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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 06 FEBRUARY 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00qfb1t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qb5y1)
The First Cities and States (4000 - 2000 BC)

Early Writing Tablet

This week's programmes in the history of the world looks at the growing sophistication of humans around the globe, between 5000 and 2000 BC. Mesopotamia had created the royal city of Ur, the Indus valley boasted the city of Harappa and the great early civilisation of Egypt was beginning to spread along the Nile. New trade links were being forged and new forms of leadership and power were created. And, to cope with the increasing sophistication of trade and commerce, humans had invented writing.

In today's programme, Neil MacGregor describes a small clay tablet that was made in Mesopotamia about 5000 years ago and is covered with sums and writing about local beer rationing. The philosopher John Searle describes what the invention of writing does for the human mind and Britain's top civil servant, Gus O'Donnell, considers the tablet as an example of possibly the earliest bureaucracy


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qfb3n)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qfb3q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qfb3s)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00qfb3v)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qfb3x)
Daily prayer and reflection with Mark Coffey.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00qfb3z)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00qfb41)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00qfy6q)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00qfy6s)
Series 14

Wensleydale - Middleham

Clare Balding explores the joys of group walking.

For 25 years a group of Yorkshire friends have been meeting every few months for a hike through the countryside of northern England. Clare joins them on their silver jubilee walk.

The group first met as anxious parents watching their sons play rugby at Bradford Grammar School; when their sons left home they decided to keep in touch by organising regular rambles. Since then the walkers have helped each other through all that life can throw at you, using the healing powers of friendship, stunning landscapes and a good walk.

Clare meets up with the group as it tackles one of its favourite routes across the horse racing gallops of Middleham in Wensleydale.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00qfy6v)
Farming Today This Week

The law which gave people in England and Wales more access to the countryside - commonly known as the right to roam - caused many arguments when it was introduced ten years ago. Now the maps showing where people can and can't go are to be reviewed. The idea is to give walkers, farmers and other landowners the chance to change any mistakes.

Charlotte Smith visits a Warwickshire farm to find out what impact the right to roam is having on farmers' livelihoods. Charlotte also talks to ramblers about whether they think they have enough access to the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00qfy6x)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00qfy6z)
With James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00qfy71)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them.

Fi Glover is joined by comedian Dave Gorman.

With poetry from Salena Godden.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00qfy73)
Peter Curran meets trekking-guide writer Kate Clow, who has trail-blazed a number of long-distance walks in rural Turkey. She connected a series of paths to make Turkey's first long-distance walking route, the Lycian Way, and has since forged the St Paul Trail in the region walked by the saint, the Turkish Lake District. It reveals a side of Turkey usually unseen by the travellers to Istanbul or the coastal resorts. In addition art historian Francis Russell tells Peter about exploring the huge range of fascinating - often unexcavated - ruins from the Hittites to the Ottomans, that are a testament to Turkey's historical heritage.

Peter also meets Peter Allison, a former safari guide, and asks him where the magic lies in watching African animals in the bush and if the growing tourist trade has benefitted the clients, the local people or the wildlife.


SAT 10:30 Stefan Gates's Cover Story (b00qfzbw)
When he was four, food writer Stefan Gates appeared on the cover of Led Zeppelin's classic album Houses of the Holy. This deeply personal programme follows him as he investigates for the first time the story behind this iconic cover.

It is a famously unsettling image. Taken at the Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland, Stefan and his sister Samantha appear naked climbing up the eerie landscape against a bright orange apocalyptic sky.

It's a photo that's dogged Stefan all his life. Ever since he was a child, the picture has disturbed him, even scared him. He's ambivalent about it; should he be proud of it or is there something to be ashamed of? He's purposely never found out the story behind it. He has never even listened to the record.

Now he sets out to revisit that chapter in his life and to confront his own mixed emotions about it, discovering the story behind the image, and its ideas and ethics. He discovers his sister's memories of the difficulties in getting it made, confronts his mother about why she let him pose naked as a child and meets Aubrey Powell, the cover art's photographer, from the famous graphic design team Hipgnosis. Finally, he makes an emotional journey back to the Giants Causeway to listen to the album for the very first time.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00qfzbz)
A look behind the scenes at Westminster with Steve Richards.

The Labour MP Ann Cryer reflects on the Legg Report, as MPs have once again been under scrutiny over their expense claims. But how good are MPs themselves at scrutinising the government? In the week when the prime minister appeared before the select committee chairs, should our MPs get legal training?

Plus John Hutton, Sir Menzies Campbell and Bernard Jenkin discuss the future of the nation's defences. And should the Pope have intervened in the UK's equality debate?


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00qfzc1)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.

It's the Mexican choice: Plata o plomo - silver or lead: you work for the drug cartels or they kill you. Katya Adler's been in the Mexican border town of Ciudad Juarez meeting the young police recruits preparing to confront the country's murderous drug gangs.

There's tension on the streets of Ukraine ahead of Sunday's presidential election. Both sides accuse the other of planning to rig the poll. There's speculation about a return of the street protests reminiscent of the Orange Revolution in 2004. James Coomarasamy meets a man who could be called the Ukrainian Frank Sinatra. He, like many, has become disillusioned with Ukrainian politics.

In China, the gender imbalance is a serious issue. Chris Hogg in Shanghai says it means more and more Chinese men will find it harder to find a bride in the years ahead. And getting your children married so you can become a grandparent is a vitally important ambition for many Chinese parents - it's still the best way to ensure you will be cared for in old age.

Twenty years ago much of the world got its first proper look at Nelson Mandela. After 27 years behind bars in South Africa he was released and cameras from around the world rolled as he walked to freedom. Today Mr Mandela is in retirement and has cut back his public appearances. Among his closest friends is the man who represented him in his many court battles against the apartheid regime, George Bizos. Andrew Harding has been to meet him and learned that the old lawyer is still fighting for a better South Africa.

Emma Jane Kirby in Paris has a series of confrontations with taxi drivers as she muses on what the revolution of 1792 has done for the service industry in France.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00qfzc3)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00qf7bn)
Series 70

Episode 5

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Francis Wheen, Jeremy Hardy, Micky Flanagan and Jack Dee.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00qfzc5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00qfzc7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00qf7bq)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Edgware in Middlesex. The panellists are The Daily Telegraph's chief political commentator Benedict Brogan, Francis Crook, director of the Howard League for Penal Reform, broadcaster and parliamentary candidate Esther Rantzen, and Brian Paddick, former Metropolitan Police deputy assistant commissioner and former Liberal Democrat candidate for Mayor of London.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00qfzc9)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00b0c4h)
The Small Back Room

Richard Stevens' dramatisation of Nigel Balchin's tense Second World War thriller.

Sammy Rice is called in to try and solve the mystery of a series of unexploded bombs that are being scattered after German air raids. They lie dormant and then inexplicably explode on human contact.

Holland/Brine ...... Paul Jesson
Sammy ...... Damian Lewis
Tilly ...... Dominc Rowan
Waring ...... Nick Rowe
Sue ...... Rebecca Saire
Mair ...... Christopher Benjamin
Stuart ...... Will Keen
Joe ...... Stuart Laing
Pinker/Strang ...... Sean Baker

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats (b00qc036)
Series 8

Sonny Rollins

Ken Clarke MP profiles great jazz musicians of the 20th Century.

New York sax player Sonny Rollins is regarded as one of most influential and unique saxophonists in contemporary jazz. He began playing in the late 1940s, rehearsing and performing with such luminaries as Thelonious Monk, Art Blakey and Tadd Dameron. By the mid 1950s he was winning popularity polls and enjoying widespread critical acclaim. He has since gone on to develop a fluid and easily accessible style, often lauded for bringing jazz to a wider audience.

Ken talks to Mercury Music Prize-nominated saxophonist Denys Baptiste, a fellow Sonny Rollins fan.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00qfzcc)
Weekend Woman's Hour

With Jane Garvey. Writer Margaret Forster on grandmothers; fashion icon Zandra Rhodes on how to stand out in a crowd; award-winning singer Nanci Griffith on her music and career; Natasha Walter on the return of sexism; working parents and arguments for extending leave; older women behind the wheel - are they a risk?


SAT 17:00 PM (b00qfzcf)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00qf5p9)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests to discuss how much technical understanding they need of their products, and he asks them to reveal the secrets of a good showroom.

Evan is joined by Lisa King, chief operating officer of Christie's, Dr Markus Miele, managing director of the appliance manufacturer Miele, and Frank Meehan, chief executive of handset manufacturer INQ Mobile.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00qfzch)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00qfzck)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qfzcm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00qfzcp)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive is joined by the American investigative journalist and author of Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser, Conservative MP Nadine Dorries and actor Clive Mantle.

Arthur Smith finds out how to lose a million from former dotcom millionaire Benjamin Cohen.

With comedy from Jo Caulfield and music from Tom McRae and Ian King.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00qfzcr)
Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster

Clive Coleman profiles Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster. In a week in which the Pope has attacked UK equality laws, Clive looks at the leader of the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales. Who were his influences and what is his vision for the Church?

Interviewees include Clifford Longley, whose daughter's wedding he officiated, and Austin Ivereigh, former press secretary to his predecessor, Cardinal Cormac Murphy O'Connor.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00qfzct)
Tom Sutcliffe is joined by historian Tristram Hunt, writer Bidisha and writer and broadcaster Matthew Sweet to review the cultural highlights of the week.

When Martin Amis was working on the original version of The Pregnant Widow back in 2006, he described it as 'blindingly autobiographical'. He abandoned much of that version the following year; what remains is mainly set in Italy in 1970 and explores the impact of the sexual revolution of the time. Twenty-year-old Keith Nearing spends the summer in an Italian castle with his girlfriend Lily and other friends, including Scheherazade - the object of much sexual longing on Keith's part. His callow take on sexual politics back then is also commented on from the rueful perspective of the older Keith.

The 1995 Rugby World Cup, which had many of the elements of a Hollywood movie already, has been translated to the screen with Clint Eastwood in the director's chair. Morgan Freeman stars as Nelson Mandela, a new president seeking to start bridging the deep divisions in his nation. The green and the gold colours of the national rugby team are viewed by black South Africans as being synonymous with the old apartheid order, but Mandela forges a link with Springboks captain Francois Pienaar (Matt Damon) to get the whole nation behind the team as South Africa hosts the World Cup. But they don't stand a chance of actually winning it... do they?

Tamsin Oglesby's play Really Old, Like 45 at the National Theatre in London is a satirical comedy based in the near future which takes the problems posed by an ageing population as its theme. The action cuts between a government research centre where increasingly sinister solutions are being proposed and the domestic lives of three siblings who are coping in very different ways to advancing age: Lyn (Judy Parfitt) has Alzheimer's and is often blissfully unaware that anything's wrong, Alice (Marcia Warren) is treating all her problems with cheerful resolution, while Robbie (Gawn Grainger) seems to lose 10 years every time he's offstage, reappearing in ever more youthful costume.

Some of the most iconic images of war in the second half of the 20th century came to us via the lens of photojournalist Don McCullin. Shaped by War at the Imperial War Museum North in Manchester is the largest ever exhibition of his work to be staged in the UK. The images range from gang members in 1950s north London, through conflicts all over the globe, including Cyprus, Vietnam and Biafra, to meditative British landscapes. There are also artefacts from his his career, including a ruined Nikon camera which protected him from an AK-47 bullet when he was on assignment in Cambodia.

Frank Cohen is often dubbed 'the Saatchi of the North' and selected works from his collection are currently on view at Manchester Art Gallery in the exhibition Facing East. Contemporary artists from China, India and Japan are represented, their work being typified by vivid colour and a fascination with popular and commercial culture. Pieces include The Big Kiss by Chen Lei - a fibreglass sculpture featuring a small boy balancing a polar bear on his nose - and The Skin Speaks a Language Not Its Own by Bharti Kher - a reclining, life-size elephant decorated with bindis.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00qfzcw)
Open Sesame

Konnie Huq looks back at four decades of Sesame Street, the experimental American children's television show which mixed radical educational techniques with extraordinary subject matter and subversive humour.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00q9l86)
Book 2: The Honourable Schoolboy

Part 2

Dramatisation of John le Carre's classic novel featuring intelligence officer George Smiley.

