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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 08 AUGUST 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00lxhhm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00lxjln)
Martin Stannard - Muriel Spark: The Biography

Episode 5

Hannah Gordon reads from Martin Stannard's biography of the acclaimed Scottish novelist, written with full access to her letters and papers.

Despite finding companionable happiness in Italy, the vexations of Spark's family life continued to intrude long into her old age.

Abridged by Rosemary Goring.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lxhhp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lxhhr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lxhht)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00lxhhw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lxhhy)
Daily prayer and reflection with George Craig.


SAT 05:45 Backstreet Business (b008pxsy)
Episode 3

Nicola Heywood Thomas visits five small businesses. Byron George of Llanelli repairs false teeth in a workshop attached to his house.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00lxhj0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00lxspy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00lxsq1)
Ospreys of Rutland Water

Our growing population in the UK is creating more demand for water and so several new reservoirs are planned and others extended. Helen Mark explores Rutland Water to investigate the controversy it caused in the 1970s when plans to flood two villages and vast swathes of farmland were announced. Now it is home to thousands of wildlife species, including the rare osprey.

Helen finds out about the success of the reintroduction project there and gets within touching distance of three new chicks as they are ringed. But once again farmland has been sacrificed for the lagoons. She explores how well new species are taking to the man-made pools and investigates who wins in the battle for food, water and wildlife.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00lxsq3)
Farming Today This Week

Anna Hill looks into the human cost of bovine TB for farming families trapped within the cycle of the disease.

For years, even decades, it has become a never-ending nightmare. The latest government figures show that, since January 2009, new cases of bovine tuberculosis in cattle have fallen by 5.3 per cent compared with the same period last year. However, there are still thousands of farms, especially in the south and west, which are caught in the bovine TB trap. We hear more from those farmers and their families in one of the worst affected areas of the country, Worcestershire.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00lxsq5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00lxsq7)
Presented by James Naughtie and Edward Stourton.

Ian Pannell reports on the length of the UK's commitment to Afghanistan.

Political correspondent Ross Hawkins examines who has been left in charge in Downing Street.

Pakistan's most wanted man, Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud, has reportedly been killed by a US missile. Author Ahmed Rashid discusses whether he is confident that Mr Mehsud has been killed.

Business correspondent Joe Lynam reflects on comments that the UK retirement age is likely to rise to higher that 68.

Robert Pigott reports on how Californian nuns are reaching out to the community.

Tom Esslemont reports from Georgia on a day of ceremonies to mark the first anniversary of its war with Russia over South Ossetia. Former ambassador Donald MacLaren discusses EU efforts in the region.

Martin Smith of the British Beekeepers Association warns that the price of honey is likely to rise as a result of recent wet weather.

Rohan Guhnaratna, of the School of International Studies in Singapore, says that Noordin Mohamed Top is the most important terrorist in south-east Asia and is responsible for all the major attacks in Indonesia since 2002.

Thought for the Day with Canon David Winter.

John McFall MP and Adrian Coles, director of the BSA, discuss the way mortgage lenders operate.

Wajid Shamsul Hasan, Pakistan's High Commissioner for the UK, discusses whether Pakistan's most wanted man, Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud, has been killed by a US missile.

Carol Highton discusses how her son Bryan committed suicide because of debts he owned to a loan shark.

Reporter Sanchia Berg and writer and broadcaster Lucinda Lambton discuss the rich architectural heritage of public conveniences.

Jon Leyne reports on the second group of people brought before Iranian courts following violent protests in the wake of June's presidential elections.

James Naughtie investigates whether events in the City are separate from the real economy.

Mike Gapes MP discusses the UK's role in development, governance and security sector reform in Afghanistan.

Comedian Chris Neill imagines what might be contained in the latest diary entries of Harriet Harman, who was in charge of the government during the week.

John Ridding of the Financial Times and Charlie Beckett, director of Polis, discuss whether people will pay for news on the internet.

Journalist Edward Enfield and film director and restaurant critic Michael Winner discuss whether or not men should act their age.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00lxsq9)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. Rev Richard Coles is joined by wildlife film maker Simon King. With poetry from Susan Richardson.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00lxsqc)
Sandi Toksvig joins a botanist in search of the Lotus Flower in rural Japan and takes a journey into the dark and fascinating hinterland of Russia, where she finds a country still struggling to come to terms with the fall of communism.


SAT 10:30 Soho Stories (b00lxsqf)
Mergers and Acquisitions and Megabucks

A mere seven years ago, there were some in the industry who dismissed the independent production sector as unsustainable. However following government intervention in 2003, it is now the envy of the world and British television has become responsible for some 53% of all format hours on the planet.

However, with the emergence of a worldwide digital market, its future is once more uncertain. In the final programme of the series, Paul Jackson is joined by the likes of Simon Cowell (X-Factor and Britain's Got Talent), Peter Bazalgette (Big Brother and Deal Or No Deal), Lorraine Heggessey (The Apprentice and The Bill), Paul Smith (Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? and Slumdog Millionaire), Jimmy Mulville (Have I Got News For You and Outnumbered), Steve Morrison (Skins and George Gently), David Frank (Wife Swap and Faking It) and Henry Normal (The Mighty Boosh and Gavin & Stacey) to follow the changing fortunes of their industry during the 2000s and to discuss what is needed to maintain our artistic and business supremacy in the future.

With plot twists worthy of Ashes To Ashes, as much tension as Britain's Got Talent and a payday to rival Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?, Paul Jackson draws on his own experiences in the television industry to trace the development of a sector that today earns the country almost half a billion pounds a year in exports alone.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b00lxsqh)
As the recession deepens, Jim Hancock and a panel of MPs discuss the impact of the recession in the West Midlands and the North West and ask if government measures to support struggling manufacturing firms and their employees are working.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00lxsqk)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.

Including communities stranded on either side of the hostile border between Georgia and South Ossetia, bull running on a budget in Spain, and a look inside the private playground of Marshall Tito of Yugoslavia.


SAT 12:00 The Money Grab (b00lxsqm)
Episode 2

Alvin Hall explores the rise in corporate pay and bonus culture.

He meets the politicians and shareholders looking to rein in sky-high executive salaries and asks if their cause is a realistic one. Will the era of big bonuses soon be over, or can the finance world's top talent always name their price?


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b00lxh42)
Series 28

Episode 7

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a satirical review of the week's news, with help from Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, Mitch Benn and Ben Goldacre.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00lxsqp)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00lxsqr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00lxh7t)
Eddie Mair chairs the topical debate in Margate. The panellists are writer Charles Moore, British Medical Association chairman Hamish Meldrum, commentator and chief executive of the Index on Censorship John Kampfner and chair of the Health and Safety Executive, Judith Hackitt CBE.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00lxsqt)
Eddie Mair takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Friday Drama (b00lxsqw)
The Song Thief

By Michael Chaplin

A young composer arrives in Northumberland, looking for an old man reputed to have written a hauntingly beautiful love song. The old man only sang it once - after his wife left him - and says he'll it sing it no more.

The composer embarks on a cold-hearted campaign to make the old man's daughter fall in love with him.

In the long summers of Edwardian England, a stream of educated young men trickled out of London and meandered into the country. Composers and musicologists, they carried with them specially-adapted phonographs and a missionary zeal to excavate their country's unrecorded folk culture - the songs of the mill, market and meadow - and by embellishment turn it into high art. They included men - Vaughan Williams, Delius and Percy Grainger - who became famous for their "discoveries". While with a passion for this lost music, they were also aware it might make their careers. Some might call it homage, others theft.

This play draws on this story to follow one man's quest for his holy grail - a mythically beautiful song written by a Northumbrian shepherd in praise of the wife who abandoned him. It leads him in his turn to other betrayals -of his own values and the shepherd's daughter who tries to help him.

Entwined around two love stories and the beautiful song that joins them, this is a play about music - its capacity to redeem and corrupt - and the vexed question of who owns it.

Concertina/Fiddle Sheena Masson

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Produced by Catherine Bailey
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Gesualdo: Musician and Murderer (b00lv204)
Aled Jones examines the bizarre life and tormented music of Carlo Gesualdo, Prince of Venosa, who slaughtered his unfaithful wife and her paramour and then composed six books of madrigals about the joys of love.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00lxsqy)
Weekend Woman's Hour

With Sheila McLennon.

Including Harriet Harman, who talks about her week in the spotlight, standing in for Gordon Brown at Number 10.

What is a 'just war' for feminist? Clare Fox of the Institute of Ideas and journalist Carol Gould discuss the issues.

Penelope Lively on her latest novel, Family Album, with its themes of family, memory and how people manage to edit and re-arrange the past.

21-year-old bassoonist Karen Geoghegan, who made her Proms debut at the Royal Albert Hall, plays live and talks about the challenges of the repertoire and her ambition of popularising the bassoon as a solo instrument.

The novelist Jude Morgan and Bronte sisters biogrpher Lucasta Miller discuss Charlotte Bronte's Villette, which is the current Woman's Hour drama.

Dr Paul Taylor of Leeds University and Quentin Willson, a former presenter of Top Gear, discuss men who don't drive.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00lxsr0)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00lxsr2)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00lxsr4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00lxsr6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00lxsr8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00lxsrb)
Another eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy, with Peter Curran and his guests.

Peter is joined by comedian Dave Gorman, cookery writer Allegra McEvedy and actor David Harewood.

Robin Ince talks to scientist and presenter of Bang Goes the Theory, Yan Wong.

With comedy from Liz Carr and music from Sam Carter and Polly and the Billets Doux.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00lxsrd)
James Murdoch

Clive Coleman profiles the media modul James Murdoch, son of Rupert and a growing influence within News Corp.

He is an unusual business giant; he is young, has an interest in green issues and was the founder of a rap music studio, launching new acts onto the New York scene. But his biggest contribution to popular culture has been his development of the satellite broadcaster BSkyB, which now boasts a 40 per cent share of the UK television market.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00lxsrg)
A new translation of Euripides Helen by Frank McGuinness, and Everything That Rises by Lawrence Weschler

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by writers Louise Doughty and Bidisha and literary critic John Carey to discuss the cultural highlights of the week, featuring a shipwrecked king, two imposters and a singing building.

Euripides's play Helen begins with the premise that the face that launched a thousand ships was that of a mischievous doppelganger and that Helen herself was spirited away to Egypt by the gods. In Frank McGuinness's version of the play at Shakespeare's Globe, Paul McGann's Menelaus gets a shock when he is shipwrecked on the coast of Egypt and bumps into his wife Helen, played by Penny Downie, who he thought he had just rescued from Troy. Can they escape before Theoclymenes, King of Egypt and hater of Greeks, kills Menelaus and marries Helen?

Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno had their first outing as The Yes Men in 2003's eponymous film. Now they return in The Yes Men Fix The World with the same modus operandi: passing themselves off as representatives of global corporations and powerful agencies while pulling off stunts to expose the misdeeds of the powerful. The most notorious hoax in this film involved Andy posing as a spokesman for Dow and announcing to the media that they were going to provide full compensation for the victims of the Bhopal chemical disaster.

Lawrence Weschler is a writer who likes collecting what he calls convergences, correspondences he notices between images and structures in art and nature. He has collected a selection of these in his book Everthing That Rises: A Book of Convergences, in which, for instance, a photograph of a Venezuelan landscape reminds him of Velasquez's Venus and Cupid and also of Man Ray's A l'Heure de l'Observatoire: les Amoureux, which combine to bring him on to Chagall's Nu au-dessus de Vitebsk.

David Byrne has turned the Roundhouse in London into an unlikely musical instrument with his installation Playing The Building. A small 19th-century organ at the centre of a web of cables and tubes coaxes a range of sounds from the surrounding structure by hitting, rubbing and blowing air over parts of it. All visitors are encouraged to see what happens when they strike the keys. Absolutely no musical experience required.

When the death of John Updike was announced at the beginning of 2009, his status as a major voice in post-war American literature seemed assured. However, in our occasional series of counterblasts against cultural landmarks, guest reviewer Louise Doughty puts forward the case that Updike is, in fact, massively overrated as a writer.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00ly4nk)
Under the Red Duster

John Prescott MP went to sea as a waiter on Cunard Liners before entering Parliament. He recalls his own career from steward to Deputy Prime Minister.

Via archive, poetry and new interviews, John also tells the little-known story of the British Merchant Navy. The tale starts from when its ships once carried half of all the cargo that moved around the world and its role in wartime, through to its near-collapse in the 1970s and 80s and the changes in law in recent years that have helped rebuild the fleet.

A Malcolm Billings and Associates production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00ltnfs)
Ruth

Episode 1

Dramatisation by Ellen Dryden of the novel by Elizabeth Gaskell.

Sixteen-year-old orphan Ruth Hilton is apprenticed as a dressmaker to the hard-bitten Mrs Mason, because she is too much of an inconvenience for her legal guardian. A job as a seamstress for a Hunt Ball and an encounter with a young man have far-reaching consequences.

