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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 JANUARY 2010

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00prgj0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00pnstc)
Must You Go?

Episode 5

Antonia Fraser reads from her diary of her life with Harold Pinter.

Pinter is still working, still grasping at the joy of life, until a double blow falls. First the death of his oldest friend, the playwright Simon Gray, and then his own fateful diagnosis.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00prgj2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00prgj4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00prgj6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00prgj8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00prgk7)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev Kelvin Holdsworth.


SAT 05:45 A Box of Wittgensteins (b00g44sj)
The One-Handed Pianist

The great-niece of philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, Margaret Stonborough, talks to artist and historian Michael Huey as she delves into six boxes of newly-inherited family archives. As she digs deeper into the talented but tortured lives of the Wittgensteins she finds her cramped London house becoming ever more crowded with her larger-than-life forbears.

Margaret uncovers details of the life of her great uncle Paul Wittgenstein who, after the First World War, was determined to continue his career as a concert pianist, despite the loss of his right arm.

The readers are Sarah Finch, Nicholas Rowe and Dan Starkey.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00prgn3)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00prgn5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00ps0hx)
Herefordshire

Richard Uridge muses on the idea that one tiny fruit - the strawberry - has transformed both the physical and cultural landscape of Herefordshire, with the arrival of pickers from Eastern Europe and the building of polytunnels to grow the fruit all year round.

He meets some of the young people from countries such as Lithuania and Poland who have taken the brave decision to settle in the county, sometimes moving on from fruit picking to start their own businesses, and discovers how new friendships are being made between local people and the migrant workers. On a very snowy hill in woodland overlooking the city of Hereford, he meets one woman who says her life has been enriched by the friendships she's made with some of the workers, and how she, in turn, can take credit for introducing the Hokey Cokey to some of the Baltic States.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00ps0hz)
Farming Today This Week

Changes in weather patterns are affecting the future of farming. Charlotte Smith visits one farmer who is fighting to stop his land disappearing underwater. She investigates how farmers may have to think differently in the future about the crops they plant. And we hear how, in some areas, they are still battling the elements to feed their livestock.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00ps0ts)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00ps0tv)
With Evan Davis and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00ps1h8)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. The Rev Richard Coles is joined by novelist Tariq Goddard. With poetry from Matt Harvey.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00ps1hb)
John McCarthy meets Christopher Aslan Alexander, who ran a carpet weaving workshop in Khiva in Uzbekistan to revive traditional skills and provide work and a focus for local women. He reveals a country that is a confusion of Mohammedism, Marxism and modernism.

John also talks to author Deborah Moggach, who visited Ghana to find out about the role of women and girls in society there and discovered a melting pot of the ancient and the modern.

And Professor Clive Harber has been visiting Africa for nearly 40 years as an academic specialising in education. He tells John about African academic life, how the school systems there treat girls in particular and about some of the spectacular wildlife parks he has been to over the years.


SAT 10:30 What's So Great About ...? (b00ps1hd)
Series 2

Samuel Beckett

Lenny Henry questions the iconic status of people or things held dear by many.

Despite having seen Waiting for Godot half a dozen times and studying the work of the modernist Irish writer as part of his degree, Lenny has never really completely tuned in to the work of Samuel Beckett. He sets out to rectify this by talking to a glorious cast of Beckettophiles, who are determined to make the great playwright and poet come alive for him. He talks to actor and director Simon McBurney, actress Fiona Shaw, Beckett's long-term friend and publisher John Calder, and the man who was authorised to write his biography, James Knowlson. Lenny also joins a rehearsal by the Godot Theatre players, some of whom knew the playwright well, and hears their thoughts on tuning in to the Beckett idiom.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00ps3w7)
Jackie Ashley looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

Alastair Campbell, giving evidence to the Chilcot Inquiry on Iraq, said he stood by everything he had done as the prime minister's head of communications in the run up to war. Denis MacShane, a minister in the Foreign Office at the time, and Norman Baker, a Liberal Democrat opposed to the war, evaluate the strength of his testimony.

Bankers' bonuses are still causing the government embarrassment. Angela Knight of the British Bankers' Association says they are necessary to maintain a successful banking industry in Britain, while Michael Fallon, Conservative member of the Treasury Select Committee, thinks they are a gross misuse of taxpayers' money.

Also in the programme: accountability of cabinet ministers in the House of Lords (Lord Tyler and Peter Luff MP discuss), and snow chaos - should the government have done more? Justine Greening (Conservative) and Phyllis Starkey (Labour) discuss.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00ps3w9)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00ps3wc)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00prd54)
Series 70

Episode 2

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Andy Hamilton, Miles Jupp, John Gordillo and Fred Macaulay.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00ps3wf)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00ps3wh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00prd56)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Cheddar in Somerset. The panellists are novelist, playwright and critic Louise Doughty, historian Peter Hennessy, shadow home secretary Chris Grayling, and Ben Bradshaw, secretary of state for culture, media and sport.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00ps3wk)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00p016z)
Dover and the Sleeping Beauty

Comedy thriller by Paul Mendelson, set in the 1960s, featuring Scotland Yard's most unwanted man, Chief Inspector Wilfred Dover, and his long-suffering gofer, Sergeant McGregor. A young woman, Isabel Slatcher, has been in an irreversible coma for months after being shot outside her local church in a small northern town. Now she has been smothered - murdered. Who killed her? Was it the person that shot her and why have they waited until now to complete their evil crime?

Chief Inspector Dover ...... Kenneth Cranham
Sergeant McGregor ...... Stuart McQuarrie
Chief Constable Muckle ...... Philip Whitchurch
Mrs Muckle ...... Colleen Prendergast
Reverend Bonnington ...... Shaun Prendergast
Mrs Horsley ...... Geraldine McNulty
Violet ...... Debbie Arnold
Freddie Gash ...... Ross Adams
Muckle ...... Cesca Bonetti

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed by David Ian Neville.


SAT 15:30 Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats (b00pqj0z)
Series 8

Humphrey Lyttelton

Ken Clarke MP profiles great jazz musicians of the 20th century.

Many Radio 4 listeners knew 'Humph' as the hilariously deadpan chairman of I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue. But the much-loved broadcaster was also an exemplary and influential jazz musician. Louis Armstrong dubbed him 'the top trumpet man in England today', and not without reason. A master of his instrument as well as several others, he spearheaded the post-war traditional jazz revival in Britain, later forming his own band that set the standard for British jazz for several decades.

Friend and fellow BBC jazz presenter Alyn Shipton joins Ken in the studio to discuss Britain's most important jazz musician.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00ps50r)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Highlights of this week's Woman's Hour programmes with Jane Garvey.

War widow Christina Schmid talks about rebuilding her life; Celia Imrie on stepping from Cranford on to the stage; why help is needed for people who survive cancer; the working-class family and what politicians could do for it; what women in 1950s films tell us about how society was changing; and stop before you throw out your old furniture - could it have arrived at the cutting edge of retro?


SAT 17:00 PM (b00ps5dr)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Felicity Evans, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00ps5dt)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00ps5dw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00ps5dy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ps5f0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00ps5f2)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

He is joined by the actor John Hurt to discuss his latest role in the film 44 Inch Chest, Silent Witness star Emilia Fox and the man behind The Fast Show and Bellamy's People, Paul Whitehouse.

Emma Freud talks to Rachel Johnson, the editor of Britain's oldest women's magazine, The Lady.

With comedy from Ava Vidal and music from Biffy Clyro and Jesse Dee.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00ps5f4)
Arlene Foster

Jonathan Maitland charts the meteoric rise of Northern Ireland's acting First Minister, Arlene Foster. She is stepping into the shoes of Peter Robinson and is the first woman to hold the top post. But can she make a permanent mark on the face of politics in Northern Ireland?


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00ps5f6)
Tom Sutcliffe is joined by poet Kate Clanchy, literary critic John Carey and comedian and writer Danny Robins to discuss the cultural highlights of the week - featuring a man whose life is spent up in the air, a woman who's legally blonde, a reclusive movie star arriving in Donegal, Doctorow's eccentric brothers and A History of the World in 100 Objects.

The film Up in the Air stars George Clooney as Ryan Bingham, a corporate downsizing expert whose cherished life on the road is threatened just as he is on the cusp of reaching ten million frequent flyer miles and just after he's met the frequent-traveller woman of his dreams. The anguish, hostility, and despair of his 'clients' has left him falsely compassionate, living out of a suitcase, and loving every second of it until his boss hires arrogant young Natalie, who has developed a method of video conferencing that will allow termination without ever leaving the office.

Legally Blonde, The Musical is a stage adaptation of the 2001 comedy film which starred Reese Witherspoon, with a score by Laurence O'Keefe and Nell Benjamin. After a run on Broadway, it now comes to the Savoy Theatre in London with Sheridan Smith as Elle Woods, a pink-clad blonde from Malibu who aims to show her ex (Duncan James) that she's the serious type he's looking for by applying to study law at Harvard. Despite numerous setbacks it all hurtles towards a happy ending for those who deserve it with the help of a chihuahua, a bulldog and a UPS delivery man with a big package.

Frank McGuinness's play, Greta Garbo Came to Donegal, is set in 1967. Ireland is on the verge of violent change, two couples are on the verge of separating, a woman tries to save her family, a girl tries to save her future. Above it all but in the midst of things, determining what happens next, is the loveliest and loneliest of all women, the great Garbo.

Homer and Langley Collyer were reclusive brothers whose names became a byword for clutter and eccentricity due to the tons of junk which they accumulated in their Manhattan townhouse. EL Doctorow, whose mother would look into his bedroom when he was a teenager and cry 'The Collyer Brothers!' has used their story as the basis for his novel, Homer and Langley. The blind Homer tells how the house fills up with a bizarre collection of objects relating to Langley's various projects and obsessions - newspapers stacked to the ceiling, a Model T Ford, dismembered pianos, body parts in jars - while the 20th century laps against their doorstep and occasionally intrudes into their lives.

The Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, retells the history of human development on Radio 4, from the first stone axe to the credit card, using 100 selected objects from the Museum. Each of the 100 episodes focuses on a different object from the collection. Neil tells the fascinating stories behind the chosen item, which may be anything from a mundane tool to a great work of art, but which must be man-made. The series is chronological, beginning with some of the earliest objects from Tanzania dating to almost two million years ago, and running up to the present day.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00ps5f8)
The ITV Story

This is the story of how Yorkshire seems to have disappeared. In fact, it is not a single county that has vanished from the map - the territory that has gone missing also stretched across Lincolnshire and into north Norfolk.

Of course, if you look at any road atlas of the UK, there is still a sizeable piece of land between The Pennines and the North Sea. What has gone, in fact, is the regional ITV company, YTV, which began broadcasting from new studios in Leeds on July 29th, 1968.

One of ITV's unique features in previous decades has been its regional structure, which was especially strong in the north of England where Granada, Yorkshire TV and Tyne Tees provided the backbone of national programmes made from around the nation.

Today however, ITV is no longer a collection of regional companies; Mark Lawson examines why by taking a look at the history of Yorkshire Television.

Initially, Granada served the whole of the north of England but for 40 years, YTV was Yorkshire's very own station and gave its region a prominent voice in millions of homes all over the country. Yorkshire Television was a station run by local people who 'talked right'. It made the likes of Richard Whiteley, Les Dawson, Annie Sugden and Hannah Hauxwell household names and it became part of a regional revolution that provided ITV with a significant part of its output, from soap opera (Emmerdale), and drama (Flambards and Heartbeat) to hard-hitting, award-winning documentaries including Johnny Go Home and Rampton: The Secret Hospital.