Smiley's operation in Hong Kong becomes increasingly dangerous when the government and American Intelligence begin to take notice.

George Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale
Jerry Westerby ...... Hugh Bonneville
Peter Guillam ...... Richard Dillane
Connie Sachs ...... Maggie Steed
Sam Collins ...... Nicholas Boulton
Doc De Salis ...... Bruce Alexander
Craw ...... Philip Quast
Tiu ...... Paul Courtenay Hyu
Pelling ...... John Biggins
Mrs Pelling ...... Kate Layden
Liese Worth ...... Daisy Haggard
Hibbert ...... Ewan Hooper
Martello ...... John Guerrasio
Eckland ...... Rhys Jennings
Luke ...... Joseph Cohen-Cole

Directed by Marc Beeby

This episode is available until 3.00pm on 14th February as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00qfzcy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00qck2s)
The author Sir Terry Pratchett is calling for euthanasia tribunals to give sufferers from incurable diseases the right to medical help to end their lives. His idea comes as two polls are published which show widespread support for assisted dying. A system that allowed people to get medical help to die would avoid the harrowing dilemma of either watching a loved one suffer, or face jail for helping them out of their misery. But is there moral cowardice at the heart of this debate? Is it more about fear of our own death, rather than a genuine compassion for others? Whose death is it anyway?

Our witnesses are:

Dr Kevin Yuill - senior lecturer in history and American Studies at the University of Sunderland. Currently working on a book on assisted suicide.

Debbie Purdy - has MS and campaigns for assisted dying.

Rev Dr Lee Rayfield, Anglican Bishop of Swindon - Used to teach medical and dential students and has a particular interest in questions of medical ethics.

Andrew Norman Wilson - author and columnist.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00qbvg7)
Russell Davies chairs the 2010 final of the perennial general knowledge contest. Contestants Ian Bayley from Oxford, David Clark from Port Talbot, Anne Hegerty from Manchester and Rob Hannah from Torquay compete to be this year's winner.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00q9lzn)
Roger McGough introduces listeners' requests, including Stevie Smith's galloping cat and Les Murray's poem defining the quintessentially Australian quality of 'sprawl'. Plus a whirling drunken evening with Tony Harrison and a recollection of high summer from Sylvia Plath and Robert Graves.

With readers Tanya Moodie, John Telfer and David Henry.



SUNDAY 07 FEBRUARY 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00qfzl6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b008ydqb)
Cupid Strikes

Sparks

Stories exploring the reality behind St Valentine's Day.

When Gracie's compost-obsessed husband dies, she decides it's time for some radical personal growth.

Written and read by Frances Tomelty.

Producer Eoin O'Callaghan.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qfzl8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qfzlb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qfzld)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00qfzlg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00qfzlj)
The sound of bells from St Paul's Cathedral.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00qfzcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00qfzll)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00qfzln)
The Pearl of Great Price

Mark Tully considers the enduring symbolism of pearls and the mystical properties with which they are endowed in myth and religious tradition.

The readers are Janice Acquah, William Gaminara and Frank Stirling.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b00qg0qf)
Cave Spiders

Cave Spiders are one of the largest spiders found in the United Kingdom, with adults measuring up to 5cm legspan and 15mm body length. For arachnophobes they are probably the stuff of nightmares, but to spider lovers they are creatures of great beauty with shiny brown abdomens rather like polished conkers.

There are two species found in Britain, Meta bourneti and the slightly more common Meta menardi. Both species like dark places, but only Meta bourneti has been found in the damp cellars of Witley Court.

Cave spiders can be identified by their large teardrop-shaped white egg cases, about the size of a damson, which are suspended on a silk thread from the roof of their dwelling. When the spiderlings hatch (and there can be 100 spiderlings in a single case) they are attracted to light, unlike the adults which are strongly repelled by light. This helps the young find new areas to colonise. They release silken thread from their spinnerets and drift on these threads which are caught up and blown by the wind, so they can travel long distances. Once they land they produce a small orb web in which they catch insects. In mid-summer the spiderlings seek out dark caves or tunnels in which to spend the rest of their lives. Spiderlings have two moults before they reach the adults, and cave spiders feed on small insects and woodlice which they catch in their fine orb webs.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00qg0qh)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00qg0qk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00qg0qm)
Edward Stourton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qg0qp)
BTCV

Jonathon Porritt appeals on behalf of BTCV.

Donations to BTCV should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope BTCV. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide BTCV with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Number: 261009 and Scotland SCO39302.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00qg0qr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00qg0qt)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00qg0qw)
Wisdom From Above

An exploration of the ultimate sources of knowledge and wisdom in this service live from St John's College in the University of Cambridge.

Led by Rev Duncan Dormer, Dean of St John's.

Preacher: Rev Dr Gregory Seach, who teaches at Clare College and lectures in Literature and Theology in Cambridge's Divinity faculty.

Director of Music: Andrew Nethsingha. Organ Scholar: John Challenger.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00qf7lj)
Lisa Jardine reflects on the need for climate scientists to take scrupulous care when they inform and persuade.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00qg0qy)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week, with Paddy O'Connell.

Broadcasting House pays tribute to Sir John Dankworth, the jazz legend who has died at the age of 82.

We discuss whether leaders need to be whiter than white, with Baroness Onora O'Neill and businessman Gerry Robinson.

Reporter Nigel Wrench remembers the day, nearly 20 years ago, when he waited for Nelson Mandela to be released from prison.

Correspondent Steve Evans speaks to survivors of the Australian bush fires.

Lisa Russell and her mother speak about the month Lisa spent in a coma, and how it changed her life for ever.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00qg0r0)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00qg0r2)
Gok Wan

Kirsty Young's castaway is the stylist Gok Wan.

Dispensing fashion advice and hugs in equal measure, he aims, he says, to 'make women feel like women, not like turkeys'.

Yet although he made his name as a stylist, his special talent isn't for fashion, but for gaining people's trust. He understands only too well the emotional journey he is asking women to make; the first person he had to transform was himself, and that, he says, is very much work in progress.

Record: The Promise
Book: Beautiful Thing by Jonathan Harvey
Luxury: Lip balm.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00qbw66)
Series 56

Episode 5

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with Paul Merton, Charles Collingwood, Josie Lawrence and Chris Neill. From February 2010.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00qg0r4)
Seeds

Since the earliest times humans have selected particular seeds to resow next season, noticing mutations that they liked and in so doing have shaped the nature of food. This shaping has never been greater than today, when technology makes our ability to shape our future food enormous, but who is to control what qualities we want in our peas or tomatoes?

Sheila Dillon traces the history of plant breeding from neolithic times to today's GM era with Noel Kingsbury, author of Hybrid: The History and Science of Plant Breeding. Early examples of tasteless strawberries well suited to the railroad, and fights between farmers and millers over which wheat variety to grow, inform today's battles for control.

Geoff Tansey, co-editor of The Future Control of Food, outlines the changing legal instruments which cover seeds, and which have placed ownership of seeds and genetic material increasingly in private hands, while many of our older, non-commercial breeds are now illegal to sell.

European legislation means only listed varieties can be sold, with a set fee payable irrespective of volume of sales, which hit heritage and non-commercial varieties hardest. One place attempting to preserve them is the Heritage Seed Library at Garden Organic in Ryton, Coventry, who instead arrange seed swaps and a membership system to distribute these seeds. Neil Munro manages the collection.

The desire to grow traditional seeds is now an international movement. Geoff Tansey visited a village seed bank in Jarkand region of India with Gene Campaign Director, Suman Suhai. And new collaborative approaches, like the participatory breeding in Rwanda, bringing farmers back into the breeding debate, may be the answer to developing seeds that suit farmers needs, and that will be able to respond to changing climates.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00qg0r6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00qg0r8)
A look at events around the world.


SUN 13:30 In Pursuit of Treasure (b00qg0rb)
Archaeologist and broadcaster Mike Pitts delves into the sometimes murky world of the metal detector, from harmless amateur history buffs to criminal nighthawkers, and discovers how metal detecting is changing our national heritage.

He hears stories of in-fighting within the metal detecting community, bust-ups between landowners and detectorists and battles inside the archaeological establishment.

Mike hears from the man who found a multi-million pound Saxon hoard and the farmer who has been threatened and attacked for the treasures beneath his farm.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00qf7bg)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Matthew Wilson, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank join gardeners in Linton, Cambridgeshire.

Bob Flowerdew draws inspiration for creating winter dazzle in the garden from Cambridge University Botanical Gardens.

Plus a profile of one of the nation's favourite flowers, the camellia.

Includes gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Gameboy v The Mongolian Steppe (b00clmhc)
Episode 5

Series following the exploits of a computer games-obsessed 14-year-old with learning difficulties who is taken to Mongolia by his father to experience the more exciting side of life.

The family settle into life with a remote nomadic tribe in western Mongolia, make friends with their hosts, spend days out hunting in the wild snowy landscape of the plains and finally bid a sad farewell. Dexter might not have quite forgotten that his computer games exists, but he knows that life has a lot more to offer.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00qg17p)
Book 2: The Honourable Schoolboy

Part 3

Dramatisation of John le Carre's classic novel featuring intelligence officer George Smiley.

Smiley's plans to get hold of Russian spy Nelson Ko are coming to a head. But Smiley has pinned his hopes on Jerry Westerby - and Westerby has plans of his own.

George Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale
Jerry Westerby ...... Hugh Bonneville
Liese Worth ...... Daisy Haggard
Peter Guillam ...... Richard Dillane
Martello ...... John Guerrasio
Enderby ...... James Laurenson
Oliver Lacon ...... Anthony Calf
Connie Sachs ...... Maggie Steed
Sam Collins ...... Nicholas Boulton
Drake Ko ...... David Yip
Charlie Marshall ...... Paul Courtenay Hyu
Mickey ...... Angelo Paragoso
Ricardo ...... Chris Pavlo
Murphy ...... Joseph Cohen-Cole

Directed by Marc Beeby

This episode is available until 3.00pm on 14th February as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b00qg1hs)
Clive James

James Naughtie and readers talk to Clive James about the first volume of his autobiography, Unreliable Memoirs, which has sold over a million copies.

Clive James is a poet, essayist, novelist, documentarist, critic, talk show host, travel writer, cultural commentator - and red-hot tango dancer. The audience talk to Clive about Unreliable Memoirs, which covers his boyhood years in Kogarah, a suburb of Sydney. Clive was born in 1939; the other event that year (he says) was the outbreak of war, from which his father never returned. Clive tells Bookclub how that event has dominated his whole life.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00qg23w)
Roger McGough introduces listeners' requests. He guides us through a poetic landscape cast in frost, with requested poems by Ted Hughes, William Morris and Raymond Carver. There's also a tender poem about fatherhood and language from the 2008 Forward Prize-winning poet Mick Imlah.

With readers Tanya Moodie, John Telfer and David Henry.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00qcj8p)
Improvised Explosive Devices in Afghanistan

The government has pledged 150 million pounds to combat the threat of improvised explosive devices, which are now the biggest danger to British and other coalition troops in Afghanistan. But is the UK doing enough to tackle the increasing threat they pose? Allan Urry investigates.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00qfzcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00qg43r)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00qg43t)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qg43w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00qg43y)
Ernie Rea introduces his selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.

