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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00mm0dy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00mjmvk)
Halfway to Hollywood

Episode 5

Michael Palin reads from his second volume of memoirs, covering his film work and family life in the 1980s.

Lots of kissing, the rushes look good, and a career swerve into world travel beckons.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00mm0v9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00mm0vc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00mm0vf)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00mm0vh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00mm0vk)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


SAT 05:45 Wars of The Roses (b00frp64)
Episode 4

Wesley Kerr follows the Somerset town of Taunton in its bid to win the RHS Britain in Bloom competition.

Wesley finds out who the winners are at the Britain in Bloom awards, as dozens of finalists from across the country gather for a gala event at Chester Racecourse. Will Taunton have done enough to win the prestigious gold medal and be crowned Best Large Town in Britain?


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00mm101)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00mp51z)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00mp521)
Series 13

Northumberland - St Oswald's Way: Holy Island

Clare Balding walks the length of St Oswald's Way in Northumberland.

The first section of the route takes Clare from Holy Island to St Cuthbert's Cave. She is joined by local clergyman Michael Mountney, the creator of the route, who conceived the idea as a millenium project for his parish. They are joined by long-distance walking expert Jenny Walters, who offers Clare advice on how to keep her feet in shape for the miles ahead and the kit she needs to keep on track.

St Oswald's Way is a 97-mile route, running from Holy Island in the north, along the stunning Northumberland coast before heading inland to Heavensfield and Hadrian's Wall. The path links some of the places associated with St Oswald, the King of Northumbria in the early seventh century, who played a major part in bringing Christianity to his people.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00mp5rc)
Farming Today This Week

It's been an emtional week for many after the e.coli outbreak at Godstone Farm in Surrey. As another farm closes, Charlotte Smith investiagtes what impact this could have on farms which open to the public. A number of petting farms have told us they have seen a drop in the number of visitors since the outbreak. Charlotte visits a farm in Worcester which opens its doors on a regular basis to organised school visits, to find out how safe farms really are.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00mp5rf)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00mp5rh)
Presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague.

The Liberal Democrats' Treasury spokesman Vince Cable has drawn up a 14 billion pounds-a-year list of cuts he says are needed to begin tackling Britain's record national debt. Correspondent Ross Hawkins reports from the Liberal Democrats' party conference in Bournemouth.

President Obama has recorded interviews with all the US Sunday talk shows to convince people about his plans for healthcare reform. Washington correspondent Imtiaz Tyab considers how unusual it is for a president to do so many interviews at once.

Followers of the exiled former Thai prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra are holding a mass rally in Bangkok to coincide with the third anniversary of the coup which ousted him. Correspondent Alastair Leithead reports from the rally on what the so-called 'red shirts' are hoping to achieve.

English councils lose almost 90 million pounds a year through people falsely claiming the single person's discount on their council tax, the Audit Commission says. Correspondent John Andrew reports on the efforts of the Newcastle councillor Sir Jeremy Beecham to do something about it.

As violence and anarchy continues in Somalia, so does the exodus of many of its people. Some resettle in calmer corners of Somalia but, as correspondent Mike Thomson reports, many others are so desperate that they are braving desert conditions, bandits and militia groups to get out of the country altogether.

The North-East Passage, running from the northern Pacific to the North Sea along the northern coast of Russia, has until recently been too icy to navigate. Reporter Richard Galpin meets one of two German ships which have just completed the journey at the Russian port of Arkhangelsk.
Prof Paul Berkman, head of the Arctic Ocean geopolitics programme at the University of Cambridge, considers whether there will be battle for ownership of this potentially valuable trade route.

Thought for the Day with Rev Bob Marshall, an Anglican priest.

A solicitor who faced a disciplinary panel after campaigning against care home closures has been cleared of breaching the codes of her profession. Yvonne Hossack explains why she began campaigning and the support she was given by the home secretary, Alan Johnson.

President Obama's decision to shelve plans for bases in Europe has been seen in a variety of ways by US commentators: both strong and weak, sensible and reckless, pragmatic and idealistic. World affairs editor John Simpson and Dr Robin Niblett, director of the think-tank Chatham House, discuss how the new approach to foreign policy is being seen around the world.

A fourth farm in England has closed because of concerns about E.coli. Hugh Pennington, Emeritus Professor of Bacteriology at Aberdeen University, discusses whether all children's animal attractions should be closed down until the outbreak has been contained.

A new set of guidelines on how to treat patients who are dying in hospitals is facing criticism from relatives and medical experts, who say that in some cases people are dying too early because they have been put on the scheme. Reporter Jack Izzard investigates the Liverpool Care Pathway and meets staff and patients' relatives to discuss the initiative.

France has said it intends to close the camp in Calais known as 'The Jungle', where migrants gather to try to reach the UK. William Spindler of the UNHCR Sir Andrew Green of Migration Watch UK and Donna Covey, chief executive of the Refugee Council, discuss the move by the French government.

The avid art collector, gallery owner and advertising oligarch Charles Saatchi rarely reveals much about his private life. Gavin Turk, one of the Young British Artists - or YBAs - and art critic Brian Sewell discuss their opinion of the art collector and consider his impact on the world of contemporary art.

Scotland's most senior prosecutor has condemned a fresh move by the Lockerbie bomber to protest his innocence. Tony Kelly, Scottish lawyer for Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, explains why documents relating to an appeal against his client's conviction for the 1988 bombing have been put on a new website.

Is enough being invested in the long term future of British design? Sir John Sorrell, chairman of the London Design Festival, and Alice Rawsthorn, design critic for the International Herald Tribune, discuss some iconic pieces of work and the role design can play to help the UK through the recession.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00mp5wk)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. Fi Glover is joined by musician and actor Gary Kemp. With poetry from Elvis McGonagall.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00mp5wm)
Oil wealth transforms cities but in very different ways. Sandi Toksvig hears about Abu Dhabi from Jo Tatchell, who was brought up there. Its high-rise glitz and cultural aspirations, coupled with caution and reserve, contrast vividly with the chaos and corruption - but liveliness - of Lagos, Nigeria, as seen by the former Financial Times correspondent there, Michael Peel.

Sandi also finds out from Middle East travel writer Matthew Teller about why the ultra-modern Gulf states, where there is no shortage of cheap petrol, want to take a 19th-century lesson and build a railway linking the countries.


SAT 10:30 Youssou N'Dour at 50: Africa's Greatest Star (b00mp5zb)
Robin Denselow profiles the musician Youssou N'Dour as he reaches his 50th birthday, and travels to Senegal to interview the singer in his home city of Dakar.

Denselow analyses not just his music but the way N'Dour has used it for the benefit of his country and his continent. He had huge success with the duet 7 Seconds with Neneh Cherry in 1994, but he has been making music for nearly 40 years and has collaborated with many international artists.

Contributors include Peter Gabriel, Branford Marsalis, DJ Charlie Gillett and Senegalese band Orchestra Baobab.

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b00mp5zd)
Ten years after Labour introduced the ASBO, anti-social behaviour is still a worry to many voters. With both government and opposition promising a crackdown, Ben Wright asks how much power politicians really have over our behaviour and hears claims that too much interference by the state is damaging society.

Trying to make us behave better has been one of the Labour government's missions. Nuisance neighbours, troublesome teenagers, yobs and louts have been in the sights of successive home secretaries and the government has legislated with zeal. It is ten years since the first antisocial behaviour order - or ASBO - was issued. Since then the government has built up a vast arsenal of measures to combat a wide number of problems, from crack houses to high hedges. But have the dispersal orders, behaviour contracts, parenting orders and noise notices made any difference in the worst-affected areas? And how has the ASBO industry that has developed over the past decade affected our ability to resolve disputes among ourselves? Have we become too dependent on state mediation? And are we less tolerant of other people's behaviour? Ben Wright goes to Gorton in east Manchester to talk to people in an area where the police and council have used a wide range of measures to tackle antisocial behaviour.

He speaks to Assistant Chief Constable Constable Garry Shewan of Greater Manchester Police, to Paul Cullen from Manchester City Council and to Eric Allison, a long-time Gorton resident and the Guardian's prisons correspondent. We also hear from the Labour MP Frank Field, who wants communities to be given more power to deal with nuisance neighbours directly, and from sociologist Stuart Whaiton, who thinks politicians who call for more crackdowns on antisocial behaviour are indulging in a 'politics of fear'. Finally, Home office minister David Hanson and Shadow home secretary Chris Grayling debate current policy on the issue.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00mp5zg)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00mp63v)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 I Guess That's Why They Call It The News (b00mlxft)
Episode 5

Fred MacAulay chairs a topical panel show in which two teams play games inspired by the week's headlines. The show asks both the big and the little questions, and provides thoroughly silly answers to both. With Will Smith, Paul Sinha and Sarah Millican.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00mp63x)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00mp63z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00mlxpr)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from Ashbourne in Derbyshire. The panellists are former cabinet minister Margaret Beckett, Shadow Secretary of State for International Development Andrew Mitchell, broadcaster and contestant in The Apprentice Saira Khan and Julia Unwin, chief executive of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00mp66c)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00mpjnh)
Choice of Straws

Dramatisation by Roy Williams of the novel by ER Braithwaite. 1960, London's East End: twins Jack and Dave Bennett are a happy-go-lucky, rootless pair. If they do occasionally rough-up a black guy it's just a game to them - until a victim in Whitechapel fights back and Dave pulls a knife.

Jack ...... Harry Hepple
Dave ...... Luke Norris
Michelle ...... Gugu Mbatha-Raw
Mum ...... Ellie Haddington
Dad ...... David Hargreaves
Ruth ...... Annabelle Dowler
Mr Spencer ...... Alex Lanipekun
Officer ...... Stephen Hogan

Directed by Claire Grove.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b00mk6tc)
Series 8

Vaughan Williams' Fantasia on a Theme, by Thomas Tallis

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis

When Vaughan Williams wrote his Tallis Fantasia in 1910, he changed the course of British music. Here at last was a piece of music which was no longer under the Teutonic influence, but which drew on old English hymn tunes and folk idioms for its themes. As the string music builds to a climax, interviewees tell how this music has brought solace and hope in times of tragedy and changed the course of their lives.

When composers Herbert Howells and Ivor Gurney heard the premiere of Vaughan Williams' Tallis Fantasia in Gloucester Cathedral in 1910, it's said that they walked the streets of Gloucester all night because of the sheer excitement of possibility that this new piece had awakened in them.

This programme tells how the beauty and richness of Vaughan Williams' Tallis Fantasia awakened a life long love of classical music in a nine year old boy at bedtime; how it served as comfort for an artist in despair and how it brought solace to a grieving father

Contributors:
Michael Kennedy
Ian Clarke
EM Marshall
Rolf Jordan
Peter Phillips
Harry Atterbury
Colin Wood

Producer: Rosie Boulton

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00mpjnm)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Highlights of this week's Woman's Hour programmes with Jane Garvey.

Including Royal biographer William Shawcross on his biography of the Queen Mother, Maeve Binchy on her life as a novelist, the popularity and influence of German chancellor Angela Merkel, Margaret Drabble on writers' relationship with the British landscape; the backlash against the sexualisation of young girls, and extended paternity leave and whether dads really want to stay at home.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00mpjnp)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00mpjnr)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00mpjny)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00mpjp2)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00mpjp4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00mpjpd)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

He is joined by Python and traveller Michael Palin, the comedians Mitchell and Webb and the actress Jane Horrocks.

With comedy from Edinburgh Comedy Award winner Tim Key, and music from Fiery Furnaces and Duke and the King.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00mpjpj)
Christopher Bailey

Mary Ann Sieghart profiles fashion designer Christopher Bailey, the 38-year-old Yorkshire lad who made his mark in New York and Milan before returning to put a unique stamp on the quintessentially British brand Burberry. Thanks to Bailey's efforts, it is now considered one of the top fashion brands in the world.

Featuring contributions from designer Zandra Rhodes, the editor in chief of the American edition of Marie Claire magazine Joanna Coles, his teacher and a student friend from his early art school days in Dewsbury.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00mpjpz)
Sam Mendes's new film Away We Go, A Gate at the Stairs by Lorrie Moore, and Small Island tv adaptation

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by historian Frances Stonor Saunders, critic David Benedict and writer Louise Doughty to discuss the cultural highlights of the week - featuring a giant operatic nude, fumbled adoptions and old pots in a new room.

In Sam Mendes's new film, Away We Go, Verona (Maya Rudolph) and Burt (John Krasinski) are a couple who are bumbling their way through life until Verona becomes pregnant. This inspires them to set off on a North American odyssey, dropping in on friends and family to try and find the ideal location to begin parenthood together. However, everywhere they go and all the families they visit seem to lack whatever it is they're looking for.

Andrea Levy's novel Small Island, which won the Orange Prize in 2004, traced the experience of Jamaicans seeking a new life in postwar London. Paula Milne and Sarah Williams have now adapted the book for television. In late 1930s Jamaica, trainee teacher Hortense (Naomie Harris) dreams of travelling to 'the mother country' and living in a house in London with a garden and a doorbell. Queenie (Ruth Watson) escapes to London from the drudgery of a Yorkshire pig farm. War and marriages of convenience combine to intertwine their lives in unforeseen ways.

Lorrie Moore is an American writer best known for her short stories. A Gate at the Stairs is her first novel for 15 years and records a year in the life of Midwest college student Tassie Keltjin, beginning just before 9/11. Tassie has escaped her rural roots to study in the college town of Troy, but her search for a babysitting job brings her into the lives of Sarah and Edward and their adopted daughter. Back home her brother is thinking of joining the army. Eventually secrets are revealed and tragedies unfold.

Hungarian composer Gyorgy Ligeti wrote only one opera, Le Grand Macabre. A sprawling, absurdist work with a libretto based on a play by Michel De Ghelderode, its central character, Nekrotzar - a personification of death - arrives in Breughelland to annouce the imminent extinction of all life by a huge comet. The ENO production of the opera by Catalan company La Fura del Baus features an enormous model of a naked woman in, on and around which all the action takes place. The meaning of the opera may be obscure, but the staging is spectacular.

