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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 07 NOVEMBER 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00nlzh1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nnnb0)
The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham

Episode 5

Barbara Flynn reads from Selina Hastings' biography of Somerset Maugham, which sheds new light on his complex character.

When Maugham's companion Gerald Haxton dies, Alan Searle becomes a major part of Maugham's life.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nlzh3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nlzh5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nlzh7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00nlzh9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nlzhc)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Lesley Carroll.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00nm0lh)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00nm11p)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00nm11r)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00nmz7n)
Owenstown

The philanthropist Robert Owen brought about sweeping social reforms in his model village of New Lanark. Workers in the mill town were given improved housing and working conditions while the children were taken out of the mills and schooled instead. But his vision for a self-sufficient community was never fully realised in his lifetime.

Matt Baker explores new plans for Owenstown, a new town of 20,000 planned just a few miles from New Lanark. The co-operative society will be encouraged to foster a sense of community and the town will be carbon neutral, generating its own power from wind and waste. Matt also visits the nearby village of Rigside; once riding high on the jobs and prosperity of the coal pit, it is now facing severe decline and hopes that some of the excitement and prosperity from Owenstown will benefit their area.

However, the site chosen for the new town has no natural resource to provide jobs, unlike Rigside's mine and New Lanark's river to power the mills. Matt asks how the planners envision starting their town from scratch.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00nmz7q)
Farming Today This Week

We're farming fewer breeds than ever before, to feed our desire for consistent cuts of meat. Ninety per cent of dairy cows are Holsteins, 90 per cent of pig sows are Landrace, and 70 per cent of our beef comes from Limosin cattle. Last century, the UK lost 26 native breeds of livestock, as farmers concentrated on the most productive lines. Charlotte Smith visits a research farm in Oxfordshire to find out how these breeds have come to dominate, and what makes them stand out from the crowd.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00nmz7s)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00nmz7v)
Presented by James Naughtie and Justin Webb.

Doubts have been raised over the implementation of reforms of MPs' expenses. Professor Sir Ian Kennedy, the head of the new independent body charged with rewriting the allowances regime, is reported to have said he might not implement all of the recommendations set out by the Kelly Report. Political correspondent Rajini Vaidyanathan comments on the reported claims.

G20 finance ministers are disagreeing over climate change and stimulus spending at a meeting in St Andrews. It is the last time the ministers will meet ahead of next month's climate summit in Copenhagen. Business correspondent Joe Lynam examines the breakdown in the talks.

Senior military figures have criticised the government's Afghan policy. Correspondent Mark D'Arcy reports from a sometimes passionate defence debate in the House of Lords.

Out-of-court punishments are intended only for minor crimes, but an investigation for this week's Panorama reveals that half of all criminal cases in England and Wales, including violent assaults, were dealt with by police and did not make it to court. Reporter Shelley Joffre discusses the findings.

For the countries of southern Asia the Second World War is seen very differently to the triumph it is seen by Europe. For millions who fought from the subcontinent, the conflict provided a new outlet for the struggle against colonialism. Journalist Mihir Bose reflects on the subcontinent's role in the war.

A vigil has taken place for the 12 civilians and one soldier who were killed at an Ford Hood army base in Texas by army major Nidal Malik Hasan. The shock at the killings has reverberated around America, and led to questions about the loyalty and trustworthiness of Muslim Americans, particularly those serving in the military. Many Muslims are worried that those questions will morph into racism and discrimination. Reporter Gavin Lee reports from Fort Hood on the aftermath of the shootings.

The death this week of Royal Logistic Corps Staff Sergeant Olaf Schmid, who had made safe 64 bombs during five months in Afghanistan, has highlighted the work of the army's bomb disposal operators. Former bomb disposal operator Major Chris Hunter discusses the pressures they face and the mental qualities needed to survive.

Thought for the Day with Canon David Winter.

Earlier this week, the Bank of England decided to print a further 25 billion pounds as part of its quantitative easing strategy. The latest move takes the total amount of money printed over the course of the recession to 200 billion pounds. Stephen Bell, chief economist at hedge fund GLC, and Wilem Buiter, Professor of European Political Economy at the London School of Economics, discuss the affects of further quantitative easing on the economy.

Home secretary Alan Johnson earlier this week described Labour's handling of immigration as 'maladroit'. Mr Johnson's comments have been seen as a change of heart from the government. Reporter Nicola Stanbridge went to Barking to speak to constituents and to Margaret Hodge MP, who has long campaigned for her party to do more about the issues around immigration. Immigration minister Phil Woolas discusses the government's policy.

Barristers are warning that miscarriages of justice will result from government proposals to cut public spending on legal aid. The chairman of the Bar Council, Desmond Browne QC, said the cuts will drive away experienced barristers and lead to poorer standards of advocacy in criminal trials in England and Wales. Mr Brown discusses the implications of reducing the legal aid budget.

As the row continues in the UK over where MPs should live to fulfil their parliamentary duties, plans are emerging in Japan to house new MPs in a dormitory. The plans have come under criticism with members of the Japanese parliament accusing their colleagues of building themselves luxurious new accommodation. Correspondent Roland Buerk reports on Japan's accommodation row.

Britain's presence in Afghanistan has been seriously questioned this week following the deaths of seven army personnel, and calls from former junior Foreign Office minister Kim Howells MP to withdraw all troops from the country. Prime minister Gordon Brown yesterday defended Britain's continued presence, saying that troops there are 'our first line of defence' against terrorist attacks on British streets. Shadow security minister Baroness Pauline Neville Jones and the chairman of the Royal United Services Institute, Sir Paul Lever, debate the government's Afghan policy and whether the fight against Islamic extremism should be concentrated at home or abroad.

Sir Ian Kennedy, head of the new independent body charged with rewriting MPs' allowances regime, is reported to have concerns about legal challenges to some of the Kelly reforms. Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker comments on the implications of not implementing the changes.

Sir Edward Elgar's The Fringes of the Fleet is being prof


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00nmz7x)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them.

Fi Glover is joined by businessman Harvey Jacobson.

With poetry from Susan Richardson.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00nmz7z)
John McCarthy explores wild Scotland in the company of writers Andrew Greig and Sara Maitland, who live in remote places, and talks to them about how the landscape has affected their writing.

He also talks to architectural historian David Heathcote about his recent trip on the Orient Express to Venice and about the influence of Art Deco on travel.


SAT 10:30 Where Do You Want Me (A Comic in Continental Crisis) (b00nmz81)
Johnny Vegas is at a turning point in his professional status. He has a thriving career but knows deep down that audiences are getting younger and his shelf-life within showbusiness could be too close to perishable for comfort.

What will become of Johnny should The Mighty Boosh demand it is time for him to take his final bow? Johnny sees that with the demise of working men's clubs and the unforgiving nature of popular culture, many household names have followed their ageing audiences to the Spanish coast, where they are still revered and can play once more to packed houses of grateful punters.

Is Benidorm merely the elephants' graveyard for entertainers who just don't know when to call it a day, or a shining tribute to the glories of past comedy? Is it a fate that awaits Johnny himself? And what if Benidorm itself is nearing the end of a golden age, now that it is under threat as global recession bites.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00nmz83)
The Week in Westminster - one of the longest-running radio programmes - celebrates 80 years of broadcasting.

November 6th 1929: Wall St had just crashed, bringing the Roaring Twenties to an end. In Britain, women achieved equal voting rights with men and the May general election - sometimes known as the Flapper Election - returned Ramsay MacDonald as prime minister for a second time. You Were Meant for Me was the hit tune of the day.

For the benefit of these newly-enfranchised women, the BBC introduced a series of talks on the proceedings of Parliament presented by women MPs. These talks became The Week in Westminster, continuing to the present day, except for an 18-month break during the Second World War.

The first presenter was Mary Agnes Hamilton (Molly), newly elected as Labour MP for Blackburn and already an experienced broadcaster through her BBC book programme. There followed a list of famous names such as Nancy Astor, the first woman to take her seat in Parliament, Lady Cynthia Mosely, the Duchess of Atholl, Ellen Wilkinson, Miss E Rathbone and Megan Lloyd George.

In 1931, the programme expanded to include male MPs and reached out to a wider audience. A young RA Butler was one of the first men to take part. By then, it had gained the attention of the political parties: MPs taking part had to be vetted by their respective party whips.

In the late 1930s, the programme acquired a new young producer tasked with being the BBC's man in Westminster. He was none other than Guy Burgess, the spy who later defected to the Soviet Union. Author Michael Dobbs talks about Burgess' career.

From its earliest days, the programme sought to balance the views of the various parties at Westminster and deal fairly with the demands and expectations of politicians. Harman Grisewood, political adviser to the Director General in the 1950s, gives an account of the developing relationship between politicians and the media.

In the late 1960s, the format of The Week in Westminster changed. Political journalists rather than politicians were brought in to present. It has remained broadly the same ever since - discussing the week's events in parliament with backbenchers.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00nmz85)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.

Prague; Budapest; Warsaw. Our correspondent takes the train on a journey which illustrates how, in some ways, Europe is more joined up than ever before.

Another is in the slums of Nairobi, trying to find out how a friend was murdered. A young soldier is baptised in the Helmand River in Afghanistan, and our hypochondriac reporter in LA has a close encounter with the US healthcare system and, he says, only just survived to tell the tale.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00nmz87)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.

Bailed out and up for sale, will the break up of RBS and Lloyds benefit customers?

The FSA claims to put bank customers in the driving seat, so we provide a road test.

The future looks uncertain for Child Trust Funds.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00nlyvh)
Series 69

Episode 7

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Jeremy Hardy, Danielle Ward, David Mitchell and Francis Wheen.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00nmz89)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00nmz8c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00nlyvk)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Hartlepool. The panellists are Vince Cable, treasury spokesman and deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats, former Europe minister Caroline Flint, shadow culture secretary Jeremy Hunt, and author and documentary maker Carol Gould.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00nmz8f)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00nmz8h)
All Quiet on the Western Front

Dramatisation by Dave Sheasby of Erich Maria Remarque's haunting, comic, lyrical and desperate story of a group of young German soldiers enduring and coming to terms with the realities of the First World War.

Paul Baumer ...... Robert Lonsdale
Kropp ...... Simon Trinder
Muller ...... Gunnar Cauthary
Leer ...... Lloyd Thomas
Tjaden ...... Joseph Arkley
Katczinsky ...... Stephen Critchlow
Cook ...... Malcolm Tierney
Westhaus ...... Stuart McLoughlin
Captain Bertinck ...... Dan Starkey
Kemmerich ...... Luke Walker
Himmelstoss ...... Tim Treloar
Detering ...... Nick Sayce
Mother ...... Janice Acquah
French girl ...... Donnla Hughes
Erna ...... Jill Cardo
Mrs Kemmerich ...... Carolyn Pickles
Orderly ...... Inam Mirza
Mittlestaedt ...... Paul Rider
Major ...... Chris Pavlo
Nurse ...... Manjeet Mann

Directed by David Hunter.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00nmz8k)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Highlights of this week's Woman's Hour programmes with Jane Garvey.

Tennis ace Serena Williams talks about sisterhood and her success on the courts; how the system is coping with a jump in applications to take children into care; help for male infertility; comedian Miranda Hart on her new BBC TV series; psychoanalyst Melanie Klein's legacy to motherhood; Sophie Grigson creates a tasty winter soup with cod and pineapple.


SAT 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00nmz8m)
7th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

The communist authorities in the GDR are buckling under the pounding they are taking in the streets; 8,000 troops celebrate 72 years of the Bolshevik Revolution in Red Square but protestors carry banners saying '72 years on the road to nowhere'; the Church of England Synod votes to ordain women priests.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00nmz8p)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Ritula Shah, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00nkv3t)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests to discuss private equity - the investors who have endured boom and bust like no other. He also finds out if English is the only real language of business.

Evan is joined by Keith Clarke, chief executive of Atkins, one of the world's largest civil engineering and design consultancies, Laura Tenison, founder and managing director of Jo-Jo Maman Bebe, a clothing company for babies, toddlers and expectant mothers, and Peter Taylor, managing partner of the private equity firm Duke Street.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00nmz8r)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00nmz8t)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00nmz8w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00nmz8y)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

He is joined by interior designer and socialite Nicky Haslam, actor Nigel Harman and author and screenwriter Anthony Horowitz.

Arthur Smith talks to journalist Tanith Carey about agony aunts over the last 100 years.

With comedy from Manchester's multi-award-winning stand-up Jason Manford, and music from Aboriginal roots musician Gurrumul and soul funksters The Brand New Heavies.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b00nmz90)
Series 7

The Man In The Suit

Playwright Rebecca Lenkiewicz creates a fictional response to the week's news, prompted by Radovan Karadzic's first appearance at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

As Karadzic insisted that he needed more time to prepare his defence and claimed that his fundamental rights had been violated, there were many with other thoughts on their mind.

With Nigel Anthony, Annette Crosbie, Adam Kotz and Zoe Waites.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00nmz92)
Philip Roth’s The Humbling, The Men Who Stare At Goats, and E4's The Misfits

Tom Sutcliffe and guests review The Men Who Stare At Goats, which stars George Clooney, Ewan McGregor and Jeff Bridges and is based on a factual account by journalist Jon Ronson of the American military experiments in mind control known as 'psych-ops'. In this satirical screwball comedy soldiers try to walk through walls and stare at goats in order to kill them.

Philip Roth's 30th novel, and 10th since he turned 60, is also out and tells the story of Simon Axler, a world-class actor who can no longer act. Is Roth a world-class writer still capable of writing a world-class novel?

The Misfits is the new drama from E4; it follows a group of teenagers who are doing community service when they get struck by lightning and are bestowed with supernatural powers. Subverting the idea of the superhero while commenting on the demonization of youth, are The Misfits the A Team of the 21st century?

'Radical' and 'edgy' are words used to describe Green Ginger, and their touring show Rust continues their reputation. Opening at the Pleasance Theatre in Islington, hot on the heels of the London Puppetry Festival, Rust is a fast-moving story of piracy, passion and vinyl. Grotesque puppets, animated sets and shiploads of absurd humour are welded into a dark comic-book vision of low life on the high seas.