Jon Ronson On... Ambition - Radio 4
Stefan Gates' Cover Story - Radio 4
Henry Moore, My Father - Radio 4
The Right Ingredients - Radio 4
Nature - Radio 4
Robo Wars - Radio 4
Today - Radio 4
Sunday Feature: Songs of Trebizond - Radio 4
Elvis Trail - Radio 2
Listening to China - Radio 4
Joan Armatrading on Bob Harris - Radio 2
The Ditch - Radio 4
First Nation, First People - Radio 4
Mark Thomas: The Manifesto - Radio 4
Stephen Nolan Show - Five Live.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00qg44v)
Susan's not pleased that she's having to cover Annette's work at the shop because Annette has left abruptly, leaving just a scribbled note. Helen's quietly upset too and explains that she's just as surprised by Annette's sudden departure. Later Susan and Neil speculate that Helen and Annette must have had a bust-up. Susan tells Neil she thinks Annette may have done them a favour. With the uncertainty about the shop, Susan might as well make up the extra hours while she can.

Pat's concerned about tired Helen, who blames herself for Annette's departure. Pat tells Helen that she couldn't have been kinder and gave Annette the strength to stand on her own two feet. Helen should feel proud of herself, and if she can't feel that way herself Pat is very proud of her.

David's furious after hearing from Izzy that Pip's boyfriend Jude is 28. He confronts defensive Pip who says age has nothing to do with it - they have lots in common. Ruth's shocked too, but cautions against lashing out, otherwise they'll drive Pip away and neither of them wants that.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00qg44x)
Matt Frei is joined by conservative commentator Tucker Carlson for a look at the week's top news. Up for debate are America's renewed examination of the 'don't ask, don't tell' policy, which excludes gays and lesbians from military service, and if President Obama's chief of staff is about to lose his job.

Matt talks to actor John Lithgow about his current work and the way Americans can reinvent themselves - sometimes fictionally.

In 1960 four young African American men sat down for lunch at a counter in North Carolina, but when they were refused service they refused to stop asking. They inspired actions for racial justice across the country including sit-ins, protests and marches. Fifty years later, a museum opens on the grounds of that famous lunch spot and Americana hears from Joseph McNeil about what it was like for him when he first sat down behind that Woolworth Company lunch counter.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00b736m)
Jennings' Little Hut

The Kettle of Fish

Mark Williams reads one of Anthony Buckeridge's classic school stories, abridged in five parts by Roy Apps.

Mr Wilkins blows his top when he finds Jennings and Darbishire looking for a fish - up a tree.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00qf6t6)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00qf7bj)
John Wilson presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

Marking the lives of Sir Percy Cradock, Lucienne Day, Lieutenant-Colonel Lee Archer and Pernell Roberts.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00qfzc3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qg0qp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00qbxwj)
Glass-Steagall: A Price Worth Paying?

Should the taxpayer bail out so-called casino banking? Edward Stourton explores the arguments for and against the return of Glass-Steagall, a 1930s American law which split the banks into high street and investment banks.

President Obama's recent declaration of willingness to fight the banks has pushed the issue of whether taxpayers should bail out so-called casino banking to centre stage in America and across the world. There are growing calls for a British version of an American post-Depression law called the Glass-Steagall Act. In this new banking world there would be retail banks which would look after the needs of ordinary customers and there would be separate investment banks which could play the stock markets without putting depositors' savings at risk.

Former Chancellor Nigel Lawson is now one of the most prominent people calling for a British-style Glass-Steagall. As is Liam Halligan, the chief economist at the investment fund Prosperity Capital Management, who outlines the case for a new separation of banking activities. Another surprising person calling for Glass-Steagall to be resurrected is former Wall Street banker John S Reed. Back in the 1980s and 90s he was one of the people calling for the original law to be repealed. Now he's convinced that some kind of separation is crucial to protect taxpayers from future bank bail-outs.

But critics like Brandon Davies, a former head of retail risk at Barclays Retail, fear that splitting the banks would severely damage the economy. Angela Knight, chief executive of the British Bankers' Association warns that Britain could not take this kind of action alone. Professor John Kay, formerly of Oxford University, the London Business School and the Institute for Fiscal Studies - probably the most prominent academic economist making the Glass-Steagall case - tells the programme why he thinks there is not more political support for the idea of splitting the banks


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00qg4k0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00qg4k2)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including Class Dismissed.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00qf7bl)
Morgan Freeman tells Francine Stock about the research he did to play Nelson Mandela in Clint Eastwood's drama, Invictus, about the Rugby World Cup in South Africa.

Director Cary Fukunaga reveals what happened when he rode the trains from South to North America with hundreds of illegal immigrants for his thriller Sin Nombre.

La Grande Vadrouille was the most succesful film in French cinemas until the release of Titanic, and is still phenomenally popular whenever it's shown on television. Ginette Vincendeau explains why this 1966 war comedy with Terry-Thomas is so well loved across the Channel.

Jane Graham reports on the state of film distribution in Britain and why the best-reviewed movies are often the most difficult to see.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00qfzln)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 08 FEBRUARY 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00qg4yw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00qcjwn)
How does a country's international reputation affect its economy and its political power? The diplomatic advisor Simon Anholt says it is extremely important, and takes great pains to measure national PR. Each year he publishes an index which ranks 50 countries in terms of their reputation. He tells Laurie Taylor who is at the top and who languishes at the bottom, and why.

Ethno-theme parks, Native American casinos and Kalahari bushmen attempting to reap profits from pharmaceutical companies using their traditional medicinal plants: all modern examples of how ethnic identity has become a commodity in today's global market place. John and Jean Comaroff explore how communities sell their traditional culture in their new book, Ethnicity Inc. They tell Laurie about the effect it has on indigenous cultures, and how selling your identity can be both empowering and impoverishing.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00qfzlj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qg4z8)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qg545)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qg56t)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00qg593)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qg5ch)
Daily prayer and reflection with Mark Coffey.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00qg5fs)
Charlotte Smith hears how a new strategy to better understand the sea could lead to more accurate weather forecast.

A report on how the Farming Today sow and her litter of piglets are getting on, just weeks after their birth.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00qgv93)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00qg5m9)
With Sarah Montague and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00qgvzt)
Andrew Marr discusses the need for radical reform of the markets with former World Bank economist Joseph Stiglitz, and finds out why the financial crisis has been a boon for artists with Enron playwright Lucy Prebble. Peter Brook explores the question of violence and tolerance in his latest play, 11 and 12, and the theologian Robert Beckford takes a new look at the Book of Revelation.


MON 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5my)
The Beginning of Science and Literature (1500 - 700 BC)

Flood tablet

A small tablet was found in modern Iraq and brought back to the British Museum. When it was translated, back in 1872, it turned out to be an account of a great flood that significantly pre-dated the famous Biblical tale of Noah. This discovery caused a storm around the world and led to a passionate debate about the truth of the Bible - about story telling and the universality of legend. In a week that looks at the emergence new ways of expression like literature and mathematics, Neil MacGregor introduces us first to the British Museum's provocative "Flood Tablet".


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qg63b)
Nick Clegg interviewed

An interview with Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg MP. Plus, cooking with eggs.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qg63d)
Writing the Century 12: 1966-1969 - Pleidiol Wyf I'm Gwlad/True To My Land

Episode 1

Series exploring the 20th century through diaries and correspondence of real people.

In the 1960s Welsh identity was under threat. Sharon Morgan was a young history student at Cardiff University; Sir Glanmor Williams was an eminent historian, and a member of the Broadcasting Council for Wales. Despite their differences, the student activist and the establishment figure shared the same passion for Wales and the Welsh language. We follow them through these turbulent years as the nation begins to reassert itself.

Dramatised by Tina Pepler from documents at the National Library of Wales.

Glanmor ...... William Thomas
Fay ...... Helen Griffin
Sharon ...... Elin Phillips
Mami ...... Sharon Morgan
Gwen ...... Anya Murphy
Iwan ...... Dewi Rhys Williams
John Rowley ...... Richard Mitchley
George Cook ...... Richard Nichols
Gareth ...... Liam James
Rhys ...... Sam Jones
Dewi ...... Scott Arthur
Mike ...... Gareth Williams
Janet ...... Catrin Stewart

Original music by Nicolai Abrahamsen.


MON 11:00 The Voices Who Dug Up The Past (b00qgwck)
Episode 1

Broadcaster and archaeologist Mike Pitts delves into the question of why different archaeologists can dig the same sites yet reach completely different conclusions.

Mike visits Britain's biggest Iron Age hill fort, Maiden Castle, and, through archive, diary excerpts and interviews, relives two seminal digs that took place there in the 1930s and 1980s. Is it a monument tied up in Roman warfare and invasion, or a structure symbolising power and exclusion from the outside world? Featuring interviews with Niall Sharples, Beatrice de Cardi, Ian Armit and Chris Sparey-Green.


MON 11:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b00qgxxb)
Series 6

A Bottle of Ulterio Motivo

ED REARDON'S WEEK
Episode 5 : A Bottle of Ulterio Motivo

Ed finds himself in the money when he sells most of his possessions to a themed wine bar owned by the lovely Violet Carson.

With Christopher Douglas as Ed Reardon and
Stephanie Cole as Olive
Simon Greenall as Ray
Geoff McGivern as Cliff
Philip Jackson as Jaz
Rita May as Pearl
Barunka O'Shaughnessey as Ping
And Geoffrey Whitehead as Stan
With Dan Tetsell and Emma Fryer.

Written by Christopher Douglas and Andrew Nickolds

Producer: Dawn Ellis.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00qg719)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00qg73m)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00qg7d2)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Quote... Unquote (b00qgxxd)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes.

With guests Ken Bruce, Valerie Grove, Dr Ben Goldacre and Kwame Kwei-Armah.

The reader is Peter Jefferson.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00qg44v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00qgyyl)
Raft to Bondi

Bittersweet comedy by Ian Kershaw. It's July 4th 1990 and the country is football crazy because England are playing West Germany in the semi final of the World Cup. Everyone is glued to the TV, except for 15-year-old Jim who's got other things on his mind. He's ripe for a bit of an adventure.

Jim ...... Stephen Hoyle
Carol ...... Shannon Flynn
Dad ...... Mark Jordon
Kath ...... Naomi Radcliffe

Producer Gary Brown.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00qfzcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 A Guide to Woodland Birds (b00bfk03)
Classic Woodland Birds

Brett Westwood presents a series to help listeners identify different species.

Brett is joined by keen bird watcher Stephen Moss in the Forest of Dean. With the help of wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, they identify some classic woodland birds, including nuthatches and tree-creepers.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00qg0r4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00qgyyn)
History of the World Special

In a special programme linked to the BBC's A History of the World series, Ernie Rea and guests discuss the meaning of the flood tablet relating part of the Epic of Gilgamesh.

The 7th-century BC tablet from northern Iraq tells the story of the adventures of Gilgamesh, a legendary ruler of Uruk, and his search for immortality. The tablet contains details similar to the story of Noah and the flood in the Hebrew Bible.


MON 17:00 PM (b00qgshs)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qgsn5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00qgz7x)
Compilation

Episode 1

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game. Paul Merton and Graham Norton talk about how to pass the time if you're stuck in traffic, and Sue Perkins and Liza Tarbuck debate whether bikers should be clad in leathers or lettuce.

First broadcast in 2010.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00qgsbc)
Jennifer and Brian discuss Pip's older boyfriend. When Brian agrees with David's approach of wanting to give Jude a good thumping, Jennifer reminds him of what they went through with Kate and how proud they are of her now. Alan calls by to get sponsorship for his Lent camping project and Brian agrees to support him. While enlisting Adam's help, they discuss the pros and cons of small-scale farming against the monoculture approach.

Jennifer picks Peggy up from The Laurels where they bump into Ted. When Peggy tells Jennifer she misses Jack terribly, Jennifer tentatively mentions Ted's bridge club. Having an interest outside the Laurels seems to help Ted's relationship with his wife. But Peggy's adamant that she won't be joining any bridge clubs. She needs to keep her time free for Jack.

Later, worried Jennifer wishes to Brian and Adam that Peggy had more outside interests. When she suggests that Jill and Chris take her out for the day, they think it's a great idea. Jennifer thinks it's worth a try.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00qgsnw)
Rachel Cooke reviews new film, The Wolfman, starring Benicio Del Toro as a haunted English aristocrat.