Sir Paul Fox, a former managing director at YTV, says: 'You can tell a Yorkshire man but you can't tell him much.' And it was this refusal to compromise on its own particular provincial flavour that characterised the YTV style. For many years, Yorkshire Television demonstrated a regional approach to broadcasting that was successfully duplicated across the network by other many other ITV franchise holders.

Mark Lawson grew up in Yorkshire and has a keen understanding of the workings of the British television industry.

Those contributing include Sir Paul Fox, Jeremy Isaacs (Director of Programmes at Thames in the 1970s and Chief Executive at Channel 4 in the 1980s), John Whiston (former Director of Programmes at YTV and now Creative Director of ITV Studios UK), Alan Whicker and Austin Mitchell MP.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00pnp9c)
Edith Wharton - The Custom of the Country

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Jane Rogers of Edith Wharton's 1913 satire of marriage and money in early-20th century American society.

Leaving her husband and child in New York, Undine travels to Paris where she meets a charming French aristocrat.

Mrs Heeny ...... Lorelei King
Elmer Moffatt ...... Tom Hollander
Undine Spragg ...... Rebecca Night
Mrs Spragg ...... Barbara Barnes
Abner Spragg ...... Jonathan Keeble
Ralph Marvell ...... Dan Stevens
Clare Van Degen ...... Lucy Gaskell
Peter Van Degan ...... William Houston
Mabel Lipscombe ...... Tessa Nicholson
Laura Fairford/Princess Estradina ...... Provence Maydew
Raymond De Chelles ...... Joseph Kloska

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


SAT 22:00 Weather (b00ps5fb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Decision Time (b00pr52d)
How would a government, facing a huge deficit, cut middle-class benefits? Nick Robinson and a panel of politicians, civil servants and journalists examine how this controversial proposal would fare in Whitehall and Westminster.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00pqh8v)
Russell Davies chairs the second semi-final of the perennial general knowledge contest, with heat winners Dr Ian Bayley from Oxford, Bernard Fyles from St Helens, Chris Quinn from Huyton and Martin Wyatt from Accrington competing for a place in the final.


SAT 23:30 And Go To Innisfree (b00pnp9h)
Poet Kenneth Steven explores WB Yeats's The Lake Isle of Innisfree.

In his famous poem, Yeats declared that he will 'arise ... and go to Innisfree', and Kenneth does exactly that: journeying from the Strand in London, where Yeats had the idea, to the the Lake Isle of Innisfree in Lough Gill, near Sligo, investigating why the poem strikes a chord with so many people.

Yeats spent many childhood summers on Lough Gill, a large lake with several small islands. Then his family moved to London, to a depressingly grey area of Kensington. One day while he was walking along the Strand he saw in a shop a fountain with a ball balanced on top of the jet and, somehow, the water transported him imaginatively back to the lough and the Isle of Innisfree. So he wrote the short poem which became perhaps his best known, somewhat to his chagrin (he was once faced by 10,000 boy scouts, chanting it in unison).

The poem is a work of contrasts, opposing the city with the country, crowds with solitude, and peace not with war (though the situation in Ireland at the time was tense) but with stress and anxiety. It also demonstrates the poet's early philosophical thinking. When he speaks of planting nine rows of beans and living in 'the bee-loud glade', it is clear that he has been reading Henry Thoreau's Walden Pond, which, as well as being radical in its environmental concerns, is about freedom, about the individual in relation to society (it was published with his great essay On Civil Disobedience) and about that society in relation to other powers.

Kenneth Steven's own life and work share similar concerns. He too is drawn to the remote and rural, and is deeply concerned with the cultural and political integrity of his country, Scotland. Here Kenneth explores all this on his journeying to the Lake Isle of Innisfree, starting, like Yeats, on the Strand in the rain, and while speaking to Yeats experts, historians and other poets, journeys from London to Sligo to Lough Gill and rows across to the Isle itself.



SUNDAY 17 JANUARY 2010

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00ps5s0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b008x3ym)
Cupid Strikes

Better Off Without Them

Stories exploring the reality behind St Valentine's Day.

By Philip Ardagh.

Will Cupid's arrow reach its target of Juliet and Geoff or will some unusual tokens of love knock it off course?

Read by Denis Lawson and Phyllis Logan.

Producer Heather Brennon.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00ps5s4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00ps5s6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00ps5s8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00ps6kl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00ps6kn)
The sound of bells from St Edward's Church in Eggbuckland, Plymouth.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00ps5f4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00ps6qq)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00ps6qs)
Absolutely Honest

Mark Tully asks if absolute honesty is always the best policy, and questions philosopher AC Grayling about his suggestion that dishonesty can sometimes even be virtuous.

The readers are Emily Raymond and David Westhead.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00psp8n)
Caz Graham travels to Wales to find out why an artist is building a house out of wool.

For many centuries, wool was the UK's most important export and the cloth trade led to the development of many of the nation's industrial towns. One of those is Newtown in Mid Wales. Among other things, they produced flannel and apparently even Queen Victoria ordered her garments from there. However, the market for wool has seen a massive decline. To highlight this decline, artist Steve Messam is using 300 white fleeces from the local breed of sheep, the Kerry Hill, to clad a traditional timber-framed building.

Steve's work is part of an exhibition called Beyond Pattern from a Newtown Gallery and 'Clad' aims to 'investigate and celebrate the cultural and industrial heritage of the area'. He wants to demonstrate how the wool has been an important part of the fabric of the built as well as rural environment here. Caz helps build the house of wool and investigates how the decline in the wool trade has affected those who live and work in the area.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00psp8q)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00psp8s)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00psp8v)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00psp8x)
National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

Juliette Kaplan appeals on behalf of National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society.

Donations to NRAS should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope NRAS. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide NRAS with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity Numbers: 1086976 SCO39721.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00psp8z)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00psp91)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00psp93)
The Potter's Hand

A service reflecting on the creative power of God from the Chelmsford Corps of the Salvation Army with the International Staff Songsters of the Salvation Army and the Chelmsford Corps Band. Leaders: Majors Derek and Susan Jones. Preacher: Lt-Col. George Pilkington, executive officer of the International Staff Songsters. Staff Songster Leader: Dorothy Nancekievill. Bandmaster: Dr Simon Schultz.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00prd58)
Lisa Jardine reflects on the challenge of delivering the right level of supplies for public use, be it salt to cope with ice or a flu vaccine.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00psp95)
On the programme this week, we looked at the international response to the disaster in Haiti. Dr Agostino Miozzo, who led the relief operation after last year's earthquake in L'Aquila in Italy, said that clear strategies for how to react such events should be pre-planned and ready to put into operation. The ballot for tickets to see Tony Blair at the Iraq Inquiry is about to take place... Paddy went to talk to people who've applied and who've been watching the inquiry. Are they the Tricoteuses de nos jours? We delved further into the BBC's archives and Norman Smith lamented the apparent demise of great political oratory.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00psp97)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00psp99)
James Ellroy

Kirsty Young's castaway is American crime writer James Ellroy.

His books have been translated into 30 languages and, according to the New York Times, he is the author of some of the most powerful crime novels ever written.

But the case that has dominated his life and much of his writing was the murder of his mother when he was just ten years old. In the years since, he has tried to find a way of getting to know and understand her.

Record: Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 29 'Hammerklavier', Op. 106
Book: Libra by Don DeLillo
Luxury: Sun block.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00pqh91)
Series 56

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game. Panellists Josie Lawrence and Charles Collingwood reveal how they know when they are in love (though not necessarily with each other), and Paul Merton and Chris Neill remember what it was like to be sweet sixteen.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00psp9c)
Micro Dairies

In the last decade, two-thirds of dairy farmers in England and Wales have gone out of business. With milk cheaper than mineral water, many just cannot make a living. Charlotte Smith hears how dairy farmers are forging stronger links with consumers to stay in business. Could small scale community dairies be the way forward?

Sheila Dillon visits North Aston Dairy in Oxfordshire, where a small herd of 18 Ayrshires provides milk to 250 residents in local villages, all within a two-and-a-half mile radius. She also catches up with Nick Snelgar of Future Farms co-operative in Hampshire, who is planning to start a 'micro dairy' along the same lines as North Aston. She also hears from dairy farmer Ian Crouch in Dorset about his struggle to stay in business with a mixed herd of 150 cows including Holsteins, Jerseys and Guernseys.

MP Michael Jack, Chair of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee, gives his view of the state of the industry, and Charlotte is joined in the studio by Gwyn Jones, Dairy Board Chairman of the National Farmers' Union.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00psph7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00psph9)
A look at events around the world.


SUN 13:30 Ruthless and Brilliant (b00pn4c5)
Following her own experience of a mastectomy, Jenni Murray asks what does it take to wield the surgical knife?

At the end of 2006 Jenni, one of Radio 4's longest standing presenters announced, very publicly, that she had breast cancer. She told her listeners on Woman's Hour that she would be away from the microphone for a while, as she underwent treatment.

Jenni returned to work after a mastectomy and chemotherapy. Then in 2008 she was joined on the programme by the Irish journalist Lia Mills, who had much of her jaw, neck and cheekbone removed after she was diagnosed with oral cancer. She described her surgeons as 'ruthless and brilliant' - brilliant enough to save her life but ruthless enough to take a knife to her face.

This got Jenni thinking - what does it take to lift a scalpel and cut into the most intimate and treasured parts of the human body? The programme examines the extremes of surgery, and speaks to the doctors whose work may save lives, but also fundamentally change them. The patient may survive, but their appearance will be essentially altered. How do you tell a patient that radical surgery is needed, as they beg you for an alternative?

As part of the programme Jenni will attend a mastectomy.

Presented by Jenni Murray, produced in Manchester by Nicola Swords.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00pr8bh)
Eric Robson and the Gardeners' Question Time panel remember the late John Cushnie, whose untimely death was announced over the New Year.


SUN 14:45 Gameboy v The Mongolian Steppe (b00cmqnc)
Episode 2

Series following the exploits of a computer games-obsessed 14-year-old with learning difficulties who is taken to Mongolia by his father to experience the more exciting side of life.

The family leave Beijing on the Trans-Mongolian Express on their way to Ulan Bator, where they plan to equip themselves for their stay with nomads on the snowy wastes of the steppes. Sarah kits herself out in the traditional dress - a long fleece lined del - and Dexter tries to persuade his dad to buy him a hunting knife. Dexter's computer game causes much excitement in the capital's main square.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00psqvj)
Edith Wharton - The Custom of the Country

Episode 3

Dramatisation by Jane Rogers of Edith Wharton's 1913 satire of marriage and money in early-20th century American society.

Undine's plans to secure a better future for herself move on apace, but will she ever find real happiness?

Mrs Heeny ...... Lorelei King
Elmer Moffatt ...... Tom Hollander
Ralph Marvell ...... Dan Stevens
Undine Spragg ...... Rebecca Night
Marquise de Chelles ...... Olwen May
Raymond de Chelles ...... Joseph Kloska
Princess Estradina ...... Provence Maydew
Paul ...... Daniel Rogers

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00psqvl)
Mariella Frostrup talks to the creator of the phenomenally successful Lemony Snickert children's books, Daniel Handler. A Series of Unfortunate Events, his 13 volumes chronicling the sufferings of the Baudelaire orphans, have sold over 50 million copies in the last decade. He explains how painful family history led to the dark tone of his work.

Kati Nicholl joins Mariella to choose some of her favourite recent audiobooks, from Conan Doyle to Cormac McCarthy.