Ruth ...... Laura Rees
Bellingham ...... Rory Kinnear
Benson ...... Anton Lesser
Mrs Mason ...... Abigail Thaw
Guardian/Jones/Thomas ...... Richard Hope
Nelly/Mrs Bellingham ...... Alison Skilbeck
Miss Duncombe ...... Aimee Cowen
Jenny ...... Helen Jenkinson
Bessie ...... Daisy Ashford

Directed by Ellen Dryden.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00lxsrl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Reality Check (b00lv6fn)
Series 2

Episode 2

Justin Rowlatt presents a discussion series involving experts and people closely involved in the issues.

The UK is suffering an obesity crisis, supermarkets are accused of having too much power over our lives and of squeezing farmers dry, while others worry about the impact of the food industry on global warming.

Consumers, farmers, retailers and food experts ask if our food chain needs a radical overhaul and discuss who has the right to tell us where to shop.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b00lv0x1)
Tom Sutcliffe chairs the cryptic general knowledge quiz, featuring teams from Wales and the North of England.


SAT 23:30 Tennyson's Ulysses Revisited (b00ltnpm)
Marking the 200th anniversary of the birth Alfred, Lord Tennyson's birth, poet Sean O'Brien explores his great poem, Ulysses, from the singular story of its tragic origins to its many meanings for readers today.

He hears from Homer scholar Oliver Taplin and Dante scholar Martin McLaughlin about Tennyson's sources for the poem and its surprisingly ambiguous hero. Sean learns from Victorian experts Seamus Perry, Robert Douglas Fairhurst and Linda Hughes about the tragedy in Tennyson's young life that led him to write this poem about an old man when he himself was just 24.

It is a poem about bereavement and death but, as poet Vicki Feaver explains, it is also about the personal struggle in each of us between comfort and adventure, between the familiar and the unknown, between accepting life as it is and striving ever onward.

Featuring a powerful new reading of Ulysses by Anton Lesser.



SUNDAY 09 AUGUST 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00lxsyz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b008118z)
Cheltenham Festival Readings

Whisk Me Around

Bruce takes care of a wealthy old man's unusual final wish. Written and read by Julia Blackburn.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lxsz1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lxsz3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lxsz5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00lxsz7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00lxsz9)
The sound of bells from St Mary's Church, Barnes in London.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00lxsrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00lxtmd)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00lxtmg)
Miracles of Thrift

Mark Tully wonders why habits of thrift have been lost in a generation, and asks how they can be recovered - and even celebrated once again - in response to the needs of the day.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00lxtmj)
Charlotte Smith visits hill farmer Simon Bland, who has developed a new use for unwanted sheep's wool and bracken from the Cumbrian fells - which is threatening the very existence of the sheep grazing there.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00lxtml)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00lxtmn)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00lxtmq)
Jane Little discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00lxtms)
Grasslands Trust

Chris Beardshaw appeals on behalf of The Grasslands Trust.

Donations to The Grasslands Trust should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope The Grasslands Trust. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide The Grasslands Trust with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode. so they can claim the gift aid on your donation.

Registered Charity No: 1097893.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00lxtqy)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00lxtr0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00lxtr2)
Martin Palmer visits Syria to experience the living spirituality of a community stretching back to the birth of Christianity, yet which has adapted to its current status as a minority faith. Homily: Metropolitan Yohanna Ibrahim.


SUN 08:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00lxhb3)
Series 1

Birds of Paradise

Sir David Attenborough talks about the Birds of Paradise, a group of birds which evolved in the relative safety of New Guinea, allowing them to acquire adornments and feathered decorations so resplendent that they fooled the early explorers who discovered them.

Series of talks by Sir David on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Producer: Julian Hector.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in August 2009.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00lxtr4)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00lxtr6)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00lxvkz)
Dame Joan Bakewell

Kirsty Young's castaway is the broadcaster Dame Joan Bakewell. Born in Stockport in 1933, it was in the 1960s that she first started to shape the cultural agenda, interviewing the likes of Kingsley Amis and Stockhausen for the radical BBC TV show Late Night Line-Up. It was also during the 1960s that she had an affair with Harold Pinter, a relationship which inspired his play Betrayal. Looking back on it now from the age of 76, she says, "We always said we had a damn good time".

Now appointed as the Voice of Older People by Gordon Brown, her passion for debate and social change is as strong as ever. She says she has always regarded the world to be improved and is not afraid of being called a wishy-washy liberal. "It's a good thing to do," she says, "you feel you can be part of change."

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: String Quintet in C Major by Franz Schubert
Book: War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
Luxury: An abundance of paper and pencils.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00lv13k)
Series 55

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game. With Paul Merton, Shappi Khorsandi, Gyles Brandreth and Kit Hesketh-Harvey.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00lxvl1)
Chefs' Choices Number 1: Indian Meat Pickle

Cyrus Todiwala, award-winning chef of Cafe Spice, acclaimed for his unique and creative Indian cuisine, gets to work with spices, herbs and in particular his very own Indian meat pickle. Joining Cyrus, and laden with fresh herbs, is his supplier, Rob Davies.

The programme also features a trip to the coriander beds of a grower, Charlie Bransden, to hear why the roots, as well as the seed of this herb, are crucial to Indian cuisine, and food historian Tom Jaine decribes the unusual culinary route of coriander from west to east.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00lxvl3)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00lxvl5)
A look at events around the world with Edward Stourton.


SUN 13:30 Bombay's Beatle (b00hv1dt)
Sarfraz Manzoor visits Mumbai to visit some of the musicians who were recruited in 1968 by George Harrison to help him record the soundtrack to the psychedelic film Wonderwall


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00lxh3w)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

John Cushnie, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Biggs answer questions posed by members of Brightlingsea Garden Club.

Brightlingsea is on the Essex coast near Colchester, and, as winner of the 2006 Britain in Bloom award and multiple winner of the Best Town in Anglia competition, it has an enviable reputation.

Bunny Guinness investigates how local man Brian Wickenden's garden ended up being nominated as the National Collection of Corydalis, and finds out how Brian is coping with its maintenance.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 The Tribes of Science (b00lxvl7)
Computer Programmers

Series in which Peter Curran visits members of the many and varied disciplines of science, from astronomy to zoology, to explore their habitat, customs, rituals and beliefs. Beneath the typecast and somewhat nerdy image of scientists, Peter finds passion, humour and, on occasion, an enviable sense of community.

Peter meets the makers of the virtual world, Second Life. Are they architects, engineers or computer geeks, or highly competent people for whom one life just isn't enough?

The UK headquarters of Linden Lab promotes a Californian, groovy way of working, free from old-fashioned office politics and hierarchy, but in their Second Life, the Linden tribe enjoy being treated like royalty.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00lxwh4)
Ruth

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Ellen Dryden of the novel by Elizabeth Gaskell.

Abandoned in Wales, Ruth is taken in by the preacher Benson and his reluctant sister. The cause of Ruth's illness is established and brings with it a secret which could destroy her unless it is kept from everyone.

Ruth ...... Laura Rees
Benson ...... Anton Lesser
Faith ...... Anne Reid
Bellingham ...... Rory Kinnear
Bradshaw ...... David Schofield
Sally ...... Marcia Warren
Jemima ...... Amy Ewbank
Mrs Bradshaw ...... Abigail Thaw
Elizabeth ...... Helen Jenkinson
Mary ...... Daisy Ashford
Richard/Hickson ...... Dudley Hinton

Directed by Ellen Dryden.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00lxwh6)
Christopher Brookmyre, a guide to Thomas Pynchon, and a New Biography of Arthur Ransome

Muriel Gray presents the books programme. Her guests include thriller writer Christopher Brookmyre, who talks about his new horror satire, Pandaemonium.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00lxwh8)
Roger McGough presents a special edition devoted to the poetry of Tennyson, as part of the poet's bicentenary celebrations. Tennyson is one of the most frequently requested 19th-century poets on the programme, and this edition features readings of his works including The Lady of Shallot, The Throstle and Crossing the Bar.


SUN 17:00 Rewriting the Psychiatrist's Bible (b00kf117)
Matthew Hill investigates the links between psychiatrists and the pharmaceutical industry. Should there be increased transparency over top psychiatrists' links to the industry?

He looks at the influence of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM), produced by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), which has been heavily criticised in the past for a lack of transparency between the panel members and pharmaceutical companies. Matthew also examines the 'Chinese menu' aspect of the DSM's diagnostic criteria and the sheer number of conditions it includes. Matthew investigates whether the APA's transparency policy goes far enough and if we are medicalising real conditions or just traits of human personality.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00lxsrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00lxx6w)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00lxx6y)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00lxx70)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00lxx72)
Liz Barclay introduces her selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.

Programmes featured:

Billy Liar 50 Years On - Radio 4
Great Lives: Tennyson - Radio 4
Searching For Alfred - Radio 3
M16: A Century in the Shadows - Radio 4
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - Radio 2
Benjamin Jealous: The Future of the NAACP - Radio 4
The Election Agent - Radio 4
The Odd Half Hour - Radio 4
Between Ourselves - Radio 4
The Now Show - Radio 4
The Movie That Changed My Life - Radio 2
Very Amazing - Radio 4
The Long View - Radio 4
The Hidden World of Jacques Cousteau - Radio 4
Last Chance For Africa's Elephants - Radio 4
Muriel Spark: The Biography - Radio 4
Gesualdo: Musician and Murderer - Radio 4.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00lxx74)
David asks Tom how he's getting on with Pat and Tony away on holiday. Tom says he's stretched but just managing. David tells Tom that they've have decided to go to Sharm El Sheikh for his 50th birthday. The kids can't wait.

David gets a call from Ed, asking if he can help with a cow which has some chaff stuck in its eye. Ed's really grateful. They manage to help the cow and Ed apologises for being such a wuss. David says Ed's done a great job. David thinks their share farming idea is great, though he can't help with extra land.

Vicky confides in Lynda about her tricky relationship with Brenda. She also tells her that Mike's told her their second honeymoon involves a boat, and the destination begins with B. It must be the Bahamas or Bermuda. She can't wait!

Jolene tries to persuade Sid to let her take Lilian to a bar supplies promotion, to take her mind off things. Sid doesn't want Lilian to be more involved with the Bull, after last time. But Jolene says if Lilian's unhappy, she might leave Ambridge. They could end up with an even more difficult partner. Is that what Sid really wants?

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00lxx76)
Is President Obama's massive spending rejuvenating the American economy? Jane Little finds out about the effects of the stimulus package.

Jane also visits the oldest new-age institute in the US, and talks to a man whose anonymous name has earned him a place in the spotlight.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b008dk9j)
An Audience with Max Wall

First Footings

Tony Lidington plays entertainer Max Wall in a series of shows recorded before an invited audience at the Concert Artistes' Association in Covent Garden.

Max recalls his birth into a showbiz world of spit and sawdust in Brixton in 1908. His father was Jack Lorrimer, a Scottish character comedian famous for songs and eccentric dancing. Max recalls seeing Marie Lloyd and Little Titch perform.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b00lxh3t)
Tim Harford investigates statistics which some claim reveal the 'Islamification' of Europe and checks whether the Home Office has been doing its sums properly. Do its claims about the DNA Database really add up?

An Open University co production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00lxh3y)
Jane Little presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Face the Facts (b00lxz4t)
Beaten by the Bullies

John Waite presents the investigative consumer series.

John looks at why, all too often, it is the victims of bullying, rather than the bullies themselves, who have to leave schools. One estimate suggests that up to 6,000 children have been bullied so badly they have quit mainstream education. The programme hears from the victims of bullying and their parents, who say that schools are not doing enough to tackle bullying.


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00lxtms)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00lvlv3)
Hell for Leather

How do you manage a traditional family shoe repair firm with 550 outlets all over the country? John Timpson does it by dropping in on them all the time to find out what's going on, day by day. He calls it 'upside-down management'. Peter Day went along for the ride.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00lxz4w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00lxz4y)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including The Election Agent.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00lxh40)
Father and son Freddie and Toby Jones talk to Matthew Sweet about the art of being a character actor, from The Elephant Man to Harry Potter.

Mark Gatiss presents his alternative guide to British cinema.

Jane Graham on what makes an evil organisation tick.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00lxtmg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 10 AUGUST 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00m0rcd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00lv5hf)
Islamic Movement in Turkey - Fair Access to Work

The Islamist movement in Turkey is not revolutionary, it does not decry the United States and it is not opposed to Turkey's liberal capitalist state. In fact, it forms the democratically-elected government of that country and has done since 2002. Laurie Taylor discusses an in-depth study which analyses how and why the Islamic movement in Turkey transformed itself into a pillar of the state, and asks whether the process could work in other Muslim countries.