In the bicentenary of Chopin's birth, pianists Stephen Hough and Ingrid Fliter discuss performing his works.

Journalist Peter Taylor's three-part TV series investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslim extremists radicalised on the internet. Describing them as 'Generation Jihad', he unravels the history - from the Rushdie affair to Afghanistan - that has set them on this path, explores al-Qaeda propaganda distributed internationally online, and examines Prevent, the British government's policy to counter radicalism in the UK.

Neil MacGregor responds to news that Iran has cut ties with the British Museum following the row over the Cyrus Cylinder, a cuneiform clay tablet which is one of the most important objects in the Museum's collection.


MON 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5my)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


MON 20:00 Robo Wars (b00qh04j)
Episode 2

The modern military makes increasing use of robots, but to what extent can machines replace soldiers? And where does this leave the laws of war? Stephen Sackur discovers the potential benefits - and perils - of a revolution in warfare.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00qh0zf)
Foreigner Policy

In the past decade, Britain has experienced mass immigration on an unprecedented scale. A former government aide recently suggested this was a deliberate policy, motivated in part by a desire to increase racial diversity. David Goodhart investigates the ideological forces behind one of the most significant social changes to have affected the UK.

Andrew Neather, a former Number 10 speechwriter, recently wrote a much-discussed article in the Evening Standard in praise of multicultural London, but suggesting that those who have influenced immigration policy under Labour were politically-programmed to be relaxed about such numbers. His article was immediately seized upon by anti-immigration campaigners as evidence of a conspiracy to make Britain a more racially diverse society.

In this programme, David Goodhart investigates the truth about reasons for recent increases in migration to Britain. Political insiders, including former home secretary David Blunkett, talk candidly about the real influences behind the scenes. None of them give credence to the accusation that there was a plan to create a more multicultural Britain. An unexpected increase in asylum applications and the demand for cheap labour from employers were the main motivators, according to those who influenced policy. But, admits former Home Office special adviser Ed Owen, a nervousness about discussing immigration policy meant that New Labour was, in its first years in office, poorly prepared to deal with the issue.

We may not have witnessed a grand act of social engineering, concludes David Goodhart, but New Labour's combination of economic liberalism and cultural liberalism led it to regard mass immigration as a trend which would bring great social benefits and few disadvantages.

Interviewees include:

Rt Hon David Blunkett MP, former home secretary

Tim Finch, head of migration, equalities and citizenship, and director of strategic communications at the Institute for Public Policy Research

Andrew Neather, Comment editor at The Evening Standard and former Number 10 speechwriter.

Sir Andrew Green, Migrationwatch

Sarah Spencer, deputy director, Centre on Migration Policy and Society

John Tincey, Immigration Services Union

Ed Owen, former Home Office special adviser

Claude Moraes MEP.


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00qhl63)
Keep on Trucking

While aviation is often seen as the climate change villain, the transport of freight by road and ship is often ignored. Shipping is a far bigger polluter and seems unlikely to benefit from the investment in technology which airlines have planned. Could there be a way to cut down emissions from freight transport? Tom Heap finds out just how much pollution is being shifted needlessly around the place by hitching a lift with a 25-year-old Londoner, who was named the UK's Young Entrepreneur of the Year 2009. His business, Shiply.com, is a bit like eBay, but for shipping your stuff. The business has been going for just over a year and has already saved over 1.6 million kg of CO2 by making use of spare capacities.

On a larger scale Eddie Stobart's is Britain's best known haulier. The company recently made moves into rail freight but questions remain on how many of our deliveries can be made by rail and if the freight industry as a whole is really facing up to the question of how to decarbonise transport.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00qgvzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00qgtch)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qgtwj)
News from a global perspective with Ritula Shah.

Jack Straw appears a second time before the Chilcot Inquiry.

Could sanctions on Iran harm the opposition movement?

Senior Met Police officer Ali Dizaei is jailed for four years.

Has Ukraine's Orange Revolution been reversed?

The US gathers its census data but will immigrants co-operate?


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qj37n)
Capturing America

David Mamet's Emotions, The Rehearsal Process, and The Play and the Scene

As part of Radio 4's Capturing America series, Mark Lawson selects short pieces by five American authors.

Playwright David Mamet has some typically terse advice for actors in his essays on Emotions, The Rehearsal Process, and The Play and the Scene.

Read Colin Stinton.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b00nvzyv)
Porky Pies

According to a recent survey we live in a world full of lies - concluding that most people tell at least two important lies a day, a third of conversations involve some sort of deception and 60 per cent of the population have cheated on their partners at least once.

To debate this and seek out the truth about lies are Professor Richard Wiseman, who has spent a lifetime trying to discover the clues that give away deception, writer Ian Leslie, who described the search for the perfect lie detector, and columnist Michele Hanson, whose mother was only ever able to tell the truth.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qgtyb)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



TUESDAY 09 FEBRUARY 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00qg4wt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5my)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qg4yy)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qg52w)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qg547)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00qg56w)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qg595)
Daily prayer and reflection with Mark Coffey.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00qg5ck)
Anna Hill hears plans for Europe's largest dairy farm: 9,000 cows on 1,500 acres. It's been welcomed as a sign of confidence in the industry, but welfare groups are concerned animal health will suffer. And while the national flock of sheep has shrunk, sheep farmers say exports are the highest they've been in years and that the hills can cope with more sheep.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00qg5fv)
With James Naughtie and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


TUE 09:00 Taking a Stand (b00qhmfm)
Fergal Keane talks to Barbara Harris, whose organisation pays drug- and alcohol-addicted women to take long-term contraception.

Barbara's experience of fostering babies born to those addicted to drugs and alcohol led her to one conclusion: that these women should be offered financial inducement to be sterilised, or given long-term contraception to stop them having children they are unable to care for. Founded over a decade ago in the United States, her organisation, Project Prevention, has so far made payments to over 3,000 women.


TUE 09:30 Famous Footsteps (b00qhmfp)
Episode 5

Fiona Neill examines the reality behind the apparently bohemian lifestyle enjoyed by creative people, talking to William Miller, Guy Chambers and the daughter of Daphne Du Maurier.


TUE 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mc)
The Beginning of Science and Literature (1500 - 700 BC)

Rhind Mathematical Papyrus

In a week that explores man's early experiments with numbers, Neil MacGregor describes the British Museum's most famous mathematical papyrus. This shows how and why the ancient Egyptians were dealing with numbers around 1550 BC. This papyrus contains 84 different calculations to help with various aspects of Egyptian life, from pyramid building to working out how much grain it takes to fatten a goose. Neil MacGregor describes it as "a crammer for a dazzling career in an ancient civil service".


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qg61n)
Women in the 1930s

A special programme on women in the 1930s, the decade of the Great Depression, the abdication and appeasement. But how did all this impact on the lives of ordinary British women?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qjw6j)
Writing the Century 12: 1966-1969 - Pleidiol Wyf I'm Gwlad/True To My Land

Episode 2

Series exploring the 20th century through diaries and correspondence of real people.

Glanmor's Broadcasting Council for Wales meeting has been interrupted by news of a disaster at Aberfan. Sharon learns of the tragedy when hitchhiking back from a night out.

Dramatised by Tina Pepler from documents at the National Library of Wales.

Glanmor ...... William Thomas
Fay ...... Helen Griffin
Sharon ...... Elin Phillips
Mami ...... Sharon Morgan
Gwen ...... Anya Murphy
Iwan ...... Dewi Rhys Williams
John Rowley ...... Richard Mitchley
George Cook ...... Richard Nichols
Gareth ...... Liam James
Rhys ...... Sam Jones
Dewi ...... Scott Arthur
Mike ...... Gareth Williams
Janet ...... Catrin Stewart

Original music by Nicolai Abrahamsen.


TUE 11:00 Nature (b00qhmfr)
Series 4

A Local Patch, part 2

The second of two programmes exploring our relationship with the landscape and the value of getting to know 'a local patch'.

Paul Evans explores both the personal benefits which can be gained from connecting with the natural world and the wider benefits for wildlife conservation. He examines the roles of garden wildlife monitoring schemes, and the ways in which these schemes not only generate data which provides information about the UK's biodiversity but also encourages individuals to get involved with the landscapes around them.

The programme explores how an interest in a 'local patch' can lead to a sense of responsibility and care, and the relationship between getting to know your local patch and the long-term benefits for conservation of our wildlife and our wild places.


TUE 11:30 With Great Pleasure (b00qhq5w)
Robert Webb

Comedian Robert Webb plunders his bookshelves to present a selection of his favourite prose and poetry in a special edition recorded at the University of Bedfordshire. Including the first piece of writing to make him laugh out loud and a poem that best captures his feelings in his newly-acquired role as a father. The readers are Abigail Burdess and Jonathan Dryden Taylor.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00qg6zr)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00qg71c)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00qg73p)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Milton's Music (b00qhql9)
What was the influence of John Milton senior on his famous poet son? Clarinettist and Cambridge University English literature graduate Emma Johnson sets out to find out.

In one of his early Latin poems John Milton junior wrote, 'Apollo, wishing to disperse himself between the two, gave to me certain gifts, to my father others, and father and son, we possess each one half of the god'.

Emma fills in the other half of that Godly image by exploring the musical gifts of John Milton senior. The musicologist and performer Richard Rastall has unearthed and recorded many of the elder Milton's pieces including choral, viol consort and song settings. He shows what he has discovered and what it sounds like in specially reconstructed recordings of works that even scholars are unfamiliar with.

As well as revealing John Milton the composer, discover the life of the man and his relationship with his son. Although a gifted musician, John Milton was not able to live on the earnings from his compositions alone. A scrivener by trade, he managed to free himself from the Scriveners' Company in 1599 and was subsequently able to afford a private tutor for his son and then provide for him when he took a place at St Paul's School and Christ's College, Cambridge.

Emma also talks to Milton scholars and the early music group Fretwork, as they prepare and record John Milton's instrument works.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2010.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00qgsbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00qjwvy)
Buffalo Bill and Little Matty Dyer

By Peter Spafford. 1903 Cardigan Fields, Leeds. Buffalo Bill, slayer of the Lacota, the most famous American in the world, disembarks at Armley station with his Wild West show. They will stay in Leeds just five days, but that is long enough to change the life of 15-year-old Matty Dyer.

Matty ...... Christian Foster
Buffalo Bill/Small Bear ...... Kerry Shale
John ...... Gerard Fletcher
McConnell ...... Andrew Westfield
Jess ...... Julia Malham
Wind in Face ...... Demetri Goritsas
Sid ...... Ryan Greaves
Street Shouter ...... Howard Chadwick

Producer Gary Brown.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00qhrc9)
Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects that help tell A History of The World.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00qhrjy)
Casual Cruelty

The Lottery

Series of short stories by the American author Shirley Jackson, who wrote in a style of 'creeping unease' from the 1940s until her death in 1965.

An exciting day for the inhabitants of a small American farming community. As always, no-one likes to upset the tradition of the ancient black box.

Read by Stacy Keach.

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 A Guide to Woodland Birds (b00bvbzy)
Common Warblers

Brett Westwood presents the guide to help identify your local woodland birds.

Brett joins birdwatcher Stephen Moss and wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson in the Forest of Dean to identify the songs of the chiffchaff, the blackcap and the willow and garden warblers

Producer: Sarah Blunt

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2008.


TUE 16:00 I Was A Teenage Dotcom Millionaire (b00qhrpk)
Ten years ago, Benjamin Cohen was at the heart of the British dotcom boom. Aged seventeen, he became the youngest ever director of a publicly quoted company when his website Jewish Net merged with the London Jewish News. He then went on to run a search engine company Cyberbritain, which eventually embroiled him in some controversial publicity.

No longer an entrepreneur, Benjamin now looks back at his involvement in the internet investment bubble.

