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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 JULY 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00lmp9r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00ljmx9)
You're Coming With Me Lad

Episode 5

Graham Fellows reads from Mike Pannett's account of his experiences as a rural policeman, having swapped a post with the Metropolitan Police for a return to his native North Yorkshire.

Mike confronts two kinds of explosive devices: one in the hands of children is dealt with by the constable; the other, dispatched to North Yorkshire by Herr Hitler, is best left to the Army.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lmp9t)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lmp9w)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lmp9y)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00lmpb0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lmpb2)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Richard Hill.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00lmpb4)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00lmpk6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00lmpk8)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00lmpkb)
Doggerland

Helen Mark explores a land lost beneath the waves off the Northumbrian coast.

‘Doggerland’ is the name for a huge area that, ten thousand years ago, before the end of the last Ice Age, linked the British Isles with Denmark and Northern Germany, a time when the Thames was a tributary of the Rhine. Besides speaking to archaeologists who are investigating Doggerland, she is joined by the storyteller Hugh Lupton who imagines the myths of those long-lost hunter-gatherers.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00lmpkz)
Farming Today This Week

News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00lmpl1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00lms6h)
Presented by Evan Davis and Edward Stourton.

Political correspondent Terry Stiasny considers reports that the government was unhappy with the head of the British Army, General Sir Richard Dannatt.

Evan Davis looks at Nasa's plans to return man to the lunar surface and beyond.

Stephen Alambritis, of the Federation of Small Businesses, discusses if companies are prepared for a swine flu epidemic.

Tehran correspondent Jon Leyne says the Iranian government is leaking support day by day.

Reporter Mike Thomson examines an alleged increase in devastating violence in Congo.

Science correspondent Tom Feilden reports on the cultural revolution that coincided with the Apollo era.

Thought for the Day with Brian Draper, associate lecturer at the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity.

Labour MP Denis MacShane and business expert Jospeh Lampel discuss the future of the steel industry.

Michael Evans of the Times and former Defence Secretary Malcolm Rifkind discuss whether generals and politicians should fight their battles in public.

Paola Antonelli, a senior curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, considers if there is a connection between the world of design and the idea of space travel.

Chris Morris reports on the problems caused by the lack of rainfall in India.

The British veteran of the First World War Henry Allingham has died at the age of 113. Military historian Max Hastings remembers the man and what he signifies to younger generations.

Mike Griffin, the former administrator of Nasa, explains why no human has returned to the moon since 1972.

Journalist Carl Bernstein remembers the life of former US TV newscaster Walter Cronkite.

Author Matthew Brzezinski and Dr John Sheldon, of the US Air Force School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, discuss the competition between Russia and the US in the space race.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00lmz4h)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. Fi Glover is joined by Tobias Jones. With poetry from Lemn Sissay.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00lmz4k)
Sandi Toksvig explores London's City Wall and other Roman remains around the City, and discovers that there is much of the wall hidden from the public eye.

She also examines the popularity of 'laughter yoga' in the frenetic city of Mumbai in India, where she takes a tour around the eclectic, cosmopolitan and fascinating city that is one of India's leading commercial and artistic centres.


SAT 10:30 Tarantino's Jukebox (b00lnczw)
Episode 2

Episode 2/2

For the first time since Hitchcock, moviegoers have embraced a film director whose name denotes a genre in itself.

Transcending his reputation as a maker of violent movies, Quentin Tarantino is also recognised by his fans and admirers as an exceptional soundtrack producer. True Romance, Natural Born Killers, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, Kill Bill... Tarantino selected all the tracks himself. In the 2nd of two programmes, the enfant terrible of American Cinema reveals his musical obsessions and his influences, and talks us through the contents of his virtual jukebox.

Music is a critical element in many movies, but never more so than in Tarantino's - he plunders his own backstory, remembering the tracks of his youth, as well as often making references to - and featuring music from - cult movies and television.

This intriguing documentary (coming to you from the red leatherette banquettes of Quentin's favourite virtual diner in LA) not only forages in the annals of great popular music, it focuses on the new styles of music Quentin has found for his latest movie Inglourious Basterds, which was recently nominated in the Best Picture category at the Oscars.

Also featuring film producer Laurence Bender, music & movie critic Paul Gambaccini, film editor Sally Menke, composer Charles Bernstein and music supervisors Mary Ramos and Karyn Rachtman.

Presented by conductor/composer & film-music historian Robert Ziegler.

Produced by Heavy Entertainment.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00ln096)
In this programme, Steve Richards of The Independent assesses the political prospects of two Cabinet ministers involved in the big stories of the week.

They happen to be brothers. Ed Miliband announced the government's latest climate change plans. David Miliband defended the conduct of the campaign in Afghanistan.

But how are they each performing? And what's the view of them inside the Westminster village? Fraser Nelson of the Spectator and Andy Grice of the Independent reflect on their progress.

Also in the programme:

* The chairman of the Sustainable Development Commission, Jonathan Porritt, gives a favourable reaction to the government's plans on climate change

* The Conservative, Patrick Mercer, and Labour's Mike Gapes assess a difficult week for ministers after more British troops are killed in Afghanistan

* And Professor Anthony King reveals that he is to conduct research into why governments seem to be making more and more mistakes.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00ln099)
Kate Adie introduces BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the headlines.

Rupert Wingfield Hayes considers the story of Natalya Estemirova, the human rights worker in Chechnya who became a victim of the brutality she worked so fearlessly to document.

Lucy Williamson on why the people of Jakarta weren't surprised that their city this week came under attack from suicide bombers.

Chris Hogg examines the reaction in a Chinese village as news comes through of a recovery in the country's economic fortunes.

Guy Delauney on the Cambodian family unhappy that they're closing down the rubbish tip in the capital Phnom Penh.

And why was our man Steve Gibbs handed a letter for The Queen when he dodged the howler monkeys and parakeets on Nicaragua's Mosquito Coast?


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00ln09d)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.

The government's plans for social care reform are examined in detail.

Will a new code of practice for comparison sites really benefit consumers?

Plus concern that saving in a Child Trust Fund might affect the help children with disabilities get from the state when they turn 18.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b00lmdh0)
Series 28

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a satirical review of the week's news, recorded at the Latitude Festival, with help from Mitch Benn, Laura Shavin, Jon Holmes, Marcus Brigstocke.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00ln09g)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00ln09j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00lmdh2)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in Norwich. The panellists are deputy leader of the Labour Party Harriet Harman, shadow secretary of state for energy and climate change Greg Clark, Liberal Democrat foreign affairs spokesman Ed Davey and writer and chairman of the National Trust Simon Jenkins.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00ln09l)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00ln09n)
Statement of Regret

Statement of Regret by Kwame Kwei-Armah

The Year of Obama should be an opportunity for Kwaku's black policy think tank to florish. But Kwaku is still grieving for his father and his latest misjudged proposal is about to explode. A second chance to hear this provocative play first produced by the National Theatre in 2007 and first broadcast in 2009.

Director........................Alison Hindell.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00ln09q)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Weekend Woman's Hour with Jane Garvey.

Including an interview with the first female helicopter pilot to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross medal after her mission in Iraq.

Plus the impact of the murders of Peter Sutcliffe on the families left behind; learning disabilities and the Woman's Hour drama; a debate on whether feminism failed the 'ordinary women'; co-parenting classes for divorcees; the romantic letters of John Keats and Fanny Brawne; and an exclusive performance by one of the world's leading violinists.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00ln09s)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00lk30m)
It's the end of term and summer is here, so what advice would Evan Davis's successful business guests give to youngsters just leaving school now?

Entrepreneur James Dyson took five years to develop the bagless vacuum cleaner, Martha Lane Fox went on a 'crazy journey' to set up lastminute.com, and Adrian Ringrose still isn't sure he has grown up, even though he is chief executive of a company with 50,000 employees. Evan asks them all about creativity in business and how important it is.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00ln09v)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00ln09x)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ln09z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00ln0b1)
Loose Ends just cannot keep away from the Latitude Festival!

Recorded in front of an audience at Suffolk's music and arts festival, Clive Anderson presides over the usual mix of live music, conversation and comedy.

Joining Clive on stage are the British film director Stephen Frears, the actor, musician and comedian Keith Allen and the American actor Janeane Garofalo.

Rachael Stirling talks to British human beatbox artist Shlomo.

With comedy from Seann Walsh and music from The Airborne Toxic Event.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00ln0b3)
Sonia Sotomayor

Claire Bolderson profiles Sonia Sotomayor. Nominated to the Supreme Court by President Obama, Sotomayor would, if confirmed by the Senate, become the first Hispanic - and only the third woman - to hold a seat in the highest court in the United States.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00ln0b5)
Jerusalem at the Royal Court, Menage by Ewan Morrison, and Duncan Jones's directorial debut, Moon

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by historian Tristram Hunt, playwright Julia Pascal and writer Michael Carlson to discuss the cultural highlights of the week, featuring lunar loneliness, anarchy in Wiltshire and some very small clothes.

In the midst of the celebrations to mark the 40th anniversary of the first lunar landing, Duncan Jones's directorial debut, Moon, presents a stark contrast to the brave new world of Apollo 11. Sam Jones (played by Sam Rockwell) is the only employee at a plant on the far side of the Moon which mines Helium-3 to solve Earth's energy problems. Nearing the end of his three-year tour of duty, he suddenly finds that he has far more than loneliness and boredom to deal with.

Jez Butterworth's new play Jerusalem is at the Royal Court in London and features a bravura central performance by Mark Rylance, playing Johnny 'Rooster' Byron. As St George's Day dawns in a Wiltshire village, Johnny faces eviction from the encampment in the woods where he has lived for 27 years. He's a lord of misrule, a supplier of drugs to local teenagers, and possibly deeply connected to an older, more mystical England. Will Saint George come to his rescue?

In his third novel, Menage, Ewan Morrison aims his pen at the rise of the Young British Artists in the early 1990s and the commodification of art which accompanied it. His three protagonists - Owen, Dot and Saul - who comprise the menage of the title, find themselves in a Hoxton-based cross between Withnail and I and Jules et Jim. Plenty of squalor, lots of sex and critical essays (with footnotes) on nine video installations.

The Young British Artists of the Victorian era didn't have video cameras, but, if Desperate Romantics on BBC2 is to be believed, the pre-Raphaelites shared their Hoxton counterparts' interest in capturing real life, boozing and getting it on. Aidan Turner cuts a Jagger-esque Rossetti, strutting around town with Hunt and Millais in his wake, blowing raspberries at the Royal Academy and searching for the perfect model. Apparently, the aim of the series is to create Entourage with easels.