Seventy years after the death of Mikhail Bulgakov, the author of novels including The Master and Margarita, two fans discuss his work. The writer and broadcaster Misha Glenny - the son of Bulgakov's first translator - and the novelist's biographer Julie Curtis explore the life of a writer now regarded as one of Russia's greatest.


SUN 16:30 Consorting With Angels (b00psqvn)
A tribute to the life and work of American poet Anne Sexton.

Featuring poetry, home video archive and dramatised transcripts of audio tapes recorded during Sexton's psychotherapy sessions. Anne's daughters Linda and Joyce remember their mother, and her close friend JD McClatchy and former psychiatric nurse and poet Anne Rouse share their thoughts on a truly remarkable woman.


SUN 17:00 Closing Guantanamo (b00pqn29)
President Obama has admitted that the process of closing the controversial prison camp in Guantanamo Bay will take longer than the 12 months he promised in his first major announcement as president. Jon Manel reveals the inside story of what went wrong.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00ps5f4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00psr3d)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00psr3g)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00psrcs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00psrcv)
Simon Parkes introduces his selection from the last seven days of BBC Radio.

Chris Evans - Radio 2
Simon Mayo - Radio 2
Radcliffe and Maconie - Radio 2
Ruthless and Brilliant - Radio 4
At Any Cost - Radio 4
Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats - Radio 4
Ed Reardon's Week - Radio 4
Book of the Week: Must You Go? - Radio 4
Front Row - Radio 4
The Frost Collection - Radio 4
Guantanamo Reunited - Radio 5live
Deep Cut - Radio 4
Archive on 4: The ITV Story - Radio 4
The Jonestown Letters - Radio 4
Midnight Feasts and Lashings of Ginger Beer - Radio 4.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00psrt6)
Fallon and Jazzer have fun at Laser Quest but are surprised when they bump into Pip and Jonathan with some friends. They comment on Pip's striking new look although afterwards Jazzer tells Fallon he's not impressed by it.

Later on they spy Pip leaving, looking miffed with Jonathan, and speculate they must have had a row. When the game's finished Fallon hugs Jazzer telling him she's had a brilliant time. They arrange to go out for a curry on Tuesday.

Nic and Ruth chat about Susan's worries over her future at the shop, although she has got a job interview tomorrow. Mia and Jake are delighted to see Helen, who's out walking with Annette, and demand that she comes with them to the playground. While Helen plays with them, Annette and Nic chat about motherhood. Nic says that although sometimes it's hard work she wouldn't have it any other way. And now she's met Will - you never know how things will turn out, do you?

Later subdued Annette tells Helen she was great with the kids, but when Helen says Annette would be just as good, Annette's dismissive. Helen clarifies that she just meant you just never know if you're cut out for it unless you try.

Episode written by Tim Stimpson.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00psrt8)
While a nation waits for Obama to deliver his State of the Union Address, Americana asks why wait? We deliver our own State of the Nation programme.

Kevin Connolly hears from the celebrated Haitian American author Edwidge Danticat to learn more about what life is like in Haiti and the view from the United States.

James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic, joins us to discuss the long-term outlook for United States, and attempts to answer the question 'Can America rise again?'

The United States Census just launched its 2010 campaign. Its work will have a last political, social and economic impact on the country. Census Director Robert Groves explains how the survey works and what powers he has to say 'no' to the man in the White House.

We also hear from some of the nation's newest citizens at a naturalization ceremony in Richmond, Virginia. At a time when so many in the US feel demoralized about the country's future, Americana hears what makes these newbies feel optimistic about officially joining the country.

There is one US citizen who continues to inspire Americans around the nation, even though he is no longer with us. On Monday the United States observes a national holiday in honour of Martin Luther King Jr. Americana hears from third graders in Illinois about what they'd ask Martin Luther King Jr if they had the chance.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b00b0t4s)
An Italian Bestiary

The Smiling Shepherd

Stories by Julia Blackburn about life and survival for the animals and people of Liguria in Northern Italy, where she has made her home.

In February, Giovanni the shepherd begins to move his flock of sheep and goats back to the high mountain.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b00pr8bc)
Tim Harford and the team ask if the electoral system is biased in favour of Labour, as some Conservatives claim, and why Wales is so frequently used as a unit of measurement.

An Open University co production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00prd50)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00ps3wc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00psp8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00pr72d)
Doing It Wrong

Russell Ackoff was a great subversive - a business school professor who thought that business schools were a block on management thinking and who delighted in pointing out the flaws in the way companies work. Before he died at the age of 90 in October 2009, this business rebel gave Peter Day some insights into his unconventional approach to getting things done.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00psrtb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00psrtd)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including More Than A Game.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00prd52)
Director Andrea Arnold discusses her controversial drama Fish Tank and how she discovered her star on a station platform having an argument with her boyfriend.

Novelist Jonathan Coe and historian Matthew Sweet mull over the qualities of forgotten British melodrama They Were Sisters.

Jacques Audiard tackles crime and punishment in his prison drama A Prophet.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00ps6qs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 18 JANUARY 2010

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00pstm1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00pr4wz)
Professor Jytte Klausen maintains that the crisis following the publication of cartoons depicting Mohammed in the Jyllands-Posten newspaper in Denmark back in 2005 was stirred up by different sets of people all with something to gain from precipitating a crisis.

Her detailed analysis of the course of events claims to show that irresponsible newspaper publishers, vested interests in elections in Denmark and Egypt, and later Islamic extremists seeking to destabilise governments in Pakistan, Lebanon, Libya and Nigeria all played a part in orchestrating the upset.

Also, Laurie Taylor talks to Les Back and Mike Robinson, editor of The Framed World: Tourism, Tourists and Photography, about the hidden significance of holiday snaps. What are people hoping to achieve when they 'capture' a scene and what does the holiday pose tell us about modern mores?


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00ps6kn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00pstnq)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00pstsp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00pstq6)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00pstw7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00psv51)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev Kelvin Holdsworth.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00psv9j)
Multi-storey growing could be the future of farming in UK towns and cities. Europe's first vertical farm is being piloted at Paignton zoo in Devon. In Kevin Frediani's farm, 11,000 plants are growing in trays stacked three metres high while rotating around the glasshouse. If the pilot's a success, this could open up the way for schools, hospitals and housing estates in cities and towns to grow their own vegetables.

Also, the number of rats in the UK is on the rise by around 15 per cent a year. As rats become resistant to some poisons, farmers are being warned that they risk killing wildlife if they're not careful.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00pxhwy)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00psvbm)
With Evan Davis and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00pxj6d)
Tom Sutcliffe is caught in a web of deception, as Ben Macintyre retells one of the greatest hoaxes of World War 2, and the writer John Guare talks about the duplicity at the heart of his most famous play, Six Degrees of Separation. AL Kennedy makes a plea for the purpose and point of art in the 21st century. And the all-important catchy book title: would James Bond have sounded quite so adventurous if The Undertaker's Wind had triumphed over Live and Let Die? The biographer Frances Spalding discusses choosing the right name.


MON 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwmgq)
Making Us Human (2,000,000 - 9000 BC)

Mummy of Hornedjitef

The Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, retells the history of human development from the first stone axe to the credit card using 100 selected objects from the Museum. His history will cover two million years and include items that were made in every part of the globe. But his journey begins when, at the age of eight, he visited the British Museum for the first time and came face-to-face with an object that fascinated and intrigued him ever since - an Egyptian mummy.

Hornedjitef was a priest who died around 2250 years ago, and he designed a coffin that, he believed, would help him navigate his way to the afterlife. Little did he know that this afterlife would be as a museum exhibit in London. This ornate coffin holds secrets to the understanding of his religion, society and Egypt's connections to the rest of the world.

Neil MacGregor tells the story of Hornedjitef's mummy case, with contributions from egyptologist John Taylor, Egyptian author Ahdaf Soueif and Indian economist and Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00pwp1y)
Teaching children about finance; Bold make-up

Why children need to be taught financial skills. Plus, a report on women in Northern Irish politics, and the return of bold make-up.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00pwp20)
The Postman of Good Hope

Episode 1

By Al Smith, inspired by a true story.

When Nicholas returns to his village after fighting in the civil war, he discovers that none of the post has been delivered.

Nicholas ...... Steve Toussaint
Grub ...... Nyasha Hatendi
The Mayor ...... Patrice Naiambana
Caramella ...... Chipo Chung
Inspector Shandy ...... Jimmy Akingbola
Perdita ...... Adjoa Andoh
Loupe ...... Darren Hart
The Oracle ...... Anni Domingo
Cornelius ...... Ilario Bisi-Pedro
The Boy ...... Isaac Ajala

Directed by Sally Avens.


MON 11:00 Obama's Babies (b00pxjpp)
In Swahili Obama means 'blessed one' and mothers across Africa were quick to bestow the name on their offspring. 'Obama babies' followed in America and across Europe as parents grasped at the hope that the President Elect's magic could rub off on their children. But one year on and with the President's dreams being tested by reality, how have some of the babies named after him fared?

Peter White explores the hopes and fears of five families and follows their lives as the babies approach their first birthdays. For the babies - including Nancy Otieno's son, Barack Obama, and Sasha Fisher's baby, Sanjae Obama - it will be years before they fully comprehend the hopes and aspirations imbued in a name.

The programme focuses on five very different families, examining how our changing world, in part shaped by the man they so admire, is having an impact on their experiences.


MON 11:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b00pxjpr)
Series 6

Charity Begins Next Door

Ed applies for help from a hardship fund, and acquires an enthusiastic new student. With Philip Jackson. From January 2010.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00pwppf)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00pwpsr)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00pwptl)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00pxjzx)
Russell Davies chairs another semi-final of the perennial general knowledge contest, with heat winners Martin Boult from Basingstoke, David Clark from Port Talbot, Jane Ann Liston from St Andrews and Anthony Payne from St Bees in Cumbria competing for a place in the final.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00psrt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00pxjzz)
Some Secluded Glade

Psychological thriller by Hugh Costello.

Following a fall and severe concussion, Tom Beaumont's grasp on reality begins to weaken, with terrifying results for his family.

Tom Beaumont ...... Patrick Fitzsymons
Gail Beaumont ...... Cathy Belton
Toby Beaumont ...... Robbie Gilmore
Bruno ...... Sean Campion
Megan ...... Maggie Cronin
Dr Marriott ...... Melissa Advani
Sgt Osborne ...... Hugh Costello

Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00ps5f8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Lost, Stolen or Shredded (b00lydhb)
Series 2

The Great Omar

Series of programmes in which antiquarian book dealer Rick Gekoski tells the stories that lie behind five very different missing works of art.

Rick tells the story behind the fabulous jewelled binding of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, which was encrusted with over a thousand diamonds, rubies and emeralds and was regarded as the finest work produced by the bindery of Sangorski and Sutcliffe. Sadly it went down with the SS Titanic and is still lying unclaimed at the bottom of the ocean.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00psp9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00pxk01)
Ernie Rea and guests discuss the religious traditions of the poorest state in the Arab world and ask why Jihadi networks are taking hold in Yemen.


MON 17:00 PM (b00pwqdc)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00pwqfb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00pxk23)
Series 56

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game, recorded at Derby University. The panellists are Josie Lawrence, Justin Moorhouse, Tony Hawks and Dave Gorman. Subjects include how to spot a mature student and three ways to pay back your student loan.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00pwpyj)
Vicky and Lynda go for a snowy walk and Lynda points out where they would have done the butterfly egg survey if it hadn't been for the bad weather forecast. Vicky compliments Lynda on her ability to get things done. If it wasn't for Lynda stopping Adam from flailing the hedge, there wouldn't be any butterfly eggs at all. This prompts Lynda to bring up the topic of Derek standing down as chairman of the parish council. It takes a while before Vicky takes the bait and suggests Lynda goes for it!

