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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 OCTOBER 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00n9ly8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nctk9)
The Blaze Of Obscurity

Episode 5

Clive James reads from his fifth volume of memoirs, charting the TV years that shot him into the public eye.

Clive makes a programme out of his attempts to learn to drive, tutored by Stirling Moss, and makes a postcard in Rome where he only just escapes the advances of Leonard Bernstein.

Abridged by Polly Coles.

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00n9lyb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00n9lyd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00n9lyg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00n9lyj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00n9lyl)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev John Cairns.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00n9lyn)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00n9lyq)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00nccrf)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00nccrh)
Series 13

Northumberland - St Oswald's Way: Hadrian's Wall

Clare Balding walks the length of St Oswald's Way in Northumberland.

Clare walks the final part of the route in the company of the men who were responsible for designing and looking after the path, Gary Cambell and Martin Paminter. They explain how the route was launched three years ago and their plans for its future. Clare is also, once again, joined by walking expert Jenny Walters, who wants to discover if the advice she gave Clare 90 miles ago has helped her remain fit and healthy throughout her journey.

St Oswald's Way is a 97-mile route, running from Holy Island in the north, along the stunning Northumberland coast before heading inland to Heavensfield and Hadrian's Wall. The path links some of the places associated with St Oswald, the King of Northumbria in the early-seventh century, who played a major part in bringing Christianity to his people.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00nccsv)
Farming Today This Week

Charlotte Smith finds out how food and farming is helping many local pubs stay in business. Fifty two pubs are closing every week - and 20 per cent of those are in the countryside, where the effect of a pub closure is often felt more keenly. But many have been diversifying so they don't become part of the trend - including some which have started up their own farms.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00ncd4k)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00ncdcv)
Presented by Justin Webb and John Humphrys.

Postal workers have returned to work and are clearing the mountain of undelivered mail, after this week's two-day postal strike. Business correspondent Joe Lynam comments on the effects the strike has had on Royal Mail's reputation and the likelihood of more strikes next week.

Talks between Iran and western powers on Iran's nuclear programme have ended without a deal. Tehran correspondent Jon Leyne examines how negotiations can develop further.

The European Commission has said it wants to harmonise the laws on consumer protection across all 27 member states. Members of the House of Lords, who have been studying the plans, are concerned they will mean the UK will lose much of its consumer protection. Parliamentary correspondent Mark D'Arcy reports on the Lords debate about the new laws.

Too many employers automatically reject women who have been to prison, according to the charity Working Chance. Reporter Angus Stickler spent the day with one woman the charity helped and Jocelyn Hillman, chief executive of Working Chance examines the affect of being refused employment.

Violence continued in Pakistan yesterday. Among the casualties were 15 wedding guests, most of them children, after their vehicle hit an explosive device. Shahid Saidullah, editor of the UK section of Pakistani newspaper the Daily Jang, examines the effect the attacks are having on the country, and where the conflict is heading.

The UK is still in recession, according to new figures released yesterday. Yesterday's GDP figures show that the country is now in the longest recession since records began. Reporter Sanchia Berg went to Swindon to talk to Alison Hindmarsh, who lost her job a few months ago, to see whether her situation has managed to improve.

Thought for the Day with Brian Draper, associate lecturer at the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity.

Birmingham has more Michelin-starred restaurants than any other town or city outside London. Three were awarded this year, to chefs born and raised in the city. Correspondent Claire Marshall reports on Birmingham's culinary success.

The new head of the elite Russell Group of universities is calling for the vast bulk of government research funding to be concentrated among the top universities. Professor Michael Arthur says the funding which is currently spread across 150 universities should instead be concentrated among the top 30 universities. Professor Arthur and Professor David Maguire, vice chancellor for corporate development at Birmingham City University, discuss whether too many institutions carry out research.

A key deal between Iran and western powers on its nuclear programme has overrun its deadline. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) draft agreement is aimed at reducing international concern over Tehran's nuclear programme. The IAEA had suggested exporting most of Iran's enriched uranium to Russia and France for further refining, a proposal Iran says it will respond to next week. Kasra Naji, special correspondent for BBC Persian TV, analyses whether a deal will be reached.

Around 600 Church of England priests are meeting to decide how to respond to the Pope's unprecedented invitation to them to join their own special section of the Roman Catholic Church. The priests are from Forward in Faith, a group representing Catholic-minded Anglicans who are unhappy about the way women bishops are being introduced into the Church of England. They want to unite Catholics and Protestants in the same church. Religious affairs correspondent Robert Pigott reports on the competing views of the different factions, and Rev Rod Thomas of Evangelical group Reform discusses if Anglicans should join the Catholic Church.

The ancient craft of maintaining hedges is being celebrated today at the National Hedgelaying Championships in Herefordshire. More than 130 competitors will be participating. Nigel Adams, deputy chairman of the National Hedgelaying Society, discusses the historical importance of hedging.

The government has taken a number of measures to try and curtail the recession. Billions of pounds have been pumped into the economy, interest rates have been kept at an historical low and VAT has been cut. But what is the effect of these moves on the recession? Today spoke to some businessman about how the government's policies have affected their companies, and shadow chancellor George Osborne discusses the Conservative Party's economic policies.

Lord Carey, former Archbishop of Canterbury, has criticised the Pope's announcement to welcome to the Catholic Church those from the Anglo-Catholic wing of the Church of England. Lord Carey discusses his views.

A new film, Life of a Child, has captured the difficult treatment of diabetes in children in the developing world. The constant blood checks and insulin injections can make it difficult for children to survive and prosper. Oscar nominee Ed Lachman, who made the film,


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00ncdcx)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them.

Fi Glover is joined by broadcaster and writer Dame Joan Bakewell.

With poetry from Matt Harvey.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00ncdcz)
John McCarthy talks to wilderness expert Ray Mears about travelling across northern Canada and to wildlife photographer Ben Hall about his trip to South America following, partially, in the footsteps of Darwin's Beagle expedition.


SAT 10:30 The Grand Masquerade (b00ljymy)
Thirty years after the publication of Kit Williams' groundbreaking picture puzzle book Masquerade in 1979, John O'Farrell reflects on the mayhem that followed as millions of readers became caught up in the search for a jewel-encrusted hare, buried somewhere in the British countryside.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00ncf8f)
Peter Riddell of The Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

It was clear this week that the saga of MPs' expenses is not yet in its concluding stages. There is disquiet amongst Commons members over Sir Thomas Legg’s audit of expenses and the Kelly report is awaited with some trepidation.

David Curry, the new chairman of the Select Committee on Standards and Privileges, and Frank Field discuss the mood of despondency in the House of Commons.

Earlier in the week the Speaker's Conference saw the three party leaders taking questions from the conference committee looking into ways of attracting a broader range of people into politics. Committee members Andrew George (Liberal Democrat), Julie Kirkbride (Conservative) and Parmjit Dhanda (Labour) assess the results.

Also in the programme:

Why has the postal dispute become so political? John Robertson, a former member of the CWU union, and Philip Dunne, chair of the all-party group on the Post Office, on how it should be resolved.

What are the dividing lines between Labour and Conservative on the role of the state? Former cabinet minister James Purnell in conversation with Shadow University and Skills secretary David Willetts.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00ncf8h)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00ncf8k)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.

Halifax Bank of Scotland offers its customers 'a little extra charge'.

How much do you want to reveal to your mortgage advisor? Get ready to get personal.

Does HMRC owe you money? One Money Box listener reclaims over 2,000 pounds.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00n9llz)
Series 69

Episode 5

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panel includes Jeremy Hardy, Rory Bremner and Francis Wheen.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00ncf8m)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00ncf8p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00n9lm1)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Burgess Hill in West Sussex. The panellists are former home secretary Jacqui Smith, Conservative MP Nadine Dorries, general secretary of the Communication Workers Union Billy Hayes and the director of the counter-extremist think-tank Quilliam Foundation, Maajid Nawaz.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00ncf8r)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00ncf8t)
Robert L Pike - Bullitt

Dramatisation of Robert L Pike's gritty detective story, set in New York's rough 52nd Precinct in 1963.

Lieutenant Clancy, head throbbing from days without sleep, is assigned to protect important Mafia witness Johnny Rossi. But when he is found dead, Clancy has only a matter of hours to find the killer before his enemy, Assistant District Attorney Chalmers, finds out.

Lieutenant Clancy ...... Jason Isaacs
Ada Chalmers/Barnett/Renick/Johnny Rossi ...... Kerry Shale
Detective Kaprowski ...... Lou Hirsch
Captain Wise/Johnny Rossi/Ships Officer ...... John Biggins
Dr Willard/Pete Rossi ...... Stephen Hogan
Doc Freeman/Sergeant ...... Bruce Alexander
Detenctive Mark Kelly ...... Sasha Pick
Ann Renick/LAPD Officer ...... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Hotel Manager/Chalmers' Secretary ...... Kate Layden

Directed by Pauline Harris.


SAT 15:30 The Sound of Magnolias (b00n5404)
Writer Irma Kurtz travels to Paris and Madrid to investigate the period just before the war when blind Spanish composer Rodrigo composed his famous Concerto de Aranjuez. She goes to the gardens of Aranjuez with his only daughter, Cecelia, and talks to guitarist Pepe Romero about the music's lasting impact.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00ncfm8)
Weekend Woman's Hour

With Jane Garvey.

'A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.' Virginia Woolf published these words 80 years ago, in an essay that became one of the seminal feminist texts of our age. A Room of One's Own has shaped the way in which creative achievement is viewed, and provided a point of reference for generations of female writers. Woman's Hour visits a room that Virginia Woolf called her own - a specially-constructed writing lodge at the bottom of her garden at Monk's House in Sussex.

Melanie C won universal recognition as Sporty Spice, one fifth of the Spice Girls, the group that burst on to the music scene in the mid-nineties with 'Girl Power'. They had nine number one singles and sold over 50 million records. Melanie has gone on to have a successful solo career, and she became a mother for the first time earlier this year. She talks about her theatrical debut in Willy Russell's hit West End musical Blood Brothers

And, Sexism in the City: how are maternity rights impacting on women's success at work?


SAT 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00ncfmb)
24th October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Egon Krenz is officially installed as East Germany's new leader but protests continue; in America, Zsa Zsa Gabor and disgraced TV evangelist Jim Bakker both appear in court.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00ncfmd)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00n911b)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests to discuss technology. From electric cars to satellites to jet engines, can it really solve the world's problems? He also asks how long is too long to work for the same company?

Evan is joined by Nani Beccalli-Falco, president of General Electric International, Candace Johnson, serial entrepreneur who co-founded the satellite company SES Global, and John Fleming, chief executive of Ford of Europe.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00ncfmg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00ncfmj)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ncfml)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00ncfmn)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

He is joined by the comedian Jack Dee and actors Simon Callow and Tamer Hassan.

Jo Bunting finds out about Stuff White People Like with Christian Lander.

With comedy from Liverpool's John Bishop and country soulsters Phantom Limb and Swedish twin sisters Taxi Taxi!


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00ncfmq)
Armando Iannucci

Mary Ann Sieghart profiles Armando Iannucci, the comedian and writer behind satirical comedies including On The Hour, I'm Alan Partridge and The Thick of It.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00ncfmz)
Wes Anderson's film of Fantastic Mr Fox, Legend of a Suicide by David Vann, and Andrew Marr’s The Making of Modern Britain

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by writer David Aaronovitch, historian Kathryn Hughes and literary critic John Carey to discuss the cultural highlights of the week - featuring wild animals, wild sculptors and wild living.

Director Gregory Doran has pestered Richard Wilson to play the role of Malvolio for 20 years. Finally persuaded, Wilson duly dons the cross-gartered yellow stockings for the RSC production of Twelfth Night at the Courtyard Theatre in Stratford. Illyria, in which Shakespeare sets the play, roughly corresponds to present-day Albania, and Doran locates the action there during the Romantic period, when adventurers such as Lord Byron made that corner of the Ottoman empire a fashionable destination.

Wes Anderson's film adaptation of Roald Dahl's book Fantastic Mr Fox sets itself apart from recent animated blockbusters by using stop-motion animation rather than CGI. It does, however, stick with the trend of employing a star-studded voice cast which includes George Clooney, Merryl Streep, Bill Murray and Willem Defoe. In a world somewhere between Tennessee and the home counties, Mr Fox and his animal pals lock horns in an existential struggle with vengeful farmers Boggis, Bunce and Bean.

Legend of a Suicide is David Vann's first novel. At least, that's how it's being presented in the UK. In the US it was marketed as a collection of five short stories and a novella. It's a small distinction, but it subtly alters the way in which the reader approaches the book. It is also significant to know that Vann grew up in Alaska and that his father committed suicide, because these are attributes shared by the book's protagonist, Roy. No matter that it is heavily autobiographical, Legend of a Suicide is a powerful work of fiction with a collossal twist in the middle.

'A well-made young wolf or some soft-moving, bright-eyed wild thing.' This is how Ezra Pound described the sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska when he met him in 1913, and it provides the title for the Royal Academy's exhibition, Wild Thing: Epstein, Gaudier-Brzeska, Gill. Between 1905 and 1915 these three artists produced work which shocked Edwardian Britain into modernity. Included in the exhibition are key works such as Gill's Ecstasy, Gaudier-Brzeska's Birds Erect, and Epstein's Rock Drill.

Andrew Marr's History of Modern Britain was a BAFTA-winning series which explored the period from the end of the Second World War to the present day. Now, in The Making of Modern Britain, he turns his attention to the events which radically reshaped British society in the years between 1901 and 1945 - little more than four decades that separated the end of the Victorian era and the dawning of the atomic age. The series uses archive footage and Marr's mixture of pithy anecdote and analysis to tell a powerful national saga.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00d1yqx)
With God on Our Side

Amid the horrors of war, what makes one man turn to God and another to atheism? Former Bishop of Edinburgh Richard Holloway explores what happens to faith when one's life is on the line.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00n6yws)
Howards End

Episode 1

Two-part dramatisation of EM Forster's classic novel.