Charles LeDray is a Manhattan-based artist whose meticulous work means that his exhibitions take years to prepare. Mens Suits - his first major exhibition in Europe, arranged by Artangel - is an installation in an old Victorian fire station in London which features an entire wardrobe of tiny, hand-stitched clothes in three separate areas, redolent of thrift shops and mens' outfitters. Perfectly crafted, he even brought his own dust.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00ln0b7)
Soho!

The singer Suggs returns to London's Soho, where he spent much of his unconventional childhood and where his jazz singer mother still lives.

He was introduced to the delights of the Colony Club as a six-year-old, and as a musician he continued to haunt the district.

Recording on location and mining the BBC archive, Suggs investigates how this unique community, complete with red-light district and village school, functions today, and whether it is still, or indeed ever was, a source of inspiration or merely a creative vacuum.

For decades, Soho was regarded as Britain's capital of sleaze and vice, but also a place where artists, writers, musicians and actors came to drink and philosophise. Tales of the area and its inhabitants abound, from painter Francis Bacon and George Melly at Muriel Belcher's infamous Colony Club to Jeffrey Bernard and Keith Waterhouse at the Coach and Horses and Dylan Thomas at The French House.

Soho was the birthplace of British pop, with the skifflers, jazzers and early rock 'n' rollers all making their names in the coffee bars of the 1950s. It was also the home of refugees of every type, including political dissidents, foreigners and homosexuals, from Casanova to Karl Marx, and Quentin Crisp to George Melly.

Yet in the 1950s, a new phrase was coined: 'Soho-itis'. It was said that if you enter Soho you will never get any work done, and you will never, ever leave. Many books, poems, songs and indeed careers were washed away with drink, but some artists, musicians and writers did survive the late nights, the fights and the booze, and took great inspiration from the place.

Producer: Justine Willett.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00ljhml)
The Complete Smiley - The Spy Who Came in From the Cold

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Robert Forrest of John le Carre's classic novel featuring intelligence officer George Smiley.

The trap is set to catch the East German spymaster who has ruthlessly destroyed Alec Leamas's Berlin network - and the bait is Leamas himself.

Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale
Alec Leamas ...... Brian Cox
Fiedler ...... Henry Goodman
Liz Gold ...... Ruth Gemmell
Control ...... John Rowe
Peter Guillam ...... Richard Dillane
Mundt ...... Sam Dale
Ashe ...... Jamie Newall
Doorman ...... Stephen Hogan
Miss Crail ...... Liza Sadovy
Mr Pitt ...... Philip Fox
Grocer ...... David Hargreaves
CIA Man ...... Benjamin Askew

This episode is available until 3.00pm on 26th July as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00ln0b9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00lk12w)
Michael Buerk chairs a debate on the moral questions behind the week's news. Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Claire Fox and Matthew Taylor cross-examine witnesses.

Who to send to war and why is one of the most morally difficult decisions any politician will have to make. If we don't have a clear and legally-justifiable set of goals, is it ever morally right to send young men - and increasingly women - to face death? With the images of the latest members of our forces to be killed all over the front pages of the papers, it is a question that all of us, not just politicians, have to face up to.

The goal of the Afghan campaign has variously been described as fighting Al-Qaeda terrorists, freeing the country from the despotic Taleban regime and fighting the drugs trade, but do any of them add up to a moral justification? What is our moral obligation to Afghanistan and is it challenged by the rising number of casualties? Is the current disquiet at home over the high rate of casualties because we no longer believe in this war? Or have we become so risk averse that we have forgotten that the enemy will shoot back and that people get killed? Do we still have the moral courage and moral authority to send our armed forces in to battle on our behalf?

Canon Dr Alan Billings
Anglican priest and chaplain in the British armed forces, teaching military ethics

John Rees
Writer and political activist, co-founder of the Stop the War Coalition

Zarghona Rassa
Chairperson of the British Afghan Women's Society.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b00ljy26)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes.

With guests Paul Bailey, Marcus du Sautoy, Lucy Mangan and Michael Simkins.

The reader is Peter Jefferson.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00ljhrs)
Roger McGough introduces poems including works by Milton, Ben Okri and Mary Oliver.



SUNDAY 19 JULY 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00ln0hc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b0085dpd)
Ones to Watch (Volume 2)

The Sand Monster

A talent showcase of unpublished work from new writers.

By Judith Allnatt, read by Jordan Clarke.

A family visit to the seaside is described by a young boy, who is acutely aware of how difficult his parents find it to deal with his disability.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00ln0hg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00ln0hk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00ln0hm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00ln0hp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00ln0qv)
The sound of bells from St Peter's Church, South Petherton, in Somerset.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00ln0b3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00ln0qx)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00ln0qz)
Genius

Mark Tully explores the nature of genius. Are geniuses born or made, what sets them above the merely excellent, what conditions do they need to reach their full potential and what are they like to live with?


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00ln0r1)
Caz Graham meets Daisy, an 11-year-old with a thriving chicken and egg enterprise and a flock of rare breed sheep. When Daisy's teacher brought a broody bantam into her reception class, it was love at first sight for her, then aged five, with the world of farming. Caz Graham finds out what sparked her passion for livestock and her ambition to spend her life looking after animals.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00ln100)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00ln102)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00ln104)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ln106)
ACE Africa

Sir Trevor McDonald appeals on behalf of ACE Africa.

Donations to ACE Africa, should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope ACE Africa. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. If you are a UK tax payer, please provide ACE Africa with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation worth another 25 per cent. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity No: 1111283.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00ln108)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00ln10b)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00ln10d)
Festival Eucharist from St John's Church, Buxton, sung by the Buxton Madrigal Singers to Haydn's Missa Brevis in F.

The celebrant is the Rev John Hudghton and the homily is given by Dame Janet Smith, chairman of the Buxton Festival and a Court of Appeal judge.

Director of music: Michael Williams.


SUN 08:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00lmdh4)
Series 1

Dragons

What did Sir David do when he was confronted by a ten-foot-long grey-scaled reptile, with a long yellow forked tongue whipping in and out of its mouth?

He didn't run and, in fact, was one of the first to film it: the Komodo dragon.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Producer: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00ln10g)
Keep calm and carry on: that is the advice from the Director of the World Influenza Centre, Dr Alan Hay, and the chief executive of Visit England, James Berresford.

On a day of street parties, Chris Neill questions the need to love thy neighbour. We watch from the shore for the first ferry to arrive on Stornoway on the Sabbath. And in the week that saw the death of Henry Allingham and Sir Edward and Lady Downes, Paddy asks Hetty Bower, aged 103, and her friend Alison Selford, who is 89, what really does survive of us.

Reviewing the papers are folk music legend Martin Simpson, former captain of the England women's cricket team Rachel Heyhoe-Flint and politician and broadcaster Michael Portillo.

The winner of the quiz is Allan Blair, and the answer was the handing out of miniature bells to tie onto purses and bags to deter thieves in Wellingborough.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00ln10j)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00ln1b2)
David Mitchell

Kirsty Young's castaway is comedian David Mitchell. Mitchell has won two Bafta awards and, as a sitcom actor, sketch show writer and humorous columnist, has never been in greater demand.

But as a child, Mitchell was sure he wasn't funny and it was only when he was at university, he says, that he learnt how to have fun. It is now just the rest of his life that Mitchell needs to address - beginning, he says, by tidying up his flat and then, maybe, even getting a girlfriend.

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: Rainbow Connection by Jim Henson
Book: Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh
Luxury: DVDs of sitcoms and DVD player.


SUN 12:00 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b00ljy2b)
Series 51

Episode 5

The perennial antidote to panel games comes from the Theatre Royal in Newcastle, with Rob Brydon taking on the chairman's role from the late Humphrey Lyttelton.

Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined by Phill Jupitus.

With Colin Sell at the piano.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00ln1b5)
Watercress

Watercress has been dubbed a 'superfood' in the media following scientific research that suggests a link between the consumption of watercress and health. But is there anything special about it or is it a case of marketing hype?

Sheila Dillon visits Vitacress Salads Ltd in Hampshire, which has for several years funded scientific research into the potential health benefits of watercress. Why did it do this? And how much did it spend?

Much research into diet and health is funded by industry. What does the food industry get out of it? What does it say about the state of science research and how does it benefit us?

Sheila interviews Prof Ian Rowland of the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Reading and is joined in the studio by Prof Martin Wiseman, medical and scientific director of the World Cancer Research Fund.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00ln1b7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00ln1b9)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 The Ian Blair Years (b00ksvt7)
Episode 1

BBC Home Affairs correspondent Danny Shaw tells the inside story of Sir Ian Blair's tenure as commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.

This liberal Oxford-educated 'Blairite' was once seen as the ideal candidate to modernise British policing and, in particular, to eliminate the taint of 'institutional racism' from the Met. But his tenure became increasingly controversial and he was forced to step aside: dogged by the police shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, accused of racial discrimination by one of his most senior officers and facing allegations of cronyism.

Danny Shaw talks to those who have known Sir Ian throughout his career and examines how Britain's highest-flying officer came to be embroiled in a bitter dispute at the top of Britain's biggest police force. Was Blair a victim of politicisation or could he simply not do the job as he had promised?


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00lmd9b)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Anne Swithinbank, Bob Flowerdew and Bunny Guinness answer questions posed by gardeners in Northamptonshire.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 The Estuary (b008kllk)
Episode 3

Peter France narrates an extraordinary story of life on the Wash as the tides and the seasons change, set against a backdrop of sounds recorded on location by Chris Watson.

The birds have been pushed across the mud flats by the advancing tide. They soon run out of space and are forced into the air in one of Britain's greatest natural spectacles.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00ln1dj)
The Complete Smiley - The Spy Who Came in From the Cold

Episode 3

Dramatisation by Robert Forrest of John le Carre's classic novel featuring intelligence officer George Smiley.

The deadly game of deceit and betrayal reaches its climax at the foot of the Berlin Wall.

Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale
Alec Leamas ...... Brian Cox
Fiedler ...... Henry Goodman
Mundt ...... Sam Dale
Liz Gold ...... Ruth Gemmell
Ashe ...... Jamie Newall
Tribunal President ...... Siobhan Redmond
Peter Guillam ...... Richard Dillane
Commissar ...... Liza Sadovy
Agent ...... Stephen Hogan
Miss Crail ...... Liza Sadovy
Mr Pitt ...... Philip Fox
Grocer ...... David Hargreaves
CIA Man ...... Benjamin Askew

This episode is available until 3.00pm on 26th July as part of the Series Catch-up Trial.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00ln2dc)
Aravind Adiga, Dame Beryl Bainbridge, and European Writers and the Carribbean

Mariella Frostrup talks to Aravind Adiga about his new novel Between the Assassinations, written before his first book, the Booker Prize -winning novel The White Tiger. The title refers to the period between the two assassinations of two former prime ministers of India, Indira and her son Rajiv Gandhi, and is a sequence of fictional stories set in a fictional seaside town Kittur.