Susan's nervous about her job interview and irritates Brenda when she says she's sorry Brenda wasn't shortlisted, although she points out she has got more management experience. When Brenda moans to Mike, he says Susan was genuinely sorry about the interview.

Mike, Ed, Brenda and Vicky have a meeting about the milk round. Everyone's impressed by Brenda's new flyer. Ed agrees to help drum up business after the flyer distribution. When Susan arrives telling them she didn't get the job, Vicky embarrasses Brenda saying she didn't need to be upset about it after all. Susan's fed up. Until she hears about the shop, she's just going to have to hope something turns up.

Episode written by Tim Stimpson.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00pwqfz)
In Clive Owen's latest film, The Boys Are Back, he makes a departure from his usual tough-guy roles, and plays a bereaved father learning how to cope with raising his sons as a single parent. Mark Eccleston reviews.

A new three-part BBC4 documentary series, Shooting the War, brings to light rare footage shot by British and German servicemen and women and civilians before and during the Second World War. The historian James Holland considers what this new material adds to our understanding of the war.

A three-mile high column of cloud - visible from up to 100km away - will be projected from Merseyside in 2012 for 18 months. It's one of twelve Arts Council commissions across the UK as part of the Cultural Olympiad. Artist Athony McCall explains why Birkenhead needs a cloud on its horizon.

At 28, New York classical Composer Nico Muhly has been commissioned by the Chicago Symphony orchestra and Carnegie Hall, written film scores including The Reader, and works regularly with Philip Glass and Bjork. Muhly talks to Kirsty Lang as he takes up a residency with Britten Sinfonia to include premieres of new works and a composers workshop.

Don't Stop Believin' was released by American rock band Journey in 1982 and made little impact on the UK charts, but now two different versions of the song are at numbers five and six in the UK singles chart. Musician and broadcaster Tom Robinson explains why the song has made such a resounding comeback and reveals the secrets of its appeal.


MON 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwmgq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


MON 20:00 The De-Railing of Transport 2010 (b00pxk9w)
In the 1990s, a new way of thinking about transport emerged. Sustainability became the buzz word, advocates of a so-called New Realism had the ear of government and a ten-year plan was hatched. But many of its ideas got no further than Whitehall. Chris Ledgard looks back at the revolution which never happened and asks if transport is one of the hardest ministerial briefs in government.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00pr5b6)
24 Hours in Tulsa

24 Attacks by midget gangsters; incompetent thieves who resort to stealing air-conditioning units; a teenage girl with a crack habit who gets shot a few days after promising to go clean. These are just some of the criminals and junkies encountered by one police officer cruising the streets of one Midwestern US city.

But this is Officer Jay Chiarito-Mazarrella, who created a cult following for his Street Story podcasts, vivid vignettes of his work for the Tulsa Police Department. Hugh Levinson hears the best of the Street Stories, giving a fresh, funny and sometimes downright scary insight into policing from the horse's mouth.

Producer: Hugh Levinson.


MON 21:00 The Vox Project (b00pxk9y)
Dysfunctional Voices

Clare Balding, with the help of the Cognitive Neuro-Science department of University College, London, investigates all aspects of the human voice and the way we use it.

Clare is joined by specialist speech therapist Christella Antoni and Dr John Local to discuss how we make sense of other people's voices.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00pxj6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00pwt5l)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00pwt8y)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

Haiti's horror worsens as aid struggles to get in.

Can Greece tackle its economic crisis?

The army prepares to fight the enemies of the future.

Could the Democrats lose a vote in Massachusetts?


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00pwv3l)
Rebecca Stott - The Coral Thief

Episode 6

Daniel is unsettled by an encounter with Henri Jagot, the infamous chief of the security police, and Lucienne reveals a secret from her past. Read by Dan Stevens.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00pqjs7)
Michael Rosen investigates lying. Does the sound of our voice change when we are trying to deceive, and do we use different words?


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00pwv6c)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



TUESDAY 19 JANUARY 2010

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00pstkc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwmgq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00pstm3)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00pstq8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00pstns)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00pstsr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00pstw9)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev Kelvin Holdsworth.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00psv53)
The scientist leading a new trial of Genetically Modified crops says the case against GM has been lost. And as TB in cattle continues to cost the taxpayer £100 million each year, Anna Hill hears how a cull of infected badgers in Ireland helped control the disease.

Following the big freeze, the big thaw - how are farmers coping with rotting crops and muddy fields?


TUE 06:00 Today (b00psv9l)
With Evan Davis and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Taking a Stand (b00pxll6)
Fergal Keane talks to people who have taken risks and made sacrifices to stand up for what they believe in.

How does it feel to come under armed attack by Somali pirates when you know you are days away from any kind of protection? Peter Stapleton knows. He was master of the cargo ship Boularibank when it was targeted by pirates at the entrance to the Gulf of Aden. Aside from cargo and crew, he was also carrying eleven passengers, including his wife. Peter Stapleton tells Fergal Keane how he managed to repel the boarders.


TUE 09:30 Famous Footsteps (b00pxll8)
Episode 2

Fiona Neill explores the advantages of being born into a creatively successful family; what is the nature of the silver spoon handed down from one generation to the next?


TUE 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7m)
Making Us Human (2,000,000 - 9000 BC)

Olduvai Stone Chopping Tool

The Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, retells the history of human development from the first stone axe to the credit card, using 100 selected objects from the Museum. In this programme, Neil goes back two million years to the Rift Valley in Tanzania, where a simple chipped stone marks the emergence of modern humans.

One of the characteristics that mark humans out from other animals is their desire for, and dependency on, the things they fashion with their own hands. This obsession has long roots and, in today's programme, Neil introduces one of the earliest examples of human ingenuity. Faced with the needs to cut meat from carcasses, early humans in Africa discovered how to shape stones into cutting tools. From that one innovation, a whole history human development springs.

Neil MacGregor tells the story of the Olduvai stone chopping tool, with contributions from Sir David Attenborough and African Nobel Prize winner Dr Wangari Maathai


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00pwnk2)
Britain's boozing culture; Violinist Vilde Frang

How do we change Britain's drinking culture? Plus, Norwegian violinist Vilde Frang performs live, and journalist Simon Carr on father-son relationships.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00pwp22)
The Postman of Good Hope

Episode 2

By Al Smith, inspired by a true story.

Nicholas helps keep a young footballer's dreams alive.

Nicholas ...... Steve Toussaint
Grub ...... Nyasha Hatendi
The Mayor ...... Patrice Naiambana
Caramella ...... Chipo Chung
Inspector Shandy ...... Jimmy Akingbola
Perdita ...... Adjoa Andoh
Loupe ...... Darren Hart
The Oracle ...... Anni Domingo
Cornelius ...... Ilario Bisi-Pedro
The Boy ...... Isaac Ajala

Directed by Sally Avens.


TUE 11:00 Nature (b00pxmcr)
Series 4

Wildlife Gardening

Gardening for wildlife is one of the most popular and practical things we can do to keep in touch with the natural world. But does it have any real benefits for wildlife on a countrywide scale or is it merely a placebo which convinces us that we're doing something to save the planet? Paul Evans visits the winter conference of the Wildlife Gardening Forum to find out if our efforts are making a difference, and asks conservationists where the future of wildlife gardening lies.


TUE 11:30 The House That Chekhov Built (b00pxmcv)
The White Dacha, the house in which Chekhov wrote his greatest works is falling into ruin. With the campaign to save it due to culminate on the 150th anniversary of his birth, actor Michael Pennington journeys to Yalta in the Ukraine to get an inside view of Chekhov's life and work.

The White Dacha was Chekhov's place of both escape and inspiration. Built in 1898 by Chekhov after the success of The Seagull, he moved there to find solace after his father's death and to help his ailing health due to tuberculosis. The building is the genesis of some of his best-loved stories but stands to be lost forever as it stands on land that could be sold off; until just a few months ago the house was crumbling away, the victim of post-Soviet politics and the recession.

After he died in 1904, Chekhov's house was protected by his sister, Masha, and then became a museum in 1921. As Michael wanders around the house and gardens he learns how it survived the Russian Revolution, civil war and Nazi occupation.

Michael meets the individuals fighting to keep Chekhov's personal and literary legacy alive, including Chekhov scholar and director of the Yalta Chekhov Campaign, Rosamund Bartlett. The campaign hopes to raise 200,000 euros by January 2010, the 150th anniversary of Chekhov's birth.

Featuring contributions from actress Prunella Scales and Oscar-winning playwright Christopher Hampton, both of whom have travelled to the house to take inspiration from the home of their literary hero.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2010.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00pwpmv)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00pwpph)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00pwpst)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats (b00pxmcx)
Series 8

Cannonball Adderley

Ken Clarke MP profiles great jazz musicians of the 20th Century.

Florida-born saxophonist Cannonball Adderley first made his name alongside his brother Nat in the 1950s. Moving to New York, he quickly found success and before long was playing with Miles Davis. Drawing influence from many of the greats, including Charlie Parker, John Coltrane and Louis Jordan, Cannonball was one of the leading pioneers of hard-bop. By the 1960s he was also prominent in the soul jazz scene, becoming increasingly experimental towards the end of the decade.

Leading British sax player Alan Barnes talks to Ken about Cannonball's eclectic career.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00pwpyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00pxmcz)
The Lonely

Dramatisation by Rebecca Hughes of Paul Gallico's romantic novella set during the Second World War.

An American airforce lieutenant suffering from battle fatigue and a young English WAAF officer become lovers. But when he returns to America to break off his engagement, things get complicated.

Jerry ...... Michael Goldsmith
Patches ...... Laura Rees
Harmon ...... Sam Dale
Helen ...... Tracy Wiles
Eagles ...... Piers Wehner

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00pxmf1)
Vanessa Collingridge brings together objects from around the UK that are making A History of The World, including a 9th-century bell in Northern Ireland and rosary beads found on the Mary Rose.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00pxmk1)
City of Two Continents

The Byzantine Passage

Series of short stories marking Istanbul's tenure as European Capital of Culture in 2010.

A young girl's life changes forever when she glimpses the man to whom she is betrothed.

By Jenny White, read by Melody Grove.


TUE 15:45 Lost, Stolen or Shredded (b00m17q8)
Series 2

The Lost Career of Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Series of programmes in which antiquarian book dealer Rick Gekoski tells the stories that lie behind five very different missing works of art.

Architect, designer and artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh is internationally celebrated as one of the most significant talents of the late-19th and early-20th centuries. His creative genius and contribution to modern architecture and design is unquestioned, with his design for the Glasgow School of Art undoubtedly his masterpiece. But commissions were few and support for his work limited.

Rick examines Mackintosh's life and work and asks why he received so little support during his lifetime.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Too White to Be Black (b00pxn0z)
Kim Normanton talks to three people who are white but black - they come from a black or Asian background and live with albinism. Around 3,000 people in Britain have albinism which means they have little or no pigment - colour - in their eyes, hair and skin. Their unusual situation provides thoughtful insights into questions of identity.

Naseem is 30 and British Asian. She has long fair hair, white skin and pale eyes. She struggled to be accepted by her Asian community and eventually left home and married Richard, who is white British. She says: "Within the Asian community while I was growing up I was seen as a bit freaky. I didn't quite look English but I was meant to be Asian. I did have an identity crisis - who am I, where do I fit in?"

