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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 FEBRUARY 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00qlf3c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mk)
The Beginning of Science and Literature (1500 - 700 BC)

Statue of Ramesses

A History of the World in 100 Objects has arrived in Egypt around 1250BC. At the heart of this programme is the British Museum's giant statue of the king Ramesses II, an inspiration to Shelly and a remarkable ruler who build monuments all over Egypt. He inspired a line of future pharaohs and was worshipped as a god a thousand years later. He lived to be over 90 and fathered some 100 children! Neil MacGregor considers the achievements of Ramesses II in fixing the image of imperial Egypt for the rest of the world. And the sculptor Antony Gormley, the man responsible for a contemporary giant statue, The Angel of the North, considers the towering figure of Ramesses as an enduring work of art.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qlf3f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qlf3j)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qlf3l)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00qlf3n)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qlf3q)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Johnston McKay.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00qlf81)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00qlf83)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00qlf85)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00qlgz3)
Series 14

Gloucestershire - Stroud

Clare Balding explores the joys of group walking.

Clare walks with artists Richard and Tom Keating, and Kel Portman. They all lead guided walks in the area, encouraging their companions to enjoy the landscape by drawing and painting what they see as they go. The artists use their knowledge of the area and of creating art to assist the other walkers in the work, suggest different techniques or views and to generally encourage and support.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00qlgz6)
Farming Today This Week

Charlotte Smith is in a Birmingham market to find out from butchers and shoppers if there's a healthy appetite for lamb and mutton. All this week the future of the sheep industry has been in the spotlight on Farming Today, with the rising cost of technology, the decreasing price of wool and imports, it faces an uncertain future.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00qlgz8)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00qlgzb)
With John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00qlgzd)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them.

Fi Glover is joined by cook and food writer Simon Hopkinson. With poetry from Matt Harvey.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00qlgzg)
Don McCullin is renowned as a photographer for his stark and telling pictures, often of conflicts and catastrophes. Now in his seventies, he has turned to photographing landscapes and Roman ruins across the ancient empire. John McCarthy asks him about his life of travel, both in combat zones in the remoter parts of the world, and the apparent peace of scenes closer to home.

Journalist Monica Porter and her family left their native Hungary after the failed uprising against the Soviet powers in1956. In the many times she has returned there since she has witnessed the huge changes that have brought it to its current status as a democratic member of the EU. She joins travel writer Andrew Eames, who horse-trekked across Hungary, in telling John about the rich heritage of the country and the appeal of the contrast between bustling, modern Budapest and the more traditional rural areas.


SAT 10:30 Johnny Cash of Easter Cash (b00qll0x)
Johnny Cash is an all-American hero, yet he discovered that his ancestors came from a small village in Scotland. A chance conversation on a transatlantic flight led him to trace his family roots to Easter Cash in Fife. Sarfraz Manzoor goes in search of the Cash connection.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00qll0z)
A look behind the scenes at Westminster with Andrew Pierce.

The Conservatives have been accused of back tracking on their economic policy, making it barely distinguishable from that of the government. Michael Fallon, Conservative member of the Treasury Select Committee, and Kitty Ussher, until recently economic secretary to the Treasury, form the battle lines between Labour and Conservative on cutting the deficit.

Current opinion polls suggest the possibility of a hung parliament. Would that lead to instability or might it have advantages? Liberal Democrat peer Lord McNally and the Conservative Lord Howell, both with experience of inconclusive elections results in the 1970s, consider the implications for 2010.

Also in the programme:

Are the Conservatives losing momentum? Tim Montgomerie of ConservativeHome and Conservative MP Mark Field on what strategy they should employ to improve their ratings.

Politicians who shed tears: do we believe them? Sketch writers Ann Treneman of The Times and Andrew Gibson of The Telegraph take a wry look politicians parading their emotions.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00qll11)
Kate Adie introduces foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00qll13)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00qldxx)
Series 70

Episode 6

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Will Smith, Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton and Milton Jones.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00qll15)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00qll17)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00qldxz)
Shaun Ley chairs the topical debate from Burnley.

The panellists are UKIP chairman Paul Nuttall, former editor of The Sun Kelvin MacKenzie, professor emeritus at the Royal College of Arts Christopher Frayling and professor of politics and women's studies at the University of York Haleh Afshar.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00qll19)
Shaun Ley takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00qny57)
Slaughterhouse 5

Dramatisation by Dave Sheasby of the celebrated anti-war novel by Kurt Vonnegut. Billy Pilgrim, who hops back and forth in time, relives various moments in his real and fantasy lives, as a prisoner of war, optometrist and time traveller.

Narrator ...... John Guerassio
Billy Pilgrim ...... Andrew Scott
Bernard V O'Hare ...... Nathan Osgood
Mary ...... Joanne McQuinn
Montana ...... Annabelle Dowler
Barbara ...... Sarah Goldberg
Valencia ...... Madeleine Potter
Roland Weary ...... Simon Lee Philips
Mother ...... Liza Ross
Eliot Rosewater ...... Kerry Shale
Howard J Campbell Jnr ...... Stephen Hogan
Bertram Rumfoord ...... Peter Marinker
English Officer ...... Michael Mears
Cinderella ...... Philip Fox
Paul Lazarro ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Soldiers ...... Orlando James, Michael Shelford

Music by 65 Days of Static

Directed by David Hunter.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00qll1c)
Weekend Woman's Hour

With Jane Garvey.

Including, as part of Winning Women's Votes, the first of the programme's interviews with the party leaders. Nick Clegg, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, talks about his plans, if were to be elected to No. 10. You can hear what he has to say on such issues as childcare provision, parental leave and tuition fees.

In 2005 Bee, a BBC World Service journalist, contacted May, an English-speaking Iraqi university lecturer, to ask if she would give an interview about living conditions in Baghdad in the run-up to the elections. An unlikely friendship blossomed between Bee, who was living the quiet life juggling work and children, and May, who was dealing the daily terror of bombs and violence. The collection of their emails over a four-year period has resulted in a new book, Talking about Jane Austen in Baghdad. The two women talk to Jenni about their correspondence and why it had a life-changing effect on both of them.

Kelly McGillis was one of the most successful film stars of the 1980s, appearing inTop Gun, Witness and The Accused, to name but a few. Then she walked away from stardom to concentrate on the theatre. She joins Jenni to talk about her life and career.

Plus the working class and their domestic lives in the 1930s, and, after the revelations about Margaret Thatcher's egg diet, a celebration of the great egg revival with some tasty dishes.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00qll1f)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Brian Hanrahan, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00qjx5n)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top executives from the world of public relations to discuss exactly what it is that they do. He also finds out what advice they would give to companies in crisis; what should they say when it all goes wrong?

Evan is joined by chairman of Chime Communications Lord Bell, chief executive of Editorial Intelligence Julia Hobsbawm and chief executive of Edelman UK Robert Phillips.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00qll1h)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00qll1k)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qll1m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00qll1p)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive is joined by former director of communications and strategy at No.10 Alastair Campbell and the actors Ashley Walters and Ralf Little.

Emma Freud talks to the director of Skippy: Australia's First Superstar, Stephen Oliver.

With music from Stornoway and The Low Anthem.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00qll1r)
Rajendra Pachauri

Jonathan Maitland profiles Rajendra Pachauri, a key player in the climate change debate.

As the head of the UN's climate change panel, he is coming under increasing fire for a glaring error in the IPCC reporting on glaciers. Pachauri's critics also claim that his business interests - as a consultant to energy industry giants - could represent a conflict of interest. But his supporters say he's a tireless champion in alerting people to the impact of climate change on developing nations.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00qll1t)
Tom Sutcliffe is joined by novelists Linda Grant and Aminatta Forna and theatre writer David Benedict to review the cultural highlights of the week.

Tom Ford is an established name in the world of fashion, but A Single Man is his first foray into film-making. Based on Christopher Isherwood's 1964 novel, it stars Colin Firth as a British college professor in Los Angeles struggling to steer his way through life after the death of his long-term partner.

Peter Brook's play 11 and 12, which has just opened at the Barbican in London, is based on a book by Malian writer Amadou Hampate Ba called The Life and Teachings of Tierno Bokar. Bokar was Hampate Ba's mentor and found himself at the heart of a religious argument over whether a particular prayer should be said 11 or 12 times. After a clumsy intervention by the French colonial authorities, the dispute led to violence and murder. Brook's play explores the issues of tolerance and belief raised by these incidents.

Prokofiev completed his opera The Gambler in 1917, but its premiere in Russia was cancelled because of the revolution and it was never performed in the composer's home country during his lifetime. It comes to the Royal Opera House for the first time in a visually stunning new production by director Richard Jones. Based on the novella by Dostoevsky, its convoluted plot follows a group of characters at a casino in a German spa town, obsessed with gambling and crippled by their growing debts.

Paul Nash is primarily known as a landscape painter and war artist. In Paul Nash: The Elements at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, curator David Fraser Jenkins considers the work according to its visual symbolism, bringing together paintings from different periods and showing how Nash took elements from the visible world and set them into certain kinds of relationships. The exhibition also features some of Nash's photography and collages which he assembled.

Married, Single, Other is a new romantic comedy on ITV1. With echoes of Thirtysomething and Cold Feet, the drama turns around three couples. Babs and Dickie are married but may not be for much longer, Clint and Abbey are both currently single but looking as if they will soon be an item, and Lillie and Eddie are blissfully happy but unmarried because Lillie has rejected each one of Eddie's 15 proposals. It stars Lucy Davis, Ralf Little and Shaun Dooley and was written by former advertising executive Peter Souter.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00qs41j)
AJP at the BBC

Joe Queenan recalls the long and turbulent relationship between the BBC and the first television don, historian AJP Taylor.

Taylor's broadcasting career spanned five decades, beginning on BBC radio and then switching to the new medium of television, where his unscripted lectures brought serious history out of the university lecture halls and into the living rooms of millions of people for the first time. His broadcasts were as provocative as they were popular, at one point arousing bitter condemnation in the House of Commons, and his relationship with the corporation was often far from cordial.

It dropped the sulky don, as he became known, from the airwaves on numerous occasions - once for refusing to speak any further in a live discussion programme. For his part, Taylor campaigned vigorously for an independent competitor to the BBC, and frequently mocked it in the press. Still, the relationship served both well over the years, providing Taylor with the mass audience he craved and the BBC with many hours of entertaining and enlightening broadcasting from one of the greatest academics of his day.

Queenan, a long-term admirer of Taylor, tells the story of the historian and the corporation through written and broadcast archives.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00qg17p)
Book 2: The Honourable Schoolboy

Part 3

Dramatisation of John le Carre's classic novel featuring intelligence officer George Smiley.

Smiley's plans to get hold of Russian spy Nelson Ko are coming to a head. But Smiley has pinned his hopes on Jerry Westerby - and Westerby has plans of his own.

George Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale
Jerry Westerby ...... Hugh Bonneville
Liese Worth ...... Daisy Haggard
Peter Guillam ...... Richard Dillane
Martello ...... John Guerrasio
Enderby ...... James Laurenson
Oliver Lacon ...... Anthony Calf
Connie Sachs ...... Maggie Steed
Sam Collins ...... Nicholas Boulton
Drake Ko ...... David Yip
Charlie Marshall ...... Paul Courtenay Hyu
Mickey ...... Angelo Paragoso
Ricardo ...... Chris Pavlo
Murphy ...... Joseph Cohen-Cole

Directed by Marc Beeby

This episode is available until 3.00pm on 14th February as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00qll1w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00qj218)
More than 70,000 citizens will be denied their chance to vote in the general election this Spring. They're prisoners and the ban has been in place since 1870. In 2005 the European Court of Human Rights ruled that the ban breaches prisoners' right to free elections. Prison reform charities have warned that the government has had enough time to sort this out and if the general election goes ahead and prisoners aren't allowed to vote, it could be challenged in the courts. Have criminals by definition lost their moral authority to vote or could it help with their rehabilitation and keep them in touch with society and their role as citizens? How do we balance the rights of prisoners with our rights to punish them, and who should decide which takes precedence?