The Ashmoleon Museum in Oxford is the oldest museum in Europe, and is re-opening after a 61-million pound makeover. The new building, designed by Rick Mather, fits seamlessly with the 1845 Charles Cockerell original museum, adding 39 new galleries and 100,000 feet of floor space, while being invisible from the street.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00nmzp7)
This Is the Army, Mr Jones

Actor and entertainer John Barrowman tells the story of Irving Berlin's groundbreaking army show, This Is The Army, that came to bomb-ravaged London in 1943 before setting out on a world tour that raised military morale from Glasgow to Guam.

The show's choreographer, Robert Sydney, and Irving Berlin's daughter, Mary Ellin Barrett, recall how the show was put together and the effect it had in places as far afield as Washington DC and Tehran, via Bristol, Birmingham, Glasgow, London and the fiercest area of fighting in the south of Italy shortly after the British and American landings there.

Also remembering the show are members of the audience in Birmingham, Glasgow and London, where a young airman by the name of Denis Norden was spellbound by the show at The Palladium.

The programme also features archive recordings made especially for the BBC in the winter of 1943, including a performance from Irving Berlin himself.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00nhv35)
Guy de Maupassant - Bel Ami

Episode 1

Dramatisation by Frances Byrnes of Guy de Maupassant's story of political corruption in the newspaper world of 19th-century France and the inexorable rise of Georges Duroy - 'Bel Ami' - a charming, ruthless man of little talent but plenty of ambition.

Bel Ami is making the perfect match with a society heiress but his past is about to catch up with him, in the shape of Mme de Marelle, his long-term mistress.

Bel Ami ...... Jonathan Slinger
Marelle ...... Emma Fielding
Madeleine ...... Mali Harries
Forestier ...... Kieran Self
Monsieur Walter ...... Steffan Rhodri
Rachel ...... Sara McGaughey

Other roles played by Richard Nichols.

Directed by Polly Thomas.


SAT 22:00 Weather (b00nmzp9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00nkcfk)
When does a popular and spontaneous protest become mob rule? Fans of Twitter, the micro-blogging site, have chalked up a couple of notable victories of late. Followers helped to expose a legal injunction against The Guardian and Twitter-led protests generated tens of thousands of complaints against Jan Moir when she wrote a column using the death of Stephen Gately to criticise gay marriage. Is this net-based protest a valuable tool to demonstrate popular opinion or are we sacrificing traditional political engagement for the instant gratification direct action?

Witnesses:

Professor Andrew Chadwick of the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, and author of the book Internet Politics

Brendan O'Neill, journalist, writer and editor of Spiked Online

Nick Cohen, author and Observer journalist

Ben Locker, 'Twitterer'.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00njxlv)
Russell Davies chairs the fourth heat of the perennial general knowledge contest.


SAT 23:30 High Flight (b00nhw26)
When Anglo-American poet John Magee was killed in a mid-air collision over Lincolnshire in December 1941, aged just 19, he left behind a sonnet started, he claimed, 'at 30,000 feet and finished soon after (he) landed'. The poem, High Flight, has become the most celebrated poem about the intoxication of flying.

Sean Street traces the trajectory of the poem and its poet from Rugby School through the Library of Congress and the space race to Ronald Reagan's tribute to the victims of the Challenger space shuttle disaster and beyond, into a unique place in the popular imagination.

The programme includes contributions from Andrew Motion, veterans of the Royal Canadian Air Force, composer Bob Chilcott and Library of Congress archivist Cheryl Fox.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 08 NOVEMBER 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00nn2g5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Original Shorts (b008pvmt)
Series 3

Dad's Chair

New short stories by well-known authors.

Rob Green's compelling tale of an eccentric family bereavement.

Read by Nicholas Lyndhurst.

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nnlm2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nnlm4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nnlm6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00nnlm8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00nnlmb)
The sound of bells from Worcester Cathedral.


SUN 05:45 The Cases That Changed Our World (b00nknyx)
Episode 1

Clive Coleman tells the stories of cases that shaped our lives but which are little known outside the legal world.

The dramatic 1670 trial of two Quakers which established the principle that judges cannot intimidate juries, no matter how furious the bench may be.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00nnlmg)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00nnmsl)
Words My Mother Taught Me

Pamela Marre, a storyteller from a non-orthodox Jewish family, looks at how ancient wisdom is passed down through families - what we choose to remember, what we carry with us from the previous generation and what we create for the next.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b00nnp03)
Autumn Crickets

As the days shorten, the classic sound of the summer makes an untimely focus for Lionel Kelleway as he heads to Dartmoor to get close to the rhythmical autumnal chirping of grasshoppers and crickets.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00nnp05)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00nnp07)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00nnp09)
Jane Little discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00nnp0c)
Bhopal Medical Appeal

Jon Snow appeals on behalf of Bhopal Medical Appeal.

Donations to Bhopal Medical Appeal should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Bhopal Medical Appeal. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Bhopal Medical Appeal with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity No: 1117526.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00nnp0f)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00nnp0h)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00nnp0k)
On Remembrance Sunday, a programme specially recorded at Camp Bastion, the main base for British forces in Afghanistan.

Presented by army chaplain Rev Andrew Martlew.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00nlyvm)
High Road to Xanadu

Clive James reflects on the seductive allure of illegal narcotics, and lays the blame for their attractions at the door of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his trip to Xanadu.


SUN 09:00 News and Papers (b00nnp0m)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 09:15 The Archers Omnibus (b00nnp0p)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 10:30 Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph (b00nnpgj)
In the year when the UK bade farewell to its last First World War veteran Harry Patch and marked the 70th anniversary of the beginning of Second World War, Nicholas Witchell sets the scene in Whitehall as the nation remembers the sacrifices made by so many in two World Wars and more recent conflicts.

The traditional music of remembrance is played by the massed bands and, after the Last Post and two minutes' silence, Her Majesty the Queen lays the first wreath on behalf of the nation and Commonwealth.

The Bishop of London leads a short Service of Remembrance. During the March Past, veterans and those serving in the armed forces today share their thoughts.


SUN 11:45 Poppies Are Red, Cornflowers Are Blue (b00nnqpg)
Mark Whitaker tells the stories behind the British and French flowers of remembrance, the poppy and the cornflower, recorded on location in Ypres, Verdun, London and Paris.

The adoption of the poppy in Britain is a particularly intriguing story, and one which has rarely been told in full. Through these contrasting symbols, and assisted by historians of the Great War, Whitaker gives an insight into the two countries' different approaches to remembrance.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b00nk0g7)
Series 4

Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Clive Anderson, Dom Joly, Fi Glover and Henning Wehn.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00nnqpj)
The National Honey Show

There was a lot going on in Weybridge as Sheila Dillon joined beekeepers, enthusiasts and scientists from all over the world at the 78th National Honey Show.

We hear the latest on the well-publicised problem of honeybee colony collapse disorder, meet a beekeeper who first attended the show in 1936 at the old Crystal Palace, and get inside an observation hive with Reigate Beekeepers' Association.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00nnrcj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00nnrcl)
A look at events around the world with Brian Hanrahan.


SUN 13:30 Selling Cheese to the Chinese (b00lyvz5)
Mukul Devichand travels to Shanghai to tell the story of the Europeans who are trying to persuade China's expanding middle class that it is worth ditching their noodles and soya, and paying for pricey European fine foods instead.

He explores a world of classes in western table manners, Single Malt Karaoke and Shanghai jazz DJs who broadcast shows about brie and camembert. Beneath the colourful marketing, Mukul discovers that the story of food helps to reveal who the new Chinese middle classes really are.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00nlxzr)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Chris Beardshaw, Anne Swithinbank and John Cushnie are guests of Linkinhorne Horticultural Society in Cornwall.

Chris meets the man collecting over 200 varieties of Cornish apples, cherries and pears, and Anne celebrates the office plant, revealing the Office Plant of the Year.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 The Two-Minute Silence (b00nnrcn)
2009 sees the 90th anniversary of the Remembrance Day two-minute silence, which was first observed on what was then called Armistice Day on the orders of King George V, as a tribute to those who had died during the First World War.

Clare Jenkins hears from five people with their own, very personal, reasons for observing the silence.

A Pennine production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00nnrcq)
Guy de Maupassant - Bel Ami

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Frances Byrnes of Guy de Maupassant's story of political corruption in the newspaper world of 19th-century France and the inexorable rise of Georges Duroy - 'Bel Ami' - a charming, ruthless man of little talent but plenty of ambition.

Bel Ami's first wife and mistress are in the church to see him marry again, but will their knowledge of his past threaten his glittering future?

Duroy ...... Jonathan Slinger
Marelle ...... Emma Fielding
Madeleine ...... Mali Harries
Msr Walter ...... Steffan Rhodri
Rachel ...... Sara McGaughey
Suzanne ...... Catrin Morgan
Mme Walter ...... Nickie Rainsford
The Bishop ...... Richard Nichols

Directed by Polly Thomas.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00nnrcs)
Neglected Classics Results, David Malouf, and Gothic Fiction

Mariella Frostrup announces the hotly-anticipated result of Neglected Classics, Open Book's quest for literature's most unfairly overlooked masterpiece - and the winner joins her to celebrate victory. John Mullan and Jenny Hartley also survey the hundreds of other books mentioned by listeners in response to the vote.

Plus, Mariella talks to the Australian novelist David Malouf, whose novel Ransom is based on an incident from the Trojan War. He explains how a story he first heard aged nine in wartime Canberra made a lifelong impression on him, and why he thinks Australia's greatest writer is Shakespeare.

And the gothic fiction expert Robert Mighall discusses the Terrific Register, a collection of exciting, odd and sometimes gory stories which was the favourite reading material of the young Charles Dickens.


SUN 16:30 Adventures in Poetry (b00nnsrk)
Series 10

Adlestrop

Peggy Reynolds explores the background, effect and lasting appeal of some well-loved poems.

Written in 1915 about a two-minute stop at a railway station in the Cotswolds, this poem has long been loved for its evocation of high summer, rural England and the intimation of changes to come.


SUN 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00nnv4c)
8th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

The Politburo resigns in East Germany - could the Berlin Wall fall next? The ambulance workers' dispute escalates as the government calls in the army to answer emergency calls; Santa Claus battles high street gloom with a mere 39 shopping days until Christmas.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00nk55r)
Increasing Bank Profits

The head of the Financial Services Authority, Lord Turner, has questioned the social usefulness of what banks do. But as he and other regulators wrestle with ways of controlling so-called 'casino operations', Michael Robinson lifts the lid on the latest tricks of the trade which some banks are now using to increase profits.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b00nmz90)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00nnvqp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00nnvqr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00nnvqt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00nnvqw)
Sheila McClennon introduces her selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.

Book of the Week: The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham - Radio 4
The Essay: A Five Day Journey - Radio 3
Archive on 4: This Is The Army Mr Jones - Radio 4
Behind Enemy Lines - Radio 2
The Singer Behind The Glasses - Radio 2
The Bell Boys - Radio 4
M1 Modernist Marvel - Radio 4
Victoria Derbyshire - 5 Live
Where Do You Want Me? - Radio 4
The Tony Kay Scandal - Radio 4
The Day The Wall Fell - Radio 2
The World Tonight - Radio 4
Night Witches - Radio 4.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00nnvqy)
Lilian's spirits sink even lower as she and Matt end another week in Costa Rica. Lilian points out that they should have been home by now, but Matt refuses to budge. When Lilian refuses his suggestion that they eat breakfast out, Matt heads off alone.

In desperation, Lilian calls Jennifer. Brian steadily tries to make Jennifer accept that Matt and Lilian have left Ambridge for good - but the phone call gives Jennifer hope. Lilian tearfully confesses that Matt insists they are staying in Costa Rica, and that she's been trying to convince him to come home. Jennifer insists there is no way Lilian can stay in Costa Rica.

Sensing Lilian is crumbling, Brian takes charge of the situation. He takes the phone and instructs Lilian to buy two tickets home and present Matt with a fait accompli. But if Matt still refuses to come home, she must return without him.

Susan comes home from work early. She's angry because news about the community shop has appeared on the village website. And a builder has been to the shop on Brian's instruction, to 'measure up' in case it's turned into a flat. Neil shares her anger and suggests she talk to Pat.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00nnvr0)
Americana heads west to sun-soaked Los Angeles. Guest host David Willis is joined by satirist, comedian and commentator Harry Shearer to examine the week's top news through lively discussion, and maybe even a song.

David takes flight with Amelia Earhart, but this Earhart has no record of crashing - she sticks to reporting the traffic over the packed streets of Los Angeles. David rides in the news helicopter with this distant relative of the first lady in flight.

It's a thin line between loving the entertainment world and causing trouble. David Willis tags along with the LA's paparazzi to learn more about the industry and to discuss how much is too much love of the stars - even for Hollywood.

American country music singer Toby Keith visits Americana with songs that embody the spirit of the USA. Keith's music tackles topics from beer, to trucks, to romance, and discusses how politics, too, can become intertwined.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b0090mt8)
Stories from the Bath Literature Festival

Big Boys Don't Fly

4/5. Big Boys Don't Fly, by Paul Dodgson.

This is the story of a man who is stuck on the ground. He used to be able to fly, but he has forgotten about that now.

Read by Michael Maloney.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00nlx8j)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00nlxzt)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00nmz87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00nnp0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00nk0gc)
The Economist's New Clothes

Many have said that the near collapse of the global financial system exposed the failures of 30 years of economic thinking. Stephanie Flanders, the BBC economics editor, examines the arguments raging within and outside the world of economics and asks what future students should learn from the 'great recession'.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00nnvr2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00nnvr4)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including The Cases That Changed Our World.


SUN 23:00 1989: Day by Day Omnibus (b00nnvy0)
Week ending 7th November 1989

A look back at the events making the news 20 years ago, with Sir John Tusa.