Also, Richard Reeves joins Laurie to discuss the latest research into what it takes to get a decent job in Britain these days.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00lxsz9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lxz9v)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lxzdh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lxzc0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00lxzfx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lxzhb)
Daily prayer and reflection with George Craig.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00lxzkq)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill. Will we need to change what we eat to ensure the security of our food supply?


MON 05:57 Weather (b00ly7bw)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00lxzl3)
Presented by James Naughtie and Edward Stourton.

Security correspondent Gordon Corera reports on his interview with MI6 chief Sir John Scarlett.

Dr Lee Elliot Major of the Sutton Trust discusses what should be done to increase access to higher education.

Adam Brimelow reports on the launch of two films in England and online to challenge the misconception that all sufferers of schizophrenia are violent.

Labour MP Tony Wright and whistleblower Chris Galley discuss how civil servants should voice their concerns.

Pakistani interior minister Rehman Malik discusses whether or not there is still uncertainty over Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud's death.

Jane Peel looks back at the events 40 years ago that are regarded by many as the start of the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Hilary Benn, discusses the government's plans to protect food production in Britain.

Director of campaign group Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti, and Dr Kim Howells MP discuss if the government can guarantee non-complicity in torture.

Can England's cricketers recover from such a shameful lack of pluck in the fourth Test sufficiently to win the fifth? Former England Test batsman Ed Smith and journalist Matthew Syed discuss what the future holds for England's cricket team.

Kenton Lewis and Dr Anthony Seldon discuss a government scheme to get more people from poor backgrounds into university.

Police sergeant Alfie Moore discusses his unusual second career as a stand-up comedian and how his comedy routine helps him to engage with ex-prisoners and others who normally hate the police.

Journalist David McKitterick and former BBC Ireland correspondent Denis Murray discuss why none of the peace lines set up during the Troubles have yet come down.

Professor Tim Lang and journalist Tom Standage discuss how we will feed ourselves, and the world, in 50 years time.


MON 09:00 MI6: A Century in the Shadows (b00ly7j7)
New Enemies

BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera looks inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service. He talks to senior intelligence officers, agents and diplomats as well as their former arch enemies about the shadowy world of espionage.

Exploring the role of MI6 in the 21st century. The head of Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, John Scarlett, talks for the first time about the interrogation of terrorist suspects and MI6's role in the run-up to the war in Iraq.


MON 09:30 The Call (b00ly7j9)
Series 1

The Abduction

Dominic Arkwright talks to people who have taken or made life-changing phone calls.

In March 1999, Martin Friend was on a gorilla trek in Uganda when he was taken hostage and killed by Hutu rebels on the run from neighbouring Rwanda. His parents, Ron and Pauline Friend, have built a school in the region in memory of him.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00lxzrj)
Bluestockings

Episode 1

Miriam Margolyes reads from Jane Robinson's account of the pioneering British women who overcame all odds to get a university education.

Women had to wait until 1869 before they could enrol at Cambridge University, and even then the odds were stacked against them. Female brains were considered too small to compete with those of men, and the country's leading doctors warned that if women studied too hard their wombs would wither and die.

This episode tells story of the sacrifices made by the first young women to arrive at Cambridge in 1869, as well as the pioneers who helped to get them there. And why the first Bluestocking wasn't a woman at all.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ly09p)
Marielle and Katia Labeque; Sara Payne

Sara Payne and Shy Keenan on their friendship. Plus, pianists the Labeque sisters play live; and getting married for the first time late in life.


MON 11:00 Mind Changers (b00ly7lp)
Harlow's Monkeys

Claudia Hammond presents a series looking at the development of the science of psychology during the 20th century.

When psychologist Harry Harlow decided to look at how baby rhesus monkeys learned to recognise their mothers, he didn't know that he would revolutionise parenting.

Claudia visits the Primate Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, where Harlow conducted his experiments, and meets his former assistant, Helen LeRoy, and the current director of the lab, Professor Christopher Coe. At the University of Massachussets, Amherst, she meets Harlow's last PhD student, now Chair of Psychology, Professor Melinda Novak. She also talks to Roger Fouts, Professor of Psychology at the University of Central Washington, about the perceived cruelty of Harlow's work, and to Dr John Oates, lecturer in the Centre for Childhood, Development and Learning at the Open University.


MON 11:30 Hazelbeach (b00ly7mv)
Series 2

Cleaner

Ronnie has a close encounter in Hull, while his hapless friend Nick invents a new sport.

Caroline and David Stafford's comedy about likeable conman Ronnie Hazelbeach starring Jamie Forman.

Ronnie Hazelbeach....Jamie Foreman
Nick..........Paul Bazely
James.........Neil Stuke
Chloe......... Tracy Wiles
Doctor Helmut.....Stephen Hogan

Director: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2009.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00ly57p)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00ly5cp)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00ly610)
A team of medical experts have said that children shouldn't be given Tamiflu because the harm outweights the benefits in treating swine flu. We hear from one of the report's authors and ask whether the government should change its advice.

Is the extra 50 billion pounds being spent by the Bank of England doing any good? We talk to a big City dealer who warns that increasing the money supply will lead to inflation, just like it did in Zimbabwe.

Plus, after the arrest of a British security guard in Iraq for murder, a private contractor tells us what is wrong with the industry.


MON 13:30 Round Britain Quiz (b00lycln)
Tom Sutcliffe chairs the cryptic general knowledge quiz, featuring teams from the Midlands and Scotland.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00lxx74)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00lyclq)
Three in a Bed

By Ewa Banaszkiewicz and Mateusz Dymek. Tom and Sarah Hadley appear to have it all. But when Gemma becomes involved with the couple, she finds herself caught in a web of jealousy and lies.

Sarah ...... Anastasia Hille
Tom ...... Matthew Marsh
Gemma ...... Annabelle Dowler
Kira/Tasha ...... Lizzy Watts
Sebastian Murray ...... Philip Fox
Caterer ...... Benjamin Askew

Directed by Sally Avens.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00ly4nk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 The Fortune Hunters (b00fzbbq)
Episode 1

Series in which Max Flint investigates the 15 billion pounds in unclaimed assets in the UK and asks how, if it's possible, these funds are distributed to their rightful owners.

Max explores what happens when people die without leaving a will and their estate passes to the crown. He talks to Wendy Pentelow, who learned from probate investigator Cat Whiteaway that her father, who she had not seen for over 20 years, had died just a few miles away from where she lives and that she was first in line to inherit his estate.

A Tinderbox Broadcast production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00lxvl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00lycz4)
Water

Ernie Rea and guests discuss the religious symbolism and rituals associated with water and asks how these can offer insights into the ecology and politics of water.


MON 17:00 PM (b00ly63s)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ly6bp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00lycz6)
Series 55

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons' 60-second challenges to Paul Merton, Stephen Fry, Charles Collingwood and Jenny Eclair. From August 2009.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00ly61d)
As Roy, Hayley and Brenda sit in the garden at Willow Farm, Mike brings round the revamped gardens plans for approval.

Brenda quietly says that the plans have improved, and Roy and Hayley are pleased with the features for the children. Hayley says Phoebe's not happy with her at the moment. They've spent the afternoon buying her school uniform for Borchester Green. Roy and Hayley tell Mike they've accepted Vicky's offer to look after Abbie for a day each week. They're delighted. Brenda is put out but Roy and Hayley say Brenda can still help - they just need something regular arranged.

Tom and Helen are busy enjoying the responsibility of looking after Bridge Farm. Helen tells Tom she's going out with Kirsty tomorrow evening. Now Annette's in with Alice's crowd, she doesn't need to worry so much.

Later, Tom gets home. Tony has rung and asked Tom to visit Peggy. Brenda knows Tom's busy, so she'll go, but Tom says she doesn't need to. Brenda's upset. Why doesn't anyone trust her to do anything? She complains about Vicky looking after Abbie. The more Vicky pushes her way into things, the more Brenda feels she and her Mum are shoved out.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00ly6px)
The novelist behind bestseller Girl With a Pearl Earring tells John Wilson about Mary Anning, the unsung 19th-century fossil hunter behind the tongue-twister She Sells Sea Shells on the Sea Shore, and subject of her new novel Remarkable Creatures.

An award-winner at the 2009 Cannes festival, Sin Nombre (Without Number) tells the story of Honduran teenager Sayra and ex-gang member Willy. Sayra is determined to find a better life in America, a journey which first involves a perilous train-top ride to Mexico. Willy is desperate to turn his back on the vicious gang who rule his life and killed his girlfriend. In terrifying circumstances, the two form an unlikely bond. Critic Adrian Wootton gives his verdict.

The new 20th anniversary special edition re-release of The Stone Roses' eponymous debut album includes a disc of hitherto unavailable demo tracks, as have past releases by the Beatles, The Beach Boys and The Clash. To put the cases for and against bringing demos to record shops, John Wilson is joined by music writers Travis Elborough and John Aizlewood.

As the credit crunch gains pace, record numbers of holidaymakers are planning to stay in the UK for the summer. Author Graham Hurley offers the first in a series of cultural guides for 'Staycationers', letting us know what arts and entertainment are on offer in some of the country's top holiday destinations. He offers some tips on what to watch out for in Devon, Cornwall and Somerset.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ly6qy)
Villette

A Burial

Dramatisation of the classic romantic novel by Charlotte Bronte.

Lucy aches to stay with her dear friends and is dreading her return to Madame Beck's smooth indifference and Monsieur Paul's fiery scorn.

Lucy Snowe ...... Anna Maxwell Martin
Dr John ...... Benjamin Askew
Monsieur Paul ...... Sam Dale
Paulina/Ginevra ...... Lizzy Watts

Directed by Tracey Neale.


MON 20:00 On the Top Deck (b00grrzw)
Travel writer Ian Marchant travels London's buses, talking to drivers and passengers young and old, and to the people trying to keep order in the face of a massive increase in the numbers of teenagers using buses.

He hears the feelings of many older passengers that things have got out of control; that crime, overcrowding and anti-social behaviour have increased; and that some buses have been turned into mobile youth clubs.

Plus teenagers talk about the unwritten rules of the top deck - who may sit where, what you can get away with and the risks of being robbed.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00lvh19)
Southern Sudan

While the world's attention has focused on the conflict in Darfur, an older and even bloodier conflict between the Muslim north and mainly Christian south of Sudan is in danger of reigniting. Four years after a peace deal was agreed, Grant Ferrett travels to Southern Sudan to investigate claims that Africa's biggest nation is sliding back to civil war.


MON 21:00 Britain's Atlantis (b00gw18s)
Archaeologist Francis Pryor travels from the far north of Orkney, around the North Sea coast to the Isle of Wight and the Bristol Channel, chronicling some of the most recent knowledge and discoveries of what the land around mainland Britain was like before it was submerged by the melting ice at the end of the last Ice Age.


MON 21:30 MI6: A Century in the Shadows (b00ly7j7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00ly6yx)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ly73f)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

An eyewitness account of bomb attacks in Iraq from the city of Mosul.

China, the mining company Rio Tinto and industrial espionage allegations.

The opposition to President Obama's healthcare plans.

Bamboo bicycles from Zambia.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00ly73h)
The Whole Day Through

Episode 1

Samantha Bond and Nathaniel Parker read from the romantic novel by Patrick Gale.

Forty-something Laura Lewis is obliged to abandon a life of stylish independence in Paris, and with it all apparent hopes of romance, to care for her elderly mother in Winchester.

Laura bumps into Ben Patterson, her former boyfriend from her student days, at the county hospital where he works as a doctor. They have not seen each other for more than 20 years, but there is still a spark between them.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00lv28b)
Chris Ledgard takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

'Giving a presentation' has become an ordeal that many people dread. But why has this business practice spread into so many parts of modern life, from primary school to the armed forces? And does the pre-eminent presentation software package, PowerPoint, force us to think and speak in certain ways?


MON 23:30 Lives in a Landscape (b00f6p8n)
Series 4

Fellside Photographer

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

Alan Dein meets Wayne Hutchinson, a Cumbrian farmer who combines the hard graft of shepherding with a second job - photographing some of Britain's most expensive livestock. Wayne farms Swaledale sheep with his father in the hills linking Cumbria to the Yorkshire dales. It is rugged territory, but Wayne has allied his farming pedigree with an enthusiasm for photography.

He now mixes his farming duties with time spent travelling the length and breadth of Britain taking pictures of pedigree livestock. It takes him to the farms of some of the wealthiest landowners in Britain as well as smallholders with a passion for livestock.

But these are tough times for farmers, with the aftermath of foot and mouth still being felt, alongside the twin menaces of Blue Tongue and the increasing pressure put on them to protect the environment while at the same time keeping cheap food on our plates. Alongside those tensions are the pressures of mixing farming and family life with the increasingly 'on call' nature of the photography business.

Alan introduces us to Wayne as he prepares for what nobody realised at the time was to be the penultimate Royal Show.