Witnesses:

Bobby Cummines
Chief executive of UNLOCK and reformed offender.

Sir Ivan Lawrence QC
Criminal lawyer mainly engaged in defence for 48 years, and Conservative MP for 23 years where he was chairman of the Conservative Party legal and home affairs committee.

David Green
Director of Civitas, institute for the study of civil society.

John Walsh QC
Barrister at Doughty Street Chambers specialising in immigration and prison law. He is also chair of the trustees of Irish Chaplaincy in Britain, which supports Irish prisoners abroad.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b00qgxxd)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes.

With guests Ken Bruce, Valerie Grove, Dr Ben Goldacre and Kwame Kwei-Armah.

The reader is Peter Jefferson.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00qg23w)
Roger McGough introduces listeners' requests. He guides us through a poetic landscape cast in frost, with requested poems by Ted Hughes, William Morris and Raymond Carver. There's also a tender poem about fatherhood and language from the 2008 Forward Prize-winning poet Mick Imlah.

With readers Tanya Moodie, John Telfer and David Henry.



SUNDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00qllt3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b008x3yr)
Cupid Strikes

Interview with a Cupid

Stories exploring the reality behind St Valentine's Day.

A revealing interview gives a rare insight into Cupid's world.

By Polly Devlin, read by Julian Clary.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qlm27)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qlm29)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qlm2c)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00qlm2f)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00qlm2h)
The sound of bells from All Saints Church in Worcester.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00qll1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00qlm50)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00qlmr5)
Breathe Easy

Mark Tully explores the power of the breath as the source of our physical, mental and spiritual health.

The readers are Janice Acquah, Frank Stirling and David Westhead.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b00qm35q)
The Deer Park

On a very blustery autumn morning, Lionel Kelleway joins naturalist Phil Gates from Durham University in Bishop Auckland Deer Park in County Durham where he learns about the history and wildlife of this undulating landscape in the grounds of Auckland Castle.

Auckland Castle is the home of the Bishop of Auckland. It is built above the Rivers Wear and Gaunless, 10 miles south-west of Durham. It was established about 800 years ago, and has expanded over the centuries. In 1822 it became the official residence of the Bishop of Durham. The grounds would have been a managed forest in medieval times, then converted parkland with a collection of now slowly disintegrating trees (wonderful habitats for wildlife) - amazing old sweet chestnuts whose trunk and branches grow twisted like a corkscrew, decaying beeches, giant redwoods with soft bark, horse chestnuts, poplars, birches and old oaks.

A fine stone deer house still exists. This would have been used to shelter the deer. A watchtower was built for guests to view the animals, and there was at one time a banqueting apartment where guests would have feasted on the venison. Today, while only the occasional wild roe deer might be spotted in the park, there's a metropolis of meadow ant hills.

Yellow Meadow Ants, Lasius flavus live primarily underground in meadows and very commonly in lawns. The nests are often completely overgrown by grass and mosses and form mounds. Below ground, the nests are highly intricate with numerous fine channels; the whole structure strengthened by the plant roots. Usually the mounds have one flat face which faces south east to gain the maximum benefits from the heat of the sun.

Like all ants, meadow ants live in organised social colonies, consisting of the reproductive female, the queen, a few males and large numbers of workers, which are non-sexual females. Mating takes place in summer during a 'nuptial flight' when a male and female form a pair and mate on the wing. After mating, the female finds a suitable place to establish a new colony.

Where there are meadow ants, there are often Green Woodpeckers, as these birds feed on as many as 2,000 ants a day, digging a hole into the mound and licking up the ants as they rush out.

As they explore this undulating landscape, Lionel and Phil also find a fine collection of autumn fungi and huge numbers of berries and nuts before the blustery wind blows them on their way. It's a beautiful and fascinating park in any season, but in autumn, when the wind whisks up the leaves in a whirling dance, and the river in the valley gurgles and chuckles over the rocks, nature is perhaps at its most playful.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00qm35s)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00qm35v)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00qm35y)
William Crawley discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qm360)
Coeliac UK

Dr Chris Steele appeals on behalf of Coeliac UK.

Donations to Coeliac UK should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Coeliac UK. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Coeliac UK with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: England and Wales (1048167) and in Scotland (SC039804).


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00qm362)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00qm364)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00qm366)
A service from St Nicholas Buccleuch Parish Church, Dalkeith, Midlothian.

Led by Rev Sandy Horsburgh. Preacher: Rev Marjory MacLean.

With the Edinburgh University Renaissance Singers directed by Noel O'Regan. Organist: Willie Hendry.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00qldy1)
Lisa Jardine reflects on the power of music and the value of musical education.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00qm368)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00qm36c)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00qm36f)
Professor Jim Al-Khalili

Kirsty Young's castaway is the physicist Professor Jim Al-Khalili.

He's spent his adult life studying sub-atomic particles - and trying to explain them to the rest of us. He fell in love with physics when he was a teenager growing up in Iraq. With an Iraqi father and English mother, the Baghdad he spent his early years in was cosmopolitan and vibrant but, once Saddam Hussein came to power, his parents realised the family would have to flee, and he has lived and worked in Britain for the past 30 years.

Record: She's Not There by Santana
Book: The Road to Reality by Roger Penrose
Luxury: Acoustic guitar.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00qgz7x)
Compilation

Episode 1

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game. Paul Merton and Graham Norton talk about how to pass the time if you're stuck in traffic, and Sue Perkins and Liza Tarbuck debate whether bikers should be clad in leathers or lettuce.

First broadcast in 2010.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00qm461)
The New Gastronomy

In 1825 Brillet-Savarin published one of the most famous books about food, The Physiology of Taste. In one chapter, the book's 'Third Meditation', he put forward the argument that the world needs an 'Academy of Gastronomy', where, gastronomy, 'will have its own academicians, courses, professors, and scholarships'.

Now, nearly 200 years later, that idea is finally being put into practice. In Italy the Slow Food organisation has set up the University of Gastronomic Sciences, where students from all over the world study food taking what they describe as 'a holistic approach'. During the three-year degrees they have lectures in plant biology, study cheesemaking, research the anthropology of food and learn to develop their palates.

Do these courses have any practical value? Their supporters argue that the food industry will now be able to recruit graduates with a deeper understanding of food. To put that argument to the test Sheila Dillon travels to Pollenzo in the north of Italy to meet students and lecturers at the University of Gastronomic Sciences. She also hears how the American television chef Julia Child helped launch a similar course at Boston University.

Back in the UK Sheila hears from academics in Oxford, Shropshire and London who reveal the work underway to bring the study of gastronomy to Britain.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00qm463)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00qm465)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 Let's Go To Misterland (b00qm467)
Created in 1971 by Roger Hargreaves, the Mr Men books have been an inherent part of so many childhoods.

Inspired by the author's son Adam, who one day inquired, "what does a tickle look like?". and the first character was born. The Little Miss books followed ten years later, worldwide sales have exceeded 100 million, and today the brand is flourishing under its new owners.

Stephanie Flanders takes a look at the Mr Men business and its growth over the years. She speaks to Adam Hargreaves who tells us the story behind the books and what inspired his father to create such a simplistic, yet hugely influential brand.

Created in the humble surroundings of a small home office, the characters have reached a global audience, and they appeal to today's children as much as their 1970s counterparts. Despite his death in 1988, Roger Hargreaves was the third best-selling author of the past decade, outstripping such feted writers as Jacqueline Wilson, Terry Pratchett and John Grisham.

Stephanie Flanders, daughter of the actor and singer Michael Flanders, examines the appeal of the Mr Men and how these bold, colourful drawings and simple stories continue to capture children's hearts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00qldxq)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Anne Swithinbank, Chris Beardshaw and Pippa Greenwood answer questions from the gardeners of Lacock and District Garden and Allotment Association in Wiltshire.

Pippa Greenwood attends a meeting of snowdrop-lovers.

In part two of the Behind the Scenes at Chelsea series, we meet the nurserymen involved in design execution.

Includes gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Head to Head (b00js7tl)
Series 1

Episode 1

Edward Stourton presents a series celebrating great debates, combining archive of rare discussions between key figures with analysis by a panel of experts.

The panel discusses the heated 1969 debate between left-wing philosopher Noam Chomsky and conservative commentator William F Buckley about United States foreign policy and how it justifies its objective of spreading 'freedom' around the world.

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00qm62k)
Plantagenet: Series 1

What Is a Man?

Series of plays by Mike Walker, inspired by Holinshed's Chronicles, about the early years of the Plantagenet dynasty.

The first of the House of Anjou to be king of England, Henry II's long reign was finally beset by conflict with his sons.

King Henry II ...... David Warner
Queen Eleanor ...... Jane Lapotaire
Prince Richard ...... Joseph Cohen-Cole
Prince Hal ...... Piers Wehner
Prince Geoffrey ...... Rhys Jennings
William Marshall ...... Stephen Hogan
Bertran de Bourne ...... Bruce Alexander
King Louis ...... Philip Fox
Courtier ...... John Biggins

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00qm62m)
Mariella Frostrup talks to Australian writer Peter Carey, whose celebrated novels include Oscar and Lucinda and True History of the Kelly Gang. He talks about his latest, Parrot and Olivier in America, and reflects on why lonely children feature so heavily in his fiction.

Liz Thomson joins Mariella to reveal the ways in which publishers persaude reluctant celebrities to join the ranks of their authors.

And Jon McGregor, whose new novel Even the Dogs tells the story of an impoverished alcoholic, and Peter Kemp, fiction editor of the Sunday Times, talk about the tradition of writing about the dispossessed.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00qm62p)
Roger McGough introduces a selection of poems for Valentine's Day, with love on the menu but no straightforward hearts and flowers.

Including poems on extraordinary manifestations of love by Edson Burton, Anne Sexton and John Updike, and poet Jenny Joseph reads from her new collection, Nothing Like Love.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00qhrxd)
The next banking nightmare?

While Britain's top bankers celebrate their bonuses, Michael Robinson investigates the commercial property market and the nasty surprises that it may hold for the banks and for the long-suffering British taxpayers who bailed them out.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00qll1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00qm62r)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00qm62t)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qm62w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00qm62y)
Clive Coleman introduces his selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.

The Mystery of the Moving Statues - Radio 4
The Essay: Germany Dreaming - Radio 3
Robo Wars - Radio 4
Let's Go To Misterland - Radio 4
Capturing America: Mark Lawson's History of Modern America - Radio 4
Archive on 4: AJP at the BBC - Radio 4
I Was A Teenage Dotcom Millionaire - Radio 4
Outlook - World Service
Mark Thomas: The Manifesto - Radio 4
Act Your Age - Radio 4
Milton's Music - Radio 4
Taking A Stand - Radio 4
The Ocean - Radio 2.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00qm6lw)
Alan gives the congregation the sad news that Phil passed away on Friday. He's pleased to see Shula there, and arranges to meet Jill on Tuesday to discuss the funeral.

Alan also tells the congregation of his plan to spend Lent under canvas. He'll travel from place to place for 46 days and nights and is looking for offers of gardens where he can camp out. Everyone is also invited to drop in on him and he's inviting sponsorship in aid of Refugee Support International, in Felpersham.

Meanwhile, David struggles to concentrate on lambing, and is grateful for Pip's offer to help. They reminisce about Phil's preference for pigs. Ruth tells Pip they've haven't forgotten her birthday. Jude's taking Pip out on the day, so they agree to a family meal on Thursday.

Ruth suggests they hold the wake at Brookfield. David doesn't mind.

Clarrie calls round with some flowers for Jill, and they start to reminisce. Elizabeth finds a Valentine's card addressed to Jill. Jill knows Phil wasn't one for sentimental stuff but he never missed a Valentine's day because he knew it was important to her. Through tears, Jill laments on what a lovely man he was.