President Bush agrees to meet Chairman Gorbachev on his boat in the Mediterranean, protests in East Germany force the resignation of the Mayor of Leipzig, and ex-Chancellor Nigel Lawson makes things even more difficult for Margaret Thatcher by spilling the beans on TV.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00nnmsl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 09 NOVEMBER 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00nnw82)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00nkb0b)
White Collar Crime: Culture of Crime

1/3 In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction. He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie considers the culture of the crime. What exactly is white collar crime, who commits it and why?


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00nnlmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nnwb7)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nnwhk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nnwbp)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00nnww8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nnwz7)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Lesley Carroll.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00np17n)
Farmers and landowners are lining up to offer their land for wind turbines; each turbine can earn the landowner around 20,000 pounds a year - but only if planning permission is granted. Charlotte Smith kicks off the programme's in-depth coverage on wind power by speaking to a company which advises farmers how to get the best deals out of wind turbines.

Also, it may have been a poor summer for sunbathers but the English cider apple crop has done very well, as Charlotte finds out.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00npjng)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00np1y9)
Presented by John Humphrys and Justin Webb.

Does the turnover between governments happen too quickly? Peter Riddell of The Institute for Government and former cabinet secretary Lord Butler discuss how government transitions are handled in Britain.

Militants in Pakistan are waging an insidious campaign against the country's artists, a cultural war which is threatening freedom of cultural expression. Andrew Hosken reports from the country's cultural capital, Lahore.

Gordon Brown wants the world to bring in a tax that would have to be paid every time there was an international financial transaction. Chief economics correspondent Hugh Pym analyses support for the measure.

Fishermen who are strongly opposed to a planned cull of fish at a lake in Bristol have threatened to chain themselves to the entrance gates. The culling at Henleaze Lake is supported by swimmers who also use the lake. Local champion fisherman Callum Dicks discusses the campaign.

The government is to announce measures that will see a new generation of nuclear power stations sped through the planning process. Shadow energy secretary Greg Clark discusses whether the Conservatives will support the proposals.

The row over whether or not the Conservatives should be allied in the European Parliament with Michal Kaminski, a Polish MEP with a far-right background, has overshadowed some of the other members of the European Conservatives and Reformists Group to which British Tories now belong. Allan Little reports from Latvia on the activities and views of the For Fatherland and Freedom Party.

Thought for the Day with Rev Dr Giles Fraser.

What approach to parenting works best? The Demos think-tank are giving their advice on parenting, saying both warmth and discipline builds a good character in children. The report suggests children of married couples and wealthier backgrounds also tend to fare better. Co-author of the report, Richard Reeves, and Camila Batmanghelidjh of charity Kids Company, discuss the report.

We spend a lot of time talking to politicians about the strategy in Afghanistan, but we spend very little time talking to the people who are sent there to fight. Captain Andrew Tiernan of the Grenadier Guards, who came back from Afghanistan on leave on Friday and will be back there next week, gives his insights into the conflict.

The Berlin Wall came down 20 years ago. The dramatic events of November 9 1989 led to the dissolution of the German Democratic Republic and to German reunification. The communist GDR may no longer exist as a nation, but as Berlin correspondent Steve Rosenberg reports, it has not disappeared completely.

Plans for fast-tracking a new generation of nuclear power stations are to be announced by the government. Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Miliband will unveil statements of policy including a list of sites judged suitable for nuclear developments. Mr Miliband discusses the announcement.

As part of their plans to hold the 2010 World Cup, the South African department of tourism is holding a conference in London, in the hope that the games will boost world tourism to their country. Footballer and World Cup ambassador Lucas Radebe and Roshene Singh, marketing officer for the South African Department of Tourism, discuss expectations.

The race for the leadership of the Welsh Labour Party and the job of First Minister in the Welsh Assembly is gathering pace. Wales correspondent Wyre Davies reports on battle for prospective candidates to secure the support of the party.

Allegations of widespread phone-tapping at the News of the World have been rejected by the press watchdog. In July, The Guardian reported claims that numerous public figures may have had their messages hacked into. But after investigating, the Press Complaints Commission (PCC) said it had found 'no evidence' that phone-message tapping was still going on. Media correspondent Torin Douglas and Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger discuss the case.

The book Freakonomics changed the way economics was viewed and its follow up SuperFreakonomics hopes to do the same. Authors Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner discuss some of their more controversial economic theories.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00npjnj)
Andrew Marr sets the cultural agenda for the week. He talks to writer Tony Marchant about crime, law and Georgian London, Hans Ulrich Obrist about the art of the curator, Shlomo Sand about his controversial unravelling of Jewish history, and Sue Brown about Keats's deathbed companion, Joseph Severn.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00np1yc)
The Magnetic North

The Arctic Defined

Adjoa Andoh reads from Sara Wheeler's account of her journey to the lands that border the Arctic Ocean.

Wheeler considers what the Arctic means to the rest of the world and begins her travels in the semi-inhabited fringes of Asian Russia, nine time zones from Moscow.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00npdj7)
Kym Marsh on premature babies; Life skills for children

Actor Kym Marsh on the death of her premature baby. Plus, building character in children; and can you beat the recession by entering competitions?


MON 11:00 Calling Time on Student Bars (b00npr8d)
Alcohol sales in student unions have halved in past decade; some bars have closed, and others have downsized. Comedian Ed Byrne returns to the city of his student days, Glasgow, to find out if that notorious institution, the student union bar, has had its day.


MON 11:30 Beauty of Britain (b00npr8g)
Series 1

Beauty and the Beast

Comedy by Christopher Douglas and Nicola Sanderson. Beauty Olonga works as a carer for the Featherdown Agency and sees herself as an inspiration to other African girls hoping to achieve their goals in the land of semi-skimmed milk.

Beauty is looking after the elderly Mr Easterby, who has a new girlfriend and is behaving like a lovestruck teenager. She is also trying to get to the Aspire to Dream retreat. Meanwhile Anil is on a big cat stakeout, as several have been spotted in the region.

Beauty ...... Jocelyn Jee Esien
Sally ...... Felicity Montagu
Karen ...... Nicola Sanderson
Mrs Gupte ...... Indira Joshi
Anil ...... Paul Sharma
Mr Easterby ...... Leslie Phillips
Mrs Mason ...... Liz Fraser
Kevin/Cab Man/Steve ...... Christopher Douglas
Girl on Stretcher ...... Nicola Sanderson

Music by The West End Gospel Choir.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00npdly)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00npdnz)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00npdpk)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00npr8j)
Russell Davies chairs the fifth heat of the perennial general knowledge contest.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00nnvqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00nprdf)
Gilda and Her Daughters

Comedy drama by Carine Adler about a mother and her three daughters who gather at their family home after the death of the father. A compelling and comic story about sibling rivalry, maternal love and lies, and the illusiveness of 'truth'.

Gilda ...... Sian Thomas
Amy ...... Pippa Haywood
Natalie ...... Kathryn Hunt
Clarissa ...... Claire Bleasdale
Therapist/Frank ...... Jonathan Keeble

Trumpet player: Jamie Prophet

Directed by Pauline Harris.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00nmzp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Whatever Happened to the Teapots? (b00npf9t)
Episode 1

In the 1980s, Roger Law of Spitting Image went to Stoke-on-Trent to get some novelty Margaret Thatcher teapots made. Now Roger returns to meet up with the craftsmen who helped him get a handle on Mrs T.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00nnqpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Click On (b00npwh0)
Simon Cox looks at one rural community that isn't willing to wait on the telecoms industry and is building its own high-speed broadband network.


MON 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00npfr2)
9th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

East Berlin's party chief declares that all citizens can leave immediately - the first border crossings take place at 9.00pm. Reporter Graham Leach joins the first East Germans crossing through Checkpoint Charlie.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 17:00 PM (b00npfvp)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00npfxh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b00npwh2)
Series 4

Episode 6

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Arthur Smith, Phill Jupitus, Tony Hawks and Graeme Garden.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00npf65)
Pat is wrongfooted when Susan confronts her about the village shop. Jennifer was supposed to inform Susan about the website. Pat is shocked to learn that Brian sent someone in to measure up for the flat conversion. Pat does her best to defend the community shop idea. Susan demands to know if she's going to be asked to be on the committee. Usha has already been asked. While Pat tries to avoid a commitment, Tony saves her with a fictional problem in the dairy. Angry Susan leaves.

Pat complains to Tony about Brian's actions over the shop, prompting predictable annoyance from Tony at Brian's constant interfering.

Matt is shocked when Lilian presents him with two tickets to Birmingham, flying on Wednesday. They can get back for the hearing, but she insists that she will go home with or without him. Matt tries to convince her to stay, insisting that he can't face prison. Lilian insists she can't give up her friends, family and life in Ambridge.

As it seems that the only option is to part, Lilian calls Russell, only to discover that she might face questioning from the police when she returns to Ambridge. Even this is not enough to make Matt change his mind.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00npfzc)
Paul Gambaccini reviews Taking Woodstock, the new film from director Ang Lee, starring Demetri Martin and Imelda Staunton.

After Strictly Come Dancing and Argumental, former political journalist John Sergeant discusses his latest TV presenting role, looking at Britain through the eyes of overseas tourists.

Music writer Sophie Harris offers her verdict on the first new album by Robbie Williams in three years.

Stephen Daldry, a director with one of the highest Oscar nomination strike rates in film history, explains why he wanted to have another go at a 17-year-old theatre production, JB Priestley's An Inspector Calls.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00npgh1)
Our Mutual Friend

Episode 1

Adaptation by Mike Walker of Charles Dickens' classic novel.

A father and daughter on the Thames at night, and tied to their boat a lifeless shape bobs in the water.

Charles Dickens ...... Alex Jennings
Bella Wilfer ...... Daisy Haggard
Lizzie Hexam ...... Lizzy Watts
John Rokesmith ...... Carl Prekopp
Eugene Wrayburn ...... Patrick Kennedy
Mortimer Lightwood ...... Matt Addis
Nicodemus Boffin ...... Jason Watkins
Mrs Boffin ...... Pauline Quirke
Pa Wilfer ...... Philip Fox
Ma Wilfer ...... Annabelle Dowler
Charlie Hexam ...... Adam Arnold
Gaffer Hexam ...... Malcolm Tierney
Silas Wegg ...... Lee Ross
Aenus Venus ...... Stephen Hogan
Rogue Riderhood ...... Jamie Foreman

With Paul Rider and Janice Acquah.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole and Jeremy Mortimer

This episode is available until 7.45pm on 11th December as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


MON 20:00 Child of the State (b00npwh6)
Between the ages of two months and 18 years old, poet Lemn Sissay was a child of the state. In this programme he tracks down the staff, social workers and old friends who remember him from that time, and looks for the lost memories of his years in social care.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00npwh8)
Death to the Deficit!

Frances Cairncross explores the UK's options in the face of a growing deficit, and asks if the coming cuts in public service spending might afford us an opportunity rather than represent an unmitigated disaster.


MON 21:00 Aping Evolution (b00npwhd)
Episode 2

Professor of Genetics Steve Jones challenges the controversial science of evolutionary psychology.

Evolutionary psychologists say human behaviour, such as who we marry, when we have children and even the quality of our sex lives, can be explained by having a Stone Age brain in a 21st century body.

Professor Jones examines the scientific evidence for such claims and asks if we should be worried if contentious theories escape the world of science and enter the arena of social policy.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00npjnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00nphk9)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00npjcp)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

The government announces its energy strategy, but will local people always object?

World leaders mark the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

David Cameron prepares for a major speech on poverty.

Saudi forces clash with rebel fighters in Yemen.

Chinese investment in Africa.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00npjdh)
The Glass Room

Episode 1

Greta Scacchi reads from the novel by Simon Mawer.

It is the beginning of the 1930s and Victor and Liesel Landauer are on honeymoon in Venice. Soon they will return to newly-formed Czechoslovakia, inspired to build an extraordinary family home.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 With Great Pleasure (b00npwhj)
Robert Webb

Comedian Robert Webb presents a selection of his favourite prose and poetry in a special edition recorded at the University of Bedfordshire. It includes the first piece of writing to make him laugh out loud and a poem that best captures his feelings in his newly-acquired role as a father.

The readers are Abigail Burdess and Jonathan Dryden Taylor.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00npjlx)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Susan Hulme.



TUESDAY 10 NOVEMBER 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00nnw64)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00np1yc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nnw84)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nnwh1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nnwb9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00nnwnh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nnwwd)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Lesley Carroll.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00np0th)
There are around 3,000 wind turbines in the UK, and the government's commitment to renewable energy means that another 5,000 will have to be built by 2020. Anna Hill visits the top of a 100-metre-high wind turbine and investigates some of the objections to them.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00np17q)
Presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb.

Barclays bank has announced its financial results for the three months to the end of September. Business presenter Adam Shaw and Hugo Dixon, founder and editor in chief of the financial commentary site BreakingViews.com, examine the results.

Conservative leader David Cameron will deliver a speech setting out the Tories' plans to abolish child poverty by the end of the decade. He will criticise the government's welfare system, accusing Labour of 'a moral failure'. Fraser Nelson, editor of The Spectator, examines the history of the party's policy on poverty.

The opening up of family courts to journalists has given an insight in to the once-closed world of the family justice system. Reporter Sanchia Berg has been following a High Court case of a father who has been seeking contact with this children for eight years. Judges have supported his requests but his wife has failed to comply with the court order, and so far has not been penalised.

The Academy of Medical Sciences has launched a new study to examine the use of animals containing human material in scientific research. They argue that a debate is needed to ensure that research into the understanding of diseases and their treatment can take place in the UK within a robust ethical and regulatory framework. Professor Martin Bobrow, chair of the working group undertaking the study, discusses the ethical implications of implanting human tissue into animals for research.

In August Britain took control of the Turks and Caicos Islands following allegations of high-level corruption. Islanders initially welcomed the move, but are now accusing the territory's British governor of behaving like a dictator and are calling for independence. Correspondent Mike Thomson reports from the Turks and Caicos Iiand of Providenciales.

The National Gallery is to exhibit its first contemporary art installation. The Hoerengracht, Dutch for Whore's Canal, recreates a sleazy street scene from Amsterdam's red light district. The project was made in the 1980s by artists Ed and Nancy Kienholz. Arts correspondent Rebecca Jones took a look at the controversial installation.

Thought for the Day with Dr Indarjit Singh, Director of the Network of Sikh organisations.

A new video game being released today is expected to be the fastest-selling video game ever. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 has been described as realistic and violent. Players can join a group of terrorists rampaging through an airport building killing people as they cry for help. James Binns, a computer game publisher, and Marc Cieslak, reporter for BBC technology programme Click, discuss the game's appeal.

David Cameron has long accused Labour, and what he describes as 'big government', of failing the poor. Today he will set out his party's policies to combat poverty and reform the welfare system. Mr Cameron will say the government is guilty of a moral failure, creating a welfare system that tells young girls having children before finding work and a loving relationship means a home and cash. Shadow secretary for work and pensions, Theresa May, and eork and pensions secretary Yvette Cooper debate their party's poverty policies. Political editor Nick Robinson comments on the changes to the Conservatives' welfare plans.

The Roald Dahl Funny Prize honours books that make young people roar with laughter. One of the judges, the comedian Bill Bailey, discusses the hunt for the country's funniest children's literature.

Journalists are no longer banned from reporting the family courts, highlighting workings of a system which has left many fathers disappointed and frustrated. Helen Trotter, barrister from Pump Court Chambers, and Professor Liz Trinder, a family courts expert from Exeter University, examine the effectiveness of family court reporting.

Barclays have announced a 4.5 billion-pound net profit for the first nine months on 2009. Chief economics correspondent Hugh Pym reflects on the the bank's results.

Vladimir Nabakov's final novel, The Original of Laura, is to be published. Erica Wagner, literary editor of The Times, and novelist John Banville discuss the significance of the book's release.

President Obama has attempted to revive the Middle East peace process by meeting Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Washington. President Obama vowed to make peace a priority during his election campaign. Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen reports from Israeli-occupied East Jerusalem on whether or not any progress has been made.

How dangerous are Britain's streets? In a speech in August, the shadow home secretary, Christopher Grayling, claimed that 'The Wire used to be just a work of fiction for British viewers. But under this government, in many parts of British cities, The Wire has become a part of real life in this country too. Far too many of those features of what we have always seen as a US phenomenon are now to be found on the streets of Britain as well.'


TUE 09:00 The Choice (b00nq9ym)
Michael Buerk interviews people who have made life-altering decisions and talks them through the whole process, from the original dilemma to living with the consequences.

Michael talks to Miranda Ponsonby about her decision to change sex.


TUE 09:30 Parting Shots (b00nq9yp)
Series 1

Episode 4

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores. The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

Despatches which changed the course of history, including Nicholas Henderson's 1979 valedictory lament to a Britain 'poor and unproud', in economic decline and losing ground to her European rivals.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00npdg7)
The Magnetic North

Alaska and Canada

Adjoa Andoh reads from Sara Wheeler's account of her journey to the lands that border the Arctic Ocean.

Wheeler finds traces of American entrepreneurial drive in the wide spaces of Alaska and visits a bedrock-mapping project on an isolated Canadian island.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ntnkp)
FTSE females; Anti-depressants during pregnancy

The American women in charge of FTSE 100 companies. Plus, the effects of taking anti-depressants during pregnancy, and the alternatives.


TUE 11:00 1989: A German Story (b00nq9yr)
The Sad Death of Mack the Knife

Series in which German programme-makers reflect and report on aspects of the country that rarely, if ever, find their way into the British media.

Helmut Kopetzky tells the story of East German actor Wolf Kaiser.

At the Berliner Ensemble theatre, Kaiser played Mack the Knife in Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's Threepenny Opera. He was perhaps the GDR's biggest star on film and TV; he had a fortune and a mantlepiece full of awards and state honours, including the GDR's gold Patriotic Order of Merit. But in October 1992, Kaiser jumped to his death from his Berlin apartment window.

Helmut Kopetzky, who had a few days earlier conducted a long and searching interview with Kaiser, uncovered a story of a man raised and feted by the communist regime who suddenly found himself utterly out of joint with society.

Now in his late 60s and still a prolific 'author' (as the Germans describe producer/presenters), Kopetzky is the doyen of German radio feature-makers, the winner of several Prix Italia and Prix Europa and Premios Ondas top international awards for documentary.


TUE 11:30 Britain's Other Music Hall: The Story of the Blackface Minstrels (b00nq9yt)
Musician Tony Etoria explores the strange world of blackface minstrelsy, the Victorian forebear of the Black and White Minstrel show, and its continuing impact on popular music, dance, comedy and racial stereotypes.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00npdkn)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00npdm0)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00npdp1)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 A Cymbal Tale (b00n87sj)
Writer, comedian and rock drummer Andrew McGibbon, aka Andrew Paresi, tells the story of a 175-year-old cymbal and explores the history of the instrument.

He traces the earliest cymbals from ancient Assyria and China, their development by Avedis Zildjian in Turkish military bands, to their arrival in Europe in the 1670s and their unlimited deployment by modern orchestral composers and jazz musicians. Andrew also discovers why cymbals became so popular in the 1960s and today form part of every rock drummer's kit.

Featuring contributions from British Museum archeomusicologist Richard Dumbrill, Heather Corbett, chief percussionist with the Scottish Symphony Orchestra, and John Keeble from Spandau Ballet.

The show also includes interviews with manufacturers and metallurgists who help to unravel the intriguing delights of this evocative, iconic idiophone.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00npf65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00nq9yw)
Albert's Boy

By James Graham. How can Albert Einstein find a unified theory of everything when he can't even match his socks? A funny, touching look at the eccentric genius' last years and the personal grief that prevented him from making one great final breakthrough.

Albert Einstein ...... Victor Spinetti
Peter ...... Richard Laing

Directed by Peter Kavanagh.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00nqb7m)
Vanessa Collingridge and the team investigate the impact of racial segregation in the American armed forces in Britain during WWII, why we don't know as much as we think we do about our historic battlefields, how Indian soldiers on the Western Front have been misprepresented in history, and a chance buy at auction reveals a 300-year history of navigation at sea.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nqbl3)
The Diaries of Edith Appleton

Episode 1

Series of readings featuring extracts from the diaries of Edith Appleton, a nurse working close to the front line during the First World War.

It is 1915 and Edie is based at Casualty Clearing Station Number 3 near Ypres, where she witnesses first-hand the horrors of war. In these dark days, small pleasures mean everything and the rare chance to have a bath is most welcome.

Read by Rachel Atkins.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 Whatever Happened to the Teapots? (b00nt9cy)
Episode 2

In the 1980s, Roger Law of Spitting Image went to Stoke-on-Trent to get some novelty Margaret Thatcher teapots made. Now Roger returns to meet up with the craftsmen who helped him get a handle on Mrs T.

Roger visits the Barleston Estate to find out if there is anything left of Wedgwood apart from its award-winning museum.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b00nqbth)
Inside the Mental Health Court

The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton and takes a wider look at Mental Health Treatment orders and the problems faced by defendants with mental health problems in the criminal justice system.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00nqbtk)
Michael Mansfield and Molly Flatt

Sue MacGregor talks to Michael Mansfield QC and blogger Molly Flatt about their favourite books.

Michael's choice: Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky, trans. Sandra Smith, Vintage

Molly's choice: The Vintner's Luck by Elizabeth Knox, Vintage

Sue's choice: The Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers, Penguin.

Produced by Toby Field.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


TUE 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00npfmd)
10th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Hundreds of thousands of East Germans arrive in West Berlin amid scenes of shock and joy. East Germany will hold free, democratic and universal elections, but will it be enough to keep its citizens? Moscow and Washington join in welcoming the reforms.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00npfr4)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00npfvr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Jo Caulfield Won't Shut Up! (b00nqc54)
Episode 1

Jo Caulfield is back with her glorious mixture of bitchy friendliness and foot-in-mouth populism.

In this episode, Jo is failing to shut up about relationships, love and Tony Benn.

Starring Jo Caulfield, with Zoe Lyons, Nick Revell and Simon Greenall.

Written by Jo Caulfield & Kevin Anderson.

Additional material by Michael Beck, James Branch, Dan Evans, Jules Gregg, Nick Revell and Matt Ross.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00npf5x)
Susan's not interested in Annette's gossip about absent Matt and Lilian. She's getting employment rights advice from Usha later. Annette bemoans her own lack of employment rights - and lack of boyfriend

Susan is hopeful when Usha explains her potential rights to an unfair dismissal claim and redundancy pay, although this would only amount to a few thousand. Usha freely admits that she's agreed in principle to be on the shop committee. Susan hasn't been asked but intends to keep fighting.

As they head off to look at their new grassland, Mike is surprised that Ed disapproves of Jazzer's interest in Fallon. He doesn't want to see Fallon hurt; Jazzer will only be out for one thing. Will's Land Rover is parked across the track to their new fields. Ed is quick to put an angry note under Will's windscreen wiper, threatening to shove his Land Rover in a ditch. Mike despairs, wishing that the brothers could bury their differences.

Later, Will confronts Ed in the shop. The boys square up to each other as Will insists that if Ed carries out his threat, he'll call the police. A possible fight is diffused by Annette, who timidly asks Ed to pay for his shopping.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00npfxk)
The White Ribbon, the new film from director Michael Haneke, is set in a German village on the eve of WWI. Strange accidents, which gradually take the shape of a punishment ritual, befall members of the local choir, prompting a schoolteacher to attempt to discover who is behind these accidents. Tibor Fischer joins Mark Lawson to review the film.

Lord Mandelson recently announced the government's plans for tackling illegal file sharing online. Under new measures, repeat offenders who ignore warning letters could have their internet connection removed. High-profile figures including Lily Allen and Radiohead's Ed O'Brien have been weighing into the debate over what approach the government and music industry should take to tackle the problem. Minister for Digital Britain Stephen Timms, CEO of UK Music Feargal Sharkey and Cory Doctorow, the journalist and supporter of copyright liberalisation, discuss the issues surrounding the file sharing debate.

Conductor Vladimir Jurowski discusses his passion for the 20th-century Russian composer Alfred Schnittke, whose symphonies, concertos and film scores inhabit an almost schizophrenic sound world, which borrows from the entire western classical tradition, from Bach to Shostakovich. Jurowski and the London Philharmonic Orchestra are celebrating Schnittke's music with a festival at the Southbank Centre.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00npggq)
Our Mutual Friend

Episode 2

Adaptation by Mike Walker of Charles Dickens' classic novel.

How old John Harmon made his money out of rubbish, and the will he left to spite his son.

Charles Dickens ...... Alex Jennings
Bella Wilfer ...... Daisy Haggard
Lizzie Hexam ...... Lizzy Watts
John Rokesmith ...... Carl Prekopp
Eugene Wrayburn ...... Patrick Kennedy
Mortimer Lightwood ...... Matt Addis
Nicodemus Boffin ...... Jason Watkins
Mrs Boffin ...... Pauline Quirke
Pa Wilfer ...... Philip Fox
Ma Wilfer ...... Annabelle Dowler
Charlie Hexam ...... Adam Arnold
Gaffer Hexam ...... Malcolm Tierney
Silas Wegg ...... Lee Ross
Aenus Venus ...... Stephen Hogan
Rogue Riderhood ...... Jamie Foreman

With Paul Rider and Janice Acquah.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole and Jeremy Mortimer

This episode is available until 7.45pm on 11th December as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00nqcy5)
Funding the Frontline Police Force

Some of Britain's police forces are warning of a funding crisis, with staff cuts, stations closing and parts of the motorway network left unpatrolled. Allan Urry investigates the effects on the frontline and asks if the police could still do more to deliver better value from the money they get.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00nqcy7)
When Tom Bremridge became chief executive of the Macular Disease Society, he thought he was joining a relatively small self-help organisation. He certainly hadn't anticipated that, as potential successful treatments came on the horizon for this formerly untreatable form of blindness, he would find himself crossing swords with government departments, quangos and the medical establishment. He talks about what has been by turns an exciting, frustrating but ultimately satisfying experience.

Plus, what is going on with the BBC iPlayer? The BBC's Head of Audience Experience and Usability, Jonathan Hassell, explains why the Real Audio stream has been switched off.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b00nqcy9)
Drug Side Effects - Evolutionary Prejudice - Carl Jung

Claudia Hammond hears about some surprising side effects of drugs used to treat conditions like schizophrenia and why they particularly effect women. Shubulade Smith, a consultant psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital in London, talks to Claudia about the hormonal side effects of anti-psychotic drugs and why they can cause infertility, premature ageing and a loss of libido. She discusses why patients are often not warned about the possible effects and how those effects can be avoided.

Why the origins of prejudice might lie in our evolutionary past and the need to avoid infection and disease. Claudia talks to Mark Schaller, Professor of Psychology at the University of British Columbia, about why our need to detect signals that might suggest someone has a disease may have led to us being programmed to erroneously discriminate against people who don't fit the norm.

Along with Freud, Carl Jung is one of the most influential figures in psychoanalysis. But his most important work has been kept in a Swiss bank vault for nearly half a century. Jung started writing his Red Book in 1914. It is the story of his exploration of his own soul, but it has remained a mystery because his family have kept it hidden. Claudia Hammond talks to Sonu Shamdasani from the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, the man responsible for getting it published, who explains why its so significant.


TUE 21:30 The Choice (b00nq9ym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00nph36)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00nphtp)
National and international news and analysis with David Eades and Robin Lustig.

Why is The Sun gunning for Gordon Brown?

The Palestinian Authority faces crisis after Mahmoud Abbas threatens to quit.

If Copenhagen can't provide the answer to climate change fears, what can?


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00npjcr)
The Glass Room

Episode 2

Greta Scacchi reads from the novel by Simon Mawer.

Viktor has commissioned modernist architect Rainer von Abt to design his family home. Meanwhile, Liesel's best friend Hana has lost none of her talent to shock.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 As Told To Craig Brown (b00bbnxt)
Episode 5

The Jane Austen industry and car user manuals.

Craig Brown introduces a mixture of satire, social observation and nonsense.

Narrated by Juliet Stevenson and Steve Wright

With John Humphrys, Ronni Ancona, Jon Culshaw, Lewis MacLeod, Sally Grace, Ewan Bailey and Margaret Cabourn-Smith.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2008.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00npjld)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



WEDNESDAY 11 NOVEMBER 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00nnw66)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00npdg7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nnw86)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nnwh3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nnwbc)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00nnwnk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nnwwl)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Lesley Carroll.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00np0tk)
Anna Hill hears from a landowner who has turned down the opportunity to earn thousands by refusing to have a wind farm because he does not think they are the solution to meeting our renewables target. And Andy Biggs from the British Cattle Veterinary Association explains how badgers will be vaccinated next year to fight bovine TB.


WED 06:00 Today (b00np17s)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

Youth unemployment in the UK could pass one million, becoming the highest in Europe, according to new figures out today. Correspondent Luke Walton spoke to unemployed youths in Sunderland, and Paul Fletcher, director of charity Youth Engagement at Rathbone, discusses why so many youths are unemployed.

Legislation to build a coastal path around the entire coast of England and Wales and to set up marine conservation zones could be passed today. The Marine and Coastal Access Bill is the first of its kind, but fishermen say it will damage their livelihoods. Environment correspondent Sarah Mukherjee reports from Studland Bay in Dorset.

Bosnian leaders are meeting tomorrow to try and resolve long-standing divisions which many fear could lead to a new civil war. Correspondent Edward Stourton reports from the Bosnian Serb town of Banja Luka.

Three more scientists who sit on the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) have resigned. Scientists met home secretary Alan Johnson yesterday seeking reassurance that their independence would not be compromised, following the sacking of the chief drugs adviser, Professor David Nutt. One of those who resigned, Dr Simon Campbell, comments on the breakdown in the discussions.

Armistice Day is an opportunity for the country to remember and honour the dead of the First World War. The two-minute silence has been part of the tradition for 90 years, but continued British deaths in Afghanistan will make today's occasion more poignant. Today presenter Justin Webb examines whether the mood of Armistice Day has changed.

Thought for the Day with the Right Rev Tom Butler, Bishop of Southwark.

The number of unemployed youths could exceed one million, with thousands of unemployed graduates joining the growing number of 16- to 24-year-olds who are not in employment, education or training ('NEETS'). The government will today set out its plans to tackle the problem in its white paper, Skills for Growth. Skills secretary Lord Mandelson discusses the proposals.

The DNA profiles of innocent people arrested in England and Wales will be kept for six years and not indefinitely under new government proposals. The changes will be put before the European Court of Human Rights, which had ruled the current policy unlawful. Police have defended the system, which it says has led to the solving of crimes, but human rights groups are unhappy with the compromise. Julie Bindel from the campaign group Justice for Women and the shadow home secretary Chris Grayling debate the DNA policy.

The recording of a telephone conversation between the prime minister and the mother of a dead soldier has generated much media comment. Mr Brown contacted Jacqui Janes to apologise for a mis-spelt letter of condolence. Sheila Gunn, former press secretary to John Major, and former Downing Street press officer Lance Price examine whether the continuing criticisms of Gordon Brown and his actions are reminiscent of the last days of the Major government.

Economists are warning that the growing number of 'NEETS' could lead to a whole generation being lost to mass unemployment. Today presenter Sarah Montague visited a youth project in Salford which tries to engage and reform the lives of unemployed youths.

A growing dispute between Venezuela and its neighbour Colombia is threatening trade and stability in the region. Venezuela's president Hugo Chavez has ordered his army to prepare for war after the Colombian president granted US troops access to its military bases. Todd Landman, Professor of Government at Essex University, examines the dispute.

Between five and ten per cent of the prison population in England and Wales are former servicemen. The Howard League for Penal Reform is setting up an inquiry to investigate the issue. Wing Commander Dr Hugh Milroy, chief executive of Veterans Aid, comments on the high proportion of ex-serviceman in prison.

The goalkeeper of the German national football team Robert Enke has died after being hit by a train in what is believed to have been suicide. The BBC's Berlin correspondent Steve Rosenberg has the latest.

Author Catherine Millet, renowned for her account of the many sexual adventures she had outside her marriage, has published a new book. Jealousy examines how she felt when she had proof that her husband was also being unfaithful. Ms Millet discusses how the revelations in her books affected her life.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00nqcyz)
Wing Commander David Hill is director of operations with Combat Stress, the charity that specialises in the care of British veterans who have been profoundly traumatised by harrowing experiences during their service career. He is joined by James Saunders, a veteran who has been helped by the charity.

Toby Keith is an American country music singer-songwriter, record producer and actor. Since releasing his first album in 1993 he has sold more than 30 million albums and is the fourth best-selling artist in the US this decade across all musical formats, ahead of Madonna and Bruce Springsteen. He is currently touring the UK and has just released a new album, his 16th, entitled American Ride.

Jayne Torvill is one half of the ice skating duo Torvill and Dean, who won gold at the Sarajevo Winter Olympics in 1984. They are releasing a DVD to celebrate the 25th anniversary of winning the gold medal with their stunning Bolero routine. They now star in the ITV1 show Dancing on Ice, in which celebrities compete and have released the DVD Torvill and Dean's Dancing on Ice: The Bolero 25th Anniversary Tour 2009.

James Gemmill is a scenic artist and sculptor. Born in the United States, he got his first big break in the early 1990s when he worked as a scenic artist on Four Weddings and a Funeral, and since then has worked on The Da Vinci Code, Elizabeth: The Golden Age and Atonement, to name but a few. He has a new exhibition of his works at London's Belgravia Gallery.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00npdg9)
The Magnetic North

Greenland

Adjoa Andoh reads from Sara Wheeler's account of her journey to the lands that border the Arctic Ocean.

Sara is struck by some of the paradoxes of climate change as she flies above the huge Greenland ice sheet.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ntnkc)
Women bishops; Chef Darina Allen

Sexism in the Church of England discussed. Plus, chef Darina Allen on forgotten cooking skills; and Dr Andrea Marshall on her ground-breaking work on manta rays.


WED 11:00 Armistice Day Silence (b00nsl70)
The traditional two-minute silence to mark Armistice Day.


WED 11:02 Find Me a New York Jewish Princess (b00nqf4s)
A light-hearted look at the New York Jewish dating scene through the eyes of presenter Tim Samuels, a London-based single Jew desperate to find the girl of his dreams.

Tim has always thought he would settle down with a nice Jewish girl in Britain, but with his single Jewish friends taking the plunge one after another and no sign of love in his life, Tim, at 33, takes decisive action. He is heading for the bright lights of New York City. He wants to find a Jewish princess with that NY get-up-and-go, someone who will get British humour - and still have lovely teeth (think Cheryl David from Curb Your Enthusiasm or comic Sarah Silverman).

He puts the word out on the NY Jewish singles circuit by way of an advert announcing that he is coming over for a week on an intense dating mission. He scrambles around for something impressive to say in the advert, before setting off for a week of power-dates. Will he find a New York girl who isn't averse to rainy weekends and watching soccer on the box?


WED 11:30 Hut 33 (b01k6hfc)
Series 3

Unlucky for Some

1942: It's unlucky for some of the code breakers at Bletchley when they're forced to move into spooky Hut 13.

James Cary's sitcom set at Bletchley Park - the top-secret home of the Second World War codebreakers.

Professor Charles Gardner …. Robert Bathurst
Archie …. Tom Goodman-Hill
Gordon ...... Fergus Craig
3rd Lieutenant Joshua Featherstonhaugh-Marshall …. Alex MacQueen
Minka …. Olivia Coleman
Mrs Best …. Lill Roughley

Producer: Adam Bromley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00npdkq)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00npdm2)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00npdp3)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00nqhsz)
A new report describes English libel laws as intimidating and out of date. The campaigning organisations Index on Censorship and English PEN are calling for urgent reform before the UK becomes a global 'pariah'. So what exactly is wrong with the laws as they currently stand? Joining Steve to discuss is John Kampfner, chief executive of Index on Censorship, and Mark Thomso,n a media lawyer with Atkins Thomson.

There is no escaping the X Factor: stories about the contestants, the judges and speculation on production changes are filling the column inches week after week. But with thousands of complaints about Simon Cowell's decision to keep twins John and Edward in the contest and fans alleging it was a fix, could the programme be coming apart at the seams?

And the story of the badly written letter and the apology from the PM. The Sun's managing editor Graham Dudman tells us the story behind the paper's coverage of the letter Gordon Brown sent to Jacqui Janes, whose son was killed in Afghanistan.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00npf5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00nqht1)
28

By Dawn King. Nathan, a schoolteacher tainted by connection with a terrorist, is detained for 28 days and then released without charge. In the 28 days following his release he tries to recover his former life with his family, his girlfriend, his job and his social life.

Nathan ...... Joseph Cohen-Cole
Juliet ...... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Maggie ...... Gillian Wright
Tom ...... Rhys Jennings
Miss Warren ...... Tessa Nicholson
David ...... Philip Fox
Libby ...... Kate Layden
Police Officers ...... Piers Wehner and David Hargreaves
Lucie ...... Jade Beaty
Tiru ...... Matthew Hall
Brona ...... Stefanie Walker

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00nqht3)
Vincent Duggleby and a panel of guests answer calls on wills and estate planning.

Guests:

Alan Barr, partner, Brodies and director of Legal Practice at University of Edinburgh
Ian Johnson, tax partner, Grant Thornton
Nicola Plant, partner, Thomas Eggar.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nqbl5)
The Diaries of Edith Appleton

Episode 2

Series of readings featuring extracts from the diaries of Edith Appleton, a nurse working close to the front line during the First World War.

It is 1915 and Edie has been moved to a hospital in Etretat on the Normandy coast, where she must supervise members of the Voluntary Aid Detachment. These are well-meaning but relatively untrained girls and, at times, Edie finds their presence somewhat trying.

Read by Rachel Atkins

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 Whatever Happened to the Teapots? (b00nt9c3)
Episode 3

In the 1980s, Roger Law of Spitting Image went to Stoke-on-Trent to get some novelty Margaret Thatcher teapots made. Now Roger returns to meet up with the craftsmen who helped him get a handle on Mrs T.

Roger finds out who is winning in the battle for ceramic supremacy, Stoke or China. The Far East may have notched up a high score but Stoke-on-Trent have some key players in reserve.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00nqht5)
White Collar Crime: Regulation of Crime

2/3 In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction. He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie explores the culture of corporate crime and how regulatory bodies serve to keep the police at arm's length. In the UK, people are twice as likely to suffer a serious injury at work than to be a victim of violent crime, yet only a fraction of safety crimes are actually prosecuted.

Globally, more people are killed at work each year than are killed in war. Why has corporate crime had a low priority, why has it been so hard to prosecute corporations and will the new crimes of corporate manslaughter and corporate murder make firms more responsible for the crimes they commit?


WED 16:30 All in the Mind (b00nqcy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00npfmg)
11th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Bulldozers tear down sections of the Berlin Wall to make more crossing points; 129 are injured in a riot between police and protestors in Moldavia and Moscow sends in the troops to enforce calm; reformist foreign secretary Petur Mladenov is sworn in as the new leader of Bulgaria.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 17:00 PM (b00npfr6)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00npfvt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Nick Mohammed: Apollo 21 (b00nqht7)
Mockumentary by Nick Mohammed, recorded at Bedford University.

Forty years after man first landed on the moon, the surviving astronauts tell us what it was like to be part of the moon mission.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00npf5z)
Matt and Lilian sadly part company as Lilian heads to the airport. She calls Jennifer before she boards, tearfully reporting that she's coming home alone. However, once she's on the plane, Matt joins her. He tells her that there was no point in facing life without her so instead he'll go home and face the music. Delighted Lilian calls Russell and tells him to let Jennifer know. She and Matt are coming home together. They should be back in time for the hearing tomorrow...

Adam reports that the planning meeting went well, so he can start looking for quotes on polytunnels. Meanwhile, Lynda reports that the editor of Borsetshire Life secured an exclusive with Lee Mason, rather than print the photos from Grey Gables. Lynda is delighted that she and Robert are to play host to Robert's daughter Coriander and new baby Oscar when Justin goes to work in the States for a few weeks.

Later, Jennifer is relieved to hear that Lilian is coming home. Russell talks to Brian, saying that there's still a long way for Matt to travel before he lands in the UK...and plenty of time for him to change his mind.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00npfxm)
Mark Lawson visits the new Nottingham Contemporary arts venue and speaks to its director, Alex Farquharson, whose opening show is a major retrospective of the work of David Hockney, and the architect Adam Caruso of Caruso St John, who has created a green concrete and gold metal building on the site of a former railway cutting.

Steven Soderbergh, director of Erin Brokovich, Traffic and Ocean's Eleven, talks about his new film, The Informant! which stars Matt Damon as a whistleblower in an agri-industry company.

Mark reviews the new Channel 4 comic drama series Cast Offs, in which disabled characters are left on a desert island for a fictional reality TV programme, with the journalist Sarah Crompton and the sociologist and disability rights campaigner Tom Shakespeare.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00npggs)
Our Mutual Friend

Episode 3

Adaptation by Mike Walker of Charles Dickens' classic novel.

With young John Harmon presumed drowned, the Boffins have inherited old Harmon's fortune.

Charles Dickens ...... Alex Jennings
Bella Wilfer ...... Daisy Haggard
Lizzie Hexam ...... Lizzy Watts
John Rokesmith ...... Carl Prekopp
Eugene Wrayburn ...... Patrick Kennedy
Mortimer Lightwood ...... Matt Addis
Nicodemus Boffin ...... Jason Watkins
Mrs Boffin ...... Pauline Quirke
Pa Wilfer ...... Philip Fox
Ma Wilfer ...... Annabelle Dowler
Charlie Hexam ...... Adam Arnold
Gaffer Hexam ...... Malcolm Tierney
Silas Wegg ...... Lee Ross
Aenus Venus ...... Stephen Hogan
Rogue Riderhood ...... Jamie Foreman

With Paul Rider and Janice Acquah.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole and Jeremy Mortimer

This episode is available until 7.45pm on 11th December as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00nqj80)
What is the best way to bring up a child? According to the think tank Demos the answer is clear. Children whose parents adopt a 'tough love approach' are much more likely to develop vital life than those whose parents took a more laissez-faire attitude to rules and boundaries. The research also found it was middle-class and married parents that were most likely to take the tough love approach. Demos believe this study shows the best way to bring up children and it's time to be more honest about the damage that poor parenting is causing our society. With so much at stake should parenting be a private matter or should the state take more action to support the most vulnerable children and their parents? What is the nature of good parenting, can we teach it and what should be the government's role in it all?

Witnesses:

Sue Cohen, director of Single Parents Action Network

Nola Leach, general director of CARE (Christian Action, Research and Education)

Dr Ellie Lee, Senior Lecturer in Social Policy, University of Kent

Richard Reeves, director of DEMOS.


WED 20:45 The Cases That Changed Our World (b00nqj82)
Episode 2

Clive Coleman tells the stories of cases that shaped our lives but which are little known outside the legal world.

The curious saga of the Carbolic Smoke Ball, a bizarre Victorian quack medicine. The case established important principles about truth in advertising and the relationship between companies and their customers.


WED 21:00 Supersize Surgeries (b00j3xd3)
Penny Marshall asks if new super-sized polyclinics will mean the end of the family GP at the core of the NHS.

She hears from a GP in Hereford who is worried that a new polyclinic will destroy his own highly-regarded practice and doctors in London who cannot wait for their own on-site x-rays and blood tests, saving time for both them and their patients.

Penny hears the aims behind the overhaul of primary care, pioneered by acclaimed surgeon Lord Darzi, who has now become a target of criticism by politicians and doctors alike.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00nqcyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00nph38)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00nphtr)
National and international news and analysis.

Unemployment has risen again, but the increase is slowing. The Bank of England warns that the recovery is 'only just starting'.

Britain tries to revive the peace talks in Cyprus.

The Vatican considers the possibility of extra-terrestrial life.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00npjct)
The Glass Room

Episode 3

Greta Scacchi reads from the novel by Simon Mawer.

The Glass Room in the Landauers' new house is nearly complete, but Liesel and Viktor's relationship is growing strained.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 One (b00nqj84)
Series 3

Episode 6

Sketch show written by David Quantick, in which no item features more than one voice.

With Graeme Garden, Dan Maier, Johnny Daukes, Deborah Norton, Katie Davies, Dan Antopolski, Andrew Crawford and David Quantick.


WED 23:15 Rik Mayall's Bedside Tales (b00nqj86)
Wake Up

Settle down, brush your teeth, do whatever it is you do at this time of night. But, most of all, listen because Rik would like to talk to you. One on one. Tonight he'd mostly like to tell you about Wake Up.

Performer ..... Rik Mayall
Writers ..... Rik Mayall & John Nicholson
Producer ..... Steven Canny

Written by Rik and John Nicholson, this is a woozy, strange and resonant series from one of the country's most loved comic performers. Rik wants to sit with you in your room - one on one. He wants to let you know things - important, secret things, things about your neighbours. About him. About you.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00npjlg)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



THURSDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00nnw68)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00npdg9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nnw88)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nnwh5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nnwbf)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00nnwnm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nnwws)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Lesley Carroll.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00np0tm)
The Liberal Democrats say that hill farming could die out within a decade, and accuse Natural England of ignoring the issue.

Charlotte Smith hears that new government legislation could help the marine environment, but might harm the fishing industry.

And, as the UK needs to build more than 5,000 wind turbines in the next decade to meet government targets, Charlotte meets villagers who have come to love their turbines.


THU 06:00 Today (b00np17v)
Presented by John Humphrys and Justin Webb.

Rail passengers in south-east England face a day of disruption because of an absence of train drivers. The union Aslef has stressed the drivers are not on strike but are refusing to work overtime. District organiser for Aslef Mick Whelan discusses the dispute.

The House of Lords has voted in favour of government plans for secret inquests, allowing proceedings into controversial deaths to be held in private. Inquests which involve sensitive information such as intercept intelligence are to be held before a judge, not a jury. Daniel Machover, solicitor for the family of the only inquest to have been held in private, examines the implications on justice.

The US ambassador in Kabul, Karl Eikenberry, has advised President Obama against sending more combat troops to Afghanistan, according to a leaked private letter. Correspondent Martin Patience analyses the comments.

The Department of Health is publishing a review into the use of anti-psychotic drugs on dementia sufferers in England. Critics have warned that the powerful drugs - commonly known as "chemical coshes" - are being prescribed inappropriately for people with dementia in order to keep them quiet. Jeremy Wright MP, chairman of the All Party Group on Dementia, and Nadra Ahmed, chairman of the National Care Association, discuss the use of the drugs.

Concerns are growing that escalating violence in Bosnia could lead to a new civil war. Ethnic tensions and corruption have remained unresolved since the civil war ended 15 years ago. Correspondent Edward Stourton reports from Bosnia.

The use of shorthand has long been an important journalistic tool, but the growing use of recording devices is threatening the skill. Kim Fletcher, chairman of the National Council for the Training of Journalists, comments on the future of shorthand, and Today presenter John Humphrys tests his shorthand skills.

Thought for the day with the writer Rhidian Brook.

The House of Lords has passed a law allowing the use of secret inquests for deaths involving the disclosure of delicate information. Tory MPs who had been against the measure abstained from voting, allowing the law to pass. The law has been strongly criticised and was previously blocked by the Lords. Shadow justice secretary Dominic Grieve and Liberal Democrat Baroness Miller who opposed the measure, discuss its implications.

All new nurses in England will need to have a degree from 2013. The minimum level for pre-registration courses will be raised from diploma to degree level, making nurses better equipped to improve the quality of patient care. Chief nursing officer Christine Beasley, and Gail Adams, head of nursing at trade union Unison, discuss the implications of increasing the educational level of nurses.

A year after hurricanes devastated Haiti, deforestation has greatly reduced the country's ability to protect itself from further natural disasters. Ninety-eight percent of the country's forests have been chopped down for charcoal and firewood, leaving little to slow raging flood waters that create deadly mud slides. Correspondent Mike Thomson, who reported from the country in the aftermath of the hurricanes, returned to see how its inhabitants are surviving.

Are horses intelligent? Today sports presenter Garry Richardson posed the question to champion jockey Richard Dunwoody yesterday. Equine behaviourist Emma Massingale describes horses' intellect.

Ethnic tensions have remained unresolved in Bosnia since the civil war ended more than a decade ago. The international community has failed to find a solution to governance in the country and the continued lack of dialogue between Bosnia's Muslim, Serb and Croat factions. Lord Ashdown, former High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, examines the current political crisis.

A 93-page booklet advising police officers how to cycle has been published by Association of Chief Police Officers. The Police Cycle Training Doctrine comes in two volumes and offers advice on how not to fall off and how to avoid obstacles such as kerbs and rocks. Mayor of London Boris Johnson and Dave Holladay, a member of the National Cycling Organisation, discuss the tips.

The Copenhagen environmental summit will hear a good deal about ways in which the world must and should combat carbon emissions in order to save the planet. But others say that the fundamental premise - that global warming is caused to a significant extent by carbon emissions and that we can do something about it - is wrong. Professor Ian Plimer from Adelaide University in Australia is among the sceptics.

The results of a two-year study into office gossip are being published in the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. The study analysed the gossip between teachers at a primary school. Dr Tim Hallett of the University of Indiana which conducted the research, reveals its findings.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00nqljy)
Radiation

Melvyn Bragg and guests Jim Al-Khalili, Frank Close and Frank James discuss the history of the discovery of radiation.Today the word 'radiation' conjures up images of destruction. But in physics, it simply describes the emission, transmission and absorption of energy, and the discovery of how radiation works has allowed us to identify new chemical elements, treat cancer and work out what the stars are made of.Over the course of the 19th century, physicists from Thomas Young, through Michael Faraday to Henri Becquerel made discovery after discovery, gradually piecing together a radically new picture of reality. They explored the light beyond the visible spectrum, connected electricity and magnetism, and eventually showed that heat, light, radio and mysterious new phenomena like 'X-rays' were all forms of 'electromagnetic wave'. In the early 20th century, with the discovery of radioactivity, scientists like Max Planck and Ernest Rutherford completed the picture of the 'electromagnetic spectrum'. This was a cumulative achievement that transformed our vision of the physical world, and what we could do in it.Jim Al-Khalili is Professor of Theoretical Physics and Chair in the Public Engagement in Science at the University of Surrey; Frank Close is Professor of Physics at Exeter College, University of Oxford; Frank James is Professor of the History of Science at the Royal Institution.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00npdgc)
The Magnetic North

Svalbard and the North East Passage

Adjoa Andoh reads from Sara Wheeler's account of her journey to the lands that border the Arctic Ocean.

Sara remembers some of the explorers who have sought the North Pole - by boat, on foot and even by hot air balloon.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ntnkf)
Romola Garai; Dementia care; Canine chic

Actor Romola Garai on her role in Glorious 39. Plus, model Caprice on canine chic; and what are a family's financial entitlements when caring for a relative with dementia?


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00nqmf2)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.

Bitter criticism of the Indian government and its handling of a Maoist uprising which now stretches across six states in the heart of the country. The prime minister Dr Manmohan Singh has described the rebels as the country's single largest internal security threat. Mark Tully wonders if once again the root of the problem is Indian governments' inability to provide what those they govern rightly feel is their entitlement.

Natalia Antelava on how the fed-up Lebanese have learned to ignore their ruling classes, and the new government which has emerged in Beirut after months of wrangling and which many believe stands little chance of success.

US military drones take off from The Seychelles in the search for Somali pirates. But on the islands themselves Will Ross finds that there is still interest in the pirates who operated there in the 18th century, and one lot in particular who are believed to have buried a horde of priceless treasure.

There's anger in paradise as people in the British Turks and Caicos Islands in the Caribbean accuse London of being heavy handed and undemocratic. Direct rule from London was introduced there back in the summer after accusations of corruption and dishonesty, and Mike Thomson says that some of the islanders believe the time is now right for independence.

And no sleep at all in Congo as the citizens of Lubumbashi celebrate the best thing to have happened to their city for many a year. Steve Vickers travelled there to watch the local football team TP Mazembe compete and win in the finals of the African Champions League trophy.


THU 11:30 Brel et Moi: Alastair Campbell on Jacques Brel (b00d7nrz)
Alastair Campbell, former director of communications for Tony Blair, reveals his little-known but lifelong passion for the music of Belgian singer/songwriter Jacques Brel.

Campbell happened across Brel's music during the time he spent hitchhiking across France as a student in the late 1970s, and has been hooked ever since. Now, over 30 years after Brel's death, Campbell travels to Paris to delve into the secrets of the singer's life and music. Though he is revered in France, Brel is still little known in Britain. With songs like Ne Me Quitte Pas he was willing to explore much deeper, darker emotions than most pop music. On stage, he was hugely popular for his intense, ferocious live performances. But behind his public image, he led a complicated personal life.

Campbell meets Brel's friends and family to find out more about the personality that produced his powerful, emotional music. The programme includes contributions from Brel's co-writer Jean Corti, journalist and author Olivier Todd and another Brel fanatic, comedian Mel Smith.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00npdks)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00npdm4)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00npdp5)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Off the Page (b00ny8gr)
I'm H.A.P.P.Y

From euphoria to contentment.

Miriam Akhtar, Dr Phil Hammond, Lucy Mangan and Dominic Arkwright focus on happiness.

Producer: Paul Dodgson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00npf5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00nrrd1)
The Railway Siding

By Jonathan Holloway. When struggling architect Jack is forced to take the overnight train from Haverfordwest to Paddington, he encounters a garrulous guard and a spookily familiar young woman. All is not quite what it seems.

Jack ...... Sam Dale
Train Guard ...... Ewan Hooper
Hope ...... Lydia Leonard
Stationmaster/Tom ...... Mark Lewis

Directed by David Hunter.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00nmz7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00nnp0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nqbl7)
The Diaries of Edith Appleton

Episode 3

Series of readings featuring extracts from the diaries of Edith Appleton, a nurse working close to the front line during the First World War.

It is 1918 and Edie is based at a grand hotel which has been turned into a military hospital, on the cliffs above Treport. Anticipation is growing that the war could be coming to an end.

Read by Rachel Atkins

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 Whatever Happened to the Teapots? (b00nt9c5)
Episode 4

In the 1980s, Roger Law of Spitting Image went to Stoke-on-Trent to get some novelty Margaret Thatcher teapots made. Now Roger returns to meet up with the craftsmen who helped him get a handle on Mrs T.

Designer pottery and the bottom line. Roger talks to artists about the division in ceramics between art and industry to find out if the two can ever be reconciled.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00nnrcs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00nrrd3)
Quentin Cooper presents a special edition from Cardiff University. Including the latest thoughts on the ecological impact of the proposed Severn Barrage.


THU 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00npfmj)
12th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

The mayors of East and West Berlin shake hands at a new border crossing at Potsdamerplatz; El Salvador declares a curfew as fighting between troops and leftist rebels leaves 78 dead in the capital, San Salvador; pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy returns to Moscow for the first time in 26 years to conduct the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 17:00 PM (b00npfr8)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00npfvw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Bleak Expectations (b00nrrd5)
Series 3

A Sort of Fine Life De-Niced Completely

Pip Bin strives to improve working conditions in his bin factory.

But will his quest distract him from a dastardly plan to steal London and sell it to the French?

Mark Evans's epic comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip Bin ...... Richard Johnson
Gently Benevolent ...... Anthony Head
Young Pip ...... Tom Allen
Harry Biscuit ...... James Bachman
Dr Wackwallop ...... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely Fecund ...... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ...... Susy Kane

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00npf61)
It's the day of Matt's arraignment hearing. Russell, Jennifer and Brian wait anxiously. Matt and Lilian are stuck in traffic, so Russell has to plead for a late start with the judge. Meanwhile, Matt is in a doleful mood in the back of the cab, while Lilian begs the driver to get a move on - and take any possible shortcuts.

As Matt and Lilian arrive outside the court, Russell is quick to swoop into action, and he shepherds Matt into court for the start of the hearing.

Inside the court room, the hearing commences. Everyone is shocked when Chalkman pleads guilty. Lilian is hopeful that this means business will be dealt with quickly. There is no need for a trial, and they can go home until Matt is sentenced. However, the judge decides to sentence Matt and Chalkman there and then. Lilian is shocked and devastated as Matt is taken down, to begin his eighteen month sentence, to serve a minimum on nine months.

Later, Jennifer sits with a shell-shocked Lilian. She tries to comfort her but Lilian is beyond reassurance. Matt is in prison - and that's all there is to it.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00npfxp)
John Wilson and film critic Jason Solomons assess 2012, the latest apocalyptic film from director Roland Emmerich, whose previous films include The Day After Tomorrow and 10,000 BC. John Cusack plays a failed science-fiction writer who is fated to save his family from erupting volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis.

Philip Kerr discusses his latest novel, which recently won the Crime Writers' Association's historical fiction award. Set in Berlin in 1934, If the Dead Rise Not tells the story of Bernie Gunther, a detective investigating the death of two guests staying at the Adlon Hotel.

The multi-million-selling singer Norah Jones, daughter of sitar player Ravi Shankar, won five Grammy Awards for her debut album in 2002. She discusses her latest CD, The Fall, which sees a departure from her more traditional jazz sound, embracing elements of contemporary rock.

As the winners of the 2009 Arts and Business Awards are announced, John Wilson and Colin Tweedy, chief executive of Arts and Business, debate whether this year's economic downturn is having a significant effect on corporate sponsorship of the arts.

Tim Knox, director of Sir John Soane's Museum, tells John Wilson about the latest addition to their collection: a gold mourning ring containing a lock of Napoleon's hair. The Napoleon mourning ring was one of Sir John's prized possessions, but after his death it passed out of the family's ownership. The museum is delighted to welcome its return.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00npggv)
Our Mutual Friend

Episode 4

Adaptation by Mike Walker of Charles Dickens' classic novel.

Silas Wegg, a literary man with a wooden leg, finds employment with the Golden Dustman.

Charles Dickens ...... Alex Jennings
Bella Wilfer ...... Daisy Haggard
Lizzie Hexam ...... Lizzy Watts
John Rokesmith ...... Carl Prekopp
Eugene Wrayburn ...... Patrick Kennedy
Mortimer Lightwood ...... Matt Addis
Nicodemus Boffin ...... Jason Watkins
Mrs Boffin ...... Pauline Quirke
Pa Wilfer ...... Philip Fox
Ma Wilfer ...... Annabelle Dowler
Charlie Hexam ...... Adam Arnold
Gaffer Hexam ...... Malcolm Tierney
Silas Wegg ...... Lee Ross
Aenus Venus ...... Stephen Hogan
Rogue Riderhood ...... Jamie Foreman

With Paul Rider and Janice Acquah.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole and Jeremy Mortimer

This episode is available until 7.45pm on 11th December as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b00nqbth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00nrrd7)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests, including two leading Silicon Valley investors, to discuss one of the most successful business clusters of them all and why it is that businesses tend to bunch up. They also explore the future of television; can it survive the downturn in advertising revenues and competition from the internet?

Evan is joined by Michael Moritz, a partner at Sequoia Capital, Dawn Airey, the chief executive of Channel 5, and Reid Hoffman, co-founder and executive chairman at LinkedIn and partner at venture capital firm Greylock.


THU 21:00 Leading Edge (b00nrrd9)
Cooking and Human Evolution

Geoff Watts follows an archaeological theme, beginning at a critical stage of human evolution about 1.9 million years ago. Our ancestors then were unlike any other ape. Not only were they walking upright, but their mouths and teeth were smaller and their digestive tracts shorter - just like modern humans. Harvard anthropologist Richard Wrangham thinks that was possible because of cooking. Cooked food is easier to chew and digest, freeing up time for other activities, and requiring patience, ingenuity and division of labour around the cooking fire.

Another revolution occurred a mere 10,000 years ago, with the Neolithic revolution and the dawn of settled agriculture. Dr Tamsin O'Connell of Cambridge University describes how the change of diet left its traces in bones and how she can distinguish between diets based around different crops, meat or seafood.

Archaeologists are now exploring the oldest Atlantis - a Mycenaean city submerged beneath the Mediterranean. The ruins of Pavlopetri were discovered off the Greek coast in 1967, but now Dr Jon Henderson of Nottingham University is surveying them for the first time and has shown that they date back almost 5,000 years, through the Bronze Age and into the Neolithic.

The underwater search continues almost to modern times, with the quest to trace the lost ships of Sir John Franklin's ill-fated 1845 expedition to the frozen waters of the North West Passage. Robert Grenier of Parks Canada is leading the search, and meets Geoff at an exhibition about the North West Passage at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00nqljy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00nph3b)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00nphtt)
National and international news and analysis.

Gordon Brown proposes to tighten up immigration.

BA and the Spanish airline Iberia agree to merge.

Would you holiday in Iraq?


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00npjcw)
The Glass Room

Episode 4

Greta Scacchi reads from the novel by Simon Mawer.

The Landauer House is the envy of Czech society. Hitler is beginning his rise to power but Liesel and Viktor are distracted by new love.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Pick Ups (b00nkxfc)
Series 2

Carpe Diem

Sitcom by Ian Kershaw, set around a Manchester taxi company.

Lind endures a dinner date in a bid to secure the future of Irwell Cars, while Mike's pick-up is on a quest for sexual and personal liberation.

Mike ...... Paul Loughran
Lind ...... Lesley Sharp
Dave ...... Phil Rowson
Alan ...... Parvez Qadir
Simon De Vere ...... James Quinn
Shelly ...... Naomi Radcliffe
Johnny ...... Peter Keeley.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00npjlj)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00nnw6b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00npdgc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nnw8b)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nnwh7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nnwbh)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00nnwnp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nnwwz)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Lesley Carroll.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00np0tp)
New research suggests that more than half of horse owners can't tell when their animal is overweight. An estimated 40 per cent of horses in Britain are too fat, and the consequences can be fatal.

Also, 5,000 wind turbines are to be built in Britain over the next 10 years, but where should they go?


FRI 06:00 Today (b00np17x)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Evan Davis.

Eight people have been killed and at least 35 injured by two suicide bomb attacks in Pakistan. Correspondent Aleem Maqbool reports on the latest from Islamabad.

Labour have won the Glasgow North-East by-election with a reduced majority of 8,000. The SNP finished second, and the Conservative party were third. Professor John Curtice of Strathclyde University analyses the results.

A security strategy for the 2012 London Olympics has been established. A conference at Royal United Services Institute will hear from all the major players involved. Security minister Lord West and his shadow, Baroness Neville-Jones, discuss the project.

Six thousand people will take part in the procession at the Lord Mayor's Show in the City of London marking the change from one Lord Mayor to another. Correspondent Sanchia Berg reports on the history of the procession.

The rising death toll in Afghanistan and the release of a private telephone conversation have sparked much media comment about the prime minister. Political editor Nick Robinson reflects on the aftermath of a challenging week on Gordon Brown's leadership.

A memo seen by the BBC reveals that the British are considering a settlement with the government of President Karzai and the Taliban's governing body. Security correspondent Gordon Correra comments on the prospects of reconciliation.

Gardeners at a National Trust property are encouraging their male staff to urinate on the compost, to assist the composting process. A "pee bale" has been installed in the grounds of Wimpole Hall, Cambridge. Head gardener Philip Whaites comments on the initiative.

It is uncertain whether the Palestinian presidential election will take place. The country's Election Commission announced that a vote should not occur if the Islamist Hamas movement in Gaza refused to take part. The political disarray has undermined the credibility of the Palestinian Authority and the prospects of peace with Israel. Correspondent Tim Franks reports from Ramallah.

Thought for the day with the Reverend Rosemary Lain-Priestley, Dean of Women's Ministry in central London.

The family of a boy of three have won the right to claim compensation for injuries he suffered when he was allegedly hit over the head by another toddler. The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority had refused to make an award, saying the alleged assailant, also aged three, was too young to be held responsible. Simon Gibson, partner at Kirwan's who are representing the Jay family, and Richard Garside, director of the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies at Kings College London, discuss the precedent set by the case for children injured in fights.

Gordon Brown's leadership has been dictated by the war in Afghanistan. Two hundred and thirty-two British lives have been lost, the majority under his government. Public opinion is mounting against continued British presence in Afghanistan, and the Obama administration's position on the war is undecided. Gordon Brown discusses the future of his Afghanistan policy.

The Today programme has recently reported from Bosnia on the disputes and tensions among the country's politicians threatening to take it into a new crisis. Disenchanted voters are now turning to history for a model of leadership they can admire. Edward Stourton reports from Bosnia.

Are young people turning to Islamic, Pakistani, Middle Eastern channels in Britain for news on their loved ones and events in Pakistan? Zubeida Malik spoke to British Pakistanis.

There has been a shake-up of England's World Cup 2018 bidding team. Five of the twelve members on the board have been removed, focussing more on football instead of politics. Jim White, columnist for the Daily Telegraph, and Alec McGivan, who led England's last bid to host the World Cup, discuss the change in tactic.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00nrrhr)
Anthony Julius

Kirsty Young's castaway is the lawyer and writer Anthony Julius. He was already renowned in legal circles when, in 1996, he moved into the public arena, representing Princess Diana in her divorce. He became her confidante and, after her death, one of the founders of her memorial fund. Of the high profile cases he has fought, he says. "You're on a higher wire, stared at by a larger number of people, but in the end, the only audience that matters is your own client."

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: The Promise of Living by Aaron Copland
Book: Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Luxury: San Pellegrino water on tap.


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00npdgf)
The Magnetic North

The Gulag

Adjoa Andoh reads from Sara Wheeler's account of her journey to the lands that border the Arctic Ocean.

Sara journeys to a remote archipelago, visiting the ancient holy site which became one of the most feared places in 20th-century Russia.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ntnkh)
Unemployed single parents; Scottish suffrage

How long should single parents with school age children expect to stay at home on state benefits? Plus, the Scottish Suffrage movement; and the woman playing Charles Hawtrey.


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b00nrrq6)
Series 5

Tilting at Windmills

Windfarms, Earth-destroying asteroids and raining fish - apocalyptic visions run surprisingly high in the sleepy beauty of the Welsh borders, as Alan Dein discovers when he visits the village of Knighton on the route of Offa's Dyke.

Situated with one foot in Wales and the other in England, Knighton is known for its picture-postcard tranquillity. Yet today all is far from calm, as a new windfarm, with its giant slowly rotating turbines, is planned for the hill on the edge of town. Some people look on this as their part in saving the Earth from the threat of climate change, others as the destruction of the ancient landscape. Meanwhile, on the hill itself stands an observatory, the Spaceguard Centre, whose director sees its role as drawing attention to the dangers lurking in space, and the likelihood of the world's destruction by asteroid strike.

So did a strange shower of fish over the town hint at apocalypse? Alan Dein visits the town, reads the omens and tries to understand why the sky over Knighton is filled with portents.


FRI 11:30 The Richest Man in Britain (b00nrrq8)
The Elephant in the Room

Sitcom by Nick Hornby and Giles Smith about an ageing rock star and his search for fulfilment.

Trillionnaire rocker Dave Mabbutt introduces ex-lead singer Andy to his new best friend and personal assistant, Mr Tumble the elephant.

Dave Mabbutt ...... Mark Williams
Dom ...... Russell Tovey
Dave's Mum ...... Lynda Bellingham
Andy ...... Noddy Holder
The Lawyer ...... Gus Brown.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00npdkv)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00npdm7)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00npdp7)
National and international news with Edward Stourton.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00nrs1k)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00npf61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00nrs1m)
Number 10 - Series 3

Be A Good Chap...

Series of plays by Jonathan Myerson depicting life inside Downing Street.

After a general election, the Tories have won more seats but Labour got the biggest vote. Both need help from the Lib Dems, which will come at a cost. So who will get to form the next government?

Adam ...... Antony Sher
Monica ...... Sasha Behar
Polly ...... Penny Downie
Bill ...... Bill Paterson
Steve ...... Stephen Mangan
Sir Cosmo ......Nicholas Woodeson
Simon Laity ...... Damian Lewis
Lewis Smiley MP ...... Nigel Lindsay
Peter Chadwick ...... Clive Russell
Palace equerry/TV producer ...... Joseph Kloska
Assorted reporters ...... Scott Cherry, Theo Fraser Steele

Directed by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00nrs1p)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Chris Beardshaw, Bob Flowerdew and Pippa Greenwood are guests of Transport for London at the London Transport Museum.

Pippa talks to recent contestants of the Underground in Bloom competition about how to get the best out of container gardening of the most challenging kind.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 Whatever Happened to the Teapots? (b00nt9c7)
Episode 5

In the 1980s, Roger Law of Spitting Image went to Stoke-on-Trent to get some novelty Margaret Thatcher teapots made. Now Roger returns to meet up with the craftsmen who helped him get a handle on Mrs T.

After a week in Stoke-on-Trent, Roger reads the tea leaves to see what the future holds for the city of six towns.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00nrs1r)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.

Marking the lives of epidemiologist, Professor Jeremy Morris; Chinese author and historian Nien Cheng; linguist and dialect expert Stanley Ellis; public campaigner Lady Tumim; and inventor, lawyer and 'Nessie' hunter, Robert Rines.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00nrs1t)
Barry Norman talks to Francine Stock about the film career of his dad, Leslie, an esteemed producer, editor and director.

Isabelle Huppert reveals the reasons why she, as president of the jury at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival, gave the Palme D'Or to Michael Haneke's The White Ribbon.

Ondi Timoner discusses her documentary about an early experiment in reality television, We Live In Public.


FRI 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00npfml)
13th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

The East German Politburo elects Hans Modrow as prime minister; he will oversee universal, democratic elections. President Mitterand calls an urgent EU summit to forge consent on the future of Europe. The leading Bulgarian opposition party, Ecoglasnost, is formally recognised.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00npfrb)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Edward Stourton. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00npfvy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00nrs1w)
Series 69

Episode 8

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz, recorded at Cardiff University. The panellists include Jeremy Hardy, Holly Walsh and Andy Parsons.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00npf63)
Brenda and Helen gossip about Matt's sentence. Brenda bemoans the fact that she hasn't had a decent job since she worked for Matt, and complains about the difficulties of job hunting. Their conversation is interrupted by Leon, who joins them - and quickly endears himself to Brenda.

Later, Brenda tells a beaming Helen that Leon has her full approval. Helen admits that she really likes Leon - and that she's looking forward to a double date with Adam and Ian next week.

Lilian remains in a bad way after the court hearing yesterday, obsessing about what Matt must be going through in prison. Jennifer tries to lift Lilian's spirits as they go to celebrate Peggy's birthday. Lilian finds the experience a challenge - especially as she has to keep the fact that she has been in Costa Rica for the past few weeks a secret from her mother. She cannot help but feel guilty, drinking champagne while Matt sits in prison. Peggy tries to be supportive but inadvertently makes the situation worse when she comments that at least Matt and Lilian enjoyed a restful holiday together...

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00npfxr)
The Indian-born film director Mira Nair came to prominence with her 1988 hit Salaam Bombay! Her latest film, Amelia, is a biopic of the aviator Amelia Earhart, who disappeared while flying over the Pacific Ocean in a circumnavigation flight of the globe in 1937. Mira Nair discusses her fascination with the pioneer and the challenge presented by the aerial sequences.

Kirsty Lang and children's author Francesca Simon discuss Enid, a TV drama about the life of Enid Blyton. Starring Helena Bonham Carter as Enid, the drama follows the writer's life - from her unhappy childhood to her becoming internationally renowned - showing how the orderly, reassuringly clear worlds which she created in her stories contrasted with the complexity of her personal life.

The Mexican guitar duo Rodrigo y Gabriela's energetic performances have attracted a lot of attention, so as they release their new album, 11:11, Front Row invites them to the studio to see what it is that people are talking about.

Lumiere is a four-day festival that will turn the historic city of Durham into a winter wonderland: more than 50 artists are creating a series of installations, illuminations and performances using light. Poet Katrina Porteous reports from the festival and performs, live, a poem specially commissioned by Front Row about her experiences there.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00npggx)
Our Mutual Friend

Episode 5

Adaptation by Mike Walker of Charles Dickens' classic novel.

There is a rumour on the river that Gaffer Hexam might have had a hand in John Harmon's death.

Charles Dickens ...... Alex Jennings
Bella Wilfer ...... Daisy Haggard
Lizzie Hexam ...... Lizzy Watts
John Rokesmith ...... Carl Prekopp
Eugene Wrayburn ...... Patrick Kennedy
Mortimer Lightwood ...... Matt Addis
Nicodemus Boffin ...... Jason Watkins
Mrs Boffin ...... Pauline Quirke
Pa Wilfer ...... Philip Fox
Ma Wilfer ...... Annabelle Dowler
Charlie Hexam ...... Adam Arnold
Gaffer Hexam ...... Malcolm Tierney
Silas Wegg ...... Lee Ross
Aenus Venus ...... Stephen Hogan
Rogue Riderhood ...... Jamie Foreman

With Paul Rider and Janice Acquah.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole and Jeremy Mortimer

This episode is available until 7.45pm on 11th December as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00nrs1y)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Cardiff University. The panellists are Chuka Umunna, Labour parliamentary candidate for Streatham, Tim Montgomerie, editor of the ConservativeHome website, Claire Fox, director of the Institute of Ideas, and the writer AN Wilson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00nrs20)
The Man on the Fourth Plinth

Clive James celebrates the honouring of Battle of Britain commander Sir Keith Park with a temporary statue on Trafalgar Square's fourth plinth.


FRI 21:00 Jonathan Holloway - A Night with Johnny Stompanato (b00nxc15)
One night in 1958 police were called to the house of 'sweater girl' Lana Turner, where her current boyfriend, Johnny Stompanato, was lying in a pool of blood, stabbed to death by Lana's daughter, Cheryl. At the ensuing coroner's inquest, Lana gave the performance of her life.

Lana Turner........................Laurence Bouvard
Johnny Stompanato.......John Guerrasio
Cheryl...................................Georgia Moffett
Del.........................................Demetri Goritsas
McGinley.............................John Chancer
Geisler..................................Paul Mohan
Langhauser........................John Telfer
Bill Brooks..........................Oliver Millingham
Annie....................................Kim Baker

Written by Jonathan Holloway, based on real events, newspaper reports and FBI files from 1957-1958.

Directed by Sara Davies

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00nph3d)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00nphtw)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

The man alleged to have planned the September 11 attacks in the United States is to be put on trial in New York.

The lessons of the Glasgow North East by-election.

President Obama begins a tour of Asia.

The politics of time.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00npjcy)
The Glass Room

Episode 5

Greta Scacchi reads from the novel by Simon Mawer.

Refugees from Nazi-controlled Austria are flooding into Czechoslovakia. One of these refugees arrives at the Landauer House, with profound consequences for Viktor and Liesel.

Abridged by Jeremy Osborne.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00nqbtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00npjll)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00npgh1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00npggq)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00npggs)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00npggv)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00npggx)

1989: A German Story 11:00 TUE (b00nq9yr)

1989: Day by Day Omnibus 23:00 SUN (b00nnvy0)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 SAT (b00nmz8m)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 SUN (b00nnv4c)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 MON (b00npfr2)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 TUE (b00npfmd)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 WED (b00npfmg)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 THU (b00npfmj)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 FRI (b00npfml)

A Cymbal Tale 13:30 TUE (b00n87sj)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00nqbtk)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00nqbtk)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00nlyvm)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00nrs20)

Adventures in Poetry 16:30 SUN (b00nnsrk)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b0090mt8)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00nqbl3)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00nqbl5)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00nqbl7)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b00nqcy9)

All in the Mind 16:30 WED (b00nqcy9)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00nnvr0)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00nk0gc)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00npwh8)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00nmz8f)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00nlyvk)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00nrs1y)

Aping Evolution 21:00 MON (b00npwhd)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00nmzp7)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00nmzp7)

Armistice Day Silence 11:00 WED (b00nsl70)

As Told To Craig Brown 23:00 TUE (b00bbnxt)

Beauty of Britain 11:30 MON (b00npr8g)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00nnlmb)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00nnlmb)

Bleak Expectations 18:30 THU (b00nrrd5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00npjdh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00npjcr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00npjct)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00npjcw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00npjcy)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00nnnb0)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00np1yc)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00np1yc)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00npdg7)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00npdg7)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00npdg9)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00npdg9)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00npdgc)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00npdgc)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00npdgf)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00njxlv)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00npr8j)

Brel et Moi: Alastair Campbell on Jacques Brel 11:30 THU (b00d7nrz)

Britain's Other Music Hall: The Story of the Blackface Minstrels 11:30 TUE (b00nq9yt)

Calling Time on Student Bars 11:00 MON (b00npr8d)

Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph 10:30 SUN (b00nnpgj)

Child of the State 20:00 MON (b00npwh6)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00nhv35)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00nnrcq)

Click On 16:30 MON (b00npwh0)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00nrrhr)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00nprdf)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00nq9yw)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00nqht1)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00nrrd1)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00nrs1m)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00nmz7z)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00nmz7q)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00np17n)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00np0th)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00np0tk)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00np0tm)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00np0tp)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00nlx8j)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00nrs1k)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00nk55r)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00nqcy5)

Find Me a New York Jewish Princess 11:02 WED (b00nqf4s)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b00nmz90)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b00nmz90)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00nmz85)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00nqmf2)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00npfzc)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00npfxk)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00npfxm)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00npfxp)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00npfxr)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00nlxzr)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00nrs1p)

High Flight 23:30 SAT (b00nhw26)

Hut 33 11:30 WED (b01k6hfc)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00nqljy)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00nqljy)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00nqcy7)

Jo Caulfield Won't Shut Up! 18:30 TUE (b00nqc54)

Jonathan Holloway - A Night with Johnny Stompanato 21:00 FRI (b00nxc15)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00nlxzt)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00nrs1r)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b00nqbth)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b00nqbth)

Leading Edge 21:00 THU (b00nrrd9)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b00nrrq6)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b00nnp03)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00nmz8y)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00nqb7m)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00nrrd3)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00nlzh1)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00nn2g5)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00nnw82)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00nnw64)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00nnw66)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00nnw68)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00nnw6b)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00nqcyz)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00nqcyz)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00nqht3)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00nmz87)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00nmz87)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00nkcfk)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00nqj80)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00nlzh9)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00nnlm8)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00nnww8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00nnwnh)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00nnwnk)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00nnwnm)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00nnwnp)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00nnlmg)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00nm11p)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00nnp07)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00nnp0h)

News and Papers 09:00 SUN (b00nnp0m)

News 13:00 SAT (b00nmz8c)

Nick Mohammed: Apollo 21 18:30 WED (b00nqht7)

Off the Page 13:30 THU (b00ny8gr)

One 23:00 WED (b00nqj84)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00nnrcs)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00nnrcs)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00nmz7n)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00nmz7n)

Original Shorts 00:30 SUN (b008pvmt)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00nmz8p)

PM 17:00 MON (b00npfvp)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00npfr4)

PM 17:00 WED (b00npfr6)

PM 17:00 THU (b00npfr8)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00npfrb)

Parting Shots 09:30 TUE (b00nq9yp)

Pick Ups 23:00 THU (b00nkxfc)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00nnvqw)

Poppies Are Red, Cornflowers Are Blue 11:45 SUN (b00nnqpg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00nlzhc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00nnwz7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00nnwwd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00nnwwl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00nnwws)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00nnwwz)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00nnp0c)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00nnp0c)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00nnp0c)

Rik Mayall's Bedside Tales 23:15 WED (b00nqj86)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00nmz8h)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00nmz7x)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00nmz92)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00nlzh5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00nnlm4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00nnwhk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00nnwh1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00nnwh3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00nnwh5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00nnwh7)

Selling Cheese to the Chinese 13:30 SUN (b00lyvz5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00nlzh3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00nlzh7)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00nmz8r)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00nnlm2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00nnlm6)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00nnvqp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00nnwb7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00nnwbp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00nnw84)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00nnwb9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00nnw86)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00nnwbc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00nnw88)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00nnwbf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00nnw8b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00nnwbh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00nmz8w)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00nnvqt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00npfxh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00npfvr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00npfvt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00npfvw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00npfvy)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00nnmsl)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00nnmsl)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00npjnj)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00npjnj)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00nnp0k)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00nnp09)

Supersize Surgeries 21:00 WED (b00j3xd3)

The Archers Omnibus 09:15 SUN (b00nnp0p)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00nnvqy)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00nnvqy)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00npf65)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00npf65)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00npf5x)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00npf5x)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00npf5z)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00npf5z)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00npf61)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00npf61)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00npf63)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00nkv3t)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00nrrd7)

The Cases That Changed Our World 05:45 SUN (b00nknyx)

The Cases That Changed Our World 20:45 WED (b00nqj82)

The Choice 09:00 TUE (b00nq9ym)

The Choice 21:30 TUE (b00nq9ym)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00nrs1t)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00nnqpj)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00nnqpj)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00nqhsz)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00nlyvh)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00nrs1w)

The Richest Man in Britain 11:30 FRI (b00nrrq8)

The Two-Minute Silence 14:45 SUN (b00nnrcn)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b00nk0g7)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b00npwh2)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00nmz83)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00nnrcl)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00npjcp)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00nphtp)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00nphtr)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00nphtt)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00nphtw)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00nkb0b)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00nqht5)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00npjlx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00npjld)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00npjlg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00npjlj)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00npjll)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00nmz7v)

Today 06:00 MON (b00np1y9)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00np17q)

Today 06:00 WED (b00np17s)

Today 06:00 THU (b00np17v)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00np17x)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00nm11r)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00nmz7s)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00nmz89)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00nmz8t)

Weather 22:00 SAT (b00nmzp9)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00nnp05)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00nnp0f)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00nnrcj)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00nnvqr)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00nnvr2)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00npjng)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00npdnz)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00nphk9)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00npdm0)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00nph36)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00npdm2)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00nph38)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00npdm4)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00nph3b)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00npdm7)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00nph3d)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00nnvr4)

Whatever Happened to the Teapots? 15:45 MON (b00npf9t)

Whatever Happened to the Teapots? 15:45 TUE (b00nt9cy)

Whatever Happened to the Teapots? 15:45 WED (b00nt9c3)

Whatever Happened to the Teapots? 15:45 THU (b00nt9c5)

Whatever Happened to the Teapots? 15:45 FRI (b00nt9c7)

Where Do You Want Me (A Comic in Continental Crisis) 10:30 SAT (b00nmz81)

With Great Pleasure 23:00 MON (b00npwhj)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00nmz8k)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00npdj7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00ntnkp)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00ntnkc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00ntnkf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00ntnkh)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00npdpk)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00npdp1)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00npdp3)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00npdp5)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00npdp7)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00npdly)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00npdkn)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00npdkq)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00npdks)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00npdkv)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00nm0lh)