TUESDAY 11 AUGUST 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00lxz5z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00lxzrj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lxz8m)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lxzc2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lxz9x)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00lxzdk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lxzfz)
Daily prayer and reflection with George Craig.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00lxzhd)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill. With the grouse-shooting season starting on 12 August, Farming Today takes a look at the sport. And with the government urging a rethink on what we grow and what we eat, the Vegetarian Society offers its view on how to achieve reliable food supplies.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00lxzks)
Presented by Edward Stourton and James Naughtie.

David Barnes of the British Association of Social Workers discusses the naming of the couple responsible for the death of Baby P, after a court anonymity order expired.

Ed Young of Cancer Research UK explains why the number of cancers of the lip, mouth, tongue and throat among men and women in their 40s has risen.

Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been sentenced to an additional 18 months under house arrest by a court in Rangoon. Correspondent Karishma Vaswani explains the conviction of the Nobel Peace Laureate.

Adam Fleming visits Salford to gauge opinion on the idea that vandalism to Hazel Blears's car might be related to anger about her expenses claims. Criminologist Roger Graef discusses whether this is the kind of crime children commit when they are bored.

Martin Patience reports on the latest attacks in Afghanistan, and Michael Semple, former EU representative to Afghanistan, examines vows made by the Taliban to disrupt the elections.

Scotland correspondent Colin Blane reports from the shore of Loch Tay on a replica Bronze Age logboat made from a single Douglas Fir tree trunk.

Thought for the Day with Canon Dr Alan Billings, an Anglican priest.

Shadow Chancellor George Osborne discusses how he believes Tory plans can preserve the quality of front line services.

A court in Burma has sentenced pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi to three years jail and hard labour. Foreign Office minister Ivan Lewis and historian Dr Peter Carey discuss the importance of the verdict.

Mark Easton reflects on why, as one paper puts it, 'alarm bells never rang' about Baby Peter's safety. Wes Cuell of the NSPCC and Haringey MP Lynne Featherstone discuss what releasing the names of the couple responsible will achieve.

Professor Hugh Pennington discusses the side effects of the antiviral drug Tamiflu.

Dr Richard Simmons of the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment and John Stewart of the Home Builders Federation examine if there is a lack of room in modern housing.

Michael Schumacher has abandoned his Formula 1 comeback with Ferrari because of a neck injury. Jonathan Legard, one of the BBC's F1 commentary team, reacts to the news.

A number of rare and endangered tortoises have been stolen from an animal sanctuary in Cornwall. Mrs Joy Bloor, the owner of the sanctuary, describes her devastation over the theft.

Nick Donovan, head of campaigns at anti-war crimes group the Aegis Trust, discusses the loophole that allows war criminals to stay in the UK without prosecution.

Philosopher Julian Baggini and Liberal Democrat MP Lembit Opik consider whether or not there needs to be a more honest relationship with error-making in public.


TUE 09:00 Fry's English Delight (b00lv1ln)
Series 2

So Wrong It's Right

Stephen Fry explores the highways and byways of the English language.

Stephen examines how 'wrong' English can become right English. For example, nowadays, more people use the word 'wireless' in a computer context than in a radio one. With help from a lexicographer, an educationalist, a Times sub-editor and a judge, Stephen examines the way in which usage changes language.

He applauds the council leader who claimed the services provided by her local authority should be seen as strawberry-flavoured and castigates attempts at banning government jargon like step change and synergy. Banning words is fruitless; he favours blue sky thinking, and strawberry flavouring.


TUE 09:30 Lost, Stolen or Shredded (b00lydhb)
Series 2

The Great Omar

Series of programmes in which antiquarian book dealer Rick Gekoski tells the stories that lie behind five very different missing works of art.

Rick tells the story behind the fabulous jewelled binding of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, which was encrusted with over a thousand diamonds, rubies and emeralds and was regarded as the finest work produced by the bindery of Sangorski and Sutcliffe. Sadly it went down with the SS Titanic and is still lying unclaimed at the bottom of the ocean.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00m0ls4)
Bluestockings

Episode 2

Miriam Margolyes reads from Jane Robinson's account of the pioneering British women who overcame all odds to get a university education.

Women had to wait until 1869 before they could enrol at Cambridge University, and even then the odds were stacked against them. Female brains were considered too small to compete with those of men, and the country's leading doctors warned that if women studied too hard their wombs would wither and die.

Faced with the eternal chaperone problem, prejudice from lecturers and the attentions of the so-called 'odd fish', life isn't always easy for the first 'undergraduette'. Yet while, even as late as 1897, women students at Cambridge face burnt effigies and fireworks being hurled at them, the bluestockings begin, quietly, to make their mark.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ly088)
Fertility MOTs; Japanese hostesses; Pessimism

The benefits of fertility tests discussed. Plus, Lucie Blackman's life and death in Japan; the positive side of pessimism; and what music can tell us about who we are.


TUE 11:00 The Partisan Coffee House (b00fq6nm)
Historian Mike Berlin tells the story of a short-lived but influential left-wing coffee house set up in London's Soho in 1958 and considers what happened to the political and cultural optimism that flourished after it closed in 1961.

Founded by Raphael Samuel, a young radical historian, the Partisan aimed to recreate a European-style meeting place for politically engaged young people in the wake of such events as the Suez Crisis and the Hungarian Revolution.

Featuring interviews with surviving Partisan participants including historian Eric Hobsbawm and sociologist Stuart Hall.


TUE 11:30 With Great Pleasure (b00lydrl)
Vivienne Westwood

Guest performers select their favourite pieces of writing.

Fashion designer Vivienne Westwood chooses some of the pieces of writing which inspire her, from Alice in Wonderland to Bertrand Russell. The readers are David Morrissey and Lucy Briers.

Westwood exploded onto the fashion scene at the beginning of the 1970s, the decade whose look she would do so much to create. Since then she has been consistently and uncompromisingly original in her designs, moving from anarchy and pornography to a deep interest in classic British tailoring. In a programme recorded at the Latitude Festival in Suffolk, Vivienne presents an eclectic mixture of readings which have influenced her.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00ly55y)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00ly57r)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00ly5cr)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Tales Before the Stave (b00lybns)
Francis Fyfield unpicks the hidden codes of a beautiful 11th-century manuscript that confirms that the English were pioneers of musical notation long before the arrival of staves.

With the help of Professor Susan Rankin and the French performer Dominique Vellard, Francis tells the story of the Winchester Troper, a tiny book belonging to Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, and written in Winchester around the year 1030, and how scholars have used it to clarify the way musical notation developed in the 11th and 12th centuries.

The magical discovery in the Troper was that polyphony, the use of two-part harmony, which many thought did not appear in manuscript form before the 13th century, was actually captured by the cantor scribbling in the Troper at a time when Winchester was at the heart of Anglo Saxon culture. This little book provides us with insights into the soundscape of Edward the Confessor's England.
But it only does so thanks to the scholars like Susan and Dominique who have deciphered what looks like modern shorthand notation.

The programme describes the process of unravelling the musical language and how that fits in to the broader story of the development of musical notation in Europe. Frances tries to get an idea of who this cantor was who managed to preserve a golden era of Anglo Saxon music well before the universal staves and notes were developed to simplify the process.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00ly61d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00lybnv)
The Mouse House

By Adrian Penketh. Wannabe cultural terrorist Mike is determined to make a splash; make a statement; make more of his life. But has he got what it takes to pull it off and light up the skies above London?

Mike ...... Adam Kotz
Kate ...... Raquel Cassidy
Steve ...... Nicholas Gleaves
Will ...... Giles Fagan
Mike's Colleague ...... Stephen Hogan.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00lydx5)
Do we truly appreciate the role that trees play in moderating our climate? Do Tree Preservation Orders fail to protect trees and why do trees split as they grow?

Why has hemp not made a bigger impact on the building industry?

Concern over so-called 'kinetic plates', designed to generate electricity as cars drive over them. Are they really producing power for free or are they yet another way big business can extract income from the customer?

Tackling these conundrums are planning expert Professor Yvonne Rydin, forest ecologist Dr Nick Brown and Professor Philip Stott. As always we want to hear your comments on the topics discussed and any questions you might want to put to future programmes.

Don't forget we want to hear your observations of House Martins; have they returned this year and when, and have they bred successfully?


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lyf65)
We Are Stardust, We Are Golden...

Dreams of Milk and Honey

Read by Mark Bazeley

These three short stories were commissioned by Radio 4 to mark the 40th anniversary of the famous Woodstock Music Festival. With different themes reflecting that momentous time, We Are Stardust We Are Golden begins with Dreams of Milk and Honey by Patrick Neate.

The narrator, Tommy, is a child of Woodstock whose parents' relationship blossomed during the festival. On his way to visit his rather remarkable mother, still in some ways a child of the 60's, he has to break some news to her about his personal life and finds himself contemplating how she will take it. But it is not at all as he had imagined.

Producer: Cherry Cookson
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 The Fortune Hunters (b00g3374)
Episode 2

Series in which Max Flint investigates the 15 billion pounds in unclaimed assets in the UK and asks if and how these funds are distributed to their rightful owners.

The Dormant Banks and Building Society Accounts Bill dictates that, after 15 years or dormancy, any assets that lie unclaimed in accounts can be used for charitable purposes.

Max talks to a building society in north Staffordshire which turned detective and found 10,000 pounds for a local charity.

A Tinderbox Broadcast production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b00lyfm6)
The dentist's chair, the taxi rear seat, the hairdresser's salon; just what are the rules of conversational engagement for these everyday encounters? Chris Ledgard goes for a ride, a trim and a filling to find out.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00lyfm8)
Series 19

Joe Slovo

Matthew Parris presents the biographical series in which his guests choose someone who has inspired their lives.

David Miliband discusses the life of Joe Slovo, a leading member of the African National Congress and the first housing minister in Nelson Mandela's government. Slovo's daughter, Gillian, joins in the discussion.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00ly63j)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ly678)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Laurence & Gus: Hearts and Minds (b00lyfr6)
Series 2

Episode 5

Comic sketches starring Laurence Howarth and Gus Brown.

Sketches on the theme of 'Joining in and Opting out'.

With Duncan Wisbey, Isy Suttie and Kate Fleetwood.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00ly612)
There's a blast from the past for Fallon when her father Wayne Tucson turns up drunk on the village green. Knowing he's been banned for drink driving, Fallon isn't impressed. Wayne says he just wanted to see Fallon, and he'll head off now. Fallon finds out he's sleeping rough, so eventually drives him to the Elms homeless shelter to find a bed for the night.

Kirsty and Helen go out for the night. The Australian barman Leon spends a long time making cocktails for them and chatting. Leon asks Helen to go out with him, but Helen says she doesn't want to be another of his many conquests. When she goes to the loo, Leon tells Kirsty he's not like that, and Helen's really special. Kirsty tells Leon he'd better not make a fool of her, and quickly gives him Helen's number.

The Elms won't take Wayne, although he says he'll be fine. But Fallon decides she can't leave him and ends up taking him back to the Bull. Jolene eventually persuades Sid to let Wayne stay the night. He's not well, and has nowhere else to go. Sid says he's doing it for Fallon's sake, but first thing in the morning, Wayne's on his way.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00ly6br)
Arts news and reviews with John Wilson.

In the 1940s and 50s, the activities of the anti-communist House Un-American Activities Committee changed the face of Hollywood. Their investigations into alleged communist influence on the American film industry heralded an era in which numerous writers, actors and directors were blacklisted and ostracized for their political affiliations. Dalton Trumbo was just one of many forced to write under an assumed name and some of his most celebrated works, including Roman Holiday and Spartacus, were written during the dark days of the blacklist.

Art critic and journalist Laura Cumming discusses her new book, A Face to the World, on the art of self-portraiture. She considers the drama of self-portraits and what they reveal about the artist's innermost sense of self, from Rembrandt and Velazquez to Munch and Warhol.

John Wilson speaks to Tony Parsons about his novel Starting Over, a story which follows the life of 47-year-old George Bailey, who, after suffering a heart attack, is given the heart of a 19-year-old wildboy and nothing is the same again.

Music critic Alexis Petridis provides a guide for UK-bound holiday makers who want to keep an eye on what cultural fare is on offer for their 'staycation'. Alexis gives the lowdown on what to look out for in Brighton and the south east.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ly6pz)
Villette

Monsieur Paul

Dramatisation of the classic romantic novel by Charlotte Bronte.

After burying her treasured letters from Dr John and concealing her broken heart, Lucy finds friendship from an unexpected quarter.

Lucy Snowe ...... Anna Maxwell Martin
Monsieur Paul ...... Sam Dale
Rosine ...... Lizzy Watts

Directed by Tracey Neale.


TUE 20:00 The Fraud Capital of Britain (b00lyfr8)
Thamesmead was one of the most exciting new towns to be built in the 1960s, intended as a vibrant, riverside community of 60,000 people in south east London. Forty years on, the area is perhaps best known as a notorious hub of fraud, dubbed 'Little Lagos' because of its association with west African criminal gangs.