The Victoria and Albert Museum's ceramic galleries were first opened 100 years ago. Since then the ceramics collection has grown to more than 26,000 pieces, making it the largest and most comprehensive of its kind in the world. The opening of these new galleries represents a move to make the collection more accessible to the public after a century of languishing in gloomy wooden cabinets, seldom visited by anyone apart from scholars or museum visitors with a poor sense of direction. The first phase of the renovation sees key pieces from the collection arranged in chronological and thematic groups to provide a comprehensible and visually stunning account of the global evolution of ceramics.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00mpjq7)
Scott of Slimbridge

From the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust centre in Gloucestershire, Frank Gardner reflects on the career of Sir Peter Scott - ornithologist, author, painter, sportsman, war hero and broadcaster, whose television programme Look ran for over 25 years.

Born 100 years ago, the son of Scott of the Antarctic, he was dubbed the patron saint of conservation. He was the first to campaign for the preservation of endangered species and to warn against the destruction of natural habitats.

A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00mjklh)
The A-Z of Dr Johnson - Boswell's Life of Johnson

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Robin Brooks of James Boswell's biography of Samuel Johnson, to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Johnson's birth.

Boswell visits Johnson only intermittently, but relies on him more and more. Johnson meets Hester Thrale, who becomes his devoted friend and confidante, and the most important person in his life.

Samuel Johnson ...... Kenneth Cranham
James Boswell ...... Paul Higgins
Hester Thrale ...... Annabelle Dowler
David Garrick ...... David Hargreaves
Mrs Desmoulins ...... Susan Jameson
Joshua Reynolds ...... Matt Addis
Dilly ...... Stephen Hogan
Wilkes ...... Philip Fox

Directed by Claire Grove.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00mpjqk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Iconoclasts (b00mkbyn)
Series 2

Episode 2

Edward Stourton chairs a discussion series in which guests set out their strong views on a subject, before being challenged by a panel of experts.

Kenyan economist James Shikwati argues that aid to developing countries does more harm than good. He says that aid promotes corruption and complacency, damages local economies and teaches people to be beggars.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b00mjrxs)
Tom Sutcliffe chairs the cryptic general knowledge quiz, featuring teams from Wales and the north of England.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00mjklm)
Roger McGough presents requests for much-loved poems that contrast the joy of living with the experience of memory loss.



SUNDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00mplq8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b0088v2z)
Telling the World

The Glamoury Ointment

Series of stories from cultures and folklore around the world.

Hugh Lupton tells a story from English folklore featuring the powerful magic of the fair.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00mplqb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00mplqd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00mplqg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00mplqj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00mplql)
The sound of bells from St Mary Magdalene, Ditcheat in Somerset.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00mpjpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00mplqn)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00mplqq)
Reinventing Ritual

Mark Tully asks how, in an increasingly secular age, our deep need for rituals and rites of passage is being expressed and nourished. How do new rituals develop and in response to what needs?

The readers are Janice Acquah, Frank Stirling and David Westhead.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00mplqs)
Charlotte Smith takes tea with Emma, Duchess of Rutland, to talk about the reorganisation at Belvoir Castle estate. Aimed at encouraging younger farmers to stay in the area, the Home Farm is being redistributed to tenant farmers.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00mplqv)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00mplqx)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00mplqz)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00mplr1)
Elizabeth Finn Care

Jenni Murray appeals on behalf of Elizabeth Finn Care.

Donations to Elizabeth Finn Care should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope EFC. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Elizabeth Finn Care with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity No: 207812.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00mplr3)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00mpmlw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00mpmly)
A Fiery Light

Early in the 12th century, Hildegard of Bingen was given into the care of an enclosed religious community. Her visions, writings and music speak of the depths of the mystery of God.

Michael Ford travels to Germany with singer Sasha Johnson Manning to explore Hildegard's life. The preacher is medieval scholar Sister Benedicta Ward.


SUN 08:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00mlxpv)
Series 1

Bird's Nest Soup

Filming the birds that make the nests of saliva so prized by Chinese gourmet chefs in the total darkness of a Borneo cave proved difficult, until a conical mound of bat guano provided a natural platform.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2009.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00mpmm0)
We hear from an illegal immigrant about why he chose to come to the UK, and Sir Stirling Moss gives his thoughts on the Formula 1 car crash controversy.

After Iran's President again denied the Holocaust, a child survivor of the Theresienstadt concentration camp tells the story of a living memorial to the children who died there.

After the bones of St Therese of Lisieux arrived in the UK to go on tour, we talk to US author David Farley about another very special relic.

The Sunday newspapers are reviewed by Susannah York, star of stage and screen, and the writer Francis Wheen.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00mpmm2)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b00mpmm4)
Stonewall

Sue MacGregor presents the series which reunites a group of people intimately involved in a moment of modern history.

Sue brings together the men and women who were instrumental in the early years of the gay rights campaign group, Stonewall. She is joined by Sir Ian McKellen, Matthew Parris, Lisa Power, Michael Cashman and Olivette Cole-Wilson.

In September 1988 a small group joined forces in a campaign against a law now known as Section 28. This law banned councils from 'promoting homosexuality' or 'promoting the teaching in any maintained school of the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationship'.

The gay rights scene at the time was radical and activist and there were no campaign groups engaging both gay men and lesbians together. Stonewall aimed to create a professional lobbying group that would fight against the discrimination of lesbians, gay men and bisexuals. Dubbed Stonewall to signal doggedness and to commemorate the New York riots in which gay protestors had fought back against police brutality two decades before, it called for full legal rights, which still seemed a loony-left pipe dream.

Stonewall's moderate tone attracted criticism from more radical veterans of the gay rights movement, but also lent its advocates greater media respectability and a hearing from government ministers.

Since its inception, Stonewall has led the way with an impressive number of reforms, pressing ministers and taking test cases to court. These reforms include the repeal of Section 28, equalising the age of consent, permitting civil partnerships and overturning the ban on gays in the military. Another legacy has been to allow gay and lesbian politicians into the mainstream - not just demanding equal rights, but as representatives of the wider community.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00mk5x7)
Series 55

Episode 8

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with Graham Norton, Gyles Brandreth, Paul Merton and Suki Webster. From September 2009.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00mpmm6)
Food Myths

Britain is famed for its many local and national traditional dishes, with recipes handed down over centuries. But how accurate is the history relating to these foods? Some have an association with a particular village, county or country and have become icons of identity.

However, many of the stories told about their origins are either spurious or exaggerated. Other foods, associated with national events, have a curious background with interesting changes in their nature and usage. For example, simnel cake, which we associate with Easter, was actually linked to Mothering Sunday.

Sheila Dillon delves into the past and explodes a few myths along the way, with plenty of surprises in store.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00mpn0j)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00mpn0l)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 If You're Reading This (b00c0ltb)
Documentary looking at the letters soldiers write, to be read only in the event of their death in conflict.

Featuring letters from the American Civil War, Allied forces in both world wars, and Japanese kamikaze pilots. The programme also hears from veterans of the Falklands and Gulf wars, who wrote letters that never had to be sent or read.

Also focusing on the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and featuring letters and the last blogs and poems from British and American soldiers. Some have used their final words to criticise the wars, others to leave simple heartfelt messages of love for those left behind. The programme also hears from a family whose son was killed in Afghanistan, and how his last letters are their sole comfort.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00mlxfm)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Bunny Guinness, Chris Beardshaw and Bob Flowerdew answer questions posed at the annual Gardeners' Question Time Summer Garden Party, which is held at the programme's northern garden at RHS Harlow Carr in Yorkshire.

Set against the hustle and bustle of this all-day event, Peter Gibbs offers an expert's guide to running a DIY weather station, and Bob Flowerdew faces his very own scrapheap challenge - in the process, he grants an old bicycle a new lease of life. Listeners are able to extend their plant collection at the GQT Plant Swap Shop and seek expert advice at Pippa Greenwood's pest and diseases clinic.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Food for Thought (b00mpn0n)
Series 1

Erwin James

Journalist Nina Myskow discovers how attitudes to food, shape and affect individual lives.

The bags of oats at one prison, where journalist and lifer Erwin James was an inmate, were all stamped "Canadian pig meal, grade 3". The porridge was made with water. However, as Erwin explains to Nina Myskow, adding full cream milk, honey and pine nuts to his own breakfast recipe, they were an important part of his diet and his rehabilitation, after a chaotic itinerant lifestyle and living rough as a child.

The producer is Tamsin Hughes, and this is a Wise Buddah production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00mpn0q)
The Complete Smiley - The Looking Glass War

Episode 1

Dramatisation by Shaun McKenna of John le Carre's novel, the fourth to feature spymaster George Smiley.

When word reaches The Department that Soviet missiles are being installed close to the West German border, they seize the opportunity to relive former glories.

Leclerc ...... Ian McDiarmid
George Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale
Avery ...... Patrick Kennedy
Haldane ...... Philip Jackson
Woodford ...... David Hargeaves
Sarah ...... Fenella Woolgar
Control ...... John Rowe
Carol ...... Annabelle Dowler
Taylor/Sutherland ...... Philip Fox
Peersen ...... Stephen Hogan
Lansen ...... Matt Addis
Girl ...... Lizzy Watts
Fred Leiser ...... Piotr Baumann

Directed by Marc Beeby

This episode is available until 3.00pm on 4th October as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00mpn62)
John Banville, Malcolm Lowry and a New Biography of Charles Dickens

Mariella Frostrup talks to John Banville, winner of the 2005 Man Booker Prize for his novel The Sea. Since then he has branched out into detective fiction with his popular novels published under the pen name Benjamin Black. He explains how his alter ego influenced his new book, The Infinities, and why this tale set in a rambling Irish country house is narrated by a Greek god.

The poet Ian McMillan explains his enthuasiasm for the work of Malcolm Lowry, the alcoholic whose masterpiece Under The Volcano is cited by some as one of the greatest novels of the 20th century.

As a new biography of Charles Dickens is published - the first major survey of his life in almost 20 years - Mariella talks to its author, Michael Slater. They discuss how Dickens's sometimes troubled childhood prompted his social activism and his love of public performance.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00mpndq)
Roger McGough presents listeners' requests for works with an environmental theme, including Alan Brownjohn's deceptively simple, unsettling poem from the 1960s, We Are Going to See the Rabbit, and two of Jo Shapcott's Mad Cow poems, written in response to the BSE crisis.


SUN 17:00 Persuading Us to Be Good (b00mk7rq)
Danny Finkelstein explores how and to what extent the increasingly popular and important ideas of social psychology and behavioural economics can be exploited to make us behave better - to recycle more, conserve energy, litter less, eat healthily, drink less, and turn up for our medical appointments. It is becoming a more significant issue, as the economic situation means that politicians are looking for ways of achieving public policy outcomes that do not cost a great deal of money.

The programme examines how these ideas are being considered by David Cameron and George Osborne and includes interviews with leading American thinkers whose ideas are now spreading to Britain - Richard Thaler, co-author of Nudge, who has been advising the Tories; and Bob Cialdini, author of the best-selling book Influence, who spoke at a seminar in Downing Street.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00mpjpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnds)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00mpndv)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00mpndx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00mpndz)
Sheila McClennon introduces her selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.

Nature - Radio 4
Scott Of Slimbridge - Radio 4
David Attenborough's Life Stories - Radio 4
You're Entering The Twilight Zone - Radio 4
Inside The Bermuda Triangle - Radio 4
Titter Ye Not - Radio 2
The A-Z Of Dr Jonhson - Words, Words, Words - Radio 4
The House I Grew Up In - Radio 4
A River Runs Through It - Radio 4
Great Lives - Radio 4
Dreams From My Mother - World Service
That Mitchell And Webb Sound - Radio 4
Halfway To Hollywood - Radio 4
Tom Jones - From The Valleys To Vegas - Radio 2.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00mpnjl)
Josh is thrilled he's been picked for the under 13's home football match next Sunday. Eddie takes a keen interest in David and Ruth's soil problem.

Vicky's feeling nervous but Mike reckons her Eiffel Tower of honey cakes will shake up the flower and produce show. Ruth and David sneak a look at the other exhibits, including Robert's Warhol style photograph of Lynda. Eddie agrees that Lynda's eyes seem to follow you around the room. As Lynda admires Jill's versatile bee entries, Vicky's cake suddenly topples over. Although disappointed, Vicky congratulates Jill on coming first, and wants a copy of the family's secret recipe.

Eddie tells Jim that Joe's entered every category, trying to steal a march on Bert. Jim's pleased to hear that Joe liked his birthday present - a model Riley. Eddie wishes it was in its original box.

With Jack to look after, Peggy couldn't enter this year, but participates as a judge. Lynda's pleased to learn that she's found another carer for Jack.

Vicky encourages Sabrina Thwaite to light her beeswax candle but it sets off the smoke alarm. Vicky hopes no-one will be cross - after all, this flower and produce thing is only a bit of fun, isn't it?

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00mpnjn)
Matt Frei presents an insider guide to the people and the stories shaping America today. Combining location reports with lively discussion and exclusive interviews, the show provides new and surprising insights into contemporary America.

Matt Frei talks to Tom Friedman about President Obama's busy media schedule and Washington's policy promises.

Thomas L Friedman, author and journalist, joined The New York Times in 1981 as a financial reporter specializing in OPEC- and oil-related news and later served as the chief diplomatic, chief White House, and international economics correspondents. A three-time Pulitzer Prize winner, his foreign affairs column, which appears twice a week in the Times, is syndicated to 100 other newspapers worldwide.

Americana takes a look at why so many people in the US move so often. From Michigan to Arkansas, moving companies, storage centres and truck rental services help Americans to help themselves move.

Demographer and sociologist William H Frey breaks down the truths about migration across the United States - the hotspots and burnt-out locations that motivate relocation.

William H Frey specialises in US demographics. He is currently a Senior Fellow with the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, and Research Professor at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research. Dr Frey received his PhD from Brown University in 1974.

From coast to coast, Americans think about the so-called American Dream, but for some, the goal of owning their own home and the obsession with success can distrupt their actual slumber. Producer Krissy Clarke probes the American dreamworld.

Matt Frei asks pollster John Zogby if the pulse of America is picking up or slowing down these days. Zogby has been keeping tabs for 25 years.

John Zogby is head of Zogby International, an interactive polling group that focuses on public opinion. His company examines the nuances of language and has successfully predicted election results with its unique research methods.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b008mb9n)
Granta Stories

Cary Grant's Suit

Extracts from the archives of Granta, the UK's most prestigious literary magazine.