Ayo is 18 and lives in London with his parents, who originally come from Nigeria. He talks about the complications of having parents who are black when he has white skin. "I have African features but my skin is white so I look different. People tend to stare and call me 'white boy' if they don't know my nationality. They say 'You're not black'. I ask 'Where do you think I'm from, then?'"

Mian is 30 and was born and raised in Punjab in Pakistan. He came to Britain 3 years ago to study because he found it impossible to live and study in Pakistan due to abuse and intolerance.

Producer: Kim Normanton
A Loftus Audio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00pxn11)
Series 20

Picasso

Matthew Parris presents the biographical series in which his guests choose someone who has inspired their lives.

Photographer David Bailey first saw Picasso's work in Look magazine in the 1950s - it was a revelation to him. He discusses the founder of Cubism's work and the enigma of the man himself, and their influence on him.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00pwq9h)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00pwqdf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Act Your Age (b00pxn13)
Series 2

Episode 1

Simon Mayo hosts the comedy show that pits the comic generations against each other to find out which is the funniest.

Team captains Jon Richardson, Lucy Porter and Adrian Walsh are joined by Kevin Bridges, Jason Byrne and Johnnie Casson.

Producers: Ashley Blaker and Bill Matthews.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2010.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00pwpxk)
Jazzer and Fallon lark about in her bedroom while getting ready to go out for a meal. Jolene overhears and takes Fallon to one side, advising her not to give Jazzer mixed messages. Fallon admits that although she's fond of Jazzer, she doesn't fancy him. Jolene tells her to be straight with him.

Later, when Jazzer tells Fallon she's looking gorgeous and that he's got a gift for her, Fallon interrupts him. Although he's her best friend, that's all he'll ever be. Stoic Jazzer gives her the gift anyway. Fallon's touched to find a jewelled memory stick necklace with all The Lies' best tracks on it.

Annette bumps into Leon in Borchester. When she tells him to leave her alone he asks what the problem is. He thought they'd had fun together. Annette explodes when he asks her for a drink and to spend the night with him. He's ruined her life. She never wants to see him again! Leon says that suits him fine.

Later Annette tells Helen she's going to have the abortion. Helen says that although she's sad, she's not angry. Annette asks Helen to support her through it.

Episode written by Tim Stimpson.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00pwqfd)
The writer AS Byatt reviews the Royal Academy's Van Gogh exhibition which, for the first time, displays his paintings together with his letters.

In a new film, Brothers, Tobey Maguire, best known for his role as Spiderman, plays an American soldier in Afghanistan with domestic complications. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews Jim Sheridan's latest film.

The style guru Gok Wan returns with a new three-part series of his show How To Look Good Naked, this time focusing on three women with disabilities: Tracy, who is in a wheelchair, Clare, who lost her leg in a motorbike accident, and Di, who has been blind for over 25 years. Sophie Morgan reviews.

As the Liverpool Everyman production of Pinter's The Caretaker opens in London, Jonathan Pryce talks to Mark Lawson about the play that marked Pinter's arrival as the leading playwright of his generation.


TUE 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00pxng0)
Who polices the police?

In 2009, 2,445 cases, including allegations of police brutality, deaths in custody and serious negligence, were referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. But is it truly independent, and does its record over five years encourage public confidence? Gerry Northam investigates.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00pxng2)
Peter White talks to Stephen Hallett and Cheryl Gabriel, who along with professional photographer Chloe Gewe Mathews, ran a workshop with a group of blind radio journalists organised by the UK charity PhotoVoice in Beijing.

The idea of non-visual or sensory photography is to give blind people a voice through the medium of photography, using their other senses rather than sight. This course was designed to give blind and partially sighted people basic skills and techniques to operate a digital camera and take photographs of things that are important to them. Part of the course was a music exercise which Peter also experienced in the studio. He was played an extract of music and at the end he was asked to describe what was in his mind whilst listening. He said that he had a strong image of horses running and he was also reminded of his violin lessons.

In Beijing during the workshop one of the blind participants Li Ning, who has never seen, took a photograph of herself. Another participant Yan Shuang managed to capture a water droplet. All the participants were enthused by being able to participate in the powerful and visual language that is photography.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00pxng4)
Aspirin

Aspirin is being used to prevent miscarriage, heart disease and cancer, but it's not suitable for everyone and can sometimes do more harm than good. Mark Porter unpicks the confusing messages about aspirin and when it should be taken.


TUE 21:30 Taking a Stand (b00pxll6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00pwt3l)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00pwt5n)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

Haiti's horror continues: but how best to reconstruct the country?

Geoff Hoon appears at the Chilcott Inquiry.

Why Italians might be forced out of the parental home.

Mervyn King sounds pessimistic note on UK economy.

Why resource rich countries often stay poor.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00pwv38)
Rebecca Stott - The Coral Thief

Episode 7

Dan Stevens reads from Rebecca Stott's love story, set in Paris in 1815 in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars.

Lucienne receives one last and unwelcome commission.

Abridged by Viv Beeby

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 23:00 Jon Ronson On (b00pxng6)
Series 5

Living in a Movie

The journalist and documentary maker Jon Ronson talks to the conflict photographer Jason Howe. Jason had gone to Colombia to photograph both sides of the war when he met a Colombian woman Marilyn at a bus stop. They quickly became romantically involved but then she revealed she was a paramilitary fighter. Suddenly Jason was living his life as if it were a movie, going down a dangerous path that would end in tragedy.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
An Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00pwv5z)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



WEDNESDAY 20 JANUARY 2010

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00pstkf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00pstm5)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00pstqb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00pstnv)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00pstst)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00pstwc)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev Kelvin Holdsworth.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00psv55)
Anna Hill hears that rabbits are being milked to create drugs for stroke patients. Meanwhile, the government launch a campaign for the public to drink more low fat milk; farmers fear that milk sales will suffer. And as Scotland is declared free of TB in cattle, Farming Today hears that its trade with England could reduce.


WED 06:00 Today (b00psv9n)
With John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00pxqh7)
Libby Purves is joined by Immodesty Blaize, Tony Visconti, Joanne Whalley and Vitali Vitaliev.


WED 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7p)
Making Us Human (2,000,000 - 9000 BC)

Olduvai Handaxe

The Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, retells two million years of history of human development through the objects it has produced. This programme follows early humans as they slowly begin to move beyond their African homeland taking with them one essential item - a handaxe.

In the presence of the most widely used tool humans have created, Neil sees just how vital to our evolution this sharp, ingenious implement was and how it allowed the spread of humans across the globe.

Today Neil MacGregor tells the story of the handaxe, with contributions from designer Sir James Dyson and archaeologist Nick Ashton


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00pwnk4)
GP services; Long-term couples, Spaghetti Bolognese

Have polyclinics and out-of-hours services improved access to healthcare, or has the patient's right to choice come at a price? Plus, how to make an authentic Bolognese sauce.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00pwp24)
The Postman of Good Hope

Episode 3

By Al Smith, inspired by a true story.

Nicholas decides to stop editing the post so only good news is delivered. But it might be too late.

Nicholas ...... Steve Toussaint
Grub ...... Nyasha Hatendi
The Mayor ...... Patrice Naiambana
Caramella ...... Chipo Chung
Inspector Shandy ...... Jimmy Akingbola
Perdita ...... Adjoa Andoh
Loupe ...... Darren Hart
The Oracle ...... Anni Domingo
Cornelius ...... Ilario Bisi-Pedro
The Boy ...... Isaac Ajala

Directed by Sally Avens.


WED 11:00 QE2: Portrait of an Ocean Liner (b00fkbrp)
After 40 years as arguably the most elegant ship at sea, QE2 docked at her final resting place in Dubai to be converted into a floating hotel. The story of the ship's eventful life, from construction on the Clyde in the 1960s, through refitting as a cruise ship that epitomised a golden age of luxury travel, to service in the Falklands, is told through the words of serving and former staff and recordings made on board the vessel during one of her final cruises.

A Falling Tree production.


WED 11:30 Agatha Christie (b00pxqz1)
Towards Zero

Episode 2

Towards Zero
By Agatha Christie
Dramatised by Joy Wilkinson
Part Two

Lady Tresselian's house party is thrown into disarray by the death of her old friend Justice Treves. Meanwhile Nevile is feeling the strain of a house party with both his wife and his ex-wife in attendance.

Nevile............Hugh Bonneville
Lady Tresselian.......Marcia Warren
MacWhirter.........Tom Mannion
Audrey............Claire Rushbrook
Mary.............Julia Ford
Kay............Lizzy Watts
Latimer...........Joseph Kloska
Inspector Leach .......Philip Fox
Royde............Stephen Hogan
Receptionist...........Annabelle Dowler
Sergeant...........Matt Addis
Doctor Lazenby........Benjamin Askew
Treves...........David Hargreaves

Directed by Mary Peate.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00pwpmy)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00pwppk)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00pwpsw)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00pxqz3)
The BBC Trust has started a year long review into the accuracy and impartiality of the BBC's science coverage, with climate change one of the topics which has attracted controversy. How does the BBC and the media at large measure up to the task of reporting science? And what does impartiality mean in the context of science reporting? Steve Hewlett is joined by James Delingpole of The Telegraph, Mary Hockaday who heads the BBC newsroom and Fiona Fox, director of the Science Media Centre.

Lord Heseltine has stepped down this month from his role at the magazine publishers Haymarket. He talks about the challenge of competing with magazines linked to television programmes - and ways of making money from a magazine's name even when it is no longer actually printed.

And what's really going on with pay TV? Reports have claimed that Sky is to be forced to drop the price it charges for its sports channel. Will this lead to lower prices for viewers - and will Sky get their pay channels on Freeview in return? Media commentator Mathew Horsman gives his view.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00pwpxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00pxqz5)
Sophie Woolley - Carbon Cleansing

By Sophie Woolley. When ex-banker Tabitha knocks 'green' activist Will off his bicycle with her 'Chelsea Tractor', two worlds literally collide. A tale of ecological responsibility, guilt and grimy hot tubs.

Tabitha ...... Doon Mackichan
Will ...... Joseph Kloska
Samantha ...... Gemma Saunders
Mary ...... Tessa Nicholson
Reporter ...... John Biggins

Directed by David Hunter.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00pxqz7)
Vincent Duggleby and a panel of guests answer calls on small business finance.

Guests:

Mary Monfries, tax partner and head of UK private business, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Stephen Alambritis, Federation of Small Businesses
Ed Harber, advisor, Business Debtline.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00pzhcw)
City of Two Continents

The Abyss as Viewed from Istanbul on 27th October 1962

Series of short stories marking Istanbul's tenure as European Capital of Culture in 2010.

By Maureen Freely. The Cuban Missile Crisis as viewed from the streets of Istanbul. As the world stands on the brink of annihilation, one city resident negotiates the fears and preoccupations of his lovers, friends and neighbours.

Read by Jimmy Chisholm.


WED 15:45 Lost, Stolen or Shredded (b00m68s7)
Series 2

Has Anybody Seen a Copy of Et Tu Healy?

Series of programmes in which antiquarian book dealer Rick Gekoski tells the stories that lie behind five very different missing works of art.

Written by James Joyce in 1891 when he was just nine years old as a protest at the death of the Irish nationalist leader Charles Parnell, the poem Et Tu Healy was printed by his proud father and distributed to friends and family; even the Pope was sent a copy.