Phil Kemp investigates how this reputation has stuck. He talks to a former fraudster and meets residents fighting to turn the community around and shake off its crime-ridden image.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00lyfrb)
Since the programme brought you the news of redundancies among braille production staff at the National Library Service for the Blind, many listeners have contacted us with their worries about the future of the service and for UK braille production in general. The RNIB, whose decision this was, respond to these concerns and explain how they remain committed to braille.

There is also information on self defence classes across the country and how aspiring visually-impaired judokas still have time to make the Great Britain team for the 2012 Paralympics.

Plus, as more airlines allow assistance dogs to travel in the cabin with their handlers, we take a closer look at the experience for both dog and person. Lee Kumutat shares her experience of taking guide dog Beau with her from London back to her native Australia.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00lyfrd)
Lens of the Eye

Dr Mark Porter investigates the latest treatments for problems with the lens of the eye.

He visits Southampton General Hospital and talks to Rob Morris, consultant eye surgeon, about how he treats cataracts. These are very common: nearly half of us will develop some degree of clouding of the lens of the eye by late middle age. Most people have cataracts by the time they reach their mid-80s. Mark meets some of Rob Morris's patients and hears about how they realised that they had cataracts. He then watches an operation in which the patient is under just a local anaesthetic.

Rob Morris explains that nowadays the replacement lenses are made to measure. Some patients, including some with astigmatism, have better eyesight after they have had their cataracts removed and tailor-made lenses fitted.

Dr Susan Blakeney from the College of Optometrists tells Mark about what happens to the eye as we age.

Also, Rob Morris explains how recent developments in lens implants are helping people with the most common type of macular degeneration - the dry form - in which thinning of the retina at the back of the eye leads to poor central vision.


TUE 21:30 Forbidden Families (b00ctl6t)
Episode 1

Bettany Hughes tells the stories of remarkable women denied their families by the march of history.

In 842 AD, Dhuoda's two sons were kidnapped. This terrible loss spurred her to write a manual for her stolen boys, advising them on the skills they need to become men. We eavesdrop on a woman, bereft but unbroken, as she becomes a mother on paper, as she can no longer be one in the flesh.


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00ly6w8)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ly6yz)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.

As more details emerge about Baby Peter's life, The World Tonight spends two days with social workers dealing with children at risk.

Is change on the horizon in Burma?

The effect of air conditioning on office workers.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00m0fy1)
The Whole Day Through

Episode 2

Samantha Bond and Nathaniel Parker read from the romantic novel by Patrick Gale.

Forty-something Laura Lewis is obliged to abandon a life of stylish independence in Paris, and with it all apparent hopes of romance, to care for her elderly mother in Winchester.

Ben's mother has recently died and he is working in Winchester so he can help his brother, when he bumps into Laura, the girlfriend he hasn't seen in over 20 years.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Heresy (b00bcv9f)
Series 5

Episode 2

Victoria Coren hosts the show that thinks the unthinkable. With Sue Perkins, Euan Ferguson and Richard Herring. From May 2008.


TUE 23:30 The Hollow Men (b0088nqn)
Series 2

Episode 2

Comic sketch show written and performed by David Armand, Rupert Russell, Sam Spedding and Nick Tanner, with Katy Brand.



WEDNESDAY 12 AUGUST 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00lxz61)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00m0ls4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lxz8p)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lxzc4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lxz9z)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00lxzdm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lxzg1)
Daily prayer and reflection with George Craig.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00lxzhg)
As the shooting seasons begins, Anna Hill goes on a deer stalk. With food security moving up the political agenda, could science provide the solution to securing food supplies?


WED 06:00 Today (b00lxzkv)
Presented by Evan Davis and James Naughtie.

Nick Davis, chief executive of the Merchant Maritime Warfare Centre, considers what could have happened to a merchant ship which disappeared off the coast of Portugal in the Atlantic Ocean on 28 July 2009.

Jonathan Beale reports on US President Barack Obama's fight to gain support for health insurance reform.

Radio 4's Face the Facts presenter John Waite discusses the level of the service jobseekers are receiving.

About 700 people missing in southern Taiwan after Typhoon Morakot have been found alive, say army officials. Alastair Leithead reports.

Reporter Jack Izzard interviews people who have been made redundant about the impact it has had on their lives. Professor Danny Dorling and Lord Layard discuss the current jobless rate in the UK.

Feral wildlife expert Tony Peacock discusses how the camel has come to be such a nuisance in the outback of Australia.

Thought for the Day with the novelist and columnist Anne Atkins.

The Iraqi government says it is in control and security is improving. Correspondent Natalia Antelava finds out whether the people of Baghdad share the government's optimism.

The number of people unemployed in the UK could reach 2.5 million. Business Secretary Lord Mandelson considers the extent of damage the recession is doing to the government.

Peter Bleksley, a former Scotland Yard detective who now writes on crime and policing, discusses the romanticism of robbers who stole jewellery worth 40 million pounds.

Iraq expert Toby Dodge reflects on allegations that Saudi Arabia is responsible for a new wave of violence in Iraq.

Steve Bundred, of the Audit Commission, says councils need to be planning for the social impact of recession.

Bishop of Bradford David James says Christians in Pakistan are living in fear.

Astronomer Dr Marek Kukula explains what to look for if you want to see the Perseid meteor shower.

Biographer Justin Wintle and Mark Farmaner, director of human rights group the Burma Campaign UK, discuss the global reaction to the conviction of the Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi.


WED 09:00 Between Ourselves (b00lv4h7)
Series 4

Episode 2

Olivia O'Leary presents the series which brings together two people who have had profound and similar experiences, to hear their individual stories and compare the long-term effects on each of their lives.

Olivia talks to two soldiers who were injured abroad. David Hart was sent to Afghanistan in 2003 to serve with his Territorial Army unit. One day he was involved with his regular convoy duties - escorting a bomb-disposal team - when was caught up in a suicide car bomb attack. He suffered multiple injuries, including the near-amputation of one arm.

Albert Thomson was serving in Iraq with the Black Watch in 2003. He was returning from collecting a fatally-injured soldier when he was hit by 'friendly fire' which hit him in both legs. His injuries were so severe his left leg was amputated. David and Albert tell their stories to Olivia and discuss the impact their injuries have had financially, physically and psychologically.


WED 09:30 Very Amazing: Behind the Scenes at the V and A (b00lv4h9)
Episode 2

Rosie Goldsmith goes behind the scenes at London's Victoria and Albert Museum as it attempts to transform itself from 'the nation's attic' to a 'very amazing' modern museum.

Rosie discovers how the architects and designers are rebuilding and redisplaying the original museum and its treasures.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00m0ls6)
Bluestockings

Episode 3

Miriam Margolyes reads from Jane Robinson's account of the pioneering British women who overcame all odds to get a university education.

Women had to wait until 1869 before they could enrol at Cambridge University, and even then the odds were stacked against them. Female brains were considered too small to compete with those of men, and the country's leading doctors warned that if women studied too hard their wombs would wither and die.

The glamour of the graduette and bluestocking fashion. As the first few decades of university education for women slip by, the image of the drab, maverick bluestocking has begun to metamorphose into a far more luminous creature, the 'undergraduette'. Suddenly, by the 1920s, women students are quite the thing, and prim bluestocking fashion even takes on a hint of glamour.

Yet, even at Cambridge University in 1920, one item of student fashion is still unavailable to bluestockings. Since they are not permitted to receive degrees, women are still not allowed to wear the university gown.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ly08b)
Women in Westminster; Soho in the 1950s

What are political parties doing to ensure women are better represented at Westminster? Plus, women in the Basque separatist group ETA; and Soho in the 1950s.


WED 11:00 The Naming of Genes (b00lyfy1)
Kakapo, Cleopatra and Pavarotti are cryptic names for genes; the clue to what they do lies in their names. Sue Broom cracks the code in this subtle game of scientific one upmanship.

Chardonay, Hedgehog and Cheap Dates all have one thing in common. They are all names for genes, specifically of fruit fly or drosophilia genes. The trick is you have to guess what it is, so for example Amontillado is a allusion to the Edgar Allan Poe book where the hero is walled in alive; the gene amontillado refers to mutant larvae who can't hatch.

Chardonay is a reference to the white blood cells and other wine genes are Chablis, retsina and Chianti. The wine collection is housed at Dr Leonard Zon's laboratory at Harvard Medical School. When one of Dr Zon's students discovers a new wine gene, they are awarded with a bottle of that particular wine, although he has got wise to them choosing some of the more rarified and expensive vintages.

Other labs prefer to use Shakespeare characters, musical references or more colloquial terms such as Lush, referring to an increased affection for alcohol. Sometimes there are races to name the gene, and a fight may break out between institutions. Kathy Matthews of the Bloomington Drosophilia Stock Centre in Indiana proudly says that fly geneticists were the first geneticists and therefore in the early days it was like being in the Wild West, but now political correctness is moving in.

More seriously, worm, mice and human geneticists think they should tone down their gene names. Its not appropriate they say to call a gene a Sonic Hedegehog.

But Kathy and her colleagues are resisting; it is part of their tradition, they say. A witty, whimsical or colloquial name can get a scientist lot of attention in the scientific community.

Sue Broom looks at some of the more famous examples and charts the resistance to turning Van Gogh into a chain of numbers and letters.


WED 11:30 Baggage (b00lymqf)
Series 4

You're a Long Time Dead

Comedy series by Hilary Lyon, set in Edinburgh.

It's summer and all change all-round. Caroline struggles to come to terms with Ruth now being her dad's lover, and agonises over Roddy's shock proposal - the end of an era beckons.

Caroline ...... Hilary Lyon
Hector ...... David Rintoul
Ruth ...... Adie Allen
Nicholas ...... Moray Hunter
Roddy ...... Robin Cameron
Gladys ...... June Watson

Directed by Marilyn Imrie.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00ly560)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00ly57t)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00ly5ct)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00lymqh)
The reporting restrictions which protected the identity of the mother of Baby Peter have been lifted. The decision by Mr Justice Coleridge to withdraw anonymity from Tracey Connelly and Steven Barker followed pressure from several major media organisations. We hear from Fran Unsworth, the head of BBC Newsgathering and Charlie Beckett, Director of Polis, about the impact of the decision.

Ofcom have found the two programmes that George Galloway presents on London-based Press TV to be in breach of impartiality rules. Some journalists have expressed their concerns that those British journalists contributing to the Iranian state-funded television station are lending their credibility to a 'propaganda channel'. Mehdi Hasan, senior editor for politics at the New Statesman, and Oliver Kamm, leader writer and columnist at The Times and contributor to the Jewish Chronicle, discuss the ethical decisions that face journalists.

ITV have recorded a pre-tax loss of 105 million pounds in the first six months of the year. Advertising revenue is falling and the challenges for ITV's new CEO are mounting up. Ed talks to Mathew Horsman, founder and principal at media analysis and advice company Mediatique, about those who are tipped to take on the job and what chances they have of reversing the channel's fortunes.

Peter Mandelson has suggested that we could see a US presidential-style debate between Gordon Brown and David Cameron at the next general election. Blogger Iain Dale and Mehdi Hasan of the New Statesman discuss the role of the televised presidential debate and how well it might transfer to this country.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00ly612)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00lymqk)
The Summer Walking

Contemporary drama by Iain Finlay MacLeod, set in the far north of Scotland. Catriona is pregnant to a man who is always in trouble, so the burden of making ends meet falls to her: poaching salmon and fishing for freshwater pearls. She finds an unlikely ally in Hassan, an Iranian working illegally as a gamekeeper on the big estate, and their friendship offers the possibility of a life beyond the walls of her caravan.

Catriona ...... Amy Mason
Jess ...... Ann Louise Ross
Hassan ...... Khalid Laith
Alec ...... Finn Den Hertog
Eddie ...... Jimmy Chisholm
Joan ...... Wendy Seager.


WED 15:00 The Money Grab (b00lxsqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lyf67)
We Are Stardust, We Are Golden...

Arnold in a Purple Haze

Read by Conleth Hill

These three short stories were commissioned by Radio 4 to mark the 40th anniversary of the famous Woodstock Music Festival. With different themes, which reflect that momentous time, We Are Stardust We Are Golden continues with Arnold in a Purple Haze by Nick Walker.

Still damaged by his Vietnam experiences, Arnold is trying to arrange transport for a band due to perform at the Woodstock Festival. But the sounds of the city and the noise of the helicopters begin to unbalance him and blur things in his mind.

Producer: Cherry Cookson
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 The Fortune Hunters (b00g4gq8)
Episode 3

Series in which Max Flint investigates the 15 billion pounds in unclaimed assets in the UK and asks if and how these funds are distributed to their rightful owners.

Did you know that borrowing a book from your local library means that the author should receive 5.9p?

Max finds out about the millions of pounds of royalties owed to authors and musicians which lie unclaimed, often simply because of a lack of knowledge of the registration system, and discovers if and how these funds are reunited with their rightful owners.