Todd McEwan contemplates the suit worn by the star of North By North West.

Read by Nathan Osgood.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00mlxfh)
Roger Bolton is joined by Bob Shennan, the controller of Radio 2 to discuss Terry Wogan, Jonathan Ross, Chris Evans and the station's music policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00mlxfp)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series.

BBC Foreign Correspondent Brian Barron - correspondents Martin Bell and Michael Nicholson, and cameraman Eric Thirer pay tribute; Keith Floyd - Rick Stein and TV producer David Pritchard remember the TV chef; memories of agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug from his friend Dr Ed Runge; and Alan Alda and Stephen Armstrong remember comedy writer Larry Gelbart.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00mp63v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00mplr1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00ml2r3)
Hard to Credit

Smaller businesses are still struggling to cope with the impact of the credit crunch as banks stay tough on their customers and vital trade insurance is hard to get, as Peter Day reports.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00mpnjq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00mpnjs)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including Peace In Our Time - And What Followed It.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00mlxfr)
Francine Stock interviews actor Paul Bettany and director Sam Mendes about their latest projects.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00mplqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00mpnrv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00mkbyj)
Restorative Justice in N.I - RG Collingwood

What is the best way to settle a dispute, and if you are a victim of crime what is the best way to get justice? Laurie Taylor finds out about an alternative to police and courts and the conventional criminal justice system.

The idea of restorative justice is to try to find a new way to settle arguments and bring justice so that offenders and victims can carry on living side by side. Can bringing victims and culprits together to talk or making a guilty party compensate the injured one provide the answer? And can it work for all crimes, however serious? Laurie talks to Anna Eriksson and Heather Strang about the use of restorative justice in Northern Ireland. For countries with a long history of violence in their communities, can restorative justice be used to heal the wounds?

Also in the programme, what lessons can we learn from history about how to live our lives? Laurie talks to Prof Fred Inglis about the life of philosopher Robin Collingwood and how we can live the good life by learning our lessons from the past.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00mplql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnx3)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00mppm6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00mpp1s)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00mppms)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00mppyt)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00mq3tc)
Thanks to a new law, the whole of the English coastline could soon be open to all, including large areas of agricultural land. Charlotte Smith hears from coastal landowners who fear the worst for their business, and from ramblers, who welcome the new law.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00mqc1c)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00mq4ls)
Presented by Evan Davis and Sarah Montague.

The Confederation of British Industry (CBI) says universities should escape the public spending squeeze by charging students higher tuition fees and giving them less financial support. Wes Streeting, president of the National Union of Students (NUS), explains how this will affect students.

The Liberal Democrats' leader Nick Clegg faces a revolt from his party over public spending. Political correspondent Ross Hawkins reports from the Liberal Democrats' party conference in Bournemouth on the party's reaction to their leader's policy.

Violence has flared in County Armagh, after three men were sentenced over a dissident republican plot to kill police officers. It comes as police in Northern Ireland crack down on dissident republican activity ahead of the arrival of the new chief constable tomorrow. Correspondent Natasha Sayee reports on the latest violence.

Correspondent Peter Bowes reports on the winners and losers at the Emmy awards ceremony.

The French government has said it will close an asylum seeker camp in Calais, where migrants gather to try to reach the UK. Reporter Andrew Hosken reports from the camp known as 'The Jungle'.

The Washington Post has obtained details of the long-awaited assessment of the war in Afghanistan by the US and NATO commander, General Stanley McCrystal. Correspondent Allan Little reports from Kabul on General McCrystal's report.

Thought for the Day with Rev Dr David Wilkinson, Principal of St John's College, Durham.

The leader of the Liberal Democrats, Nick Clegg, is proposing that anyone with a house worth more than a million pounds should pay an annual levy. The money would be used to raise the income tax threshold to 10,000 pounds. Clegg explains the proposals, which have come under some criticism from within his party.

Political editor Nick Robinson reports on the Liberal Democrats' proposals for public spending, and the divisions over the policy within the party.

A new CBI reports suggests that students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland should pay more in tuition fees, and that there should be fewer grants and higher rates of interest on loans. John Cridland, deputy director of the CBI, and Les Ebdon, the vice chancellor of the University of Bedfordshire and chairman of Million+, which represents the new universities and polytechnics, discuss the impact of raising students' costs to offset cuts in public spending.

Violence has erupted over the weekend in County Armagh after three men were sentenced over a dissident republican plot to kill police officers. Richard English, Professor of Politics at Queen's University, discusses the latest increase in violence in Northern Ireland.

A new exhibition at the Tate Britain gallery explores a fascinating aspect of artist William Turner's life and work. Whenever Turner came across an artist he considered them a competitor, whether an Old Master or one of his contemporaries. He would make a work of the same genre to demonstrate that he was their equal. John Humphrys reports from the exhibition.

On World Alzheimer's Day, new findings from King's College, London show that the number of people suffering from dementia is set to double to 65 million by 2030, and to double again by 2050. Dr Robert Stewart of King's College explains the new findings, and science correspondent Tom Feilden reports on the breakthrough, earlier this month, of three new genes identified by researchers in the UK and France.

A debate is brewing at the Liberal Democrats' party conference over which direction the party should take. Baroness Shirley Williams discusses whether the ultimate aim should be a reunification of the liberal left.

Renault are to appear before the Formula 1 governing body, the FIA, in Paris. They are charged with ordering former driver Nelson Piquet Jr to deliberately crash in Singapore last year to help team-mate Fernando Alonso win the race. Tim Harris, author of Players: 250 Men, Women and Animals Who Created Modern Sport, and Ed Smith, a former England cricketer and author of What Sport Tells Us About Life, discuss who has most influenced modern sport - the cheats, administrators or those who excel in their sport.

The roof over Shakespeare's grave is in danger of collapse, but the Stratford church which houses iy does not have the 50,000 pounds necessary to fix the rotten beam. Meanwhile the Royal Shakespeare Company is spending 100 million pounds on rebuilding a theatre 500 yards away. Correspondent Nick Higham reports from the church.

As a general election approaches, how should the Liberal Democrats position themselves in the political debate? Columnists Matthew Parris and Steve Richards discuss the latest shifts in policy from the Liberal Democrats' party conference in Bournemouth.


MON 09:00 Children of the Olympic Bid (b00mqc1f)
Series 4

Episode 2

Peter White talks to the London youngsters who contributed to the bid to stage the 2012 Olympics.

Peter catches up with 18-year-old Janani, who has become a key activist in student sit-ins supporting the Tamil Tigers, all the while trying to reassure her many concerned uncles that she is still on track with her studies.

And Danielle, as her first year at university draws to an end, prepare with her friends to move into their first house - if only they can decide on who gets which room.


MON 09:30 Jeopardising Justice (b00mqc1h)
Episode 4

Helena Kennedy QC examines the ways in which the best intentions in legal reform can sometimes produce unexpected and unpalatable consequences.

Helena examines the rise of litigation and so-called compensation culture in the UK. It has resulted partly as a consequence of the campaigns for greater access and accountability pioneered by those very liberal lawyers who are now the compensation culture's sternest legal critics.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00mq4m7)
Tracy Borman - Elizabeth's Women

Episode 1

Emma Fielding reads from Tracy Borman's biography of Elizabeth I, which explores the relationships she had with the women in her life. These women brought out the best and the worst of Elizabeth, who could be loyal and kind but also cruel and vindictive. They all influenced Elizabeth's carefully-cultivated image as Gloriana, The Virgin Queen.

Anne Boleyn takes centre stage, and the influence of her life and death on Elizabeth's future.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00mq4qd)
Jane Clark; Bedwetting; Parents' needs

Jane Clark, widow of Alan Clark on her life with the former Conservative MP. Plus, mandolin virtuoso Alison Stephens; children and bedwetting, and addressing parents' needs.


MON 11:00 Passing the Hat (b00mqhqr)
Jolyon Jenkins explores the world of street performance and busking, and takes to the streets of Cardiff as part of a course with the School of Busking, founded by Mario Morris. Jolyon meets fellow students, including a German juggler and a naked unicyclist, and learns tips from the Great Soprendo and Gazzo, the world's finest exponent of the cups and balls.


MON 11:30 The Maltby Collection (b00mqhqt)
Series 3

Episode 5

The museum is due to send an exhibition of its finest artefacts around Europe.

But can Walter find a suitably experienced and diplomatic member of staff to curate it?

Geoffrey Palmer and Julian Rhind-Tutt star in series 3 of David Nobbs’s sitcom about a small museum of paintings and sculpture.

Rod Millet ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Walter Brindle ...... Geoffrey Palmer
Prunella Edgecumbe ...... Rachel Atkins
Susie Maltby ...... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Julian Crumb-Loosely ...... Ben Willbond
Wilf Arbuthnot ...... Geoff McGivern
Eva Tattle ...... Juklia Deakin
Des Wainwright ...... Michael Smiley
Stelios Constantinopoulis/Van Driver ...... Chris Pavlo
Barman ...... Stephen Hogan.

Producer: Colin Anderson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2009.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00mq503)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00mq529)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00mq554)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Round Britain Quiz (b00mqhqw)
Tom Sutcliffe chairs the cryptic general knowledge quiz, featuring teams from Scotland and the Midlands.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00mpnjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00mqhqy)
Blame the Parents

Episode 1

Drama by Nicholas McInerny and Jonathan Myerson about teenagers caught up in a violent crime outside their school.

How much do parents really know about what their teenagers are up to? As far as the parents of Ben, Rory and Kris are concerned, their children have the world at their feet. But behind the promise of university and sporting achievement lies a much darker reality.

Lekha Balaji ...... Bharti Patel
Nitin Balaji ...... Paul Bhattacharjee
Kris Balaji ...... Ashwin Bolar
Millie Balaji ...... Chandeep Uppal
Shona Peattie ...... Deborah McAndrew
Malcolm Peattie ...... Tom Roberts
Rory Peattie ...... James Rastall
Linda Swann ...... Claire Benedict
Ben Swann ...... Daniel Anderson

Directed by Steven Canny and Peter Leslie Wild.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00mpjq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved (b00mq5x8)
Episode 6

Investigative journalist Tom Mangold journeys inside the Bermuda Triangle to try to get to the truth about this mysterious area.

Tom tracks down one of the original Bermuda Triangle authors and discovers that the pursuit of truth was not necessarily the priority when the story was first told.

A Ladbroke Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00mpmm6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Tracing Your Roots (b00mr0rj)
Series 4

Immigrants' Tales

Sally Magnusson presents the series exploring the practice of researching family history.

Sally and resident genealogist Nick Barratt explore the roots of Britain's immigrant families. John Millar's father never talked about his Lithuanian roots after starting a new life with a new name in Scotland, but family research revealed that he is still a hero in his native country.


MON 17:00 PM (b00mq6b4)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00mq6bj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00mr0rl)
Series 55

Episode 9

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with Tony Hawks, Pam Ayres, Sue Perkins and Tim Rice. From September 2009.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00mq58p)
Brian's hoping for a unanimous decision from Borchester Land to back Ed's tenancy. He goes with Jennifer, to be at the Lodge when the new carer arrives. Brian wants to talk to Peggy about her meeting with Bryce, the financial advisor, on Friday. They're pleased when Peggy takes to Brigitta, the new carer.

Matt's still tense but Lilian tells Jolene that she's convinced him they're in it together. Jolene admits that things are better with Sid. But Lilian's not convinced that Jolene's plan to support Wayne is the right thing.

Wayne's house-share has fallen through. He's taken aback by Jolene's change of attitude, especially when she insists he finds somewhere else to live. He'd rather stay in the village where he can see Fallon and keep in touch with Jolene. Jolene's adamant he's more likely to find a job further afield. And it would be cheaper, especially if she's paying. Wayne's surprised that she's willing to support him until his jobseeker's allowance comes through. She tells him he can stay until she finds him somewhere else, but he's not to get the wrong idea. Sid knows what she's doing, and agrees it's for the best if it gets him out of the pub.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00mq833)
Spike Lee's film Do the Right Thing became a cause celebre when it was released 20 years ago, because of its portrayal of racial tensions in New York. Now in the UK for a British Film Institute season of films that influenced Do the Right Thing, and films that were then influenced by it, Spike Lee reveals what was going through his mind while he was making the film.

A new exhibition, Turner and the Masters, at Tate Britain in London sees paintings by JMW Turner displayed alongside masterpieces by artists including Canaletto, Rubens, Rembrandt, Titian and Turner's old rival, John Constable. The exhibition focuses on Turner's obsession to prove he was just as good as - if not better than - the Old Masters he so admired.

The Soloist is the latest film from Atonement director Joe Wright. Based on a true story, it recounts the relationship between a Los Angeles Times journalist, played by Robert Downey Jr, and a homeless schizophrenic cello genius, played by Jamie Foxx. Helen Wallace reviews.

Cellist Matthew Barley was the music director and presenter on the 2007 BBC Two series Classical Star. Mark Lawson talks to the cellist as he prepares to begin a residency at a London concert hall.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00mq835)
Jane Gardam - The Man in the Wooden Hat

Episode 1

Dramatisation by Pete Atkin of the new novel by Jane Gardam.

Barrister Edward Feathers and his wife Elizabeth's lives are intertwined with that of his hated rival, Terry Veneering, as their relationships play out from 1950s Hong Kong to present-day Dorset.

Eddie ...... Michael York
Betty ...... Olivia Williams
Terry ...... Lloyd Owen
Amy ...... Moira Quirk
Delilah ...... Carolyn Seymour
Albert Ross ...... Jon David Yu
Young Harry ...... Oliver Dillon
Expat ...... Kenneth Danziger
Older Harry ...... Matthew Wolf
Narrator ...... Martin Jarvis

Directed by Rosalind Ayres and Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:00 What's in Your Head (b00jnkdx)
Under pressure, when we are on our own, many of us hear the words or songs we learnt by heart as a child. This programme features people discussing how these songs have helped them in situations of extreme pressure and danger.

Heidi Vincent is a secondary school teacher in Devon whose son Theo was born prematurely at 23 weeks. She describes her four months of waiting in intensive care as being 'like in some kind of shifted reality'.

