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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 31 OCTOBER 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00nh5vp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nhs7s)
Dear Mr Bigelow

Episode 5

Sophie Thompson reads from the letters of Frances Woodsford, a Bournemouth council worker, to wealthy American widower, Paul Bigelow, who she never met, written between 1949 and his death in 1961. They evoke life in postwar Britain, and are introduced by Woodsford herself, who is now in her 90s.

Frances attends the 'wedding of the year' between her brother and Audrey and begins to get used to life alone with Mother - only to realise, perhaps too late, that the most important friend in her life is Mr Bigelow, who has now fallen seriously ill.

Abridged by Doreen Estall.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nh5vr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nh68j)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nh68l)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00nh6fk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nh68n)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Roger Hutchings.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00nh6cm)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00nh6cp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00nhn1l)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00nhn1n)
Brian May's 3-D Village

Queen guitarist Brian May uncovers the story of an Oxfordshire village captured in time by Victorian photographic pioneer T.R. Williams.

May has been fascinated by 3-D images since collecting cereal packet picture cards as a boy. He was particularly intrigued by a set of stereoscopic images of village life taken by photographic pioneer T.R. Williams. Further investigation revealed all the images to be 3-D pictures of the tiny Oxfordshire village of Hinton Waldrist, taken in the 1850s.

Brian joins presenter Helen Mark for a time-travel tour of the village. Together they discover how the people and wildlife of this Thames-side community have changed since Williams recorded these evocative images of blacksmiths, spinners and farm workers.

Kerry Lock of the Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust describes the waxing and waning of wildlife over the past 160 years, while Nicola Verdon of the British Agricultural History Society examines the telling detail in photos taken at the height of farming's golden age.

To discuss the past, present and future of 3-D photography Helen is also joined by Brian's collaborator, the photo historian Elena Vidal and by David Burder of the British Stereoscopic Society. Has the boom in 3-D cinema and the launch of a 3-D digital camera come at just the right time for a revival of interest in T.R. Williams and a re-birth of the art of stereoscopic photography?


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00nhn1q)
Farming Today This Week

Every year 6.7 million tonnes of food are thrown away. That's about 10 billion pounds-worth. Charlotte Smith visits a village where residents are embracing food waste recycling and asks the environment secretary Hilary Benn if similar schemes could be rolled out across the country.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00nhn1s)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00nhn1v)
Presented by James Naughtie and John Humphrys.

Torrential rain and strong winds have caused scores of rescues and travel misery across the UK. Scotland has been worst hit by the downpours, with several severe flood warnings in force after rivers burst and threatened their banks and flooded houses. Peter Murray is assistant chief fire officer with Grampian Fire and Rescue.

Hospital intensive care wards are under 'a lot of pressure' as a result of the swine flu pandemic, the UK government's most senior medical adviser has said. Dr Bruce Taylor is an intensive care specialist in Portsmouth and is honorary secretary of the Intensive Care Society.

The schools adjudicator in England is expected to call for tougher measures to punish parents who lie to get their children into good schools. The report will also consider one of the mechanisms now used for determining admissions to popular schools in a quarter of English local authorities - the lottery. The first education authority to use a lottery, two years ago, was Brighton and Hove. Councillor Vanessa Brown oversees the system on the city council.

Professor David Nutt has said he doubts any 'true' scientist could work for the home secretary, Alan Johnson. Colin Blakemore is Professor of Neuroscience at Oxford University and a former head of the British Medical Research Council. He says there are reasons why the government might want to ignore or act against scientific advice on matters such as drugs.

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the opening of the M1, and the event is being marked by a musical. Steve Chittenden reports from the Watford Gap service station where the musical will premiere.

Last week 105 people were killed in a bomb attack in Peshawar; this morning there has been another bombing, in the city of Rawalpindi. At least 20 people have died. Correspondent Aleem Maqbool has the latest.

The American singer-songwriter Steve Earle has been interviewed several times over the years on this programme about his political views, including about the war on terror and death row. But more recently his appearance on the cult American television series The Wire has taken him back to the issue of drugs. which has dogged most of his life and the life of the musician Townes Van Zandt, his close friend. Our reporter Nicola Stanbridge meets him as he starts a UK tour.

Thought for the Day with Rev Dr Giles Fraser.

The former commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, Sir Ian Blair, has called for a national inquiry into the police through a Royal Commission. Sir Ian discusses how a root and branch examination would improve the service and how the force can be made more democratically accountable.

The home secretary Alan Johnson is coming under pressure to make a Commons statement following his sacking of the chair of the Advisory Council on the misuse of drugs, Professor David Nutt. But what is the correct relationship between scientific advisors and policy makers? Former home secretary Charles Clarke, home affairs editor Mark Easton and political editor Nick Robinson analyse the issue.

What does the pull-out of Dr Abdullah Abdullah from the Afghan presidential run off mean for the future of the conflict in the country? Correspondent Ian Pannell in Kabul and former British ambassador in Washington Sir Christopher Meyer discuss the future of democracy in Afghanistan.

How do you make schools admissions policy fair? Dr Sheila Lawlor of the think-tank Politeia and Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the Royal Society for Arts, Manufacture and Commerce discuss whether or not parents should be punished for attempting to bend the rules to get their children into their preferred schools.

Are you sitting comfortably? Then we'll begin. Britain is to have its first laureate for storytelling. The new post is being filled by Taffy Thomas, who discusses his repertoire of 300 stories culled from oral sources as a professional story teller for the past 30 years.

Hundreds of extra police are being recruited to stop young people getting involved in extremism as part of the government's Prevent initiative, to which the Home Office has dedicated 140 million pounds this year. Asian Network reporter Catrin Nye has had exclusive access to a Prevent project that sees young people at the forefront of efforts to combat terrorism.

There is an 18-year gap in life expectancy between the better- and worse-off areas of the city of Sheffield. Professor Danny Dorling of the University of Sheffield has just compiled a report into inequalities in the city and he discusses his warning that the recession could make the inequalities much worse.

Family Britain, the second book about postwar Britain by Austerity Britain author David Kynaston, is being published. Sanchia Berg delves into the BBC archive to get a flavour of life in the 1950s, and Mr Kynaston gives some insights into his latest work.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00nhn1x)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them.

Fi Glover is joined by clinical psychologist and writer Dorothy Rowe.

With poetry from Elvis McGonagall.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00nhn1z)
John McCarthy explores Berlin with the head of tourism and a writer who lives there, and finds a forward-looking and vibrant city coming to terms with a turbulent past.

John also meets two former British soldiers who talk about their travelling life with the army.


SAT 10:30 Now Wash Your Hands (b00nhn21)
The story of the original Izal Medicated, in the words of people who have a soft spot for hard toilet paper. Featuring songs written by the presenter, Sally Goldsmith, and sung by a Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Sheffield and locals of the city, where the paper was originally made.

A Loftus Audio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00nhn23)
Leaks of what Sir Christopher Kelly is proposing for MPs and their allowances increased the sense of gloom at Westminster this week.

Hilary Armstrong the former Labour chief whip who is retiring at the next election feels the recommendations will deter women, especially those with children, from becoming MPs.

Another topic of conversation at Westminster was whether or not Tony Blair should become president of the European council when the Lisbon Treaty is finally ratified. Patricia Hewitt, Michael Howard and Ed Davey discuss.

Also in the programme. How could the government make a misjudgement over the funding of the Territorial Army so soon after having to climb down over the issue of the Ghurkhas? Lindsay Hoyle and Desmond Swayne give their verdict.

And two parliamentary prospective candidates Claire Kelley ( Liberal Democrat) and Sean Bailey (Conservative) talk of their expectations of what parliamentary life might involve.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00nhn25)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.

A talk with a night witch in Moscow; fear, suspicion and heavy artillery on the streets of Conakry, Guinea; what the ancient traditions of Halloween reveal about modern America; an insight into the two rivals about to contest the second round of the Afghan presidential election.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00nhn27)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.

Pester power - Halifax Bank of Scotland makes changes to its controversial overdraft charges.

Where there's a will there's a way - don't forget to write one.

How just paying off the minimum on your cards messes with your mind.

National Savings enters the best buy tables, and why that is unusual.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00nh0qz)
Series 69

Episode 6

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz, recorded at the University of Bedfordshire. The panel includes Jeremy Hardy, Paul Sinha and Sue Perkins.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00nhn29)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00nhn2c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00nh1cm)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Cambridge University. The panellists are the shadow business secretary Kenneth Clarke, Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Shirley Williams, UKIP MEP Marta Andreasen and the former Lord Chancellor, Lord Falconer.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00nhn2f)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b0090f6x)
The Voyage of the Demeter

Robert Forrest's chilling tale of the supernatural, set on a schooner sailing from Bulgaria to England in 1867. Something very unpleasant is lurking aboard the ship, and the voyage becomes a terrifying ordeal.

Ripelski ...... Finlay Welsh
Robash ...... Gary Lewis
Kanesky ...... Steven McNicoll
Bretov ...... Grant O'Rourke
Gentleman ...... Alexander Morton.


SAT 15:30 Baroque and Roll: Townshend on Purcell (b00nf3kr)
The Who guitarist and songwriter Pete Townshend talks about the band's career and reveals the influence on his songwriting of Baroque composer Henry Purcell.

When Pete was a struggling 20-year-old musician he was turned on to Purcell by his manager, Kit Lambert. It was Kit's recommendation of Purcell's Gordian Knot Untied that struck the loudest chord with Pete, awakening him to a lineage in English music that seemed strangely familiar. Immersing himself in the music, he soon set about writing The Who's first album.

Pete reveals how he drew on Purcell's dramatic genius for his most intriguing compositions. From his first mini-rock opera to his masterpiece, Tommy, and from his enduring Lifehouse project through to his current musical endeavour, there has always been a Purcellian presence.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00nhn6z)
Weekend Woman's Hour

With Sheila McClennon.

The best-selling American crime writer Patricia Cornwell talks about her latest book, the 17th to feature Dr Kay Scarpetta, the workaholic forensic scientist. She was first introduced in 1990, and Patricia explains why Kay has been such an enjoyable character to write about for the last 20 years.

Listener Sue Green emailed Woman's Hour recently to say that she is something of a running joke among her friends because she continues to use cotton handkerchiefs in favour of the paper variety. But Sue is not alone: the programme hears from another die-hard handkerchief fan, Annalisa Barbieri - who goes so far as to iron her beloved collection - who talks about the history of this small square of cloth.

Within the next few months, one million young people under the age of 24 are going to be out of work. With no employment and no direction, the lives of these youngsters can quickly spiral into poverty, family disintegration and homelessness. This is what happened to Elvige. Struggling with a dysfunctional family and the threat of a life on the streets, she dropped out of college but is now a confident young adult studying for a degree and doing work with troubled youngsters.

The government wants to scrap the defence of provocation in murder cases where a spouse or partner has been unfaithful. Woman's Hour asks what the bill's defeat in the House of Lords means for women.

Kamilya Jurban is a Palestinian singer, instrumentalist and composer, and one of the most prominent contemporary artists in the Middle East. Karine Polwart is a Scottish folk singer songwriter whose debut album won the Radio 2 Folk Album of the Year Award in 2005. They were brought together to perform for the British Council and they give us a taste of their unique collaboration.

What do clothes mean to women? Why do some of us find it so hard to give or throw things away that we no longer wear? Justine Picardie, author of My Mother's Wedding Dress: The Life and Afterlife of Clothes', Jay Hunt, style writer and broadcaster, and Oriole Cullen, the curator of fashion and textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London share their emotional experience of clothes with Jenni Murray.


SAT 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00nhnxp)
31st October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Former Chancellor Nigel Lawson tells the House of Commons why he resigned; shadow energy secretary Tony Blair demands electricity privatisation plans be scrapped; a court investigates a fraud case involving the use of sonic binoculars to fix horse races.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00nhnxr)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Ritula Shah, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00ngzcf)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests to discuss those silly bits of paper and metal we call money. Surely someone can invent a better way to pay for things? He also asks what companies are doing to look after their low-income consumers.

Evan is joined by Antony Jenkins, chief executive of credit card company Barclaycard, Jim McCarthy, chief executive of the UK chain Poundland, and Chris Dedicoat, European president of Cisco, the world's largest producer of computer network equipment.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00nhnxt)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00nhnxw)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00nhnxy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00nhny0)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Clive Anderson is joined by drummer Ginger Baker, presenter and the new voice of Radio 2's breakfast show, Chris Evans, and actor Alun Armstrong.

Robin Ince finds out what everday things, from teacups to memory sticks, can tell us about the universe with cosmologist Marcus Chown.

With comedy from Edinburgh Comedy Award nominee Tom Wrigglesworth and music from jazz singer-songwriter Jamie Cullum and country blues band Hey Negrita.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00nhny2)
Jose Manuel Barroso

Edward Stourton takes a closer look at the life and career of the President of the European Commission, Jose Manuel Barroso.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00nhny4)
The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver and Cristian Mungiu's Tales From The Golden Age

Bidisha is joined by comedian Natalie Haynes, historian Tristram Hunt and actor and writer Michael Simkins to review the cultural highlights of the week - featuring hot-headed Mexican revolutionaries, Viennese students in a whirl and Romanian chickens in a truck.

Ferdinand Bruckner's 1926 play Pains of Youth is set in Vienna and features a group of bored, disillusioned medical students. In the aftermath of the First World War they view their youth as a kind of sickness and see the future as holding two alternatives: bourgeois existence or suicide. Martin Crimp's new version of the play at the National Theatre in London is directed by Katie Mitchell and features some of her typically striking twists of staging.

Barbara Kingsolver's last novel, The Poisonwood Bible, was published more than 10 years ago and became a bestseller. The Lacuna is her new novel and the story of its protagonist - writer Harrison Shepherd - is told through letters and entries in his diary. With a Mexican mother and an American father, his life oscillates between the two countries. As a young man in revolutionary Mexico, he becomes close to artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo and their houseguest Leon Trotsky, something which comes back to haunt him in the anti-communist climate of postwar America.

It is almost 20 years since Nicolae Ceasescu's regime in Romania came to a violent end, but the Ceasescu era is a period which fascinates and inspires the writer and director Cristian Mungiu. His previous film 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, which won the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2007, concerned a young woman trying to procur an illegal abortion. Tales From The Golden Age is more satirical in tone and while there's pathos here, there's also humour. Five urban myths from the twilight years of the communist era are played out, including a village sent into panic by an official visit and a photographer tasked with making Ceausescu look taller than Valerie Giscard d'Estaing.

The title poem of Grace Nichols's poetry collection Picasso, I Want My Face Back is written in the voice of Dora Maar, the photographer who was Picasso's lover and muse for ten years and inspired his 1937 painting Weeping Woman. Van Gogh, Munch and Tracey Emin also find their way into the verse here, which is understandable given Nichols's recent stint as writer in residence at the Tate. It's not all art and artists though; there are also poems about her native Guyana, India and the English landscape.

Collision is definitely car-crash TV, but in a literal rather than derogatory sense. The ITV1 drama, written by Anthony Horowitz and scheduled to be broadcast over five successive nights, focuses on a group of characters who are involved in a major traffic accident. Douglas Henshall plays DI John Tolin, who is investigates the accident and tries to determine whether two of his colleagues, who were in pursuit of one of the cars, may have been reponsible. But Tolin finds many unsuspected secrets hidden in the wreckage and also has to come to terms with some skeletons in his own closet.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00nhny6)
Capering With Ken Campbell

Ian McMillan explores the world of the actor and director Ken Campbell, who died in 2008.

Campbell's acting credits included Fawlty Towers, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Brookside, Law and Order and In Sickness and In Health, as well as performing one-man shows. He also directed theatrical events, including the nine-hour Illuminatus trilogy, a 22-hour production of The Warp and Macbeth in pidgin English.

His daughter, Daisy, gives Ian McMillan a tour of Ken's home in Essex, where he didn't have a bedroom and had a parrot run in every room. He also talks to Campbell's manager Colin Watkeys, theatre director Richard Eyre, fan and collaborator Ian Potter and fellow actors Julia McKenzie and Jim Broadbent.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00ncwzv)
Howards End

Episode 2

Dramatisation of EM Forster's classic novel.

Helen Schlegel is unhappy that her sister Margaret has agreed to marry the recently-widowed Henry Wilcox. Unbeknown to the sisters, Ruth Wilcox bequeathed the Wilcox country home, Howards End, to Margaret, but the note has been destroyed by Henry's son, Charles.

Narrator ...... John Hurt
Margaret Schlegel ...... Lisa Dillon
Helen Schlegel ...... Jill Cardo
Tibby Schlegel ...... Tom Ferguson
Aunt Juley ...... Alexandra Mathie
Henry Wilcox ...... Malcolm Raeburn
Ruth Wilcox ...... Ann Rye
Charles Wilcox ...... Joseph Kloska
Leonard Bast ...... Joseph Prospero
Dolly Wilcox/Jacky Bast ...... Christine Marshall.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00nhpgc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00nfqzl)
The war crimes trial of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic has opened at the UN-backed International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. He faces 11 counts of genocide, including complicity in the Srebrenica massacre in which 8,000 Muslim men and boys were killed. It was one of the worst acts of atrocity in Europe since the Second World War. But is what we are about to see justice or revenge - A show trial organised by the victors, with TV coverage broadcast throughout the world, and eagerly viewed, especially in the Balkans. Can there ever be any morally certain and globally acceptable definition of what constitutes a war crime or will pragmatism and real politique always get in the way?

Witnesses:
John Laughland
Author of Travesty: The Trial of Slobodan Milosevic and the Corruption of International Justice, and
A History of Political Trials from Charles I to Saddam Hussein.

Geoffrey Nice
The British QC who led the prosecution of the Serbian leader Slobodan Milosovic

Professor David Chandler
Professor of International Relations at the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and editor of the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding

Mark Ellis
Executive Director, International Bar Association.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00ndxjr)
Russell Davies welcomes four more guests to take part in the perennial general knowledge contest.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00ncyzd)
Roger McGough introduces poems about snow and solitude. There are splashes of colour too, with Goulash by Myrna Schneider and Poppies by Carole Satymurti. The readers are Mark Meadows, Tanya Moodie and Osi Okerafor.



SUNDAY 01 NOVEMBER 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00nhpyp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b008v8zk)
Dilemmas of Modern Martyrs

Sabotage

Series of stories by Morven Crumlish.

Pressed into service as a bridesmaid at a gay wedding, Jenny almost expected to be miserable. But weird scenes are to follow.

Read by Siobhan Redmond.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nhqd3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nhqd5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nhqd7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00nhqd9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00nhqdc)
The sound of bells from the church of St Lawrence Jewry in London.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00nhny2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00nhqdf)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00nhqdh)
Building Bridges

Writer Christie Dickason considers the physical and metaphorical significance of bridges - connecting peoples, cultures and countries, but also underlining differences.

She talks to violinist Ruth Waterman about the famous bridge of Mostar in Bosnia, and draws upon the poetry of Emily Dickinson and music by Bobbie Gentry and Mozart.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00nhqdk)
Alex James visits the Isle of Man to meet George Steriopulos, the final nominee for the 2009 BBC Farmer of the Year award.

George has been instrumental in re-establishing the island's flock of Manx Loughtan sheep. The breed is famous for its four horns but nearly became extinct in the 1960s as farmers switched to quicker-growing types. The Loughtan has just been granted the EU's Protected Designation of Origin status, ranking it alongside Stilton Cheese and Champagne. Such efforts mean the sheep are once again covering the island's hills in their thousands.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00nhqdm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00nhqdp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00nhsn4)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00nhsn6)
Meningitis UK

Sandi Toksvig appeals on behalf of Meningitis UK.

Donations to Meningitis UK should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Meningitis UK. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Meningitis UK with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity No:1076774.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00nhsn8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00nht55)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00nht57)
A Great Cloud of Witnesses

A service on All Saints Day from St Michael's Church in Aberystwyth.

The preacher is Canon Stuart Bell, Rector of Aberystwyth.

Musical Director: Andy Herrick.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00nh1cp)
On Strike

Clive James reflects on the postal workers' dispute and gives his personal view of the modern history of labour relations.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00nht59)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Kevin Connolly.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00nht5c)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00nht5f)
Jerry Springer

Kirsty Young's castaway is the talk show host Jerry Springer. His life has been split between serving the public and outraging them. His first career was in politics where, as a life-long Democrat, one of his early jobs was working with Bobby Kennedy. Then he found global fame with his controversial TV programme, The Jerry Springer Show. He says that in politics and in his TV show, he is always on the side of the powerless and disenfranchised. It's a philosophy, he says, he learned from his parents. They were among the last Jews to escape from Berlin in August 1939 and their memories and fears of that time shaped the entire family.

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: Wind Beneath My Wings by Bette Midler
Book: Photo album of family & friends
Alternative to Bible: Torah
Luxury: A cheeseburger machine.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b00nf01t)
Series 4

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Adam Hills, Rhod Gilbert, Reginald D Hunter and Shappi Khorsandi.

Recorded at the Edinburgh Festival.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00nhtk2)
Yoghurt

Central Asia was the birthplace of yoghurt, as Golden Crescent nomadic tribes domesticated sheep and goats and began to curdle milk. Aylin Bozyap grew up in Istanbul, and as a child used to take the ferry with her family to the port town of Kanlica to eat yoghurt.

Recreating the journey, she takes as her guide the political scientist, food historian and author Professor Artun Unsal, who finds the yoghurt a poor immitation of its former self. In search of something better they visit the artisan yoghurt maker Mehmet Nazli, whose family has been making yoghurt for many years, and who still makes it the traditional way. His son and grandson also work in the business, but the work is hard and they don't make much money, with the profits staying mainly with the middlemen and shops.

On the other side of Istanbul they visit an artisan yoghurt maker who has had to stop producing; the quality of the milk is no longer good enough, nor the city clean enough, to make real yoghurt any more.

Finally they go to the Silivri Yoghurt Festival, an annual celebration of traditional yogurt, and meet one of the winners. They also meet the deputy mayor of Silivri, who takes them to visit a disused yoghurt house that Professor Unsal is keen to see turned into a yoghurt museum.

In the studio Sheila Dillon and Aylin taste a range of plain yoghurts, as well as a typical British style yoghurt.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00nhtk4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00nhtk6)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 The Deighton File (b00kjh8g)
From the start of his writing career in 1962, Len Deighton has gifted his readers the Harry Palmer spy stories, including The Ipcress File, his compelling accounts of Second World War combat in Fighter and Blitzkrieg, and his experience in the kitchen with the Action Cook Book. Now 80, in this rare interview from 2009, he talks to Patrick Humphries about his life and work.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00nh06t)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Matthew Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and Pippa Greenwood are guests of the Weald Horticultural Society in Sevenoaks, Kent.

Bob explores the vineyards in the 'Garden of England', discussing which varieties are best suited to winemaking and how best to care for them.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Brother Mine (b00cm7h2)
Global Differences

Famous sibling Julian Lloyd Webber takes a closer look at what it is to be a sibling and why that relationship can be a lifelong source of love, hate, conflict and peace.

Julian looks at global differences in siblings: milk siblings in Islamic culture (sibling through the same milk nurse), sibling hierarchies in African countries, and Chinese and Bangladeshi immigrant families in Britain today.

With contributions from Prof Juliet Mitchell, anthropologist Prof Tom Weisner, psychologist Dorothy Rowe, sociologist Dr Miri Song, Prof Eve Gregory, anthropologist Prof Ruth Mace, and Ahmed Darwish (psychologist and Chairman of the Muslim Council of Wales).

Producer: Terry Lewis
A Tinderbox production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00nhv35)
Guy de Maupassant - Bel Ami

Episode 1

Dramatisation by Frances Byrnes of Guy de Maupassant's story of political corruption in the newspaper world of 19th-century France and the inexorable rise of Georges Duroy - 'Bel Ami' - a charming, ruthless man of little talent but plenty of ambition.

Bel Ami is making the perfect match with a society heiress but his past is about to catch up with him, in the shape of Mme de Marelle, his long-term mistress.

Bel Ami ...... Jonathan Slinger
Marelle ...... Emma Fielding
Madeleine ...... Mali Harries
Forestier ...... Kieran Self
Monsieur Walter ...... Steffan Rhodri
Rachel ...... Sara McGaughey

Other roles played by Richard Nichols.

Directed by Polly Thomas.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b00nhv5s)
Linda Grant

James Naughtie and readers talk to Linda Grant about her novel When I Lived in Modern Times, winner of the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2000.

Linda is known for bringing a strong Jewish identity to most of her writing. 'Scratch a Jew and you've got a story', remarks the main character Evelyn Sert on the story's first page as she looks over her life. The novel follows Evelyn - hairdresser, spy, lover - on her voyage from post-war London to Tel Aviv, where the British are preparing to leave Palestine and the new state of Israel is about to be born.


SUN 16:30 High Flight (b00nhw26)
When Anglo-American poet John Magee was killed in a mid-air collision over Lincolnshire in December 1941, aged just 19, he left behind a sonnet started, he claimed, 'at 30,000 feet and finished soon after (he) landed'. The poem, High Flight, has become the most celebrated poem about the intoxication of flying.

Sean Street traces the trajectory of the poem and its poet from Rugby School through the Library of Congress and the space race to Ronald Reagan's tribute to the victims of the Challenger space shuttle disaster and beyond, into a unique place in the popular imagination.

The programme includes contributions from Andrew Motion, veterans of the Royal Canadian Air Force, composer Bob Chilcott and Library of Congress archivist Cheryl Fox.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00nhw28)
1st November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

President Bush agrees to meet Chairman Gorbachev on his boat in the Mediterranean for unofficial talks; President Ortega of Nicaragua breaks a 19-month ceasefire with US-backed Contra rebels; a coroner overseeing the inquest into the death of Beverly Lewis demands better community care for the mentally ill.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 1989: How The Wall Fell (b00nfn2j)
The fall of the Berlin Wall made revolution look easy. But behind the scenes, people power and the sudden end of Cold War certainties posed all kinds of challenges. As part of Radio 4's 1989 season, John Tusa discovers what happened with key insiders from the British, German, Soviet and other governments of the time.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00nhny2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00nhw2b)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00nj7vs)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00nj7vv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00nj7vx)
Hardeep Singh Kohli makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio.

Analysis - Radio 4
The Fantastic Book of Everyone's Secrets - Radio 4
Dear Mr Bigelow - Radio 4
Parting Shots - Radio 4
Being Jewish - Blood or Belief - Radio 4
Baroque and Roll - Radio 4
Night Waves - Radio 3
M1 Magic - Radio 4
Bleak Expectations - Radio 4
Capering With Ken Campbell - Radio 4
The Verb - Radio 3
Maida Vale at 75 - Radio 1 & Radio 2
Now Wash Your Hands - Radio 4
The Unbelievable Truth - Radio 4
In Tune - Radio 3.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00nj7vz)
Lilian thinks San José is like a morgue and doesn't want to look at the apartment that Matt's found. Matt points out it's Sunday and a public holiday - and when Matt gets hold of his money, Geoff will find them something better. Once inside, Lilian's even less impressed and wants Matt to tell Geoff he's changed his mind. In a couple of days he'll come to his senses and will be flying back with her. Matt insists he won't be changing his mind, in fact he's already paid up front.