A Tinderbox Broadcast production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00lynzd)
The British Bobby - Scottish Diaspora

Laurie Taylor explores the myths and enduring realities of the British police with Clive Emsley and Dick Hobbs.

Robert Peel brought the Metropolitan Police Force into being in 1829; it was a centralised body of 3,000 uniformed men expected to patrol designated areas. They were the original 'Bobbies on the Beat'. However, in an age of mass public protests, Chartism and agitation for electoral reform, the police were founded more as a response to a crisis in public order than in a move to protect private property. The Weekly Dispatch of 1829 warned, 'The New Police is a military body employed in civil duties ... it is a powerful engine in the hands of government, and may be employed for the suppression of public freedom.' How much has changed?

Laurie also discusses the worldwide influence of the Scottish diaspora and asks why such an enormous number Scots left their country of birth even when times were good. Tom Devine enlightens Laurie ahead of his talk at the Festival of Politics in Edinburgh.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00lyfrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00ly63l)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ly67b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Odd Half Hour (b00lynzg)
Series 1

Episode 2

Another chance to hear the sketch show for anyone who's beginning to find this exciting new century a bit too much like all the rubbish previous centuries.

Discover how to name your baby and if there's anything "easier done than said" in tonight's show. Starring brilliant stand-up comedians, Stephen K Amos and Jason Byrne and the fantastic comic actors, Justin Edwards and Katherine Parkinson.

Produced by Alex Walsh-Taylor.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00ly614)
Helen is having a problem in the dairy. The thermostat has gone so she and Clarrie can't start making the yoghurt until it's fixed. Clarrie thinks Helen's been on the phone to an engineer but Helen says it was Leon. He's asked her to go on a date next week. Helen tells Clarrie to go home until the engineer arrives. Clarrie says Pat would be impressed by the way she's handling things. Something was bound to go wrong while her parents were away.

Sid hasn't slept at all well. He's been listening out all night for Wayne going downstairs, to help himself to the bar. Wayne appears, looking rough, and to Sid's horror, Jolene packs him straight back to bed. Sid's worried it might be swine flu, which would ruin his trade, but Jolene's already phoned the helpline so she knows it's not.

When Fallon brings Wayne some water, he tells her he's been thinking about her a lot. Fallon tells Jolene they mustn't let Wayne get too comfortable. Jolene says maybe Fallon can patch up her differences with her father? Sid thinks Fallon was right to bring Wayne back, but he hopes Wayne gets better quickly. The sooner he's out of Ambridge the better.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00ly6bt)
In a Front Row special, Mark Lawson examines the differences between factual and fictional writers of history and between academics and populists in the telling of stories from our heritage. Writers Antonia Fraser, Margaret MacMillan, Philippa Gregory, Hilary Mantel, Sarah Dunant and Tristram Hunt join Mark to discuss the best ways of exploring the past.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00m68lv)
Villette

Friendship

Dramatisation of the classic romantic novel by Charlotte Bronte.

Monsieur Paul and Lucy's friendship grows, but will they see the ghostly apparition again and what does her presence signify?

Lucy Snowe ...... Anna Maxwell Martin
Monsieur Paul/Pere Silas ...... Sam Dale
Paulina ...... Lizzy Watts
Mme Beck/Mme Walravens ...... Joan Walker

Directed by Tracey Neale.


WED 20:00 Reality Check (b00lynzj)
Series 2

Episode 3

Justin Rowlatt presents a discussion series involving experts and people closely involved in the issues.

The growth of surveillance is said to have made Britain one of the most watched nations on earth. Faced with the threats of crime and terrorism, how do we reconcile the demands for the protection of privacy with the benefits to security that new surveillance techniques can bring?

Justin presents a debate between people who seek to influence policy with those affected by such policies, and asks if surveillance in Britain is out of control.


WED 20:45 The Election Agent (b00lynzl)
Episode 2

Shaun Ley finds out from election agents how elections are really won and lost. What roles have cow manure, superglue and pink cadillacs played in election campaigns?


WED 21:00 Secrets of the Super Old (b00lynzn)
Adam Rutherford investigates how the oldest people on the planet are helping scientists to unlock the secrets of ageing, helping us age better and perhaps even live longer.

Super-centenarians are one of the most exclusive groups of people on the planet, having reached the staggering age of at least 110. How are they doing it and what can we learn about longevity from them?

Adam talks to the scientists about how we could all live longer, and meets the incredible people whose lives have spanned three centuries, including Henry Allingham, shortly before his death aged 113.


WED 21:30 Between Ourselves (b00lv4h7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00ly6wb)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ly6z1)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Why is unemployment falling in Wales but rising everywhere else in Britain?

The International Committee of the Red Cross says that the Geneva Conventions need to change.

Can Australia kick King Coal?


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00m0fvx)
The Whole Day Through

Episode 3

Samantha Bond and Nathaniel Parker read from the romantic novel by Patrick Gale.

Forty-something Laura Lewis is obliged to abandon a life of stylish independence in Paris, and with it all apparent hopes of romance, to care for her elderly mother in Winchester.

Ben and Laura become reacquainted and go for a meal, and one thing leads inevitably to another.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Act Your Age (b00g47nm)
Series 1

Episode 6

Simon Mayo discovers which generation is the funniest. With Jon Richardson, Lucy Porter and Roy Walker. From January 2009.


WED 23:30 Kicking the Habit (b007vlvd)
Series 1

Holy Des Res

Comedy drama by Christopher Lee, set in a Carmelite monastery where the brown habit is no protection against the problems and temptations of the modern world.

Even though the friary has occupied its idyllic riverside setting for over 600 years, it is not protected from the greedy gaze of property developers. And not all the brothers are opposed to the idea of progress.

Father Bertie ...... Alfred Molina
Brother Martin ...... Roy Dotrice
Father Michael ...... Martin Jarvis
Brother Luke ...... Darren Richardson
Mave ...... Rosalind Ayres
Father Lawrence ...... Kenneth Danziger

Directed by Pete Atkin.



THURSDAY 13 AUGUST 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00lxz63)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00m0ls6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lxz8r)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lxzc6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lxzb1)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00lxzdp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lxzg3)
Daily prayer and reflection with George Craig.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00lxzhj)
With Caz Graham. Field sports enthusiasts explain why shooting is good for children, and Caz goes on a grouse shoot.


THU 06:00 Today (b00lxzkx)
With James Naughtie and Evan Davis. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b00lyq4m)
Peter White talks to disabled people who have bucked the odds and achieved outstanding success in a variety of fields.

Peter meets deaf opera singer Janine Roebuck, who was told at 18 that the career she had set her heart on - opera singing - was impossible. Her persistence has confounded that bleak prognosis, however. She tells Peter how a combination of tricks, hard work and help from her colleagues has enabled her to perform all over the world and become a campaigner to introduce deaf children to music.

Janine comes from a family where deafness was the norm, which is how she explains her robust attitude towards her disability. She now even sees advantages to her condition: being able to enjoy a good nights sleep in a noisy hotel and using her high-tech hearing aids to adjust the accoustics to her own requirements.


THU 09:30 Islam, Mullahs and the Media (b00lyq4p)
Are All Muslims the Same?

Writer Kenan Malik explores how perceptions of Islam have been shaped by the media, considering what it means in Britain to call yourself 'Muslim'.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00m0ls8)
Bluestockings

Episode 4

Miriam Margolyes reads from Jane Robinson's account of the pioneering British women who overcame all odds to get a university education.

Women had to wait until 1869 before they could enrol at Cambridge University, and even then the odds were stacked against them. Female brains were considered too small to compete with those of men, and the country's leading doctors warned that if women studied too hard their wombs would wither and die.

Although academic success comes easily to many bluestockings, some still find relationships something of a stumbling block. Friendships, crushes and full-blown affairs with both students and tutors become treacherous for those young women who have barely spoken to a man before. Meanwhile, from fighting for academic equality, it is only a short step to agitating for political enfranchisment. The suffragette movement that is taking off across the country soon makes its mark on academia.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ly08d)
Joan of Arc reassessed; Bollywood dance

Joan of Arc: saint or spin doctor? Plus, the origins of Bollywood dance; and helping people with dementia and their carers.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b00m9jff)
VenIran

Apart from being oil producers, Venezuela and Iran seemingly have little in common, but over the last five years they have grown increasingly close. The relationship has caused a good deal of international disquiet. Rumours abound about uranium sales and terrorist cells, but the Venezuelan government denies the claims and insists that it is all about economic development. Linda Pressly sifts the evidence in Caracas.


THU 11:30 Earth to Earth: Potted Immortality (b00lyrb6)
Ceramicist Lars Tharp explores our relationship with the funeral urn. He examines both the history and future of the urn with artist Grayson Perry, using readings from Sir Thomas Browne's treatise, Urn Burial. Lars also talks to funeral directors, ceramic experts and visits the British Museum where, he uncovers the urn which inspired Keats to write his poem, Ode on a Grecian Urn.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00ly562)
Consumer news and issues with Shari Vahl. Including Face the Facts, presented by John Waite.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00ly57w)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00ly5cw)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Questions, Questions (b00lytpy)
Stewart Henderson answers those intriguing questions from everyday life.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00ly614)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00b0swj)
Dear Writer

Anna Massey stars as a writer who is finding it impossible to begin her next book. Her brother has died and in clearing out his house - troubling memories keep invading her mind - memories that hint at a family secret and a forgotten tragedy.

'Dear Writer' is written by Jane Rogers and stars Anna Massey as The Writer and Leah Verity White as Polly.

The play is being broadcast as a tribute to Anna Massey - one of the UK's most treasured actresses - who passed away earlier this month.

Producer: Clive Brill
A Pacificus Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00lxsq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00lxtms)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lyf69)
We Are Stardust, We Are Golden...

The Carpenter

Read by Stuart Milligan.

These three short stories were commissioned by Radio 4 to mark the 40th anniversary of the famous Woodstock Music Festival. With different themes reflecting that momentous time, We Are Stardust We Are Golden concludes with The Carpenter by Laura Barton.

The story is told from the point of view of Mike, whose marriage to the woman he met at the festival has not worked out as they had both planned and hoped for. The dramatic events of one afternoon have him wondering what really happened to the girl he met there and whether things could have been different.

Producer: Cherry Cookson
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 The Fortune Hunters (b00gl690)
Episode 4

Series in which Max Flint investigates the 15 billion pounds in unclaimed assets in the UK and asks if and how these funds are distributed to their rightful owners.

Ever wondered what happened to those premium bonds you were given as a baby? It could be one of the 31 million pounds worth of unclaimed premium bond prizes.

Max discovers how the NS&I tracing team tackle the problem of locating lost winners. At least they have an old address to start with. By contrast, Camelot don't even have a name to help locate lost lottery prize-winners.

A Tinderbox Broadcast production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00lxwh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00lytq0)
100 years after its discovery, Quentin talks to Dr Richard Fortey and Dr Nick Butterfield about the significance of the Burgess Shale, the world's most famous fossil location.

Jon Woodruff looks back over 1,500 years of hurricanes and their causes. Medieval seasons were worse than ours; are they really linked to climate change and are they getting worse?

Saturn's rings will pass precisely edge-on to the Sun as the planet passes through its equinox. For the first time ever we have a space craft capable of scrutinising the small bulges and the shadows they cast. Prof Carl Murray tells us what they imply for the evolution of the solar system.


THU 17:00 PM (b00ly63n)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ly67d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Electric Ink (b011f3pc)
Series 1

Episode 2

Circulation is going through the roof.

Old hacks meet new media in Alistair Beaton’s satire set in the changing world of the newspaper industry.

Maddox ...... Robert Lindsay
Oliver ...... Alex Jennings
Amelia ...... Elizabeth Berrington
Tasneem ...... Zita Sattar
Masha ...... Debbie Chazen
Freddy ...... Ben Willbond
Announcer ...... Matt Addis

With additional material by Tom Mitchelson.

Director: Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00ly616)
Lilian is dismayed when she hears from Jenny that Peggy has sacked the agency who's recently been supplying carers for Jack. If the agency can't find them anyone permanent, Peggy doesn't want anyone at all. Jenny and Lilian know that Peggy isn't being realistic.

Ben and Ruth are having lunch in a very busy Jaxx. Jim shares their table, and is impressed with the way Kenton operates. However, Kenton is short staffed so Jim offers to help. Grateful Kenton gives Jim a free meal and offers to take Jim to look at potential classic cars to buy.

Lilian and Jolene go to the pub supplies promotion. Jolene can't concentrate, thinking about Wayne and the atmosphere he's creating at the Bull. She tells Lilian, the doctor has diagnosed bronchitis. Lilian's pleased she can do the listening for a change.