Episode written by Keri Davies.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00qm6ly)
Matt Frei talks to John Heilemann and Mark Halperin, the authors of the bestseller Game Change, a candid account of the Obamas, the Clintons, McCain and Palin. Up for debate: political gridlock, the rise and fall of John Edwards and what 'real change' is needed in America

American news types have given us a new word: 'mirandize.' The White House has come under attack after it was revealled the FBI has read underwear bomber Umar Abdulmutallab his 'Miranda' rights. His what? Matt talks to lawyer Robert Shapiro - best known for his successful defence of OJ Simpson - to find out what role these Miranda rights play in the US justice system. Who do they apply to and why they are so important?

Will America ever send a man to the moon again? President Obama has set NASA off on a different course, one that does not involve the planet made of cheese. So a perfect time to hear from the last man to set foot on the moon, Captain Eugene A Cernan. He tells us about that final journey and shares his throughts about what might happen when Americans can no longer reach for the stars - or the moon or Mars.

The America's Cup, the oldest active trophy in international sport, is once again its up for grabs. Faced with high-tech yachts made of carbon-fibre, we cannot help but pine for the boats of days gone by and old-fashioned boat building. We've a slice of boat building life from two guys in Martha's Vineyard in New England who are carving out their living in the old-fashioned way.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00b736p)
Jennings' Little Hut

General Sir Melville Merridew

Mark Williams reads one of Anthony Buckeridge's classic school stories, abridged in five parts by Roy Apps.

A distinguished former pupil is to pay the school a visit.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00qld0z)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00qldxs)
John Wilson presents the obituary series. Marking the lives of Alexander McQueen, Sir John Dankworth, Charlie Wilson and Ian Carmichael.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00qll13)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qm360)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00qh0zf)
Foreigner Policy

In the past decade, Britain has experienced mass immigration on an unprecedented scale. A former government aide recently suggested this was a deliberate policy, motivated in part by a desire to increase racial diversity. David Goodhart investigates the ideological forces behind one of the most significant social changes to have affected the UK.

Andrew Neather, a former Number 10 speechwriter, recently wrote a much-discussed article in the Evening Standard in praise of multicultural London, but suggesting that those who have influenced immigration policy under Labour were politically-programmed to be relaxed about such numbers. His article was immediately seized upon by anti-immigration campaigners as evidence of a conspiracy to make Britain a more racially diverse society.

In this programme, David Goodhart investigates the truth about reasons for recent increases in migration to Britain. Political insiders, including former home secretary David Blunkett, talk candidly about the real influences behind the scenes. None of them give credence to the accusation that there was a plan to create a more multicultural Britain. An unexpected increase in asylum applications and the demand for cheap labour from employers were the main motivators, according to those who influenced policy. But, admits former Home Office special adviser Ed Owen, a nervousness about discussing immigration policy meant that New Labour was, in its first years in office, poorly prepared to deal with the issue.

We may not have witnessed a grand act of social engineering, concludes David Goodhart, but New Labour's combination of economic liberalism and cultural liberalism led it to regard mass immigration as a trend which would bring great social benefits and few disadvantages.

Interviewees include:

Rt Hon David Blunkett MP, former home secretary

Tim Finch, head of migration, equalities and citizenship, and director of strategic communications at the Institute for Public Policy Research

Andrew Neather, Comment editor at The Evening Standard and former Number 10 speechwriter.

Sir Andrew Green, Migrationwatch

Sarah Spencer, deputy director, Centre on Migration Policy and Society

John Tincey, Immigration Services Union

Ed Owen, former Home Office special adviser

Claude Moraes MEP.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00qm6m0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00qm6m2)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including Hung, Drawn and Thwarted.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00qldxv)
The Last King Of Scotland star James McAvoy talks Tolstoy, sneezing garden gnomes and his latest film, The Last Station.

Fashion guru Tom Ford discusses the links between designing clothes and directing film, and why he spent his own money to finance his debut film, A Single Man.

Matthew Sweet picks another neglected British gem, I See A Dark Stranger.

Anil Sinanan discusses the crossover between Bollywood and Hollywod and the latest example of this growing trend, My Name Is Khan.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00qlmr5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 15 FEBRUARY 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00qm7lr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00qj214)
The car was a potent symbol of freedom for black America, but the cultural critic Paul Gilroy argues that the escape it once represented has become a cage for the African American. Consumerism and the ultimate commodity of the car has turned the fight for rights into a race to buy new things. He tells Laurie Taylor how black people spend far more on their cars than whites and how the automobile has fatally undermined culture and community.

In his new book, Darker Than Blue, Paul Gilroy writes about how jazz, blues, hip-hop and much of what stood for black culture now seems generically American and is exported around the world. And within the United States luxury goods, motor cars, branded items and a quest for individual gratification have diluted the collective spirit which brought African Americans the civil rights they won. With his brilliant and provocative analysis, Paul Gilroy traces the shifting character of black culture on both sides of the Atlantic and offers an account of what it means to be black in Britain and the United States.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00qlm2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qm7qm)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qm86j)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qm87v)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00qm8d8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qm8dz)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Johnston McKay.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00qm8l7)
An Oscar-nominated film which explores large-scale agricultural production in the US is causing controversy among the farming industry in the UK. Reviewers has said that Food Inc exposes some unsavoury realities about how American food reaches the table, and the power of multinational corporations in deciding what people eat. Charlotte Smith looks at whether this film could predict the future of farming in the UK.

Also, energy could be the new cash crop for farmers. From April, farmers will be able to sell electricity to the national grid for more. And a company which builds houses out of hemp is calling on more farmers to grow the crop.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00qp09l)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00qm8v6)
With Sarah Montague and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00qp09n)
Andrew Marr gains insight into the workings of government offices with the investigative journalist Michael Cockerell and the former MP Lord Hurd. Jonathan Miller gives a 19th-century Italian opera a 1950s American facelift, and Lyndall Gordon argues that it's time to look again at the life of the poet Emily Dickinson.


MON 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qmb8h)
Old World, New Powers (1100 - 300 BC)

Lachish Reliefs

Neil MacGregor's history of the world told through objects from the British Museum in London arrives at the Palace of Sennacherib in Northern Iraq.

Throughout this week, Neil MacGregor explains the key power struggles taking place across the globe around 3000 years ago, as ambitious new forces were building sophisticated new societies. It seems that war has been one of the constant themes of our shared human history and, in this programme, Neil MacGregor tells the story of the Assyrian king Sennacherib and his bloody siege of Lachish in Judah in 701 BC. The siege is described unsparingly in giant stone carvings that were placed around the king's palace and that show, perhaps for the first time, the terrible consequences of war on civilian populations. The Assyrian war machine was to create the largest empire that the world had ever seen and used the terror tactic of mass deportations. Statesman Paddy Ashdown and the historian Anthony Beevor both reflect on these powerful images of war.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qmdk6)
Women and Maths

A special progamme about girls and maths at school and beyond. Are women's brains less tuned to maths than men's?


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qmdk8)
The Whole of the Moon, series 2

Episode 1

Legal drama serial by Colin MacDonald.

Advocate Depute Jo Ross is prosecuting her first murder trial at Edinburgh's High Court, but something about the case is beginning to bother her.

Jo ...... Vicki Liddelle
Iain ...... Steven McNicoll
Mrs Ross ...... Eliza Langland
Frank Gray ...... Simon Tait
Peter Loudon ...... Greg Powrie
DCI Brand ...... Lewis Howden.


MON 11:00 The Voices Who Dug Up The Past (b00qp0qx)
Episode 2

Broadcaster and archaeologist Mike Pitts delves into the question of why different archaeologists can dig the same sites yet reach completely different conclusions.

Mike visits the Anglo-Saxon burial ground of Sutton Hoo. Through archive, diary excerpts and interviews, he delves into two huge digs that took place there in the 1930s and 2000s. What is the site actually about? More importantly, who is buried there? He meets an archaeologist who disputes the claim that it is the final resting place of Raedweld, an idea that's thrown the cat among the archaeological pigeons. Mike also hears from a range of archaeologists who ponder the bigger questions of how much of archaeology is imagination, how much is agreed on, and is a failure to agree a failing in archaeology?

Featuring interviews with Martin Carver, Mike Parker Pearson and Lady Clarke.


MON 11:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b00qp1cf)
Series 6

Elgar Writes

Episode 6 : Elgar Writes

Whilst Ed is busily teaching grammar to some clumsy, apostrophe-ridden phishers. Elgar finds fame when he becomes an internet hit with his blog. Could Elgar be a more successful writer than Ed? Quite probably.

Ed Reardon ..... Christopher Douglas
Olive ..... Stephanie Cole
Jaz ..... Philip Jackson
Pearl ..... Rita May
Ping ..... Barunka O'Shaughnessey
Stan ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Paul Sharma ..... Nicola Sanderson

Writers ..... Christopher Douglas and Andrew Nickolds
Producer ..... Dawn Ellis.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00qmdv3)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00qmdx9)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00qmdyv)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Quote... Unquote (b00qp1ch)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes. With David Nobbs, Justin Webb, Marcel Berlins and Naomi Gryn. The reader is Peter Jefferson.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00qm6lw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00qp1kl)
Legsy Gets a Break

By Phil Gladwin. Seventeen-year-old Legsy, recently out of the care system, is on a quest to find the brother he was separated from as a child. And when he finds him, Legsy must decide whether to follow his brother into a life of escalating crime or to try and break free.

Legsy ...... Josef Altin
Brady ...... Darren Douglas
Donna ...... Sophie Stanton
Chloe ...... Tessa Nicholson
Ash ...... Benjamin Smith
John ...... Gethin Anthony
Mental ...... Joseph Cohen-Cole
Detective ...... Nigel Hastings

Directed by John Dryden.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00qs41j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 The Tribes of Science (b00lxvl7)
Computer Programmers

Series in which Peter Curran visits members of the many and varied disciplines of science, from astronomy to zoology, to explore their habitat, customs, rituals and beliefs. Beneath the typecast and somewhat nerdy image of scientists, Peter finds passion, humour and, on occasion, an enviable sense of community.

Peter meets the makers of the virtual world, Second Life. Are they architects, engineers or computer geeks, or highly competent people for whom one life just isn't enough?

The UK headquarters of Linden Lab promotes a Californian, groovy way of working, free from old-fashioned office politics and hierarchy, but in their Second Life, the Linden tribe enjoy being treated like royalty.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00qm461)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00qp1mf)
Monogamy

Ernie Rea and guests discuss whether or not monogamy is the ideal for human relationships.


MON 17:00 PM (b00qmf51)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qmf6q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00qp1mh)
Series 56

Episode 7

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with Paul Merton, Jenny Eclair, Gyles Brandreth and Pam Ayres. From February 2010.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00qmdz7)
Mike takes delivery of the first batch of 12 new cattle. Vicky thinks they're gorgeous, and wants to be there when the first calf is born, although she doesn't like the idea of the bull calves going for beef.

Jill is bearing up, and goes through the motions of registering Phil's death. She asks Chris if she'll still go to the parish council meeting on Thursday. Chris wants to see whether Lynda or Neil get voted in as chair, and it's her last meeting as clerk. Phil would be cross if she chickened out.

Kenton is keeping busy with the café conversion, but shutting Kathy out. When Shula walks in on him arguing with the designer on the phone, she gets him to talk and he opens up. He feels Jaxx is his last chance to make something work, and he wants to be able to support Meriel at college. He's scared that if he takes a break, things will get on top of him and he won't be able to start again. Shula assures him of his strengths and reminds him he's not alone. They've always got each other. Kenton agrees and thanks her.

Episode written by Keri Davies.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00qmfb5)
Mark Lawson delivers the verdict on film The Lovely Bones, directed by Peter Jackson.