When Helen Schlegel goes to stay at Howards End, the country home of the Wilcox family, her own life, along with that of her sister Margaret, is changed forever.

Narrator ...... John Hurt
Margaret Schlegel ...... Lisa Dillon
Helen Schlegel ...... Jill Cardo
Tibby Schlegel ...... Tom Ferguson
Aunt Juley ...... Alexandra Mathie
Henry Wilcox ...... Malcolm Raeburn
Ruth Wilcox ...... Ann Rye
Charles Wilcox ...... Joseph Kloska
Leonard Bast ...... Joseph Prospero
Dolly Wilcox/Jacky Bast ...... Christine Marshall.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00ncfn3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00n8nkc)
Michael Buerk and the team travel to Derby University for an edition of the programme recorded on campus. He is joined by panel members Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Clifford Longley and Matthew Taylor.

Higher education is more popular than ever; universities are crammed to the rafters as they struggle to achieve the aim of 50 per cent of young people getting a university education. The increased popularity of vocational degrees has changed the culture of academia. But students now have to balance the increasing cost of getting a degree with uncertain job prospects when they graduate. So there's no better time to ask the question, 'what are universities for and who are they for?'

Witnesses:

Professor Dennis Hayes
Professor of Education, University of Derby. Founder of the campaign group Academics for Academic Freedom (AFAF)

Professor John Coyne
Vice Chancellor, University of Derby and chairman of skills and enterprise Think Tank CFE, which is an independent specialist in skills employment and economic development.

Greg James
University of Nottingham medical student, anti-tuition fees campaigner.

Andrew Long
Young entrepreneur and CEO of Ten, named one of the top 100 fastest-growing companies in the UK by the Sunday Times.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00n7zhg)
Russell Davies chairs the second heat of the perennial general knowledge contest.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00n6z0g)
A second programme celebrating the 30th birthday of Poetry Please in the show's home town of Bristol. Roger McGough is joined at Bristol Old Vic by special guest readers, including Stephanie Cole and Patrick Malahide, for some of the best-loved poems in its history.



SUNDAY 25 OCTOBER 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00ncgyf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b008v8zj)
Dilemmas of Modern Martyrs

The Big the Beautiful Nanda Gray

Stories by Morven Crumlish.

Nanda Gray is a singer; a big lady with a big personality. But the dressing room can be a lonesome place. Waiting offstage, she reflects on her life and loves before stepping into the limelight for her 'twentieth anniversary' performance.

Read by Lorelei King.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00ncwn1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00ncwn3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00ncwn5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00ncwn7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00ncwn9)
The sound of bells from the church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Wambrook in Somerset.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00ncfmq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00ncwnc)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00ncwng)
The Consolations of Autumn

Writer and broadcaster Hazhir Teimourian asks if youth, as with spring and summer, is not overrated.

In the company of sages and poets from the most ancient times to our own era, he draws parallels between the physical 'age of mists and mellow fruitfulness' and the contentment and serenity that can be the gift of old age in these days of greater affluence and better medicine.

From Cicero in Rome 2,000 years ago, through Omar Khayyam in medieval Persia and Shakespeare in modern England, he reflects on both reminiscences of youth and the praise of 'the autumn of life'.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00ncwnj)
Alex James and Chris Haskins visit Bluebell Dairy near Derby to meet the Brown family, one of the nominees for the 2009 BBC Farmer of the Year award. Rosemary and Geoff Brown are tenant farmers with a herd of about 80 milking cows. The poor price for milk saw them diversify into ice cream at the end of 2008, since when their business has thrived.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00ncwnm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00ncwnp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00ncwnr)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ncwnt)
Asylum Aid

Baroness Neuberger appeals on behalf of Asylum Aid.

Donations to Asylum Aid should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal; please mark the back of your envelope Asylum Aid. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Asylum Aid with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity No: 328729.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00ncwnw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00ncwny)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00ncwp0)
A Word in Season

A service for Bible Sunday from St Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, London.

Led by the Vicar, Rev Nicholas Holtam, with the Choir of St Martin-in-the-Fields, directed by Andrew Earis.

The preacher is Rev Prof Richard Burridge, Dean of King's College, London.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00n9lm3)
Clive James: The Golf Ball Potato Crisp

Clive James reflects on the importance of scepticism in every walk of life, and he criticises extreme reactions to those who are sceptical about man-made global warming.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00ncwp2)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week, with Paddy O'Connell.

The programme hears from the real balloon boy, who, at the age of 11, found himself 3,000 feet up, hanging by his fingers under a hot air balloon. Paddy looks around the conciliation service ACAS, a destination of choice for so many. From Camp Bastion, Broadcasting House finds out more about a new radio station that's about to launch; Good Morning Afghanistan is a new service from the armed forces broadcaster, BFBS.

Guests Midge Ure, Philip Norman and Nicky Hambleton-Jones review the Sunday papers.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00ncwp4)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00ncwp6)
Professor Colin Pillinger

Kirsty Young's castaway is the scientist Professor Colin Pillinger. A world-class planetary scientist, his first job was for NASA, analysing the lunar samples brought back by Apollo 11. He is best known, though, for being the public face of Beagle 2, the daring mission to search for life on Mars. Although Beagle 2 was unsuccessful, he is adamant that the mission was not a failure. Now it is hoped that the technology developed for the mission to Mars can be used to diagnose TB faster than has ever been possible before.

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: As Time Goes By by Johnnie Ray
Book: Journey into Space by Charles Chilton
Luxury: A picture of the Clifton Suspension Bridge.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b00n80b1)
Series 4

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Arthur Smith, Phill Jupitus, Tony Hawks and Graeme Garden.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00ncwwm)
Omega 3

According to scientists, we need to dramatically increase our intake of omega 3 fatty acids and reduce our intake of omega 6 fatty acids to achieve a healthy balance. It is a controversial debate with all sorts of vested interests at stake.

As manufacturers add omega 3 to a whole host of products, consumers can be left confused in the face of claim and counter claim. What can they believe? What is in the products we buy anyway, and how much does it matter?

Sheila Dillon explores the issues.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00ncwwp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00ncwwr)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 Beyond This Life (b00ncwwt)
Episode 2

Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne's College, Oxford, confronts our response to death in 21st-century Britain. He reflects on how we deal with death as a society and considers the relationship between those who have gone and those who are left behind. Most people can remember their first funeral; everyone can remember the first time they saw someone who had died. But how we respond to death and our own mortality varies greatly in multicultural Britain?

Tim finds that having a keepsake of your loved one goes far beyond a lock of hair. He attends the National Funeral Exhibition and encounters an industry where physical immortality is now marketed as a desirable commodity to those who have lost their belief in life after death but who are terrified of oblivion. Human ashes are made into paperweights and an umbilical cord is made into a diamond.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00n9llp)
Peter Gibbs chairs the popular horticultural forum.

John Cushnie, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Biggs are guests of the Aileymill Primary Group in Greenock.

Matthew Wilson discusses how to achieve multi-coloured autumn brilliance in your garden.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Brother Mine (b00cm7gy)
Birth Order

The relationship with a brother or sister is probably the longest relationship in our lives.

Famous sibling Julian Lloyd Webber takes a closer look at what it is to be a sibling, and why that relationship can be a lifelong source of love, hate, conflict and peace.

Julian begins with a look at birth order, and finds out if the sequence in which we're born really can influence who and what we are.

Featuring contributions from Arthur Smith, Tanni Grey Thompson, Tim Henman, Dan Snow, Noel Janice Norton (founder of The New Learning Centre), Tessa Jackson (Director of Artes Mundi), anthropologist Professor Tom Weisner, psychologist Dorothy Rowe, Sociologist Dr Miri Song, psychoanalyst Victoria Childs and anthropologist David Lawson.

Producer: Terry Lewis
A Tinderbox production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00ncwzv)
Howards End

Episode 2

Dramatisation of EM Forster's classic novel.

Helen Schlegel is unhappy that her sister Margaret has agreed to marry the recently-widowed Henry Wilcox. Unbeknown to the sisters, Ruth Wilcox bequeathed the Wilcox country home, Howards End, to Margaret, but the note has been destroyed by Henry's son, Charles.

Narrator ...... John Hurt
Margaret Schlegel ...... Lisa Dillon
Helen Schlegel ...... Jill Cardo
Tibby Schlegel ...... Tom Ferguson
Aunt Juley ...... Alexandra Mathie
Henry Wilcox ...... Malcolm Raeburn
Ruth Wilcox ...... Ann Rye
Charles Wilcox ...... Joseph Kloska
Leonard Bast ...... Joseph Prospero
Dolly Wilcox/Jacky Bast ...... Christine Marshall.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00ncyzb)
Dame Beryl Bainbridge, Howard Jacobson, Joanna Trollope, Michael Morpurgo and Val McDermid nominate their Neglected Classics

Mariella Frostrup presents the second of two programmes in which ten leading novelists nominate books they think have been unfairly neglected. In this edition, Dame Beryl Bainbridge, Howard Jacobson, Joanna Trollope, Michael Morpurgo and Val McDermid unveil their choices.

After the programme, listeners can vote for their favourite neglected classic of the ten; the winning title will be dramatised on Radio 4.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00ncyzd)
Roger McGough introduces poems about snow and solitude. There are splashes of colour too, with Goulash by Myrna Schneider and Poppies by Carole Satymurti. The readers are Mark Meadows, Tanya Moodie and Osi Okerafor.


SUN 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00ncyzg)
25th October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

The BBC's Panorama programme asks whether Britain is about to face a crack epidemic, and recently-freed South African activist Oscar Mpetha sends a wry thank you to Margaret Thatcher.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 Return from Guantanamo (b00ncb0x)
In 2001 a journalist called Sami al-Hajj was arrested on the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan. For more than six years he was held in the infamous Guantanamo Bay detention centre until, in 2008, he was suddenly released. In an exclusive interview, he talks to Gavin Esler about what happened to him, and why.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00ncfmq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00ncyzj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00ncyzl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ncyzn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00ncyzq)
Gerry Northam makes his selection from the past seven days of BBC Radio.

The Threepenny Opera - Radio 3
The Choice - Radio 4
Parting Shots - Radio 4
Analysis - Radio 4
Benny Goodman - King of Swing - Radio 2
The Plight of the Bumblebee - Radio 4
Words and Music - Radio 3
The Sound of Magnolias - Radio 4
Scritly Dave Podmore - Radio 4
Morecambe - Chill Winds on the Bay - Radio 4
The Music Group - Radio 4
The Decoy - Radio 4
The Blaze of Obscurity - Radio 4
Late Junction - Radio 3.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00nczk0)
Jennifer finds Lilian dozing in the sitting room. Lilian wakes, and immediately wants to check on Matt but Jennifer assures her he's fine. He's just let her in, and gone up to his office. Lilian tells Jennifer she isn't sleeping, worrying about the trial, and Matt's having nightmares. Jennifer tries to talk to Lilian about the shop but Lilian's distracted, worrying about Matt. Lilian assures concerned Jennifer he's not going off the rails. They'll just be glad when the trial's all over.

Eddie's enjoying being in charge at Brookfield. He tries to tell Joe what to do, but Joe insists he's reared more calves than Eddie's had hot dinners. Eddie hopes he's got time for dinner - Clarrie's in her element with the Aga.

Later, Ed pops in, and Clarrie tells him how happy they are. Joe concurs. After a busy morning he's staked a claim to David's comfy armchair. Ed and Eddie agree it's great being in charge, though Ed wishes he was on site at Grange Farm. Eddie doesn't expect he'll sleep tonight as there are a couple of cows close to calving. Ed sees Will's car in the yard. As Will seems to have it in for him, Ed's steering well clear.

Episode written by Caroline Harrington.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00nczk2)
Matt Frei presents an insider guide to the people and the stories shaping America today. Combining location reports with lively discussion and exclusive interviews, the show provides new and surprising insights into contemporary America.

Matt Frei examines what some might call the engine of Wall Street: greed. The Obama administration is going after the hefty bonuses paid out in America's financial district, and Matt visits the street itself to get insider scoop from Rolling Stone magazine's Matt Taibbi, The Nation magazine's Katrina vanden Heuvel, and bonus consultant Marc Hodak. We also hear from a man who has been selling New York skyscrapers at a discount.

Americans minds have begun to turn to thoughts of gloom and doom, anghosties and goblins. With the Halloween season upon us, we hear an excerpt from Edgar Allen Poe's The Raven, dramatized for us by Emon Hassan, producer, director and editor of Hassberry Theatre Company.

Adaptation of The Raven radio script by William Spear; narrated by Thos Shipley, with an original score by Kevin Mahonchak.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b0090mt6)
Stories from the Bath Literature Festival

Out of Time

By Joe Hollins.

The cargo of the Phoenix, wrecked off the south Devonshire coast 200 years ago, rises from the ashes in a very 21st-century manner.

Read by Michael Maloney.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00n9llm)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00n9llr)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00ncf8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ncwnt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00n80b5)
Ayatollogy

Edward Stourton asks if a battle over theology could help bring about the end of the Islamic Republic of Iran.

The demonstrations have been suppressed and the president is still in power, so has the storm that blew up in Iran after this summer's elections been stilled? Far from it, and now the opposition is coming from where you'd least expect. Some of the country's top theologians and clergymen think that President Ahmadinejad is doing grave damage to the standing of Islam and they want him out.

The programme contains an exclusive email interview with one of Shia Islam's most senior and respected clerics, Grand Ayatollah Hoseyn Ali Montazeri, who calls on Iran's clerics to work with political activists to bring about reform and 'be in step with the people'. Other interviewees include Professor Ali Ansari from the Institute for Iranian Studies, journalists Amir Taheri, Baqer Moin and Nazenin Moshiri, theologian Mehdi Khalaji and human rights campaigner Roya Kashefi.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00nczk5)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00nczk7)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including Avoiding The Question.


SUN 23:00 1989: Day by Day Omnibus (b00nczpl)
Week ending 24th October 1989

Another chance to look back at the events making the news 20 years ago, with Sir John Tusa.