But it was never published, and, apart from three lines, no copy of it has ever been found. Rick Gekoski asks where might one be, and, if one were to be found, how much it might be worth.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00pxqz9)
Twitter, Broadband, BlackBerries, Globalisation - are they all forces ranged against out traditional concept of work or does a deeper analysis favour continuity over change? Laurie Taylor discusses the workplace of the future with Richard Donkin, author of The Future of Work, and with Kevin Doogan from Bristol University. Are we all set to become 'portfolio workers' or is the factory system in place since the Industrial Revolution and the office 9 to 5 set to continue for a while yet.

Also, what have you been doing with your teddy lately? Schools have begun sending young children home with teddy bears to write diaries of their shared experiences over holidays or half-terms. So widespread has this practice become that children as far apart as China and Norway are jotting down the daily experiences they share with these teds. A unique opportunity for a sociologist to compare childhood experiences in these two places. Laurie's guest Randi Waerdahl talks about her research.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00pxng4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00pwq9k)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00pwqdh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Ayres on the Air (b00mg9fy)
Series 3

Shopping

Pam Ayres returns with a new series packed with poetry, anecdotes and sketches.

Pam is joined on stage by Geoffrey Whitehead and Felicity Montagu for poems and sketches on the subject of Shopping. Featuring sketches about braving the cosmetics department, and how some shop assistants think anyone over 40 should only wear beige.

Pam's shopping poems include 'Nowadays We Worship at Saint Tesco', the Contact Lens poem and 'I Can't Find Nice Knickers', one of her briefer poems.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00pwpxm)
Jazzer seems distracted when Mike talks about plans for the milk round so Mike persuades him to go to the Bull for a pint. When Mike cottons on it's about Fallon, he encourages Jazzer to let her know how he feels. Jazzer says he already has but she's not interested. Mike knows it's rough but he'll get over it. They haggle over payment for Jazzer's help with the milk round and come to a compromise.

Kathy's at Bridge Farm for the shop committee meeting where she tells Pat it's a relief to escape from Jim and Kenton who are pouring over the plans for Jaxx. Lynda has heard that Jim's put in an offer for Greenacres (formerly the old police house) and that he and Nathan Booth have both applied to be clerk of the parish council. Kathy's surprised by Lynda's revelation that someone has suggested that Lynda should stand for parish council chair.

The meeting drags by when Susan takes issue at everything, especially when she thinks she's being left out of the sub-committees. Brian appeases her by praising her energy and wisdom, encouraging her not to waste her time getting involved in more lowly responsibilities.

Episode written by Tim Stimpson.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00pwqfg)
Arts news and reviews with Mark Lawson.

John Sullivan discusses his new series Rock and Chips, a prequel to the much loved sitcom Only Fools and Horses which Sullivan created and wrote.

Front Row remembers Erich Segal, the classics professor from Harvard and Yale who wrote the best-selling novel Love Story, which became a hugely successful film starring Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw

A Prophet, the latest film from the director of The Beat That My Heart Skipped, is a hard-hitting drama set in a tough Parisian prison. The film, which follows one convict's rise through the mafia ranks, won the Grand Jury Prize in Cannes. Crime novelist Denise Mina reviews.

As 26-year-old American trumpeter Christian Scott prepares to release a new album, Kevin LeGendre considers the choices young jazz musicians have to make about their sound and their style.


WED 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


WED 20:00 Decision Time (b00pxqzc)
How to abolish the BBC licence fee? Nick and a panel of former political insiders examine how a government which wanted to abolish the BBC licence fee could get its way, and ask what opposition it would face in Whitehall, Westminster and White City.


WED 20:45 More Than A Game (b00pxr8k)
The Football War

Professor Anthony King tells the story of politically-significant sporting events.

In 1969, Honduras and El Salvador played each other in a series of qualifying matches for the 1970 World Cup in Mexico. Both were absolutely determined to win, so much so that shortly after the final whistle of the final match, they went to war. It only lasted four days but thousands were killed and thousands more displaced. Was it really all about football?


WED 21:00 Nature (b00pxmcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00pxqh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00pwt3n)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00pwt5q)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

Setback for Obama - Democrats lose Senate seat in Massachusetts

How much will Haitian crisis cost the world?

More than 400 dead after riots in Nigeria.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00pwv3b)
Rebecca Stott - The Coral Thief

Episode 8

Dan Stevens reads from Rebecca Stott's love story, set in Paris in 1815 in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars.

Plans to break into the Jardin des Plantes advance rapidly.

Abridged by Viv Beeby

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 23:00 Weird Tales (b00wr8s9)
Series 2

The House on Pale Avenue

Hoarder of horror Lovecraft returns to share three more chilling tales.

By Richard Vincent. Scratching in the walls, under the floorboards, in the pipes: their new home is trying to tell the Williams family something and they won't be given a moment's peace until its secret is out in the open.

Geoff Williams ...... Jamie Glover
Jane Williams ...... Julia Ford
Sarah Williams ...... Agnes Dromgoole
Martin Crabtree ...... John Biggins
DCI Cram ...... Piers Wehner
Psychiatrist ...... Melissa Advani
Lovecraft ...... Stephen Hogan

Directed by Gemma Jenkins.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00pwv61)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



THURSDAY 21 JANUARY 2010

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00pstkh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00pstm7)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00pstqd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00pstnx)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00pstsw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00pstwf)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev Kelvin Holdsworth.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00psv57)
The police are being given guidelines on how to spot people shooting legally, amid concerns that many don't understand 'countryside ways'.

As the government's former chief scientific advisor warns TB in cattle could threaten the future of British dairy farming, Charlotte Smith hears how a vaccination programme could curtail the spread of the disease.


THU 06:00 Today (b00psv9q)
With John Humphrys and Sarah Montague. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00pxrr7)
The Glencoe Massacre

Melvyn Bragg and guests Karin Bowie, Murray Pittock and Daniel Szechi discuss the Glencoe Massacre of 1692, why it happened, and its lasting repercussions.On a winter night in 1692, a company of soldiers quartered with the MacDonalds of Glencoe rose early and slaughtered their hosts. About 38 men, women and children were killed. Their homes were torched and many survivors died as they fled into the snow. This mass killing was branded by a Scottish Parliamentary Commission of Inquiry as 'murder under trust'.Why did this still infamous atrocity happen? The answer takes in the seismic impact of the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and the ongoing struggles for religious power that swept through the country in the 17th century. Crucially, Britain was at war in Europe, and the distracting nature of the conflict in Scotland, as far as the London government was concerned, helped to give the events at Glencoe their particular character. But this is also a story of a deadline and the fatal consequences of the Glencoe MacDonalds' attempts to meet it - and of how their technical failure to do so was exploited.The Glencoe Massacre had a severe impact on the reputation of the government of the Protestant King William III, who had ousted the Catholic James II with the support of the English and Scottish Parliaments only four years earlier. Some historians contend that it pushed the two states along the road to the Act of Union of 1707. Karin Bowie is Lecturer in Scottish History at the University of Glasgow; Murray Pittock is Bradley Professor of English Literature at the University of Glasgow; Daniel Szechi is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Manchester.


THU 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7r)
Making Us Human (2,000,000 - 9000 BC)

Swimming Reindeer

The Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, retells the history of human development from the first stone axe to the credit card using 100 selected objects from the Museum. Today Neil has chosen an object found in France, dating back 13,000 years. It is a carving of two swimming reindeer and it's not just the likeness that is striking. The creator of this carving was one of the first humans to express their world through art. But why did they do it?

Neil MacGregor tells the story of the Swimming Reindeer, and its place in the history of art and religion with contributions from the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams and archaelogist Professor Steven Mithen.

Producer: Anthony Denselow


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00pwnk7)
Julie Walters on Mo Mowlam; The politics of sleep

Actor Julie Walters on Mo Mowlam's life and character. Plus, is sleep the 'next feminist issue'?


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00pwp26)
The Postman of Good Hope

Episode 4

By Al Smith, inspired by a true story.

Nicholas must deliver a letter to the Oracle of Good Hope but she has a surprising message for him.

Nicholas ...... Steve Toussaint
Grub ...... Nyasha Hatendi
The Mayor ...... Patrice Naiambana
Caramella ...... Chipo Chung
Inspector Shandy ...... Jimmy Akingbola
Perdita ...... Adjoa Andoh
Loupe ...... Darren Hart
The Oracle ...... Anni Domingo
Cornelius ...... Ilario Bisi-Pedro
The Boy ...... Isaac Ajala

Directed by Sally Avens.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00pxs36)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 The Frost Collection (b00pxs38)
Series 2

Episode 5

Sir David Frost and guests look back at some of the most memorable interviews of his long career.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00pwpn0)
Consumer news and issues with Shari Vahl.


THU 12:30 Face the Facts (b00pxs3b)
Fine Justice

John Waite presents the investigative consumer series.

Efforts by the Health and Safety Executive to ensure heavy punishment for serious breaches of regulations are often undermined by laws which are aimed at companies rather than the people who run them. Firms which go into administration after an accident can simply escape any penalty while the directors can set up in business again soon afterwards, all perfectly legally. The government has thus far resisted efforts to change the law to make it easier to prosecute individual directors. John hears how one firm, found guilty after men died. folded between verdict and sentencing, leaving a penalty of nearly half a million pounds unpaid.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00pwppm)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00pwpsy)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Questions, Questions (b00pxshw)
Stewart Henderson answers those intriguing questions from everyday life.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00pwpxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00cxbdh)
Two-Pipe Problems

A Streetcar Named Revenge

Plays by Michael Chaplin, set in The Old Beeches, a retirement home for elderly thespians. Inmates William and Sandy still nurse a certain affectionate animosity towards one another since they starred as Holmes and Watson in a 1960s television series.

William and Sandy are haunted by the return of two characters from the past. Sandy becomes amorously involved through the medium of a shared passion for crosswords.

Sandy Boyle ...... Stanley Baxter
William Parnes ...... Richard Briers
Hatty Doran ...... Edna Dore
Angel Hosmer ...... Linda Broughton
Mary Winter ...... Jillie Meers
Edgar ...... David Shaw-Parker
Karen ...... Tracy Wiles
Ronnie Adair ...... Nickolas Grace
Marie Devine ...... Susan Wooldridge
Hugo Oberstein ...... Rad Lazar

Directed by Marilyn Imrie

A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00ps0hx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00psp8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00pzhcp)
City of Two Continents

True Turk

Series of short stories marking Istanbul's tenure as European Capital of Culture in 2010.

A wise gypsy wrestler comes to the aid of a couple whose relationship is threatened by their families' entrenched prejudices.

By Moris Farhi, read by Grant O'Rourke.


THU 15:45 Lost, Stolen or Shredded (b00mbhqx)
Series 2

The Cradle of Civilisation

Series of programmes in which antiquarian book dealer Rick Gekoski tells the stories that lie behind five very different missing works of art.

One of the little-reported but culturally significant effects of the war in Iraq has been the loss of works of antiquity from the country's museums. From the Iraq Museum in Baghdad alone, it is estimated that 15,000 objects dating from the dawn of civilisation have disappeared.

Rick Gekoski examines how and why these Mesopotamian artefacts were looted and speculates on what may have happened to them.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00psqvl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00pxshy)
A thousand years ago, the centre of world science and invention was not in Europe but the Middle East. Muslim minds produced a flying machine in the 9th century, the first distillation system, surgical instuments familiar in a modern hospital, and the most accurate clock in 1,000 years. Gareth Mitchell visits the Science Museum in London and picks out a few exhibits from an exhibition of 1,001 inventions.