David Hare discusses his new radio drama Murder in Samarkand, in which David Tennant plays Craig Murray, former ambassador to Uzbekistan.

Andrew O'Hagan reviews a new exhibition of portraits by photographer Irving Penn, who died in 2009.

With the announcement of the death of the former champion jockey and author Dick Francis, Mark revisits one of the last interviews he gave.

Playwright and screenwriter Neil LaBute discusses his new short film, How Far Would You Go to Save Someone You Love?


MON 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qmb8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


MON 20:00 Paying for the Party (b00qpkln)
Anne McElvoy asks if reform is likely to the way political parties are funded. What plans are in the pipeline to end fears that wealthy individuals and trades unions 'buy' influence with big donations?


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00qpklq)
Crying Treason

There have been calls for the treason laws to be used against an Islamic group protesting about British troops in Afghanistan. Such laws are widely regarded as out of date, so can any citizen now challenge the state with impunity? Chris Bowlby asks if treason still matters in modern Britain.

Interviewees include:

Charles Falconer, Former Lord Chancellor

Kristen Eichensehr, Yale Law school

Michael Lobban, Historian

Anjem Choudary, Former leader of Islam4UK

Kieran McEvoy, Professor of law at Queen’s University in Belfast

Edward Garnier, Shadow attorney general


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00qpkls)
Protecting the Past

Alice Roberts investigates the threats posed to our great historic sites by climate change. Is there anything we can do to save the most vulnerable properties from extreme weather and regular flooding?

All over the world conservators and policy makers are pondering the implications of global warming for our most important heritage sites. Alice visits three sites to investigate possible responses to the problem.

In Ireland she visits Newgrange, the stunning centrepiece of a Neolithic landscape which finds itself assaulted by regular flooding of the nearby River Boyne and ever more extreme rainstorms. Europe's greatest collection of Megalithic art is being eroded faster than ever and undiscovered archaeology is being ploughed into the ground as local farmers turn from farming cattle and sheep to the arable farming that suits the changing climate.

At Rosslyn Chapel near Edinburgh the laser-scanners from Historic Scotland are part way through their ambitious attempt to record 3-D models of the pick of the World Heritage Sites. They have already fired lasers at the presidents' heads on Mount Rushmore and are set to visit Machu Picchu and Orkney's Skara Brae, an ancient village at imminent risk of destruction from rising sea levels and more frequent storms.

Is all we can do really to record, scan, photograph and despair, or can our historic landscapes be saved with enough time, vision and money? On Exmoor the National Trust is devising a plan to manage an entire river from source to sea. The aim is to avoid another Boscastle-style disaster where sudden, unprecedented rainfall overwhelms a river and the historic sites on the coast below.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00qp09q)
Andrew Marr gains insight into the workings of government offices with the investigative journalist Michael Cockerell and the former MP Lord Hurd. Jonathan Miller gives a 19th-century Italian opera a 1950s American facelift, and Lyndall Gordon argues that it's time to look again at the life of the poet Emily Dickinson.


MON 21:58 Weather (b00qmfdc)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qny2t)
News from a global perspective with Ritula Shah.

Day three of the Afghan offensive; what effect is it having on civilians?

The former head of the IPCC gives us his take on the climate change debate.

Is Chinese economic growth benefiting Japan?

European finance ministers meet to decide their response to Greece.

Hillary Clinton says Iran is turning into a 'military dictatorship'; is she right?


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qnztt)
Moonlight in Odessa

Episode 1

Jane Collingwood reads from Janet Skeslien Charles's debut novel, set in the Ukraine.

Daria is a young woman just out of university with an engineering degree and perfect English. However, in Odessa impeccable qualifications alone are no guarantee of a good job.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b00p31l0)
Everyone's A Critic

Are you worried about the future of criticism?

You should be. When newspaper editors are forced to make cutbacks, it is critics who are the first in the firing line. But do we really need critics and criticism?

Critic and journalist Toby Young is joined by blogger Lynne Hatwell and occupational psychologist Clive Fletcher to write about and discuss criticism and the critics.

Presented by Dominic Arkwright.

Producer: Beatrice Fenton.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2009.


MON 23:30 The Lawrence Sweeney Mix (b008tnzk)
Series 2

Episode 1

Fom something your Dad did to something you save up for...

Josie Lawrence and Jim Sweeney make it up as they go along!

Faced with a live studio audience and a couple of microphones - the masters of improve create sketches from shouted out suggestions.

Producer: Dawn Ellis

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2008.



TUESDAY 16 FEBRUARY 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00qm7c8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qmb8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qm7lt)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qm80k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qm86l)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00qm87x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qm8db)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Johnston McKay.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00qm8hj)
Anna Hill visits the world's largest straw-burning power station, to hear how farmers can make money from renewable energy. And Britain's sexiest farmers explain how their image can help the industry.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00qm8l9)
With Evan Davis and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Taking a Stand (b00qpl4q)
Fergal Keane talks to William and Kate Lyons about the devastating effects of bipolar disorder on both sufferer and carer.

The lives of William and Kate Lyons, a young married couple, have included dealing with Kate's bipolar depression. It's a condition she has had most of her adult life and that William has to monitor constantly. It has led, on one occasion, to him having Kate sectioned under the Mental Health Act. They have decided to speak out because they believe there is a taboo surrounding the illness which can leave carers, as well as sufferers, isolated and vulnerable.


TUE 09:30 When I Grow Up (b00qpl4s)
Episode 1

Forty years ago 14,000 youngsters across Britain were asked to write about where they saw themselves in the future - their jobs, family lives, belongings, living environments and leisure pursuits. Those essays have now been followed up by the Nuffield Foundation as a way of finding out how far ambition at an early age shapes what happens in later life.

This is the first time that media access has been granted to those who have taken part in their research. As well as evidence of ambition the essays offer lovely detail about how the eleven year olds imagined life would be at 25, with one writing: "my husband would have just won £200 so we decided to go to the moon for our holiday while we had not got any children."

The series covers the following five areas: jobs, family lives, living environments, leisure pursuits and belongings that they imagined owning when first studied. The findings suggest that children who are ambitious go on to enjoy greater success than those with lower aspirations. Once background and ability were accounted for, children did better if they set themselves lofty goals.

It reveals that, even if a child is economically disadvantaged or less able, having high ambitions at around the time they leave primary school means that they are significantly more likely to have a professional job, though not necessarily the one that they predicted.

Producer: Sue Mitchell.


TUE 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8z8)
Old World, New Powers (1100 - 300 BC)

Sphinx of Taharqo

Throughout this week, Neil MacGregor is describing power struggles across the globe around 3000 years ago, as ambitious new forces set about building sophisticated new societies - from the Middle East to South America.

Today he describes what was happening along the River Nile and how a powerful new king conquered Egypt from Sudan. His name was Taharqo and he ruled from a vibrant new civilisation (in modern day Sudan) called Kush. These days few people even know that the mighty land of the Pharaohs was once ruled over by its southern neighbour. The evidence is summed up by a sculpture at the British Museum that shows the ruler from Kush as an Egyptian sphinx.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qmd5v)
Women in North Korea; Barb Jungr; Will power

Journalist Barbara Demick on women in North Korea. Plus, are some of us born with more will power than others? And cabaret star Barb Jungr sings live.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qmdkb)
The Whole of the Moon, series 2

Episode 2

Legal drama serial by Colin MacDonald.

Jo visits a leading private school and turns up some surprising information about the dead man.

Jo ...... Vicki Liddelle
Iain ...... Steven McNicoll
Irene Lee ...... Eliza Langland
Tom Stein ...... Lewis Howden
Chris Murray ...... Andrew Clark
Frank Gray ...... Simon Tait
Peter Loudon ...... Greg Powrie.


TUE 11:00 Watching the Watchdog (b00qpl4v)
Penny Marshall looks at the progress of a new internet watchdog that is working with the government to protect children from dangers in the digital world.

How best to strike a balance between safety and freedom online? Penny finds that issues such as cyber bullying and access to harmful material are affecting younger and younger children - 66 per cent of five- to seven-year-olds are now internet users - and getting industry players to agree to some form of regulation is not easy.


TUE 11:30 With Great Pleasure (b00qpl4x)
Kate Humble

Wildlife presenter Kate Humble shares some favourite pieces of writing with an audience. The readers are John Telfer and Rosie Cavliero.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00qmdtq)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00qmdwd)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00qmdxc)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Piano Stool Beethovens (b00qpl4z)
Ian McMillan sets out on the trail of a forgotten local hero, one of countless composers whose work lies buried under the bottoms of amateur pianists to this day. As he discovers, it's also a route to the passions and preoccupations of everyday people from a century ago.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00qmdz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00qpl51)
English in Afghanistan

Modern-day fable by Ryan Craig, set against the backdrop of war-torn Afghanistan. Two British soldiers embark on a perilous quest to retrieve a love letter.

Lieutenant Will Carter ...... Ifan Meredith
Lieutenant Colonel Morton ...... Jonathan Coy
Khalid ...... Imran Khan
Kelly ...... Emily Beecham
Sergeant Dale Preston ...... Tom Meredith
Leyya ...... Sirine Saba

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00qpl53)
Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects that help tell A History Of The World.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00qplcy)
AL Kennedy - The Writing Life

The Author at Home

1/3 The Author at Home

There's the lady novelist reclining in her Creating Hammock, attended by Juan her fragrant assistant. Or maybe not.

Produced by Mark Smalley.


TUE 15:45 The Tribes of Science (b00m0jvx)
The Zoologists

Peter Curran visits members of the many and varied disciplines of science, from astronomy to zoology, to explore their habitat, customs, rituals and beliefs.

Peter meets zoologists and spends time at the Institute of Zoology at London Zoo. Are the otter specialists as quick-witted, sociable and fun as the aquatic animals they study? And does the office hierarchy mirror the pecking order of the food chain?


TUE 16:00 Chips With Everything (b00lv18s)
Sue Nelson explores the mining town in North Carolina that is responsible for the production of the entire world's supply of silicon chips.

The small community of Spruce Pine is home to the purest quartz on Earth, which is essential for making the chips that run every computer, digital radio, washing machine and microwave on the planet.

Quartz is vital because of how computer chips are made; this uniquely pure mineral forms the mixing bowls and tools that make the manufacture of silicon chips possible. If the quartz is contaminated then it becomes useless, but by a stroke of geological luck these rocks formed in the shadow of the Blue Ridge Mountains are just perfect. Without them - and therefore without the work of this North Carolina town - microchip development as we know it would grind to a halt.

But as new quartz deposits are discovered in other countries, including Norway, could Spruce Pine cease to be indispensible? And what will the people of the town do if their last major industry disappears? The programme meets the locals of this Mitchell County town and digs beneath the surface of this strategically important mineral.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00qplyl)
India Knight and Richard Hawley

Columnist India Knight and musician Richard Hawley join Sue MacGregor to discuss favourite paperbacks. by Nora Ephron, John Steinbeck and Adeline Yen Mah.

India's choice: Heartburn by Nora Ephron
Publisher. Virago

Richard's choice: Tortilla Flat by John Steinbeck
Publisher. Penguin

Sue's choice: Falling Leaves by Adeline Yen Mah
Publisher. Penguin

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00qmf15)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qmf53)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Act Your Age (b00qplyn)
Series 2

Episode 5

Simon Mayo hosts the comedy show that pits the comic generations against each other to find out which is the funniest.

Team captains Jon Richardson, Ed Byrne and Johnnie Casson are joined by Tom Wrigglesworth, John Bishop and Tom O'Connor.

Producers: Ashley Blaker and Bill Matthews.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00qmdyx)
Jill confirms the funeral for next Tuesday. She tells Alan that Ruth and David have offered to have the wake at Brookfield but Jill thinks it's too much so she's going to sort something out. Jill goes to the Bull and books the function room. Jolene assures Jill she'll make it really nice for her.