75 years after JB Priestly's English Journey was published, novelist Dame Beryl Bainbridge discusses Priestly's love of England and the impact of the book, 25 years on, from following in Priestly's footstep herself - documented as a film and in the book, English Journey or the Road to Milton Keynes.

Also, European writers and their literary love affair with the Carribbean, from Jean Rhys's The Wide Sargasso Sea to the present, with two new Trinidadian writers Amanda Smyth and Monique Roffey, and Carole Angier biographer of Jean Rhys.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00ln2df)
Roger McGough introduces requests for poems about space by Shakespeare, Seamus Heaney and others.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00lk028)
RAF Safety Record

With an inquiry underway into the mid-air explosion in 2006 aboard a Nimrod aircraft, which killed 14 service personnel, Angus Stickler examines the safety record of the RAF in recent conflicts.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00ln0b3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00ln2dh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00ln2dk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ln2dm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00lnd6q)
Val McDermid introduces her selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.

Angel of Harlem: the Billie Holiday Story - Radio 2
The Inconstant Moon - Radio 4
Death Diminishes Me - World Service
Fiery Cross - Radio Scotland
The Pursuits of Darleen Fyles - Radio 4
In Living Memory: The Contraceptive Train - Radio 4
Gay Life After Saddam - Radio 5 Live
The Today Programme - Radio 4
On Your Farm - Radio 4
I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue - Radio 4
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold - Radio 4
The Call in the Middle of the Night - Radio 4
The Political Club - Radio 4
The Grand Masquerade - Radio 4.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00lnd6s)
Jennifer tells Lilian to hurry up. Lilian says she'll just be a minute, she's checking something on the computer. Jennifer goes and Lilian suddenly gasps.

Adam drops the strawberries at the Lodge before heading to the cricket. Jennifer and Lilian arrive and get everything ready for Jack's party while Peggy checks on Jack. Lilian's distracted but says they'll talk later.

At the cricket Adam tells David their two agricultural students have left abruptly. So, Brookfield's combining will have to wait till next week. David isn't happy. Adam tells David he'll do what he can, but it doesn't look hopeful.

Susan tells everyone that Neil might have someone interested in his weaners, and observes that Peggy has her work cut out looking after Jack. Later, Jack opens his present - a Staffordshire bull terrier statue, which looks like Jack's old dog Captain. Jack doesn't remember Captain, but asks Peggy to dance, to everyone's delight.

Lilian and Jennifer wash up. Lilian reveals that Matt's emptied their joint account! Jennifer admits that Brian thought Matt might be selling some paintings. Lilian can't believe it. What does he need this money for? She'll just have to go round and ask him face to face.

Episode written by Carole Simpson Solazzo.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00lnd6v)
Matt Frei presents an insider guide to the people and the stories shaping America today. Combining location reports with lively discussion and exclusive interviews, the show provides new and surprising insights into contemporary America.

Matt talks to Jane Roe; she gave her name to the most famous legal decision in American history, Roe versus Wade. But now Norma McCorvey is a full-time anti-abortion activist, and she was arrested in the Senate for protesting at the hearings to select Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sottormayor. We hear about her extraordinary journey.

It has stopped raining in Texas, in the worst drought since 1885. Cattle farmers fear they will soon have to slaughter their herds. Why has the rain stopped falling in the Lone Star State?

And how would you like to be told you are a genius and handed half a million dollars? The programme examines the secretive MacArthur Foundation and their 'genius grants'.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b008cnz7)
Blake's Doors of Perception

Waiting for the 'elicopter

Short stories marking the 250th anniversary of William Blake's birth, each inspired by a quote from the great poet.

Written and read by Jack Shepherd.

A group of young boys in Leeds is inspired to prospect for bauxite, convinced by an older lad that the clay can be traded for real guns and ammunition.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00lk9dy)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.

Today editor Ceri Thomas discusses BBC coverage of Afghanistan and we take a look at the surprisingly extensive criminal underworld of Ambridge.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00lmd9d)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00ln09d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ln106)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00ljy2d)
Preserving Pakistan

International leaders have warned that the survival of Pakistan's government could be threatened by Islamic radicals. Owen Bennett-Jones discovers who the radicals are, why they have made such an impact and whether military action alone can ever defeat them.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00lnd6x)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00lnd6z)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including The Call in the Middle of the Night.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00lmd9g)
Lars Von Trier defends his controversial drama Antichrist, which was booed at its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. Duncan Jones talks about his space drama Moon, 70s science fiction, and life with his father David Bowie. Sir Christopher Frayling reviews a Marlene Dietrich documentary and Kissese director Lance Daly reveals the difficulties of working with child actors.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00ln0qz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 20 JULY 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00lnd9w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00lk12r)
Equal Societies - Teddy Bears

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

Research has shown that health and social problems become more acute in an unequal society, where the gap between the richest and poorest is greatest. For most of us, respect is measured in money, and lack of it or low pay tells us that we are worth very little. But given the chance, would we as a society be prepared to rebalance?

Laurie Taylor discusses these issues with Professor Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, authors of The Spirit Level: Why Equal Societies Almost Always So Better, and Sunder Katwala from The Fabian Society, on a new paper on underlying motivation.

Also teddy bears; how did a real hunting story become a political myth which left Theodore Roosevelt forever credited as the namesake of the teddy bear, symbolic of childhood innocence?


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00ln0qv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lndg0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lndjd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lndh3)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00lndm3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lndt5)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Richard Hill.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00lndx8)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.

Bird scarers, the ones which sound a bit like a gunshot, divide opinion, and now the National Farmers Union is revising its advice to farmers on how and when they should be used. They are designed to keep birds off crops, but farmers are now being told to never use the noisy scarers near buildings where people sleep and when it's dark.

Charlotte investigates whether the gloom in the dairy industry is over, after news that 97 per cent of Dairy Farmers of Britain producers have now found new buyers for their milk.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00lny44)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00lnfk9)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Edward Stourton.

Liberal Democrat treasury spokesman Vince Cable talks about his own party's proposals to reform the system of financial regulation.

Professor Steve Field tries to clarify the risks of swine flu to pregnant mothers.

Head of Policy at NSPCC Diana Sutton explains why abused children often have to wait for counselling.

Marcus Allen, the British publisher of Nexus - a magazine which deals with the paranormal - and Professor Martin Ward, Head of Physics at Durham University, discuss the conspiracy theories surrounding the moon landings.

Sarah Montague describes the strategy the British army has taken in Afghanistan and examines how well it is working on the ground.

Iain Logie Baird explains how televisions of any age can be made ready for the switch to digital television.

Thought for the Day with Canon Dr Alan Billings, an Anglican priest.

Damian McBride has gone public and explained the nature of working at Downing Street. Former special adviser at Downing Street Lance Price comments on Mr McBride's revelations.

Health Secretary Andy Burnham outlines his plans for a swine flu advice service and clarifies the risk to pregnant women and children.

Journalist Sam Smith looks back at the life of Frank McCourt, author of bestseller Angela's Ashes, who has died of cancer in a New York hospice aged 78.

Kevin Connolly visited the latest venture in pet care: Pet Airways.

Business Secretary Lord Mandelson explains how investment in car manufacturer Nissan could secure the future of at least 4,000 workers.

Entertainment reporter Colin Paterson has been speaking to music professor Jonathan Pieslack, who has been examining the effects of music on soldiers in the Iraq war.

A crowd control tactic known as 'kettling', which has been used by the police, is under scrutiny. Lawyer Louise Christian explains the tactic.

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Anthony Lester explains the problems he sees with the constitutional reform bill.

Law Professor Patrick McAuslan and Aminullah Habibi from Afghanistan examine the strategy of the British army in Afghanistan.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00lny46)
Andrew Marr sets the cultural agenda for the week.

He is joined by the former cabinet minister James Purnell on the future of the Left in Britain, the writer Hanif Kureishi on the theatre adaptation of his novel The Black Album, doctor David Haslam on a cultural history of obesity and Tristram Stuart on wastefulness.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00lnfkc)
In the Valley of Mist

Episode 1

Fenella Woolgar reads from Justine Hardy's account of the lives of ordinary people who have lived in the disputed territory of Kashmir through 20 years of conflict.

Mohammad Dar's family and Rafiq, a Hindu tailor, reveal how the early days of the conflict changed the shape of their everyday lives, and also their futures.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00lnfxk)
Gloria Hunniford; Anna Del Conte; Elizabeth Watts

Broadcaster Gloria Hunniford on angels. Plus, cook Anna Del Conte on the food of her childhood; and rising opera star Elizabeth Watts on the demands of a performing career.


MON 11:00 Planning for Pandemic (b00lqcll)
With access to the Health Protection Agency, Winifred Robinson follows the work of doctors, scientists and officials as they attempt to limit possible damage from the swine flu pandemic.

The programme goes behind the scenes with health professionals at the Health Protection Agency as they coordinate a national response to the flu pandemic. Data comes in from around the world to be interpreted and used to inform decisions that are likely to affect all of us.

The HPA's hope is that a vaccine can be developed by autumn, and so in regional flu centres, health service volunteers are being trained to deal with hundreds of calls from those suspected of having the virus.

All the information is being coordinated on a national database called Welcome to Flu Zone, which tracks how the UK moved from attempts at containment to a policy of mitigating the effects of the virus on those most vulnerable to it.

In Australia, with the flu season well underway, a policy of containment has been quickly abandoned in the face of a pressing need for treatment as cases increase. In makeshift medical centres, doctors are taking samples from people turning up sick and the virus is spreading fast.

A major concern is that swine flu will recombine in those with seasonal flu, thereby unleashing a far more virulent strain that might reach us just as schools reopen and the weather cools.


MON 11:30 Hazelbeach (b00lny4b)
Series 2

Film

An unsuitable film is made and Nick has a whirlwind romance.

Caroline and David Stafford's comedy about likeable conman Ronnie Hazelbeach starring Jamie Forman.

Ronnie Hazelbeach.... Jamie Foreman
Nick..........Paul Bazely
James.........Neil Stuke
Polly........... Lizzy Watts
Berlin Phil....... Stephen Hogan

Director: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00lnfy0)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00lng42)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00lng6n)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Round Britain Quiz (b00lny4d)
Tom Sutcliffe chairs the cryptic general knowledge quiz, featuring the defending champions, the Midlands, taking on the south of England.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00kwn9v)
Clarrie's over the moon at winning first prize for most imaginative interpretation at the flower festival.