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00qhrx8)
Chris Packham and Stella Duffy

Wildlife TV presenter Chris Packham and author/performer Stella Duffy join Sue MacGregor to discuss favourite books by Penelope Fitzgerald, Peter Nichols and JD Salinger.

Offshore by Penelope Fitzgerald
Publisher: Fourth Estate

A Voyage For Madmen by Peter Nichols
Publisher:. Profile Books

Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: an Introduction by J. D. Salinger
Publisher: Penguin

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00qgsg7)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qgshv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Act Your Age (b00qhrxb)
Series 2

Episode 4

Simon Mayo hosts the comedy show that pits the comic generations against each other to find out which is the funniest.

Team captains Jon Richardson, Ed Byrne and Johnnie Casson are joined by Mike Wozniak, Robin Ince and Ted Robbins.

Producers: Ashley Blaker and Bill Matthews.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2010.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00qgs92)
Ruth and Pip chat about Jude. Ruth suggests inviting him over for supper one evening. Pip's not sure after the way David behaved the other night, but Ruth asks her to be patient with him. Mindful of this, Pip agrees to help David move some ewes. But things deteriorate when David presumes Pip wants to spend her evenings with Jude, after she says she may not be available to help with lambing. Ruth comments wryly that at least they're still speaking...

Eddie's pleased to learn there's a livestock handler's job going at Borchester market, especially when David says he'll put in a word for him.

Helen and Pat take down Annette's bed in the spare room. Distressed Helen explains how she'd planned to have the room when the baby came. Sensitive Pat suggests having some tea and a chat.

Eddie shows Bert his new van. Bert says a friend of his could paint it at a discount. Eddie confides that he's going to call the van "Clarrie", with a picture of the sun's rays over her name. Bert's not convinced but Eddie says that when his business gets moving it's going to be the best known face in Borsetshire.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00qgsn7)
Beyond The Pole is a comedy about global warming, telling the story of two well-intentioned but inept eco-activists. Actress Helen Baxendale, one of the cast and the executive producer of the film, talks to Mark Lawson about eco-film making, and the absence of perks for an exec-producer.

Gaylene Gould reviews Valentine's Day, a romantic comedy with an all-star cast in which couples find themselves making up and breaking up under the pressure of Valentine's Day.

Scottish writer David Greig talks about his play Dunsinane, a sequel to Macbeth.

American artist Arshile Gorky had little formal training but went on to become one of the pivotal American artists of the mid 20th century, with his work anticipating the Abstract Expressionist movement of the 1940s. Art critic William Feaver reviews a new retrospective of Gorky's work at Tate Modern.


TUE 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00qhrxd)
The next banking nightmare?

While Britain's top bankers celebrate their bonuses, Michael Robinson investigates the commercial property market and the nasty surprises that it may hold for the banks and for the long-suffering British taxpayers who bailed them out.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00qhrxg)
Why a a resource centre for blind people in Carlisle is being shut down. We hear from Miriam Martin from Action for Blind People on why the organisation made the decision.

Cricket in New York: how blind English cricketers are taking their version of the game across the pond to the Big Apple. We hear from Andy Dalby-Welsh from Cricket for Change.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00qhrxj)
Cancer

Dr Mark Porter hears about the thousands of patients whose cancer has spread, but who never find out where the original cancer grew. When this happens doctors are baffled - and it can lead to patients getting a raw deal. But there are now new NICE guidelines which aim to improve the care and treatment of these patients.


TUE 21:30 Taking a Stand (b00qhmfm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00qgt9r)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qgtck)
News from a global perspective with Robin Lustig.

Greek unions prepare to strike in protest at government austerity measures - is a bailout coming?

Obama says sanctions on Iran are moving closer.

Preparing to ski off piste.

MPs vote on proposal for referendum on voting reform.

A special report on young Burmese rebels.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qj37g)
Capturing America

Our Man at Harvard

As part of Radio 4's Capturing America series, Mark Lawson selects short pieces by five American authors.

By Norman Mailer. Our hero recalls the spring of his sophomore year, which he whiled away at the offices of the Harvard undergraduates' journal, The Advocate. Along the way he learns a lesson or two about office politics and deception. Not all is as it seems as The Advocate hosts a party where the guests excitedly await the arrival of Somerset Maugham.

Read by Garrick Hagon.


TUE 23:00 Fabulous (b00qhrxl)
Series 3

Episode 1

Sitcom by Lucy Clarke about a woman who wants to be Fabulous but can't cope.

Faye is now engaged to a man she is roughly 65 per cent sure she should marry - 66 per cent on a good day. It's Faye's engagement party, and her mum is given the simple task of buying the right wedding dress, while Denise finds herself copying a toddler. Will everything go right for once?

With Daisy Haggard, Olivia Colman, Anne Reid, Alison Pettit, Joanna Munro, Sally Grace, Margaret Cabourn-Smith, David Armand, Nigel Hastings, Rufys Wright.

Music by Osymyso.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qgty2)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



WEDNESDAY 10 FEBRUARY 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00qg4ww)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qg4z0)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qg52y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qg549)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00qg56y)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qg597)
Daily prayer and reflection with Mark Coffey.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00qg5cm)
Culling badgers is an expensive and inefficient way of controlling badgers, according to a recent study.

A farmer explains why he's keen to have the ban on smoked sheep meat lifted.

Is it necessary for piglets to have their tails docked and their teeth clipped?


WED 06:00 Today (b00qg5fx)
With John Humphrys and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00qj1ql)
Lively and diverse conversation with Francine Stock and guests, including Michael Foreman.


WED 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mf)
The Beginning of Science and Literature (1500 - 700 BC)

Minoan Bull Leaper

Neil MacGregor's retelling of the history of humanity, using objects from the British Museum's own collection, arrives in Crete around 1700BC. The programme tells the story of man's fascination with bulls and the emergence of one of most cosmopolitan and prosperous civilisations in the history of the Eastern Mediterranean - the Minoans. The Minoans of Crete were more powerful than the mainland and enjoyed a complex and still largely unknown culture. They enjoyed a ritual connection with bulls as well as with a rich bronze making tradition. To consider the Minoans and the role of the bull in myth and legend, Neil MacGregor introduces us to a small bronze sculpture of a man leaping over a bull, one of the highlights of the British Museum's Minoan collection. He explores the vast network of trade routes in the Mediterranean of the time, encounters an ancient shipwreck and tracks down a modern day bull leaper to try and figure out the attraction!


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qg61q)
Women in the Bible; The 'lost generation' of unemployed

With nearly a million young people out of work, is talk of a 'lost generation' alarmist or a reality? Plus, is the Bible misogynist or an insight into a turning point for women?


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qjw64)
Writing the Century 12: 1966-1969 - Pleidiol Wyf I'm Gwlad/True To My Land

Episode 3

Series exploring the 20th century through diaries and correspondence of real people.

Glanmor is invited by the Duke of Norfolk to serve on the Investiture Committee. Sharon and her friends in the Welsh Language Society continue their peaceful protests, while others begin to take a more dangerous route.

Dramatised by Tina Pepler from documents at the National Library of Wales.

Glanmor ...... William Thomas
Fay ...... Helen Griffin
Sharon ...... Elin Phillips
Mami ...... Sharon Morgan
Gwen ...... Anya Murphy
Iwan ...... Dewi Rhys Williams
John Rowley ...... Richard Mitchley
George Cook ...... Richard Nichols
Gareth ...... Liam James
Rhys ...... Sam Jones
Dewi ...... Scott Arthur
Mike ...... Gareth Williams
Janet ...... Catrin Stewart

Original music by Nicolai Abrahamsen.


WED 11:00 Weekend Warriors No Longer (b00qj1qn)
Episode 2

Martin Bell investigates how the part-time Territorial Army is surviving full-time warfare.

The TA was at one time dismissed as 'weekend warriors', but now the military admit they couldn't fight the war in Afghanistan without them. But are we and our armed forces relying too much on them?


WED 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b00qj1qq)
Series 3

Jack Black's Black Jacks

Sitcom written by and starring Sanjeev Kohli and Donald McLeary, set in a Glasgow corner shop.

Sanjay finds a girlfriend and embraces the arts, much to Ramesh and Dave's amusement.

Ramesh ...... Sanjeev Kolhi
Dave ...... Donald McLeary
Sanjay ...... Omar Raza
Alok ...... Susheel Kumar
Kayla ...... Eleanor Bird
Father Henderson ...... Gerard Kelly
Ted ...... Gavin Mitchell
Keenan's Mum ...... Maureen Carr
Mrs Gibb ...... Marjory Hogarth
Mr Hepworth ...... Tom Urie

A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00qg6zt)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00qg71f)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00qg73r)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00qj1qs)
As the BBC comes under pressure to reveal the details of its 230 million pound payments to actors and presenters, Steve Hewlett asks the channel controller of another broadcaster if he would like to reveal details of what he pays.

The Guardian Media Group has sold the Manchester Evening News to Trinity Mirror. Will The Observer be next? That is the question for Carolyn McCall, chief executive of Guardian Media Group.

Has the media coverage of climate change been too one-sided and has that helped build support for those who challenge the idea of man-made climate change? We hear from the former editor of The Times Simon Jenkins and Professor Justin Lewis from Cardiff School of Journalism.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00qgs92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00qj1qv)
Postcards From a Cataclysm

Nine short plays about global annihilation. As an asteroid hurtles towards earth, the planet's population prepares for the end of the world. Then the strangest things start to happen. By David Varela, Rommi Smith, Lizzie Nunnery, Josie Long, Tim Crouch, Carl Grose and The Factory.

Performed by Piers Wehner, Tim Key, Kenneth Cranham, Emerald O'Hanrahan, Rhys Jennings, Joseph Cohen-Cole, Tessa Nicholson, Josie Long, Kate Layden, Ewan Hooper, Bruce Alexander and Melissa Advani.

Sound Design by Zhe Wu and Caleb Knightley

Produced by James Robinson.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00qj1qx)
Paul Lewis and guests answer calls on divorce, termination of civil partnerships and separation.

Guests:

John Fotheringham, consultant in family law, Fyfe Ireland (Scotland)
Claire Hamilton-Russell, family partner, Thomas Eggar
Rachel Hadwen, benefits rights advisor for Gingerbread/Working Families and CPAG.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00qhrk0)
Casual Cruelty

Trial by Combat

Series of short stories by American author Shirley Jackson, who wrote in a style of 'creeping unease' from the 1940s until her death in 1965.

Emily Johnson has known for some time who is stealing things from her New York furnished room, but only now has she decided to confront the suspect.

Read by Joanne Whalley.

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 A Guide to Woodland Birds (b00bydgm)
The Oakwood Trio

Do you know a wood warbler from a redstart?

Brett Westwood is joined by bird watcher Stephen Moss and wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson. Producer Sarah Blunt


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00qj214)
The car was a potent symbol of freedom for black America, but the cultural critic Paul Gilroy argues that the escape it once represented has become a cage for the African American. Consumerism and the ultimate commodity of the car has turned the fight for rights into a race to buy new things. He tells Laurie Taylor how black people spend far more on their cars than whites and how the automobile has fatally undermined culture and community.

In his new book, Darker Than Blue, Paul Gilroy writes about how jazz, blues, hip-hop and much of what stood for black culture now seems generically American and is exported around the world. And within the United States luxury goods, motor cars, branded items and a quest for individual gratification have diluted the collective spirit which brought African Americans the civil rights they won. With his brilliant and provocative analysis, Paul Gilroy traces the shifting character of black culture on both sides of the Atlantic and offers an account of what it means to be black in Britain and the United States.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00qhrxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00qgsg9)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qgshx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Write Stuff (b00qj216)
Series 12

Anton Chekhov

THE WRITE STUFF

James Walton presides over another episode of the literary quiz. John Walsh and Lynne Truss return as team captains with guests Peter Kemp and Tibor Fischer.