Alan's got his tent and camp bed out of the loft. He's had plenty of offers of places to camp but he's spending the first week on the green. This is his last night in comfort but it's still his turn to cook. However, Usha thinks he needs feeding up for his imminent ordeal and she knows how.

Alan and Usha arrive at the Bull just as the children's pancake races are happening. Sid's not well, so while Jolene's been running the bar, Fallon's been helping Freda. Fallon tells them they've got every pancake possible. Usha orders Alan a veggie, followed by a meat, and then a sweet one for dessert - with all the toppings. It's traditional to eat plenty on a feast day. Alan decides he'd better do something to work it off, and asks Jolene if she'll accept a late entrant into the men's over-forty race.

Episode written by Keri Davies.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00qmf6s)
Helen Mirren and Christopher Plummer have Oscar nominations for their performances in Michael Hoffman's film The Last Station, about the conflicts surrounding Leo Tolstoy's final days. Tolstoy biographer AN Wilson reviews.

Vanessa Redgrave, the English TV, film and stage actress, will receive a Fellowship Award for outstanding contribution to film at the BAFTA film Awards. In a rare interview the star looks back over her six-decade career, and the tragic death of her daughter Natasha.

The famous Abbey Road studios - the birthplace of some of the best-known rock and classical recordings - are set to be sold. David Hepworth considers the significance such a sale would have.

Dame Judi Dench and Sir Peter Hall have reunited for a new production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, almost 50 years after they first worked on it together. Michael Dobson reviews.


TUE 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8z8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00qplyq)
NHS safety alerts ignored?

After two big scandals in a year over dire standards in hospitals which put patients at serious risk, Julian O'Halloran asks how many people are still being killed by avoidable medical blunders, and how far the NHS has progressed since it began to address the problem ten years ago.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00qplys)
The RNIB's Losing Patients campaign aims to ensure that blind and visually impaired people have access to medical information in a format they can access. Mani Djazmi talks to two women who have experienced embarrassing situations because they have not been offered information in an accessible medium. The government claims that the DDA makes adequate provision for PCTs to provide information in alternative formats. But the RNIB feel that the law needs to be strengthened in this regard.

Two blind women take to the slopes in France and explain the method they use to enjoy the thrills and spills of the sport by following the musical beat carried by their sighted guide in their rucksack.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00qplyv)
Maternity

Dr Mark Porter visits a midwife-led unit in south London to ask the mothers there why they have chosen this option. What happens if they need surgical intervention?


TUE 21:30 Taking a Stand (b00qpl4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00qmfb7)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qmfdf)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, the Taliban's military commander, is arrested in Karachi.

Eleven alleged assassins of a Hamas official in Dubai used fake British and Irish passports. Was it a Mossad operation?

German railways ban the use of English following complaints.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qstrd)
Moonlight in Odessa

Episode 2

Jane Collingwood reads from Janet Skeslien Charles's debut novel, set in the Ukraine.

Daria is desperate not to lose her much-cherished job but just as determined not to sleep with her boss, so she recruits an old friend to help her - with unexpected results.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Fabulous (b00qplyx)
Series 3

Episode 2

Sitcom by Lucy Clarke about a woman who wants to be Fabulous but can't cope.

Faye is still engaged to a man she is roughly 65 per cent sure she should marry - 66 per cent on a good day.

All chocolate and junk food has been outlawed from the office. Seeing a chance to make some extra money to help pay for her wedding, Faye turns into a wannabe Al Capone, selling illicit biscuits and chocolate to her sugar-starved co-workers.

With Katy Brand, Daisy Haggard, Olivia Colman, Anne Reid, Alison Pettit, Joanna Munro, Sally Grace, Margaret Cabourn-Smith, David Armand.

Music by Osymyso.


TUE 23:30 The Lawrence Sweeney Mix (b008vzdy)
Series 2

Episode 2

From a room full of kittens to something you might find behind the sofa...

Josie Lawrence and Jim Sweeney make it up as they go along!

Faced with a live studio audience and a couple of microphones - the masters of improve create sketches from shouted out suggestions.

Producer: Dawn Ellis

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2008.



WEDNESDAY 17 FEBRUARY 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00qm7cb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8z8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qm7lw)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qm80n)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qm86n)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00qm880)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qm8dd)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Johnston McKay.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00qm8hl)
Anna Hill examines why Red Deer in some parts of Scotland are reported to be starving to death in the snow. Meanwhile, in Cornwall the daffodil harvest is a month behind, but growers don't want the weather to warm up too quickly. Also on the programme, the Norfolk farmer producing cheese and power for a nearby village, all from cows and their by-products.


WED 06:00 Today (b00qm8lc)
With John Humphrys and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00qpmgf)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests Leslie Kenton, Wills Morgan, Thelma Holt and Monty Don.


WED 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zb)
Old World, New Powers (1100 - 300 BC)

Chinese Zhou Ritual Vessel

Neil MacGregor's history of humanity told through one hundred objects from the British Museum. Three thousand years ago, the world was in huge flux, with new powers creating sophisticated new societies - from the Middle East to South America - as older ones collapsed. In today's programme, Neil MacGregor finds out what was happening in China of that period and describes how a group of outsiders, the Zhou, overthrew the long established Shang dynasty. The story is told through a bronze bowl that was used for feasting. What does this beautiful bronze bowl tell us about the Zhou and life in China at this time? Dame Jessica Rawson and the Chinese scholar Wang Tao help paint the picture


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qmd5x)
Women and the Green movement; Kathryn Williams

What can the Green movement in Britain offer the time-poor working woman? Plus, how much parental responsibility should parents take for the crimes of their children?


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qmdkd)
The Whole of the Moon, series 2

Episode 3

Legal drama serial by Colin MacDonald.

Edinburgh is wilting in the heat, and Jo's murder case is going pear shaped.

Jo ...... Vicki Liddelle
Iain ...... Steven McNicoll
Mrs Ross ...... Eliza Langland
Frank Gray ...... Simon Tait
Peter Loudon ...... Greg Powrie
DCI Brand ...... Lewis Howden.


WED 11:00 Fort Dunlop (b00qpmgh)
Giles Poyner, who works in Brand Design at the iconic Fort Dunlop building, pays tribute to the Birmingham landmark. He, his mother and grandfather talk about their working lives there.

Drive through Birmingham on the M6 and you can't fail to notice an imposing fort-like building, standing proud against the city's industrial skyline. The Fort Dunlop building was built for the tyre company in the early 20th century to accommodate the thousands of workers needed to supply the growing motoring and aviation industries. The Dunlop Tyre Company, was one of Birmingham's largest employers, and those who worked there were looked after and had a job for life. But by the end of the century, competition from overseas led to the closure of the site, as Dunlop transferred much of its operation abroad.

The Fort was abandoned in the late 1980s and stood empty for 20 years, until it was taken over by an innovative urban design company who transformed the vast empty tyre store into state of the art offices, cafes and shops.

This is where Giles Poyner works as brand design manager. The achingly hip surroundings of his office are a far cry from his 92-year-old grandfather's experience of working at the Fort. He recalls the stench of rubber in the air, the workers arriving by canal boat before the road was built and, above all, the sense of being part of a family, cared for by a benevolent employer.

Giles's mother Susan also worked at Fort Dunlop as a typist during the 1960s. She remembers the generous facilities provided for the workers, including a pub, theatre and playing fields.

Giles Poyner pays tribute to this iconic Birmingham landmark and discovers how his workplace has changed both physically and culturally over the decades.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


WED 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b00qpmlk)
Series 3

Mr Majhu Goes to Lenzie

Sitcom written by and starring Sanjeev Kohli and Donald McLeary, set in a Glasgow corner shop.

Ramesh inadvertently enters the murky world of Lenzie politics.

Ramesh ...... Sanjeev Kolhi
Dave ...... Donald McLeary
Sanjay ...... Omar Raza
Alok ...... Susheel Kumar
Father Henderson ...... Gerard Kelly
Bob Shandy MP ...... Ron Donachie
Guthrie ...... Tom Urie
Mrs Gibb ...... Marjory Hogarth
Mutton Jeff ...... Sean Scanlan
Jeff ...... Steven McNicol
Hilly ...... Kate Brailsford

A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00qmdts)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00qmdwg)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00qmdxf)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00qpq1n)
Last week Google launched Buzz, its new social networking service. This week, Google's facing a torrent of criticism after complaints that Buzz puts too much private information in the public sphere. Google spokesman Peter Barron explains what happened and Wired editor David Rowan tells Steve Hewlett where this leaves Google's reputation on privacy.

The Readers Digest in the UK has seen its circulation fall by a quarter in the last year - the result, it says, of chasing younger readers. Former editor Sarah Sands gives her view on the magazine and its future.

The Observer is losing supplements when it relaunches this weekend, but can it retain its own identity or will it be The Guardian on Sunday? That's the question for editor John Mulholland.

Was the BBC right to broadcast Ray Gosling's claims?


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00qmdyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00qpq1q)
Ray Connolly - God Bless Our Love

An uplifting, romantic comedy about a priest and a nun who fall in love and leave their orders to marry and begin a new life together. By Ray Connolly

Michael................David Neilson
Eleanor............Alexandra Mathie
Jane..............Fiona Clarke
Darrell..............Joe Ransom
Fr Dermot..............Stephen Tomlin
Suzy............Cherylee Houston

Produced by Charlotte Riches.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00qpq1s)
Paul Lewis and a panel of guests answer calls on debt and borrowing.

Guests:

Jasmine Birtles, Moneymagpie.com
Liz McVey, managing counsellor of CCCS Scotland and Scottish Debtline
Michael Park, money adviser, National Debtline.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00qplk8)
AL Kennedy - The Writing Life

The Author Away

2/3 The Author Away.
Stuck in the Northern Lodge Motel, Tasmania, with only foot long woodlice for company, maybe life on the road during the book tour isn't everything it's cracked up to be.

Producer Mark Smalley.


WED 15:45 The Tribes of Science (b00m8plt)
The Botanists

Peter Curran visits members of the many and varied disciplines of science, from astronomy to zoology, to explore their habitat, customs, rituals and beliefs.

Peter meets the botanists who won the lottery. Seed conservation used to be rather marginal to the main scientific activity at The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. That is, until, the scientists who preserve seeds for future generations asked for and received 30 million pounds.

At the Millenium Seed Bank in Sussex, the gentle world of botany and the rude world of commerce come together in a rampant hybrid.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00qpq1v)
Disputes about piracy are often seen as a product of the internet age, but a new analysis claims a history going back to the advent of print culture in the 15th century. Adrian Johns talks about his new book, Piracy: The Intellectual Property Wars from Gutenburg to Gates. He tells Laurie Taylor how piracy spread the ideals of the Enlightenment and has been the engine of innovation as often as its enemy.

Adrian Johns argues that it exemplifies the struggle to reconcile commerce and creativity, and that the pirates are no longer just producers who stand to make a financial gain, but implicate many citizens who download music or films illegally in the confines of their home. He suggests that these new forms of piracy force a radical reappraisal of the meaning of intellectual property.

Also on the programme, Laurie Taylor explores the morality of obesity. He talks to Helena Webb about her study of the conversations between doctors and patients in an obesity clinic. She explains why obese patients take credit for weight loss but make excuses for weight gain.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00qplyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00qmf17)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qmf55)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Write Stuff (b00qpq1x)
Series 12

Nancy Mitford

James Walton takes the chair for the game of literary correctness. Team captains John Walsh and Lynne Truss are joined by John O'Farrell and Mark Billingham. The author of the week and subject for pastiche is Nancy Mitford, and the reader is Beth Chalmers.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00qmdyz)
Usha's helping Alan put his tent up on the green. It's cold! Helen spots them on her way to Tony's birthday dinner. Alan cooks a meal for himself and Usha. Usha's not sure how he's going to cope, but Alan's enthusiastic about his project.