Lilian's feeling wretched. She's let Matt down when he most needed her support. After spending the night at Adam's, the Dower House now feels unbearably quiet to her. Worried that Matt may have reached breaking point, she's inconsolable and spends the day leaving messages, begging him to come home.

Fallon's set everything up for Tom and Brenda's engagement party. All goes well but Brenda gets upset when she learns it was Vicky's idea for an announcement in the Echo with photos of Brenda and Tom as children. Brenda's annoyed when she sees Vicky with her hands all over Mike on the dance floor. But she and Tom couldn't be happier.

Mike and Vicky leave early and Mike impulsively proposes to her under the stars. She replies with a convincing yes, yes, yes.

Lilian seeks out Adam at the party. She wants to spend another night at his. She's convinced that either something's happened to Matt, or he doesn't want to see her again, so either way she's lost him. She doesn't know how she can live without him and doesn't know what she's going to do.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


MON 14:15 Drama (b00lc9ff)
The King of Sootland

By Richard Hurford. In the early days of Queen Victoria's reign, a boy and a teenage girl - who he assumes to be a new maidservant but is in fact the young Victoria - go on an adventure through the chimneys of Buckingham Palace.

Queen Victoria ...... Daisy Marsden
Boy Cotton ...... Aidan Parsons
Duchess Of Kent ...... Olwen May
Sir John Conroy ...... Jonathan Keeble
Mr Diggle ...... Malcolm Raeburn

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00ln0b7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 The Inconstant Moon (b00lnkb2)
The Women's Moon

Forty years after the Apollo 11 landing, author Jeanette Winterson offers a series of reflective readings about the moon.

Why the male-conquered moon is still a woman's moon.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00ln1b5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00lny4g)
Ernie Rea and guests discusses whether the internet is a gift to humanity or a threat to civilized values. Is there a place for virtual churches or synagogues online, or are such attempts simply data connections between like-minded people? To what extent are real-world relationships threatened by virtual relationships, internet addiction and constant interruptions from mobile phones, emails and online communities?


MON 17:00 PM (b00lnknr)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00lnkq5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b00lny4j)
Series 51

Episode 6

The perennial antidote to panel games comes from the Theatre Royal in Newcastle, with Rob Brydon taking on the chairman's role from the late Humphrey Lyttelton.

Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined by Phill Jupitus.

With Colin Sell at the piano.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00lng7p)
Roy's helping Phoebe make a welcome home banner for Mike and "Grandma Vicky". Hayley returns and Roy gets ready to leave. Roy tells Hayley there aren't any spare tickets for Brenda's graduation. Hayley understands. Roy asks Hayley if she thinks Vicky will too? Hayley can't see why not.

Ruth phones Adam. Why don't they organise Eddie to do some milking for them, so David can drive the combine? Adam says no. David hasn't driven one for years, or one of that size. Adam just can't risk it.

Lilian goes to the Dower House and lets herself in, much to Matt's surprise. She asks him what he's doing emptying their joint account. What does he need money for? Matt says he's involved in a business deal, importing shoes from India. Lilian's horrified he's involved in something illegal, but Matt's excited by the buzz. Lilian's worried that Matt's not looking after himself. Matt says Lilian will never understand how it feels to have lost everything. But Lilian thinks Matt could end up in prison for even longer. They can make it work, they have each other. Matt refuses to back out of his deal and Lilian sadly says she'll therefore have to close their joint account.

Episode written by Carole Simpson Solazzo.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00lnkqh)
Presented by Kirsty Lang.

Lars von Trier's new film Antichrist is being condemned by many as too distasteful for cinematic release. Charlotte Gainsbourg and Willem Dafoe star as a couple who retreat to a remote cabin in the woods following the death of their young child. Charlotte Gainsbourg discusses the dark nature of the film and the explicit scenes that are causing so much controversy.

Last summer the artist Roger Hiorns transformed a derelict flat in a run-down council block in south-east London into a blue cave, using 75,000 litres of copper sulphate solution. The resulting artwork was Seizure, where the walls, ceiling, floor and bath were covered in razor-sharp blue crystals. Twenty thousand visitors queued around the block to see it before it closed as the council were due to demolish the building. But with the recession, plans have changed and the flat is about to re-open to the public. Roger Hiorns returns to see how well the crystals have survived.

As David Hockney's muse and the partner of Ossie Clark, textile designer Celia Birtwell was one of the 'Northern Bohemians' that invaded British society in the 1960s. With her distinctive prints, she helped to style some of the world's leading fashion icons, including the Beatles, Mick Jagger and Twiggy. Now entering her seventies, she talks about her role as muse, the re-emergence of sixties fashions and her latest challenge: designing a book cover for White's Books' new edition of Wuthering Heights.

Comedy critic for the Sunday Times Stephen Armstrong reviews the annual showcase of new names in stand-up comedy at the Hackney Empire, London, and looks ahead to some of the shows on offer at the Edinburgh Festival.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00lnkr6)
The Help

Episode 1

Dramatisation of Kathryn Stockett's novel set in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1962, about three brave women who dare to cross the racial lines.

Three very different women come together for a clandestine project that will put them all at risk: black maid Aibileen, her closest friend Minny, the best cook in Mississippi, and Skeeter, who is 22 and just home from college.

Aibileen ...... Alibe Parsons
Minny ...... Octavia Spencer
Skeeter ...... Laurel Lefkow
Elizabeth/Celia ...... Lydia Parker
Hilly ...... Madeleine Potter
Miss Walters/Mrs Phelan ...... Debora Weston
Raleigh/Johnny ...... Nathan Nolan
Mae Mobley ...... Edward Prout

Adapted by Penny Leicester.


MON 20:00 Iraq United (b00lny4l)
Hugh Sykes follows the Iraqi football team as they hope to unite their country through football.

In 2007, the team surprised the world by winning the Asian Cup. Thousands celebrated, religious differences were forgotten and a football team united a troubled country. It qualified them for the Confederations Cup in South Africa, a competition that brings together the best teams in the world, including Spain, Italy and Brazil.

Hugh, who has been reporting from Iraq for the past six years, follows the team and their supporters as they compete in Africa's first international football competition. Travelling with the team and supporters as Iraq take on the likes of Spain, Hugh learns the importance of football to Iraqis as a reminder of days past, before sectarianism ripped the country apart.

The team has lost loved ones and faced death threats, but survived the years of abuse and torture they suffered at the hands of Uday Hussein, the eldest son of Saddam who took direct control of the team for a time. After a series of coaching changes and poor performances, the team now faces its biggest test as it hopes to show the world that Iraq remains united, and not only in football.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00lygwz)
Chechnya

A prominent human rights worker called Natalya Estemirova has been shot dead in the Russian republic of Chechnya. She was one of the people interviewed by Lucy Ash during her investigation of the treatment of women in Chechnya.

There are reports of the police failing to investigate the common practice of the abduction of women, and of a series of murders and disappearances of women allegedly because of their immoral lifestyle.

Lucy Ash asks what the uneasy peace there means for Chechen women.


MON 21:00 Give Me the MoonLITE (b00lnycv)
To mark the fortieth anniversary of the moon landings, Richard Hollingham tells the story of the British MoonLITE project and the lunar ambitions and achievements of the other space-exploring nations.

Forty years ago, there was talk of frequent missions, permanent moon bases and even lunar factories. But still only 12 people have walked on the moon and there have been no soft landings since the 1970s. But all that could soon change.

Already, the USA, Europe, China, Japan and India have sent orbiters and there seems to be a rush, if not a race, back to the moon. Leading it, with the first instruments at the lunar poles and far side, could be the UK's MoonLITE mission.

Richard Hollingham discovers how, by using small, low cost components, British space scientists hope to set up a network of instruments to monitor moonquakes and probe the lunar interior and one or more orbiting satellites that could establish communications and navigation systems for other human and robotic missions.

Professor Sir Martin Sweeting of MoonLITE's prime contractor, SSTL, hopes it will be commercial; he likens it to the hoteliers and ironmongers who profited from the Californian gold rush. It will also, he says, give the UK a seat at the table when it comes to selecting international astronauts who might return to the moon.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00lny46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00lnl3r)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00lnl78)
News from a global perspective with Carolyn Quinn.

Reports include:

The government tries to reassure on swine flu
Why were warnings on banking practices not heeded?
Pythons on the loose in Florida
Has the government failed to promote social mobility?
Israel says it will continue to build in East Jerusalem
The brains behind the moon mission.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00lnmxy)
The First Men in the Moon

Episode 1

Tim Pigott-Smith reads from the 1901 novel by HG Wells.

Penniless businessman Mr Bedford meets the brilliant Cavor, an absent-minded scientist on the brink of developing a material that can negate the power of gravity. Cavor soon succeeds in his experiments and tells a stunned Bedford that the invention makes possible one of the oldest dreams of humanity: a journey to the moon.

Abridged by Neville Teller.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00ljzdh)
Chris Ledgard looks into the words we use to talk about music. Is it even possible to pin music down in language? Stuart Maconie thinks we should try, and he talks us through the various genres into which music is categorised.

Where did the word 'jazz' come from? What exactly is 'garage', and how has the meaning of R&B changed so dramatically?

We go to a recording studio to sit in with a band in session, and hear how they communicate their ideas. Chris also talks to Norman Lebrecht about the art of describing classical music.

Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, author of This is Your Brain on Music, talks about his years as a record producer, working with Stevie Wonder and Carlos Santana - who wanted his guitar to sound 'more orange'.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00lnnhw)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



TUESDAY 21 JULY 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00lnd8q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00lnfkc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lnd9y)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lndh5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lndg2)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00lndjg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lndrh)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Richard Hill.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00lndt7)
The UK should not attempt to be self-sufficient in food, according to a government report. The Environment Food and Rural Affairs select committee says doing so would make our own food supplies less secure. And the National Farmers Union explains why taxpayers, not farmers, should pay millions for animal disease.

Anna Hill reports.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00lnfbs)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Edward Stourton.

Commodore Toby Elliott, head of Combat Stress (a charity which looks after former members of the military), discusses NHS care of veterans.

Business editor Robert Peston interviews Robert Stheeman, Chief Executive of the UK Debt Management Office, about the effect of quantitative easing on the sale of government bonds.

Science correspondent Tom Feilden looks at Nasa's plans to return to the moon and beyond.

Chairman of the Commons Culture and Media Committee John Whittingdale discusses what MPs will be asking former News of the World editor Andy Coulson.

Why do so few people from poorer backgrounds end up working in a profession? Mark Easton reflects on a report which explains how young people can boost their ambitions.

Danny Shaw reports on the new play depicting the inquest into the death of Jean Charles de Menezes.

Thought for the Day with Dr Indarjit Singh, director of the Network of Sikh Organisations.