THU 17:00 PM (b00pwq9m)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00pwqdk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Deep Trouble (b00td8tw)
Series 2

Episode 3

A submarine systems failure puts the Goliath crew at the mercy of a drugs baron. Stars Jim Field Smith. From June 2007.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00pwpxp)
Pip surprises Ruth and David with her elaborate make-up. Although angry David tells her she can't take her exam looking like that, Ruth says there's no point arguing when it's such an important day for Pip. Ruth's shocked when Pip tells her she's finished with Jonathan. Later Ruth tells David that Pip seems much happier. If that means she's going to stay at college, that's a price worth paying.

Lilian fields another phone call for Matt. Jennifer visits Lilian, who's positive about being able to visit Matt weekly. Lilian's dismayed when she learns that Lynda is standing for parish council chair and urges David to stand instead, but he's too busy. They'll just have to hope no-one nominates Lynda...

Eddie's decrepit van breaks down on the side of the road in the middle of delivering some compost. He rings Will to help but they can't get the van started. While Will delivers the compost in his car, Eddie rings a mate with a garage about the van. Frustrated Eddie hopes he can fix it, because without his van Eddie can't do a thing.

Episode written by Tim Stimpson.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00pwqfj)
Tamsin Greig stars as a monstrous and manipulative Hollywood agent in the new play The Little Dog Laughed. Screenwriter and novelist Deborah Moggach gives her verdict.

Robin Ticciati has been appointed as the Scottish Chamber Orchestra's new Principal Conductor at the age of only 26. He is also Music Director of Glyndebourne on Tour and was the youngest ever conductor to appear at La Scala when he was 23. Ticciati discusses the pressures as well as the pleasures of taking on an orchestra at such a young age.

In a new film No Distance Left to Run, the four members of Blur, including Damon Albarn and Graham Coxon, talk intimately about the rise, fall and rise of the group. John Harris reviews.

One hundred and fifty years of photography from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh come together in a new exhibition, Where Three Dreams Cross, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. Writers Jamila Gavin and Moni Mohsin review.

John Wilson reports on how the recent discovery of fragments of a 2,500-year-old cuneiform tablet have heightened diplomatic tensions between Britain and Iran. The loan of the Cyrus Cylinder - one of the most important objects in the British Museum collection - to Iran has been delayed to allow further study, a decision that has prompted an angry reaction in Tehran.


THU 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b00pxslj)
Missing Migrant Children

Every week children who arrive alone in the UK and claim asylum go missing from local authority care. Many are believed to have been trafficked to work in brothels, cannabis factories and private homes or in street crime. Angus Crawford examines how criminals are using loopholes in the system to exploit these children.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00pxsyk)
Ready to Wear

Many of our clothes are made by low-paid workers in low-cost countries. But when In Business got involved, a factory was closed and working conditions improved. From Bangladesh, Peter Day found out what happens when westerners intervene.


THU 21:00 Hot House Kids (b00gkz12)
Episode 1

Former prima ballerina Deborah Bull investigates the advantages and the pitfalls of being an elite performer in the arts and sport and what young people need to succeed. She also looks at the physiological advantages and problems of attaining perfection, discovering the optimum and the safe age to begin meaningful training.

Deborah started ballet training at the age of seven - dangerously close to the age at which, however hard she worked, she would have been too late to consider a career on the international ballet stage today. The ability to excel at complex and extreme physical endeavours in ballet and other performing arts and sport requires a combination of two things: a highly trained body and an expert brain.

To achieve the levels of excellence necessary to compete on the global job market today you have to start young, taking advantage of the brain's early plasticity and the increased potential for muscle flexibility in pre-adolescents. In the UK, most little girls (and some boys) start serious dancing and music training at around the age of seven. A UK child has some degree of choice and control and, after a few years, the ability to decide whether or not to pursue one of the activities as a professional career. However, in some countries in Eastern Europe and Asia children enter full time training as young as three - gymnastics and ballet training are key examples - and endure challenging physical and mental regimes to ensure that they are ready to compete - and achieve the highest standards as soon as they reach double figures.

On a journey that takes Deborah to the Ukraine, she visits the National Ballet School in Kiev, the elite football training centre at Dynamo Kiev and the National Gymnastics centre in Kiev where she discovers why elite athletes are achieving such high levels of achievement in Eastern Europe.

Because of the growing number of top-class performers coming out of Asian countries she also has contributions from members of the national ballet school in Korea.

In this first programme Deborah looks at the physiological development of a young person, what happens to the body and the brain of an elite child and what key things are needed to help nurture and realise its potential. She also discovers that if a child is to avoid some of the short- and long-term injuries which result in top class training he or she may have to compromise on standards.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00pxrr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00pwt3q)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00pwt5s)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Jack Straw defends the decision to go to war in Iraq to the Chilcot Inquiry.

Harriet Harman launches a campaign against inequality.

How long can human beings survive without food and water?


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00pwv3d)
Rebecca Stott - The Coral Thief

Episode 9

Dan Stevens reads from Rebecca Stott's love story, set in Paris in 1815 in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars.

Daniel arranges a meeting with Henri Jagot and plays his trump card.

Abridged by Viv Beeby

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 23:00 House on Fire (b00pxtwg)
Series 1

Neighbourhood Watch

Vicky and Matt are continuing in their struggles to co-habit in harmony but things are not helped by some late night disturbances by some troublesome youths. Vicky decides to take action by forming Hogarth Road's first neighborhood watch scheme.

Matt is spectacularly uninterested until He's met Lindsay from down the road. Lindsay is a glamour model and Matt suddenly discovers his sense of social duty.

Vicky - Emma Pierson
Matt - JODY LATHAM
Col. Bill - RUPERT VANSITTART
Julie - JANINE DUVITSKI
Peter - PHILIP JACKSON
Lindsey - Kellie Shirley

With Fergus Craig, Colin Hoult & Ned Leadbeater

Directed by Clive Brill & Dan Hine
Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00pwv63)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



FRIDAY 22 JANUARY 2010

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00pstkk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00pstm9)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00pstqh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00pstnz)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00pstt0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00pstwh)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev Kelvin Holdsworth.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00psv59)
The Scottish Government is spending 300,000 pounds to bring the parts of animals we usually throw away back onto our plates. It's hoped eating offal could help generate three million pounds a year for the industry. Charlotte Smith asks why tripe is not as popular in this country as it is elsewhere in the world.

Also, staff working at the Rural Payments Agency have received bonuses worth 1.8 million pounds over the last five years. That's despite the agency being heavily criticised for its handling of the single farm payment subsidy to farmers. A recent parliamentary report condemned 'poor leadership' and said the agency was still beset with problems.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00psv9s)
With James Naughtie and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day; Yesterday in Parliament.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00psp99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7t)
Making Us Human (2,000,000 - 9000 BC)

Clovis Spear Point

The Director of the British Museum, Neil MacGregor, retells the history of human development from the first stone axe to the credit card using 100 selected objects from the Museum. In this programme, Neil describes an object that dates from the earliest settlement of North America, around 13,000 years ago. It's a deadly hunting weapon, used by the first inhabitants of the Americas.

This sharp spearhead lets us understand how humans spread across the globe. By 11,000 BC humans had moved from north east Asia into the uninhabited wilderness of north America; within 2000 years they had populated the whole continent. How did these hunters live? And how does their Asian origin sit with the creation stories of modern day Native Americans?

Neil MacGregor tells the story of the Clovis Point, with contributions from Michael Palin and American archaeologist Gary Haynes


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00pwnk9)
The future of the NHS

Can, and should, the NHS be ring fenced from forthcoming cuts? Plus, Emily and Robin Logie on dealing with a gap year tragedy.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b00pwp28)
The Postman of Good Hope

Episode 5

By Al Smith, inspired by a true story.

Nicholas and Grub go on trial for fictionalising the mail.

Nicholas ...... Steve Toussaint
Grub ...... Nyasha Hatendi
The Mayor ...... Patrice Naiambana
Caramella ...... Chipo Chung
Inspector Shandy ...... Jimmy Akingbola
Perdita ...... Adjoa Andoh
Loupe ...... Darren Hart
The Oracle ...... Anni Domingo
Cornelius ...... Ilario Bisi-Pedro
The Boy ...... Isaac Ajala

Directed by Sally Avens.


FRI 11:00 US Health Reform: Beware of Side Effects! (b00n8ss0)
America is the world leader in medical innovation, and many advances in medicine have been instrumental in helping Americans and people all over the world to live longer and healthier lives. So should we be worried in the UK that healthcare reform in America may impact on the sorts of drugs and technologies that NHS patients have access to?

In 2008, the US pharmaceutical industry spent 65 billion dollars on research and development, and they have made it clear that 'reform must protect the US's lead in medical innovation'.

Justin Webb investigates whether all that money, prohibitively expensive drugs and cutting-edge technology translates to better healthcare and asks if cuts can been made without stifling innovation.

He talks to those who are involved in making the decisions and those who will be affected by them when the health reform bill is delivered to the president, and speaks to leading figures in the NHS to ask if American fears are well founded.

An All Out production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b00pxvds)
Series 5

The Musical

Spoof reminiscences of a former variety star. Count Arthur Strong is an expert in everything from the world of entertainment to the origins of the species, all false starts and nervous fumbling, poorly concealed by a delicate sheen of bravado and self-assurance.

Owing to the huge success of shows like Miss Saigon, Cats and Annie Get Your Coat, Arthur decides 'his time is now' and devises his own autobiographical musical tribute to himself, Count Arthur Strong: The Musical. Hoping to raise the money to take it into the West End, Arthur performs highlights of the show to an invited audience of potential investors. Will he raise the money he needs to make his dream come true?

With Steve Delaney, Mel Giedroyc, Dave Mounfield and Alastair Kerr.

A Komedia Entertainment/Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00pwpn2)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00pwppp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00pwpt0)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00pxvdv)
Tim Harford presents the magazine which looks at numbers everywhere, in the news, in politics and in life.

An Open University co production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00pwpxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b009xspl)
Grace

Intimate family drama by Mick Gordon and AC Grayling.

Grace, a scientist and champion of atheism, is faced with the decision of her son Tom to become a priest.

Grace ...... Paola Dionisotti
Tom ...... Will Keen
Tony ...... Trevor Peacock
Ruth ...... Priyanga Burford
Michael ...... Nathan Osgood

Directed by Mick Gordon.

A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00pxvdx)
Eric Robson chairs a correspondence edition of the popular horticultural forum.

Bob Flowerdew, Bunny Guinness and Matt Biggs answer listeners' questions sent in by post and email.

Jon Stokes of The Tree Council joins the programme to discuss the problem of sudden oak death.


FRI 15:45 Lost, Stolen or Shredded (b00mg3yq)
Series 2

The Destroyed Portrait of Winston Churchill

Series of programmes in which antiquarian book dealer Rick Gekoski tells the stories that lie behind five very different missing works of art.

Graham Sutherland's portrait of Winston Churchill, commissioned by both Houses of Parliament as a tribute to Churchill on the occasion of his 80th birthday, was destroyed after his death by his wife because she hated it so much. Photographs taken before its demise show the Prime Minister hunched with age and dark in mood. A detailed study by the artist for the destroyed painting still hangs in the National Portrait Gallery.

Rick tells the story behind this lost portrait and asks if the rights of an owner override those of the public, and if the Churchills had the moral right to destroy it.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00pxvr3)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00pxvr5)
Noel Clarke counts down to his latest movie 4-3-2-1 and reveals why he never intended to make his last film Adulthood, which topped the British box office charts.