The Guildford Four have their sentence overturned after 14 years in prison, thousands of protesting East Germans surround their parliament, and Mrs Thatcher dramatically disagrees with a statement by Commonwealth leaders on sanctions against South Africa.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00ncwng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 26 OCTOBER 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00nczy0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00n8m2s)
Suburbia Planning - Modernity Forgets

How do housing estates and suburbs serve or fail to serve their residents? Three out of four British people live in the suburbs, many of which grew as cities and their populations expanded. Laurie Taylor is joined by Paul Barker and Lynsey Hanley to discuss housing estates and suburbs. What form of housing most fulfills people's desires? And will urban planning ever be able to fulfill Aneurin Bevan's dream of social integration?

Also on the programme, why modernity makes us forgetful. Does the speed and transience of life today damage our shared and individual memories? The social anthropologist Paul Connerton thinks it does. He discusses his latest book with Laurie Taylor.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00ncwn9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nczzf)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nd00x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nd00l)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00nd0dg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nd0dz)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev John Cairns.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00nd1cl)
Over five million potatoes are thrown away every day and over four million apples end up in the bin without being used. Charlotte Smith finds out who's responsible and what the solutions are.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00ndwc0)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00nd1kk)
Presented by Justin Webb and Evan Davis.

US president Barack Obama has led international condemnation of Sunday's double suicide bomb attack in Baghdad that killed at least 132 people. Patrick Coburn, Iraq correspondent for the Independent, explains the significance of the attacks.

A think-tank is urging the government to shift the tax burden by 150 billion pounds onto environmentally damaging behaviour in a new report. The chairman of the Green Fiscal Commission, Robert Napier, outlines the report's proposals.

The trial of Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity is to start at The Hague. Correspondent Allan Little, who reported on the Bosnian War from its start in 1992, gives his recollections of the former Bosnian Serb leader.

Four white students expelled from university in South Africa after making an allegedly racist video that was posted on the internet are to appear in court in Bloemfontein in a case brought by the the country's unions. But the first black vice-chancellor of the University of the Free State says it has dropped its case against them and invited the students back. South Africa correspondent Karen Allen reports on the case.

The head of the Pakistani Taliban is threatening attacks across the country if the army does not stop military action in the tribal region of South Waziristan. There is an effort to get some normality back to life in Pakistan's big cities with the reopening of schools and colleges closed after an attack. Andrew Hosken reports from Lahore, one of the cities in the firing line.

Novelist and critic Jessica Mann says she is no longer going to review 'sadistic misogyny that passes for modern crime' writing. Ms Mann and Selina Walker from publishers Transworld evaluate the state of the genre.

Thought for the Day with Rev Dr Giles Fraser, Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral.

According to the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL), a quarter of school staff say they have had a false accusation made against them. The union says that the hysterical atmosphere around child protection has left teachers vulnerable and unable to exert authority. Former teacher Matthew Wren recalls his experience and Mary Bousted, general secretary of the ATL explains their concerns.

A double suicide bomb attack in Baghdad has killed at least 132 people. Gabriel Gatehouse reports on the aftermath of the attacks and Saad Yussuf al Mutalibi, international affairs director at Iraq's Ministry of Dialogue and Reconciliation, reflects on whether the attacks will lead to a change in the US military's withdrawal strategy.

Warren Buffett is the world's most successful investor. He was the richest man on the planet last year, and is number two this. Evan Davis met Warren Buffett and discussed the investor's success and the role the rich play in society.

The trial of the former Bosnian Serb leader, Radovan Karadzic has been adjourned after he boycotted the opening session. He faces 11 war crimes charges arising from the Bosnian War including genocide at Srebrenica. Correspondent Peter Biles and former foreign secretary Lord Owen evaluate the trial.

In 1978 Lord Owen was foreign secretary and the government undertook the last thorough assessment of Britain's nuclear deterrent. In a new book, Lord Owen picks over that review and discusses how influential that report remains for today's nuclear assessment.

On certain days in October and November, Cairo experiences what locals call a 'black cloud' that envelopes the city in a visible toxic soup. It has been happening for 10 years and has dramatic effects on people's health. No-one knows precisely what the causes are, but, as Middle East correspondent Christian Fraser reports, many believe it originates in the fields of the Nile Delta, north of the city.

A South Korean scientist who became a national hero when he claimed to have made important breakthroughs in cloning stem cells has been found guilty of fraud. Hwang Woo-Suk was given a suspended prison sentence for accepting money under false pretences after his research was declared bogus. The BBC's John Sudworth reports from Seoul.

A new book about Saudi Arabia, Inside the Kingdom, gives an outsider's analysis of the complex and contradictory country. Author of the book, Robert Lacey, explains what he found after spending years in the country.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00ndwc2)
Andrew Marr sets the cultural agenda for the week, in conversation with the former British Ambassador to the United States, Sir Christopher Meyer, the religious historian Diarmaid MacCulloch and the writer Sara Wheeler, who talks about the Arctic.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nd1ww)
Dear Mr Bigelow

Episode 1

Sophie Thompson reads from the letters of Frances Woodsford, a Bournemouth council worker, to wealthy American widower, Paul Bigelow, who she never met, written between 1949 and his death in 1961. They evoke life in postwar Britain, and are introduced by Woodsford herself, who is now in her 90s.

Frances enlightens Mr Bigelow about rationing, the differences between Britons and Americans, and her endless problems with her elderly mother.

Abridged by Doreen Estall.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nd1zk)
Maternal mortality rates; Equality Bill

Reducing pregnancy-related deaths worldwide. Plus, enforcing the Equality Act; diary writing; and live music from Scots-Palestinian duo Kamilya Jurban and Karine Polwart.


MON 11:00 Planning For Pandemic (b00ndxjm)
Winifred Robinson tracks the plans that have been put in place to protect us from a swine flu pandemic, following members of the Health Protection Agency as they roll out the vaccination programme.

It is a massive undertaking, and problems abound. The difficulties range from a world shortage of vaccine supply to identifying those most at risk and persuading them that the vaccine is safe to take. GP surgeries have already encountered difficulties storing the vaccine and nationwide delivery is likely to prove a challenge.

The programme goes behind the scenes of the Agency as it addresses all these issues, and the stakes are high. Behind this planning is the fear that a second wave of swine flu cases will put enormous pressure on NHS resources through staff absence and hospital admissions. This massive vaccination programme offers a chance to reduce the likelihood of this - as long as the problems can be worked through.


MON 11:30 Beauty of Britain (b00ndxjp)
Series 1

Pastor Dave

Comedy by Christopher Douglas and Nicola Sanderson. Beauty Olonga works as a carer for the Featherdown Agency and sees herself as an inspiration to other African girls hoping to achieve their goals in the land of semi-skimmed milk.

Beauty is quite taken with the charismatic Pastor Dave, a visiting clergyman at Mrs Blanchard's local church, but is he the real deal? Should she pursue him or the gorgeous double-breasted mini-trench coat she has seen in the Mencap shop?

Beauty ...... Jocelyn Jee Esien
Sister Olu ...... Diveen Henry
Pastor Ndu ...... Javone Prince
Mrs Blanchard ...... Alison Steadman
Sally ...... Felicity Montagu
Karen ...... Nicola Sanderson
Mrs Gupte ...... Indira Joshi
Minister Lee ...... Dan Tetsell
Pastor Dave ...... Felix Dexter
Female Assistant ...... Diveen Henry
Cabbie ...... Dan Tetsel

Music by The West End Gospel Choir.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00ndljg)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00ndllj)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00ndlnz)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00ndxjr)
Russell Davies welcomes four more guests to take part in the perennial general knowledge contest.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00nczk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00ndzsy)
Lifeline

By PG Morgan. Three people fly to Bangkok on an all-expenses paid trip to test a new asthma treatment. Nick is an actor whose last big job was in a recently-axed soap, Lynne needs to pay back debts caused by her secret addiction and Rob is a drugs trial veteran with a family to support. But when the injections begin, everything starts to unravel.

Lynne ...... Shelley Rees
Nick ...... Steffan Rhodri
Rob ...... Brendan Charleson
Alison ...... Britta Gartner
Dr Zubir ...... Narinder Samra

Directed by Kate McAll.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00d1yqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00ndn43)
Magnificence

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of a celebrity divorce - a huge scandal, because the husband was the prime minister. The question then, as now, was what was the woman going to walk away with?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00ncwwm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Click On (b00ndzw4)
Series 5

Episode 4

Simon Cox asks if websites are doing enough to make content accessible to the disabled. Plus, plans to give robots intelligence modelled on the human brain.


MON 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00ndqt3)
26th October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Nigel Lawson resigns after six years as Chancellor of the Exchequer, prompting a further drop in the pound; President Gorbachev promises unilateral disarmament in the Baltic; Nirvana record their first session for Radio 1.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 17:00 PM (b00ndqvb)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ndqw3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b00nf01t)
Series 4

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Adam Hills, Rhod Gilbert, Reginald D Hunter and Shappi Khorsandi.

Recorded at the Edinburgh Festival.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00ndlpk)
Ed and Mike are on a roll with the new business. They've been to the farm in Wales and feel very positive about buying in the new cows. They discuss which villages they should target with the new milk round. Mike thinks Downham and Fawcett Magna might be the place to start. They decide to go down to the Bull for a pint.

At the pub, Jazzer is still behaving in an uncharacteristic way - smoking and drinking less and even refusing a pint proffered by Wayne. Fallon's very cheerful, because new guitarist Rollo has fixed up a couple of good gigs before Christmas. One of them is at the Tram Shed in Felpersham. Jazzer reckons it's a bit rough there and she'll need a good roadie to look after her. Wayne has some good news of his own - his girlfriend Emmy has decided to take him back. Fallon is pleased for him.

Will comes in, angry because he thinks Ed has deliberately blocked him in, in the car park. Ed is
needled, and a row develops. To everyone's amazement, Jazzer steps in and smoothes it all over, taking Ed's keys and going out with Will to move the car.

Episode written by Caroline Harrington.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00ndtmt)
Writer and broadcaster Kate Saunders reviews the new film An Education. Based on the memoirs of the journalist Lynn Barber, the film follows the story of 17-year-old Jenny, whose life plans and dreams of studying at Oxford change dramatically when she falls in love with a much older man.

Paul Theroux's latest novel is a thriller set in Calcutta, India. Jerry Delfont is a writer struggling against writer's block who has embarked on a fairly unsuccessful romance. Events take a sinister turn when a mysterious letter arrives asking for his help and a dead body is found on the floor of a cheap hotel. A Dead Hand is published in hardback by Hamish Hamilton.

Mark Lawson reports on two projects bringing together art and music.

The video and performance artist Robin Rhode is collaborating with pianist Leif Ove Andsnes to create a version of Mussorgsky's Pictures. The pianist will perform surrounded by five large screens showing Rhode's images, based on Mussorgsky's music, and an animation he has created.

At the National Gallery, musician and sound curator David Toop has been commissioned to create sound art inspired by a particular picture. He chose Hoogstraten's: A Peepshow With Views Of The Interior Of A Dutch House. The music forms part of an audio gallery tour. Other sound artists include Chris Watson, Jem Finer, Simon Fisher Turner and students from the Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ndtnb)
The Dead Hour

Episode 6

Dramatisation by Chris Dolan of the novel by Denise Mina, set in Glasgow in 1984.

A leading female lawyer has been murdered; the following day her former boyfriend commits suicide and the police believe he is the murderer. Cub reporter Paddy Meehan knows the identity of the real killer, but can she prove it?

Paddy Meehan ...... Amy Manson
Billy ...... Stevie Hannan
Neilson ...... Simon Donaldson
Trisha ...... Cara Kelly
Gourlay ...... Laurie Ventry
Sean ...... Paul Thomas Hickey
JT ...... Finlay McLean
Kate ...... Patricia Kavanagh
Sullivan ...... Andrew Clark
Burns ...... Grant O'Rourke
Ramage ...... Mark McDonnell
Lafferty ...... Stewart Porter
Knox ...... Andrew Byatt
Bernie ...... Richard Conlon

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed by Bruce Young.


MON 20:00 Being Jewish: Blood or Belief? (b00nf01w)
One child's battle to get a place at a state Jewish school has led to a landmark court ruling with major implications for other faith schools, the role of the state and the very definition of religion. As the case goes to the new UK Supreme Court, Tim Whewell examines why it has aroused such strong feelings both inside and outside the Jewish community.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00nf0my)
Knowing Too Much

As a campaigning investigative journalist, Martin Bright has devoted much of his energy into uncovering things people in power want to be kept secret. He calls himself a 'freedom of information fundamentalist'. But in this programme, he plays devil's advocate and asks if the truth is really always desirable or always in the wider public interest.

Through interviews with psychologists, intelligence officers, whistleblowers and academics, he explores the importance of institutional and personal secrecy, and asks what happens when these two areas overlap, or even collide.


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00nf0n0)
Countdown to Copenhagen

Tom Heap looks behind the jargon and political scene-shifting to ask whether or not a definitive new deal on climate change will come out of the talks at Copenhagen in December 2009.

Politicians from around the world will attempt to thrash out a deal in Denmark's capital city to limit the damage that the changing climate on the planet. Most now accept that this means drastic cuts in the use of oil, coal and gas. Getting agreement on how that should be achieved among 192 nations seems impossible. Tom seeks to find out how to interpret the codes of official statements and off-the-record briefings.

He also hears from some of the people who will have to live with the consequences and ask how their voices are working their way into the Copenhagen process. These include the President of the Maldives, who warns that his fight against the encroaching seas is our fight too. Children in Sri Lanka who have been exchanging experiences with English counterparts by the sea in Essex, and a group of children working under the banner Generation Green struggle to produce an action plan for Downing Street.

And in case anyone thinks the Jeremy Clarkson worldview has withered in the face of this upsurge of youthful greenery, Tom joins a group of boy and girl racers in Cheltenham for a petrol-fuelled conversation about living now and paying later.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00ndwc2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00ndvhg)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ndvst)
News from a global perspective with Felicity Evans.

George Osborne wants to limit bankers' bonuses; how will that go down in the City?

The trial of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic starts.

The secret of a happy marriage.

What do American soldiers make of the Afghan police they are training?

What do Czechs make of their president's opposition to the Lisbon Treaty?


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00ndvt8)
Heartland

Episode 1

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Cinderheath is in a state of flux: the Tipton Three are in Guantanamo, a mosque is about to be built on the site of the disused steel works and the BNP are standing in the forthcoming local elections. Only the World Cup offers any sign of relief.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 With Great Pleasure (b00j4hmz)
Joanne Harris

Author Joanne Harris’ selection includes Ray Bradbury, Emily Bronte, Molesworth, Ted Hughes and one of Neil Gaiman's graphic novels.

The readers are Amanda Root and Jon Strickland.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2009.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00ndw54)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



TUESDAY 27 OCTOBER 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00nczrj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nd1ww)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nczy2)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nd00n)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nczzh)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00nd066)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nd0dj)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev John Cairns.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00nd1c8)
Farmers in one of the largest pig-producing areas in the country have hired a marksman to shoot wild boar which they say could ruin their businesses. Three of the animals have already been killed in East Anglia because of concerns they will spread disease. Sightings in the region are relatively new, although the species is well established in other parts of the country. Anna Hill reports.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00nd1j2)
Presented by John Humphrys and Evan Davis.

The number of foetuses diagnosed with Down's syndrome in England and Wales has risen by more than 70 per cent in the last 20 years. Researchers have found that more than 1,800 babies had a high chance of developing the condition, but that the number of babies being born with the condition has remained static. Joan Morris, Professor of Medical Statistics at Queen Mary, University of London, who compiled the research, and Jane Fisher, chief executive of Antenatal Results and Choices (ARC), examine the increase in the number of foetuses with Down's syndrome.

American space agency NASA is making final preparations for the launch of its new Ares rocket, which will eventually replace the space shuttle and is hoped one day to reach Mars. Ares was commissioned by the previous White House administration and tight spending budgets are raising doubts over the future of the project. Correspondent Pallab Ghosh reports from the launch site in Florida.

Legislation has been passed in Paris to give French citizens who live abroad their own MPs. The first will be voted for in the 2012 French national elections. This would see French people living in the UK having their own MP to the French parliament. Benedicte Pavoit, UK correspondent for France 24, discusses the new legislation.

World leaders are meeting in a few weeks to try to draw up a new agreement on limiting carbon dioxide. Lord Stern, author of a major report into climate change, is concerned that leaders are not dedicated to reducing emissions. Lord Stern examines the climate change agenda.

American Rapper 50 Cent has produced a book on how to get ahead in business by overcoming your fears. 50th Law, written with Robert Greene, is based on the artist's early experiences hustling on the streets of South Queens, selling drugs. Evan Davis spoke to 50 Cent about his new book, and asked him if he finds any parallels between the world he grew up in and modern corporate life.

Thought for the Day with Dr Indarjit Singh, Director of the Network of Sikh Organisations.

The Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge, has said the civil justice system is failing. In an interview with Radio 4, Lord Judge raised grave concerns about the system and that a threat of civil disorder could escalate from the shortfall. Bridget Prentice, under-secretary of state at the Ministry of Justice, discusses Lord Judge's comments and the civil justice system.

More babies with Down's syndrome are being aborted. The number of women deciding on abortion after being told their child has the condition is three times higher than it was 20 years ago. Reporter Nicola Stanbridge met one mother who had a positive test result and decided against having an abortion. Rob Llewellyn, consultant obstetrician in Swansea and Carol Boys, chief executive of the Down's Syndrome Association, discuss why more women are choosing to abort their babies with the syndrome.

An Al Qaeda-linked Iraqi group has said it carried out Sunday's double suicide bombing in Baghdad. Correspondent Gabriel Gatehouse reports on the questions being asked about Iraq's security.

A new book has been published that examines into our language might have changed if King Harold had defeated William the Conquerer at the Battle of Hastings. David Cowley, author of How We'd Talk If The English Had Won In 1066, and Professor Clive Upton, Head of Modern English at the University of Leeds, discuss how the battle affected the English language.

The Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA), the organisation which the government has asked to look into new child protection laws, has found that many people will voluntarily decide to be ISA registered. Sir Roger Singleton, head of the ISA, discusses whether firms who do not need to be Criminal Records Board checked will end up with a competitive edge over those that do.

NASA is scheduled to launch the first of its prototype rockets for the new Ares rocket, which will replace the shuttle fleet. Cuts in the Obama administration's space spending has led to concerns over the project's future. Dr Chris Riley, science writer and documentary maker, comments on the scientific importance of Ares.

Geologists have unveiled the skull of a huge ancient reptile which has been found on the Jurassic Coast in Dorset. The skull belongs to a pliosaur, a huge creature which lived around 150 million years ago. Richard Edmunds, a geologist and Earth Science manager for the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, discusses the find.

The UN's Millennium Development Goals are due to be met by 2015. One of the goals is to reduce the number of women who die in childbirth by 75 per cent. Correspondent Lyse Doucet reports from Afghanistan, which has one of the worst maternal mortality rates in the world.

What is the best philosophy for to excel in business? Entrepreneur Sir Tom Hunter and philanthropist Dr Peter Lunn, author of Basic Instincts: Human Nature and the New Economics, di


TUE 09:00 The Choice (b00nf1bv)
Michael Buerk interviews people who have made life-altering decisions and talks them through the whole process, from the original dilemma to living with the consequences.

He talks to single mother Alex Bell about her choice to adopt children with Down's syndrome.


TUE 09:30 Parting Shots (b00nf33d)
Series 1

Episode 2

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores. The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

How successful diplomacy requires an ambassador to both see beyond the shortcomings of their foreign hosts and persuade them to look kindly on our own.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nhs7z)
Dear Mr Bigelow

Episode 2

Sophie Thompson reads from the letters of Frances Woodsford, a Bournemouth council worker, to wealthy American widower, Paul Bigelow, who she never met, written between 1949 and his death in 1961. They evoke life in postwar Britain, and are introduced by Woodsford herself, who is now in her 90s.

As the nation mourns the death of the King, Frances gears up for her first driving lesson, learns how to deal with a firebomb at Civil Defence classes and, with rationing still very much in force, is faced with the stark choice of kidney soup and consomme de tapioca at Bournemouth's smartest restaurant in town.

Abridged by Doreen Estall.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nd2mc)
Patricia Cornwell; Misconceptions about rape victims

American crime writer, Patricia Cornwell on Dr Kay Scarpetta. Plus; should juries be educated about the range of possible responses to a sexual assault?


TUE 11:00 Science vs The Stradivarius (b00nf33g)
Can modern technology identify the elusive components that give Stradivarius violins a unique voice? Analysts have submitted the master instruments to a battery of tests, from CT scans to burning original samples of varnish, but are they just chasing a myth? Professor Trevor Cox investigates.

(Tasmin Little finishes the programme playing her Stradivarius.)

Producer: Erika Wright.


TUE 11:30 Art Attack (b00nf33j)
Episode 1

An assault on the Mona Lisa with a teacup raises the question, why do people attack art? In two programmes the art historian and broadcasters Tim Marlow (programme one) and Lawrence Pollard (programme two) investigate centuries of attacks on art works from the earliest times to the present day. Charting the reasons why and telling the stories of some of the most sensational and provocative attacks, they explore how the wilful destruction of art is as old as art itself and how it shows no signs of stopping. Statues are demolished in the name of religion, photographs doctored for political reasons, paintings are slashed and protestors even urinate on art works. Art is attacked so that the power of a particular work is nullified, in order to eradicate the art's subject from the face of the earth, as a publicity seeking stunt and even - and increasingly - to make an artistic comment on the existing artwork. Do these attacks have anything in common? Can art be made by breaking existing art? Why are art attacks continuing?

Programme 1
Tim Marlow looks at some of the most renowned attacks on art carried out in the name of politics and religion. He speaks to Professor Eamon Duffy in the Lady Chapel at Ely Cathedral, which was desecrated in the sixteenth century during the Reformation. A place which is beautiful in its brokenness, with the damage (defaced figures and empty pedestals) clearly visible.

On 10th March 1914, suffragette Mary Richardson attacked Velazquez's Rokeby Venus with an axe at the National Gallery in London. Her motive for the attack was to bring to public attention the cruelty and hypocrisy of the Government's treatment of Emily Pankhurst. Professor Lynn Nead discusses the wider political issues of this act and the public outrage that followed.

For the past three decades, author and photo-historian David King has assembled the world's largest archive of photographs, posters and paintings from the Soviet era. Tim takes a look at his collection and discusses the doctoring of photographs by the Communists for propaganda purposes.

The Bamiyan Buddhas, which were arguably Afghanistan's most important historical monument, were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001 causing an international outcry. What does it mean to destroy art for your beliefs?


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00ndlg9)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00ndljj)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00ndlll)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Baroque and Roll: Townshend on Purcell (b00nf3kr)
The Who guitarist and songwriter Pete Townshend talks about the band's career and reveals the influence on his songwriting of Baroque composer Henry Purcell.

When Pete was a struggling 20-year-old musician he was turned on to Purcell by his manager, Kit Lambert. It was Kit's recommendation of Purcell's Gordian Knot Untied that struck the loudest chord with Pete, awakening him to a lineage in English music that seemed strangely familiar. Immersing himself in the music, he soon set about writing The Who's first album.

Pete reveals how he drew on Purcell's dramatic genius for his most intriguing compositions. From his first mini-rock opera to his masterpiece, Tommy, and from his enduring Lifehouse project through to his current musical endeavour, there has always been a Purcellian presence.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00ndlpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00cq7p6)
Dickens Confidential

Murder in the Red Barn

Series of plays looking at how Charles Dickens, as the head of a daily paper, would have tackled bringing the news to the masses.

By Mike Walker.

When the body of a young baby is found floating on the River Thames, the Herald's chief correspondent Daniel Parker is given the task of finding out why.

While his investigations take him and Charles Dickens into the poverty stricken areas of the City, Agnes is in the thick of philanthropy and theatricals in Belgravia.

Charles Dickens ...... Dan Stevens
Agnes Paxton ...... Eleanor Howell
Daniel Parker ...... Andrew Buchan
Mr Dudman ...... Henry Goodman
Mrs Dudman ...... Joan Walker
Sarah ...... Liz Sutherland
Mrs Kindly ...... Helen Longworth
The Boatman ...... John Rowe
Equerry/Stallholder/PC ...... Chris Pavlo

Directed by Tracey Neale.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00nflx6)
Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Are some green lanes and place names in southern England a reminder of an earlier Welsh invasion?


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nfmkn)
Sophie Hannah - The Fantastic Book of Everybody's Secrets

The Octopus Nest

Series of chilling tales from crime writer Sophie Hannah's first short story collection.

Claire and Timothy have no idea why there's a strange woman appearing in so many of their family photographs. As Claire stumbles across the answer, she is more frightened than ever.

Read by Helen Bradbury.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00ndm9q)
Taste

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Taste - and the making of a marriage. The story of an 18th-century couple, the Graftons - fashionable, rich, and deeply in love - who spend life together doing up their magnificent houses.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b00nfmtq)
Interview with Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge

Clive Coleman talks to the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Igor Judge, in his first broadcast interview since taking up the post.

In a wide-ranging conversation, Lord Judge discusses issues ranging from sentencing and the viability of short prison sentences to the problems of access to justice in the civil courts.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00nfmts)
David Edgar and Helen Cross

Sue MacGregor talks to playwright David Edgar and novelist Helen Cross at the Birmingham Book Festival about their favourite books - titles by Graham Greene, Anthony Trollope and Naomi Wolf.

Books featured:

The Warden by Anthony Trollope, Penguin Classics

The Treehouse by Naomi Wolf, Virago Press

The End of the Affair by Graham Greene, Vintage Classics

Producer: Mary Ward-Lowery

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2009.


TUE 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00ndqrm)
27th October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Margaret Thatcher's leadership style comes under fire after a quick Cabinet reshuffle; the IRA admits killing a British soldier and his six-month-old baby in West Germany; new East German premier Egon Krenz agrees to release reformist protestors.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00ndqt5)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ndqvd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Too Much Information (b00n88d3)
Episode 3

Waft Tourist Information introduces local walks for visitors but for the young honeymooning couple, the walks end up being painfully boring and spectacularly dangerous!

Neil Warhurst's comedy about the idiosyncratic world of Tourist Information Offices.

Jeff Rawle stars as Warren, the much put upon manager of Waft Tourist Information. The ancient northern town of Waft appears in the Lonely Planet Guide with the advice: "Don't bother". It has more people in the cemetery than living in it, is twinned with a town near Chernobyl and is most often visited by people using the toilet on the way to Alton Towers. So Waft Tourist Information Centre is hardly a hive of activity! But Warren along with the other members of the "Friends of Waft" each week attempt to solve the endless conundrum of how on earth they can attract visitors to Waft!

WARREN ............................................................................. JEFF RAWLE
DOUGLAS .................................................................. MALCOLM TIERNEY
HEATHER ........................................................................... LIZA SADOVY
LUCY ........................................................................... JOANNAH TINCEY
BRYAN ........................................................................... PAUL BARNHILL
ROGER ............................................................................ PIERS WEHNER
BECCA................................................................EMERALD O'HANRAHAN

Producer: Liz Webb

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2009.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00ndlp1)
Tired Lilian gives Peggy a hand with Jack. She knows her mum needs her around at the moment.
Lynda looks over the land Brian has promised to the village. She's keen for it to be used for green burials. Robert thinks that not everyone will like the idea, and that some people might come up with alternatives.

Pat calls on Peggy and suggests that the solution to her shop problem might be for Peggy to rent the shop to the community to run. Peggy is happy for Pat to investigate - she's got nothing to lose.

Matt unexpectedly whisks Lilian off to the airport. He's packed her bags, and booked the flights. Lilian is anxious and confused, especially when he announces he's taking her to Costa Rica. Lilian is very reluctant to go. She knows he's doing a runner. It's a fantasy as far as she's concerned, and she's terrified they'll get caught. She doesn't want to get on the plane. Matt insists he's doing what's right for him. Either she comes with him, or he goes alone.

Episode written by Caroline Harrington.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00nds0k)
Michael Caine talks about what is wrong with modern Britain and how Jack Nicholson saved his career. Caine's new film Harry Brown sees him playing a retired marine who has a score to settle.

Philip Roth's latest novel depicts an ageing actor who is worried about losing his touch. Alex Clarke reviews.

Into the Storm, the sequel to the BAFTA and Emmy award-winning The Gathering Storm, portrays Winston Churchill's political and personal life through WWII. It stars Brendan Gleeson as Churchill. Political novelist and former deputy chairman of the Conservative Party Michael Dobbs discusses the accuracy of the characters' portrayal and the purpose of political drama.

As the documentary series Wonderland returns to BBC TV with a programme about the British in bed - featuring interviews conducted in bed - Front Row compiles a list of great duvet moments in culture.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ndtmw)
The Dead Hour

Episode 7

Dramatisation by Chris Dolan of the novel by Denise Mina, set in Glasgow in 1984.

Paddy has a one-night stand with a policeman and falls out with her night-shift driver.

Paddy Meehan ...... Amy Manson
Billy ...... Stevie Hannan
Neilson ...... Simon Donaldson
Trisha ...... Cara Kelly
Gourlay ...... Laurie Ventry
Sean ...... Paul Thomas Hickey
JT ...... Finlay McLean
Kate ...... Patricia Kavanagh
Sullivan ...... Andrew Clark
Burns ...... Grant O'Rourke
Ramage ...... Mark McDonnell
Lafferty ...... Stewart Porter
Knox ...... Andrew Byatt
Bernie ...... Richard Conlon

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed by Bruce Young.


TUE 20:00 1989: How The Wall Fell (b00nfn2j)
The fall of the Berlin Wall made revolution look easy. But behind the scenes, people power and the sudden end of Cold War certainties posed all kinds of challenges. As part of Radio 4's 1989 season, John Tusa discovers what happened with key insiders from the British, German, Soviet and other governments of the time.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00nfq2j)
'Blinding up' or letting others over-estimate your visual impairment is a concept featured recently by the programme. Peter White explores your responses, including the idea of 'learned helplessness' which one listener thinks is a complaint blind people are prone to - it's where you allow other people to take over. It may seem as if it's giving you an easier life, but could you be surrendering important control? Writer and broadcaster Rob Crossan, Dr Rowena Forbes, and part-time disability equality trainer Paul Sullivan share their experiences.

Also, Mani Djazmi looks at the implications of the postal strike for visually-impaired people.

Plus an update on the proposal to remove the kerbs from Exhibition Road in London, home to the Natural History and Science Museums. The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association is taking the borough's planning decision to judicial review.


TUE 21:00 Metaphor for Healing (b00nfq2l)
Dr Phil Hammond finds out how the use of metaphorical language in health care is increasingly accepted as a powerful aid to healing.

The power of the right metaphor, long exploited in poetry, politics and marketing, is being increasingly recognised in health care, coaching and therapy, engaging the unconscious to activate self-healing. Dr Phil talks to patients, doctors and therapists, and discovers why doctors should pay closer attention to the answer to their routine question, 'And what does it feel like?'.


TUE 21:30 The Choice (b00nf1bv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00ndvg4)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ndvhj)
National and international news and analysis with Jane Hill.

The BBC learns details of expenses review.

The government reverses Territorial Army cuts.

A look at immigration in Iowa: a tale of two cities.

A report on the Briton due to be executed in China.

Why do the young over-estimate the extent of drink spiking?

Is the formal dinner party dead?


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00ndvsw)
Heartland

Episode 2

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Rob has returned home to the Black Country after an unsuccessful football career, and now helps out in his old school.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 As Told To Craig Brown (b00b4j53)
Episode 3

Satirist Craig Brown presents a bundle of parody, satire, social observation and nonsense.

Narrated by Juliet Stevenson and Steve Wright.

With the help of John Humphrys, Ronni Ancona, Jon Culshaw, Lewis McLeod, Sally Grace, Ewan Bailey and Margaret Cabourn-Smith.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2008.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00ndw4t)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00nczrl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nhs7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nczy4)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nd00q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nczzk)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00nd068)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nd0dl)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev John Cairns.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00nd1cb)
Dog attacks cost sheep farmers one million pounds a year, and our right to roam is being blamed. Anna Hill hears from a farmer whose flock was destroyed by a Rottweiler and a fighting dog.

Plus a cut-price version of the world's most prized meat could soon be at a supermarket near you; we visit the Yorkshire farmer who is breeding Japanese Wagyu cattle.


WED 06:00 Today (b00nd1j4)
Presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague.

An attack on a guesthouse in Kabul has killed six UN workers. Adrian Edwards, chief spokesman for the UN mission in Afghanistan, discusses its impact.

The review into MPs' expenses is expected to recommend substantial measures to reform the system of parliamentary allowances. MPs will no longer be able to employ family members on the parliamentary payroll and will be banned from claiming expenses for mortgages on their second homes. Instead, second homes will need to be rented. Sally Hammond, wife of Tory MP Stephen Hammond and who works for him, and Tory MP Roger Gale, who employs his wife, discuss the Kelly committee's reported conclusions.

The government is expected to perform a U-turn on its plans to cut the budget of the Territorial Army. Correspondent Iain Watson comments on the decision.

The setting for the end of Shakespeare's Richard III is being marked with a stone memorial and visitors' centre. The battle of Bosworth on the Leicestershire/Warwickshire border is said to be where King Richard reeled around the battlefield and vainly offered his "kingdom for a horse". But for years historians have disagreed on the precise location of the battle. Correspondent Bob Walker reports from the site.

US Secretary of State Hilary Clinton has arrived in Pakistan for a mission President Obama considers crucial in the military strategy against the Taliban. While the outside world focuses on the Pakistan/Afghan border and the offensive launched by the Pakistan army against the Taliban in south Waziristan, many Pakistanis blame their troubles less on the insurgents and more on their old antagonist, India, and their long-term ally, the US. Correspondent Andrew Hosken reports from the extraordinary ceremony which marks the closure of the Pakistan-India border crossing near Lahore each evening.

Rare birds are becoming more common, and common birds are becoming rarer, according to the latest assessment from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). The research shows that the numbers of almost 60 per cent of the 63 rare birds that breed in the UK have increased over the last ten years compared with only just over one third of common species. Dr Mark Avery, the RSPB's conservation director, examines the change in bird populations.

A 106-year-old board game designed to entertain supporters of the Suffragette Movement, while raising funds for them, will be sold today at Bonhams auctioneers. The game, 'Pank-A-Squith', titled after the leader of the Suffragettes, Emmeline Pankhurst and Britain's prime minister of the time, Herbert Asquith, is expected to fetch between £600 and £800. Luke Honey, who is handling the sale for Bonhams, discusses the historical importance of the game and demonstrates how it was played.

Thought for the day with Oliver McTernan, director of NGO Forward Thinking.

The European Commission is expected to approve the government's plan to split Northern Rock into a "good" and "bad" bank. The plan was submitted to European regulators earlier this year, and forms a central part of the government's aid package. The bank's toxic assets will be placed into the "bad" bank, which will remain in state ownership. The more profitable banking business will be put into the "good" bank and sold off. The same is also likely to happen to Lloyds and the Royal Bank of Scotland. John McFall, who chairs the Treasury Select Committee, and the Liberal Democrat's treasury spokesman, Vince Cable, analyse the strategy.

The BBC understands that the review of MPs' allowances will recommend a number of measures to reform the current system. MPs will no longer be able to employ family members on the parliamentary payroll and will be banned from claiming expenses for mortgages for their second homes. And MPs who represent constituencies within a reasonable distance of London will no longer be able to claim expenses for a second home. The changes will be phased in over five years. Labour MP Sir Stuart Bell, who is on the Members' Estimates Committee, discusses how MPs have reacted to the expenses review's recommendations.

The government is expected to perform a U-turn on its plans to cut the budget of the Territorial Army. Shadow Defence Secretary Liam Fox discusses the change in the government's stance, and political editor Nick Robinson sums up the mood in Westminster.

Comic Hollywood actor Steve Martin, famous for his films including Cheaper by the Dozen and Father of the Bride, is producing an album of banjo music. Mr Martin has been paying the instrument for 40 years and his album, The Crow: New Songs for the Five-String Banjo, topped the bluegrass charts when it was released this year. Sarah Montague spoke to the star about his musical career.

In Pakistan up to 50 people may have died in a bombing in a market in the city of Peshawar. Correspondent Orla Guerin reports on the latest from Islamabad.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's coalition


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00nfqz4)
Ben Haggarty is a performance storyteller and artistic director of The Crick Crack Club, which promotes the best of British and international storytelling. He brings his new work to the Barbican Pit with Mr Sandmann: Bringer of Dreams - Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, in which he explores the ambivalent mythology of the Sandman and questions the purpose of dreams.

Dr Lynn Rogers is a behavioural biologist and director of the Wildlife Research Institute and North American Bear Centre in Minnoesota. For over 40 years he has studied the black bears of the Northwoods of Minnesota. He has developed a radical method of habituating the bears to allow him to follow them all day just a few feet away, which has earned him the epithet 'the Jane Goodall of bears' and is featured in a new series of Natural World on BBC Two - Bearwalker of the Northwoods.

Aarathi Prasad is a geneticist and is also the mother of a mixed race child. In a programme for Channel 4 she sets out to challenge the ideas of racial purity and examines provocative claims that there are in fact biological advantages to being mixed race. Is It Better To Be Mixed Race? is part of Channel 4's Race: Science's Last Taboo season.

Vincent Osborne runs the Black British Classical Foundation which aims to find and promote black arts talent across the UK and the Commonwealth. He is organising the inaugural Voice of Black Opera Awards (VOBOs) to find the best black or Asian voice of classical opera. Seven finalists will compete in Birmingham in front of a distinguished panel of judges including opera stars Grace Bumbry and Maria Ewing.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nhs7n)
Dear Mr Bigelow

Episode 3

Sophie Thompson reads from the letters of Frances Woodsford, a Bournemouth council worker, to wealthy American widower, Paul Bigelow, who she never met, written between 1949 and his death in 1961. They evoke life in postwar Britain, and are introduced by Woodsford herself, who is now in her 90s.

Frances and her mother take to the road in her temperamental old banger, Frances becomes a bona fide 'fire putter-outer' at Civil Defence classes and enjoys the spectacle of the coronation before a four-inch television screen.

Abridged by Doreen Estall.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nd2l8)
Katie Piper; Grandparent carers

Katie Piper on the acid attack that changed her life. Plus, grandparents who take on the role as full-time carer for their grandchildren; and the positive effect of mentoring.


WED 11:00 M1 Magic (b00nfqz6)
4 Extra Debut. Historian Juliet Gardiner explores the surprising story of how 'Motorway One' came to be built, slashing through the countryside. From October 2009.


WED 11:30 Hut 33 (b01js406)
Series 3

Back to Your Post

Everything German's under suspicion in 1942, especially in Bletchley Park. When it's discovered Charles has German relatives, he' threatened with internment.

Will Archie help him, and can he avoid Minka's attention now she knows a true German is among them?

James Cary's sitcom set at Bletchley Park - the top-secret home of the Second World War codebreakers.

Professor Charles Gardner …. Robert Bathurst
Archie …. Tom Goodman-Hill
Gordon ...... Fergus Craig
3rd Lieutenant Joshua Fanshawe-Marshall …. Alex MacQueen
Minka …. Olivia Coleman
Mrs Best …. Lill Roughley

Producer: Adam Bromley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2009.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00ndlgc)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00ndljl)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00ndlln)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00nfqzb)
Twentieth-century copyright law has been struggling for some time to keep up with 21st-century technology. Consumers all too often don't understand what they can do and creative industries are keen to protect their businesses. David Lammy, the Minister for Intellectual Property, joins Steve to discuss the government's review of copyright law and their decision to end the consequence-free days of illegal file sharing.

We also examine the coverage of the BNP's first outing on Question Time with the BBC's Ric Baily and James Mcintyre from the New Statesman. What were the editorial choices behind the broadcast and will we now see more of Nick Griffin on our TV screens?

And we are joined by Dr Natalie Fenton from Goldsmith's University in London, who argues that instead of democratising information, the internet has narrowed our horizons.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00ndlp1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00dghmq)
A Tokyo Murder

The Parents

By John Dryden and Miriam Smith.

Jennifer and Peter Whitelock arrive in Japan to help find their daughter Daisy's murderer. Frustrated with the progress of the police investigation, Peter puts his trust in TV producer Norio Ito, who promises to champion their cause on his popular 'news and entertainment' show, while Jennifer tries to discover what her daughter's life in Tokyo was like. Then she starts getting calls from a man claiming to be the killer.

Jennifer Whitelock ...... Lynne Hobday
Peter Whitelock ...... Martin Burns
Akira Takahashi ...... Nariyasu Kato
Norio Ito ...... Ryuji Yoshimura
Brie ...... Erika Hirokawa

Other parts played by Junnichi Takahashi, Sachiko Yamada, Gemma Nokes, Shinji Kobata, Michael Ryhs, Hiroyuki Nojima, Teruhiko Nakajima, Adam Browning, Masaru Yoshihara, Harumi Tsumoto, Takako Anami, Kei Katsumoto.

Directed by John Dryden.

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00nfqzd)
Paul Lewis and a panel of guests answer calls on benefits and tax credits.

Guests:

Jean French, advice and information manager, Carers UK

Sally West, policy manager, Age Concern and Help the Aged'

Rachel Hadwen, advisor, Working Families.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nfmkq)
Sophie Hannah - The Fantastic Book of Everybody's Secrets

Friendly Amid the Haters

Three chilling tales from crime writer Sophie Hannah's first short story collection mark her debut on Radio 4.
Read by Kathryn Hunt.

A woman asks a joiner to re-hang some doors but when she challenges his laid-back approach with sarcasm, he flips and she is left in fear of her life. Worse is her feeling that she deserves her shame and humilation.

Producer: Melanie Harris
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00ndm9s)
Science and Nature at Home

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

A room constructed entirely of feathers, a hermitage in the garden of a Lincolnshire vicarage, Alexander Pope's grotto - how eccentric homes reflected wider 18th-century ideas about science and nature.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00nfqzg)
Organ Donation - Flip Flops

While nine out of ten people agree organ donation is a good thing, a recent audit found 40 per cent of bereaved families, when approached, didn't agree to donate. Laurie Taylor discusses new research which uncovers some of the reasons behind this apparent anomaly.

Magi Sque, from the University of Southampton, was part of a team who interviewed families who had declined organ donation. While many agreed in principle, carried organ donor cards and knew their relatives desire to donate, they still didn't feel able to let their loved ones organs be used. The most common reason families gave for this was a simple desire to keep the body intact. They didn't want the dead to be 'hurt' any more.

Magi explains why the research reveals some of our deep-seated cultural beliefs, and how those beliefs have their roots in wider society's values and, at times of grief, can completely overcome our pre-existing views.

We also hear from Professor Caroline Knowles of Goldsmiths College, London who has researched the history, meaning and journey of the flip flop sandal.


WED 16:30 Metaphor for Healing (b00nfq2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00ndqrp)
28th October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

A pro-democracy rally in Prague turns violent after police move in; a Northern Irish peace train is held overnight due to a bomb scare; Prince Charles calls on politicians and business leaders to tackle global warming.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 17:00 PM (b00ndqt7)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ndqvg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Rudy's Rare Records (b00nfqzj)
Series 2

Daddy Cool

When his teenage son won't be seen in public with him, Adam is determined to prove that he's got what it takes to be cool.

And his elderly dad, Rudy, is on hand to give some unexpected advice.

Sitcom by Danny Robins, set in the finest, feistiest, family-run record shop in Birmingham.

Adam ...... Lenny Henry
Rudy ...... Larrington Walker
Richie ...... Joe Jacobs
Tasha ...... Natasha Godfrey
Clifton ...... Jeffery Kissoon
Doreen ...... Claire Benedict
DJ Karel ...... Andrew Brooke
Tunde ...... Femi Elufowoju
Rapper ...... Doc Brown.

Additional material by Doc Brown and Leah Chillery.

Producer: Lucy Armitage

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2009.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00ndlp3)
Brian is pleased to report to Adam that the parish council has accepted his offer of a piece of land - a secret deal he cut with Lynda in return for her dropping her opposition to the moving of their footpath. Brian is a little taken aback by the news that it might be used as a green burial site.

Jennifer comes in from a birthday party with Ruairi, to find that Lilian has failed to turn up to help Peggy. Jennifer is irritated, and has to go straight round to the Lodge to help her mum.

Lilian and Matt arrive in Costa Rica after a long and exhausting flight. Lilian feels better for a shower in the hotel, but she is determined that this will be a holiday and nothing more, while Matt is determined to stay. Lilian phones Jennifer and tells her where they are. Brian immediately assumes Matt has done a runner. Lilian asks Jennifer not to tell Peggy where they are, and Jennifer wonders what on earth to say.

Episode written by Caroline Harrington.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00nds0m)
Arts news and reviews. Mark Lawson reports on why vampires continue to inspire best-selling books, new films and TV series, with guests including Dacre Stoker, great-grandnephew of Dracula author Bram Stoker.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ndtmy)
The Dead Hour

Episode 8

Dramatisation by Chris Dolan of the novel by Denise Mina, set in Glasgow in 1984.

Paddy discovers that the murder victim had a sister - who has gone missing.

Paddy Meehan ...... Amy Manson
Billy ...... Stevie Hannan
Neilson ...... Simon Donaldson
Trisha ...... Cara Kelly
Gourlay ...... Laurie Ventry
Sean ...... Paul Thomas Hickey
JT ...... Finlay McLean
Kate ...... Patricia Kavanagh
Sullivan ...... Andrew Clark
Burns ...... Grant O'Rourke
Ramage ...... Mark McDonnell
Lafferty ...... Stewart Porter
Knox ...... Andrew Byatt
Bernie ...... Richard Conlon

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed by Bruce Young.


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00nfqzl)
The war crimes trial of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic has opened at the UN-backed International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. He faces 11 counts of genocide, including complicity in the Srebrenica massacre in which 8,000 Muslim men and boys were killed. It was one of the worst acts of atrocity in Europe since the Second World War. But is what we are about to see justice or revenge - A show trial organised by the victors, with TV coverage broadcast throughout the world, and eagerly viewed, especially in the Balkans. Can there ever be any morally certain and globally acceptable definition of what constitutes a war crime or will pragmatism and real politique always get in the way?

Witnesses:
John Laughland
Author of Travesty: The Trial of Slobodan Milosevic and the Corruption of International Justice, and
A History of Political Trials from Charles I to Saddam Hussein.

Geoffrey Nice
The British QC who led the prosecution of the Serbian leader Slobodan Milosovic

Professor David Chandler
Professor of International Relations at the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and editor of the Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding

Mark Ellis
Executive Director, International Bar Association.


WED 20:45 Avoiding the Question (b00nfqzn)
Jon Sopel explores the techniques used by different politicians to avoid questions in interviews and how it affects their public image.


WED 21:00 The Oldest Bible (b00dp74r)
Roger Bolton tells the story of the Codex Sinaiticus, the world's oldest bible, found in 1844 in a monastery in the Sinai Desert. It is soon to become one of the British Library's greatest treasures and accessible to a worldwide audience. Its history is contentious, and its contents controversial.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00nfqz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00ndvg6)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ndvhl)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

As Hillary Clinton visits Pakistan, a car bomb kills more than 90 people in a market in Peshawar.

An independent report on an RAF plane crash which killed 14 British servicemen in Afghanistan accuses the MoD of sacrificing safety to cut costs.

The European Commission approves plans for Northern Rock to be split in two, paving the way for the 'good' side of the nationalised bank to be sold off.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00ndvsy)
Heartland

Episode 3

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Jim is worried about the forthcoming local elections.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 One (b00nfqzq)
Series 3

Episode 4

Sketch show written by David Quantick, in which no item features more than one voice.

With Graeme Garden, Dan Maier, Johnny Daukes, Deborah Norton, Katie Davies, Dan Antopolski, Andrew Crawford and David Quantick.


WED 23:15 Rik Mayall's Bedside Tales (b00nfqzs)
Jimmy's Bangkok Coffee

Settle down, brush your teeth, do whatever it is you do at this time of night. But, most of all listen, because Rik would like to talk to you. One on one. Tonight he'd mostly like to tell you about Jimmy's Bangkok Coffee.

Performer ..... Rik Mayall
Writers ..... Rik Mayall & John Nicholson
Producer ..... Steven Canny

We open a small and peculiarly shaped window in to the mind of Rik Mayall. Written by Rik and John Nicholson, it's a woozy, strange and resonant series from one of the country's most loved comic performers. Rik wants to sit with you in your room - one on one. He wants to let you know things - important, secret things, things about your neighbours. About him. About you.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00ndw4w)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



THURSDAY 29 OCTOBER 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00nczrn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nhs7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nczy6)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nd00s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nczzm)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00nd06b)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nd0dn)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev John Cairns.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00nd1cd)
Anna Hill reports that the price of food could quadruple in the next 20 years according to one analyst and talks to a carrot farmer about how he cuts down on the waste he produces by using everything but the stalk.


THU 06:00 Today (b00nd1j6)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

The second phase of nationwide postal strikes is now underway. Talks between Royal Mail and the Communication Workers Union (CWU) failed to reach agreement. Mark Higson, managing director of Royal Mail letters, discusses the newest round of strikes.

Conservative policy towards the EU has always been to take a cautious stance and move away from full integration with member states. With opinion polls showing that David Cameron could be the next prime minister, will the Tories' policy towards the EU have to change? Political editor Nick Robinson considers the question.

Metropolitan Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson has said he will not be making armed police foot patrols "routine". It emerged last week that such patrols had been introduced in London to help deal with gun crime, but without the mayor, deputy mayor, Metropolitan Police Authority nor the Met Commissioner being consulted over the policy. Sir Paul Stephenson will face tough questions at a Metropolitan Police Authority meeting today over the way the policy was introduced. Kit Malthouse, Deputy London Mayor with responsibility for the Met Police, discusses the policy.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in Lahore for the next stage of her important three day trip to Pakistan. Yesterday, more than 90 people died in a bomb attack in the north-west city of Peshawar. Pakistan's security situation has worsened since its army began a military offensive against Taliban insurgents in south Waziristan, the region bordering Afghanistan. Correspondent Andrew Hosken reports from Lahore on US policy towards Pakistan.

An independent review into the 2006 Nimrod crash in Afghanistan which killed 14 service personnel, has accused the Ministry of Defence (MoD) of sacrificing safety to cut costs. The highly critical report by Charles Haddon-Cave QC said crash occurred because of a "systemic breach" of the military covenant. The report also criticises the defence contractor BAE Systems for carrying out an inadequate safety review of the aircraft. An apology from the Defence Secretary Bob Ainsworth has not satisfied the families who are pursuing their negligence claim against the MoD. The families' lawyer, John Cooper, discusses their reaction to the report.

The Coen brothers are among America's most prolific and inventive film directors, and are releasing a new film in November. A Serious Man will join the brothers' long list of successes, which include the Oscar winners Fargo and No Country for Old Men, to Raising Arizona, Barton Fink and Blood Simple. The new film tells the story of the unbearable pressures on a Jewish academic in the mid-west in the sixties. Evan Davis speaks to Joel and Ethan Coen about their new movie, and whether the film was true to their own Jewish upbringing in the American Midwest.

Thought for the day with the writer Rhidian Brook.

The Chair of the Advisory Council on Drug Misuse, Professor David Nutt, is to give a speech arguing that the relative harms caused by legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco are greater than those of a number of illegal drugs, including cannabis, LSD and ecstasy. Professor Nutt's arguments have caused political controversy in the past. Home Editor Mark Easton examines the conflicting views around drug use, and Prof Nutt discusses the evidence behind his claims.

European Union leaders are meeting in Brussels to discuss a wide ranging agenda, from climate change to the economy. Foreign Secretary David Miliband and shadow foreign secretary William Hague discuss the EU summit's agenda.

A 10-year-old Nigerian girl who attempted suicide after being detained for a second time in an immigration removal centre has been released with her mother on the orders of Home Secretary Alan Johnson. The conditional temporary release of Adeoti Ogunsola and her mother Clementina means they can now challenge their intended removal from the UK in the Immigration Appeals Tribunal. The family's lawyer, Harriet Wistrich, comments on the case.

Former England cricket captain Michael Vaughan is releasing his autobiography, Time to Declare. Described as the most successful of all England cricket captains, in his five years leading the side, he won 26 tests. Mr Vaughan discusses his career.

The story of John Lennon's early life is the subject of a new film, Nowhere Boy. The feature-length film is a first for its director, the Turner Prize-nominated artist Sam Taylor-Wood. Sarah Montague went to talk to Ms Taylor-Wood about whether the film is an accurate portrayal of Lennon's early life.

EU leaders meeting in Brussels will discuss the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. The Czech Republic is the only country in the EU not to have ratified the Treaty. Europe correspondent Jonny Dymond reports from the Czech capital Prague, and examines why its leader, President Vaclav Klaus, is reluctant to secure the deal.

A poll published in BBC History magazine found that many of us ta


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00nfrrz)
Schopenhauer

Melvyn Bragg and guests AC Grayling, Beatrice Han-Pile and Christopher Janaway discuss the dark, pessimistic philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer.As a radical young thinker in Germany in the early 19th century, Schopenhauer railed against the dominant ideas of the day. He dismissed the pre-eminent German philosopher Georg Hegel as a pompous charlatan, and turned instead to the Enlightenment thinking of Immanuel Kant for inspiration. Schopenhauer's central idea was that everything in the world was driven by the Will - broadly, the ceaseless desire to live. But this, he argued, left us swinging pointlessly between suffering and boredom. The only escape from the tyranny of the Will was to be found in art, and particularly in music. Schopenhauer was influenced by Eastern philosophy, and in turn his own work had an impact well beyond the philosophical tradition in the West, helping to shape the work of artists and writers from Richard Wagner to Marcel Proust, and Albert Camus to Sigmund Freud.AC Grayling is Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London; Beatrice Han-Pile is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Essex; Christopher Janaway is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southampton.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nhs7q)
Dear Mr Bigelow

Episode 4

Sophie Thompson reads from the letters of Frances Woodsford, a Bournemouth council worker, to wealthy American widower, Paul Bigelow, who she never met, written between 1949 and his death in 1961. They evoke life in postwar Britain, and are introduced by Woodsford herself, who is now in her 90s.

Frances marvels at Arthur Miller's extraordinary new wife, Marilyn Monroe, at the London debut of his new play. She cuts quite a dash herself in her new silver fox fur, but, on finally meeting her brother's wealthy new fiancee, begins to wonder what the future will hold for her.

Abridged by Doreen Estall.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nd2lb)
Women's relationship with clothes

The relationship women have with clothes. Including the legacy of Coco Chanel; emotional attachment to clothes; and what do the contents of our wardrobes say about us?


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00nfsjw)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.


THU 11:30 Reece Shearsmith's Haunted House (b00nfsjy)
An Appointment with Fear

Comic actor Reece Shearsmith hosts energetic and witty illustrated discussions on horror, before an audience inside the reputedly haunted Sutton House in Hackney.

Reece examines some classic scary moments from British radio and television and explores the ingredients for a classic horror story.

He is joined by horror enthusiasts Mark Gatiss, Vic Reeves, Yvette Fielding and Mike Roberts.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00ndlgf)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00ndljn)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00ndllq)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00nf0n0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00ndlp3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00dhfsf)
A Tokyo Murder

The Detective

By John Dryden and Miriam Smith.