President of the Royal College of Physicians Professor Ian Gilmore explains the story of Gary Reinbach, who was given only a few weeks to live after developing cirrhosis of the liver.

Britain's professions have become more socially exclusive, a report into social mobility suggests. Former cabinet minister Alan Milburn, the author of the report, discusses his findings.

Peter Bowes reports on the experiment to monitor how the forest in Yosemite changes over the generations.

Sarah Montague reports from Afghanistan and talks to General Sir Richard Dannatt about his last journey to Afghanistan before he retires after 40 years of service.

Filmmaker Roger Graef explains why people are more fearful than they used to be.

Health minister Mike O'Brien considers whether the NHS treatment of military veterans 'relies too much on luck and good intentions'.

The novelist Gordon Burn has died aged 61, his agent has confirmed. He had been suffering from cancer. He last appeared on the Today programme when he spoke to Jim Naughtie about his book Born Yesterday: The News As a Novel.

Shaun Bailey, a youth worker and prospective Conservative party candidate for Hammersmith, and Dr Lee Elliot Major discuss whether working class pupils should be given special consideration.


TUE 09:00 Expenses: The MPs' Story (b00lvl1s)
In May 2009, a media cyclone hit Westminster. From duck houses to phantom mortgages, stories of MPs' expense claims dominated the news agenda for weeks. The reputation and integrity of parliamentarians - and indeed our system of democracy - was called into question as never before. Faced with unprecedented public anger, most MPs retreated away from the spotlight, aware that public sympathy for their cause, however just, was going to be hard to come by.

Becky Milligan reports from inside Parliament about what it was like being an MP during this period, caught in the eye of the expenses hurricane. Speaking candidly, MPs reveal the impact the crisis has had on their political and domestic lives. From disillusionment to death threats, the human fallout has been severe.


TUE 09:30 Musical Migrants (b00b4nsn)
Series 1

From New York to Rio de Janeiro

Stories of people who relocated to other countries, influenced by music.

In the early 90s, Scott Feiner was a successful jazz guitarist on the highly competitive New York circuit before he became disillusioned and gave up. Then he discovered Brazilian music. He became entranced and visited Rio de Janeiro, where a brief encounter changed his life.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00lqnfp)
In the Valley of Mist

Episode 2

Fenella Woolgar reads from Justine Hardy's account of the lives of ordinary people who have lived in the disputed territory of Kashmir through 20 years of conflict.

The fate of the Pandits, the Kashmiri Hindus, many of whom were forced to flee the valley as the conflict took hold.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00lnfsf)
Marketing women's sports; The Pre-Raphaelites

Why is women's sport overlooked? Plus, the women who inspired the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood; and the enduring appeal of beach huts.


TUE 11:00 The Chambers (b00lnzq9)
Episode 1

Radio 4 goes behind the elegant facades of legal London to meet the barristers, clerks and staff of one of the capital's leading Chambers as they prepare for the biggest upheaval in their history, the implementation of the 2007 Legal Services Act. "If you're looking for somebody to fight on your side you're not looking for the biggest brain-on-a-stick in the world but who can't argue their way out of a bus queue. You need somebody who's going to fight your corner!" Richard is a leading QC who's fought court battles in some of the highest profile cases of the past twenty years, and he reckons the changes will leave some more traditional people in the law reeling, and possible out of a job. For his part, he's determined that his Chambers wont get left behind.

This is the context for two programmes that paint an intimate portrait of life behind the elegant faÃade of Outer Temple Chambers, to which Radio 4 was last year granted exceptional access. From Barristers's Clerk Nick from Canvey Island, who joined Chambers at 18 - "what you see on the TV, the court stuff, it's not what actually goes on behind closed doors. In the backroom, it's hard work!" - to Cara who's nine months pregnant; how will she balance the demands of her high powered life as a barrister with those of a new mother? "Anarchy will rule!"

And then there's Christine, Commercial Director: "I have a habit of being a thorn in the side of organisations; I can't help it. If I see something that I think is wrong I just can't help myself. And sometimes it's good, and sometimes it causes me more problems than I care to think about!"

Producer: Simon Elmes.


TUE 11:30 Macavity's Not There: TS Eliot in the 21st Century (b00lp043)
TS Eliot may be regarded by some as the most significant poet in the English language over the past 100 years, but how much does he mean to modern readers? As a major project begins to edit everything he wrote, author and critic Michael Alexander explores where Eliot, and poetry in general, stand in national culture.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00lnfxm)
Call You and Yours

Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.

Chief Medical Officer, Sir Liam Donaldson join us to take your calls on swine flu.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00lnfzy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00lng44)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 From Dots to Downloads - Tune-Books on the Web (b00lp15m)
People have always gathered the music they like in custom-made collections. Before iPods and downloads there were cassette compilations, and before recordings, tune-books. These are small manuscript books people carried in their pockets or instrument cases. Thomas Hardy and John Clare both had them. Now, all over the country, tune books are being unearthed. They date from the 1690s to the 1860s and belonged mostly to artisans - shoemakers, papermakers - but some have been found in manor houses, such as Prideaux Place in Padstow. The music they contain ranges as widely, too. Tim van Eyken, award-winning young singer and squeezebox player, reveals how today's musicians are rediscovering these manuscripts, and sharing them - in the way musicians always have, but nowadays online - so, all over the world, people are playing these tunes once again in an ongoing global virtual session.

In Dorchester Tim van Eyken meets the musicians Bonny Sartin and Colin Thompson to consider the importance of music to him, pore over Hardy's tune book, and to play some of the tunes he loved on Hardy's own fiddle (an interesting instrument with a lions' head carved on the scroll).

Tim hears from Johnny Adams of the Village Music Project which researches, catalogues and makes these tune books available online. He reveals their importance historically as one of the few sources of information about the cultural lives of working people, and how they spent their leisure time.

Colin Thompson also plays from the recently discovered and exquisite tune-book of Benjamin Rose, a farmer who began collecting tunes he liked in 1820, when he was a single man of 24 - he went on to have five children, who have left their mark on his book, too. Tim also looks at tune book of William Winter, who was a shoe-maker from the Quantocks, and some of whose collection he has recorded.

These tune books are musically very revealing, too. Several pieces are common to collections from distant regions, and some have been copied from published sources. Those that remain aside from survive from the indigenous musical tradition of the area where the tune book was used. Tim talks to Mike O'Connor in Cornwall, who has found five tune books, learned a good deal about Cornish music from them, and heard it being played there - and elsewhere - again.

Tim goes to Greenwich University to meet Dr Chris Walshaw, lecturer in Maths and Computing (and in demand as a musician - he plays French bagpipes). He demonstrates the simple form of notation he invented that makes is easy to put tunes on the internet using an ordinary keyboard. There's software that turns it into conventional music on a stave and allows you to hear the tune. There are now thousands of tunes available online, and Walshaw's website has had more than 100,000 hits from all over the world - including Timbuctoo.

'From Dots to Downloads' explores how these tune-books, which have been a valuable resource to historians are reverting to their original purpose. Now, using the latest technology young players are accessing them, playing the old tunes once again, and bringing their modern musical sensibilities to bear on them. So Laurel Swift of the band Gadarene brings to bear the techniques of modern dance music, the kind of work the Chemical Brothers do, on centuries old country dance music.

Tim van Eyken puts it all to the test: he accesses a tune from one of the old books online, made by one Henry Atkinson in 1694, and with bouzouki player James Fagan spends a morning in a BBC studio learning and working on it, then performing their arrangement to end the programme.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00lng7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 McLevy (b00nhw1f)
Series 5

Picture of Innocence

The Victorian detective probes a high court judge's murder, as his allegedly cheating wife claims her innocence. With Brian Cox.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00lp15p)
Richard Daniel and a panel discuss listeners' questions. On the panel are Dr Ros Taylor of Kingston University, Professor Denis Murphy of the University of Glamorgan, and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist at the University of London.

Is planting German oaks in British woods likely to be a problem?

Has anyone shown the relationship between individual wealth and the emission of greenhouse gases?

Why do cold oceans support more life than warm seas?

Can we plant more forests to reduce the risk of flooding?

Do large animals have bigger cells than smaller ones, or do they have more of the same size?

Plus a request for your observations of House Martins - have they returned in 2009, and have they bred successfully?

Home Planet will visit the British Birdwatching Fair at Rutland Water to record a programme on the evening of Friday 21 August. Listeners are invited to come to the recording, and if you want to ask a question, please let the programme know in advance by clicking on the Contact Us link above.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lp15r)
Stories with Latitude

I Drink Nothing

Emma Kennedy's memories of accompanying her parents to hear the Rolling Stones at a rock festival when she was nine offer a hilarious child's eye-view of the event, from the sanitary facilities and the inaccessibility of the ice-cream van to the motley crowd of festival goers, the sight of a male streaker and the thrilling arrival of Mick Jagger strutting onto the stage.

Producer Sara Davies.


TUE 15:45 The Inconstant Moon (b00lnk9t)
The Earth's Moon

Forty years after the Apollo 11 landing, author Jeanette Winterson offers a series of reflective readings about the moon.

The moon's imprint on our crops, our weather and our tides.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b00lp2hl)
Chris Ledgard considers the use of words to control minds, exploring hypnosis, brainwashing and the recruiting language of cults to find out just how influenced we are by language.

Chris is put into an altered state of consciousness by the soothing words of a hypnotherapist, to find out what kind of words are used to do this and how. Some in the medical profession are calling for hypnosis to be used for pain relief during medical procedures such as bone marrow transplantation and cancer treatment. They say that as hypnosis has no side effects it makes the operation quicker, the recovery faster and the cost less than with the use conventional anaesthetic. But does it really work, and if so, how? Chris talks to the scientists currently working on a systematic review to find out.

Can talk also be used to control and manipulate us into doing things that we would otherwise not do? Stories of people being indoctrinated into cults usually involve descriptions of brainwashing, corruption and manipulation. But are words really powerful enough to control the mind? Chris talks to an ex-cult member turned rhetorical theorist about how language is used.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00lp2hn)
Alys Fowler and Professor Athene Donald

Gardener and broadcaster Alys Fowler and physicist Professor Athene Donald join Kate Mosse to discuss favourite paperbacks by Desmond King-Hele, MFK Fisher and Douglas Kennedy.

Erasmus Darwin: A Life of Unequalled Achievement by Desmond King-Hele
Publisher: Giles de la Mare

The Gastronomical Me by MFK Fisher
Publisher: North Point Press

The Woman in the Fifth by Douglas Kennedy
Publisher: Arrow

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00lnklr)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00lnknt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


TUE 18:30 Laurence & Gus: Hearts and Minds (b00lp2hq)
Series 2

Episode 2

Comedians Laurence Howarth and Gus Brown are joined by Kate Fleetwood, Isy Suttie and Duncan Wisbey, in this sketch show about all things heartfelt and mind-thought.