Ghias Aljundi was a political prisoner of conscience who was tortured and held in a Syrian prison cell for four years without charge. He was comforted by a poem he had memorised called My Mother.

Peter Shaw from south Wales was kidnapped while working in Georgia and held underground for four months. He found that music and songs which he had learned from his father helped him.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00mr16g)
In Defence of Targets

As NHS targets fall out of political fashion, journalist Michael Blastland argues that they could be good for our health.

Targets, once seen by New Labour as the key to improving public services, look as if they may be on the way out. The devolved health services of Wales and Scotland have already retreated from their previous target regimes, the Conservative Party has pledged to scrap them in England and there are signs that some of Gordon Brown's ministers are losing faith in them, too.

Why then does Michael believe that there is still a case for targets?


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00mr1wc)
Supergrid

Carbon-free energy could become a greater possibility if we help to form a Europe-wide 'Supergrid', but what is it, how will it work and who will pay for it? Tom Heap finds out.

Even if it does sound like science fiction, the European Union want to be able to power the entire continent with green energy: from solar panels to wind and wave turbines, from geothermal to hydroelectric power stations. The 'Supergrid' project will lie from the North Sea, going down to the Sahara Desert, from Iceland's volcanoes to the tides of Finland, from the winds of Scotland to the Black Sea and to the sun of the Middle East.


MON 21:30 Children of the Olympic Bid (b00mqc1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00mq86r)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00mqbrs)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Is China on the brink of a momentous announcement on its climate policy?

Is China's economic stimulus programme working?

Is the Liberal Democrat message getting across?

The commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan says the next 12 months will be 'decisive' for the outcome of the mission.

Chess legends Kasparov and Larpov renew their old rivalry.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00mqbs5)
Ordinary Thunderstorms

Episode 6

David Holt reads from the thriller by William Boyd. Adam Kindred, a young scientist, loses everything and is pursued by the police and a ruthless hitman.

Adam's hiding place by Chelsea Bridge has been discovered, so he becomes a lodger in Mhouse's flat.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 With Great Pleasure (b00cxr9l)
Will Hutton

Will Hutton, chief executive of the Work Foundation, shares his admiration for not just JM Keynes but also writers such as Dickens and Umberto Eco.

Readers: Michelle Terry and William Hope

Producer: Mark Smalley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2008.


MON 23:30 Black Screen Britain (b00jck88)
Ambassadors for the Race

Burt Caesar presents two programmes exploring how British film and television drama from the 1950s to the 1970s portrayed the lives of African-Caribbean immigrants.

1: Ambassadors for the Race
Powerful screen dramas such as A Man from the Sun, Fable, Pool of London, Flame in the Streets and Jemima and Johnny first introduced British audiences to a new generation of black actors such as Cy Grant, Earl Cameron and Mona Hammond.

Producer Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise Production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00mpnqj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00mq4m7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnrx)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00mpp1v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnx5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00mppm8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00mppp2)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00mq3nj)
The future of the organic vegetable box could be under threat. It's been a symbol of a household's commitment to shopping locally and supporting organic farming - but with organic veg sales down 34 per cent, a huge number of businesses have folded. Anna Hill visits one farmer who has just put an end to his box scheme.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00mq3tf)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Justin Webb.

The operation to clear migrants from makeshift camps near Calais has begun. Andrew Hosken reports on the largely peaceful clearance of the camp known as The Jungle.

President Obama is bringing the Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas together for the first time since Mr Netanyahu came to office. Jon Donnison in Ramallah and Bethany Bell in Jerusalem report on Israeli and Palestinian hopes ahead of the summit.

Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg has forced the party to 'grow up' by facing the need to cut public spending, his spokesman has said. Sarah Montague considers whether it is Mr Clegg's European background that is the key to understanding him.

The chance of suffering a heart attack is increased while suffering flu, scientists at University College, London say. The author of the paper, Dr Andrew Hayward, explains why he believes those with a history of heart problems should get vaccinated against flu.

Migrants camped near the French port of Calais are preparing to see their makeshift homes destroyed by police. Michele Cercone, spokesman for Jacquess Barot, the EU's justice commissioner, discusses how France and the UK can 'find a joint solution' to the issue of asylum and economic migration.

Around 100 world leaders are gathering at the UN to try and revitalise deadlocked negotiations on climate change. The summit comes two months ahead of a high-stakes meeting in Copenhagen to agree a global treaty on cutting carbon emissions. Correspondent Barbara Plett examines who, and what, is driving the process.

Thought for the Day with the Right Rev Tom Butler, Bishop of Southwark.

Conservative party chairman Eric Pickles has called on Liberal Democrat voters to 'come home to the Conservative Party'. Mr Pickles and Lib Dem home affairs spokesman Chris Huhne discuss the battle over the hearts of the electorate.

The Office of Fair Trading has fined 103 construction firms a total of 129.5 million pounds following an investigation into illegal 'bid-rigging'. Business presenter Adam Shaw explains why the fines were enforced. Stephen Ratcliffe, director of the UK Contractors Group, discusses the severity of the fines.

The army is drawing up plans to send another 1,000 soldiers to Afghanistan, The Times reports. Former Liberal Democrat leader Lord Ashdown reflects on his view that withdrawing coalition troops now would enable Al-Qaeda to roam free in Afghanistan and further endanger UK security.

PJ O'Rourke, one of the US's foremost satirists and journalists, came from humble origins in Ohio as the son and grandson of car dealers. He discusses his love for fast cars and his belief that Americans have fallen out of love with their vehicles.

The US has no 'grand expectations' from the summit of Israeli and Palestinian leaders which President Obama is to host, the White House says. North America editor Mark Mardell and Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen discuss why Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas are attending the talks in New York.

Is the UK losing its interest in public debates? Lewis Iwu, former president of Oxford University Student Union and trustee of the charity Debate Mate, and David Yelland, former editor of The Sun, consider how debating can be promoted to schoolchildren.

French police have moved in to dismantle a makeshift camp set up by migrants near the port of Calais. Reporter Andrew Hosken reflects on what he has seen at the camp over the morning.

The airline industry will promise to make deep cuts in aviation carbon emissions over the coming decades, BA will announce. Jonathan Counsell, BA's head of environment, and Jeff Gazzard of the Aviation Environment Federation, discuss a deal that airlines, airports and aircraft companies have reached to cut the industry's emissions to half of their 2005 levels by 2050.

Is Dr John Dee the forgotten hero of English intellectual life? Author Benjamin Woolley and Jennifer Rampling, of the University of Cambridge, discuss the man credited with coining the phrase 'the British empire', advising on some of the great Tudor voyages of exploration but also known for using crystal balls to communicate with angels.


TUE 09:00 The House I Grew Up In (b00mr232)
Series 3

Kwame Kwei-Armah

Wendy Robbins presents a series revisiting the childhood neighbourhoods of influential Britons.

Playwright and actor Kwame Kwei-Armah takes Wendy to Southall, west London, to remember his West Indian childhood there in the 1970s.


TUE 09:30 The Good Samaritan (b00mr234)
Sylvia's Story

2. Sylvia's story
After serving just two days of her prison sentence for failing to pay her full council tax, pensioner Sylvia Hardy had her protest ruined when an anonymous benefactor paid her arrears and she was released.
Producer John Byrne.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00mq4lv)
Tracy Borman - Elizabeth's Women

Episode 2

Emma Fielding reads from Tracy Borman's biography of Elizabeth I, which explores the relationships she had with the women in her life. These women brought out the best and the worst of Elizabeth, who could be loyal and kind but also cruel and vindictive. They all influenced Elizabeth's carefully-cultivated image as Gloriana, The Virgin Queen.

Elizabeth's stepmother Katherine Parr sets an inspiring example, but an ill-judged flirtation threatens all.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00mqgbx)
Novelist Cecelia Ahern; Dr Heidi Kastner

Bestselling novelist Cecelia Ahern on bereavement and loss. Plus, our love affair with 70s junk food; and Dr Heidi Kastner, the psychiatrist who worked with Josef Fritzl.


TUE 11:00 Nature (b00mr2fg)
Series 3

Calf of Man

It has taken many years for the BBC Natural History Unit to get onto the Calf of Man, a rugged island to the south of the Isle of Man. The weather and tides need to be right to get on and off the Calf, and for this programme it also had to be a new moon in order to meet a particularly enigmatic seabird which is yet to breed on the island.


TUE 11:30 Calvin and Hobbes (b00mr2fj)
Phill Jupitus celebrates Calvin and Hobbes, the comic strip about the little boy and his stuffed tiger named after eminent philosophers.

Over the course of ten years, the strip became an international phenomenon, being syndicated in 2,500 newspapers worldwide. It tells the tale of a young boy whose stuffed tiger is as real to him as the people around him, and deals in the process with philosophical issues about free will and the meaning of life, via the perspective of a child with an extraordinary imagination. Its creator, the reclusive Bill Watterson, could have become a multi-millionaire through merchandising deals and film offers, but turned them all down without hesitation.

Phill sets out to discover more about the characters and the man behind them. In Watterson's absence, Jupitus heads to Oxford to speak with artists, merchandisers, booksellers and philosophers to find out what makes the strip so popular, years after Watterson drew the final frame.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00mq4x8)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00mq505)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00mq52c)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Soul Music (b00mr2wr)
Series 8

You've Got a Friend

Series exploring famous pieces of music and their emotional appeal.

Written by Carole King and made famous by James Taylor, You've Got a Friend won a Grammy Award in 1971. In this programme people tell how this song has affected their life.

Contributors
Carole King
Nick Barraclough
Marcella Erskine
Estelle Williams
Karen Garner
James Taylor

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00mq58p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00mr31n)
Blame the Parents

Episode 2

Drama by Nicholas McInerny and Jonathan Myerson about teenagers caught up in a violent crime outside their school.

In the days after the knifing, the three sets of parents try to comprehend how their children could have become involved.

Lekha Balaji ...... Bharti Patel
Nitin Balaji ...... Paul Bhattacharjee
Kris Balaji ...... Ashwin Bolar
Millie Balaji ...... Chandeep Uppal
Shona Peattie ...... Deborah McAndrew
Malcolm Peattie ...... Tom Roberts
Rory Peattie ...... James Rastall
Linda Swann ...... Claire Benedict
Ben Swann ...... Daniel Anderson

Directed by Steven Canny and Peter Leslie Wild.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00mr37s)
There's a distinctly avian hue to this programme as we reveal the results of our summer-long house martin survey. Just how have these birds fared in 2009? How do they manage to live alongside the apparently similar swifts and swallows, are they competing for a limited supply of food, or is there something else going on? And just why did one listener's house become a magnet for little owls?

We also keep our gaze upwards to answer two astronomical queries. Does the Moon appear different to observers in the southern hemisphere and are there really more stars in the universe than grains of sand on the beach?

On the panel are astronomer Dr Carolin Crawford, ornithologist Graham Appleton and Prof Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

As always we want to hear your comments on the topics discussed and any questions you might want to put to future programmes.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b009mc8t)
Countryman's Cooking

Of Pigeon and Pastry

Leslie Phillips reads from WMW Fowler's definitive cookery manual for men.

First sold 40 years ago by Willie Fowler in his local pub and recently rediscovered in a charity shop, these joyfully wicked musings retain a surprising relevance today.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved (b00mq5t8)
Episode 7

Investigative journalist Tom Mangold journeys inside the Bermuda Triangle to try to get to the truth about this mysterious area.

Tom pursues the truth about Charles Berlitz, the man who wrote the all-time Bermuda Triangle bestseller. He hears from critics of Berlitz's para-science and speaks to Berlitz's biggest fan, his surviving daughter, Lin Hilton.

A Ladbroke Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 From Abacus to Circle Time: A Short History of the Primary School (b00mr3qm)
Episode 2

Education journalist Mike Baker traces the controversial changes to the ways we have educated our youngest children over the past 150 years, from the rigidity of the Victorian age to the occasionally anarchic, experiential learning of the progressive 1970s.

Mike explores the birth of progressive and informal teaching methods in the 1960s. The landmark Plowden Report banished the Victorian concept of children as 'vessels to be filled', bringing in instead the idea of the 'developmental age' - the notion that children are individuals who develop at different and uneven rates.

Calling on archive recordings and the personal reminiscences of pupils, parents and teachers, plus an interview with the only surviving member of the Plowden Committee, Mike hears how progressive teaching was loved by some and reviled by others. He also traces the fierce political backlash in the 1980s, as public concerns grew over school standards and fears that anarchy was taking over in primary school classrooms.

Key contemporary policy-makers, including Baroness Shirley Williams, Lord Ken Baker and David Blunkett, help to explain why arguments over curriculum, teaching methods and testing are deeply rooted in our ideas about the nature, development and role of the youngest members of society.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00mr4w1)
Series 19

Harry Houdini

Matthew Parris presents the biographical series in which his guests choose someone who has inspired their lives.

Paul Daniels explores the life of Harry Houdini. They are joined by Houdini biographer William Kalush, who argues that the master escapologist may have been murdered by spiritualists.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00mq68v)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00mq6b6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 That Mitchell and Webb Sound (b00mr4w3)
Series 4

Episode 5

A date with a slightly disappointing superhero; and the perils of compulsory workplace drinking.

Sketch show starring David Mitchell and Robert Webb.

With Olivia Colman,Sarah Hadland and James Bachman.

Producer Gareth Edwards

Firs broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2009.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00mq58f)
After Chalkman's veiled threats last week, Matt wants reassurance from his solicitor. Russell assures Matt that he won't get ten years, and the Dower House is safe so Lilian won't end up on the streets. Russell senses something's still bothering Matt but Matt insists he's as well as can be expected.

David's sure everything will be fine while they're away but asks Adam to keep an eye on Eddie.

David and Adam give a great presentation at the 'meet the farmer, cook the dish' event at Grey Gables. Caroline is pleased with its success. Brenda asks Caroline to consider using her services for even better PR and marketing next time. Caroline's sorry but she can't afford to take Brenda on.

Roy tells Brenda that something will come up but she's frustrated at the thought of ending up back on the burger van. And it doesn't help to have Vicky talking about her new career as Mike's business partner. Brenda sees it as another way to control Mike and wonders where it's going to end. Roy tells her to give Vicky a break. He knows Brenda's having a hard time but if Tom's offered her some work, maybe she should take it.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00mq7nn)
Louis de Bernières, the bestselling author of Captain Corelli's Mandolin, has written a new book set in the fictional Surrey village of Notwithstanding. His latest offering takes the form of a series of linked episodes in the lives of the Notwithstanding villagers, and draws heavily on memories of his own Surrey upbringing.

The artist Anish Kapoor has a major new retrospective opening at the Royal Academy in London, showcasing a number of new and previously unseen works. Architect Amanda Levete reviews the exhibition by the 1991 Turner Prize winner.

The American actor and musician Harry Shearer is best known for his role as bassist Derek Smalls in the mockumentary This is Spinal Tap, and for providing the voices for many of the characters in The Simpsons, most notably the evil Mr Burns. Shearer looks back on his career which began aged seven, acting alongside Richard Burton in Hollywood.

Paul Bettany stars in Creation, a new biopic of Charles Darwin which explores the impact of his revolutionary ideas on his wife, religion, an English village and an orangutan. Novelist Tracy Chevalier reviews.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00mvbmy)
Jane Gardam - The Man in the Wooden Hat

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Pete Atkin of the new novel by Jane Gardam.

News that a plane carrying schoolchildren to England has crashed over the Indian Ocean provokes surprising reactions.

Eddie ...... Michael York
Betty ...... Olivia Williams
Terry ...... Lloyd Owen
Amy ...... Moira Quirk
Delilah ...... Carolyn Seymour
Albert Ross ...... Jon David Yu
Young Harry ...... Oliver Dillon
Expat ...... Kenneth Danziger
Older Harry ...... Matthew Wolf
Narrator ...... Martin Jarvis

Directed by Rosalind Ayres and Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00mr4w5)
Right-Wing Extremists

As the government's strategy for combating extremism is revised to focus on white racist groups as well as Islamic radicals, Allan Urry assesses the threat of attacks by right-wing extremists and fears that they could lead to a rise in racial tensions.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00mr52m)
A 'quantum leap in accessibility' is how Apple described its new model iPhone. Our reporter Geoff Adams-Spink tests its usability for visually-impaired consumers and finds that, despite the benefits of built-in assistive technology, easy emailing and internet surfing, it falls short in some important areas.

We also hear your uncompromising responses to switching off concourse platform announcements at Birmingham's New Street Station.

And we visit a group of blind and partially-sighted gardeners in Bradford who have turned a patch of wasteland outside their resource centre into a a safe outdoor haven where potatoes, beans, tomatoes, herbs and onions are flourishing and no-one minds if you pull up a dandelion instead of a daffodil.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00mr52p)
Internet

The internet is changing the face of medicine. Eight out of every ten people now use it to search for health information, and some go on to self-diagnose and treat their illnesses. But is it safe to play doctor? And can ordinary citizens with a computer really replace years of medical training?

Dr Mark Porter looks at what the web has to offer healthcare and asks where we can find helpful and accurate advice. Wikipedia is a popular source of information, but should it be trusted? Kevin Clauson from Nova Southeastern University discusses his findings.

There's also the issue of online pharmacies - a common choice for people seeking value for money. The websites are not always hosted in the UK and many are completely unregulated. Dr Porter finds out about the risks and how to avoid buying a box full of counterfeits.


TUE 21:30 The House I Grew Up In (b00mr232)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00mq85g)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00mq86t)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

World leaders line up to promise dramatic targets on climate change.

The build up to Germany's elections.

Why Colonel Gaddafi couldn't pitch his tent in New York.

Obama meets Netanyahu and Abbas - but was anything achieved?

The poor state of French prisons.

Why swine flu has led to mounds of rubbish on Egypt's streets.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00mqbrv)
Ordinary Thunderstorms

Episode 7

David Holt reads from the thriller by William Boyd. Adam Kindred, a young scientist, loses everything and is pursued by the police and a ruthless hitman.

The killer is still on Adam's trail, so he has moved in to live with Vladimir.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Heresy (b00jyc77)
Series 6

Episode 3

Victoria Coren hosts the show that thinks the unthinkable. With comedians Frank Skinner and Arthur Smith, and journalist Lucy Mangan. From April 2009.


TUE 23:30 Another Case of Milton Jones (b007cnxp)
Series 2

Explorer

The surreal comedian's new challenge is to be an explorer, with no ability whatsoever. With Tom Goodman-Hill. From May 2007.



WEDNESDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00mpnql)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00mq4lv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnrz)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00mpp1x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnx7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00mppmb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00mppp4)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00mq3nl)
We hear the latest from a town in Lancashire that has seen locals growing their own food in every spare patch of earth - from verges to town centre tubs, and everyone is free to come along and tuck in. Anna Hill also asks how in touch UK shoppers are about eating in season.


WED 06:00 Today (b00mq3th)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Evan Davis.

Official guidance on who will and who will not be prosecuted for breaking the law on assisted suicide are to be released. Simon Gillespie, chief executive of the Multiple Sclerosis Society, considers why none of the cases where individuals have been helped to travel abroad to commit suicide have led to a prosecution.

A small but statistically significant number of patients die each year when junior doctors start work in August, a study suggests. The author of the report, Dr Paul Aylin of Imperial College, London, and Nigel Edwards, policy director at the NHS Confederation, discuss results that show patients in August were six per cent more likely to die.

China will increase efforts to improve energy efficiency and curb the rise in CO2 emissions, President Hu Jintao has told a UN climate summit in New York. Anthony Froggatt, Senior Research Fellow at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, explains the significance of this speech.

The RSPB is publishing the results of its summer wildlife survey. Grahame Madge, a spokesman for the Society, reveals results which suggest that a quarter of UK gardens are home to foxes and hedgehogs.

Banks must focus on restoring the public's trust in their role, despite signs of economic improvement, the boss of the UK financial watchdog has said. Financial Services Authority (FSA) chairman Lord Turner discusses whether the industry should walk away from activities that had no 'social benefit'.

Australia's biggest city, Sydney, has been shrouded in red dust blown in by winds from the deserts of the outback. Correspondent Phil Mercer reports on dust blanketing eastern parts of New South Wales, creating havoc on the roads and causing a surge in emergency calls from those with breathing problems.

Prince William has been speaking for the first time about his charitable work. He told the BBC he wants to be more than just a royal 'ornament'. Royal correspondent Peter Hunt talks to the prince about The Princes' Charities Forum, set up to encourage different royal charities to work together.

Thought for the Day with Abdal Hakim Murad, Muslim Chaplain at the University of Cambridge.

Gordon Brown is to tell the UN he is willing to cut the UK's fleet of Trident missile-carrying submarines from four to three. Political editor Nick Robinson, who is travelling with the prime minister, discusses what will be contained in Mr Brown's speech. Prof Ron Smith, a defence economist at Birkbeck College, discusses the implication of this announcement.

Guidelines on assisted suicide law in England and Wales will be published later to clarify when people are likely to be prosecuted. The Director of Public Prosecutions, Keir Starmer QC, discusses what guidance will be given.

The prime minister is expected to propose scaling back Britain's nuclear deterrent when he speaks at the United Nations. Sir Menzies Campbell, a former Liberal Democrat leader, considers whether the Trident fleet of submarines should be cut from four to three.

Music veterans Chas and Dave have split after 35 years together, their agent has announced. Bassist and singer Dave Peacock is to retire from the music business following the death of his wife Sue from lung cancer. Chas Hodges, the othe member of Chas and Dave, explains why the decision was made.

At what age should doctors begin to treat young people who want a sex change? Mother 'Sharon' and daughter 'Nicky' tell their story. Clinical psychologist Dr Polly Carmichael, of London's Tavistock Centre, discusses whether prepubescent teens should be allowed medicine which would stop them developing the adult bodies that they would otherwise grow into.

The sculptor and former Turner Prize winner Anish Kapoor has become the first living artist to be given a solo show at the Royal Academy in London. The artist himself gives Evan Davis a guided tour round an exhibition which includes a wax cannon and giant metal spheres seemingly suspended in the air.

For the first time, the Ministry Of Defence has allowed the BBC to follow wounded soldiers as they are flown back from Helmand Province in Afghanistan. Defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt reports from the Selly Oak hospital in Birmingham, where 31 soldiers are currently being treated.

Cooking caused the extraordinary transformation of our ancestors from ape-like beings rather than, as previously assumed, meat eating, a new book argues. Richard Wrangham, Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University, examines whether eating cooked food allowed the human brain to grow and helped structure human society.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00mr5n8)
Sarah Butler is a writer who has just completed a residency on the London Underground, working with staff on the Central Line for six months to produce a book of stories, Central Line Stories, that will be available for passengers to read on the tube and ultimately online. It is the latest project in London Underground's pioneering Art on the Underground programme.

Lenny Henry is an actor, writer and comedian. His big break came when he won the TV talent show New Faces as a 16-year-old stand-up comedian and went on to become a household name in TV shows including Tiswas, the sketch show Three Of A Kind and the hugely successful Lenny Henry Show, featuring Delbert Wilkins. More recently he has branched out into acting and is currently taking on his first stage role, playing the Moor in Barry Rutter's production of Othello at London's Trafalgar Studios.

Leslie Caron is the French actress who was spotted by Gene Kelly in Paris when she was just 17 and a member of Roland Petit's famous ballet company. She became an overnight success when Kelly bought her to Hollywood to co-star with him in An American in Paris. She went on to star with Maurice Chevalier in the classic film Gigi and also Lili, Daddy Long Legs with Fred Astaire and The L-Shaped Room. Her autobiography, Thank Heaven, is published by JR Books.

Clarissa Dickson Wright found fame alongside Jennifer Paterson as one half of the much-loved TV cooking partnership Two Fat Ladies. She is the author of the bestselling memoir Spilling the Beans as well as many cookery books. She is also a qualified barrister. Her new book, Rifling Through My Drawers, features stories from her life as she travels around Britain.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00mq4lx)
Tracy Borman - Elizabeth's Women

Episode 3

Emma Fielding reads from Tracy Borman's biography of Elizabeth I, which explores the relationships she had with the women in her life. These women brought out the best and the worst of Elizabeth, who could be loyal and kind but also cruel and vindictive. They all influenced Elizabeth's carefully-cultivated image as Gloriana, The Virgin Queen.

The public world of Elizabeth's court as she begins her reign, and the more intimate realm of her private apartments, where she is attended by her Ladies in Waiting.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00mqgbj)
Shirley Williams; Nicola Benedetti

Shirley Williams on her extraordinary life and career in politics. Plus, music from the violinist Nicola Benedetti; and what makes a good political leader?


WED 11:00 Bowling for Love (b00mr5r6)
Following a bowls community, and the friendships and romances formed on and off the green. When Brian and Meryl joined Adastra Bowls Club in Hassocks, they were looking for a new hobby. But as their lives changed, the crown green became the setting for another sort of interest.


WED 11:30 The Stanley Baxter Playhouse (b008nw1c)
Series 2

Pasta Alfredo at Cafe Alessandro

Series of comic plays starring Stanley Baxter.

By Rona Munro.

An Italian cafe owner in Glasgow employs a little guile and cunning to defend the honour and the environment of his beloved native land.

Sandy ...... Stanley Baxter
Antonia ...... Luisa Pretolani
Christina ...... Tracy Wiles
Christopher ...... John Kazek
Rockafella ...... John Guerrasio
Radio Interviewer ...... Gordon Kennedy

Directed by Marilyn Imrie

A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00mq4xb)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00mq507)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00mq52f)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00mr5tn)
At a time when most magazines are feeling the pinch, political weeklies like The Spectator and The Economist are bucking the trend. Political observer Anthony Howard and Fraser Nelson, the new editor of The Spectator, join Steve Hewlett to discuss why political magazines are in such rude health and the extent to which they influence the mainstream media and the political landscape.

ITV's announcement that it is to sue STV over programme payments marks the culmination of a long-running battle between the two companies. As we have reported before, STV's decision to drop some of the network's most popular series, including as Doc Martin and The Bill, has received a lukewarm response from viewers and angered the bosses at ITV. So what lies behind this long-standing dispute?

Sales of smartphones, including the iPhone, have led to exponential growth in the special applications industry. You can download apps which enable you to buy music, watch TV, read books and even have the news headlines delivered to your phone. We look at the impact of the app on media consumption.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00mq58f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Brief Lives (b007s1b7)
Series 1

Episode 4

Series by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly, set in a Manchester legal practice.

Frank gets Debbie out of trouble, but Sarah is unsympathetic.

Frank ...... David Schofield
DeeDee ...... Denise Welch
Ben ...... Kwame Kwei Armah
Sarah ...... Gina Bellman
Debbie ...... Emma Atkins
Doug ...... Rod Matthew
Julie ...... Sue Kelly
DS Perry ...... David Fleeshman

Music by Carl Harms.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00mrc8j)
Vincent Duggleby and a panel of guests answer calls on tax and self assessment.

Guests are:

Leonie Kerswill, tax partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers

Mike Warburton tax partner, Grant Thornton

Anita Monteith, technical manager, Tax Faculty, The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b009mc92)
Countryman's Cooking

Of Poultry and Poison

Leslie Phillips reads from WMW Fowler's definitive cookery manual for men.

Willie realises that the jolly, bucolic animal-loving Farmer Giles is a myth.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved (b00mq5tb)
Episode 8

Investigative journalist Tom Mangold journeys inside the Bermuda Triangle to try to get to the truth about this mysterious area.

Tom examines the relationship between the supposedly inexplicable disappearance of hundreds of seamen and aviators in the Bermuda Triangle, and the mythical lost kingdom of Atlantis.

A Ladbroke Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00mrc8l)
Acquaintance - Tea Rooms

Many of us will exchange intimate details of our lives with our hairdesser or chat to the person on the same train platform as us every morning on the way to work, but we probably don't think of either as a friend. Laurie Taylor discusses the role of acquaintances, and why the people who are neither friend nor stranger are incredibly important.

He talks to sociologist David Morgan and anthroplogist Henrietta Moore about the role of acquaintances in our lives and finds out why, without them, the very fabric of society could break down.

Also in the programme, why more than one million tea rooms opened in the early 20th century and gave American women their first taste of business and financial freedom.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00mr52p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00mq68x)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00mq6b8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Chain Reaction (b00mrc8n)
Series 5

Eddie Izzard interviews Alastair Campbell

Comedian Eddie Izzard chats to former Labour spin doctor Alastair Campbell.

Chain Reaction is the tag talk show, where the guest becomes the interviewer in the next episode.

Eddie Izzard asks him about his breakdown, working for Tony Blair and his beginnings as a soft porn writer.

Producer: Sam Bryant

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2009.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00mq58h)
Wayne's feeling pleased with himself. He's going to be Neville Booth's lodger, right here in the village. It's not what Jolene wanted but it'll do until he finds somewhere better.

Kenton and Jim are in a quiet country pub. Kenton can see potential - just like he'd done for Jaxx. Jim's impressed by Kenton's plans and can't understand why Kathy was so against them. Back at the Bull, Jim gets collared by Annette, who gives him a blow-by-blow account of the latest man in her life - Max. Wayne and Jolene return from Felpersham with Wayne's entire record collection. Neville's a big jazz and blues fan too. Wayne invites Kenton and Jim round to Neville's one evening, for a listening session.

Peggy's outraged that the agency have sent a different carer. The agency insist they would never have promised a regular carer but will try to send someone familiar on Friday. Jennifer and Lilian do their best to convince Peggy she needs this help. But Peggy doesn't think it's going to work, especially when she learns that today's carer, Dennis, doesn't work on Fridays. When she hears that Brigitta can't come again either, Peggy insists she's going to cancel the contract.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00mq7nt)
Actors Ian Hart and Kerry Fox reveal the challenges presented to them and their co-star John Simm by the play Speaking in Tongues. A new stage version by Andrew Bovell of his own film, Lantana, Speaking in Tongues is a multi-stranded thriller involving nine different people, four infidelities and a missing person.

Moctezuma: Aztec Ruler is the fourth of the British Museum's exhibitions examining power and empire. The show reassesses the myths surrounding Moctezuma ll, who ruled Central America from the Caribbean to the Pacific from 1502 until the arrival of the Spanish under Cortes, in 1521, devastated the native civilisation and laid the foundations for modern Mexico.

Nic Roeg is the director and cinematographer behind Don't Look Now and The Man Who Fell to Earth. Roeg's work has often caused controversy; the sex scene between Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland in Don't Look Now became notorious and Roeg went on to direct both Mick Jagger and David Bowie. With his films due to be screened as part of a film festival in Liverpool, he talks to Mark Lawson about a career spent pushing the boundaries of film making.

Mark Lawson talks to the double Olivier Award-winning actor Daniel Evans, who has turned his back on acting at the peak of his career to become the artistic director of Sheffield Theatre. What has Evans scheduled for his first season at the theatre where Michael Grandage made his name?


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00mvbn0)
Jane Gardam - The Man in the Wooden Hat

Episode 3

Dramatisation by Pete Atkin of the new novel by Jane Gardam.

Difficulties for Betty and Eddie in London and phone calls from Hong Kong.

Eddie ...... Michael York
Betty ...... Olivia Williams
Terry ...... Lloyd Owen
Amy ...... Moira Quirk
Delilah ...... Carolyn Seymour
Albert Ross ...... Jon David Yu
Young Harry ...... Oliver Dillon
Expat ...... Kenneth Danziger
Older Harry ...... Matthew Wolf
Narrator ...... Martin Jarvis

Directed by Rosalind Ayres and Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:00 Iconoclasts (b00mrd9g)
Series 2

Episode 3

Edward Stourton chairs a live discussion series in which guests set out their strong views on a subject, before being challenged by a panel of experts.

Cambridge lawyer, Prof John Spencer, says that we should make it legal for young teenagers to have sex. He says the age of consent, fixed at 16 by the Sexual Offences Act 2003, makes criminals of half the population.


WED 20:45 Peace In Our Time - And What Followed It (b00mrd9j)
Episode 1

It is 40 years since the Troubles started and ten since they stopped, but has that decade brought Northern Ireland ten years closer to normality? Are headlines dominated by race, health and education issues, or is terrorism a black hole from which the news agenda can never fully escape?

Reporter Tara Mills talks to the generations of journalists and politicians who have had their professional lives dominated by violence. She looks at their efforts to find a way out of it and asks how they have made the transition to peacetime roles.


WED 21:00 Nature (b00mr2fg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00mr5n8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00mq85j)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00mq86w)
A special edition from New York as world leaders gather for the UN General Assembly. Ritula Shah asks if the global recession has shifted the balance of political power. Are old alliances breaking down? We hear reports from China and the North Dakota and talk to a panel of experts at the Council on Foreign Relations.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00mqbrx)
Ordinary Thunderstorms

Episode 8

David Holt reads from the thriller by William Boyd. Adam Kindred, a young scientist, loses everything and is pursued by the police and a ruthless hitman.

The chairman of Calenture-Deutz has discovered that Keegan had a meeting with Philip Wang hours before he was murdered.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Cowards (b007h55q)
Series 1

Episode 5

Unusual pets and shock elections in the bizarre world of the comedy sketch show team.

Featuring the talents of writers and performers Tom Basden, Stefan Golaszewski, Tim Key and Lloyd Woolf.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2007.


WED 23:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b00wmxj3)
Dead Side of the Mic

Episode 3

The actor-sleuth heads to New York for a funeral, and to pursue his investigation into a death at the BBC. Stars Bill Nighy.



THURSDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00mpnqn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00mq4lx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00mpns1)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00mpp1z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnx9)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00mppmd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00mppp6)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00mq3nn)
British farmers are likely to receive a 13 per cent increase in their subsidies this year; the weak pound means that farmers will receive more when they convert the payments into sterling from Euros. Charlotte Smith asks why agriculture still deserves to be subsidised while other industries struggle through a recession.

Also, why we should all be concerned about soil.


THU 06:00 Today (b00mq3tk)
Presented by John Humphrys and James Naughtie.

Scientists say they have developed a vaccine that reduces the risk of infection by HIV - the virus that causes Aids - by more than 30 per cent. The vaccine has been tested on 16,000 volunteers in Thailand in a programme financed by the US military. Dr Seth Berkley, chief executive of the International Aids Vaccine Initiative, says he is excited by the findings.

The number of complaints against the police has risen by eight per cent over the past year, the Independent Police Complaints Commission says. Nick Hardwick, chairman of the Commission, discusses why one complaint in every four was for 'neglect of duty' - officers being slow or ineffective.

Repeated requests from Britain for a formal meeting between President Barack Obama and Gordon Brown were rejected by the White House, it has emerged. Political editor Nick Robinson examines the state of the 'special relationship' between the two countries.

Europe correspondent Jonny Dymond reports on the well-mannered election campaign in Germany and the attempts from current Chancellor Angela Merkel, who has led the country in a coalition for the last four years, to win enough votes to form a right-wing coalition.

Can computer games be used to get children interested in maths? Marcus du Sautoy, professor of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University, explains his case for exploiting websites like Facebook to help children engage with maths.

The BBC has been told of new research linking toxins found in the air systems of commercial airliners and neurological damage suffered by pilots. Reporter Angus Stickler considers claims by researchers who say those affected have developed chronic medical conditions after being exposed to contamination from jet engine fumes.

One of the greatest rivalries in the history of chess is being resumed as Garry Kasparov takes on Anatoly Karpov in the Spanish city of Valencia. Columnist Dominic Lawson and chess writer Malcolm Pein discuss whether the 12-game rematch - in a form of the game called speed chess - shows a move away from the traditional chess match.

Thought for the day with Canon Lucy Winkett, of St Paul's Cathedral.

The results of the largest ever human trial of an HIV/Aids vaccine have been revealed in Bangkok after seven years of trials involving more than 16,000 people. Correspondent Alastair Leithead and HIV specialist Professor Jonathan Weber discuss what the results show.

A strategy to protect the health of England's soils and ensure they continue to store carbon dioxide will be published by the government. Correspondent Sarah Mukherjee and Defra chief scientist Bob Watson discuss how the quality of soil can be improved.

PG Wodehouse's witty prose, poking fun at the English upper classes, has won him a small army of fans that continue to celebrate his writing more than 30 years after his death. Evan Davis visits a small London bookshop to discover there is more to the literary humorist than Jeeves and Wooster.

The report on the events of Bloody Sunday has been delayed until March 2010, more than 12 years since the tribunal was set up. Northern Ireland Secretary Shaun Woodward discusses his concern at the impact on the families of those who lost loved ones.

The BBC has been told of new research linking toxins found in the air systems of commercial airliners and neurological damage suffered by pilots. Lord Patel, of the House of Lords' science and technology committee, examines claims that those affected have developed chronic medical conditions after being exposed to contamination from jet engine fumes.

A dinner lady who told a parent his seven-year-old daughter had been attacked at school in Essex has lost her job after a disciplinary hearing. Margaret Morrissey, of website Parents Outloud, and Mick Brookes, general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, discuss the treatment of Carol Hill, who was sacked for a breach of confidentiality.

The UK's largest horde of Anglo-Saxon gold has been discovered buried beneath a field in Staffordshire. Dr Kevin Leahy, an archaeologist with the Portable Antiquities Scheme, discuss the collection of 1,500 pieces which, experts say, is unparalleled in size and may date back to the 7th Century.

The great famine of 1932 and 1933 in Ukraine, known as the Holodomor, may have killed as many as 10 million people. Some believe that it was a deliberate act of genocide. Correspondent Nick Higham reports on the Royal Shakespeare Company's world premiere of a play about the famine, written by a Ukrainian writer.

Complaints against the police have risen by eight per cent, according to figures released by a watchdog. John Feavyour, spokesman for the Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo), and Simon Reed, vice-chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales, discuss why one complaint in four was for 'neglect of duty'.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00mrfwq)
Calculus

Melvyn Bragg discusses the epic feud between Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz over who invented an astonishingly powerful new mathematical tool - calculus. Both claimed to have conceived it independently, but the argument soon descended into a bitter battle over priority, plagiarism and philosophy. Set against the backdrop of the Hanoverian succession to the English throne and the formation of the Royal Society, the fight pitted England against Europe, geometric notation against algebra. It was fundamental to the grounding of a mathematical system which is one of the keys to the modern world, allowing us to do everything from predicting the pressure building behind a dam to tracking the position of a space shuttle.Melvyn is joined by Simon Schaffer, Professor of History of Science at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Darwin College; Patricia Fara, Senior Tutor at Clare College, University of Cambridge; and Jackie Stedall, Departmental Lecturer in History of Mathematics at the University of Oxford.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00mq4lz)
Tracy Borman - Elizabeth's Women

Episode 4

Emma Fielding reads from Tracy Borman's biography of Elizabeth I, which explores the relationships she had with the women in her life. These women brought out the best and the worst of Elizabeth, who could be loyal and kind but also cruel and vindictive. They all influenced Elizabeth's carefully-cultivated image as Gloriana, The Virgin Queen.

Elizabeth is compelled to confront that 'bosom serpent', Mary Queen of Scots, and much anguish follows.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00mqgbl)
Mary Berry; Women in the boardroom

Cookery writer Mary Berry on baking. Plus, Hengemah Shahidi, the pro-democracy journalist imprisoned in Iran; and why are there still so few women in the boardroom?


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00mrgrd)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.


THU 11:30 R.E.S.P.E.C.T. - The Art of Backing Vocals (b00kgfc1)
Nick Barraclough pushes aside the lead singer and delves into the world of the backing singer.

With the help of musicians, composers, and vocalists, he draws a straight line from the medieval canon to 50s doo-wop, celebrating the innovations of The Beatles and the multi-tracked world, inhabited by the likes of Joni Mitchell, along the way.

Producer: John Leonard

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00mq4xd)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00mq509)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00mq52h)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00mr1wc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00mq58h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b009ts31)
Good Evening

Roy Smiles' celebration of the Beyond the Fringe team takes a funny and affectionate look at how four young men from Oxbridge changed the face of British comedy.

Alan Bennett ...... Matt Addis
Peter Cook ...... Rory Kinnear
Jonathan Miller ...... Jonathan Aris
Dudley Moore ...... Benedict Cumberbatch

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b00mp521)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00mplr1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b009mc9b)
Countryman's Cooking

Of Gin and Soft-Soap

Leslie Phillips reads from WMW Fowler's definitive cookery manual for men.

Willie reveals why kissing the pastry-maker too early can be disastrous.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved (b00mq5td)
Episode 9

Investigative journalist Tom Mangold journeys inside the Bermuda Triangle to try to get to the truth about this mysterious area.

Tom returns to the peculiar story of British South American Airways and the last flight of Star Ariel, which disappeared without trace in the Bermuda Triangle in 1949. He uncovers new evidence suggesting that, far from being a mystery, the disappearance was in fact down to one small, but fatal, flaw.

A Ladbroke Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00mpn62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00mrgvg)
Vaccine trails in Thailand suggest it may be possible to find safe protection from HIV; Quentin Cooper gets the experts' view.

In the light of 2009's wet summer, Quentin hears about the long-range influences that can steer bad weather our way.

We give a new carbon-fibre vilin a professional roadtest.


THU 17:00 PM (b00mq68z)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00mq6bb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Electric Ink (b0116gvm)
Series 1

Episode 1

Maddox is an old school journalist struggling to keep up with new technology.

He feels the art of finding stories is being forgotten and he is not about to let that happen.

Old hacks meet new media in Alistair Beaton’s satire set in the changing world of the newspaper industry.

Maddox ...... Robert Lindsay
Oliver ...... Alex Jennings
Amelia ...... Elizabeth Berrington
Tasneem ...... Zita Sattar
Masha ...... Debbie Chazen
Freddy ...... Ben Willbond
Announcer ...... Matt Addis

With additional material by Tom Mitchelson.

Director: Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00mq58k)
Mike wants Ed to look through the share farming agreement he's come up with, before Ed and Emma go away for Ed's birthday. Ed struggles to get his head round the technicalities, and starts to wonder if he can manage the financial commitment. Mike tries to assure Ed that he's taking the biggest risk, using Vicky's money to purchase the cows, but Ed's not convinced and tells Mike to leave it for a bit. Mike realises Ed's really got cold feet.

Jennifer tells Brian that Peggy has fired the care agency. Brian offers to have a word with Peggy tomorrow, to see if he can get her to change her mind.

The board of Borchester Land discuss the land options for the Grange Farm proposal and Brian highlights the excellent PR opportunity it offers. He's confident of Martyn's support, but needs to win Andrew round. Gerry summarises the two options. Although the board members are split, after much debate they eventually agree to lease Ed a sloping piece of land on a five year tenancy. Annabelle congratulates Brian, who's looking forward to telling Mike and Ed. Unaware of Ed's worries, Annabelle can see why - they'll think Christmas has come early.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00mq7nx)
Matt Lucas talks to Mark Lawson about playing Kenneth Halliwell, the infamous lover and murderer of playwright Joe Orton, in a new stage play entitled Prick Up Your Ears, based on John Lahr's biography of Orton.

After winning the Mercury Music Prize in 2003 with his debut album Boy In Da Corner, East London-born rapper, songwriter and record producer Dylan Mills (better known by his stage name Dizzee Rascal) has gone from strength to strength, with his last three singles going to Number One. With his new album, Tongue N' Cheek, promising a more commercial sound, he talks about being the voice of a generation and meeting Jeremy Paxman.

Hughie O'Donoghue discusses his new exhibition at Leeds City Gallery, The Journey, which includes work based on his father's experiences as an infantryman in World War Two and pictures inspired by Van Gogh, Francis Bacon and Gericault. Also on show in London at the James Hyman Gallery is a series of O'Donoghue's works depicting Ireland and Egypt, which use a fusion of photography and paint.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00mvbn2)
Jane Gardam - The Man in the Wooden Hat

Episode 4

Dramatisation by Pete Atkin of the new novel by Jane Gardam.

After more than 20 years in Hong Kong, are Betty and Eddie destined to be lifetime expats?

Eddie ...... Michael York
Betty ...... Olivia Williams
Terry ...... Lloyd Owen
Amy ...... Moira Quirk
Delilah ...... Carolyn Seymour
Albert Ross ...... Jon David Yu
Young Harry ...... Oliver Dillon
Expat ...... Kenneth Danziger
Older Harry ...... Matthew Wolf
Narrator ...... Martin Jarvis

Directed by Rosalind Ayres and Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 20:00 The Report (b00mrw7t)
US Healthcare Debate

Simon Cox explores the US healthcare debate. Why has the path towards reform been so difficult and what forces are at work, as various groups in the lobbying battle compete to get their voices heard?


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00mrw7w)
Evan Davis and his guests discuss managing the expectations of customers and shareholders, and meetings - what makes them effective, and who needs to be in the room?

His guests are Andrew Cosslett, chief executive of Intercontinental Hotels (owners of chains including Holiday Inn), Allan Cook chief executive of international defence and aerospace company Cobham, and leading architect Rafael Vinoly.


THU 21:00 Leading Edge (b00mrw7y)
Music and the Mind

Violinist and music psychologist Paul Robertson tells Geoff Watts about his lifelong journey to find out why humans have always been a musical species, a quest that has introduced him to neuroscientists and therapists as well as musicians, and taken him from concert hall to brain scanner.

Musicality, he believes, is more than a form of 'brain candy', an accidental side effect of our biological evolution. Perhaps it is central to highly-prized human capacities such as verbal and emotional communication, abstract and symbolic representation, memory and even identity.

Geoff hears, from discussion and performance, how music transforms the life of gifted autistic musicians and can play a key role in mental development from womb to grave. And how music helped Paul Robertson through a coma and severe illness while preparing the first performance of a new work by Sir John Tavener which describes in music the process of a peaceful death.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00mrfwq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00mq85l)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00mq86y)
National and international news and analysis with Jane Hill.

G20 leaders arrive in Pittsburgh to talk about global financial recovery.

A report from Switzerland on cracking down on tax havens.

A NASA probe discovers water on the Moon.

Why the Scots have lowest life expectancy in western Europe.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00mqbrz)
Ordinary Thunderstorms

Episode 9

David Holt reads from the thriller by William Boyd. Adam Kindred, a young scientist, loses everything and is pursued by the police and a ruthless hitman.

Adam has discovered that all the children who died during the drug trials were moved out of the de Vere Wing before they passed away.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Poetry Slam (b00mrwng)
Series 2

Episode 1

Radio 4's Radio 4's 2009 Poetry Slam kicked off with performance poets competing in heats all round Britain for a place in the semi-finals, the first of which was held at The Bluecoat in Liverpool and hosted by popular poetry performer, slammer and former Poet Laureate of Birmingham, Dreadlock Alien. The competition was fierce, the energy high and the rhymes came thick and fast as nine poets battled it out for a place in the final. They were: Ash Dickinson, Harry Giles, Mark Madden, Ben Mellor, James Oates, Abby Oliveira, Scott Tyrell, Sohia Walker and Michael Wilson.

A slam is a knockout performance poetry competition in which poets perform their own work to a time limit and are given scores based on content, style, delivery and level of audience response. In the space of two minutes, performers must demonstrate their word-play, performance skills and inventiveness; over two or three rounds, poets are knocked out until one top scorer emerges as the winner. Slams attract a wide range of performers and styles, from heartfelt love poetry to searing social commentary, uproarious comic routines, and bittersweet personal confessional pieces.


THU 23:30 Jon Ronson On (b0076pmb)
Series 1

Being Invisible

Journalist and broadcaster Jon Ronson tries to find out how to be invisible with the help of a collection of extraordinary stories which try to illuminate the human condition.

He talks to Frank Ahearn, whose job it is to make people vanish; comedian Jon Holmes, whose parents are 'invisible' to him as he is adopted; and Maggie O'Farrell who recalls her time as a chamber maid, cleaning hotel rooms while guests carried on extremely personal activities.



FRIDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00mpnqq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00mq4lz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00mpns3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00mpp21)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00mpnxc)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00mppmg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00mppp8)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Janet Wootton.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00mq3nq)
England's hedgerows are disappearing, and farmers are being blamed. Charlotte Smith hears that 16,000 miles of hedgerows have been lost since 1999.

Plus concern over E.coli on open farms is causing the public to stay away. We hear from a farmer who insists it is safe to bring children to visit farm animals.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00mq3tm)
Presented by John Humphrys and James Naughtie.

Correspondent Kevin Connolly reports on what the summit between the leaders of the G20 countries in Pittsburgh could achieve. Economics editor Stephanie Flanders considers whether the 20 leaders can agree.

One in ten of the prison population is a military veteran, the National Association of Probation Officers (Napo) estimates. Harry Fletcher, assistant secretary general of Napo, discusses whether this is because of a lack of support when they leave the Services.

Since the Sri Lankan government's victory over the Tamil Tigers, nearly 280,000 Tamil civilians have been held in government-run camps. Correspondent Charles Haviland reports from eastern Sri Lanka, meeting a family that survived the end of the war and endured life in a government camp for Tamil refugees.

Conservationists say there could be more spiders and daddy longlegs than usual this autumn because of favourable breeding conditions. Correspondent Sarah Mukherjee reports from Suffolk, the home of Britain's biggest spider.

Fresh doubts have emerged over proposals to limit how long the DNA profiles of innocent people can be held on the national database. Home affairs correspondent Danny Shaw reports on why information on 850,000 people who were never charged, or charged and later cleared, are being kept.

When the relics of St Therese of Lisieux were taken on tour around Ireland it was claimed they attracted bigger crowds than the Pope. North of England correspondent Danny Savage reports on the thousands of people in the UK now flocking to see, touch and pray by a casket containing some of the remains of the French nun who is admired by Catholics for her simple way of life.

The parliamentary expenses scandal began because the mole behind the leak was angry about inadequate equipment for the armed forces, the Daily Telegraph said. Andrew Pierce, the paper's assistant editor, discusses the motivation for the leak.

Thought for the day with the Chief Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks.

The SNP government in Scotland is proposing a new broadcasting corporation to serve Scottish listeners and viewers, funded by money taken from the BBC licence fee and by advertising. Scottish Culture Minister Mike Russell and Labour MP Rosemary McKenna consider whether Scottish licence-fee payers are being short changed.

Nations must cooperate to boost their economies or face the prospect of long-term slow economic growth, Gordon Brown has warned at the G20 summit. Business editor Robert Peston, Chief Economist at GLC Hedge Fund Steven Bell and Terry Smith, Chief Executive of Tullett Prebon, discuss what can be achieved at the meeting.

'Proof' that birds are directly descended from dinosaurs is to be unveiled in Bristol. Chinese fossil hunter Xu Xing claims he can confirm the 'dinosaur-bird hypothesis'. Science correspondent Tom Feilden considers the debate that has raged and reports on whether the latest discoveries leave much room for doubt.

The Home Office has proposed plans for a six and 12-year time limit on holding the DNA profiles of innocent people on a national database. Shadow Home Secretary Chris Grayling explains what the Conservatives would do with the samples.

How can people cope with an increase in the number of spiders and daddy long legs expected this autumn? Former arachnophobe Dave Clarke, now head of bugs at London Zoo, explains why no-one should be afraid of the 'harmless' spider.

The play Our Class, currently at the National Theatre in London, tells the story of how one half of a class in Poland ends up murdering the other. Play director Bijan Sheibani and psychologist Dr James Thompson, of University College London, discuss how actors and audiences can deal with the portrayal of such harrowing events.

In Dallas, Texas, the FBI has arrested a Jordanian national who, they say, was trying to blow up a skyscraper in the city. Correspondent Jonathan Beale reports on the third arrest on suspicion of terrorist activity in the United States in recent days.

What would John Maynard Keynes make of the financial crisis and the credit crunch? Author Peter Clarke, former professor of modern British history at Cambridge University, and the former Conservative chancellor Lord Lamont consider whether Mr Keynes's ideas were twisted by modern politicians to support their desires to run big spending deficits.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b00mpmm4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00mq4m1)
Tracy Borman - Elizabeth's Women

Episode 5

Emma Fielding reads from Tracy Borman's biography of Elizabeth I, which explores the relationships she had with the women in her life. These women brought out the best and the worst of Elizabeth, who could be loyal and kind but also cruel and vindictive. They all influenced Elizabeth's carefully-cultivated image as Gloriana, The Virgin Queen.

In the final years of her reign, Elizabeth begins to lose her grip on matters at court. This state of affairs is reflected in the loosening morals of her newer and younger Ladies-in-Waiting, who she fittingly terms her 'flouting wenches'.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00mqgbn)
Fashion industry regulation; Strict parents

Should there be more regulation in the fashion industry. Plus, how our feelings affect our finances; and who's stricter: mum or dad?


FRI 11:00 Lost Souls of Ireland (b00mrwzc)
As a new and damning report into institutional abuse in Ireland's Catholic state schools is published, reporter Ruth McDonald examines the scandal's impact on Irish society.

Cathy Spillane, 48, sent a letter from her Norfolk home to the Irish Times in which she documented the horrific abuse her father had suffered as a child brought up in one of Ireland's institutional schools, and her anger towards the Catholic Church, which had failed to admit culpability.

She is not alone. The earlier Ryan Report, published in May 2009, exposed a secret which many had refused to believe about how widespread the abuse was. It is estimated that a third of all survivors now live in the UK, having fled Ireland. Many among this group of exiles had never spoken of what happened to them until recently.


FRI 11:30 The Adventures of Inspector Steine (b00mrwzf)
While the Sun Shines

Lynne Truss' comedy drama about celebrity policeman Inspector Steine returns to Radio 4. It's six months on and Twitten is back from a secondment at Scotland yard. But all is not well at the station since Brunswick is more depressed than ever. To cheer him up Twitten arranges for Brunswick's favourite crime reporter Harry Jupiter to interview him and Brunswick is jubilant. But then Steine gets involved and disaster follows. That's episode one of "The Adventures Of Inspector Steine' : While the Sun Shines.

Written by Lynne Truss

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00mq4xg)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00mq50c)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00mq52k)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00mrygc)
Roger Bolton asks the editor of PM to answer charges that the programme is turning into a light entertainment show, valuing listeners' opinions more than its own journalists' reporting.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00mq58k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00mrygf)
Nick Leather - Wednesdays with Strangers

Wednesday with Strangers
When a welcome pack to the UK offers advice on how to talk to strangers, a migrant worker decides to spend his one day off each week attempting to get to know the people of Britain and prove to his disillusioned flatmate that there is such a thing as the British Dream after all. A gentle comedy of manners by Nick Leather.

Mirek...............Matt McGuirk
Alex............... Eddie Capli
Andy..............James Quinn
Frank...............Greg Wood
Joy.................Sue Kelly

Producer Gary Brown.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00mrzf7)
The second of two programmes recorded at the annual Gardeners' Question Time garden party, held at RHS Harlow Carr in North Yorkshire, GQT's base in the north.

Peter Gibbs chairs and the panel are Anne Swithinbank, Pippa Greenwood and John Cushnie.

Peter explores how Harlow Carr is addressing the problems posed by future climate change. Pippa puts the fun into fungi, and Anne launches the GQT slug deterrent trial.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved (b00mq5tg)
Episode 10

Investigative journalist Tom Mangold journeys inside the Bermuda Triangle to try to get to the truth about this mysterious area.

Tom concludes his rigorous investigation into the mysteries of the Triangle by visiting Bermuda itself. The extraordinary experiences of local fishermen and treasure divers seem at odds with the empirical evidence collected by oceanographers, air traffic controllers and air sea rescue officers. So where does the truth lie?

A Ladbroke Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00mrzf9)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series. Including:

Ultrasound pioneer John Wild - Dr John Reid and Professor Kit Hill pay tribute; scriptwriter Troy Kennedy Martin remembered by producers Ted Child and Michael Dealey and by writer Keith Dewhurst; a picture of French photographer Willy Ronis by his agent Kathleen Grosset and friend Paul Ryan; Patti Smith shares her memories of punk poet Jim Carroll; and radio producer Leonie Cohn - a tribute from her son Paul Finlay and colleague Judith Bumpus.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00mrzmt)
Atonement director Joe Wright on the effect of the recession on Hollywood, and why he wouldn't be able to make The Soloist now, even though it was only filmed last year.

Sally Potter on Jude Law in drag and why the love of celebrity has become an epidemic.