Detective Inspector Julie Hill is sent to Tokyo to investigate the disappearance of British teacher Daisy Whitelock. Working with the Tokyo police, who are reluctant to have a foreign police officer interfering with the case, she has to overcome cultural and bureaucratic obstacles as she attempts to untangle what really happened at the foreign language school Daisy taught at.

Julie Hill ...... Rachel Ferguson
Assistant Inspector Takasugi ...... Takuya Matsumoto
Superintendent Yamagawa ...... Teruhiko Nakajima
Alex ...... Micheal Naishtut
Brie ...... Erika Hirokawa
Akira Takahashi ...... Nariyasu Kato

Other parts played by Ken Endo, Daan Archer, Shinji Kobata, Hiroyuki Nojima, Masaru Yoshihara, Takako Anami, Rika Wakasugi and Kei Katsumoto.

Directed by John Dryden.

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b00nccrh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ncwnt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00nfmks)
Sophie Hannah - The Fantastic Book of Everybody's Secrets

You Are a Gongedip

Three chilling tales from crime writer Sophie Hannah's first short story collection mark her debut on Radio 4. Read by Charles Swift

When William's daily routine is interrupted by an irate woman he vaguely recognises, he is irritated and soon shakes her off. But he vastly underestimates her capacity for revenge.

Producer: Melanie Harris
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00ndm9v)
Courtship and Setting Up Home

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of two 18th-century marriages and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride. One got it right, the other destroyed any chance of a happy partnership.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00ncyzb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00ngyvy)
Quentin Cooper hears from participants in a new collaboration between writers and scientists, assembled by novelist Geoffrey Ryman.

Where have all the metals gone? Jason Rauch discusses his mineralogical map showing metals usage around the world, and how landfills and city streets may be the mines of the future.

150 years after Darwin's Origin of Species, Yale University's Steve Stearns forecasts the trends in human evolution over the next few generations.


THU 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00ndqrr)
29th October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Walter Sisulu addresses 70,000 people at the biggest ever ANC rally; East Berlin's Communist party chief tells socialists, 'we need to practise democracy'; the great British cup of tea comes under threat as prices rise by 10 per cent.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 17:00 PM (b00ndqt9)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ndqvj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Bleak Expectations (b00ngz6q)
Series 3

A Lovely Life Re-Kippered Again Once More

Pip Bin's happiness is shattered once again.

Fog-filled streets, murders, and apparitions abound, and through it all echoes the terrible, menacing coo of a possessed evil pigeon.

The return of Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy pastiche in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip...........................Richard Johnson
Young Pip..................................Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent........................Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit......................James Bachman
Dr Wackwallop ...................Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely Fecund......................Sarah Hadland
Pippa........................................Susy Kane
Other parts ...........Mark Evans

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00ndlp5)
Pat has found an excellent website that tells her all she needs to know about setting up a community shop. She's found examples of shops that are real success stories. She's keen to get Usha on board as an expert on the legal side. She's discovered that some of the shops pay someone to run the business and organise the volunteers. Tony wonders about Susan. Of course, they'd like to keep her on as postmistress, but she doesn't know yet if they'll be able to offer her a paid job.

Pat shares her findings with Peggy, who is concerned about Susan and wants to tell her what they know so far.

Eddie and Joe run the cider club at Brookfield, since they're there, rather than in the cold shed at Grundys' Field. It's a convivial evening, though Clarrie is very worried about them making a mess. She had no idea the club was happening there. Joe has a few too many, and bumps into the dresser. Quick fielding by Robert and Neil saves some crockery, but a teapot crashes to the floor.

Episode written by Caroline Harrington.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00nds0p)
John Wilson reports on the re-opening of Oxford's Ashmolean Museum, after a multi-million pound redevelopment.

The Ashmolean in Oxford is the world's oldest public museum, dating back to the 17th century and named after its founder Elias Ashmole. These days its collection includes drawings by Michaelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, paintings by Constable and Picasso and the Anglo-Saxon treasure, the Alfred Jewel. The Ashmolean reopens after a 61-million-pound demolition and rebuilding project. John Wilson visited the museum as the builders raced to meet the deadline.

Kirsty Lang talks to Alexander Aciman and Emmett Rensin about their book, Twitterature, in which the two US university students retell 75 great works of literature, from Shakespeare to Homer to Chaucer, through Twitter

The Romanian film, Tales From The Golden Age, is a re-telling of urban myths which were popular during the regime of Ceausescu in the 1980s. Kirsty Lang and critic and broadcaster Susan Hitch discuss the long-held tradition of storytelling in Eastern European culture, and how humour was used as a way of dealing with oppression during that time.

Kirsty Lang speaks to the family duo Anita and Kiran Desai to discuss the different cultural, historical and literary forces that formed their writing, making them the internationally-renowned authors they are today. Kiran Desai found fame with her novel, The Inheritance of Loss, when it won the 2006 Man Booker Prize. Her mother, Anita Desai, started writing at an early age while growing up in Mussoorie, India, and has had three of her novels shortlisted for the same prize, including In Custody.

As a new website launches, offering downloadable theatre productions which have been filmed in High Definition, Kirsty Lang discusses the pros and cons of the service with Robert Delamere of digitaltheatre.com and critic Andrew Dickson.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ndtn0)
The Dead Hour

Episode 9

Dramatisation by Chris Dolan of the novel by Denise Mina, set in Glasgow in 1984.

Paddy goes into hiding when she starts to believe she could be the killer's next victim.

Paddy Meehan ...... Amy Manson
Billy ...... Stevie Hannan
Neilson ...... Simon Donaldson
Trisha ...... Cara Kelly
Gourlay ...... Laurie Ventry
Sean ...... Paul Thomas Hickey
JT ...... Finlay McLean
Kate ...... Patricia Kavanagh
Sullivan ...... Andrew Clark
Burns ...... Grant O'Rourke
Ramage ...... Mark McDonnell
Lafferty ...... Stewart Porter
Knox ...... Andrew Byatt
Bernie ...... Richard Conlon

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed by Bruce Young.


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b00nfmtq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00ngzcf)
Evan Davis is joined by a panel of top business guests to discuss those silly bits of paper and metal we call money. Surely someone can invent a better way to pay for things? He also asks what companies are doing to look after their low-income consumers.

Evan is joined by Antony Jenkins, chief executive of credit card company Barclaycard, Jim McCarthy, chief executive of the UK chain Poundland, and Chris Dedicoat, European president of Cisco, the world's largest producer of computer network equipment.


THU 21:00 Leading Edge (b00ngzch)
Nuclear Weapons Testing

The human race's brief relationship with element 92, uranium, has been a tempestuous one, from Nazi research and Hiroshima to Iran and North Korea. Geoff Watts opens secret archives and hears the science behind the fragile peace that has held since 1946.

He begins by talking with Amir Aczel of Boston University, author of Uranium Wars, which examines the early history of research into the element. Dr Aczel once met pioneering physicist Werner Heisenberg and has spent many hours reading letters and archives of the pioneering days of atomic physics.

Though not used against people as a bomb since 1946, uranium hit the headlines again during the first Gulf War, when it was used in armour-piercing shells due to its high density. Professor Simon Wessely, Director of the Centre for Military Health Research at King's College, London tells Geoff about the consequences and about his theory for the cause of Gulf War Syndrome.

With a few notable exceptions, including North Korea, India and Pakistan, most of the major nations have signed the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Most of those, with exceptions such as the USA, China and Iran, have ratified the treaty, agreeing not to let off a nuclear explosion anywhere on or within the Earth. But how can scientists tell if the treaty has been broken?

Geoff Watts investigates the shady world of nuclear weapons testing and asks how UN inspectors can tell if there has been an illegal underground test. He hears about major exercises in Kazakhstan and Slovakia to see just what the inspectors are able to find out.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00nfrrz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00ndvg8)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ndvhn)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Will Europe's leaders back Gordon Brown's climate change fund?

Congress gets tough with 'too big' banks.

Why nothing succeeds like dying.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00ndvt0)
Heartland

Episode 4

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Rob witnesses a stabbing on the local estate.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Pick Ups (b00ngzck)
Series 2

Stags and Bucks

Sitcom by Ian Kershaw, set around a Manchester taxi company.

An old school friend rocks Dave's world, while Mike gets involved in a gay stag night - on the straight side of town.

Mike ...... Paul Loughran
Lind ...... Lesley Sharp
Dave ...... Phil Rowson
Shelly ...... Naomi Radcliffe
Ashley ...... Jonathan Mayor
Darren ...... Chris Hoyle.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00ndw4y)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



FRIDAY 30 OCTOBER 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00nczrq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00nhs7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00nczy8)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00nd00v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00nczzp)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00nd06d)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00nd0dq)
Daily prayer and reflection with the Very Rev John Cairns.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00nd1cg)
Charlotte Smith asks Hilary Benn, Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what happened to the personal details of farmers after the rural payments agency lost them. Originally, 37 tapes containing data of 100,000 farmers were mislaid, and since then all but two have been recovered.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00nd1j8)
Presented by James Naughtie and Justin Webb.

EU leaders meeting in Brussels have agreed a deal designed to win Czech backing for the Lisbon Treaty. Leaders will discuss a deal on how to pay the developing world for tackling emissions of greenhouse gases. Europe correspondent Gavin Hewitt analyses the Lisbon treaty deal, and former director of Friends of the Earth Tony Juniper discusses the EU's climate change policy.

House prices are rising, but more slowly than they have been, according to the Nationwide house price survey. Chief economist at Nationwide, Martin Gahbauer, examines the results.

American troops may have to stay longer in Iraq than is currently anticipated, if elections planned for January are postponed. Bombs recently left 150 people dead, raising concerns over the country's stability and security. Stuart Bowen, Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, comments on the violence in the country and whether it will affect the planned elections in January.

The Earl of Wessex has sparked controversy after suggesting the risk of dying is part of the attraction of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award scheme (DofE). Prince Edward was speaking during a visit to Australia. Correspondent Nick Bryant discusses the reaction to Prince Edward's comments.

The UN's torture investigator has been refused entry to Zimbabwe, despite insisting he was invited by the Prime Minister, Morgan Tsvangirai. The incident is the latest episode in a escalating power struggle between Mr Tsvangirai's MDC party and President Robert Mugabe's Zanu-PF. Human rights group Amnesty International has warned the country is on the brink of sliding back into violence. Correspondent Andrew Harding reports from Zimbabwe's capital, Harare.

A pilot who safely landed 155 passengers and crew after his US Airways plane hit a flock of birds has received the highest award given by the Guild of Air Pilots and Air Navigators, the Masters' Medal. Captain Chesley 'Sully' Sullenberger safely brought the aircraft down in the Hudson River shortly after it came into difficulty after taking off from La Guardian airport in New York, last January. Captain Sullenberger has written a book, Highest Duty, about his 42-year career. James Naughtie spoke to "Sully" Sullenberger about the Hudson River flight.

Thought for the day with Vishvapani, a member of the Western Buddhist Order.

Britain's train operators are calling for longer franchises and more financial support, to deliver what they say would be improved services for passengers. The Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) are calling for financial assistance to maintain the appeal of rail travel over more polluting forms of transport, such as road and air travel. ATOC's chief executive Michael Roberts and transport writer Christian Wolmar discuss whether train companies should receive more financial assistance during the recession.

A wartime massacre in the Polish town of Jedwabne became the centre of debate between Foreign Secretary David Miliband and shadow foreign secretary William Hague on the Today programme. The argument centred on the views of Polish MEP Michal Kaminski, leader of a new group in the European Parliament, which includes Tory MEPs. The Foreign Secretary claimed that Mr Kaminski is an anti-semite, and cited the Chief Rabbi of Poland and Mr Kaminski's controversial statements on Jedwabne, in support of his argument. A subsequent statement from the Rabbi appears to support the Tories' claim that Mr Kaminski is not a racist. The Chief Rabbi of Poland discusses the argument and clarifies his views, and political editor Nick Robinson comments on the Conservatives' policy in Europe.

One of the most famous English compositions of the 18th century is being restaged at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, London. Artaxerxes by Thomas Arne, who was the leading British composer of his day, has not been played at the Royal Opera House since 1842. Reporter Nicola Stanbridge goes along to the opera's rehearsals.

The UN's torture investigator has been prevented from entering Zimbabwe. Manfred Nowak had been invited by Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangarai, but has been prevented from entering by President Mugabe's Zanu-PF party. Mr Nowak discusses the incident.

Royal Mail and the Communication Workers' Union are to resume talks in an attempt to break the dispute which has paralysed the postal service. Neither side is speaking publicly about the talks, but details have been leaking since last night. Employment correspondent Martin Shankleman comments on the fresh talks.

A book documenting the economics of World War I and the Great Depression has won the Business Book of the Year Award 2009. Author Liaquat Ahamed was awarded the Financial Times Goldman Sachs award for his book Lords of Finance. Mr Ahamad discusses his book and its appeal in the current recession.

The House of Commons will for the first time sit without any MPs, as members of the UK Youth Parliament take to the


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00ncwp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00nhs7s)
Dear Mr Bigelow

Episode 5

Sophie Thompson reads from the letters of Frances Woodsford, a Bournemouth council worker, to wealthy American widower, Paul Bigelow, who she never met, written between 1949 and his death in 1961. They evoke life in postwar Britain, and are introduced by Woodsford herself, who is now in her 90s.

Frances attends the 'wedding of the year' between her brother and Audrey and begins to get used to life alone with Mother - only to realise, perhaps too late, that the most important friend in her life is Mr Bigelow, who has now fallen seriously ill.

Abridged by Doreen Estall.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00nd2ld)
Provocation defence in murder trials

Should infidelity be a defence for murder? Plus, the advantages of flat sharing as a single parent; and how women write love letters.


FRI 11:00 The Entrepreneur's Wound (b00nh06m)
BBC business editor Robert Peston talks to some of Britain's most successful business people about the effect that their traumatic childhood had on them.

Featuring interviews with Sir Stuart Rose of Marks and Spencer, Damon Buffini of Permira, Sir Gulam Noon, Vincent Tchenguiz and Professor Manfred Kets de Vries of INSEAD business school in Paris.


FRI 11:30 The Adventures of Inspector Steine (b00nh06p)
The Deep Blue Sea

Comedy drama series by Lynne Truss set in 1950s Brighton.

It is Twitten's birthday but no one's in the mood to celebrate - Mrs Groynes has a problem with contraband and lovesick Brunswick is threatening to resign, so Twitten suggests that a boat trip might solve things all round.

Inspector Steine ...... Michael Fenton Stevens
Sergeant Brunswick ...... John Ramm
Constable Twitten ...... Matt Green
Mrs Groynes ...... Samantha Spiro
Adelaide Vine ...... Janet Ellis.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00ndlgh)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00ndljq)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00ndlls)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00nh06r)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00ndlp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00dhhcq)
A Tokyo Murder

The Daughter

By John Dryden and Miriam Smith.

Daisy Whitelock arrives in Japan to teach English at a foreign language school in Tokyo. Her desire to scratch beneath the surface of Japanese society leads her to shun the companionship of the other ex-pat teachers in her shared apartment, and exposes her to the terrifying reality of a disturbed mind.

Daisy Whitelock ...... Sophie Cartman
Akira Takahashi ...... Nariyasu Kato
Brie ...... Erika Hirokawa
Alex ...... Michael Naishtut

Other parts played by Junnichi Takahashi, Sachiko Yamada, Adam Browning, Shinji Kobata, Rika Wakasugi, Kei Katsumoto, Ken Endo, Masaru Yoshihara, Takako Anami, Erika Akiyama, Hikari Motohashi.

Directed by John Dryden.

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00nh06t)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Matthew Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and Pippa Greenwood are guests of the Weald Horticultural Society in Sevenoaks, Kent.

Bob explores the vineyards in the 'Garden of England', discussing which varieties are best suited to winemaking and how best to care for them.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life (b00ndm9x)
Neat and Not too Showy

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Moving into the 19th century, Prof Vickery explores the homes of people lower down the social scale and their ideas about how they wanted them to look. She draws on a series of funny and revealing letters which she discovered in the archive of a wallpaper company.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00nh0qv)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series.

Marking the lives of actor and scriptwriter Norman Painting, voice of Phil Archer in The Archers, manager of Northern Ireland bus company during the Troubles Werner Heubeck, pediatric orthopedist Dr Ignacio Ponseti, international cricket upmire David Shepherd, and British silversmith William Phipps.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00nh0qx)
Nick Hornby talks about his adaptation of Lynn Barber's memoir, An Education, with director Lone Scherfig.

Neil Brand tells us the score about the theme tune of The Great Escape.

Cristian Mungiu discusses life in communist Romania as depicted in his portmanteau movie Tales From The Golden Age.


FRI 16:56 1989: Day by Day (b00ndqrt)
30th October 1989

Sir John Tusa looks back at the events making the news 20 years ago.

Riots in Moscow follow a demonstration outside the KGB headquarters; the Bishop of London warns the Church against an invasion of female priests; Margaret Thatcher's leadership style causes grumblings among the Tory grass roots.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00ndqtc)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ndqvl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00nh0qz)
Series 69

Episode 6

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz, recorded at the University of Bedfordshire. The panel includes Jeremy Hardy, Paul Sinha and Sue Perkins.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00ndlp7)
In the small hours of the morning, Clarrie comes out with a cup of tea for Eddie, who is dealing with a difficult calving. Eddie apologises for the mess in the kitchen - he will clear it up. Clarrie is worried about the broken teapot, but Eddie says he'll get his friend Barry to fix it.

The calf is duly born, and they share a moment together. Clarrie knows that this is where Eddie belongs. It's what he should be doing, if there was any justice in the world.

In Costa Rica, Matt meets up with a British expat. Geoff is keen to organise them an apartment to rent. Lilian is appalled that Matt's taken it on from someone he doesn't know - and anyway, as far as she's concerned, it's money down the drain. They aren't staying.

Matt calls a taxi, and takes Lilian to see the apartment. Lilian is not enchanted. They've barely gone a few yards when a dog rushes at them behind a gate. Lilian is genuinely frightened. She phones Russell, to Matt's horror. Russell is clear. Matt absolutely must be back for the hearing. If he doesn't turn up, he really will be in deep trouble.

Episode written by Caroline Harrington.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00nds0r)
John Wilson presents a special edition live from the BBC's Maida Vale studios, reporting on their 75-year history of recording and broadcasting classical, pop and radiophonic music, and radio drama.

Musician Jarvis Cocker, actor Bill Paterson and composer Anthony Payne discuss their work at Maida Vale; John speaks to artists taking part in the celebration, including Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Corinne Bailey Rae, Jamie Cullum and former member of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Dick Mills.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ndtn2)
The Dead Hour

Episode 10

Dramatisation by Chris Dolan of the novel by Denise Mina, set in Glasgow in 1984.

Paddy confronts the killer, just as he is about to strike again.

Paddy Meehan ...... Amy Manson
Billy ...... Stevie Hannan
Neilson ...... Simon Donaldson
Trisha ...... Cara Kelly
Gourlay ...... Laurie Ventry
Sean ...... Paul Thomas Hickey
JT ...... Finlay McLean
Kate ...... Patricia Kavanagh
Sullivan ...... Andrew Clark
Burns ...... Grant O'Rourke
Ramage ...... Mark McDonnell
Lafferty ...... Stewart Porter
Knox ...... Andrew Byatt
Bernie ...... Richard Conlon

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed by Bruce Young.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00nh1cm)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Cambridge University. The panellists are the shadow business secretary Kenneth Clarke, Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Shirley Williams, UKIP MEP Marta Andreasen and the former Lord Chancellor, Lord Falconer.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00nh1cp)
On Strike

Clive James reflects on the postal workers' dispute and gives his personal view of the modern history of labour relations.


FRI 21:00 A History of Private Life: Omnibus (b00nh1w5)
Episode 5

Omnibus edition of Prof Amanda Vickery's series revealing the hidden history of home over 400 years, drawing on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self - an idea which was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The readers are Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

The singers are Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00ndvgb)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ndvhq)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

The government's adviser on drug use is sacked for criticising the Home Secretary's decision on cannabis.

Europe agrees on a 100-billion euro climate fund for developing nations. What help is being offered for struggling East European members?

Ex-president Chirac ordered to stand trial on corruption allegations.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00ndvt2)
Heartland

Episode 5

Alex Jones and David Holt read from the novel by Anthony Cartwright, set in 2002 in the fictional Black Country community of Cinderheath.

Jim makes an unwelcome discovery on his son's computer.

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00nfmts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00ndw50)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00ndtnb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00ndtmw)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00ndtmy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00ndtn0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00ndtn2)

1989: Day by Day Omnibus 23:00 SUN (b00nczpl)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 SAT (b00ncfmb)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 SUN (b00ncyzg)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 MON (b00ndqt3)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 TUE (b00ndqrm)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 WED (b00ndqrp)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 THU (b00ndqrr)

1989: Day by Day 16:56 FRI (b00ndqrt)

1989: How The Wall Fell 20:00 TUE (b00nfn2j)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00nfmts)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00nfmts)

A History of Private Life: Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b00nh1w5)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00n9lm3)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00nh1cp)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b008v8zj)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b0090mt6)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00nfmkn)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00nfmkq)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00nfmks)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 MON (b00ndn43)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 TUE (b00ndm9q)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 WED (b00ndm9s)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 THU (b00ndm9v)

Amanda Vickery - A History of Private Life 15:45 FRI (b00ndm9x)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00nczk2)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00n80b5)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00nf0my)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00ncf8r)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00n9lm1)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00nh1cm)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00d1yqx)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00d1yqx)

Art Attack 11:30 TUE (b00nf33j)

As Told To Craig Brown 23:00 TUE (b00b4j53)

Avoiding the Question 20:45 WED (b00nfqzn)

Baroque and Roll: Townshend on Purcell 13:30 TUE (b00nf3kr)

Beauty of Britain 11:30 MON (b00ndxjp)

Being Jewish: Blood or Belief? 20:00 MON (b00nf01w)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00ncwn9)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00ncwn9)

Beyond This Life 13:30 SUN (b00ncwwt)

Bleak Expectations 18:30 THU (b00ngz6q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00ndvt8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00ndvsw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00ndvsy)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00ndvt0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00ndvt2)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00nctk9)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00nd1ww)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00nd1ww)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00nhs7z)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00nhs7z)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00nhs7n)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00nhs7n)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00nhs7q)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00nhs7q)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00nhs7s)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00n7zhg)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00ndxjr)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00ncwp2)

Brother Mine 14:45 SUN (b00cm7gy)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00n6yws)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00ncwzv)

Click On 16:30 MON (b00ndzw4)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00nf0n0)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00nf0n0)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00ncwp6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00ncwp6)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00ndzsy)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00cq7p6)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00dghmq)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00dhfsf)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00dhhcq)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00ncdcz)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00nccsv)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00nd1cl)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00nd1c8)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00nd1cb)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00nd1cd)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00nd1cg)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00n9llm)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00nh06r)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00ncf8h)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00nfsjw)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00ndtmt)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00nds0k)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00nds0m)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00nds0p)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00nds0r)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00n9llp)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00nh06t)

Hut 33 11:30 WED (b01js406)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00nfrrz)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00nfrrz)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00nfq2j)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00n9llr)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00nh0qv)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b00nfmtq)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b00nfmtq)

Leading Edge 21:00 THU (b00ngzch)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00ncfmn)

M1 Magic 11:00 WED (b00nfqz6)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00nflx6)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00ngyvy)

Metaphor for Healing 21:00 TUE (b00nfq2l)

Metaphor for Healing 16:30 WED (b00nfq2l)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00n9ly8)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00ncgyf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00nczy0)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00nczrj)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00nczrl)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00nczrn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00nczrq)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00nfqz4)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00nfqz4)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00nfqzd)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00ncf8k)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00ncf8k)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00n8nkc)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00nfqzl)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00n9lyj)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00ncwn7)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00nd0dg)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00nd066)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00nd068)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00nd06b)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00nd06d)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00ncwnc)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00n9lyq)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00ncwnp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00ncwny)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00ncfn3)

News 13:00 SAT (b00ncf8p)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00ncwnj)

One 23:00 WED (b00nfqzq)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00ncyzb)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00ncyzb)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00ncfmd)

PM 17:00 MON (b00ndqvb)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00ndqt5)

PM 17:00 WED (b00ndqt7)

PM 17:00 THU (b00ndqt9)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00ndqtc)

Parting Shots 09:30 TUE (b00nf33d)

Pick Ups 23:00 THU (b00ngzck)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00ncyzq)

Planning For Pandemic 11:00 MON (b00ndxjm)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00n6z0g)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00ncyzd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00n9lyl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00nd0dz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00nd0dj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00nd0dl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00nd0dn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00nd0dq)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00ncfmq)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00ncfmq)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00ncfmq)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00ncwnt)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00ncwnt)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00ncwnt)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b00nccrh)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b00nccrh)

Reece Shearsmith's Haunted House 11:30 THU (b00nfsjy)

Return from Guantanamo 17:00 SUN (b00ncb0x)

Rik Mayall's Bedside Tales 23:15 WED (b00nfqzs)

Rudy's Rare Records 18:30 WED (b00nfqzj)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00ncf8t)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00ncdcx)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00ncfmz)

Science vs The Stradivarius 11:00 TUE (b00nf33g)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00n9lyd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00ncwn3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00nd00x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00nd00n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00nd00q)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00nd00s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00nd00v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00n9lyb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00n9lyg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00ncfmg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00ncwn1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00ncwn5)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00ncyzj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00nczzf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00nd00l)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00nczy2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00nczzh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00nczy4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00nczzk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00nczy6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00nczzm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00nczy8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00nczzp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00ncfml)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00ncyzn)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00ndqw3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00ndqvd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00ndqvg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00ndqvj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00ndqvl)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00ncwng)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00ncwng)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00ndwc2)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00ndwc2)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00ncwp0)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00ncwnr)

The Adventures of Inspector Steine 11:30 FRI (b00nh06p)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00ncwp4)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00nczk0)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00nczk0)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00ndlpk)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00ndlpk)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00ndlp1)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00ndlp1)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00ndlp3)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00ndlp3)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00ndlp5)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00ndlp5)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00ndlp7)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00n911b)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00ngzcf)

The Choice 09:00 TUE (b00nf1bv)

The Choice 21:30 TUE (b00nf1bv)

The Entrepreneur's Wound 11:00 FRI (b00nh06m)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00nh0qx)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00ncwwm)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00ncwwm)

The Grand Masquerade 10:30 SAT (b00ljymy)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00nfqzb)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00n9llz)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00nh0qz)

The Oldest Bible 21:00 WED (b00dp74r)

The Sound of Magnolias 15:30 SAT (b00n5404)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b00n80b1)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b00nf01t)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00ncf8f)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00ncwwr)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00ndvst)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00ndvhj)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00ndvhl)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00ndvhn)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00ndvhq)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00n8m2s)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00nfqzg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00ndw54)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00ndw4t)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00ndw4w)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00ndw4y)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00ndw50)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00ncdcv)

Today 06:00 MON (b00nd1kk)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00nd1j2)

Today 06:00 WED (b00nd1j4)

Today 06:00 THU (b00nd1j6)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00nd1j8)

Too Much Information 18:30 TUE (b00n88d3)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00nccrf)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00ncd4k)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00ncf8m)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00ncfmj)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00ncwnm)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00ncwnw)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00ncwwp)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00ncyzl)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00nczk5)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00ndwc0)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00ndllj)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00ndvhg)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00ndljj)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00ndvg4)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00ndljl)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00ndvg6)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00ndljn)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00ndvg8)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00ndljq)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00ndvgb)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00nczk7)

With Great Pleasure 23:00 MON (b00j4hmz)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00ncfm8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00nd1zk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00nd2mc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00nd2l8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00nd2lb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00nd2ld)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00ndlnz)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00ndlll)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00ndlln)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00ndllq)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00ndlls)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00ndljg)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00ndlg9)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00ndlgc)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00ndlgf)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00ndlgh)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00n9lyn)