This week: lying and honesty


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00lng6q)
Insomniacs Lynda and Elizabeth are out for a dawn walk on Lakey Hill, talking about Coriander's baby. Elizabeth gives Lynda a few pregnancy tips to pass on. Lynda asks Elizabeth if she's noticed the memorial garden's overgrown? Something needs to be done. Lynda invites Elizabeth for breakfast. They talk about Roy and Hayley's difficult childcare arrangements and agree they should have something formal organised. Lynda thinks Vicky will be an asset to the community. And Lynda might be able to pass on some stepmother advice.

Fallon startles Jazzer who's delivering milk to the Bull. Fallon's despondent about her search for a guitarist. Jazzer tells her to keep looking. What else is she going to do?

At the shop, Jazzer tells Annette he's worried that if the Lies split, there'll be no roadie work for him. Annette says he needs cheering up. They could go for a drink? Jazzer says he needs a night out with the boys.

Fallon calls in to the shop. Annette notices she's buying things to cheer herself up. Jazzer appears again. Annette tells him Fallon's upset, so Jazzer says he'll take Fallon out. Annette reluctantly wishes them a nice night together.

Episode written by Carole Simpson Solazzo.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00lnkq7)
Arts news and reviews.

Tony Scott's first action movie was Top Gun in 1986 with Tom Cruise. His latest is a new version of the 1974 New York subway heist film The Taking of Pelham 123, featuring John Travolta as a disgruntled hijacker who takes a subway train full of hostages and Denzel Washington as the transport operator who gets dragged into a game of cat-and-mouse. Northumberland-born director Tony Scott discusses his approach to dynamic film-making.

Chair of judges Simon Frith discusses the shortlist for this year's Mercury Prize for Best Album. Florence and the Machine, Kasabian and Bat for Lashes are the favourites to win the 20,000 pound prize, voted for by industry experts and critics.

Actor Peter Bowles discusses theatrical competitiveness, mumbling on stage and balancing a career which has spanned television comedies such as To The Manor Born and The Irish RM, to the stage with Anthony Shaffer's Sleuth, Simon Gray's The Old Masters and Alan Ayckbourn's Absent Friends.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00lsq6v)
The Help

Episode 2

Dramatisation of Kathryn Stockett's novel set in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1962, about three brave women who dare to cross the racial lines.

Skeeter tries to find out what has happened to her beloved maid Constantine, and Minny settles into her new position as Celia Foote's help.

Aibileen ...... Alibe Parsons
Minny ...... Octavia Spencer
Skeeter ...... Laurel Lefkow
Elizabeth/Celia ...... Lydia Parker
Hilly ...... Madeleine Potter
Miss Walters/Mrs Phelan ...... Debora Weston
Raleigh/Johnny ...... Nathan Nolan
Mae Mobley ...... Edward Prout

Adapted by Penny Leicester.


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00lp32g)
Corporate Fraudsters

Fraud is estimated to cost the UK economy upwards of 14 billion pounds a year, a figure which is expected to rise dramatically during the recession. Gerry Northam investigates whether some of the biggest and most audacious corporate fraudsters are now practically immune from prosecution.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00lp32j)
Peter White with news and information for the blind and partially sighted.

We test a selection of new gismos from the Sight Village exhibition of technology for visually-impaired people. Our gadget guru, Ian Macrae, takes a closer look at a labelling 'pen' which promises to help you sort your peas from your peaches, among other things.

Also we go behind the microphone with the blind and partially-sighted radio students at Redstone FM when they go live on air for the very first time. Reporter Johnny Cassidy visits the Redhill radio station which pledged to offer these opportunities as part of its licence application to Ofcom.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00lp32l)
Communication

Dr Mark Porter explores how to improve communication between the medical profession and patients.

There are always times when a diagnosis is bad news or a treatment has failed. Some doctors have an excellent bedside manner and can talk about the worst with compassion, but there are many who don't naturally have that skill. Mark Porter joins cancer specialist Dr Pauline Leonard as she runs a course for other cancer doctors to train them to give bad news in a more caring way. He finds out if doing role play with actors can change senior specialists' approaches to patients.

The experience of being in hospital and undergoing lots of procedures can be daunting for anyone, but particularly for children. They may not understand what the doctors and nurses are telling them. The Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in London is giving each child who is having an operation an age-appropriate DVD that explains what is going to happen to them. The youngest children receive a cartoon and the older ones are given a film presented by other children who have been through the operation in question. Mark talks to the children and the paediatric medical teams to see if the scheme is working.

And what happens when patients or their families don't understand English well? Mark sits in on a consultation with an advocate who has to translate both the language and the medical terms.


TUE 21:30 Expenses: The MPs' Story (b00lvl1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00lnkws)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00lnl3t)
News from a global perspective with Carolyn Quinn.

There are new clashes in Iran between protestors and riot police.

The head of the US Federal Reserve assesses the state of the US economy.

Has independence made any difference to daily life in Kosovo?

A new website reveals the soldiers who fought in Medieval times.

Why a crucial report on the future of Guantanamo Bay has been delayed.

Could Malaysia's controversial ethnic policies be under threat?


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00lnnhk)
The First Men in the Moon

Episode 2

Tim Pigott-Smith reads from the 1901 novel by HG Wells.

Cavor and Bedford travel to the moon in a sphere covered with a new material that blocks the effect of gravity, and they encounter a strange new world and new life forms.

Abridged by Neville Teller.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Arthur Smith's Balham Bash (b00lp32n)
Series 1

Episode 3

Arthur Smith invites an audience into his home in Balham, south London, for music and comedy.

With comedians Nat Luurtsema, Seann Walsh and Micky Flanagan.

In the kitchen, Arthur learns a thing or two about rock n' roll from guest band Alabama 3 (responsible for the theme tune to The Sopranos).

Pippa Evans - as singer-songwriter Loretta Maine - lends a hand.

Producers: Sam Michell and Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00lnnhm)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Susan Hulme.



WEDNESDAY 22 JULY 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00lnd8s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00lqnfp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lndb0)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lndh7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lndg4)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00lndjj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lndrk)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Richard Hill.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00lndt9)
As one of Britain's largest vegetable growers goes into administration, there are calls for retailers to pay farmers more for home-grown fruit and veg. Plus, with one kilo of beef taking 16,000 litres of water to produce, there could soon be a new water label added to our food. Anna Hill reports.


WED 06:00 Today (b00lnfbv)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Edward Stourton.

Economist Simon Kirby considers research that predicts heavy cuts in spending in addition to a rise in taxes over the following four years, to mitigate the significant debt.

Amnesty International UK Campaigns Director Tim Hancock explains why a report describes Saudi Arabia's human rights record as 'shocking' and 'dire'.

Lord Jopling discusses whether piracy and money laundering are financing terrorism.

Barrister Sheikh Faiz-Ul-Aqtab Siddiqi and Dr Denis MacEoin, a former lecturer in Islamic studies, discuss why someone who does not belong to a particular religion would choose to use a service which uses that faith's law.

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is beginning a four-day visit to the US. Gabriel Gatehouse reports from Baghdad on what the talks are likely to focus on. Dr John Nagl discusses what the relationship is like between the US and Iraq.

Sanjoy Majumder reports on the longest total solar eclipse of the century.

Thought for the day with The Right Reverend James Jones, Bishop of Liverpool.

Chief Executive of the League Against Cruel Sports Douglas Batchelor and Tim Bonner of the Countryside Alliance discuss whether the law to ban foxhunting should be changed.

Dr Laleh Khalili discusses whether the protests in Iran will eventually die down.

Professor Michael Clarke, director of the Royal United Services Institute, discusses the significance of helicopters to military operations in Afghanistan.

Tony Pilson, who for 30 years has been searching for treasure along the banks of the Thames, takes Ed Stourton out to the river to explain the story of how the artefacts were collected.

Headteacher Len Holman and Shami Chakrabarti of Liberty discuss whether it is right for schools to use technology to monitor students.

Keith Bristow, of ACPO, discusses the Home Office figures which show that although the total number of knife crime offences has fallen, the number of deaths has risen slightly.

Pakistan has been hit by a wave of protests against a severe shortage of electricity. International development correspondent David Loyn reports.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00lp5gn)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests Ben MacFarlane, Chris Barber, Maurice Gran and Rosalind Wyatt.

Ben MacFarlane is a doctor who started carrying out medical repatriations in 2001. His book Holiday SOS follows him as he flies around the world, patching up Britons in need and bringing them home. It includes stories of the distraught woman in Cairo whose romantic break turned into a nightmare when she got explosive food poisoning, the 78-year-old grandmother who mistook ecstasy for aspirin in Ibiza and performing life-saving surgery in the aisle of an aeroplane, during turbulence. Holiday SOS: Sun, Sea and Surgery is published by Hodder and Stoughton.

Jazz trombonist Chris Barber celebrates his 60th year as a bandleader in 2009. Inspired by the King Oliver Creole Jazz Band, Chris formed his first Barber New Orleans Band in 1949 at the age of 19 and in 1954 he formed Chris Barber's Jazz Band, which has been one of Europe's most successful traditional jazz bands ever since. This year Chris Barber, Kenny Ball and Acker Bilk reunite for their first live performance in 10 years at Indigo at the O2 and release the album Boater, Bowlers and Bowties on Universal.

Maurice Gran is one half of the successful writing partnership of Marks and Gran, with Laurence Marks. The pair created hit television comedies and other classics including Shine on Harvey Moon, Birds of A Feather, The New Statesman, Goodnight Sweetheart and Love Hurts. Their latest work is the new musical Dreamboats and Petticoats, based on the hit album featuring some of the greatest hit songs of the rock 'n' roll era. Dreamboats and Petticoats is at the Savoy Theatre in London.

Rosalind Wyatt is an artist who works with calligraphy, textile and collage. She has a life-long fascination with text, words and handwriting and her latest body of work, The Stitch Lives of Others Parts 1-3, features three garments chronicling the lives and loves of three generations of her husband's family, the Tukes. She will is exhibiting in the A21 International Art Exhibition at the Harada-no-Mori Museum in Kobe, Japan.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00lqnfc)
In the Valley of Mist

Episode 3

Fenella Woolgar reads from Justine Hardy's account of the lives of ordinary people who have lived in the disputed territory of Kashmir through 20 years of conflict.

Arshad recounts the unsettling memory of an armed attack by militants on his family home.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00lnfsh)
Parents on their children joining the Forces; Abi Grant

Parents' reactions to their children joining the Forces. Plus, Abi Grant on waiving anonymity to talk about the attack that changed her life; and remembering Natalia Estemirova.


WED 11:00 In Living Memory (b00lp6dm)
Series 10

T Dan Smith

Contemporary history series.

T Dan Smith was a political star of the 1960s. As Labour leader of Newcastle city council he had plans to turn the city into the 'Brasilia of the north' through slum clearance, inner city motorways and exciting new industries. In 1974, he was jailed for corruption along with architect John Poulson. But if he was such a crook, why do so many people in the north east still cherish his memory?


WED 11:30 Baggage (b00lp6dp)
Series 4

The Father, the Mother, the Dead Friend and Her Lover

Comedy series by Hilary Lyon, set in Edinburgh.

It's autumn, but life in the flat is still hotting up. An unplanned dinner party sets the scene for some serious seduction tactics, Hector's secret is finally revealed and there is nothing cool about Caroline's temper.

Caroline ...... Hilary Lyon
Fiona ...... Phyllis Logan
Ruth ...... Adie Allen
Roddy ...... Robin Cameron
Hector ...... David Rintoul
Gladys ...... June Watson

Directed by Marilyn Imrie.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00lnfxp)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00lng00)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00lng46)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00lp6dr)
Are women disproportionally affected by ageism on TV?

Founded in 1885 as a 'journal for gentlewomen', The Lady magazine is famous for articles about English gardens, recipes, rules of etiquette and classified ads seeking cooks, butlers and nannies. But with a circulation of 30,000 and an average reader age of 70, it is faced with a dying market. Rachel Johnson has just been appointed its new editor and joins us to talk about her 'fragrant' vision for the magazine.

There is no denying that media advertising has been hard hit by the recession, with traditional formats such as TV suffering the most. However, recent industry reports suggest that the worst is now over; marketing budgets are still being cut, but at a slower rate than earlier in the year. But what will the post-recession marketing landscape look like and can the more traditional forms of advertising in print and on TV compete with more innovative internet marketing? Steve is joined by Patrick Barwise from the London Business School, Amanda Andrews, media editor at the Telegraph, and Irfon Watkins from the web-based creative agency Coull.com.

Legendary news anchor Walter Cronkite, who was the face and voice of the CBS evening news for nearly two decades, has died, aged 92. What legacy did he leave for the US media?


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00lng6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00lp85p)
Chronicles of Ait

By Michael Butt. In the east coast settlement of Ait, a young girl is upsetting a normal life with her claims to second sight. Psychologist Alice Pyper arrives with tried-and-tested solutions but finds that what works elsewhere is dangerously ineffectual in Ait.

Linus Scott ...... Greg Wise
Alice Pyper ...... Hattie Morahan
Linny Custer ...... Lydia Fewell
Maddie Custer ...... Lisa Ellis
Mrs Flowers ...... Patience Tomlinson
Alan ...... Bruno Skapensky

Directed by John Taylor

A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00lp85r)
Paul Lewis and guests answer listeners' personal finance questions on the subject of divorce and separation. He is joined by Liz Welsh, Chair of the Scottish Family Law Association; Janet Tresman, a consultant at Piper Smith Watton; and Simon Piggot, a partner at Levison, Meltzer, Piggot.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lpp9g)
Stories with Latitude

Scott Hardy's Queensway Sessions

PHOTOGRAPHER REUBEN CANTARINI BECOMES OBSESSED WITH THE WORK OF A BRILLIANT MUSICIAN CALLED SCOTT HARDY, WHOSE MUSIC ONLY EXISTS ON THE INTERNET UNTIL REUBEN CLANDESTINELY TAPES A PRIVATE SESSION. WHEN HARDY'S DEATH IS ANNOUNCED, HIS CULT FOLLOWING GROWS. REUBEN NEVER DIVULGES THE EXISTENCE OF HIS BOOTLEG RECORDING UNTIL AN EMAIL FROM ANOTHER MUSIC COLLECTOR STARTS TO UNRAVEL THE MYSTERY OF HIS HERO'S DEATH.

Producer Sara Davies.


WED 15:45 The Inconstant Moon (b00lnk9w)
The Magic Moon

Forty years after the Apollo 11 landing, author Jeanette Winterson offers a series of reflective readings about the moon.

Jeanette wonders at spells and futurology, alchemy and broomsticks.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00lpc8f)
Black Girls and British Education - Roads

Most of the research into black children's experience in British education has focused on the underachievement of boys, whereas black girls are thought to be doing well. However, new research from Heidi Mirza at the Institute of Education shows that, far from being served well by the system, black girls are having to make huge efforts to overcome obstacles to their advancement and are still falling behind white girls and boys. Laurie Taylor hears about supplementary schools, retaking GCSEs and entrenched attitudes from largely white teaching staff.

Laurie also hears about the secret history of roads. Joe Moran calls them, 'the most commonly-viewed and least-contemplated landscape in Britain'. He tells Laurie how our motorways are built on pulped remaindered literature and that migratory birds use our system as tools for their navigation.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00lp32l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00lnklt)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00lnknw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 4 in a Field (b00lpc8h)
Stand-up comedy hosted by Australian comic Adam Hills, featuring the best comic talent at the 2009 Latitude Festival, including Stephen K Amos, Janeane Garofalo, Rob Rouse and Rob Deering.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00lng6s)
Lilian has a terrible headache and is going back to bed. Jennifer returns from the farmers' market, gasping for a cuppa. Adam tells her to take one up to Lilian, who doesn't look well.

Lilian confirms that she's closed the account. She tells Jennifer about Matt's new business deal. Matt just didn't understand her concerns; it was like talking to a stranger. Jennifer says maybe he'll come to his senses but Lilian thinks it's over.

Roy rings Tom. He won't be at nets as he's working. Tom's tempted to skip it as he's so busy but Roy thinks it isn't worth risking Adam's wrath. Roy says that Mike's just rung. He and Vicky will be back around five pm. Tom says he'll be there.

On their way to Willow Cottage, Brenda says Tom being late made her think she'd have to go on her own. Tom says he'd never let her down. Everyone gathers at Willow Cottage and Phoebe's so excited. Mike carries Vicky over the threshold, and they're delighted to find everyone waiting. They all raise their glasses and Mike begins a speech, but Vicky interrupts with her own. They're going to be so happy there.

Episode written by Carole Simpson Solazzo.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00lnkq9)
Arts news and reviews.

Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds star in the new comedy The Proposal, about a high-powered publisher who forces her assistant to marry her so that she can avoid deportation. Their plan goes awry as they travel to Alaska to meet his family. Natalie Haynes reviews the film.

Hanif Kureishi's novel The Black Album is set in 1989, the year when the fatwa was issued against Salman Rushdie and Prince was in the music charts. In a co-production between the National Theatre and Tara Arts, Kureishi has now created a stage version of his story about a young Asian student who finds his ideals and ambitions challenged when he meets a group of anti-racists and radical Muslims at college. Critic Sarfraz Manzoor reviews the play.

The American thriller writer Jeffery Deaver has created a fictional blog - The Chilton Report - with online clues to accompany his latest thriller featuring Special Agent Kathryn Dance. Roadside Crosses features a series of victims' graves marked with crosses and a criminal who inhabits the cyber world. Deaver discusses the influence of changing technology on crime fiction. Roadside Crosses is out in hardback from tomorrow.

The British actress Haydn Gwynne is currently on Broadway starring in Billy Elliot The Musical in a role which has involved her learning to skip and tapdance at the same time, and working with a lot of children. She talks about the difference between US and UK audiences and how a 1984 Geordie mining strike is more relevant to Americans today than ever.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00lsq6n)
The Help

Episode 3

Dramatisation of Kathryn Stockett's novel set in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1962, about three brave women who dare to cross the racial lines.

Skeeter pursues her potentially explosive idea for a book about the daily lives of black maids in Jackson. But will anyone agree to be interviewed?

Aibileen ...... Alibe Parsons
Minny ...... Octavia Spencer
Skeeter ...... Laurel Lefkow
Elizabeth/Celia ...... Lydia Parker
Hilly ...... Madeleine Potter
Miss Walters/Mrs Phelan ...... Debora Weston
Raleigh/Johnny ...... Nathan Nolan
Mae Mobley ...... Edward Prout

Adapted by Penny Leicester.


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00lpc9l)
Michael Buerk chairs a debate on the moral questions behind the week's news. Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Clifford Longley and Matthew Taylor cross-examine witnesses.

The Moral Maze considers 'the holiday'.

It's that time of year when we can't wait to get away from work for a couple of weeks. Our one opportunity a year to jet off to far-flung and exotic destinations spewing carbon all over the place, where the human rights record is often appalling, to be waited on hand and foot by some poor waiter who is only paid a couple of dollars a day and to stay in a hotel where their idea of an environmental policy is to take our rubbish to a landfill for local people to pick over it, rather than dumping it at sea.

Is it time we re-calculated the true cost of that self indulgent holiday? Should we stay at home to help the UK economy? And should we think of improving the mind rather than our tan?

The witnesses are:

Leo Hickman
Author of The Final Call: In Search of the True Cost of our Holidays

James Panton
Manifesto Club; Campaign to Celebrate the Freedom of Flying

Cole Moreton
Journalist, currently writing a book about Englishness

Jonathan Lorie
Director of Travellers Tales Festival, an international festival of travel writing and photography.


WED 20:45 The Call in the Middle of the Night (b00lpc9z)
Episode 2

Who makes the decision to wake presidents and prime ministers in the middle of the night to tell them bad news? Jonathan Powell, Tony Blair's former chief of staff, interviews key advisers to American presidents and British prime ministers to find out whether it is better to wake the leader or let sleeping politicians lie.


WED 21:00 A Life With ... (b00lpkd7)
Series 5

Loons

Writer and naturalist Paul Evans goes to Maine to meet David Evers, a conservation biologist who has spent a life with loons, the enigmatic bird of northern lakes known in the UK as the Great Northern Diver.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00lp5gn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00lnkwv)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00lnl3x)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

US vice president Biden's message to Georgia's president.

Comparing British and American capability in Afghanistan.

How an earthquake brought Australia and New Zealand closer together.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00lnng2)
The First Men in the Moon

Episode 3

Tim Pigott-Smith reads from the 1901 novel by HG Wells.

The intrepid explorers encounter advanced, intelligent beings on the moon, but it is a meeting of worlds that proves far from harmonious.

Abridged by Neville Teller.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Act Your Age (b00fr1tp)
Series 1

Episode 2

Simon Mayo discovers which generation is the funniest. With Jon Richardson, Lucy Porter and Roy Walker. From December 2008.


WED 23:30 Whatever Happened To The Working Class (b00hkl7g)
From Engels to Oasis

Sarfraz Manzoor examines the forces that have had an impact on the traditional 'working class' in Britain. After a decade of supposed 'classlessness', the issue of class is back on the agenda. Once again, it matters if you identify yourself as working class, especially, it seems, if you are white.

Sarfraz visits Manchester, the site of the world's first industrial proletariat, where he spent his student years, to examine the origins and the modern reality of the working class.

Featuring contributions from Hazel Blears MP, photographer Shirley Baker, Leslie Holmes of Salford Lads' Club, author Andrew Davies, football fan Colin Hendry, historian Selina Todd and resident of the Gorton area of Manchester Audrey Hurley.



THURSDAY 23 JULY 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00lnd8v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00lqnfc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lndb2)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lndh9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lndg6)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00lndjl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lndrm)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Richard Hill.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00lndtc)
Hundreds of farmers who supplied MBMG with fruit and vegetables have lost a buyer, as it goes into administration. It sold the produce to wholesalers, processors and the catering service. Anna Hill speaks to one farmer who says it will affect both farmers and other rural workers.

And in the week when a report by the Environment Food and Rural Affairs Committee calls on British farmers to grow more, just how realistic are plans for food security in the UK?


THU 06:00 Today (b00lnfbx)
Presented by Sarah Montague and James Naughtie.

Reporter Andrew Hosken investigates how the UK has coped with previous flu pandemics.

Danny Shaw reports on the allegations that Catherine Crawford, chief executive of the Metropolitan Police Authority, discriminated against black officers and did not carry out duties properly.

Canadian musician Dave Carroll explains his shock at his song about an airline breaking his guitar getting 3.7 million views on YouTube.

Correspondent Jonathan Beale reports on an interview with US Vice-President Joe Biden.

James Naughtie examines the idea of 'happiness economics', the idea that in setting taxes, making social policy and crafting public services the aim should be to promote well-being.

Frances Harris of the British Library discusses the release of an autobiographical account of the life of Russian spy Anthony Blunt.

Thought for the Day with the Reverend Angela Tilby, Vicar of St Bene't's Church in Cambridge.

Lib Dem MP Phil Willis and Sir David King discuss whether scientific research should be central to government policy.

Medical correspondent Fergus Walsh and Dr Laurence Buckman discuss the introduction of the National Flu Service.

President Barack Obama has defended his plans for health reform in a news conference broadcast live in the US. Sidney Blumenthal, a long time adviser to the Clintons, explains the pledge to push through a reform by the end of the year.

Technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones reports on whether Spinvox is capable of converting voice messages into text messages.

Author John Banville and MI6 historian Professor Christopher Andrew discuss the life of Cambridge don, Soviet spy and keeper of the Queen's pictures: Anthony Blunt.

Dr Dick Shaw explains how a new bug could halt the progress of the invasive Japanese knotweed plant.

Residents of Chicago have been gathering to remember the notorious 1930s bank robber John Dillinger. Kevin Connolly joins the commemorations and considers whether the criminals of the Great Depression were heroes or villains.

Should today's politicians and generals revisit the early 19th Century thinker on war, Carl von Clausewitz, for inspiration in Afghanistan? Brigadier Allan Mallinson and Professor Jeremy Black discuss.


THU 09:00 Inside the Ethics Committee (b00lpkfb)
Series 5

Transplant

Joan Bakewell discusses the thorny ethical issues in the real life case of a young woman called Charlotte who needs a kidney transplant.

Since her kidneys failed she has to spend every night attached to a dialysis machine. Dialysis is by no means perfect and her long term outlook is bleak. Doctors do not expect her to be alive in a decade. Her only hope is a kidney transplant from a living donor.

But Charlotte is an extremely high risk patient. She suffers from a severe form of antiphospholipid syndrome or 'sticky blood'. There is a high chance that a transplanted organ will fail if it is transplanted into Charlotte, and she could even lose her life.

Is it ethical to offer Charlotte a kidney transplant? Whether the organ comes from the cadaver waiting list or a live donor, is this the best use of a precious resource when there is a high chance the organ will fail?

Joan Bakewell is joined by a panel of experts to discuss the complex ethical issues arising from the case.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00lqnff)
In the Valley of Mist

Episode 4

Fenella Woolgar reads from Justine Hardy's account of the lives of ordinary people who have lived in the disputed territory of Kashmir through 20 years of conflict.

How the lives of Kashmir's women were altered by the conflict.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00lnfsk)
Breastfeeding health benefits; Sex diaries

What, if any, are the health benefits of breastfeeding? Plus, the life of lepidopterist Lady Eleanor Glanville; and how do couples cope when they have mismatched libidos?


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b00lygvy)
Pakistan

Bill Law investigates if Pakistani youngsters are in danger of joining the ranks of the Taliban or if they are fighting back against the extremists. Two-thirds of the Pakistani population is under the age of 25. In a country under siege from the forces of religious extremism, this youth bulge serves as a ticking time bomb.


THU 11:30 Journey to Armenia: Mandelstam - The Long Desired for Voyage (b00lpl8p)
British writer Toby Litt scours the mountains, lakes and capital city of Armenia for traces of a great forebear, the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam.

Mandelstam visited Armenia in 1930, and during the eight months of his stay rediscovered his long-lost poetic voice and was inspired to write a prose masterpiece, Journey to Armenia. This essay, which is a beautiful, almost Cubist, meditation on the country and its ancient culture, forms the basis of Toby's quest and his dialogue with the dead poet.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00lnfxr)
Consumer news and issues with Shari Vahl. Including Face the Facts, presented by John Waite.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00lng02)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00lng48)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Questions, Questions (b00lpl8r)
Stewart Henderson answers those intriguing questions from everyday life.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00lng6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00lpl8t)
Machado de Assis - A Second Life

Comic drama by Adam Beeson, adapted from a short story by the 19th-century Brazilian writer Machado de Assis. Anxious to avoid all the mistakes in his life, a man appeals to Heaven to allow him to be born again with 'experience'. But in his second life this precious knowledge proves no use at all.

Father Caldos ...... John Bett
Jose Maria ...... Richard Conlon
Dona Clemencia ...... Lucy Paterson
Lucas ...... John Macaulay
Prophet Job ...... Mark McDonnell

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed by Bruce Young.


THU 15:02 Open Country (b00lmpkb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ln106)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00lpp9l)
Stories with Latitude

Grandfather

STEPHEN K AMOS IS BEST KNOWN FOR HIS STAND-UP COMEDY AT THE EDINBURGH FRINGE FESTIVAL, REGULAR APPEARANCES AT THE COMEDY STORE AND A RAFT OF RECENT ACCLAIMED TELEVISION AND RADIO WORK. HE ENDS RADIO 4'S TRIO OF STORIES WITH LATITUDE WITH A SPECIALLY WRITTEN STORY ABOUT HOW A FAMILY HEIRLOOM HAS THE POWER TO TAKE HIM BACK TO HIS CHILDOOD AND A VERY SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP IN HIS LIFE.

PRODUCER SARA DAVIES.


THU 15:45 The Inconstant Moon (b00lnk9y)
The Inconstant Moon

Forty years after the Apollo 11 landing, author Jeanette Winterson offers a series of reflective readings about the moon.

The moon in medieval and Renaissance thought.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00ln2dc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00lpm1s)
Among the cargo Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took to the Moon on Apollo 11 in 1969 was an array of mirrors that are still, 40 years on, at the forefront of science. By bouncing laser beams of light off the mirrors, scientists are now able to measure the Moon's position to an accuracy of one millimetre. They have already shown that the Moon is receding at a speed of nearly four centimetres every year. But with these more precise measurements they can even test whether Einstein got his theory of gravity absolutely right.

An update on how solar scientist Lucie Green fared on her trip to the Pacific to observe the latest total eclipse.

400 years ago, Englishman Thomas Harriot was the first to draw a telescopically-enhanced map of the moon's surface. It is due to go on display as part of the Science Museum's Cosmos and Culture exhibition.

Further out in space, an Australian amateur astronomer has noticed a new spot on Jupiter's tempestuous surface. As the world's biggest telescopes wheel round to have a look, we hear of the similarities with the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levi 9. It seems we missed a big splash this time.

And as Australia begins testing its version of a swine flu vaccine, Quentin finds out how to make a vaccine and what the challenges are of getting one in time for the impending northern hemisphere flu season.


THU 17:00 PM (b00lnklw)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00lnkny)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Shappi Talk (b00lpmz7)
Series 1

Religion

Comedy series in which Shappi Khorsandi examines what it is like growing up in multi-cultural families.

Joining Shappi is Bengali comic Paul Sinha sharing his experiences of religion in his family. Shappi will also be joined by another 'related' guest- and she chats to ex Mayor of London Ken Livingstone.

There'll also be a chance for Shappi to chat with the audience and a song from Hils Barker.

Producer: Paul Russell
An Open Mike Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00lng6v)
Helen pops in at the flat. Annette's there, checking her phone for texts. Helen insists there are other boys out there, but Annette says they're not as hot as Jazzer.

Vicky calls in at Grange Farm. She's brought a snack for Mike, who's delighted. She says she'll cook dinner later. Then they can open their wedding presents together, if he doesn't mind not going to the Bull? Mike doesn't mind at all!

Vicky calls in at the shop for dinner ingredients. Susan thinks teriyaki chicken sounds a bit fancy for Mike, and certainly for Neil, but Vicky says Mike's quite a risk-taker. Annette tells Vicky about Jazzer as Helen appears. Susan tells Helen although Neil's not getting his hopes up, Chris might have found him a pig producer to supply.

Mike's enjoyed his dinner, and he and Vicky start to open their presents. Susan calls in and has a look at what Vicky's done to the place. Susan tells Mike the pig producer's rung and wants thirty weaners a month. They talk about Brenda's graduation. After Susan goes, Vicky says she'd love to come. It would be their first family outing. Mike says he'll talk to Brenda, to see what can be done.

Episode written by Carole Simpson Solazzo.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00lnkqc)
Arts news and reviews.

Critic Alex Clark reviews Rupert Everett's two-part TV documentary about Lord Byron.

Playwright Rebecca Lenkiewicz on her new version of Ibsen's drama, Ghosts.

As the six shortlisted contenders for the RIBA Stirling Prize 2009 are announced, critic Hugh Pearman and architect Gillian Horn discuss whether it should be awarded to older buildings rather than to new ones. The six nominees are:

Fuglsang Kunstmuseum, Denmark by Tony Fretton Architects,

Maggie's Centre, London by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners,

Bodegas Protos, Spain by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners,

Liverpool One Masterplan, Liverpool by BDP,

5 Aldermanbury Square, London by Eric Parry Architects,

Kentish Town Health Centre, London by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris.

Long-running ITV1 drama The Bill is being relaunched at a start time of 9.00pm. