us understand how humans spread across the globe. By 11,000 BC humans had moved from north east Asia into the uninhabited wilderness of north America; within 2000 years they had populated the whole continent. How did these hunters live? And how does their Asian origin sit with the creation stories of modern day Native Americans? Neil MacGregor tells the story of the Clovis Point, with contributions from Michael Palin and American archaeologist Gary Haynes

And if you'd like to see the objects described in the programme, up-close and from all angles, then go online to bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld.

Producers: Anthony Denselow, Paul Kobrak and Philip Sellars


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00qzrss)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qzsbb)
Gordon Brown defends the decision to go to war in Iraq at the Chilcot inquiry

Elections in Iraq - we look at the fragile relationship between the Shias and the Sunnis

The Greek PM goes to Germany looking for help in tackling his country's debt crisis

And allegations about a homosexual prostitution ring rock the Vatican

The World Tonight with Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qzsqn)
Trespass

Episode 5

Sara Kestelman reads from the new and disturbing novel by Rose Tremain. Set in the Cevennes, an untamed area of southern France where traditions and secrets run deep, it is the story of two very different sets of siblings.

Veronica and Anthony are privileged, cultured and English. Aramon and Audrun are French, rooted in the old stone mas and the land around it that their family have cultivated for generations, and in their shared and violent past.

Disappointed at Mas Lunel, Anthony sets out in search of another dream house, while at the mas, Audrun's future is in doubt.

Abridged by Sally Marmion.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00r0tvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qzswt)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00r0tvf)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00r0tvf)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 SAT (b00qsvj7)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 21:00 FRI (b00r2hky)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00qx5rh)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00r2fhd)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00qzfhp)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00r0tbs)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00r0tbv)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00r0tbx)

Am I Normal? 21:00 TUE (b00r66v6)

Am I Normal? 16:30 WED (b00r66v6)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00qzf72)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00qttpp)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00r3r5h)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 10:30 SAT (b00qy1k5)

Another Case of Milton Jones 18:30 THU (b00r2cm9)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00qynb4)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00qx5rf)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00r2fhb)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00qyqwd)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00qyqwd)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00qyt4r)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00qyt4r)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00r0qw1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00qzswk)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00qzsqg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00qzsqj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00qzsql)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00qzsqn)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00qzh56)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00qzh56)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00r2jkd)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00r2jkd)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00r2jf3)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00r2jf3)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00r2jf6)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00r2jf6)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00r2jf9)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00qyvf2)

Capturing America: Mark Lawson's History of Modern American Literature 11:30 THU (b00r2cm3)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00qs5kh)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00qzd3b)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00r0qw9)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00r0qw9)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 18:30 TUE (b00d3rvq)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00qyvf6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00qyvf6)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00r0qhc)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00r0smq)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00r0xt5)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00r2cm5)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00r2dpb)

Earls of the Court 23:00 WED (b00r0yt2)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00qy01w)

Fabulous 23:00 TUE (b00r0w3b)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 WED (b00r0xt1)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00qxzzg)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00qzgyh)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00qzgwc)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00qzgwf)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00qzgwh)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00qzgwk)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00qx1m9)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00r2dp8)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00qvm9h)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00r0vxg)

Food Fights 20:00 MON (b00r3r0k)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00qy21p)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00r2bqb)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00r0qw5)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00qzrsb)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00qzrsg)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00qzrsl)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00qzrsq)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00qx5r5)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00r2dpd)

Head to Head 14:45 SUN (b00k8g51)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 10:45 MON (b00qzjr4)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 19:45 MON (b00qzjr4)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 10:45 TUE (b00qzjr6)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 19:45 TUE (b00qzjr6)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 10:45 WED (b00qzjr8)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 19:45 WED (b00qzjr8)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 10:45 THU (b00qzjrb)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 19:45 THU (b00qzjrb)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 10:45 FRI (b00qzjrd)

Hilary Mantel - Beyond Black 19:45 FRI (b00qzjrd)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00r0sms)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00r2cn4)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00r2cn4)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00r0vxj)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00qtt8c)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00r0qw3)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00qx5r7)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00r2fh4)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b00r0tvc)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b00r0tvc)

Lent Talks 00:30 SUN (b00qvpf0)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b00r0yq3)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b00qyvdk)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00qyqw6)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00r2cm7)

Michael Foot: Champion of the Left 21:30 WED (b00rl86v)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00qxfpg)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00qysrw)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00qzg9k)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00qzg5c)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00qzg5f)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00qzg5h)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00qzg5k)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00r0wtq)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00r0xzq)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00qylpq)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00qylpq)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00qvnjk)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00r0ymn)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00qxfpq)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00qyt4p)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00qzgql)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00qzgnb)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00qzgnd)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00qzgng)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00qzgnj)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00qyt4v)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00qxfpx)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00qyvdp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00qyvdy)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00qyrsl)

News 13:00 SAT (b00qylpw)

Night Witches 11:00 FRI (b00nk0g9)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b00p93sw)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00qzdvz)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00qzdvz)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00qynvz)

PM 17:00 MON (b00qzrn6)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00qzrl9)

PM 17:00 WED (b00qzrlc)

PM 17:00 THU (b00qzrlf)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00qzrlh)

People In Cars 11:30 FRI (b00r2dp6)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00qzf0l)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00qs5lz)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00qzdw1)

Portraying the Poor 13:30 SUN (b00qyw6y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00qxfps)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00qzgt1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00qzgqn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00qzgqq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00qzgqs)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00qzgqv)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00qyqw8)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00qyqw8)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00qyqw8)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b00qtsnp)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00qyt4x)

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