Old Boy director Park Chan Wook discusses vampires, religion and guilt, all of which play a major part in his new horror film Thirst.

Professor Roger Luckhurst visits District 9, the science fiction allegory about apartheid.

Colin Shindler presents the film news from 1960.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00pwq9p)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00pwqdm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00pxvr7)
Series 70

Episode 3

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Francis Wheen, Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman and Sue Perkins.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00pwpxr)
Lilian's approached by a stranger looking for Matt and is surprised to discover he's Matt's half-brother Paul. He's always wanted to meet Matt. Since their mother has been terminally ill, she's been more open about the past and let slip about Matt and Lilian's visit. Lilian reveals that Matt's in prison but she'll tell him about Paul's visit. She's sure it'll be something positive for Matt to think about.

Eddie discovers his van's ready for the scrap heap; it will cost more to get it fixed than the van's worth. But Baggy's renting him a spare wagon to use. He worries to Clarrie about how they're going to afford another van but she tries to be positive saying they'll get by.

Tearful Helen talks to Brenda about Annette's decision to have an abortion and admits it was a shock. When Brenda says Annette's going to need Helen's support, Helen isn't sure she's up to it. She just feels so sad for Annette. They could have had a home and family. When Brenda tells Helen she's absolutely the best person to look after Annette, Helen hopes so. Brenda reassures her that Annette's going to be fine.

Episode written by Tim Stimpson.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00pwqfl)
Julie Walters stars as Mo Mowlam in a television drama about the former Northern Ireland Secretary in Tony Blair's government, her role in the Good Friday Agreement and her death from cancer. Edwina Currie reviews.

Artist Dexter Dalwood reveals how history informs his paintings of unpopulated interiors and landscapes, as a retrospective of his work opens at Tate St Ives in Cornwall.

The American novelist Richard Powers is only the ninth person to have his entire DNA genome sequenced. His latest book, Generosity, is about a woman with a gene that makes her constantly happy.

Forever Vienna is an album of waltz music performed by Dutch violinist and conductor André Rieu and his Johann Strauss Orchestra, which is currently at number seven in the album charts and outselling Susan Boyle. John Evans reveals how Rieu has waltzed his way to chart success.


FRI 19:45 A History of the World in 100 Objects (b00pwn7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00pxvr9)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from the BBC Radio Theatre in London. The panel includes author Anthony Horowitz, journalist Amanda Platell, chief executive of Turning Point Lord Victor Adebowale, and Bob Crow, general secretary of the RMT.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00pxvrc)
Lisa Jardine on the importance of science education for national prosperity, and a failed attempt in the late 19th century to change our culture to be more pro-science.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00q3f44)
The Accountant of Solyanka Square

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz.

Now that Andrei's business interests are legitimate, he never talks about how he made his millions. But when he is kidnapped by his estranged son Victor, who will stop at nothing to get answers, he is forced to reveal his secrets.

Set against the backdrop of Russia's turbulent recent past - from the Soviet Union's fall to Putin's rise - this slick thriller explores the period which gave birth to the now infamous 'oligarchs'.

Andrei ...... Steven Mackintosh
Victor ...... Steven Webb
Alina ...... Kate Ashfield
Chubatkin ...... Struan Rodger
Valentin ...... Ben Crowe
Orlovsky ...... John Rowe
Verzirov ...... Stephen Critchlow
Uzrovskaya ...... Liz Sutherland

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00pwt3s)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00pwt5v)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Two brothers who tortured two other boys are given indeterminate sentences. Can rehabilitation ever work?

Rebuilding the Haitian capital, Port au Prince.

The diplomatic spat between China and the USA.

The state of Premier League football's finances.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00pwv3g)
Rebecca Stott - The Coral Thief

Episode 10

Dan Stevens reads from Rebecca Stott's love story, set in Paris in 1815 in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars.

Lucienne's audacious plan is carried out, and Paris' subterranean quarries provide the backdrop for a vanishing act.

Abridged by Viv Beeby

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00pxn11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00pwv65)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b00pwp20)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b00pwp22)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b00pwp24)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b00pwp26)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b00pwp28)

A Box of Wittgensteins 05:45 SAT (b00g44sj)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 MON (b00pwmgq)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 MON (b00pwmgq)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 TUE (b00pwmgq)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 TUE (b00pwn7m)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 TUE (b00pwn7m)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 WED (b00pwn7m)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 WED (b00pwn7p)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 WED (b00pwn7p)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 THU (b00pwn7p)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 THU (b00pwn7r)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 THU (b00pwn7r)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 00:30 FRI (b00pwn7r)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 09:45 FRI (b00pwn7t)

A History of the World in 100 Objects 19:45 FRI (b00pwn7t)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00prd58)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00pxvrc)

Act Your Age 18:30 TUE (b00pxn13)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b008x3ym)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b00b0t4s)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00pxmk1)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00pzhcw)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00pzhcp)

Agatha Christie 11:30 WED (b00pxqz1)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00psrt8)

And Go To Innisfree 23:30 SAT (b00pnp9h)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00ps3wk)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00prd56)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00pxvr9)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00ps5f8)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00ps5f8)

Ayres on the Air 18:30 WED (b00mg9fy)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00ps6kn)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00ps6kn)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00pxk01)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00pwv3l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00pwv38)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00pwv3b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00pwv3d)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00pwv3g)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00pnstc)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00pqh8v)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00pxjzx)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00psp95)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00pxng4)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00pxng4)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00pnp9c)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00psqvj)

Closing Guantanamo 17:00 SUN (b00pqn29)

Consorting With Angels 16:30 SUN (b00psqvn)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 11:30 FRI (b00pxvds)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00pr5b6)

Decision Time 22:15 SAT (b00pr52d)

Decision Time 20:00 WED (b00pxqzc)

Deep Trouble 18:30 THU (b00td8tw)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00psp99)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00psp99)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00pxjzz)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00pxmcz)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00pxqz5)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00cxbdh)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b009xspl)

Ed Reardon's Week 11:30 MON (b00pxjpr)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00ps1hb)

Face the Facts 12:30 THU (b00pxs3b)

Famous Footsteps 09:30 TUE (b00pxll8)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00ps0hz)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00psv9j)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00psv53)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00psv55)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00psv57)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00psv59)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00pxng0)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00q3f44)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00ps3w9)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00pxs36)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00pwqfz)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00pwqfd)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00pwqfg)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00pwqfj)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00pwqfl)

Gameboy v The Mongolian Steppe 14:45 SUN (b00cmqnc)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00pr8bh)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00pxvdx)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00pxn11)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00pxn11)

Hot House Kids 21:00 THU (b00gkz12)

House on Fire 23:00 THU (b00pxtwg)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00pr72d)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00pxsyk)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00pxrr7)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00pxrr7)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00pxng2)

Jon Ronson On 23:00 TUE (b00pxng6)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00pqh91)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00pxk23)

Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats 15:30 SAT (b00pqj0z)

Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats 13:30 TUE (b00pxmcx)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00prd50)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00pxvr3)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00ps5f2)

Lost, Stolen or Shredded 15:45 MON (b00lydhb)

Lost, Stolen or Shredded 15:45 TUE (b00m17q8)

Lost, Stolen or Shredded 15:45 WED (b00m68s7)

Lost, Stolen or Shredded 15:45 THU (b00mbhqx)

Lost, Stolen or Shredded 15:45 FRI (b00mg3yq)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00pxmf1)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00pxshy)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00prgj0)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00ps5s0)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00pstm1)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00pstkc)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00pstkf)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00pstkh)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00pstkk)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00pxqh7)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00pxqh7)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00pxqz7)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00ps3wc)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00ps3wc)

More Than A Game 20:45 WED (b00pxr8k)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b00pr8bc)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00pxvdv)

Nature 11:00 TUE (b00pxmcr)

Nature 21:00 WED (b00pxmcr)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00prgj8)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00ps6kl)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00pstw7)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00pstsr)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00pstst)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00pstsw)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00pstt0)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00ps6qq)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00prgn3)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00psp8s)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00psp91)

News 13:00 SAT (b00ps3wh)

Obama's Babies 11:00 MON (b00pxjpp)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00psp8n)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00psqvl)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00psqvl)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00ps0hx)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00ps0hx)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00ps5dr)

PM 17:00 MON (b00pwqdc)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00pwq9h)

PM 17:00 WED (b00pwq9k)

PM 17:00 THU (b00pwq9m)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00pwq9p)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00psrcv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00prgk7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00psv51)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00pstw9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00pstwc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00pstwf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00pstwh)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00ps5f4)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00ps5f4)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00ps5f4)

QE2: Portrait of an Ocean Liner 11:00 WED (b00fkbrp)

Questions, Questions 13:30 THU (b00pxshw)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00psp8x)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00psp8x)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00psp8x)

Ruthless and Brilliant 13:30 SUN (b00pn4c5)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00p016z)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00ps1h8)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00ps5f6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00prgj4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00ps5s6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00pstsp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00pstq8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00pstqb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00pstqd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00pstqh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00prgj2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00prgj6)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00ps5dw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00ps5s4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00ps5s8)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00psr3d)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00pstnq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00pstq6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00pstm3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00pstns)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00pstm5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00pstnv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00pstm7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00pstnx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00pstm9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00pstnz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00ps5f0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00psrcs)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00pwqfb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00pwqdf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00pwqdh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00pwqdk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00pwqdm)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00ps6qs)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00ps6qs)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00pxj6d)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00pxj6d)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00psp93)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00psp8v)

Taking a Stand 09:00 TUE (b00pxll6)

Taking a Stand 21:30 TUE (b00pxll6)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00psp97)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00psrt6)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00psrt6)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00pwpyj)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00pwpyj)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00pwpxk)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00pwpxk)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00pwpxm)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00pwpxm)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00pwpxp)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00pwpxp)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00pwpxr)

The De-Railing of Transport 2010 20:00 MON (b00pxk9w)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00prd52)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00pxvr5)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00psp9c)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00psp9c)

The Frost Collection 11:30 THU (b00pxs38)

The House That Chekhov Built 11:30 TUE (b00pxmcv)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00pxqz3)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00prd54)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00pxvr7)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00pxslj)

The Vox Project 21:00 MON (b00pxk9y)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00ps3w7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00psph9)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00pwt8y)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00pwt5n)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00pwt5q)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00pwt5s)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00pwt5v)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00pr4wz)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00pxqz9)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00pwv6c)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00pwv5z)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00pwv61)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00pwv63)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00pwv65)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00ps0tv)

Today 06:00 MON (b00psvbm)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00psv9l)

Today 06:00 WED (b00psv9n)

Today 06:00 THU (b00psv9q)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00psv9s)

Too White to Be Black 16:00 TUE (b00pxn0z)

US Health Reform: Beware of Side Effects! 11:00 FRI (b00n8ss0)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00prgn5)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00ps0ts)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00ps3wf)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00ps5dy)

Weather 22:00 SAT (b00ps5fb)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00psp8q)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00psp8z)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00psph7)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00psr3g)

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Weather 05:57 MON (b00pxhwy)

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Weather 12:57 FRI (b00pwppp)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00pwt3s)

Weird Tales 23:00 WED (b00wr8s9)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00psrtd)

What's So Great About ...? 10:30 SAT (b00ps1hd)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00ps50r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00pwp1y)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00pwnk2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00pwnk4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00pwnk7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00pwnk9)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00pqjs7)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00pwptl)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00pwpst)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00pwpsw)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00pwpsy)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00pwpt0)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00pwppf)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00pwpmv)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00pwpmy)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00pwpn0)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00pwpn2)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00ps5dt)