The author of the week and subject for pastiche is Anton Chekhov and the reader is Beth Chalmers.

PRODUCER SAM MICHELL.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00qgs94)
Jill chats to Ruth about the trip she's planning with Christine, to take Peggy to a hat exhibition on Friday. It was Jennifer's idea. She thought it might take Peggy out of herself a bit. Jill's surprised when Ruth tells her how old Pip's boyfriend is.

David tries to enlist Josh's help with the lambing, but he wants a rise in his pocket money in return! Ruth says he's just business-minded. He's picked it up from them - he's going to go far.

Helen tells Kirsty how shocked she was by Annette's sudden departure, covering for Annette by explaining it was down to relationship issues. Patrick invites Kirsty to watch bitterns with him at Arkwright Lake during her lunchtime and Helen assures her it's fine to take a long lunch.

Jill pops into Ambridge Organics and Helen admits to her that she's missing Annette's company. Jill tells Helen that Annette was lucky to have had her support.

Kirsty returns having had fun with Patrick. He's a great guy although they didn't see any bitterns. When Kirsty says how good it is working there because you never know who you're going to meet, Helen sadly agrees.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00qgsn9)
Actor Jeff Bridges; JG Ballard art exhibition; architect IM Pei

Mark Lawson talks to the actor Jeff Bridges, who is Oscar nominated for his role as an alcoholic country singer.

JG Ballard's daughter Fay discusses an art exhibition dedicated to the writer.

Robert Sandall reviews new albums by Sade, Massive Attack and Gil Scott-Heron.

Mark talks to the RIBA Gold Medal-winning architect IM Pei.


WED 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00qj218)
More than 70,000 citizens will be denied their chance to vote in the general election this Spring. They're prisoners and the ban has been in place since 1870. In 2005 the European Court of Human Rights ruled that the ban breaches prisoners' right to free elections. Prison reform charities have warned that the government has had enough time to sort this out and if the general election goes ahead and prisoners aren't allowed to vote, it could be challenged in the courts. Have criminals by definition lost their moral authority to vote or could it help with their rehabilitation and keep them in touch with society and their role as citizens? How do we balance the rights of prisoners with our rights to punish them, and who should decide which takes precedence?

Witnesses:

Bobby Cummines
Chief executive of UNLOCK and reformed offender.

Sir Ivan Lawrence QC
Criminal lawyer mainly engaged in defence for 48 years, and Conservative MP for 23 years where he was chairman of the Conservative Party legal and home affairs committee.

David Green
Director of Civitas, institute for the study of civil society.

John Walsh QC
Barrister at Doughty Street Chambers specialising in immigration and prison law. He is also chair of the trustees of Irish Chaplaincy in Britain, which supports Irish prisoners abroad.


WED 20:45 Class Dismissed (b00qj272)
Mary Ann Sieghart explores class as an increasingly important issue in British politics in the run-up to the General Election, and considers the historical change in the role of class in politics. She examines the psephological and political evidence on Labour's attempts to appeal to its core vote and followers of New Labour. Mary Ann also questions whether there is an unease among some Conservatives with David Cameron's wealth and background.


WED 21:00 Nature (b00qhmfr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00qj1qz)
Lively and diverse conversation with Francine Stock and guests, including Michael Foreman.


WED 21:58 Weather (b00qgt9t)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qgtcm)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qj37j)
Capturing America

Starving Again

As part of Radio 4's Capturing America series, Mark Lawson selects short pieces by five American authors.

By Lorrie Moore. Dennis's wife has left him and his cynical, whisky-slugging friend Mave is trying to help him pick up the pieces.

She tries to assure him that the fact that his wife is seeing a Milanese man is a good thing; that it will make his wife feel that she's scruffy and so she will eventually long for her unkempt husband again. Mave thoroughly disapproves of the self-help books that Dennis is weeping into. She has a much more practical approach to her own love life, dismissing Dennis's accusation that her lover is a womaniser with, 'So, I needed to be womanised. I was losing my sheen!'

Read by Jennifer Lee Jellicorse.


WED 23:00 Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard (b00qj274)
Series 1

Ogre Bin Laden

Written by David Kay and Gavin Smith, Mordrin McDonald is a 2000 year old Wizard living in the modern world where regular bin collections and watching Countdown are just as important as slaying the odd Jakonty Dragon.

In this episode Mordrin takes matters into his own hands to try and solve his erratic bin collections, and decides to magic up a rubbish eating Ogre with disastrous consequences.

Featuring and written by Scottish stand up David Kay and starring Gordon Kennedy and Jack Docherty, Mordrin McDonald mixes the magical with the mundane and offers a hilarious take on the life of a modern day Wizard.

Step into the magically mundane world that is the life of 21st century wizard Mordrin McDonald. An isolated 2000-year-old sorcerer with enough power in his small finger to destroy a town, yet not even enough clout to get his bins emptied on time by the local council. Even for such a skilful sorcerer modern life is rubbish!

Mordrin is deadpan, dry and makes delicious jams. He initially set up as a plc for income tax relief, but has found it a useful vehicle to help him bolster his Wizard skill set and his range of services. (Even a wizard has to diversify). He's been running Fruity Potions from his cave for the past few years, in between completing the odd quest as instructed by the Wizard Council. In the past his services were to help kings in battles of good and evil, or as he prefers to put it, assisting with neighbour disputes.

Cast:
Mordrin: David Kay
Geoff: Gordon Kennedy
Heather: Cora Bissett
Councillor Campbell: Callum Cuthbertson
Flora: Eleanor Thom
Jim The Joiner: Grant O'Rourke

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 The News at Bedtime (b00pftgl)
Series 1

Episode 4

Twin presenters John Tweedledum and Jim Tweedledee present in-depth news analysis covering the latest stories happening this 'once upon a time'.

Jim reports live from the launch site of the Nurseryland space programme as preparations are finalised to put a cow over the moon.

With Peter Donaldson, Lewis MacLeod, Alex MacQueen, Lucy Montgomery, Vicki Pepperdine, Dan Tetsell.

Written by Ian Hislop and Nick Newman.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00qgty4)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



THURSDAY 11 FEBRUARY 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00qg4wy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qg4z2)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qg530)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qg54c)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00qg570)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qg599)
Daily prayer and reflection with Mark Coffey.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00qg5cp)
Charlotte Smith speaks to the man who's been asked by Prince Charles to get people using wool again. And Farming Today hears how new EU rules governing how and when pesticides are used could cost farmers 176 million pounds.


THU 06:00 Today (b00qg5fz)
With Evan Davis and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00qj2nq)
Mathematics' Unintended Consequences

Melvyn Bragg and guests John Barrow, Colva Roney-Dougal and Marcus du Sautoy explore the unintended consequences of mathematical discoveries, from the computer to online encryption, to alternating current and predicting the path of asteroids.In his book The Mathematician's Apology (1941), the Cambridge mathematician GH Hardy expressed his reverence for pure maths, and celebrated its uselessness in the real world. Yet one of the branches of pure mathematics in which Hardy excelled was number theory, and it was this field which played a major role in the work of his younger colleague, Alan Turing, as he worked first to crack Nazi codes at Bletchley Park and then on one of the first computers.Melvyn Bragg and guests explore the many surprising and completely unintended uses to which mathematical discoveries have been put. These include:The cubic equations which led, after 400 years, to the development of alternating current - and the electric chair.The centuries-old work on games of chance which eventually contributed to the birth of population statistics.The discovery of non-Euclidean geometry, which crucially provided an 'off-the-shelf' solution which helped Albert Einstein forge his theory of relativity.The 17th-century theorem which became the basis for credit card encryption.In the light of these stories, Melvyn and his guests discuss how and why pure mathematics has had such a range of unintended consequences.John Barrow is Professor of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cambridge and Professor of Geometry at Gresham College, London; Colva Roney-Dougal is Lecturer in Pure Mathematics at the University of St Andrews; Marcus du Sautoy is Charles Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford.


THU 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mh)
The Beginning of Science and Literature (1500 - 700 BC)

Mold Gold Cape

Director of the British Museum Neil MacGregor retells the history of human development from the first stone axe to the credit card, using 100 selected objects from the Museum.

Neil MacGregor continues to explore the world of around 3,600 years ago through some of the most powerful objects that remain - discovered in modern day Iraq, Crete, Egypt and now Wales.

In 1833 a group of workmen were looking for stones in a field near the village of Mold in North Wales when they unearthed a burial site with a skeleton covered by a crushed sheet of pure gold. Neil tells the story of what has become known at the British Museum as the Mold Gold Cape and tries to envisage the society that made it. Nothing like the contemporary courts of the pharaohs of Egypt and the palaces of the Minoans in Crete seem to have existed in Britain at that time, but he imagines a people with surprisingly sophisticated skills and social structures.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qg61v)
Antony Worrall Thompson; Women's mental health in the military

Chef Antony Worrall Thompson on diabetes. Plus, women's mental health in the armed forces; and novelist Janet Skeslien Charles.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qjw66)
Writing the Century 12: 1966-1969 - Pleidiol Wyf I'm Gwlad/True To My Land

Episode 4

Series exploring the 20th century through diaries and correspondence of real people.

Sharon and friends petition the BBC for more programmes in Welsh, while Glanmor puts the case for a Welsh commentator for the Investiture.

Dramatised by Tina Pepler from documents at the National Library of Wales.

Glanmor ...... William Thomas
Fay ...... Helen Griffin
Sharon ...... Elin Phillips
Mami ...... Sharon Morgan
Gwen ...... Anya Murphy
Iwan ...... Dewi Rhys Williams
John Rowley ...... Richard Mitchley
George Cook ...... Richard Nichols
Gareth ...... Liam James
Rhys ...... Sam Jones
Dewi ...... Scott Arthur
Mike ...... Gareth Williams
Janet ...... Catrin Stewart

Original music by Nicolai Abrahamsen.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00qj2ns)
As the Greek government tries to tackle the country's black economy, Malcolm Brabant is in Athens - Michael Bristow tells of a human rights lawyer, missing in China - Peter Day explains how high-speed internet is coming to the villages of Rwanda - and as the doors of the old BBC bureau in Paris close for the final time, Emma Jane Kirby reminisces on the times spent there.


THU 11:30 Capturing America: Mark Lawson's History of Modern American Literature (b00qj2nv)
Fighters and Writers

Mark Lawson tells the story of how American writing became the literary superpower of the 20th century, telling the nation's stories of money, power, sex, religion and war.

Mark traces the way a group of young Americans returning from WWII turned the US into a literary superpower.

Contributors include Philip Roth, Toni Morrison and Edward Albee as well as Norman Mailer, John Updike and Kurt Vonnegut, the last three recorded in the final major interviews of their lives.

Drawing on interviews with dozens of key writers and critics, Mark Lawson examines the role of authors in capturing the nature of the US and explores the successes and controversies of America's literary output. He shows how differences of race, region and gender informed and expanded the stories being told. And he nominates his candidate for the title of the most unfairly neglected great American novelist.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00qg6zw)
Consumer news and issues with Shari Vahl.


THU 12:30 Face the Facts (b00qjwvw)
Payment Holiday

John Waite investigates the payment processing company which refused to pass on vast sums of money from customers who bought holidays online, undermining the balance sheets of struggling travel firms. Yet at the same time, the company's chief executive was promising to save one of those travel firms from failure with major investment of his own. Despite the fact his business is based in England and handles hundreds of millions of pounds, it was not regulated by the UK's financial services watchdog. The travel firms involved have had to resort to threats of legal action to try to get the disputed money back.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00qg71h)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00qg73t)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00qhl63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00qgs94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00qhr42)
Say What You Want to Hear - The Startup

By Tim Wright. Do you have things you say to yourself? Things you wished you'd said, or wish other people had said? Dotcom entrepreneurs Erik and Mike set up Say What You Want to Hear, a website for people to voice these secret thoughts - and you can take part on the Radio 4 website.

Erik ...... Stephen Tompkinson
Mike ...... Ewan Bailey
Scarlett ...... Keely Beresford
Stephen ...... John Biggins
Roseanne ...... Alison Pettit
Max ...... Nigel Hastings

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b00qfy6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00qg0qp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00qhrk2)
Casual Cruelty

The Villager

Series of short stories by the American author Shirley Jackson, who wrote in a style of 'creeping unease' from the 1940s until her death in 1965.

Miss Clarence's visit to an apartment in Greenwich Village, New York, gives her an unexpected insight into other people's lives as well as her own.

Read by Glenne Headly.

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 A Guide to Woodland Birds (b00c0fb6)
Conifer Specialists

Brett Westwood , Stephen Moss and wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson identify birds that live on conifers, such as the siskin, goldcrest, coal tit and crossbill.

Produced by Sarah Blunt.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2008.


THU 16:00 Bookclub (b00qg1hs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00qjx0c)
Millions of Toyota owners have had their cars recalled for a variety of design problems, among them the energy-saving hybrid Prius, in which some drivers report concerns with the brakes, which are controlled by computer software. Quentin Cooper asks if cars are becoming too complex to ensure safety, or if 'drive-by-wire' is inevitable in cars of the future.

After 60 years, the BBC's Research and Development department is moving out of its grand home in Surrey. Quentin visits Kingswood Warren, where FM radio, digital audio broadcasting and HD TV were developed, meets some of the pioneers of broadcast engineering and asks what new technologies are on the horizon today

Also in the programme, a man preserved in permafrost for 4,000 years has led to the first ancient human genome being revealed, and how quantum physics has helped create a portable magnetic monitor to diagnose heart problems.


THU 17:00 PM (b00qgsgc)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qgshz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Mark Thomas: The Manifesto (b00qjx5j)
Series 2

Episode 2

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto. Comedian-activist, Mark Thomas creates a People's Manifesto, taking suggestions from his studio audience and then getting them to vote for the best. The winner of each show will be enforceable by law, so pay attention.

This edition includes such policies as forcing Ofsted inpectors to teach; taxing commodities trading; and paying off the mortgages of the customers of failed banks.

Produced by Ed Morrish.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00qgs96)
Joe reckons that Alan's Lent camping project is an opportunity for the Grundys. If Alan camped there, it would set a precedent for using the field as a camp site. But Eddie tells him that's moonshine.

Helen tells Ian she's had a card from Annette saying she'd got to her gran's ok and she's making a fuss of her. Ian's shocked when Helen tells him Annette was pregnant and that although Helen wanted her to have the baby, Annette didn't. Ian says he knows how much it hurts when there's a baby involved. He went through it with Madds, but ultimately kids weren't for Adam and him. Helen's sympathetic.

Eddie goes for an interview as a livestock handler at Borchester market. He is hindered at the interview by Joe hanging around and telling the auctioneer about the time Eddie frightened a bull at the county show by revving up his quad bike - although Eddie was the only one who could calm it down...

Later, Eddie pretends to Clarrie that he was unsuccessful because of Joe, but then tells her to crack open the Borsetshire Beauty cider - he got the job! They look forward to good times ahead.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00qgsnc)
My Name Is Khan is a classic Bollywood love story set in America in the aftermath of the 11th September 2001 attacks. It's a joint venture with Fox Studios, starring Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Kahn, and charts the story of an Indian Muslim man who suffers from Aspergers syndrome. After 9/11 he is arrested at Los Angeles airport when his behaviour is mistaken as suspicious. He embarks on an epic journey to see President Obama in a bid to clear his name. Kirsty Lang and critic Sarfraz Manzoor discuss the film.

Kirsty Lang visits artist Michael Landy to check on the progress of his installation, Art Bin. He unveiled the piece - a huge container into which unwanted works of art can be thrown - at the end of January.

Kirsty Lang talks to playwright Bola Agbaje about Off The Endz, her new play exploring the options for three young black Britons who grew up together on a London estate.

The Hacienda nightclub launched the global acid house and 'Madchester' music scenes, started the careers of bands including the Happy Mondays and paved the way for the current club scene. Yet it lost millions. Now one of the owners, Peter Hook, formerly of New Order, is starting a new club in the hope of being as influential on the current music scene. Anne-Marie Bullock reports on whether it'll be so easy this time around.


THU 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00qjx5l)
Collapse of the Copenhagen Climate Summit

Business leaders say they face unfair competition following the collapse of the Copenhagen climate summit. Europe is pushing ahead with tighter controls on greenhouse gases, in stark contrast to the US, China and India. Simon Cox investigates why the summit failed and assesses the impact on industry in the UK.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00qjx5n)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top executives from the world of public relations to discuss exactly what it is that they do. He also finds out what advice they would give to companies in crisis; what should they say when it all goes wrong?

Evan is joined by chairman of Chime Communications Lord Bell, chief executive of Editorial Intelligence Julia Hobsbawm and chief executive of Edelman UK Robert Phillips.


THU 21:00 Out Of This World (b00qjx5q)
Scientists are warning that our planet is fast running out of many essential materials. Dwindling reserves of platinum, copper and phosphorous could create crises in the electronics, medical and farming worlds. There are fears that competition between countries for remaining deposits will result in 'resource wars'.

Materials scientist Mark Miodownik finds out how serious the situation has become and asks what scientists, politicians and economists can do to secure the earth's resources for future generations.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00qj2nq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00qgt9w)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qgtcp)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qj37l)
Capturing America

The Astronomer

As part of Radio 4's Capturing America series, Mark Lawson selects short pieces by five American authors.

By John Updike. Walter's religious revival is at its height, and he has a near obsession for Kierkegaard. So he is not looking forward to the arrival of his dinner guest, the imposing and revered scientist and astronomer Bela. However, it's not theological debate but after-dinner chit chat that peels away Bela's bravura, and Walter realises that perhaps his guest is not so invincible after all.

Read by Kerry Shale.


THU 23:00 House on Fire (b00qjxdz)
Series 1

Hot Water

Episode title: Hot Water

A final dose of house-sharing hell with the last in the current series of 'House on Fire'. Vicky and Matt's boiler's on the blink but fixing it seems likely to get them into even more hot water.

Vicky - Emma Pierson
Matt - JODY LATHAM
Col. Bill - RUPERT VANSITTART
Julie - JANINE DUVITSKI
Peter - PHILIP JACKSON

With Fergus Craig & Colin Hoult

Directed by Clive Brill & Dan Hine
Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 From the Ban to the Booker (b00cxqq7)
Episode 1

Best-selling author Val McDermid examines the development of the lesbian novel and its transition from the margins to the mainstream.

In 1928 The Well of Loneliness was tried for obscenity and banned because of its lesbian content. Eighty years on and Sarah Waters and Ali Smith have, between them, been nominated five times for the Booker Prize.

With contributions from some of Britain's finest writers, including Jeanette Winterson, Sarah Waters and Ali Smith, this first programme looks at the furore surrounding The Well and the repercussions of the ban on subsequent novelists. Virginia Woolf's Orlando was published in the same year but escaped the censor.

The programme includes a rare BBC recording of Vita Sackville-West, the inspiration for Woolf's modernist masterpiece.



FRIDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00qg4x0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00qg4z4)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00qg532)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00qg54f)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00qg572)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00qg59c)
Daily prayer and reflection with Mark Coffey.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00qg5cr)
Farm land prices have risen 164 per cent in ten years, beating the London housing market and the FTSE 100 share index. And as the New Zealand lamb season starts, Charlotte Smith hears that this 'fresh' meat is typically six weeks old.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00qg5g1)
With James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00qg0r2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mk)
The Beginning of Science and Literature (1500 - 700 BC)

Statue of Ramesses

A History of the World in 100 Objects has arrived in Egypt around 1250BC. At the heart of this programme is the British Museum's giant statue of the king Ramesses II, an inspiration to Shelly and a remarkable ruler who build monuments all over Egypt. He inspired a line of future pharaohs and was worshipped as a god a thousand years later. He lived to be over 90 and fathered some 100 children! Neil MacGregor considers the achievements of Ramesses II in fixing the image of imperial Egypt for the rest of the world. And the sculptor Antony Gormley, the man responsible for a contemporary giant statue, The Angel of the North, considers the towering figure of Ramesses as an enduring work of art.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00qg61x)
Kelly McGillis, Clare Morrall; Female entrepreneurs

Hollywood superstar Kelly McGillis on her life and career. Plus, author Clare Morrall on her literary success; and female entrepreneurs.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00qjw68)
Writing the Century 12: 1966-1969 - Pleidiol Wyf I'm Gwlad/True To My Land

Episode 5

Series exploring the 20th century through diaries and correspondence of real people.

Sharon protests against the Investiture by taking part in a vigil at Cilmeri. Then news comes through that two men have blown themselves up on the way to plant a bomb on the railway line. Glanmor feels the tension in the air at the Investiture but all goes off without a hitch. Then Sharon makes a life-changing decision.

Dramatised by Tina Pepler from documents at the National Library of Wales.

Glanmor ...... William Thomas
Fay ...... Helen Griffin
Sharon ...... Elin Phillips
Mami ...... Sharon Morgan
Gwen ...... Anya Murphy
Iwan ...... Dewi Rhys Williams
John Rowley ...... Richard Mitchley
George Cook ...... Richard Nichols
Gareth ...... Liam James
Rhys ...... Sam Jones
Dewi ...... Scott Arthur
Mike ...... Gareth Williams
Janet ...... Catrin Stewart

Original music by Nicolai Abrahamsen.


FRI 11:00 The Mystery of the Moving Statues (b00qld0v)
In 1985, Ireland was gripped in a religious fervour as worshippers flocked to the village of Balinspittle to see mysterious moving religious statues. Twenty-five years later, Gerry Anderson joins thousands of people gathered at a west of Ireland religious shrine in expectation of seeing a vision of the Virgin Mary. Is Ireland suffering a 'kind of collective nervous breakdown' or does it need magical visions to make sense of difficult times?


FRI 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b00qld0x)
Cast in Order of Disappearance

Episode 3

Dramatised by Jeremy Front from the novel by Simon Brett.

Someone is determined to kill Jodie; can Charles stop them before it's too late?

Charles Paris ...... Bill Nighy
Jodie ...... Martine McCutcheon
Frances ...... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ...... Jon Glover
Juliet ...... Tilly Gaunt
Nick ...... Rhys Jennings
Elspeth ...... Kate Layden
Terry ...... Philip Fox
Yvonne ...... Avril Clark

Directed by Sally Avens.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00qg6zy)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00qg71k)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00qg73w)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00qld0z)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00qgs96)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Bad Faith (b00qldg4)
Vengeance Is Mine

Lenny Henry stars as Jake Thorne, a Birmingham police chaplain who's lost his faith. Jake gets involved in a restorative justice programme which tries to reconcile a bereaved mother and the woman responsible for killing her daughter.

Jake Thorne ..... Lenny Henry
Michael ....... Danny Sapani
Isaac Thorne ...... Oscar James
Suzanne Bloomberg ..... Tracy-Ann Oberman
Barry ..... Edward Clayton
Estelle ..... Lolita Chakrabarti
Stacey ..... Kerri Mclean
Tricia ..... Tessa Nicholson
Other parts by Kate Layden and Melissa Advani
Producer ..... Steven Canny
Writer ..... Peter Jukes


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00qldxq)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Anne Swithinbank, Chris Beardshaw and Pippa Greenwood answer questions from the gardeners of Lacock and District Garden and Allotment Association in Wiltshire.

Pippa Greenwood attends a meeting of snowdrop-lovers.

In part two of the Behind the Scenes at Chelsea series, we meet the nurserymen involved in design execution.

Includes gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 A Guide to Woodland Birds (b00c4mf9)
The Big Stuff

Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss and Chris Watson identify the sounds of jays, tawny owls, sparrowhawks and other larger woodland birds.