Later, they call in at Jaxx for coffee. Lilian is still worrying about Matt. They both wish there was a tap for turning off emotions. Jolene says it really bothers her that Fallon and Wayne don't get on. She hoped him staying with them would help them mend fences. But it might be doing more harm than good.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00ly6bw)
Almost exactly 40 years ago, thousands of people began to arrive on a farm in upstate New York for what would go down in history as the concert that summed up the 1960s - Woodstock. Billed as three days of peace and music, for many it encapsulated the spirit of the era. Riding that wave of optimism, just a few months later a second free concert took place, this time at Altamont on the west coast of America, organised by the Rolling Stones. It ended in murder, violence and bitterness, and came to be seen as a herald of the end of the Sixties dream, the dark side of the hippie ethos.

As seminal films about the two events are released on DVD, John Wilson talks to their directors: Albert Maysles, who with his brother David captured the darkness of Altamont in Gimme Shelter, and Michael Wadleigh, director of Woodstock - 3 Days of Peace and Music. He also talks to Michael Lang, the entrepreneur behind the two concerts.

Film critic Rachel Cooke joins John Wilson to review The Time Traveller's Wife, the film version of Audrey Niffenegger's best-selling novel in which a woman loves a time-travelling man who slips in and out of her life with no warning.

Classical composer Errollyn Wallen and her brother Byron, a renowned jazz trumpeter, have joined forces for the first time to create the opera Wallen, which tells the story of their childhood. Errollyn was born in Belize, while her brother was born in London, where they were brought up by an aunt and uncle when their parents emigrated to America. Errollyn and Byron explain why they waited until now to collaborate, and touch on the highs and lows of such a personal project.

Poet Paul Farley looks at the cultural offerings for those planning to holiday in Britain. His tip is for an enriching Staycation in the north-west of England.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ly6q1)
Villette

Cloud

Dramatisation of the classic romantic novel by Charlotte Bronte.

Lucy and Monsieur Paul grow close, but forces are at work to keep them apart.

Lucy Snowe ...... Anna Maxwell Martin
Monsieur Paul/Monsieur de Bassompierre/Pere Silas ...... Sam Dale
Paulina ...... Lizzy Watts
Mme Walravens/Mme Beck ...... Joan Walker

Directed by Tracey Neale.


THU 20:00 The Report (b00lytq2)
Working With Children

Several prominent children's authors have said that they will stop visiting schools in protest at the impending introduction of new rules requiring the vetting of those working regularly with young people or vulnerable adults.

Wesley Stephenson reports on the new Vetting and Barring Scheme and what it will mean for the estimated 11 million people that will need to be registered. He also asks if the new rules are likely to make children any safer.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00lytq4)
Women's Work

Some business leaders think that the credit crunch crisis marks a great opportunity for women. Peter Day asks whether female skills can help to guide the world out of the ruins.


THU 21:00 The High Price of Alder Hey (b00lytq6)
Sue Armstrong investigates the effect on pathology of the 1999 Alder Hey scandal and asks if the profession is now suffering from over-regulation.

In the wake of the crisis in 1999, when it was revealed that children's body parts had been kept for pathological analysis without parents' knowledge, many pathologists left the profession because of the media-led vilification of them as 'doctors of death'. Post mortem rates are now at an all time low.


THU 21:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b00lyq4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00ly6wd)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ly6z3)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00m0fvz)
The Whole Day Through

Episode 4

Samantha Bond and Nathaniel Parker read from the romantic novel by Patrick Gale.

Forty-something Laura Lewis is obliged to abandon a life of stylish independence in Paris, and with it all apparent hopes of romance, to care for her elderly mother in Winchester.

Ben makes a momentous decision after Laura visits him at the hospital, and writes her a love letter which has unexpected consequences.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Bigipedia (b00lytq8)
Series 1

Episode 4

The omniscient friend you know from your computer and laser watch takes over Radio 4 for 30 minutes in a unique experiment in broadwebcasting.

Written by Nick Doody and Matt Kirshen with Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Carey Marx and Sarah Morgan.

Featuring Ewan Bailey, Sam Battersea, Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Nick Doody, Neil Edmond, Pippa Evans, Kobna Holdbrook-Smith and Lewis MacLeod.

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Will Smith Presents the Tao of Bergerac (b007vl20)
Episode 3

Jersey-born comedian Will Smith continues his obsession with 1980s BBC TV detective series Bergerac.

He's using an audio book of its star, John Nettles, reading the Tao, to navigate the minefield of his life, with the help of a special guest.

Now Will is exploring his bad luck with romance.

With Amelia Bullmore, John Nettles, Dan Tetsell, Olivia Poulet and Tara Blaise.

Written by Will Smith and Roger Drew.

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2007.



FRIDAY 14 AUGUST 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00lxz65)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00m0ls8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lxz8t)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lxzc8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lxzb3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00lxzdr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lxzg5)
Daily prayer and reflection with George Craig.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00lxzhl)
Increasing numbers of people are trying to live 'The Good Life' and are keeping pigs at home. A DIY chain is now considering stocking pig arks and the British Pig Executive says there could be as many as 10,000 people in the UK rearing the animals.Ten per cent of the 4.7 million in the UK are kept in smallholdings or back gardens, but Caz Graham asks if some people may be biting off more than they can chew.

Also, in a week focusing on shooting, the League Against Cruel Sports responds to claims that the sport helps conservation and responsibility with guns.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00lxzkz)
Presented by Evan Davis and Edward Stourton.

Anne Main MP has survived an attempt to deselect her following criticism over her Commons expenses. Iain Watson reports.

Correspondent Natalia Antelava reports on hopes that Iraqi government negotiations with Asa'ib al-Haq or the Leagues of the Righteous, could help facilitate the release of hostage Peter Moore, who they claim to be holding.

Gibril Faal, chairman of the African Foundation for Development, discusses the intentions of the Obama administration in Africa.

Home Affairs Correspondent Rory MacLean went to Portsmouth with Home Office minister Admiral Lord West to see the Air Launch Running Gear Entanglement System being put through its paces.

Farming Minister Jim Fitzpatrick explains why he walked out of a marriage ceremony in his East London constituency when he and his wife found out they would have to sit in different rooms.

US businesswoman Emily Walker describes how the British health service is viewed by some on the other side of the Atlantic.

Meteorites collector Rob Elliot explains what he hopes to do with the proceeds of the sale of part of his collection.

Professor Steve Field, chairman of the Royal College of GPs, discusses the logistical challenge of vaccinating some 14 million people in an attempt to minimise the damage caused by swine flu.

Thought for the Day with John Bell of the Iona Community.

Writer Robert Fox discusses the next phase in the Afghan conflict.

David Grossman reports from Washington on the abuse being heaped on the NHS by opponents of President Obama's health care reforms. Conservative health spokesman Andrew Lansley discusses MEP Daniel Hannan's comments.

Jon Leyne reports on allegations of rape and torture of protestors following the election in Iran.

Les Paul, one of the pioneers of the electric guitar, has died at the age of 94. Music broadcaster Bob Harris examines the legacy of the influential musician and guitar maker.

Tim Montgomerie, of website conservativehome.com, discusses whether anger over the MPs' expenses issue is starting to abate.

Andy Ward, author of Football Nation, and Hunter Davies, author of the Glory Game, discuss whether, with so many foreign players, managers and owners involved in the game, it can still be described as an English league.

Ibrahim Mogra, an Imam from Leicester, explains the rules governing weddings held in a mosque.

Sports psychologist Dr Victor Thompson and Liberal Democrat and ballroom dancer Vince Cable discuss whether dancing could benefit all of us.

Executive director of the Arts Council Moira Sinclair and shortlisted artist John Cockrum discuss the Artists Taking the Lead project.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00lxvkz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00m0lsb)
Bluestockings

Episode 5

Miriam Margolyes reads from Jane Robinson's account of the pioneering British women who overcame all odds to get a university education.

Women had to wait until 1869 before they could enrol at Cambridge University, and even then the odds were stacked against them. Female brains were considered too small to compete with those of men, and the country's leading doctors warned that if women studied too hard their wombs would wither and die.

Although more and more women graduate during the 1920s and 30s, the Great Depression reinforces the pecking order, prioritising jobs for men. While critics begin to wonder whether academia is breeding white elephants, the bluestockings remain undaunted. While all too many join the teaching profession, others venture down unexplored career paths as diplomats, aviation engineers, writers and lawyers, all paving the way for future generations of bright young women.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00ly08g)
Redundancy and relationships; Backpacking

How do couples cope when redundancy forces people to spend more time together? Plus, Donna Powell, the woman in the world of men's football; and backpacking at any age.


FRI 11:00 Selling Cheese to the Chinese (b00lyvz5)
Mukul Devichand travels to Shanghai to tell the story of the Europeans who are trying to persuade China's expanding middle class that it is worth ditching their noodles and soya, and paying for pricey European fine foods instead.

He explores a world of classes in western table manners, Single Malt Karaoke and Shanghai jazz DJs who broadcast shows about brie and camembert. Beneath the colourful marketing, Mukul discovers that the story of food helps to reveal who the new Chinese middle classes really are.


FRI 11:30 Cabin Pressure (b00lyvz7)
Series 2

Kuala Lumpur

A week on stand-by at the airfield gives Arthur an opportunity to brush up on his stewarding skills, while Douglas seems to have disappeared. And why is everyone terrified of Dirk the groundsman?

Starring
Carolyn Knapp-Shappey ..... Stephanie Cole
1st Officer Douglas Richardson ..... Roger Allam
Capt. Martin Crieff ..... Benedict Cumberbatch
Arthur Shappey ..... John Finnemore
Dave ..... Paul Putner
George ..... Roger Morlidge

Written by John Finnemore.

Produced & directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00ly564)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.

Including:

Is it really possible to go to the Edinburgh Fringe, not pay a penny for tickets and still see several good shows a day? Judi Herman spent 24 hours on the Fringe to find out.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00ly57y)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00ly5cy)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00lyvz9)
Tim Harford presents the magazine which looks at numbers everywhere, in the news, in politics and in life.

An Open University co production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00ly616)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00lywv4)
Aftershock

Ten years after the 1999 earthquake in Turkey, Tina Pepler's powerful drama-documentary tells the story of a young engineering student who returns to Istanbul to find the friends she left behind. They are still trying to deal with the aftermath of the last quake, in a city trying to ready itself for the next.

Eleanor ...... Eleanor Zimmermann
Cansu ...... Serra Somay
Baris ...... Hakan Silahsizoglu
Merve ...... Sirin Onder

With contributions from Kubilay Hicyilmaz, Polat Gulkan, Mustafa Erdik, Gokay Bostan, Tamer Aker, Husamettin Alper, Ozgur Demir, Zeynep Turkmen.

Directed by Sara Davies.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00lywv6)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Matthew Biggs, Anne Swithinbank and Bob Flowerdew answer questions posed by members of St Ann's Allotments in Nottingham.

Matthew introduces Britain's oldest and largest allotment site and meets a selection of allotment-holders occupying a 670-garden enclosure, including the owners of a greenhouse constructed entirely from plastic bottles. He also talks to prize-winning fruit grower Adrian Baggley, who identifies and propagates rare heritage fruit trees as part of the allotments' National Lottery Heritage Project.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 The Fortune Hunters (b00grdc0)
Episode 5

Series in which Max Flint investigates the 15 billion pounds in unclaimed assets in the UK and asks if and how these funds are distributed to their rightful owners.

Max explores issues surrounding claims by former soldiers who had tax wrongly deducted from their service pensions. He meets the man who discovered the problem which resulted in millions of pounds in tax rebates being returned to ex-servicemen, and a 91-year-old retired major who is still fighting for his money.

A Tinderbox Broadcast production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00lywv8)
Jane Little presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00lywvb)
British actress Jean Kent on James Mason, Stewart Granger and why Marilyn Monroe was a bit grubby.

Christoph Walz reveals why he turned down every Nazi officer role he has been offered, except for one Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds.

Mark Gatiss picks a neglected classic from the 1960s.

Critic Jane Graham enters the fourth dimension with The Time Traveler's Wife.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00ly63q)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ly67g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b00lyx3g)
Series 28

Episode 8

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a satirical review of the week's news, with help from Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, Mitch Benn and Andy Zaltzman.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00ly618)
Mike goes through the dairy routine with Jazzer, who's covering the work when Mike goes on honeymoon. Mike is tight-lipped about the destination, but says he'll buy Jazzer a pint.

Helen and Tom think their week in charge has been great. Tom tells Helen he was embarrassed when he couldn't settle an account. The company will have to wait until his parents return. He thinks that now they are partners in the farm, their names should be on the farm cheque book.

Jazzer finds Fallon outside the pub, trying to escape her dad who keeps asking for her. Vicky appears and asks Jazzer if he knows her honeymoon destination, but he says Mike's not telling.

Mike sees Ed at the pub and suggests they should ask Borchester Land about renting some land. Ed says he'll talk to Pat and Tony about approaching BL.

Later, Vicky shows Mike her exotic honeymoon outfits. Mike reveals the destination ... somewhere beginning with B ...Brittany!