Helen makes a shock announcement at dinner. She wants to have a baby, by sperm donation. Tony and Tom think she's mad. It'll ruin her life. Helen says she's given it serious thought, and expected more encouragement from her family. Helen leaves.

Tony says Helen's crazy and will be left on the shelf. Pat insists that if Helen goes through with it, they'll support her. Tony wants to confront Helen but Pat says she'll talk to her.

Jude takes Pip out for her birthday. She tells Jude how close she was to Phil. He says his granddad inspired him to be an artist, though (like a succession of activities) he's given that up for web design. Pip feels bad she's celebrating, but she needs to think about something else. Jude assures her this doesn't make her a bad person. Pip and Jude have a great night. Pip thanks Jude for being perfect. Tonight was just what she needed.

Episode written by Keri Davies.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00qmf6v)
David Mitchell; designer Ron Arad; Paul Nash exhibition; Michael Jackson's This Is It

David Mitchell discusses his new comedy show The Bubble, in which comedians are locked away in a media-free zone for four days, then presented with a mixture of news stories which they must identify as either real or fake.

Paul Nash: The Elements is the first London exhibition of Nash's work since 1975 and includes paintings, watercolours and photographs from the whole of his career. Richard Cork reviews.

Ron Arad is perhaps best known for taking a car seat from a Rover in a scrap yard and attaching it to tubes of welded steel. On the eve of his first major UK exhibition, the London-based Israeli designer/artist/architect discusses his approach to the design of chairs, furniture and buildings.

Michael Jackson's This Is It, the documentary film of rehearsals for the 50 concerts that Jackson was set to give in London until his sudden death last year, has become the highest-grossing concert movie and documentary ever. Jacqueline Springer reviews the DVD.


WED 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00qpqj8)
Should some rape victims accept some responsibility for being attacked? A newly-published survey says the majority of people believe they should. It also reveals that women are even less forgiving of the victim than men. Almost three quarters of the women questioned said if a victim got into bed with the assailant before an attack they should take part of the blame. In a drink-fuelled, highly sexualised society, where do you draw the line between personal freedom and personal responsibility?

Witnesses:

Angela Levin, author and journalist.

Dr Nicole Westmarland, academic at Durham University and former chair of Rape Crisis England and Wales.

Ellie Levenson, author of The Noughtie Girl's Guide to Feminism.

Professor Lisa Isherwood, professor of feminist liberation theologies.


WED 20:45 Head to Head (b00jxb04)
Series 1

Episode 2

Edward Stourton presents a series celebrating great debates, combining archive of rare discussions between key figures with analysis by a panel of experts.

The 1976 battle between Milton Friedman and Lord Balogh on the relative merits of free-market economics at a time when Britain was in financial crisis.

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 21:00 Inside the Elephant Mind (b00qxgzw)
Everyone knows that elephants are clever but science is only now beginning to reveal just how smart they are. Andrew Luck-Baker joins British and Kenyan researchers on the East African savannah who are revealing the depths of the elephant mind with the help of a huge loudspeaker in the back of a Land Rover.

By playing different sound recordings (of elephants, lions and people) at elephant family groups, the scientists are probing the sophistication of elephant memory and pachyderm numerical skills. They are also testing whether elephants can distinguish between different human languages. Anecdotes suggest they can.

Another team of British researchers have been using urine samples and smelly clothes in other experiments to probe the agility of elephant grey matter.

All this has been taking place on the plains of Amboseli National Park in Kenya, under the looming presence of Mount Kilimanjaro. Amboseli is home to the world's longest running study of a single elephant population. Started by journalist-turned-biologist Cynthia Moss almost forty years ago, the study is a continuing record of every facet of the lives of every elephant living there. Cynthia Moss says the Amboseli data is like "gold" for the visiting animal psychologists to make sense of their experiments.

It turns out that that elephants are more intelligent than humans in some respects. For example, elephants have a much better short-term working memory than we do and out-perform people on at least one numerical skill. But why might they need to distinguish between the English language and the language of the local Masaai people? And what does this research tell us about the evolution of animal intelligence in general?


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00qpmgk)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests Leslie Kenton, Wills Morgan, Thelma Holt and Monty Don.


WED 21:58 Weather (b00qmfb9)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qmfdh)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Gordon Brown promises a 'full investigation' into the use of faked British passports by a hit squad who assassinated a Hamas commander in Dubai.

The UN fears for citizens in Marjah as the coalition confronts the Taliban.

China's campaign for gold at the Winter Olympics.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qstr3)
Moonlight in Odessa

Episode 3

Jane Collingwood reads from Janet Skeslien Charles's debut novel, set in the Ukraine.

Daria, uncertain of her future with the shipping firm, starts to moonlight for the Soviet Unions dating agency, translating for lovelorn Americans searching for a beautiful Ukrainian bride.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard (b00qprmm)
Series 1

Market Magic

Comedy by David Kay and Gavin Smith.

Mordrin is a 2,000-year-old wizard living in the modern world, where regular bin collections and watching Countdown are just as important as slaying dragons.

With Gordon Kennedy, Jack Docherty, Cora Bissett and David Kay.

A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 The News at Bedtime (b00pftgn)
Series 1

Episode 5

Twin presenters John Tweedledum and Jim Tweedledee present in-depth news analysis covering the latest stories happening this 'once upon a time'.

Mary Mary reports on a medical mystery involving an old woman who swallowed a fly.

With Jack Dee, Peter Capaldi, Fi Glover, Lewis MacLeod, Alex MacQueen, Lucy Montgomery, Vicki Pepperdine, Dan Tetsell.

Written by Ian Hislop and Nick Newman.


WED 23:30 The Lawrence Sweeney Mix (b008xf49)
Series 2

Episode 3

Fom something your Dad did to something you save up for...

Josie Lawrence and Jim Sweeney make it up as they go along!

Faced with a live studio audience and a couple of microphones - the masters of improve create sketches from shouted out suggestions.

Producer: Dawn Ellis

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2008.



THURSDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00qm7cd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qm7ly)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qm80q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qm86q)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00qm882)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qm8dg)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Johnston McKay.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00qm8hn)
The cold weather could mean fewer British strawberries in the shops this summer. Anna Hill hears that Scottish strawberry growers are set to lose hundreds of thousands of pounds. And as the amount of money paid for generating electricity for the national grid is set to increase, Farming Today puts on-farm renewable energy under the spotlight.


THU 06:00 Today (b00qm8lg)
With John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00qprnj)
The Indian Mutiny

Melvyn Bragg and guests Faisal Devji, Shruti Kapila and Chandrika Kaul discuss the Indian Mutiny of 1857 and the rebellion which followed.On 10th May 1857 Indian soldiers from the Bengal section of the East India Company's army rose up and shot their British officers. By nightfall the troops had marched on Delhi and the aged Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah II had been nominally restored to power. Nearly 15 months later, after great violence on both sides, the revolt was suppressed, but it left British rule in India transformed and, arguably, doomed.The trigger for the Mutiny was a rumour that cartridges for the new British rifles were coated with pig and cow fat, thereby insulting both Hindu and Muslim troops. But the Indian Rebellion was also a more complex story of economic strains, religious insensitivity and well-intentioned but provocative liberal reforms.The events of 1857 have resonated through history and have been appropriated and mythologised by the British press and Indian nationalists alike. However, the shocking violence of the Rebellion on both sides has meant that it has defied attempts to fit it into a coherent narrative structure. It has overshadowed British foreign policy and Indian politics ever since.Chandrika Kaul is Lecturer in Imperial and Indian History at the University of St Andrews; Faisal Devji is University Reader in Indian History at St Antony's College, University of Oxford; Shruti Kapila is University Lecturer in History and Fellow and Director of Studies at Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge.


THU 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zd)
Old World, New Powers (1100 - 300 BC)

Paracas Textile Fragment

A history of the world described through individual objects at the British Museum. This week Neil MacGregor, the Museum's Director, is looking at what was happening around the world between 2000-3000 years ago.

The theme so far has been one of empires collapsing, new regimes and warfare. In South America there were no new empires and we still don't entirely understand the cultures that were thriving there. In this programme, Neil MacGregor shows off some of the remarkably preserved textiles discovered in the Paracas peninsula on the southern coast of Peru and tries to piece together what life might have been like for these people living in around 500 BC. The early Peruvians went to astonishing lengths to make and decorate their textiles whose colours remain striking to this day. What were they for and what do they tell us about beliefs of this time?


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qmd5z)
David Cameron interviewed

A live interview with Conservative leader David Cameron on winning women's votes. Plus, the life and work of the Georgian gentlewoman Mary Delany.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qmdkg)
The Whole of the Moon, series 2

Episode 4

Legal drama serial by Colin MacDonald.

Jo suspects that the man she's prosecuting for murder isn't guilty. But if she's wrong, her career in the High Court is over before it's begun.

Jo ...... Vicki Liddelle
Iain ...... Steven McNicoll
Lord Watten ...... Simon Tait
Alan Tait ...... Lewis Howden
Old Woman ...... Eliza Langland
Peter Loudon ...... Greg Powrie
Elliot ...... Andrew Clark.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00qps7v)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 Capturing America: Mark Lawson's History of Modern American Literature (b00qps7x)
The Crucible of Capitalism

Mark Lawson explores how American writing became the literary superpower of the 20th century, telling the nation's stories of money, power, sex, religion and war.

Mark considers how America's post-war playwrights - from Tennessee Williams to David Mamet - have challenged political rhetoric about the triumph of capitalism in the USA.

Edward Albee, author of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? reveals his candidate for 'the best American play'. Other interviewees include Tony Kushner, author of Angels in America, and the late August Wilson, whose sequence of ten plays about the African-American experience is typical of the structural ambition and political questioning found in so many of the major post-war American plays.

Through the theatres of Broadway, the programme also explores the commercial pressures in America's largely-unsubsidised theatre culture, which have led to several of the nation's greatest playwrights - including Albee, Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams - facing long periods of neglect.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00qmdtv)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00qmdwj)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00qmdxh)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00qpkls)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00qmdyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00c1q5z)
Address Unknown

Tim Dee's adaptation of Kressmann Taylor's novel, published in 1938.

Two old friends, former business associates in San Francisco, exchange letters. One is an American German Jew, the other an American German who, excited and energised by the new Germany of the 1930s, has gone home. Attitudes harden with the seemingly inexorable rise of Hitler, the Jew horrified by the change in his friend and his wholesale adoption of the rhetoric and ideology of Nazism.

With Henry Goodman, Patrick Malahide.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b00qlgz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qm360)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00qplk6)
AL Kennedy - The Writing Life

In the Public Eye

3/3: In the Public Eye
Meet the author - what maniac thought of that? ALK proposes her 10 Point Plan to surviving the insatiable demands of the press, whilst living uncomfortably alongside her multi-mediated virtual presence.

Producer Mark Smalley.


THU 15:45 The Tribes of Science (b00m5rs7)
The Astronomers

Peter Curran visits members of the many and varied disciplines of science, from astronomy to zoology, to explore their habitat, customs, rituals and beliefs.

Peter meets the astronomers at Jodrell Bank Observatory. For 50 years, astronomers at the Jodrell Bank worked with colleagues around an iconic radio telescope that famously spotted Sputnik. But now most of the Jodrell tribe are leaving their telescope in the middle of the Cheshire countryside and moving to Manchester. The telescope will survive as it is a listed building, but will the tribe?


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00qm62m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00qps7z)
Quentin Cooper talks to Duncan Wingham, Professor of Climate Physics at University College, London for an update on the European Space Agency's ice mission satellite, CryoSat. The first CryoSat mission ended in disaster five years ago when the launch rocket malfunctioned. Next week, a new satellite, CryoSat-2, will be launched. If the launch goes according to plan, the satellite will enter an orbit 700 kilometres above the Earth. Using the first all-weather microwave radar altimeter, CryoSat will investigate the Earth's ice fields and map ice thickness over water and land.