Producer Sarah Blunt.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2008.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00qldxs)
John Wilson presents the obituary series. Marking the lives of Alexander McQueen, Sir John Dankworth, Charlie Wilson and Ian Carmichael.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00qldxv)
The Last King Of Scotland star James McAvoy talks Tolstoy, sneezing garden gnomes and his latest film, The Last Station.

Fashion guru Tom Ford discusses the links between designing clothes and directing film, and why he spent his own money to finance his debut film, A Single Man.

Matthew Sweet picks another neglected British gem, I See A Dark Stranger.

Anil Sinanan discusses the crossover between Bollywood and Hollywod and the latest example of this growing trend, My Name Is Khan.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00qgsgf)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00qgsj1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00qldxx)
Series 70

Episode 6

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Will Smith, Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton and Milton Jones.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00qgs98)
When Joe suggests to Alan that he camps on Grundy's Field for his Lent project, Alan teases Joe by pretending he thinks Joe's going to be camping too. Clarrie dismisses the idea of using the field, because the whole point is to be visible. Alan leaves glum Joe a sponsorship form, as he seems so keen to support the cause...

Clarrie's initially pleased by the artwork on Eddie's new van but not when she sees her name over the top of a smiley sun. She tells Eddie it makes her look fat and stupid. He'd better get it painted out quickly, otherwise they're going to fall out big time.

As they get ready for their day out Jill, Chris and Peggy discuss the latest lot of graffiti on the cricket pavilion. They have a great time at the hat exhibition reminiscing about the past, including the time Phil first noticed Jill at the village fete.

At the end of a lovely day, they go back to Jill's. But when Jill pops into the sitting room to see if Phil wants a cup of tea she stops suddenly, realising that Phil has died, sitting peacefully in his armchair. With tears welling up, she utters his name.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00qgsnf)
Arts news and reviews with Kirsty Lang.

Sebastian Barry on his play about Hans Christian Andersen's eventful visit to the home of Charles Dickens.

Natalie Haynes reviews the film Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief.

Musician Seasick Steve, who has found fame in his 60s, performs live in the studio.

And there is a report on the new Athol Fugard theatre in Cape Town, built on the site of the former township of District Six.


FRI 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00qg5mk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00qldxz)
Shaun Ley chairs the topical debate from Burnley.

The panellists are UKIP chairman Paul Nuttall, former editor of The Sun Kelvin MacKenzie, professor emeritus at the Royal College of Arts Christopher Frayling and professor of politics and women's studies at the University of York Haleh Afshar.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00qldy1)
Lisa Jardine reflects on the power of music and the value of musical education.


FRI 21:00 15 Minute Drama (b00qldzb)
Writing the Century 12: 1966-1969 - Pleidiol Wyf I'm Gwlad/True To My Land

Omnibus

Series exploring the 20th century through diaries and correspondence of real people.

In the 1960s Welsh identity was under threat. Sharon Morgan was a young history student at Cardiff University; Sir Glanmor Williams was an eminent historian and a member of the Broadcasting Council for Wales. Despite their differences, the student activist and the establishment figure shared the same passion for Wales and the Welsh language. We follow them through these turbulent years as the nation begins to reassert itself.

Dramatised by Tina Pepler from documents at the National Library of Wales.

Glanmor ...... William Thomas
Fay ...... Helen Griffin
Sharon ...... Elin Phillips
Mami ...... Sharon Morgan
Gwen ...... Anya Murphy
Iwan ...... Dewi Rhys Williams
John Rowley ...... Richard Mitchley
George Cook ...... Richard Nichols
Gareth ...... Liam James
Rhys ...... Sam Jones
Dewi ...... Scott Arthur
Mike ...... Gareth Williams
Janet ...... Catrin Stewart

Original music by Nicolai Abrahamsen.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00qgt9y)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00qgtcr)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

A month on from the earthquake, a day of mourning in Haiti.

With European economies contracting, is a 'double dip' recession looming?

Politicians battle over the grey vote.

Why Bollywood, cricket and politics don't mix.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00qgtwl)
Capturing America

The Diaries of Tennessee Williams

As part of Radio 4's Capturing America series, Mark Lawson selects short pieces by five American authors.

The diaries of Tennessee Williams reveal a social butterfly whose gregariousness is tempered by self doubt. Assignations with lovers, named only by their initials, pepper the extracts covering his burgeoning career as a writer in the 1930s, the post-golden age of A Streetcar Named Desire and the intimate and moving entries from the latter stages of his life. Throughout, his wit and lightness of touch belie a more troubled soul.

Read by Paul Birchard.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00qhrx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 From the Ban to the Booker (b00d0hvz)
Episode 2

Best-selling author Val McDermid examines the development of the lesbian novel and its transition from the margins to the mainstream.

In 1950, a novel called Women's Barracks was published. It sold in the millions and sparked an entire new genre: lesbian pulp fiction. Val McDermid samples Tender Torment, Warped Women and Satan Was a Lesbian. These books weren't entirely positive in their portrayal of lesbian life; Patricia Highsmith's Carol was a rare, classic exception. Maureen Duffy recalls the publication of her critically acclaimed Microcosm in 1966 and Val examines the influence of feminist publishing houses on the growth of novels with a lesbian theme. Jeanette Winterson talks about why she hates the label 'lesbian novel' and Sarah Waters describes the importance of television drama in bringing lesbian fiction into the living rooms of the nation.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00qg63d)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00qjw6j)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00qjw64)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00qjw66)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00qjw68)

15 Minute Drama 21:00 FRI (b00qldzb)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 FRI (b00qld0x)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00qhrx8)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00qhrx8)

A Guide to Woodland Birds 15:45 MON (b00bfk03)

A Guide to Woodland Birds 15:45 TUE (b00bvbzy)

A Guide to Woodland Birds 15:45 WED (b00bydgm)

A Guide to Woodland Birds 15:45 THU (b00c0fb6)

A Guide to Woodland Birds 15:45 FRI (b00c4mf9)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 SAT (b00qb5y1)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 MON (b00qg5my)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 MON (b00qg5my)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 TUE (b00qg5my)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 TUE (b00qg5mc)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 TUE (b00qg5mc)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 WED (b00qg5mc)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 WED (b00qg5mf)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 WED (b00qg5mf)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 THU (b00qg5mf)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 THU (b00qg5mh)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 THU (b00qg5mh)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 FRI (b00qg5mh)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 FRI (b00qg5mk)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 FRI (b00qg5mk)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00qf7lj)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00qldy1)

Act Your Age 18:30 TUE (b00qhrxb)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b008ydqb)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00b736m)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00qhrjy)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00qhrk0)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00qhrk2)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00qg44x)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00qbxwj)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00qh0zf)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00qfzc9)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00qf7bq)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00qldxz)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00qfzcw)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00qfzcw)

Bad Faith 14:15 FRI (b00qldg4)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00qfzlj)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00qfzlj)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00qgyyn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00qj37n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00qj37g)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00qj37j)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00qj37l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00qgtwl)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b00qg1hs)

Bookclub 16:00 THU (b00qg1hs)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00qbvg7)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00qg0qy)

Capturing America: Mark Lawson's History of Modern American Literature 11:30 THU (b00qj2nv)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00qhrxj)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00qhrxj)

Class Dismissed 20:45 WED (b00qj272)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00q9l86)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00qg17p)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00qhl63)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00qhl63)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00qg0r2)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00qg0r2)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00qgyyl)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00qjwvy)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00qj1qv)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00qhr42)

Ed Reardon's Week 11:30 MON (b00qgxxb)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00qfy73)

Fabulous 23:00 TUE (b00qhrxl)

Face the Facts 12:30 THU (b00qjwvw)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 WED (b00qj1qq)

Famous Footsteps 09:30 TUE (b00qhmfp)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00qfy6v)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00qg5fs)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00qg5ck)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00qg5cm)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00qg5cp)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00qg5cr)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00qf6t6)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00qld0z)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00qcj8p)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00qhrxd)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00qfzc1)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00qj2ns)

From the Ban to the Booker 23:30 THU (b00cxqq7)

From the Ban to the Booker 23:30 FRI (b00d0hvz)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00qgsnw)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00qgsn7)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00qgsn9)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00qgsnc)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00qgsnf)

Gameboy v The Mongolian Steppe 14:45 SUN (b00clmhc)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00qf7bg)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00qldxq)

House on Fire 23:00 THU (b00qjxdz)

I Was A Teenage Dotcom Millionaire 16:00 TUE (b00qhrpk)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00qj2nq)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00qj2nq)

In Pursuit of Treasure 13:30 SUN (b00qg0rb)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00qhrxg)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00qbw66)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00qgz7x)

Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats 15:30 SAT (b00qc036)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00qf7bj)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00qldxs)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b00qg0qf)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00qfzcp)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00qhrc9)

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto 18:30 THU (b00qjx5j)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00qjx0c)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00qfb1t)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00qfzl6)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00qg4yw)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00qg4wt)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00qg4ww)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00qg4wy)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00qg4x0)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00qj1ql)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00qj1qz)

Milton's Music 13:30 TUE (b00qhql9)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00qj1qx)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00qfzc3)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00qfzc3)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00qck2s)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00qj218)

Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard 23:00 WED (b00qj274)

Nature 11:00 TUE (b00qhmfr)

Nature 21:00 WED (b00qhmfr)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00qfb3v)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00qfzlg)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00qg593)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00qg56w)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00qg56y)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00qg570)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00qg572)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00qfzll)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00qfb41)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00qg0qk)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00qg0qt)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00qfzcy)

News 13:00 SAT (b00qfzc7)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b00nvzyv)

Out Of This World 21:00 THU (b00qjx5q)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00qfzcf)

PM 17:00 MON (b00qgshs)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00qgsg7)

PM 17:00 WED (b00qgsg9)

PM 17:00 THU (b00qgsgc)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00qgsgf)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00qg43y)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00q9lzn)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00qg23w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00qfb3x)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00qg5ch)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00qg595)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00qg597)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00qg599)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00qg59c)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00qfzcr)

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Quote... Unquote 13:30 MON (b00qgxxd)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00qg0qp)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00qg0qp)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00qg0qp)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b00qfy6s)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b00qfy6s)

Robo Wars 20:00 MON (b00qh04j)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00b0c4h)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00qfy71)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00qfzct)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00qfb3q)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00qfzlb)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00qfb3n)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00qfzcm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00qg43w)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00qgsn5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00qgshv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00qgshx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00qgshz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00qgsj1)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00qfzln)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00qfzln)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00qgvzt)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00qgvzt)

Stefan Gates's Cover Story 10:30 SAT (b00qfzbw)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00qg0qw)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00qg0qm)

Taking a Stand 09:00 TUE (b00qhmfm)

Taking a Stand 21:30 TUE (b00qhmfm)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00qg0r0)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00qg44v)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00qg44v)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00qgsbc)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00qgsbc)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00qgs92)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00qgs92)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00qgs94)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00qgs94)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00qgs96)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00qgs96)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00qgs98)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00qf5p9)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00qjx5n)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00qf7bl)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00qldxv)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00qg0r4)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00qg0r4)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00qj1qs)

The Mystery of the Moving Statues 11:00 FRI (b00qld0v)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00qf7bn)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00qldxx)

The News at Bedtime 23:15 WED (b00pftgl)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00qjx5l)

The Voices Who Dug Up The Past 11:00 MON (b00qgwck)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00qfzbz)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00qg0r8)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00qgtwj)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00qgtck)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00qgtcm)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00qgtcp)

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The Write Stuff 18:30 WED (b00qj216)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00qcjwn)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00qj214)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00qgtyb)

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Today 07:00 SAT (b00qfy6z)

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Weekend Warriors No Longer 11:00 WED (b00qj1qn)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00qg4k2)

With Great Pleasure 11:30 TUE (b00qhq5w)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00qfzcc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00qg63b)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00qg61n)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00qg61q)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00qg61v)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b00qg7d2)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00qg719)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b00qfb3z)