Fallon joins Jazzer for a curry in Borchester - his treat. Jazzer tells Fallon about his father. He's glad to be shot of him, he was a nightmare. Jazzer says Fallon shouldn't let Wayne get to her. Once he heads off, she can forget about him forever.

Episode written by Adrian Flynn.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00ly6by)
Arts news and reviews with Kirsty Lang.

Kirsty Lang talks to author AL Kennedy about short stories, stand-up comedy and the strangeness of domestic life. Having won the 2008 Costa prize in for her novel Day, AL Kennedy returns with a new collection of short stories and a blossoming career in stand-up comedy. Her short stories, called What Becomes, are exquisitely crafted and characterised portraits of difficult relationships, domestic strangeness and unusual epiphanies. Her stand-up show, Words with AL Kennedy, is playing in the Assembly Rooms at the Edinburgh Festival.

Dame Fanny Waterman, doyenne of piano teachers and creator of the Leeds International Piano Competition talks to Front Row about her long career at and around the keyboard. When Dame Fanny's Piano Lessons Book One was published in 1967 it became an instant bestseller and was one of the first 'modern' piano tutors, soon to be found in homes across the land. Dame Fanny continued her quest to teach piano technique and her series of masterclass programmes Fanny Waterman's Piano Progress made her a familiar figure on 1980s television. With Marion Harewood, her co-writer of the tutor series, she co-founded the Leeds International Piano Competition in 1961 which became one of the most important in the world and has launched the career of numerous star performers. The 2009 competition runs from 26 August to 13 September.

Critic Stephen Armstrong gives Front Row a round-up of the themes, the mood and the best bits of the Edinburgh Festival 2009 so far. And poet Gillian Clark gives the low-down on cultural events this summer in Wales.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00ly6q3)
Villette

Finis

Dramatisation of the classic romantic novel by Charlotte Bronte.

There are more revelations to unfold after a night-time carnival and a host of secrets, but will Lucy's new love desert her?

Lucy Snowe ...... Anna Maxwell Martin
Monsieur Paul ...... Sam Dale
Mrs Beck ...... Joan Walker
Ginevra ...... Lizzy Watts

Directed by Tracey Neale.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00lyx6c)
Eddie Mair chairs the topical debate in Rye, East Sussex. The panellists are journalist Toby Young, general secretary of the RMT Bob Crow, farmer Oliver Walston and literary critic Sarah Churchwell.


FRI 20:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00lyx6f)
Series 1

The Serpent's Stare

Underground animals are very different to the animals that spend their life on the surface. They are a different shape, their senses are tuned in a very different way and they manifestly come from a different world.

Does this explain the stare of the snake?

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Producer: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2009.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00lyx6h)
Series 2

Animal Magic

Second series of three political dramas.

By Avie Luthra.

MP Bobby Khan's marriage to Lucy is very unsettled. Bobby backs the opening of a new laboratory involving animal testing in his constituency which leads to a violent backlash, and an old flame of Lucy's is inextricably linked to the whole affair.

Bobby ...... Zubin Varla
Lucy ...... Nichola Stephenson
Elizabeth ...... Barbara Marten
Terry ...... John McArdle
Karl ...... Graeme Hawley
David ...... James Quinn
Minister ...... Malcolm Raeburn
Helen ...... Christine Brennan
Sara ...... Millie Rose Kinsey
News reporter ...... Shari Vahl

School children from St Mary's Church of England Infant and Junior School, Manchester.

Political adviser Andrew Russell

Directed by Pauline Harris.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00ly6wg)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00ly6z5)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

President Obama goes on the offensive in the healthcare reform row

A report from Iceland; why are some countries more environmentally aware than others?

Government policy or individual action: what is the best way to get carbon levels down?

Scientists discover a gene that determines how much sleep we need.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00m0fw1)
The Whole Day Through

Episode 5

Samantha Bond and Nathaniel Parker read from the romantic novel by Patrick Gale.

Forty-something Laura Lewis is obliged to abandon a life of stylish independence in Paris, and with it all apparent hopes of romance, to care for her elderly mother in Winchester.

Ben decides to leave his wife, Chloe. After his love letter to Laura is mistakenly sent to Chloe he has to act, and asks Laura to meet him one more time at the hotel where they first had dinner.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00lyfm8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Listen Against (b008crj0)
Series 1

Episode 3

The show that prises the back off your radio, fiddles around with the programmes inside and then puts it all back together the wrong way round.

Alice Arnold and Jon Holmes take liberties with Laurie Taylor, BBC Radio 1Xtra and Melvyn Bragg

The brain-child of writer, comic and broadcaster Jon Holmes.

Producer: Bill Dare and Jon Holmes

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2007.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00ly6qy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00ly6pz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00m68lv)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00ly6q1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00ly6q3)

Act Your Age 23:00 WED (b00g47nm)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b008118z)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b008dk9j)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00lyf65)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00lyf67)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00lyf69)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00lxx76)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00lxsqt)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00lxh7t)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00lyx6c)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00ly4nk)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00ly4nk)

Backstreet Business 05:45 SAT (b008pxsy)

Baggage 11:30 WED (b00lymqf)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00lxsz9)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00lxsz9)

Between Ourselves 09:00 WED (b00lv4h7)

Between Ourselves 21:30 WED (b00lv4h7)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00lycz4)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00lxsqh)

Bigipedia 23:00 THU (b00lytq8)

Bombay's Beatle 13:30 SUN (b00hv1dt)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00ly73h)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00m0fy1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00m0fvx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00m0fvz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00m0fw1)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00lxjln)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00lxzrj)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00lxzrj)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00m0ls4)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00m0ls4)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00m0ls6)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00m0ls6)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00m0ls8)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00m0ls8)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00m0lsb)

Britain's Atlantis 21:00 MON (b00gw18s)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00lxtr4)

Cabin Pressure 11:30 FRI (b00lyvz7)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00lyfrd)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00lyfrd)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00ltnfs)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00lxwh4)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00lvh19)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b00m9jff)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 08:50 SUN (b00lxhb3)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 20:50 FRI (b00lyx6f)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00lxvkz)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00lxvkz)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00lyclq)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00lybnv)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00lymqk)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00b0swj)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00lywv4)

Earth to Earth: Potted Immortality 11:30 THU (b00lyrb6)

Electric Ink 18:30 THU (b011f3pc)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00lxsqc)

Face the Facts 21:00 SUN (b00lxz4t)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00lxsq3)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00lxzkq)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00lxzhd)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00lxzhg)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00lxzhj)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00lxzhl)

Forbidden Families 21:30 TUE (b00ctl6t)

Friday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00lxsqw)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00lyx6h)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00lxsqk)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00ly6px)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00ly6br)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00ly6bt)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00ly6bw)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00ly6by)

Fry's English Delight 09:00 TUE (b00lv1ln)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00lxh3w)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00lywv6)

Gesualdo: Musician and Murderer 15:30 SAT (b00lv204)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00lyfm8)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00lyfm8)

Hazelbeach 11:30 MON (b00ly7mv)

Heresy 23:00 TUE (b00bcv9f)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00lydx5)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00lvlv3)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00lytq4)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00lyfrb)

Islam, Mullahs and the Media 09:30 THU (b00lyq4p)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00lv13k)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00lycz6)

Kicking the Habit 23:30 WED (b007vlvd)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00lxh3y)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00lywv8)

Laurence & Gus: Hearts and Minds 18:30 TUE (b00lyfr6)

Listen Against 23:30 FRI (b008crj0)

Lives in a Landscape 23:30 MON (b00f6p8n)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00lxsrb)

Lost, Stolen or Shredded 09:30 TUE (b00lydhb)

MI6: A Century in the Shadows 09:00 MON (b00ly7j7)

MI6: A Century in the Shadows 21:30 MON (b00ly7j7)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00lytq0)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00lxhhm)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00lxsyz)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00m0rcd)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00lxz5z)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00lxz61)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00lxz63)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00lxz65)

Mind Changers 11:00 MON (b00ly7lp)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b00lxh3t)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00lyvz9)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00lxhhw)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00lxsz7)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00lxzfx)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00lxzdk)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00lxzdm)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00lxzdp)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00lxzdr)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00lxtmd)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00lxhj0)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00lxtmn)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00lxtr0)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00lxsrl)

News 13:00 SAT (b00lxsqr)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 09:00 THU (b00lyq4m)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 21:30 THU (b00lyq4m)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00lxtmj)

On the Top Deck 20:00 MON (b00grrzw)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00lxwh6)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00lxwh6)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00lxsq1)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00lxsq1)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00lxsr0)

PM 17:00 MON (b00ly63s)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00ly63j)

PM 17:00 WED (b00ly63l)

PM 17:00 THU (b00ly63n)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00ly63q)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00lxx72)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00lxwh8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00lxhhy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00lxzhb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00lxzfz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00lxzg1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00lxzg3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00lxzg5)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00lxsrd)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00lxsrd)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00lxsrd)

Questions, Questions 13:30 THU (b00lytpy)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00lxtms)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00lxtms)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00lxtms)

Reality Check 22:15 SAT (b00lv6fn)

Reality Check 20:00 WED (b00lynzj)

Rewriting the Psychiatrist's Bible 17:00 SUN (b00kf117)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b00lv0x1)

Round Britain Quiz 13:30 MON (b00lycln)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00lxsq9)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00lxsrg)

Secrets of the Super Old 21:00 WED (b00lynzn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00lxhhr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00lxsz3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00lxzdh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00lxzc2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00lxzc4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00lxzc6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00lxzc8)

Selling Cheese to the Chinese 11:00 FRI (b00lyvz5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00lxhhp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00lxhht)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00lxsr4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00lxsz1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00lxsz5)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00lxx6w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00lxz9v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00lxzc0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00lxz8m)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00lxz9x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00lxz8p)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00lxz9z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00lxz8r)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00lxzb1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00lxz8t)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00lxzb3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00lxsr8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00lxx70)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00ly6bp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00ly678)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00ly67b)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00ly67d)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00ly67g)

Soho Stories 10:30 SAT (b00lxsqf)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00lxtmg)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00lxtmg)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00lxtr2)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00lxtmq)

Tales Before the Stave 13:30 TUE (b00lybns)

Tennyson's Ulysses Revisited 23:30 SAT (b00ltnpm)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00lxtr6)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00lxx74)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00lxx74)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00ly61d)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00ly61d)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00ly612)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00ly612)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00ly614)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00ly614)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00ly616)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00ly616)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00ly618)

The Call 09:30 MON (b00ly7j9)

The Election Agent 20:45 WED (b00lynzl)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00lxh40)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00lywvb)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00lxvl1)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00lxvl1)

The Fortune Hunters 15:45 MON (b00fzbbq)

The Fortune Hunters 15:45 TUE (b00g3374)

The Fortune Hunters 15:45 WED (b00g4gq8)

The Fortune Hunters 15:45 THU (b00gl690)

The Fortune Hunters 15:45 FRI (b00grdc0)

The Fraud Capital of Britain 20:00 TUE (b00lyfr8)

The High Price of Alder Hey 21:00 THU (b00lytq6)

The Hollow Men 23:30 TUE (b0088nqn)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00lymqh)

The Money Grab 12:00 SAT (b00lxsqm)

The Money Grab 15:00 WED (b00lxsqm)

The Naming of Genes 11:00 WED (b00lyfy1)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b00lxh42)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b00lyx3g)

The Odd Half Hour 18:30 WED (b00lynzg)

The Partisan Coffee House 11:00 TUE (b00fq6nm)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00lytq2)

The Tribes of Science 14:45 SUN (b00lxvl7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00lxvl5)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00ly73f)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00ly6yz)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00ly6z1)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00ly6z3)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00ly6z5)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00lv5hf)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00lynzd)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00lxsq7)

Today 06:00 MON (b00lxzl3)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00lxzks)

Today 06:00 WED (b00lxzkv)

Today 06:00 THU (b00lxzkx)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00lxzkz)

Very Amazing: Behind the Scenes at the V and A 09:30 WED (b00lv4h9)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00lxspy)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00lxsq5)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00lxsqp)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00lxsr6)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00lxtml)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00lxtqy)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00lxvl3)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00lxx6y)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00lxz4w)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00ly7bw)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00ly5cp)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00ly6yx)

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Weather 21:58 TUE (b00ly6w8)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00ly57t)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00ly6wb)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00ly57w)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00ly6wd)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00ly57y)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00ly6wg)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00lxz4y)

Will Smith Presents the Tao of Bergerac 23:30 THU (b007vl20)

With Great Pleasure 11:30 TUE (b00lydrl)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00lxsqy)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00ly09p)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00ly088)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00ly08b)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00ly08d)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00ly08g)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00lv28b)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b00lyfm6)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00ly610)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00ly5cr)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00ly5ct)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00ly5cw)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00ly5cy)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00ly57p)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00ly55y)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00ly560)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00ly562)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00ly564)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00lxsr2)