A report in Nature suggests that the brains of songbirds are physically changed by the songs they sing. Quentin discusses the research with the paper's lead author, Richard Mooney, Professor of Neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine. Richard describes the 'sensitive period' in both birds and humans when the brain is most receptive to learning.

Quentin also hears about the world's most accurate clock. The Aluminium Ion Clock is more than twice as precise as the previous pacesetter based on an atom of mercury. It's accurate to one second in about 3.7 billion years. Quentin talks to Till Rosenband, one of the researchers at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) who developed the clock. He also talks to Patrick Gill from the National Physical Laboratory in Middlesex.


THU 17:00 PM (b00qmf19)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qmf57)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Mark Thomas: The Manifesto (b00qps81)
Series 2

Episode 3

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto. Comedian-activist, Mark Thomas creates a People's Manifesto, taking suggestions from his studio audience and then getting them to vote for the best. The winner of each show will be enforceable by law, so pay attention.

The weeks' edition will include policies such as banning cars from city centres; monitoring investment bankers' testosterone levels; and abolishing all forms of self-regulation.

Produced by Ed Morrish.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00qmdz1)
Susan is fed up with the shop committee. If she's being ignored she might as well give up. Neil agrees. Susan thinks committees are just ego trips, though Neil says the parish council's not too bad. There isn't much chance of him being elected chair, with Lynda as opposition.

David brings some cows into market and Eddie helps, on his first day working there. Eddie tells David he's happy to help out on the farm. David says Eddie could work on the day of the funeral, if he doesn't mind missing it. Eddie says it'll be his way of paying his respects. They meet for tea in Eddie's break. Neil pops in too. Susan is coming to watch the vote later, but Neil's told her she'll be disappointed.

At the meeting, David announces Neil and Lynda as candidates. Votes are cast and Neil wins, much to his surprise. Neil chairs with a little help from David. Lynda raises the issue of graffiti. Neil's not sure what they can do. Lynda's rather pointed about the need for strong leadership.

After the meeting Susan proudly congratulates Neil, telling him the best thing about it was the look on Lynda's face. Talk about sucking lemons!

Episode written by Keri Davies.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00qmf6x)
Slumdog Millionaire villain Anil Kapoor discusses his Bollywood stardom and new role as president of a fictional Islamic Republic in the latest series of 24.

Sir Antony Sher stars in Ibsen's An Enemy of the People, the first production at The Crucible Theatre in Sheffield after its 15-million-pound two-year refit. Novelist Joanne Harris reviews the production and the new-look building.

Kirsty Young, chair of the judges of the 2010 Art Fund Prize for Museums and Galleries, reveals the long list for the UK's largest single arts prize. The 100,000-pound award will be made to a museum or gallery for a project completed in the last year.

The world premiere of Concerto for Beatboxer and Orchestra, by composer Anna Meredith and beatboxer Shlomo, takes place tomorrow night. Meredith, whose works include an opera and commissions for the Proms, and Shlomo, whose vocalising skills evolved from hip-hop, discuss adapting to each other's music to create the new piece, for 21 orchestral players and six beatboxers.


THU 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00qps83)
Terminal Sedation: Backdoor Euthanasia?

Author Terry Pratchett has argued that assisted suicide should be legal in the UK - but there is already a medical technique widely used in the NHS which some campaigners claim is euthanasia by the backdoor. Called terminal sedation, it's used to ease the pain and suffering of the very sick. But critics say it can hasten death. Linda Pressly investigates the extent of terminal sedation and examines if it is always in the interests of patients and their families.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00qps85)
Evan Davis asks his panel of top business guests whether it's luck that got them to the top, talent or sheer hard graft. They also talk about design: what matters most, form or function?

Evan is joined by Geoff Quinn, chief executive of shirt, tie and suit-makers TM Lewin, the interior designer Kelly Hoppen, who has created homes for celebrity clients including the Beckhams and Elton John, and James Hussey, chief executive of De la Rue, the company that makes bank notes and passports.


THU 21:00 Science on Trial (b00qps87)
What happens when the free pursuit of answers in scientific research comes face to face with English law? Alan Urry investigates.

Simon Singh, author of Fermat's Last Theorem and The Code Book, is one of the UK's most successful science writers. Peter Wilmshurst is a respected cardiologist and has long fought for high ethical standards in scientific research. Francisco Lacerda works in Stockholm studying how children learn to speak. Henrik Thomsen is a Danish radiologist with an interest in kidney disease. They are a disparate group, but what they all have in common is that they have all fallen foul of English law for engaging with what they believe are scientific debates. Lawyers, journalists and scientists are now campaigning for a change to the UK libel laws to protect free speech. Those issuing or threatening the writs say they have commercial reputations to protect. Where should the balance lie?


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00qprnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00qmfbc)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qmfdl)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

The Dubai assassination - straight out of a spy novel?

Record budget deficit for January.

IAEA concern that Iran is developing nuclear warhead.

The fattest town in America.

Who would be a climate change activist now?

A coup is underway in Niger.

Croatia gets to grips with corruption.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qstr5)
Moonlight in Odessa

Episode 4

Jane Collingwood reads from Janet Skeslien Charles's debut novel, set in the Ukraine.

Daria's plan to distract her boss, Mr Harmon, has worked so well that he is now besotted with her former friend Olga, who in turn is uncontrollably jealous of Daria. Daria's reaction is somewhat unexpected.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Sarah Millican's Support Group (b00qps89)
Series 1

1. 'I love a plumber but I'm no boiler'.

'I love a plumber but I'm no boiler'.

Dating outside of your class: would you, should you, could you?'

'Help! I love two women at the same time - my mam not included'.

Sarah Millican plays a life counsellor and modern-day agony aunt tackling the nation's problems head on, dishing out real advice for real people.

Assisted by her very own team of experts.

Sarah ...... Sarah Millican
Marion ...... Ruth Bratt
Terry ...... Simon Daye
Chris ...... Steve Edge
Jamie ...... Nick Mohammed
Carol ...... Helen Atkinson Wood.

Written by Sarah Millican.

Producer: Lianne Coop

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


THU 23:30 The Lawrence Sweeney Mix (b008z5ld)
Series 2

Episode 4

Fom something your Dad did to something you save up for...

Josie Lawrence and Jim Sweeney make it up as they go along!

Faced with a live studio audience and a couple of microphones - the masters of improve create sketches from shouted out suggestions.

Producer: Dawn Ellis

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2008.



FRIDAY 19 FEBRUARY 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00qm7cg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qm7m0)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qm80s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qm86s)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00qm884)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qm8dj)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Johnston McKay.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00qm8hq)
The island of Jersey guards the genetic purity of its cows jealously, to the extent that it completely banned imports to its herd until two years ago. But, as Caz Graham hears, a non-pedigree bull has bred with a hundred of Jersey's cows. Some of the offspring will have to be culled.

Evidence that farmers have been using a banned weedkiller. An industry body tasked to improve farming's pollution record says the vast majority are complying with the ban.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00qm8lk)
With James Naughtie and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00qm36f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zg)
Old World, New Powers (1100 - 300 BC)

Gold Coin of Croesus

The history of the world as told through one hundred objects from the British Museum. This week Neil MacGregor, the Museum's Director, has been looking at the collapse of old regimes and the emergence of new powers from the Middle East to China. In today's programme, he describes how a powerful new state finds a dramatic way to help run its increasingly complex economy and trading networks - using coins.
Croesus was a king in what is now Western Turkey and his kingdom was called Lydia. It's remarkable that over two thousand years later we still have an expression that celebrates his wealth. Neil MacGregor considers how money, in the form of coins, first came about and describes the (hugely complex) methods of creating them. And whatever happened to Croesus?


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qmd61)
Social care for the ageing population

How should we provide and pay for the care and support of our rapidly growing population of older people? Plus, what to eat on a first date; and artist Sue Moffitt.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qmdkj)
The Whole of the Moon, series 2

Episode 5

Legal drama serial by Colin MacDonald.

In a packed and stifling courtroom, Jo puts her career on the line.

Jo ...... Vicki Liddelle
Iain ...... Steven McNicoll
Peter Loudon ...... Greg Powrie
Lord Watten ...... Simon Tait
Alan Tait ...... Lewis Howden
Mrs Ross ...... Eliza Langland.


FRI 11:00 Last Orders (b00qpslw)
Episode 1

A celebration of the pub landlord and landlady.

With pubs disappearing at the rate of more than three a day , signalling one of the most rapid cultural shifts of recent times, half a dozen landlords and landladies reflect on life as a licensee and explore what we're in danger of losing besides the beer and the buildings.
This rueful view from behind the bar includes reflections on the qualities of a good landlord or landlady; their role as community confessional and settler of tap room fights, dispenser of best bitter and pearls of wisdom.

We hear from old hands like Barbara, an ex-Bunny girl who runs the Grapes in London's Limehouse; Tetley Dave who fought a battle to keep the Shoulder of Mutton from closing in Castleford; Maureen from the Waggon and Horses at Langsett who's famous for her pies ; ex miner Dennis from Barnsley, whose concern is health and safety; stand-up comedian Toby- who recalls lining up six pints apiece for the miners coming off shift at his auntie's pub in a Yorkshire pit village ; and former Cambridge academic Tim, who's taken early retirement to open his first pub in York - the Pheonix- just as many others are shutting up shop.

How have these landlords and landladies kept their marriages together , living and working on the premises? How much of a tempatation was it to hit the top shelf and go for the optics after a hard day's graft behind the bar? Why do they think the pub can teach the next generation how to hold their drink .And how do they handle an objectionable customer without starting a wild-west barroom brawl?

Producer Lindsay Leonard.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


FRI 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b00qpsrd)
Cast in Order of Disappearance

Episode 4

Dramatised by Jeremy Front from the novel by Simon Brett.

Just who did kill Elliot Roth and will they stop at one murder?

Charles Paris ...... Bill Nighy
Jodie ...... Martine McCutcheon
Frances ...... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ...... Jon Glover
Nick ...... Rhys Jennings
Dr Mayhew ...... Stephen Hogan
Elspeth ...... Kate Layden

Directed by Sally Avens.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00qmdtx)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00qmdwl)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00qmdxk)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00qpsrg)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00qmdz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Bad Faith (b00qpsrj)
The Fire This Time

Lenny Henry stars as Jake Thorne, a police chaplain who's lost his faith and has decided, as a test for God, to behave appallingly towards those he’s supposed to help. Today Jake takes on his arch rival and nemesis Bishop Elias Wright in a battle over the soul of a mentally unstable parishioner.

Jake Thorne ...... Lenny Henry
Michael ...... Danny Sapani
Ruth Thorne ..... Jenny Jules
Vincent Ngomwe ...... Jimmy Akingbola
Rev Elias Wright ...... Cyril Nri
Chief Supt Khan ...... Vincent Ebrahim
Firearms Officer ....... Melissa Advani
Radio Voice ..... Rhys Jennings

Producer ..... Mary Peate
Writer ..... Peter Jukes


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00qpsrl)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Bunny Guinness, Chris Beardshaw and Bob Flowerdew answer questions posed by the gardeners of Lakeland Horticultural Society in Windemere.

Eric Robson investigates how plants can survive flooding following the recent heavy rain in Cumbria.

Plus a profile one of the region's best-known garden designers, Thomas Mawson.

Includes gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 The Tribes of Science (b00mf27l)
The Mathematicians

Series in which Peter Curran visits members of the many and varied disciplines of science, from astronomy to zoology, to explore their habitat, customs, rituals and beliefs.

Peter meets the mathematicians of the Isaac Newton Institute of Mathematics in Cambridge. There are blackboards in the lifts and in the loos to encourage communication between visiting professors, but not everyone shares their mathematical insight.

A few members of the mathematical tribe do wear the same t-shirt for six months and it's often inside-out, but not all the stereotypes hold true. Among these mathematicians, Peter finds passion, humour and an enviable sense of purpose.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00qqz3k)
John Wilson presents the obituary series, marking the lives of Lionel Jeffries, Dick Francis, Geoffrey Burbidge and Alfred Gregory.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00qqz3m)
Lord Of The Rings director Peter Jackson discusses the challenges of adapting Alice Sebold's bestselling novel The Lovely Bones.

Sir Christopher Frayling and Professor Ian Christie chart the history of the aerial shot, from the beginning of cinema to Up.

Jane Graham reports on listeners' thoughts on the state of film distribution in the United Kingdom.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00qmf1c)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qmf59)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00qqz3p)
Series 70

Episode 7

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panel includes Fred MacAulay, Jeremy Hardy, Ava Vidal and Miles Jupp.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00qmdz3)
Kirsty enthuses about her trip to the nature reserve with Patrick. She tells Helen they are just friends. It's nice and uncomplicated. Jill pops into the shop looking for a particular tea. Helen says she'll drop some in later for her. Making a delivery, Pat asks Helen over to Bridge Farm later.

Pat's heard that Susan is thinking about an unfair dismissal claim. Pat's wondering about offering Susan work in the dairy, so she might drop her claim.

Helen arrives and Tony awkwardly leaves at Pat's request. Pat is worried that Helen's desire for a baby is a bit soon after Leon, and Annette leaving. Helen says she knew she'd be doing this without a man, but not without her family's support. Eventually Pat is convinced. She'll support Helen. Helen's grateful but has to rush off to deliver Jill's tea. Tony thinks her hasty exit's because Pat's upset Helen but Pat insists they must support her.

At Glebe Cottage, Jill and Helen talk about Phil. Jill shows Helen the Valentine's cards they bought for each other, making Helen cry. Helen eventually leaves and Jill reads her card aloud to Phil. He means the world to her. She will always love him.

Episode written by Keri Davies.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00qmf6z)
On Expenses is a TV drama about American journalist Heather Brooke's fight for the disclosure of MPs' expenses under the Freedom of Information Act, and the resulting political scandal. On Expenses, starring Anna Maxwell Martin as Brooke and Brian Cox as Speaker Michael Martin, is reviewed by Edwina Currie and Andrew Rawnsley.

Twenty years after he played an FBI agent in David Lynch's cult TV series Twin Peaks, the actor Kyle MacLachlan reflects on working with Lynch and his varied acting career, including Desperate Housewives.

Joe Goddard and Al Doyle of Grammy-nominated electropop group Hot Chip talk about their new album One Life Stand.

As nominations open for a successor to Sir Christopher Ricks as the new Oxford University Professor of Poetry, and following controversy surrounding the post with Ruth Padel and Derek Walcott, Mark Lawson considers potential candidates.


FRI 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qm8zg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00qqzzc)
Eddie Mair chairs the topical debate from Diss in Norfolk. The panellists are former Conservative cabinet minister Lord Tebbit, Labour MP Diane Abbott, journalist and cultural critic Maya Jaggi and deputy editor of the London Evening Standard Sarah Sands.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00qqzzf)
Lisa Jardine reflects on the art and dangers of writing secret missives, from love letters and confidential documents to illicit text messages.


FRI 21:00 15 Minute Drama (b00qqzzh)
The Whole of the Moon, series 2

19/02/2010

Omnibus edition of the legal drama serial by Colin MacDonald.

Advocate Depute Jo Ross is prosecuting her first murder trial at Edinburgh's High Court, and something about the case is beginning to worry her. But if she gets it wrong her career will be ruined and a killer will go free.

Jo ...... Vicki Liddelle
Iain ...... Steven McNicoll
Mrs Ross ...... Eliza Langland
Frank Gray ...... Simon Tait
Peter Loudon ...... Greg Powrie
DCI Brand ...... Lewis Howden
Chris Murray ...... Andrew Clark.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00qmfbf)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qmfdn)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

China-US row: will Beijing now block stronger Iran sanctions?

Fighting intensifies in Helmand

International attempts to reverse the latest coup in Africa

Why the French love Casanova.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qstr7)
Moonlight in Odessa

Episode 5

Jane Collingwood reads from Janet Skeslien Charles' debut novel, set in the Ukraine.

When Mr Harmon wants to give Daria's job to Olga, Daria makes him a deal: she'll take six weeks off to prove to Harmon that he can't cope without her. She spends those six weeks working at the dating agency.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00qplyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Paying for the Party (b00qpkln)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00qmdk8)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00qmdkb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00qmdkd)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00qmdkg)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00qmdkj)

15 Minute Drama 21:00 FRI (b00qqzzh)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 FRI (b00qpsrd)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00qplyl)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00qplyl)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 SAT (b00qg5mk)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 MON (b00qmb8h)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 MON (b00qmb8h)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 TUE (b00qmb8h)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 TUE (b00qm8z8)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 TUE (b00qm8z8)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 WED (b00qm8z8)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 WED (b00qm8zb)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 WED (b00qm8zb)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 THU (b00qm8zb)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 THU (b00qm8zd)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 THU (b00qm8zd)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 FRI (b00qm8zd)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 FRI (b00qm8zg)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 FRI (b00qm8zg)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00qldy1)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00qqzzf)

Act Your Age 18:30 TUE (b00qplyn)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b008x3yr)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00b736p)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00qplcy)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00qplk8)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00qplk6)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00qm6ly)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00qh0zf)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00qpklq)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00qll19)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00qldxz)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00qqzzc)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00qs41j)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00qs41j)

Bad Faith 14:15 FRI (b00qpsrj)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00qlm2h)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00qlm2h)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00qp1mf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00qnztt)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00qstrd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00qstr3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00qstr5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00qstr7)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00qm368)

Capturing America: Mark Lawson's History of Modern American Literature 11:30 THU (b00qps7x)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00qplyv)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00qplyv)

Chips With Everything 16:00 TUE (b00lv18s)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00qg17p)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00qm62k)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00qpkls)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00qpkls)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00qm36f)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00qm36f)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00qp1kl)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00qpl51)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00qpq1q)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00c1q5z)

Ed Reardon's Week 11:30 MON (b00qp1cf)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00qlgzg)

Fabulous 23:00 TUE (b00qplyx)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 WED (b00qpmlk)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00qlgz6)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00qm8l7)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00qm8hj)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00qm8hl)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00qm8hn)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00qm8hq)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00qld0z)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00qpsrg)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00qhrxd)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00qplyq)

Fort Dunlop 11:00 WED (b00qpmgh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00qll11)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00qps7v)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00qmfb5)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00qmf6s)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00qmf6v)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00qmf6x)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00qmf6z)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00qldxq)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00qpsrl)

Head to Head 14:45 SUN (b00js7tl)

Head to Head 20:45 WED (b00jxb04)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00qprnj)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00qprnj)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00qplys)

Inside the Elephant Mind 21:00 WED (b00qxgzw)

Johnny Cash of Easter Cash 10:30 SAT (b00qll0x)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00qgz7x)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00qp1mh)

Last Orders 11:00 FRI (b00qpslw)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00qldxs)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00qqz3k)

Let's Go To Misterland 13:30 SUN (b00qm467)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b00qm35q)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00qll1p)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00qpl53)

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto 18:30 THU (b00qps81)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00qps7z)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00qlf3c)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00qllt3)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00qm7lr)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00qm7c8)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00qm7cb)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00qm7cd)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00qm7cg)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00qpmgf)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00qpmgk)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00qpq1s)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00qll13)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00qll13)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00qj218)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00qpqj8)

Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard 23:00 WED (b00qprmm)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00qlf3n)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00qlm2f)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00qm8d8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00qm87x)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00qm880)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00qm882)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00qm884)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00qlm50)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00qlf83)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00qm35v)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00qm364)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00qll1w)

News 13:00 SAT (b00qll17)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b00p31l0)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00qm62m)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00qm62m)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00qll1f)

PM 17:00 MON (b00qmf51)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00qmf15)

PM 17:00 WED (b00qmf17)

PM 17:00 THU (b00qmf19)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00qmf1c)

Paying for the Party 20:00 MON (b00qpkln)

Paying for the Party 23:30 FRI (b00qpkln)

Piano Stool Beethovens 13:30 TUE (b00qpl4z)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00qm62y)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00qg23w)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00qm62p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00qlf3q)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00qm8dz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00qm8db)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00qm8dd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00qm8dg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00qm8dj)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00qll1r)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00qll1r)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00qll1r)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b00qgxxd)

Quote... Unquote 13:30 MON (b00qp1ch)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00qm360)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00qm360)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00qm360)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b00qlgz3)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b00qlgz3)

Sarah Millican's Support Group 23:00 THU (b00qps89)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00qny57)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00qlgzd)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00qll1t)

Science on Trial 21:00 THU (b00qps87)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00qlf3j)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00qlm29)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00qm86j)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00qm80k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00qm80n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00qm80q)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00qm80s)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00qlf3f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00qlf3l)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00qll1h)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00qlm27)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00qlm2c)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00qm62r)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00qm7qm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00qm87v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00qm7lt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00qm86l)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00qm7lw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00qm86n)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00qm7ly)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00qm86q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00qm7m0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00qm86s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00qll1m)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00qm62w)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00qmf6q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00qmf53)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00qmf55)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00qmf57)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00qmf59)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00qlmr5)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00qlmr5)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00qp09n)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00qp09q)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00qm366)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00qm35y)

Taking a Stand 09:00 TUE (b00qpl4q)

Taking a Stand 21:30 TUE (b00qpl4q)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00qm36c)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00qm6lw)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00qm6lw)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00qmdz7)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00qmdz7)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00qmdyx)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00qmdyx)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00qmdyz)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00qmdyz)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00qmdz1)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00qmdz1)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00qmdz3)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00qjx5n)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00qps85)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00qldxv)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00qqz3m)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00qm461)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00qm461)

The Lawrence Sweeney Mix 23:30 MON (b008tnzk)

The Lawrence Sweeney Mix 23:30 TUE (b008vzdy)

The Lawrence Sweeney Mix 23:30 WED (b008xf49)

The Lawrence Sweeney Mix 23:30 THU (b008z5ld)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00qpq1n)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00qldxx)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00qqz3p)

The News at Bedtime 23:15 WED (b00pftgn)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00qps83)

The Tribes of Science 15:45 MON (b00lxvl7)

The Tribes of Science 15:45 TUE (b00m0jvx)

The Tribes of Science 15:45 WED (b00m8plt)

The Tribes of Science 15:45 THU (b00m5rs7)

The Tribes of Science 15:45 FRI (b00mf27l)

The Voices Who Dug Up The Past 11:00 MON (b00qp0qx)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00qll0z)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00qm465)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00qny2t)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00qmfdf)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00qmfdh)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00qmfdl)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00qmfdn)

The Write Stuff 18:30 WED (b00qpq1x)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00qj214)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00qpq1v)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00qlgzb)

Today 06:00 MON (b00qm8v6)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00qm8l9)

Today 06:00 WED (b00qm8lc)

Today 06:00 THU (b00qm8lg)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00qm8lk)

Watching the Watchdog 11:00 TUE (b00qpl4v)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00qlf85)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00qlgz8)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00qll15)

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Weather 21:58 SUN (b00qm6m0)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00qp09l)

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Weather 12:57 FRI (b00qmdwl)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00qmfbf)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00qm6m2)

When I Grow Up 09:30 TUE (b00qpl4s)

With Great Pleasure 11:30 TUE (b00qpl4x)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00qll1c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00qmdk6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00qmd5v)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00qmd5x)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00qmd5z)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00qmd61)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00qmdyv)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00qmdxc)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00qmdxf)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00qmdxh)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00qmdxk)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00qmdv3)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00qmdtq)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00qmdts)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00qmdtv)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00qmdtx)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00qlf81)