David and Ruth agree that the Grundys have done well looking after the farm. David's even tempted to ask them to move in for another week while they pop back to Egypt! Ruth knows that Pip would go back like a shot too.

Eddie calls round to pick up his cheque and is pleased to hear how grateful they are - and there's no mention of the teapot, which is still being repaired.

Eddie tells Clarrie that he forgot to mention the teapot. Clarrie doesn't believe him. David and Ruth put their trust in them; what are they going to think when they find Eddie hasn't been honest with them?

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00nj7w1)
Matt Frei presents an insider guide to the people and the stories shaping America today. Combining location reports with lively discussion and exclusive interviews, the show provides new and surprising insights into contemporary America.

Americans love golf and President Obama is no exception. Matt Frei takes a swing of the club and a look at how exactly the 44th President of the United States, Barak Obama, manages to make so much time to play. He is squeezing in more golf than his predecessor, even in the midst of juggling the challenges of economic recovery and international diplomacy.

Matt Frei talks to former White House press secretary Dana Perino about life on the other side of the podium. After a few years fielding questions on behalf of the George W Bush administration, Perino tells Americana how she feels the Obama administration is handling the media storm so far.

If she looks like Sarah Palin and talks like Sarah Palin, does that mean that Michele Bachmann will be the new Sarah Palin? Bachmann has represented Minnesota in the United States House of Representatives for three years. In that short time she has managed to become a well-known voice within the Republican Party. Matt Frei talks to her about how she has amplified her opinions so effectively and what her hopes are for the Republican Party in the future.

What exactly does a Governor do? Matt Frei talks with Governor Brian Schweitzer, who moved from ranching to running one of the largest states in the US, Montana. Governor Schweitzer took office in 2009 and shares his insight on what it takes to be one of the 50 most powerful state leaders in the nation.

Matt Frei invites the a cappella group Sonos, who are currently touring around the United States, into the Americana studio. With FX pedals and well-known indie tunes, Sonos makes the studio vibrate with a whole new sound.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b0090mt7)
Stories from the Bath Literature Festival

Mathilda

By Hattie Naylor. Read by Alison Reid.

'I was born in the worst winter ever. It was said that the ground was so hard, the air so cold, the snow so thick, my heart froze the moment I was brought into the world. And then I was brought up by a cat.'.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00nh06r)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00nh0qv)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series.

Marking the lives of actor and scriptwriter Norman Painting, voice of Phil Archer in The Archers, manager of Northern Ireland bus company during the Troubles Werner Heubeck, pediatric orthopedist Dr Ignacio Ponseti, international cricket upmire David Shepherd, and British silversmith William Phipps.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00nhn27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00nhsn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00nf0my)
Knowing Too Much

As a campaigning investigative journalist, Martin Bright has devoted much of his energy into uncovering things people in power want to be kept secret. He calls himself a 'freedom of information fundamentalist'. But in this programme, he plays devil's advocate and asks if the truth is really always desirable or always in the wider public interest.

Through interviews with psychologists, intelligence officers, whistleblowers and academics, he explores the importance of institutional and personal secrecy, and asks what happens when these two areas overlap, or even collide.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00nj7w3)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00nj7w5)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including The Cases That Changed Our World.


SUN 23:00 1989: Day by Day Omnibus (b00nj7w7)
Week ending 31st October 1989

A look back at the events making the news 20 years ago, with Sir John Tusa.

Nigel Lawson resigns after six years as Chancellor, Walter Sisulu addresses 70,000 people at the biggest ever ANC rally, and riots in Moscow follow a demonstration outside the KGB headquarters.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00nhqdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 02 NOVEMBER 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00nj8j4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00nfqzg)
Organ Donation - Flip Flops

While nine out of ten people agree organ donation is a good thing, a recent audit found 40 per cent of bereaved families, when approached, didn't agree to donate. Laurie Taylor discusses new research which uncovers some of the reasons behind this apparent anomaly.

Magi Sque, from the University of Southampton, was part of a team who interviewed families who had declined organ donation. While many agreed in principle, carried organ donor cards and knew their relatives desire to donate, they still didn't feel able to let their loved ones organs be used. The most common reason families gave for this was a simple desire to keep the body intact. They didn't want the dead to be 'hurt' any more.

Magi explains why the research reveals some of our deep-seated cultural beliefs, and how those beliefs have their roots in wider society's values and, at times of grief, can completely overcome our pre-existing views.

We also hear from Professor Caroline Knowles of Goldsmiths College, London who has researched the history, meaning and journey of the flip flop sandal.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00nhqdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8qv)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nj90f)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8wp)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00nj99b)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00njkl2)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Roger Hutchings.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00nj9b3)
Charlotte Smith hears that we're farming fewer breeds than ever before, to feed our desire for consistent cuts of meat. Last century we lost 26 native breeds of livestock, as farmers concentrated on the most productive lines. Farming Today visits the Isle of Man to view one our rarest breeds of sheep, the Manx Loghtan. And in Warwickshire, a Texel sheep farmer explains why his animals dominate the industry.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00njkl4)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00nj9fr)
With Sarah Montague and Justin Webb. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00njkl6)
Andrew Marr discusses memory, secrets, failed states and snobbery with his guests.

Academic Viktor Mayer-Schonberger talks about his new book Delete - the dangers of remembering in the digital age. Director Daniel Kramer talks secrets, psychology and the accessability of opera as his new production of Bluebeard opens at the ENO. Clare Lockhart, Director of the Institute for State Effectiveness, talks about how to fix failed states by building markets, and Quentin Letts gives his thesis on how snobbery will save us.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nj9jc)
The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham

Episode 1

Barbara Flynn reads from Selina Hastings' biography of Somerset Maugham, which sheds new light on his complex character.

In 1892, at the age of 18, Somerset Maugham enrolled at St Thomas' medical school, but his heart wasn't in it. What he really wanted to do was write.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nj9pl)
Martine McCutcheon; Donor transplants

Martine McCutcheon on writing her first novel. Plus, encouraging more organ donation; and why are applications to take children into care up 50% since last year?


MON 11:00 Repossessions in the Sun (b00njwd7)
Ray Furlong visits Spain's Mediterranean resorts to hear how members of the country's one million-strong British expatriate community are weathering the recession. High unemployment in the construction and tourist sectors means that boom-time on the Costas is over, translating into increased home repossessions and divorce rates.


MON 11:30 Beauty of Britain (b00njwd9)
Series 1

Colour Me Wow

Comedy by Christopher Douglas and Nicola Sanderson. Beauty Olonga works as a carer for the Featherdown Agency and sees herself as an inspiration to other African girls hoping to achieve their goals in the land of semi-skimmed milk.

Beauty has a particularly difficult client, but is distracted by her latest business venture. Lynette assures Beauty that 'Colour Me Wow' is no pyramid scheme, while Anil shows a surprising new side to himself.

Beauty ...... Jocelyn Jee Esien
Lynette ...... Doon Mackichan
Sandra ...... Nicola Sanderson
Sally ...... Felicity Montagu
Karen ...... Nicola Sanderson
Mrs Gupte ...... Indira Joshi
Anil ...... Paul Sharma
Dr Kavanagh ...... Phyllida Law
Hilary ...... Rachel Atkins
Clare ...... Doon Mackichan

Music by The West End Gospel Choir.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00njbfv)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00njcns)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00njcpt)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00njxlv)
Russell Davies chairs the fourth heat of the perennial general knowledge contest.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00nj7vz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00cqdz9)
Goldengrove

Frances Byrnes' story of the relationship between a young working-class girl and the woman who transforms her. Margaret, a spinster, teaches Narn, a city child, how to shake hands firmly, polish silver and identify birds. Most of all, she teaches her how to speak.

Margaret ...... Jill Balcon
Narn ...... Jessica Jolleys
Narn Now ...... Siriol Jenkins
Josie ...... Beccy Alexander
Fred ...... Brendan Charleson

Directed by Kate McAll.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00nhny6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00njctx)
Education in the Moral Home

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Until the late-19th century, home was the only schoolroom many British children were to experience, especially if they were girls. But was domestic education really so inferior to formal schooling? Drawing on diaries she has discovered, Prof Vickery explores home education from the perspective of both mother and child.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00nhtk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Click On (b00njxwm)
Series 5

Episode 5

As Bonfire Night approaches, Simon Cox discovers the role computers play in creating spectacular fireworks displays. He also learns how technology used in mobile phones is helping researchers in Cambridge to monitor pollution.


MON 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00njd4p)
2nd November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

In an unprecedented move, KGB officers take questions from the public on live TV; price rises on British Rail fill commuters with woe; the Met's first black police officer talks about the 'fun and games' in the early days.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 17:00 PM (b00njdbb)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00njg1l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b00nk0g7)
Series 4

Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Clive Anderson, Dom Joly, Fi Glover and Henning Wehn.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00njcq8)
Wayne buys flowers for Emmy. She's taking him back, so Fallon's helping him move to Borchester. Susan tells him the shop's so quiet, she can't sleep with the worry. Wayne goes and Neil tells Susan her doom and gloom will put customers off. Maybe Susan should take redundancy advice? Susan says that's admitting defeat. She needs to save her job, not prepare to lose it.

Wayne tells Fallon he'll miss her. He won't be letting her slip away again. Fallon says Wayne knows where she is. And she'll be busy, practicing with the Lies. Wayne says Rollo won't let her down. It's one of the biggest hopes in Wayne's life, seeing her make it.

Lilian still isn't impressed with the house Geoff's offered them. It's filthy. Matt suddenly hears a scream from Lilian. She's seen a cockroach! Matt says they've got to laugh, haven't they? Lilian just cries. Matt phones Geoff who promises to sort it out.

Matt says adjusting to new places is always hard, but they'll have a much better life there. Lilian doesn't want a new life. Matt says they should go out - the cemeteries are being decorated. Lilian thinks that's so thoughtful of the locals. Probably arranged especially to cheer them up.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00njgdq)
The American writer James Ellroy is perhaps best known for his LA Quartet books, which include LA Confidential and The Black Dahlia. He discusses his new novel Blood's a Rover, a fusion of fact and fiction, set in the political turbulence of America in the late 1960s.

The journalist Jon Ronson stumbled across the existence of something called the First Earth Battalion, an attempt by the US government to harness paranormal abilities for military use, which he described in his non-fiction book The Men Who Stare at Goats. The book has now been turned into a film, starring George Clooney, Ewan McGregor, Kevin Spacey and Jeff Bridges. Mark Eccleston assesses this cinematic version of a virtually unknown chapter in American military history.

Be the Orchestra is the brainchild of the Philharmonia Orchestra's conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen. Mark Lawson visits the interactive installation, featuring Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, which is set over four storeys of a warehouse on the Thames. It allows people to feel the sensation of being among 106 expert musicians, experience the thrill of being under the baton and take on the role of conductor.

As Birmingham plays the part of London for the shooting of two BBC television productions - the sixth series of conman drama Hustle and the second series of the post-apocalyptic Survivors - location manager Harriet Lawrence discusses the history of location impersonations in the UK, from Beckton gasworks to Panama.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00njgds)
Singleparentpals.com

You Are Not Alone

Sue Teddern's story of the developing friendship between two single parents who correspond via a parenting advice website.

When a nervous Tom logs on to a website for lone parents for the first time, he finds new friends and an impatient response from the formidable Rosie.

Rosie ...... Maxine Peake
Tom ...... Kris Marshall
Spp.com/Tash ...... Laura Molyneux
Gill ...... Janice Acquah
Scott ...... Matt Addis
Robin ...... Malcolm Tierney
Bazz ...... Jonathan Tafler

Directed by David Hunter.


MON 20:00 Night Witches (b00nk0g9)
Lucy Ash tells the extraordinary but little-known tale of Russia's three all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions on the Eastern Front during Second World War. At home they were celebrated as Stalin's Falcons, but terrified German troops called them the Night Witches.

Lucy travels to Moscow and Rostov-on-Don to meet a number of these formidable women, who are now grandmothers in their 80s and 90s. She discovers that their bravery has inspired aerobatic champions, comic book artists and even a Dutch heavy metal band.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00nk0gc)
The Economist's New Clothes

Many have said that the near collapse of the global financial system exposed the failures of 30 years of economic thinking. Stephanie Flanders, the BBC economics editor, examines the arguments raging within and outside the world of economics and asks what future students should learn from the 'great recession'.


MON 21:00 Aping Evolution (b00nk0wl)
Episode 1

Professor of Genetics Steve Jones challenges evolutionary psychology, the controversial new science of how our brains and minds developed.

Girls like pink better because in Stone Age times they needed to be good at picking berries and women have better sex with rich men - or so some evolutionary psychologists would have us believe. Critics say this isn't science, but conjecture.

Evolutionary psychology seeks to explain human behaviour from the hunter-gatherers or our nearest relatives, the chimpanzee, and has some seductively simple theories. One argument is that we have Stone Age brains in 21st-century skulls, from which we can account for everything from the violence that men show to their stepchildren to why racism exists. Is evolutionary psychology a truly useful addition to the canon of ideas to come out of Darwinian evolution or a just-so science that can be adjusted to suit the researchers' prejudices?

Steve Jones examines the history of the new science, the methods used and asks if it can explain the human drive to language, religion and culture.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00njkl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00njhwg)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00njj5t)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

No second ballot in Afghanistan; how can the new government gain any legitimacy?

How much are MPs worth?

Why drug classification is never straightforward.

The East Germans who mourn their communist past.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00njj5w)
Heartland

Episode 6

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Jasmine catches up with some friends in London.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 With Great Pleasure (b008wr7x)
John Major

Former prime minister John Major chooses some of his favourite pieces of writing.
Including works by Anthony Trollope and Oscar Wilde

Readers: Nigel Anthony and Lucy Briers.

Producer: Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2008.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00njkhg)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



TUESDAY 03 NOVEMBER 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00nj8dm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nj9jc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8j6)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nj8wr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8qx)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00nj90h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nj99d)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Roger Hutchings.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00nj99g)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.

The programme reports on the decline of the hen harrier population, which teeters on the brink of extinction.

Anna continues her quest to find the most common breeds in British agriculture with beef cattle. The most common breed is the Limousin, and Anna encounters a herd in Ely, investigating which characteristics make the Limousin perfect for meat production.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00nj9f5)
Presented by Evan Davis and Justin Webb.

A major shake up of the banks propped up with government money has been unveiled, with announcements on the future of Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland. Financial Times columnist Gillian Tett examines the banking reform.

The use of aspirin to protect against cardiovascular disease should be abandoned, researchers have announced. New research has found that the drug can cause serious internal bleeding and does not prevent cardiovascular disease deaths. Dr Ike Iheanacho, editor of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin journal which conducted the research, explains the findings.

The government is setting out proposals for an overhaul of the funding of higher education in England. It is expected it will propose that students are treated more as paying customers and given better information about the quality of their courses before embarking on a degree. Secretary of State for Innovation and skills, Lord Mandelson, outlines the new plans.

Forecasts of a huge rise in obesity among children in England have been significantly downgraded following a new analysis of data. The National Heart Forum found that the rate of increase in childhood obesity may be starting to slow. Its figures suggest that by 2020 the proportion of teenage girls who will be obese is expected to be 9 per cent, not 30 per cent as previously predicted. Klim McPherson, Professor of Public Health at Oxford University and Chair of the National Heart Forum, examines the new trend.

The first anniversary of President Obama's election takes place tomorrow. A year after his election, Washington correspondent Kevin Connolly went to Colorado to talk to some of President Obama's supporters, to see if they are happy with his presidency.

Thought for the Day with Dr Indarjit Singh, director of the Network of Sikh Organisations.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has given his first news conference since being declared president of Afghanistan, after election officials scrapped a planned second round of voting. Correspondent Ian Pannell comments on the speech and Nick Horne, former political affairs officer for the UN, who resigned a few days ago, examines the implications of President Karzai's victory.

New plans for a big shake-up of banks have been announced. Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Banking Group are to sell off a large number of their branches after the European Commission demanded that banks bailed out by taxpayers should be scaled down. The changes will, it is hoped, ensure there is more competition for loans and mortgages in the banking industry. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Alistair Darling, outlines the banking reforms.

The Czech constitutional court has ruled that the Lisbon Treaty is in line with the constitution, clearing the way for President Vaclav Klaus to sign it. The Eurosceptic Mr Klaus, who was awaiting the court's decision, has said he will no longer oppose the treaty. Correspondent Rob Cameron comments on the latest developments.

New plans for an overhaul of the higher education system are to be announced today. Shadow universities and skills minister, David Willetts, comments on the government's proposals.

A video appeal is being launched today by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), aimed at pricking the conscience of any key witnesses involved in the disappearance of Madeleine McCann. Madeleine went missing two-and-a-half years ago while on holiday with her family in Portugal. The one-minute film includes fresh images of how Madeleine might look now, including one with dark brown hair and tanned skin in case she has been living in North Africa. It will be launched in several different languages. Jim Gamble, chief executive of CEOP, discusses the new approach in the search.

The pioneering soundtrack to David Attenborough's natural history series, Life on Earth, is being made commercially available on CD. The music was composed by a little-known English composer, Edward Williams. Mr Williams discusses the release of his works.

Progress on a deal over Iran's nuclear programme is coming to a halt, after Tehran failed to agree some of the points under negotiation. Recent talks in Vienna led to a proposal to enrich some of Iran's uranium outside the country and then return it for medical research use. It appeared at the time as if a deal had been agreed, but so far Tehran has not given an answer to the proposal. The head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which brokered the deal, has called for a quick response. America's ambassador to the IAEA, Glyn Davies, comments on the importance of a deal being brokered.

New plans for a big shake-up of banks have been announced. Changes to the asset protection scheme will ensure more competition in the banking industry. Liberal Democrat treasury spokesman Vince Cable and investor at Better Capital, Jon Moulton, examine the reforms.


TUE 09:00 The Choice (b00nk2c2)
Michael Buerk interviews people who have made life-altering decisions and talks them through the whole process, from the original dilemma to living with the consequences.

Michael talks to former banking executive Paul Moore about his choice to blow the whistle on HBOS.


TUE 09:30 Parting Shots (b00nk2c4)
Series 1

Episode 3

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores. The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

The privations of embassy life. In their valedictories, diplomats recount the hardships of foreign service - rat infested rooms, defunct plumbing and death threats.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nnn9t)
The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham

Episode 2

Barbara Flynn reads from Selina Hastings' biography of Somerset Maugham, which sheds new light on his complex character.

Still struggling to make ends meet, Maugham has a change of fortune when the manager of the Royal Court Theatre decides to stage his play, Lady Frederick.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nj9p2)
Miranda Hart; Snooker ace Allison Fisher

Comedian Miranda Hart on her BBC2 show. Plus, snooker ace Allison Fisher on life in America; and dressing female engineers.


TUE 11:00 1989: A German Story (b00nk2c6)
Under One Flag

Series in which German programme-makers reflect and report on aspects of the reunified country that rarely, if ever, find their way into the British media.

Thomas Franke explores the German armed forces, the Bundeswehr.

When reunification took place in Germany after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, one of the most painful institutional mergers was of the former East and West German armies. Ex-GDR forces were often obliged to accept lower grades in the united force. Yet today, having had to engage together in combat during the NATO Yugoslav operation of 1999, the Bundeswehr is, perhaps surprisingly, one of the success stories of the reunited nation. Yet, routinely, the annual swearing in ceremony in front of the Reichstag in Berlin is disrupted by noisy protests by those exercised by the notion of an army fighting under the German flag.

Thomas goes on patrol with the army around the Kosovan city of Prizren, where they are a part of the peace-keeping force, and visits the annual swearing-in ceremony where new members of the forces take the oath before Chancellor Merkel. But echoes remain of the horror inflicted on Europe by another German army, and such solemn moments are never far from controversy and protest - especially when former peaceniks are now members of a government which sends its young men to bear arms in both Europe and Afghanistan.


TUE 11:30 Art Attack (b00nk2xr)
Episode 2

An assault on the Mona Lisa with a teacup raises the question, why do people attack art? In two programmes the art historians and broadcasters Tim Marlow (programme one) and Lawrence Pollard (programme two) investigate centuries of attacks on art works from the earliest times to the present day. Charting the reasons why and telling the stories of some of the most sensational and provocative attacks, they explore how the wilful destruction of art is as old as art itself and how it shows no signs of stopping. Statues are demolished in the name of religion, photographs doctored for political reasons, paintings are slashed and protestors even urinate on art works. Art is attacked so that the power of a particular work is nullified, in order to eradicate the art's subject from the face of the earth, as a publicity seeking stunt and even - and increasingly - to make an artistic comment on the existing artwork. Do these attacks have anything in common? Can art be made by breaking existing art? Why are art attacks continuing?

Programme 2 -
Lawrence Pollard investigates some of the more bizarre assaults on contemporary art including attacks on Marcel Duchamp's 'Fountain' which has been both urinated on and whacked with a hammer. In this age of anti-art, it is increasingly common for vandals to claim their actions as 'art'.

Lawrence also visits the Tate Liverpool for their 'Joyous Machines' exhibition which features the work of Jean Tinguely - one of the most radical, inventive and subversive sculptors of the mid twentieth-century. Discussing his work with Lawrence is Michael Landy, artist and co-curator of the exhibition whose own work has been influenced by the artist and his constructive and destructive tendencies. In 'Break Down' (2001) Landy catalogued and destroyed every single one of his possessions from his birth certificate to his car.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00njb1p)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00njcb6)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00njcnv)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 The Bell Boys (b00nk2xt)
Their sounds have marked history's turning points: American victory in the Civil War, the death of monarchs, the collapse of governments. These are the bells of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, still standing proud in the heart of London's East End, and with a list of head craftsmen going back over five centuries. Big Ben was their greatest ever challenge, so large that the Tower of Westminster had to be built around this giant of instruments. Built to the clockmaker's specification, and contrary to Whitechapel's blueprint, the bell cracked almost immediately (the resulting bodged repair with the Victorian equivalent of Polyfilla gives it the characteristic 'bong' we have come to love.)

But many of Whitechapel's stories are much more earthbound. Harold Rogers must be one of the UK's oldest bell ringers. Aged 90, he still rings regularly at the church in south-west London where he met his bell-ringing wife. And thanks to the skills of the Whitechapel workforce he's about to become reacquainted with some very old friends. At the outbreak of WW2 Harold was one of the regular ringers at the church of St-Magnus-the-Martyr, whose bells were taken down for safety in the war and subsequently sold for scrap. 60 years later, replacements are finally being cast by Whitechapel, and Harold is perhaps the only man who will know for sure whether the new bells sound as good as the old.

As the new bells are cast we meet the colourful characters behind this typically proud East-end institution. There's Nigel who masterminds the moulding, always ready to leap to safety should disaster strike during the pouring of molten metal. Steve and his young apprentice prefer the relative tranquillity of the handbell workshop, full of the delicate sounds of miniature bells being tuned to perfection. And leading them all is Alan, the Master Founder, who inherited the business from his father and his grandfather before him. Through him we hear about the foundry's unique work during the war, turning its skills to the production of submarine detection equipment for the Admiralty. And from the foundry's safe Alan pulls some remarkable documents charting the foundry's history, including the inside story on what really went wrong with Big Ben.

As for Harold, he doesn't just get the chance to hear the bells of St Magnus ring once again, but grabs the opportunity to join the ringing team. And at the end of the rope is a special bell, dedicated to his late wife who rang with him in the same tower 60 years earlier. It's a moving moment, a piece of Whitechapel magic, a reminder of the power of bells to bring us all a little closer together.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00njcq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00chp3n)
Dickens Confidential

Why Are We in Afghanistan?

Series of plays looking at how Charles Dickens, as the head of a daily paper, would have tackled bringing the news to the masses.

By Mike Walker.

Dickens and his team find themselves in the midst of spies, intrigue and dark goings-on at the Russian Embassy, culminating in a heroic balloon chase across the London skyline.

Charles Dickens ...... Dan Stevens
Agnes Paxton ...... Eleanor Howell
Daniel Parker ...... Andrew Buchan
Nadia Durova ...... Rachel Atkins
Alex Burns ...... Dan Starkey
Joseph Paxton ...... John Dougall
Bishop ...... John Rowe
Ivan Vitkovich ...... Chris Pavlo

Directed by Tracey Neale.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00nk4k4)
Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

The different histories of marriage and divorce in England and Scotland; a listener's ground-breaking research into a placename that's linked to the Welsh cattle drovers, a new archive which explains the natural origins of Yorkshire Chemicals.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nk4lm)
Tales From the Low Countries

My Father's Photo Album

When the Dutch-Moroccan character at the centre of Abdelkader Benali's short story learns that his mother is ill, he's compelled to make a long-overdue visit to his parents' house in Rotterdam. The visit proves to be the start of a journey through his childhood, family history and sense of himself.

Read by Khalid Abdalla
Translated by David McKay
Abridged and produced by Emma Harding.


TUE 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00njct8)
The Garden Indoors

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

By the mid-19th century, the majority of the British population lived in filthy polluted towns. Yet the Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature, capturing ferns and sea anemones under glass in their parlours.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b00nk4wp)
Interview with Ken MacDonald

Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions, about his five years in the position from 2003 to 2008.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00nk4wr)
Catherine O'Flynn and Kate Pullinger

Sue MacGregor is joined by novelists Catherine O'Flynn and Kate Pullinger at the Birmingham book festival, to discuss favourite books, including titles by Gordon Burn, Don DeLillo and Alaa Al Aswany.

Books featured in this programme:
Kate's choice: White Noise by Don DeLillo
Publ: Picador

Catherine's choice: Alma Cogan by Gordon Burn
Publ: Faber & Faber

Sue's choice: Chicago by Alaa Al Aswany
Publ: Harper Perennial

Producer Mary Ward-Lowery.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


TUE 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00njd4f)
3rd November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Protests in East Germany force the resignation of the Mayor of Leipzig and five government hardliners; trouble for Gorbachev as Russian miners down tools; and a high speed link between London and the Channel Tunnel? 'Not in my back yard', say people in Swanley.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00njdb2)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00njfwk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Too Much Information (b00nk4wt)
Episode 4

Comedy by Neil Warhurst about a tourist information centre in a town with no tourist attractions whatsoever.

Waft Tourist Information resurrects an old Waft tradition, The Day of the Pie, in which the ugliest boy of the village eats a pork pie on the village green.

Warren ...... Jeff Rawle
Douglas ...... Malcolm Tierney
Heather ...... Liza Sadovy
Lucy ...... Joannah Tincey
Bryan ...... Paul Barnhill
Tourist Information Machine ...... Philip Fox
Tyler (Piggy) ...... Rhys Jennings.

Produced by Liz Webb.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00njcpw)
Mike still has lots of wood to collect for the bonfire. Vicky offers to make the guy, with Phoebe's help. Searching Mike's clothes for a guy costume, Vicky's keen to ditch a lot of it. She wants Mike to be smart. Maybe they can go clothes shopping soon?

Pat informs Peggy that the community shop idea's on the parish council agenda. Usha's already agreed to be on a committee. Peggy says Susan should be too. Pat thinks this could be awkward, if they had to make her redundant.

Mike asks David for help with bonfire wood. Clarrie appears. Eddie might be able to help too. Some country clothing catalogues have come to Brookfield for Joe. Clarrie apologises, but says she's got something else to apologise for, too.

Inside Brookfield, Ruth says she didn't notice the teapot's absence. Clarrie feels awful, but Ruth tells her she's done them a favour - she hated it! Eddie appears with the perfectly mended teapot. Ruth tells them both it's fantastic. Later, Eddie tells Clarrie the teapot mending was expensive, but he felt he had to pay, as David and Ruth have been good to them. Clarrie says he did the right thing, for once, and she's very proud of him.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00njg1n)
The filmmaker Penny Woolcock's new film, 1 Day, has been causing controversy in Birmingham, where the city's cinemas are refusing to screen it. The fictional film follows two groups of drug-dealing, gun-toting gangsters in the suburbs of the city, and features local amateur actors. Penny Woolcock discusses the background to the film and responds to the cinema chains' decision.

Seventeen-year-old musical prodigy Alexander Prior talks about his music and life in St Petersburg, where he is studying opera and symphonic conducting, and Velesslavitsa, a concerto he wrote for the four other young prodigies he discovered while making a Channel 4 series.

The South African poet Laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile and his compatriot, the poet and playwright Phillippa Yaa de Villiers, are touring the UK in a performance poetry show called Beyond Words. They tell Front Row what they hope to achieve with the tour, both politically and poetically, and discuss whether protest poetry still has a place in the new South Africa.

A new comedy series for Radio 4 by Nick Hornby and Giles Smith centres around an old 70s rock star who has ended up fabulously rich from investing in the dreams of a young computer geek called Bill Gates and a starving artist called Damien Hirst. Now living in a mansion the size of a village, the old rocker is isolated and clueless about the post-1970s world. Sarfraz Manzoor reviews the series.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00njh98)
Singleparentpals.com

Getting Back on the Horse

Sue Teddern's story of the developing friendship between two single parents who correspond via a parenting advice website.

Rosie has an interview for promotion and Tom has his first date for years. Who is the most nervous of the two?

Rosie ...... Maxine Peake
Tom ...... Kris Marshall
Spp.com/Tash ...... Laura Molyneux
Gill ...... Janice Acquah
Jo-C ...... Annabelle Dowler
Bazz ...... Jonathan Tafler

Directed by David Hunter.


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00nk55r)
Increasing Bank Profits

The head of the Financial Services Authority, Lord Turner, has questioned the social usefulness of what banks do. But as he and other regulators wrestle with ways of controlling so-called 'casino operations', Michael Robinson lifts the lid on the latest tricks of the trade which some banks are now using to increase profits.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00nk55t)
The case of a visually-impaired woman refused a ride on an airport bus because the driver claimed that unaccompanied travel by a blind person was against company regulations. The company in question insists this isn't the case, and has apologised for the mistake. But is there a real clash between the right to travel independently and the demands of health and safety? John Welsman, transport advisor for GDBA, tells us why he thinks experiences vary so much.

Our search for ever more unlikely gadgets for blind and visually-impaired people continues as we leaf through the photo album geared especially to the needs of blind people (Co-operative Xest Talking Photo Album), and examine the iPod Touch.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b00nk5t4)
Romanian Orphans

Claudia Hammond finds out how the hundreds of Romanian orphans who came to the UK 20 years ago have coped with their appalling treatment as babies.


TUE 21:30 The Choice (b00nk2c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00njhnc)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00njj38)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

David Cameron is set to announce a new Europe policy - but will it satisfy critics from within his own party?

Iranian students plan a big demonstration on Wednesday.

Taxpayers pump more billions into the banking system.

Coup plotter Simon Mann is released from prison in Equatorial Guinea.

Azerbaijan tries to tackle religious extremism.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00njj5y)
Heartland

Episode 7

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Jasmine unexpectedly bumps in to an old friend from primary school.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 As Told To Craig Brown (b00b71ds)
Episode 4

Eating too much and the end of the world.

Craig Brown introduces a mixture of satire, social observation and nonsense.

Narrated by Juliet Stevenson and Steve Wright

With John Humphrys, Ronni Ancona, Jon Culshaw, Lewis MacLeod, Sally Grace, Ewan Bailey and Margaret Cabourn-Smith.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2008.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00njk8c)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Susan Hulme.



WEDNESDAY 04 NOVEMBER 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00nj8dq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nnn9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8j8)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nj8wy)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8qz)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00nj90k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nj99j)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Roger Hutchings.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00nj99l)
News and issues in rural Britain.

Farm machinery theft has risen to record levels, and Eastern Europe's criminal gangs are stealing to order. Anna Hill hears from the largest farm insurers, who are funding a police unit to control the problem.

Plus, with 90 per cent of UK pork coming from Landrace Hybrid pigs, the programme finds out how this animal has come to dominate the industry.


WED 06:00 Today (b00nj9f7)
Presented by Evan Davis and John Humphrys.

The chairman of the Commons intelligence and security committee, Kim Howells, has called for the phased withdrawal of British troops from Helmand province. The former junior Foreign Office minister said the billions of pounds that would be saved should be redirected to defending the UK from terrorist attacks by Al-Qaida. Mr Howells discusses his proposals.

Conservative leader David Cameron is to unveil the party's new policy on Europe, after announcing the party would not hold a referendum on the EU treaty if they won the next general election. The Tories previously said that if the Lisbon Treaty were ever to be ratified by all countries, the party 'would not let matters rest there'. Eurosceptic Tory MP Mark Pritchard comments on his party's Europe policy.

The Kelly Report into the system of Parliamentary expenses is being released. Political correspondent Ross Hawkins looks back on the MPs' expenses scandal.

It is the first anniversary of Barack Obama's victory in the US presidential elections. But in the intervening year, the Democrats have lost gubernatorial seats in both Virginia and New Jersey to the Republicans. The Republican Party chairman, Michael Steele, says the results are a rejection of President Obama's reckless spending, and what he calls 'the far-left policies that are hurting our nation'. North America editor Mark Mardell examines President Obama's popularity a year after his election.

The much-discussed package of reforms to the expenses and allowances system in the House of Commons is to be put before MPs. The Kelly Report will propose radical changes which many MPs are reluctant to adopt. Conservative leader David Cameron will also give a speech on his party's Europe policy. Political editor Nick Robinson comments on what promises to be an eventful day in Westminster.

The military leader of the Republic of Guinea, Captain Moussa Dadis Camarra, has refused to step down ahead of presidential elections due for next January. Government troops violently crushed an opposition rally in the centre of the capital, Conakry, killing more than 150 people. International development correspondent Mark Doyle reports from Conakry on internal dissent in Guinea.

Thought for the Day with the Right Rev Tom Butler, Bishop of Southwark.

Five British soldiers have been killed in an attack in southern Afghanistan. Correspondent Ian Pannell reports on the latest developments.

A nationwide march commemorating the anniversary of the 1979 siege of the US embassy in Tehran will be turned into an anti-government rally. Opposition protests are banned in Iran, but protestors are hoping to use the official demonstration as an opportunity to protest against President Ahmedinejad. The head of Tehran's anti-riot police has threatened opposition protesters with a full-scale assault if they return to the streets. Iranian opposition journalist Masih Alinejad assess the violent clashes.

Five British soldiers have been killed in Afghanistan after a policeman they were training opened fire on them. Defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt reports on the latest in the incident.

The Conservatives will outline their policy on Europe after announcing they would not hold a referendum on the EU Treaty if coming to power in the next general election. Speaking to The Sun in 2007, David Cameron promised a 'cast iron guarantee' that a Conservative government would allow the British public to have their say, and shadow foreign secretary William Hague recently vowed to 'not let matters rest there' if a treaty was ratified before they came to power. The Sun's associate editor Trevor Kavanagh and former Conservative cabinet minister Michael Portillo examine Tory European policy.

Five British soldiers have been shot dead by a policeman in Afghanistan. The UN's former deputy special representative in the country, Peter Galbraith, discusses its police training.

Sir Christopher Kelly's report into the system of parliamentary expenses will outline a number of strict and unpopular measures. Today has tried to speak to MPs about the reforms, but many are reluctant to comment on the record. Richard Caborn MP, who is standing down at the next general election, gives his views on MPs' reaction to the report.

Former American vice president Al Gore, noted for his strong stance on climate change, has written a book arguing that the public is willing to make changes in their behaviours to reduce the impact of climate change. Mr Gore spoke to Today presenter James Naughtie about his optimism that the growing movement against climate change would spur the world's leaders to act. He explained that while individuals changing light bulbs and fitting insulation played a part, 'more important is changing the laws and policies'. But with sustained pressure, he says, there is cause to be hopeful that progress can be made at the Copenhagen summit. This is an extended version of the broadcast intervie


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00nk9hx)
Phill Jupitus is a comedian, broadcaster, writer and actor who has appeared on British television and radio and the stage for over 20 years. He has been a team captain on BBC's Never Mind the Buzzcocks since it began and has hosted radio shows on GLR and BBC 6Music. He now joins the cast of Hairspray, playing the role of Edna Turnblad. Hairspray is at London's Shaftesbury Theatre.

Professor Mary Beard is a Cambridge don, classicist, author, classics editor of the Times Literary Supplement and blogger on Times Online. Her book, It's a Don's Life, is published by Profile Books.

Emma Freud has worked for many years as a TV presenter and broadcaster. She has written a foreward to her late father's book, A Feast of Freud: A Collection of the Wittiest Writings of Clement Freud, which is published by Bantam Press.

Lawrence Dallaglio OBE is the former England, Lions and Wasps rugby player, who won 85 caps for England and three for the Lions. He played for Wasps for his entire club career and held the position of captain for 13 years until his retirement in 2008. He also captained his country and is regarded as one of the world's greatest ever back-row forwards. He was also a member of England's World Cup-winning side in 2003. His new book Rugby Tales: Legendary Stories of Blood, Sweat and Beers is published by Headline.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nnn9w)
The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham

Episode 3

Barbara Flynn reads from Selina Hastings' biography of Somerset Maugham, which sheds new light on his complex character.

In 1915, with the codename Somerville, Maugham is despatched to Geneva to work for British intelligence.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nj9p4)
Serena Williams interviewed; Working with your spouse

Tennis star Serena Williams on life on and off the court. Plus, what impact does working together have on a domestic relationship?


WED 11:00 M1: The Modernist Marvel (b00nk9hz)
Poet and musician John Hegley shares his reflections on Britain's first major motorway which opened in 1959, with a poetic meditation.

With his mandolin in tow, John slows down, turns off and seeks out the overlooked sights and sounds of the M1 - the 200-mile stretch of road that's the transport backbone of Britain.

John learns why there is no Junction 3, discovers how a scientific formula for loo breaks determined how far apart service stations should be built, and admires the road for the glimpse on the modern world it offers us.

Producer: Simon Jacobs

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


WED 11:30 Hut 33 (b01jz3p2)
Series 3

Spitfire Poker

The Bletchley Park code breakers try help raise money for the town's spitfire fund.

Stars Tom Goodman-Hill as Archie, Robert Bathurst as Professor Charles Gardner, Fergus Craig as Gordon, Alex MacQueen as 3rd Lt. Joshua Featherstonhaugh-Marshall, Olivia Colman as Minka and Lill Roughley as Mrs Best.

Written by James Cary.

Producer: Adam Bromley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00njb1r)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00njcb8)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00njcnx)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00nk9j3)
After the sacking of government drugs adviser Professor David Nutt, we look at whether the way the media covers drugs has a bigger impact on policy making than the science.

The BBC Trust has upheld a complaint about Mock the Week, finding that comedian Frankie Boyle's comments about swimmer Rebecca Adlington were 'humiliating'. We talk to Richard Tait of the BBC Trust and comedian Steve Punt about when comedy becomes offensive.

Almost half of the 22,000 people who complained to the BBC about its decision not to run a Disasters Ememrgency Committee appeal for Gaza actually contributed to it. Media historian Professor Jean Seaton explains why she is concerned about web-based protests.

Plus, the future of news according to American author, journalist and visionary Steven Johnson.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00njcpw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00nk9j5)
Ivan and the Dogs

Based on the extraordinary true story of a boy adopted by a pack of wild dogs on the streets of Moscow.

Of all the stories that came out of Russia during perestroika this is one of the strangest. Ivan Mishukov walked out of his drunken, arguing parents flat aged 4 and went to live on the streets of Moscow. There he was adopted by a pack of wild dogs and with them he spent two winters on the streets. When the play begins Ivan is now 11 and has never told anyone of his time with the dogs until one night his foster mother promises another dog if he will tell his story.

The story takes us though the backstreets of Moscow at a time when the idea of life itself was being devalued and where we meet glue-sniffing children who fight for their territory in underground sewers and drunks who will freeze to death in the winter. Amidst this human catastrophe Ivan learns that only his dogs can really be trusted and embarks on an extraordinary relationship of mutual need.

Credits:
Ivan: Tom Glenister
Cellist: Sarah Moody

Producer/Director: Paul Dodgson
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00nkb08)
Vincent Duggleby and guests answer listeners' questions on the subject of mortgages.

Guests:

Paula John, Your Mortgage
Ray Boulger, mortgage brokers John Charcoal
Louise Cuming, mortgage specialist, Cuming Associates Ltd.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nmt87)
Tales From the Low Countries

The Fortress at Bruges

Set in the not-so-distant future in 'what remains of Belgium'. Following the floods of global warming, most of the Low Countries are now under the sea, but the medieval city of Bruges has survived due to a feat of engineering called 'The Fortress'. The solidarity of two old friends - a Walloon historian and a Fleming engineer - is tested by the arrival on the scene of Jean's new girlfriend, Magdalena. Read by Stephen Campbell Moore
Produced by Emma Harding.


WED 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00njctb)
Exporting the Home

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Prof Vickery explores the kind of homes the British struggled to create in India, using the diaries and letters of colonial settlers.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00nkb0b)
White Collar Crime: Culture of Crime

1/3 In a series of special programmes in association with the Open University, Laurie Taylor explores the subject of white collar crime, from its late addition to the statute books to the increasing difficulty in securing a conviction. He speaks to the key academic experts in the field, explores the latest sociological research and hears from professionals on both sides of the law about the culture, the practice and most often the non-prosecution of white collar crime.

In this edition, Laurie considers the culture of the crime. What exactly is white collar crime, who commits it and why?


WED 16:30 All in the Mind (b00nk5t4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00njd4h)
4th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Margaret Thatcher is the least popular prime minister since polling began - she will stand down after the next election; SDLP leader John Hume throws down the gauntlet to the IRA; and, he may have a 'Vision of Britain', but Prince Charles is compared to Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 17:00 PM (b00njdb4)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00njfwm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Rudy's Rare Records (b00nkb2s)
Series 2

Ride With Me

Adam takes his mortality a little too seriously, and finds himself confronted with a little too much lycra.

Starring Lenny Henry, Larrington Walker and Joe Jacobs.

Sitcom by Danny Robins, set in the finest, feistiest, family-run record shop in Birmingham.

Adam ...... Lenny Henry
Rudy ...... Larrington Walker
Richie ...... Joe Jacobs
Tasha ...... Natasha Godfrey
Clifton ...... Jeffery Kissoon
DJ Karel ...... Andrew Brooke.

Producer: Lucy Armitage

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00njcpy)
Jennifer's pleased Pat can look after Jack on Friday while she takes Peggy into town. Pat hopes it will be a chance to read up on community shops. Jennifer's not sure Jack will be settled enough for that. She'll put a notice on the website about the community shop being discussed at the next parish council meeting, and offers to tell Susan about it. It will be a chance to make up for being short with her the other day.

Leon arrives at Helen's with pizzas and drinks, He needs to create a new cocktail and wants to try out his ideas on Helen and Annette. Annette really enjoys the evening. Helen knows Leon did all this for despondent Annette's benefit and thinks it's really sweet of him.

Lilian contacts Russell and tells him where they are - and that Matt says he's not coming back. Russell tells her it's pre-trial panic. If Matt's not in court on Thursday, they'll issue a warrant for his arrest and he then faces increased sanctions, or even exile. Does Lilian want to stay with him, or spend her time flying between here and there? Is that really what she wants to do with the rest of her life?

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00njg1q)
The actor Bob Hoskins looks back on his varied career of high-profile films including The Long Good Friday, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, Mona Lisa, Oliver Stone's Nixon and Dennis Potter's TV drama Pennies From Heaven. He also discusses his latest role as Mr Fezziwig in Robert Zemeckis's animated 'motion capture' adaptation of Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol.

Mark Lawson reports from Trafalgar Square, where Mayor of London Boris Johnson, the Central Band of the Royal Air Force and planes from the Queen's Colour Squadron gathered today to unveil Les Johnson's new statue for the Fourth Plinth, of Battle of Britain hero Air Chief Marshall Sir Keith Park.

In recent years the publishing industry has become increasingly aware of its duty to reduce carbon emissions, operate more sustainably and reduce its impact on the environment. Mark Lawson investigates the use of paper within the industry and considers its inventive uses in the past.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00njh8w)
Singleparentpals.com

Coming Clean

Sue Teddern's story of the developing friendship between two single parents who correspond via a parenting advice website.

The honesty game backfires on Tom. Is this the end of a short but beautiful friendship with Rosie?

Rosie ...... Maxine Peake
Tom ...... Kris Marshall
Spp.com/Tash ...... Laura Molyneux
Gill ...... Janice Acquah
Jo-C ...... Annabelle Dowler

Directed by David Hunter.


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00nkcfk)
When does a popular and spontaneous protest become mob rule? Fans of Twitter, the micro-blogging site, have chalked up a couple of notable victories of late. Followers helped to expose a legal injunction against The Guardian and Twitter-led protests generated tens of thousands of complaints against Jan Moir when she wrote a column using the death of Stephen Gately to criticise gay marriage. Is this net-based protest a valuable tool to demonstrate popular opinion or are we sacrificing traditional political engagement for the instant gratification direct action?

Witnesses:

Professor Andrew Chadwick of the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, and author of the book Internet Politics

Brendan O'Neill, journalist, writer and editor of Spiked Online

Nick Cohen, author and Observer journalist

Ben Locker, 'Twitterer'.


WED 20:45 The Cases That Changed Our World (b00nknyx)
Episode 1

Clive Coleman tells the stories of cases that shaped our lives but which are little known outside the legal world.

The dramatic 1670 trial of two Quakers which established the principle that judges cannot intimidate juries, no matter how furious the bench may be.


WED 21:00 A Voyage on Livingstone's Lake (b00grftd)
Adam Lusekelo tells the story of the MV Ilala, a boat built 60 years ago by Yarrow and Company in Glasgow as a passenger and cargo ship destined for Lake Nyasa, modern-day Lake Malawi. In a remarkable feat of engineering, it was shipped out in pieces via Mozambique and transported overland to be reconstructed on the shores of the inland lake, which has no navigable outlet to the sea. Today, it is still sailing the lake, providing a vital lifeline to remote communities in Malawi and Mozambique.

A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00nk9hx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00njhnf)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00njj3b)
Five British soldiers are shot dead by an Afghan policeman they had been training. A former foreign office minister, Kim Howells, says most British troops should leave Afghanistan.

An independent review of the system of Parliamentary expenses says MPs should no longer claim for mortgage payments on a second home or employ family members.

The house of the archaeologist Howard Carter, close to the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, is opened as a museum.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00njj60)
Heartland

Episode 8

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Rob is unsettled by the new crowd hanging out in his old drinking haunt.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 One (b00nkp1w)
Series 3

Episode 5

Sketch show written by David Quantick, in which no item features more than one voice.

With Graeme Garden, Dan Maier, Johnny Daukes, Deborah Norton, Katie Davies, Dan Antopolski, Andrew Crawford and David Quantick.


WED 23:15 Rik Mayall's Bedside Tales (b00nkp1y)
Red Coat

Settle down, brush your teeth, do whatever it is you do at this time of night. But most of all listen, because Rik would like to talk to you. One on one. Tonight he'd mostly like to tell you about Red Coat.

Performer ..... Rik Mayall
Writers ..... Rik Mayall & John Nicholson
Producer ..... Steven Canny

We open a small and peculiarly shaped window in to the mind of Rik Mayall. Written by Rik and John Nicholson, it's a woozy, strange and resonant series from one of the country's most loved comic performers. Rik wants to sit with you in your room - one on one. He wants to let you know things - important, secret things, things about your neighbours. About him. About you.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00njk8f)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



THURSDAY 05 NOVEMBER 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00nj8ds)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nnn9w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8jb)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nj8x0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8r1)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00nj90m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nj99n)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Roger Hutchings.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00nj99q)
Over 90 per cent of dairy cows in the UK are the Holstein breed. But with increasing milk demands from fewer animals, Farming Today finds out what the future is for what has been called the 'Holstein milk machine'.

And how much wildlife can you buy for 400 million pounds? Charlotte Smith hears the latest plans to encourage farmers to be environmentally friendly.


THU 06:00 Today (b00nj9f9)
Presented by Sarah Montague and John Humphrys.

The Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee is meeting to review the future of its quantitative easing policy, which has pumped 175 billion pounds into the economy. Economics editor Stephanie Flanders examines the impact of the policy.

Many MPs have refused to comply with Sir Christopher Kelly's report into MPs' expenses, despite the government giving its full backing to it. Parliamentary correspondent Mark D'Arcy reports on the mood in Westminster.

The United Nations has announced it will temporarily relocate more than half of its staff in Afghanistan. The decision follows last week's Taliban attack which killed five UN workers and three Afghans. UN spokesman in Kabul, Allen Sedique, comments on the measures.

Friends of the Earth (FOTE) have warned that plans to expand carbon markets could trigger a second 'sub-prime'-style financial collapse, and fail to protect the world from global warming catastrophe. CEO of the European Climate Exchange, Patrick Birley, and the author of the FOTE report, Sarah Jane Clifton, discuss the rise in the carbon trading market.

The NHS is failing to properly care for patients who are near the end of their lives, according to the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD), with poor communication compromising patient care. Sian van de Welle describes her family's experience with the NHS while her father was dying and Dr Ian Martin, author of the report Caring to the End? discusses the report's findings.

Russian president Dmitry Medvedev has made an unusually outspoken condemnation of attempts to rehabilitate the reputation of Joseph Stalin. In a message posted on his blog, President Medvedev called on people to remember the 'millions who died because of Stalin's terror'. Last year, in a nationwide television poll to name the greatest Russian ever, Joseph Stalin came third. Moscow correspondent Rupert Wingfield Hayes reports on how Russians view their former leader.

Thought for the Day with the writer Rhidian Brook.

Conservative leader David Cameron has announced his party will not allow any further powers to be passed to Brussels without referendum on Europe policy and will aim to return some powers in social and employment law, and criminal justice. Mr Cameron claimed the approach 'settled' Tory policy on Europe for the next parliament. Sir Stephen Wall, former Europe adviser to Tony Blair, and Conservative peer Lord Tebbit debate the Tories' European policy.

The killing of five British soldiers in Afghanistan by a police officer has raised questions over security progress in the country. The British army has been training Afghan security and police forces to enforce the rule of law for the long-term future of the country. Mark Grant-Jones, padre with 2 Rifles Battle Group, and Mark Christian, a padre serving with British soldiers in Helmand, comment on the implications of the killings on the British cause in Afghanistan, and Afghan journalist Nadene Ghouri discusses the Afghan reaction to the incident.

The story of writer Will Self's journey walking from Shepperton to Dubai is documented in a new collection of collaborations called Psycho Too, which Mr Self has worked on with artist Ralph Steadman. Sarah Montague went to meet the two men at Mr Steadman's studios in Kent.

Author and business journalist Andrew Ross Sorkin has published an insider's account of the Wall Street crash. Mr Sorkin discusses his insights into the crash.

German carworkers are furious at the decision by General Motors to cut 10,000 jobs across its European car unit Opel, instead of selling the firm. Correspondent Steve Rosenberg reports from an old Opel factory at Russelsheim near Frankfurt.

A report highlighting the cases of 71 individuals who have been subjected to various forms of detention without charge has been released by human rights campaign group Cageprisoners. The report, primarily based on testimonies taken directly from the detainees, says that the counter-terrorism tools used are counter-productive. Cerie Bullivant, who was placed on a control order, discusses his experiences of being detained.

The Isle of Man is to lose a quarter of its income, after warnings of job losses and cuts to public services. From 2011 there will be a reduction of 140 million pounds a year in the amount it receives from the British Treasury. North of England correspondent Judith Moritz reports from the Isle of Man on the reaction to the cut.

The diaries Anatoly Chernyaev, a former adviser to Mikhail Gorbachev, have been published for the first time. They entries reveal that, from the 1970s onwards, Gorbachev met senior members of the Labour Party, including and Michael Foot and Neil Kinnock, who went looking for favours from the Soviets. Pavel Stroilov, who has researched the Chernyaev diaries, and Robert Service, Professor of Soviet History at Oxford University, examine the historical implications of the d


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00nkqrv)
The Siege of Munster

Melvyn Bragg and guests Diarmaid MacCulloch, Lucy Wooding and Charlotte Methuen discuss the Siege of Munster in 1534-35.In the early 16th century, the Protestant Reformation revolutionised Christian belief. But one radical group of believers stood out. The Anabaptists rejected infant baptism and formal clergy, and believed that all goods should be held in common. They were also convinced that the Second Coming was imminent.In 1534, in the north-western German city of Munster, a group of Anabaptists attempted to establish the 'New Jerusalem', ready for the Last Days before the coming Apocalypse. But the city was besieged by its ousted Prince-Bishop, and under the reign of its self-appointed King, a 25-year-old Dutchman called Jan van Leyden, it descended into tyranny. Books were burned, dissenters were executed and women were forced to marry. As starvation spread, King Jan lived in luxury with his 16 wives. The horrors of Munster have resonated through the European memory ever since. Diarmaid MacCulloch is Professor of the History of the Church at the University of Oxford; Charlotte Methuen is University Research Lecturer in Ecclesiastical History at the University of Oxford and Lecturer in Church History and Liturgy at Ripon College Cuddesdon; Lucy Wooding is Lecturer in Early Modern History at King's College, London.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nnn9y)
The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham

Episode 4

Barbara Flynn reads from Selina Hastings' biography of Somerset Maugham, which sheds new light on his complex character.

With his marriage to Syrie imploding, Maugham escapes to the south of France with Gerald and buys the Villa Mauresque.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nj9p6)
Sophie Grigson on soup; Sue Townsend on Adrian Mole

Chef Sophie Grigson on experimental soup. Plus, writer Sue Townsend on a grown-up Adrian Mole; and who is really responsible for children's internet safety?


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00nkqrx)
Kate Adie presents global dispatches including one on what it means to be French.


THU 11:30 Reece Shearsmith's Haunted House (b00nkqrz)
Films, Fangs and Frightening Fellas

Comic actor Reece Shearsmith hosts energetic and witty illustrated discussions on horror, before an audience inside the reputedly haunted Sutton House in Hackney.

Reece examines classic scary moments from the movies and looks back at some of the great horror actors.

He is joined by horror enthusiasts Mark Gatiss, Vic Reeves, Yvette Fielding and Mike Roberts.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00njb1t)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00njcbb)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00njcnz)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Off the Page (b00nks89)
Leaving the Comfort Zone

Is leaving your comfort zone a form of masochism, or the only way to develop in life?

Dominic Arkwright is joined by comedian Rhona Cameron, mountaineer Andy Cave and journalist Agnes Poirier to write about and discuss comfort and pain.

Producer: Beatrice Fenton

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00njcpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 The Penny Dreadfuls (b00nks8c)
Guy Fawkes

What exactly is it that we’re asked to remember on the 5th of November? As the nation prepares for Bonfire Night; highly acclaimed comedy trio, The Penny Dreadfuls, take a fresh and timely look at a familiar story with a comedic, stirring and sometimes graphic exploration of the build-up to and aftermath of the Gunpowder Plot for The Afternoon Play.

Recorded in front of an audience at the Radio Theatre in London, there's plenty of laughs in places where you least expect them – from the boisterously optimistic meetings of the conspirators through to Fawkes' internment in the Tower of London.

Starring Kevin Eldon as Guy, The Penny Dreadfuls will also be joined on stage by Miles Jupp and Andrew Pugsley.

The Penny Dreadfuls are David Reed, Humphrey Ker and Thom Tuck.

The Penny Dreadfuls have previously written and performed two series of the Victorian themed Brothers Faversham for Radio 7 have just finished their fourth highly successful year at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Guy Fawkes ...... Kevin Eldon
Thomas Percy ...... Miles Jupp
John Wright ...... David Reed
Robert Catesby ...... Thom Tuck
Thomas Winter ...... Andrew Pugsley
Sir William Waad ...... Humphrey Ker.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00nhn1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00nhsn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nmt7y)
Tales From the Low Countries

In Landlocked Frontiers

Georges Hausemer is one of Luxembourg's most prolific writers, having published more than a dozen novels, short stories and poetry collections.

Read by Michael Pennington
Translated by Michael Hoffman
Produced by Emma Harding.


THU 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00njctd)
Dunroamin

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

The roots of the suburb lie very deep; but for snobs and bohemians, the adjective 'suburban' has always been the ultimate put-down. Prof Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved there.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Bookclub (b00nhv5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00nkv3p)
DNA is celebrated as the molecule that carries our genes from generation to generation. But a small group of pioneering chemists and physcists are using DNA to build the nano-engines of the future. Quentin Cooper hears about these miniature biological machines.

The Nazca civilisation is famous for the giant lines it inscribed into the high Peruvian desert; catastrophic deforestation is now blamed for its demise 1500 years ago.

ESA's SMOS satellite is intended to map soil moisture across the planet and the trajectories of the ocean currents. Quentin hears how it will improve weather forecasts.


THU 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00njd4k)
5th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Former Chancellor Nigel Lawson makes things even more difficult for Margaret Thatcher by spilling the beans on TV; the Sony Walkman celebrates its 10th birthday but the Noise Abatement Society doesn't; the greatest romantic pianist of his generation, Vladimir Horowitz, dies.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 17:00 PM (b00njdb6)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00njfwp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Bleak Expectations (b00nkv3r)
Series 3

A Now Grim Life Yet More Grimified

Pip Bin faces his most gruelling fate yet at the hands of his evil undead ex-guardian and an enormous quantity of cheese.

But can the spirits of Harvest Festival past, present and future show him a way to redemption?

Mark Evans's epic comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip Bin ...... Richard Johnson
Gently Benevolent ...... Anthony Head
Young Pip ...... Tom Allen
Harry Biscuit ...... James Bachman
Dr Wackwallop ...... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely Fecund ...... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ...... Susy Kane
Other parts ...... Mark Evans

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00njcq0)
Susan's ready to admit they can't save the shop as it is. Neil reckons the community shop could work with Susan in charge. Susan's not convinced but to protect herself as best she can, she needs to get onto the committee Peggy's talking about.

Vicky nervously announces the start of the fireworks. As the guy goes up in flames, Neil tells Mike that it's too late to save his shirt now. Vicky explains that she's taking Mike clothes shopping soon for a new image, though Mike doesn't seem too keen. Mike goes off to tell Brian that Ed still hasn't received his tenancy agreement from Borchester Land.

Matt's annoyed with Lilian for phoning Russell, and refuses to hear what he had to say. Lilian phones Jennifer, saying she just called for a chat. Jennifer soon picks up that all is not well but Lilian keeps up a front.

Matt tries hard to be conciliatory, while Lilian tries to keep calm and rational. Once he's served his sentence, he'll be free to live life as he wants, but in Costa Rica his sentence will never end. But Matt's adamant he's not going to jail, so he's never going back.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00njg1s)
Ben Elton's latest novel, Meltdown, charts the rise and fall of the career of a City trader as the global financial crisis hits. Elton discusses the comic novel and his habit of looking for the humorous side of situations.

The poet Tom Paulin reads from the latest batch of TS Eliot's letters to be published, dating from the 1920s and including his work on The Waste Land, while the conductor John Eliot Gardiner reviews Benjamin Britten's early diaries, charting the time he studied at The Royal Academy of Music under Vaughan Williams.

Today sees the launch of a National Theatre of Wales - a theatre without walls - that will not be located in any one building but will produce theatre in different venues right across Wales, including an old coal exchange, Swansea library, the beaches of North Wales and Brecon Military Range, where soldiers are trained in counter-insurgency techniques.

The American rock band REM have just released a live album with a difference. Live at The Olympia was recorded in Dublin in 2007, where the group showcased a number of songs as work in progress, many of which went on to make up their most recent album, Accelerate. Music critic John Harris joins Mark to review the new release and discuss the merits of live albums.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00njh8y)
Singleparentpals.com

The Other Man

Sue Teddern's story of the developing friendship between two single parents who correspond via a parenting advice website.

Rosie has a new boyfriend but still seeks Tom's advice.

Rosie ...... Maxine Peake
Tom ...... Kris Marshall
Spp.com/Tash ...... Laura Molyneux
Gill ...... Janice Acquah
Scott/Mark ...... Matt Addis

Directed by David Hunter.


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b00nk4wp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00nkv3t)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests to discuss private equity - the investors who have endured boom and bust like no other. He also finds out if English is the only real language of business.

Evan is joined by Keith Clarke, chief executive of Atkins, one of the world's largest civil engineering and design consultancies, Laura Tenison, founder and managing director of Jo-Jo Maman Bebe, a clothing company for babies, toddlers and expectant mothers, and Peter Taylor, managing partner of the private equity firm Duke Street.


THU 21:00 Leading Edge (b00nkwz1)
Meteorite Hunters and the Comedy of Change

The oldest rocks on Earth are aliens! They are the left-over building rubble from the formation of the solar system and can be dated to an incredible 4,568 million years old. A surprising number fall to Earth each year as meteorites.

November 5th is probably the worst night of the year for spotting incandescent rocks streaking through the sky, but tracking down a fresh meteorite, before it gets contaminated by terrestrial chemicals, is the ultimate prize for the hunters. A rare few carry complex carbon compounds - perhaps remnants of the material out of which the first life on Earth formed.

Geoff Watts hears from meteorite hunters who scour the deserts of Arizona and Australia and the ice of Canada and Antarctica to seek out extra-terrestrial rocks and meets those who analyse them, using traces of rare elements to track their history and reveal their origins.

Also in the programe, how evolution and the behaviour of birds inspired a new ballet. Cambridge Professor of Evolutionary Psychology - and tango enthusiast - Nicky Clayton and Rambert Dance Company artistic director Mark Baldwin describe the creation of the Comedy of Change.

Plus the winner of the Wellcome Trust Book Prize and the Science Museum's Centenary Icon.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00nkqrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00njhnh)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00njj3d)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

The Bank of England is to inject another 25 billion pounds into the economy.

Amid debate about the deployment of troops in Afghanistan, we hear an Afghan view.

Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, former East German apparatchiks speak out.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00njj62)
Heartland

Episode 9

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Rob hears some worrying news at school.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Pick Ups (b00nrrdc)
Series 2

All Bar Nun

Sitcom by Ian Kershaw, set around a Manchester taxi company.

Alan and Lind reveal hidden talents, while Dave seeks a nun's advice on infidelity.

Mike ...... Paul Loughran
Lind ...... Lesley Sharp
Dave ...... Phil Rowson
Alan ...... Parvez Qadir
Shelly ...... Naomi Radcliffe
Drunk ...... Mark E Smith
Tanya ...... Janie Connolly.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00njk8h)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



FRIDAY 06 NOVEMBER 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00nj8dv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nnn9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8jd)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nj8x2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nj8r3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00nj90p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nj99s)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Roger Hutchings.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00nj99v)
Farming Today hears about a new entrant to the British countryside - the alpaca - and why one breeder says there must be a policy put in place to protect and vaccinate them against TB infection.

Charlotte Smith continues to meet the superbreeds of animal who supply us with our favourite foods. Today, the common chicken.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00nj9fc)
Presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis.

Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) have published their results for the third quarter of the financial year. Chief economics correspondent Hugh Pym examines the results.

What is it like for the soldiers on the front line in Afghanistan? Major Richard Streatfeild has been keeping a diary for the Today programme as he leads his troops in the Sangin Valley, which has seen some of the heaviest fighting in the war. The latest instalment describes how his first patrol was hit by an roadside bomb.

The number of cyclists killed or seriously injured on the road in the UK rose by a fifth this spring, compared to the year before. Jo Stagg, from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, discusses what has led to the increase.

The US children's television programme Sesame Street is celebrating its 40th anniversary today. On this side of the Atlantic the puppets are best known as forerunners of The Muppet Show, but in the United States and more than 100 other countries around the world they are an even more important part of early childhood. Correspondent Kevin Connolly reports from the original New York Street set, where 4,000 episodes of the programme were produced.

A US army major has opened fire on fellow soldiers, killing 12 people and injuring 31, at the Fort Hood military base in Texas. The gunman has been identified as Major Nidal Malik Hasan, a military psychiatrist at the base. Correspondent Paul Adams discusses the incident.

A group of prominent scientists are presenting a statement of principles before the government. The statement calls for reassurances that the government will respect the academic freedom and independence of its scientific advisers. This follows the sacking last week of former government adviser Professor David Nutt, after his comments on the relative dangers of drug misuse. Lord Krebs, former vhairman of the UK Food Standards Agency and one of the scientists who signed the statement, discusses the proposals.

A new poll has found that 60 per cent of Australians want a head of state, up five per cent from a referendum 10 years ago which indicated 55 per cent wanted to keep the monarchy. The country's Republican prime minister Kevin Rudd has indicated he will not be making any changes to the state's system. Nick Bryant reports from the capital Canberra, on the anniversary of the referendum.

Thought for the Day with Rev Rosemary Lain-Priestley, Dean of Women's Ministry in central London.

Prime minister Gordon Brown is to make a speech laying out why Britain must remain committed to Afghanistan. The speech follows calls from former Labour foreign office minister Kim Howells MP that Britain should withdraw all troops and the deaths of six British soldiers this week, raising further questions on Britain's presence in the country. International development secretary Douglas Alexander discusses the government's Afghan policy.

A US army major has shot dead 12 of his fellow soldiers at the Fort Hood military base in Texas. Major Nidal Malik Hasan, a military psychiatrist at Fort Hood, was responsible for the attack in which another 31 people were injured. Correspondent Matthew Price reports from the base.

RBS has made a loss in the last quarter, despite the government pumping billions of pounds into the failing bank. Profitable parts of the bank will have to be sold off under news measures imposed by EU competition commissioner, Neelie Kroes. RBS chief executive Stephen Hester discusses the bank's future.

The prevalence of celebrity literature is causing concern among some writers. The screenwriter Lynda La Plante has recently argued that the bestseller lists are now so dominated by memoirs and novels 'written' by celebrities that genuine talent is being squeezed out. This follows the release of actress Martine McCutcheon's debut novel, The Mistress. Waterstone's spokesman Jon Howells and writer Tracy Chevalier discuss whether or not celebrity writers deserve more literary merit.

Today has been inviting MPs to discuss the Kelly Report, but has been struggling to find any who will accept the offer. So Today has allowed a publicly-elected figure to sound off anonymously, something the programme would never normally do. An anonymous MP discusses his view of the Kelly Report, and political editor Nick Robinson comments on the feeling in Westminster.

In the south of Thailand, one person is being killed every day in terrorist attacks. The south of the country has become a target for Islamic extremists, who have killed 3,800 people in the past five years. The government has deployed tens of thousands of troops to help deal with the attacks, and has now encouraged civilians to take the law into their own hands. Asia Correspondent Alastair Leithead reports from Thailand.

Exam boards could face fines for 'dumbing down' exams. Dr Richard Pike, chief executive of the Royal Society of Chemistry, which has called for the fines, discusses t


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00nht5f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nnnb0)
The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham

Episode 5

Barbara Flynn reads from Selina Hastings' biography of Somerset Maugham, which sheds new light on his complex character.

When Maugham's companion Gerald Haxton dies, Alan Searle becomes a major part of Maugham's life.

Abridged by Libby Spurrier.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nj9p8)
Infertility; UCAS forms; Polygamy in Indonesia

Why men find it so much harder than women to discuss issues of infertility. Plus, how involved should parents be in their children's choice and application for higher education?


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b00nkz1r)
Series 5

Play for Tomorrow

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Three sixth formers have the summer to get their band back on track after the bass player and best mate walks out on them.

Nick, Christian and Lawrence are all 17 and have lived most of their lives in Grimsby. The closest of friends, they had hoped to spend the summer gigging with their band, Socio Republic. But bassist Reece has just decided he no longer wants to be part of the group. The remaining trio are left shell-shocked by their friend's decision and the future of the band is cast into serious doubt.

Alan Dein presents an intimate story of friendship under pressure as the three 'in-betweeners' - not yet men, no longer boys - spend a long wet summer trying to fill Reece's shoes and get some gigs. Yet the weeks pass and the lads - heartbroken and mystified by Reece's departure - are still without a new bass player. But, as Lawrence says, 'good things have to end for better things to begin'. The relentless rain brings on severe boredom and the lads seem paralysed.

The three are aware that the clock is ticking. University beckons in a year - when, once again, their friendships will be put to the test.


FRI 11:30 The Richest Man in Britain (b00nlx7p)
The Interview

Sitcom by Nick Hornby and Giles Smith about an ageing rock star and his search for fulfilment.

Trillionnaire rocker Dave Mabbutt is persuaded to preview his 'drums-only' version of 1970s classic album, Temple of the Human Mind.

Dave Mabbutt ...... Mark Williams
Dom ...... Russell Tovey
Dave's Mum ...... Lynda Bellingham
Jane the Guardian journalist ...... Kerry Fox.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00njb1w)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00njcbd)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00njcp1)
National and international news with Edward Stourton.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00nlx8j)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00njcq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00nlxph)
The Tony Kay Scandal

By Michael McLean.

The true story of the case of footballer Tony Kay, who, in 1965, was convicted of match fixing, sent to prison and banned for life by the FA. The play follows the course of events leading up to Kay's trial, imprisonment and release, and features recently-recorded observations from Kay himself.

Tony Kay ...... Mikey North
Peter Swan ...... Carl Prekopp
'Bronco' Layne ...... Karl Davies
Solicitor ...... Andrew Branch
Harry Catterick ...... Tom Bevan
Jimmy Gauld ...... Ross Sutherland
Judge ...... Alan Leith
Prison Governor ...... Ian Masters

Directed by Martin Jenkins

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00nlxzr)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Chris Beardshaw, Anne Swithinbank and John Cushnie are guests of Linkinhorne Horticultural Society in Cornwall.

Chris meets the man collecting over 200 varieties of Cornish apples, cherries and pears, and Anne celebrates the office plant, revealing the Office Plant of the Year.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00njctg)
Alternative Homes

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

'Home means a place to go to when you are in trouble. A place sadly altered by war. A place to glorify when away and rely on always...' So reported one woman to the Mass Observation survey. Prof Vickery explores the enduring pull of a home of one's own.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00nlxzt)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00nlyvf)
Ang Lee, the director of Brokeback Mountain and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, reveals the personal reasons why he made a drama about the Woodstock festival and why he needed to make a comedy after filming six tragedies.

Matthew Sweet picks another plum from the long list of listeners' suggestions of British films they'd like to see on TV or DVD.


FRI 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00njd4m)
6th November 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

A backlash against East German refugees begins in West Germany; supporters of women's ordination hold an overnight vigil outside Lambeth Palace; and it's nuns versus vicars on the rugby field!

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00njdb8)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00njfwr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00nlyvh)
Series 69

Episode 7

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists are Jeremy Hardy, Danielle Ward, David Mitchell and Francis Wheen.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00njcq4)
Ed's received his agreement from Borchester Land. He's feeling apprehensive but Joe and Eddie are confident he'll make a go of it. Emma's told Ed that David and Ruth have put the teapot right to the back of the dresser. Eddie wonders why, after all the trouble he went to. Joe drops a big hint for Christmas. If anyone's looking for ideas, there's plenty he'd like from the catalogue that's in the kitchen.

Jennifer's been busy with Peggy, and ends up forgetting why she went to the village shop. When she remembers she should have told Susan about the parish council meeting, Brian reckons Susan will have heard about it by now. He still thinks the only option for Peggy is to convert the shop into a flat, so he's asked someone to do a costing. He wants to see what would be involved before he mentions it to Peggy.

Jolene asks after Lilian and Matt, and Jennifer tells her they're on holiday - on one of the Costas. Brian thinks that's an interesting way to put it. He knows Matt will have considered missing the trial, so if Lilian stands by him, she might have to make some very big decisions indeed.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00njg1v)
In a new film Cold Souls, which describes itself as a 'surreal comedy', Paul Giamatti plays a troubled actor called Paul Giamatti. He is suffering an existential crisis and to rid himself of his demons he visits a private lab where souls can be extracted and then traded as commodities. Critic Rachel Cooke gives her response to the offbeat concept.

American author Paul Auster, best known for his New York Trilogy, discusses his latest book, Invisible, which follows the fortunes of a young aspiring poet in New York.

Part of the Talking to Strangers exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery in London is the French artist and photographer Sophie Calle's direct response to a challenge set by Paul Auster, who is a friend of hers. Auster told Calle to take over a public space in New York, decorate it, give food and cigarettes to the homeless and smile for no reason. Also on show is Take Care of Yourself, where Sophie Calle records the responses of 107 women to an email in which she is dumped by her lover, and The Address book, a recreation of the life of a man whose address book she found in Paris.

Raymond Scott's music is better known than the man himself, for it was used in dozens of Warner Brothers cartoons. But in the last couple of years there has been a resurgence of interest in his life. A new recording of his compositions has just been released by the Scottish jazz group The Stu Brown Sextet, and Scott's son Stan Warnow has made a documentary about him. With the help of Stu Brown, Stan Warnow and some of Scott's own archive of recordings, Front Row learns that there was much more to Raymond Scott than just cheerful tunes for cartoons.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00njh90)
Singleparentpals.com

We Can't Go on Meeting Like This

Sue Teddern's story of the developing friendship between two single parents who correspond via a parenting advice website.

Tom has a conference in Manchester - is this a chance to meet Rosie in the flesh?

Rosie ...... Maxine Peake
Tom ...... Kris Marshall
Spp.com/Tash ...... Laura Molyneux
Gill ...... Janice Acquah
Jo-C ...... Annabelle Dowler
Bazz ...... Jonathan Tafler
Lily ...... Isadora Dooley Hunter

Directed by David Hunter.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00nlyvk)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Hartlepool. The panellists are Vince Cable, treasury spokesman and deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats, former Europe minister Caroline Flint, shadow culture secretary Jeremy Hunt, and author and documentary maker Carol Gould.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00nlyvm)
High Road to Xanadu

Clive James reflects on the seductive allure of illegal narcotics, and lays the blame for their attractions at the door of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his trip to Xanadu.


FRI 21:00 A History of Private Life: Omnibus (b00nlz4c)
Episode 6

Omnibus edition of Prof Amanda Vickery's series revealing the hidden history of home over 400 years, drawing on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

The readers are Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

The singers are Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00njhnk)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00njj3g)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

As Gordon Brown defends British involvement in Afghanistan, we consider political strategies for the country.

Fort Hood holds a day of mourning for the 13 people murdered there.

Examining the impact of television on Germany in 1989.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00njj64)
Heartland

Episode 10

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

It is finally polling day in the local elections.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00nk4wr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00njk8k)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00njgds)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00njh98)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00njh8w)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00njh8y)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00njh90)

1989: A German Story 11:00 TUE (b00nk2c6)

1989: Day by Day Omnibus 23:00 SUN (b00nj7w7)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 SAT (b00nhnxp)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 SUN (b00nhw28)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 MON (b00njd4p)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 TUE (b00njd4f)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 WED (b00njd4h)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 THU (b00njd4k)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 FRI (b00njd4m)

1989: How The Wall Fell 17:00 SUN (b00nfn2j)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00nk4wr)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00nk4wr)

A History of Private Life: Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b00nlz4c)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00nh1cp)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00nlyvm)

A Voyage on Livingstone's Lake 21:00 WED (b00grftd)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b008v8zk)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b0090mt7)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00nk4lm)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00nmt87)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00nmt7y)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b00nk5t4)

All in the Mind 16:30 WED (b00nk5t4)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 MON (b00njctx)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 TUE (b00njct8)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 WED (b00njctb)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 THU (b00njctd)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 FRI (b00njctg)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00nj7w1)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00nf0my)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00nk0gc)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00nhn2f)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00nh1cm)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00nlyvk)

Aping Evolution 21:00 MON (b00nk0wl)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00nhny6)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00nhny6)

Art Attack 11:30 TUE (b00nk2xr)

As Told To Craig Brown 23:00 TUE (b00b71ds)

Baroque and Roll: Townshend on Purcell 15:30 SAT (b00nf3kr)

Beauty of Britain 11:30 MON (b00njwd9)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00nhqdc)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00nhqdc)

Bleak Expectations 18:30 THU (b00nkv3r)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00njj5w)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00njj5y)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00njj60)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00njj62)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00njj64)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00nhs7s)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00nj9jc)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00nj9jc)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00nnn9t)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00nnn9t)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00nnn9w)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00nnn9w)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00nnn9y)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00nnn9y)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00nnnb0)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b00nhv5s)

Bookclub 16:00 THU (b00nhv5s)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00ndxjr)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00njxlv)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00nht59)

Brother Mine 14:45 SUN (b00cm7h2)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00ncwzv)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00nhv35)

Click On 16:30 MON (b00njxwm)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00nht5f)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00nht5f)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00cqdz9)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00chp3n)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00nk9j5)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00nlxph)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00nhn1z)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00nhn1q)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00nj9b3)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00nj99g)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00nj99l)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00nj99q)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00nj99v)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00nh06r)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00nlx8j)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00nk55r)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00nhn25)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00nkqrx)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00njgdq)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00njg1n)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00njg1q)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00njg1s)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00njg1v)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00nh06t)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00nlxzr)

High Flight 16:30 SUN (b00nhw26)

Hut 33 11:30 WED (b01jz3p2)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00nkqrv)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00nkqrv)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00nk55t)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00nh0qv)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00nlxzt)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b00nk4wp)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b00nk4wp)

Leading Edge 21:00 THU (b00nkwz1)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b00nkz1r)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00nhny0)

M1: The Modernist Marvel 11:00 WED (b00nk9hz)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00nk4k4)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00nkv3p)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00nh5vp)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00nhpyp)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00nj8j4)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00nj8dm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00nj8dq)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00nj8ds)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00nj8dv)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00nk9hx)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00nk9hx)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00nkb08)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00nhn27)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00nhn27)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00nfqzl)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00nkcfk)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00nh6fk)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00nhqd9)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00nj99b)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00nj90h)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00nj90k)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00nj90m)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00nj90p)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00nhqdf)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00nh6cp)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00nhqdp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00nht55)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00nhpgc)

News 13:00 SAT (b00nhn2c)

Night Witches 20:00 MON (b00nk0g9)

Now Wash Your Hands 10:30 SAT (b00nhn21)

Off the Page 13:30 THU (b00nks89)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00nhqdk)

One 23:00 WED (b00nkp1w)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00nhn1n)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00nhn1n)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00nhnxr)

PM 17:00 MON (b00njdbb)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00njdb2)

PM 17:00 WED (b00njdb4)

PM 17:00 THU (b00njdb6)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00njdb8)

Parting Shots 09:30 TUE (b00nk2c4)

Pick Ups 23:00 THU (b00nrrdc)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00nj7vx)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00ncyzd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00nh68n)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00njkl2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00nj99d)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00nj99j)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00nj99n)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00nj99s)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00nhny2)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00nhny2)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00nhny2)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00nhsn6)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00nhsn6)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00nhsn6)

Reece Shearsmith's Haunted House 11:30 THU (b00nkqrz)

Repossessions in the Sun 11:00 MON (b00njwd7)

Rik Mayall's Bedside Tales 23:15 WED (b00nkp1y)

Rudy's Rare Records 18:30 WED (b00nkb2s)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b0090f6x)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00nhn1x)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00nhny4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00nh68j)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00nhqd5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00nj90f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00nj8wr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00nj8wy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00nj8x0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00nj8x2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00nh5vr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00nh68l)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00nhnxt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00nhqd3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00nhqd7)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00nhw2b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00nj8qv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00nj8wp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00nj8j6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00nj8qx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00nj8j8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00nj8qz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00nj8jb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00nj8r1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00nj8jd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00nj8r3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00nhnxy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00nj7vv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00njg1l)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00njfwk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00njfwm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00njfwp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00njfwr)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00nhqdh)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00nhqdh)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00njkl6)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00njkl6)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00nht57)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00nhsn4)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00nht5c)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00nj7vz)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00nj7vz)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00njcq8)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00njcq8)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00njcpw)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00njcpw)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00njcpy)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00njcpy)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00njcq0)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00njcq0)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00njcq4)

The Bell Boys 13:30 TUE (b00nk2xt)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00ngzcf)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00nkv3t)

The Cases That Changed Our World 20:45 WED (b00nknyx)

The Choice 09:00 TUE (b00nk2c2)

The Choice 21:30 TUE (b00nk2c2)

The Deighton File 13:30 SUN (b00kjh8g)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00nlyvf)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00nhtk2)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00nhtk2)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00nk9j3)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00nh0qz)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00nlyvh)

The Penny Dreadfuls 14:15 THU (b00nks8c)

The Richest Man in Britain 11:30 FRI (b00nlx7p)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b00nf01t)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b00nk0g7)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00nhn23)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00nhtk6)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00njj5t)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00njj38)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00njj3b)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00njj3d)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00njj3g)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00nfqzg)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00nkb0b)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00njkhg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00njk8c)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00njk8f)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00njk8h)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00njk8k)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00nhn1v)

Today 06:00 MON (b00nj9fr)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00nj9f5)

Today 06:00 WED (b00nj9f7)

Today 06:00 THU (b00nj9f9)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00nj9fc)

Too Much Information 18:30 TUE (b00nk4wt)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00nhn1l)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00nhn1s)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00nhn29)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00nhnxw)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00nhqdm)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00nhsn8)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00nhtk4)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00nj7vs)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00nj7w3)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00njkl4)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00njcns)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00njhwg)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00njcb6)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00njhnc)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00njcb8)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00njhnf)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00njcbb)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00njhnh)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00njcbd)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00njhnk)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00nj7w5)

With Great Pleasure 23:00 MON (b008wr7x)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00nhn6z)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00nj9pl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00nj9p2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00nj9p4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00nj9p6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00nj9p8)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00njcpt)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00njcnv)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00njcnx)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00njcnz)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00njcp1)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00njbfv)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00njb1p)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00njb1r)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00njb1t)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00njb1w)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00nh6cm)