Francine Stock makes Neil Brand an offer he can't refuse: to play the theme tune from The Godfather.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00mq691)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00mq6bd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00mrzmw)
Series 69

Episode 1

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panellists include Andy Hamilton, Mark Steel and Jeremy Hardy.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00mq58m)
Jennifer wishes Peggy would reconsider using the care agency but Peggy won't talk about it. Peggy likes Bryce the financial advisor, and realises she let things lapse for too long. She's grateful for Brian's help.

Jennifer thinks Mike and Ed have got a lot to be grateful for but Brian can't get hold of either of them.

Kenton invites Mike to a music session with Wayne at Neville Booth's. Mike prefers country and western. Besides, Vicky's making a special supper as she believes they've got something to celebrate. Kathy has reluctantly accepted an invitation from Jim to a new bar in Felpersham. Kenton wishes Kathy would lighten up and be a bit more like Vicky,

Later at the Bull, Kenton tells Mike that Kathy's great - he was just letting off steam. Mike understands. Sid and Jolene look happier now Wayne's moved out, even though he's still in the darts team. Mike starts to tell Kenton about the situation with Ed, when in walks Brian. He tells Mike they can lease the 50 acres and Kenton encourages Mike to ring Ed. It goes to voicemail, so Mike leaves Ed a message, trying hard to sound enthusiastic.

Episode written by Mary Cutler.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00mq7nz)
The Royal Shakespeare Company launches Revolutions, a season of dramas from former Soviet Union countries. In Drunks, Mikhail and Vyacheslav Durnenkov write about a shell shocked soldier returning from frontline Chechnya. In The Grain Store, Natal'ia Vorozbhit portrays a Ukrainian community devastated by Stalin's social policies. Tom Rob Smith, author of Booker longlisted Child 44, reviews this pair of RSC premieres in The Courtyard Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon.

Comedian Dave Gorman is coming to the end of a month touring with his show Dave Gorman: Sit Down, Pedal, Pedal, Stop and Stand Up. As the title suggests, what is different is that he's doing it all by bike, cycling from the southernmost point of the UK to the northernmost point via the east and west coast. He performs a full stand-up evening comedy show at the end of each ride. As he gets off his bike in Ardnamurchan, Scotland, he describes his arduous month on the road on two wheels.

Meanwhile country singer Gretchen Peters tells the stories from her week-long gig, with travelling audience, on a narrow gauge train trip across Colorado and New Mexico.

A new film Morris: A Life with Bells On has been packing them in at village halls in the West Country. The film, a mockumentary about an avant-garde Morris dancer, gets a cinema release. The husband and wife partnership of Lucy Akhurst and Charles Thomas Oldham who made the film describe the background to their word-of-mouth hit.

Giles Waterfield talks about the changing nature of the artist's studio, from grand public space to chaotic squalor in his role as curator of the first UK exhibition on the subject, The Artist's Studio, at Compton Verney in Warwickshire.

Musical improvisation is usually associated with jazz, but a group of early music specialists will be improvising from music written as far back as the 10th century. Improvisation played a central role in medieval and baroque music, and now The Southbank Centre's Take the Risk weekend sees musicans attempting to re-learn these lost improvisatory skills.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00mvbn4)
Jane Gardam - The Man in the Wooden Hat

Episode 5

Dramatisation by Pete Atkin of the new novel by Jane Gardam.

Does old age mean that Hong Kong secrets will finally be revealed?

Eddie ...... Michael York
Betty ...... Olivia Williams
Terry ...... Lloyd Owen
Amy ...... Moira Quirk
Delilah ...... Carolyn Seymour
Albert Ross ...... Jon David Yu
Young Harry ...... Oliver Dillon
Expat ...... Kenneth Danziger
Older Harry ...... Matthew Wolf
Narrator ...... Martin Jarvis

Directed by Rosalind Ayres and Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00mrzmy)
Eddie Mair chairs the topical debate from Wells in Somerset. The panellists are the secretary of state for culture, media and sport Ben Bradshaw, shadow defence secretary Liam Fox, the Liberal Democrats' home office spokesperson Chris Huhne, and businesswoman Deborah Meaden, from the TV show Dragons' Den.


FRI 20:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00mrzn0)
Series 1

Adam's Face

What are human eyebrows for? Possibly to allow communication without the use of words.

Testing the value of eyebrow communication came into its own when David Attenborough met the men of an aboriginal tribe in New Guinea where there was no other common language.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2009.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00mrzrm)
I Am Emma Humphreys

Dramatisation by Shelley Silas of the true story of Emma Humphreys, who in 1985, aged 16, murdered her pimp, Trevor Armitage, who had found her homeless on the streets of Nottingham.

Emma's case changed the law and may yet contribute to further controversial changes in the defence laws for murder.

Emma Humphreys ...... Joanne Froggatt
Trevor Armitage ...... Stephen Critchlow
Stuart ...... Delroy Brown
Vera Baird ...... Susan Jameson
Harriet Wistrich ...... Lynne Verrall
Lord Justice Hirst ...... David Hargreaves
Nottingham Judge ...... Stephen Hogan

Directed by Claire Grove.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00mq85n)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00mq870)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

World leaders' anger at Iran's admission that it has been secretly building a second nuclear plant.

G20 leaders agree to give emerging economies more of a say.

What next for the overthrown Honduran President Manuel Zelaya?

And the mood among Labour activists in Newcastle ahead of their party conference.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00mqbs1)
Ordinary Thunderstorms

Episode 10

David Holt reads from the thriller by William Boyd. Adam Kindred, a young scientist, loses everything and is pursued by the police and a ruthless hitman.

Jonjo has been taken off the hunt for Adam Kindred but he still feels he has a score to settle.

A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00mr4w1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Misfits in France (b00f24f8)
Wilde About Dieppe

Series in which Julian Barnes and Hermione Lee explore the connections between a group of Victorian writers and artists who crossed the English Channel for different reasons.

Examining the differing fortunes of Oscar Wilde and the painter Walter Sickert, who both flouted Victorian moral conventions, during their time in the French town of Dieppe.

At 4am on May 20th 1897, Sebastian Melmoth, better known as Oscar Wilde, arrived at Dieppe Docks seeking refuge following his release from Reading Gaol, but he quickly moved out of town.

Walter Sickert is known as a Camden Town painter but his painter friend Jaques Emile Blanche called him 'the Canaletto of Dieppe'. His long association with the resort began with childhood holidays and included an affair with one of the local fishwives.

Oscar Wilde ...... Simon Russell Beale
Walter Sickert ...... Stephen Critchlow
Arthur Symons ...... Jonathan Tafler.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00mq835)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00mvbmy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00mvbn0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00mvbn2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00mvbn4)

A Charles Paris Mystery 23:30 WED (b00wmxj3)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b0088v2z)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b008mb9n)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b009mc8t)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b009mc92)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b009mc9b)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00mpnjn)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00mr16g)

Another Case of Milton Jones 23:30 TUE (b007cnxp)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00mp66c)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00mlxpr)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00mrzmy)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00mpjq7)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00mpjq7)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00mplql)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00mplql)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00mp5zd)

Black Screen Britain 23:30 MON (b00jck88)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00mqbs5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00mqbrv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00mqbrx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00mqbrz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00mqbs1)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00mjmvk)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00mq4m7)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00mq4m7)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00mq4lv)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00mq4lv)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00mq4lx)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00mq4lx)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00mq4lz)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00mq4lz)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00mq4m1)

Bowling for Love 11:00 WED (b00mr5r6)

Brief Lives 14:15 WED (b007s1b7)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00mpmm0)

Calvin and Hobbes 11:30 TUE (b00mr2fj)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00mr52p)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00mr52p)

Chain Reaction 18:30 WED (b00mrc8n)

Children of the Olympic Bid 09:00 MON (b00mqc1f)

Children of the Olympic Bid 21:30 MON (b00mqc1f)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00mjklh)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00mpn0q)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00mr1wc)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00mr1wc)

Cowards 23:00 WED (b007h55q)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 08:50 SUN (b00mlxpv)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 20:50 FRI (b00mrzn0)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00mqhqy)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00mr31n)

Drama 14:15 THU (b009ts31)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00mrygf)

Electric Ink 18:30 THU (b0116gvm)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00mp5wm)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00mp5rc)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00mq3tc)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00mq3nj)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00mq3nl)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00mq3nn)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00mq3nq)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00mlxfh)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00mrygc)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00mr4w5)

Food for Thought 14:45 SUN (b00mpn0n)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00mrzrm)

From Abacus to Circle Time: A Short History of the Primary School 16:00 TUE (b00mr3qm)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00mp5zg)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00mrgrd)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00mq833)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00mq7nn)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00mq7nt)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00mq7nx)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00mq7nz)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00mlxfm)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00mrzf7)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00mr4w1)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00mr4w1)

Heresy 23:00 TUE (b00jyc77)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00mr37s)

I Guess That's Why They Call It The News 12:30 SAT (b00mlxft)

Iconoclasts 22:15 SAT (b00mkbyn)

Iconoclasts 20:00 WED (b00mrd9g)

If You're Reading This 13:30 SUN (b00c0ltb)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00ml2r3)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00mrfwq)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00mrfwq)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00mr52m)

Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved 15:45 MON (b00mq5x8)

Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved 15:45 TUE (b00mq5t8)

Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved 15:45 WED (b00mq5tb)

Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved 15:45 THU (b00mq5td)

Inside the Bermuda Triangle: The Mysteries Solved 15:45 FRI (b00mq5tg)

Jeopardising Justice 09:30 MON (b00mqc1h)

Jon Ronson On 23:30 THU (b0076pmb)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00mk5x7)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00mr0rl)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00mlxfp)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00mrzf9)

Leading Edge 21:00 THU (b00mrw7y)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00mpjpd)

Lost Souls of Ireland 11:00 FRI (b00mrwzc)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00mrgvg)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00mm0dy)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00mplq8)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00mpnrv)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00mpnqj)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00mpnql)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00mpnqn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00mpnqq)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00mr5n8)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00mr5n8)

Misfits in France 23:30 FRI (b00f24f8)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00mrc8j)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00mp63v)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00mp63v)

Nature 11:00 TUE (b00mr2fg)

Nature 21:00 WED (b00mr2fg)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00mm0vh)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00mplqj)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00mppms)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00mppm8)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00mppmb)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00mppmd)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00mppmg)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00mplqn)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00mm101)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00mplqx)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00mpmlw)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00mpjqk)

News 13:00 SAT (b00mp63z)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00mplqs)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00mpn62)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00mpn62)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00mpjnp)

PM 17:00 MON (b00mq6b4)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00mq68v)

PM 17:00 WED (b00mq68x)

PM 17:00 THU (b00mq68z)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00mq691)

Passing the Hat 11:00 MON (b00mqhqr)

Peace In Our Time - And What Followed It 20:45 WED (b00mrd9j)

Persuading Us to Be Good 17:00 SUN (b00mk7rq)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00mpndz)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00mjklm)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00mpndq)

Poetry Slam 23:00 THU (b00mrwng)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00mm0vk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00mppyt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00mppp2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00mppp4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00mppp6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00mppp8)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00mpjpj)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00mpjpj)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00mpjpj)

R.E.S.P.E.C.T. - The Art of Backing Vocals 11:30 THU (b00kgfc1)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00mplr1)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00mplr1)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00mplr1)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b00mp521)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b00mp521)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b00mjrxs)

Round Britain Quiz 13:30 MON (b00mqhqw)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00mpjnh)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00mp5wk)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00mpjpz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00mm0vc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00mplqd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00mppm6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00mpp1v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00mpp1x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00mpp1z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00mpp21)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00mm0v9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00mm0vf)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00mpjny)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00mplqb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00mplqg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00mpnds)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00mpnx3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00mpp1s)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00mpnrx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00mpnx5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00mpnrz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00mpnx7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00mpns1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00mpnx9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00mpns3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00mpnxc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00mpjp4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00mpndx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00mq6bj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00mq6b6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00mq6b8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00mq6bb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00mq6bd)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00mplqq)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00mplqq)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b00mk6tc)

Soul Music 13:30 TUE (b00mr2wr)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00mpmly)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00mplqz)

That Mitchell and Webb Sound 18:30 TUE (b00mr4w3)

The Adventures of Inspector Steine 11:30 FRI (b00mrwzf)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00mpmm2)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00mpnjl)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00mpnjl)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00mq58p)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00mq58p)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00mq58f)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00mq58f)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00mq58h)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00mq58h)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00mq58k)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00mq58k)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00mq58m)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00mrw7w)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00mlxfr)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00mrzmt)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00mpmm6)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00mpmm6)

The Good Samaritan 09:30 TUE (b00mr234)

The House I Grew Up In 09:00 TUE (b00mr232)

The House I Grew Up In 21:30 TUE (b00mr232)

The Maltby Collection 11:30 MON (b00mqhqt)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00mr5tn)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00mrzmw)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00mrw7t)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b00mpmm4)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b00mpmm4)

The Stanley Baxter Playhouse 11:30 WED (b008nw1c)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00mpn0l)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00mqbrs)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00mq86t)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00mq86w)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00mq86y)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00mq870)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00mkbyj)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00mrc8l)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00mp5rh)

Today 06:00 MON (b00mq4ls)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00mq3tf)

Today 06:00 WED (b00mq3th)

Today 06:00 THU (b00mq3tk)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00mq3tm)

Tracing Your Roots 16:30 MON (b00mr0rj)

Wars of The Roses 05:45 SAT (b00frp64)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00mp51z)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00mp5rf)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00mp63x)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00mpjp2)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00mplqv)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00mplr3)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00mpn0j)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00mpndv)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00mpnjq)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00mqc1c)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00mq529)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00mq86r)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00mq505)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00mq85g)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00mq507)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00mq85j)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00mq509)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00mq85l)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00mq50c)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00mq85n)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00mpnjs)

What's in Your Head 20:00 MON (b00jnkdx)

With Great Pleasure 23:00 MON (b00cxr9l)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00mpjnm)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00mq4qd)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00mqgbx)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00mqgbj)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00mqgbl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00mqgbn)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00mq554)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00mq52c)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00mq52f)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00mq52h)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00mq52k)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00mq503)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00mq4x8)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00mq4xb)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00mq4xd)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00mq4xg)

Youssou N'Dour at 50: Africa's Greatest Star 10:30 SAT (b00mp5zb)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00mpjnr)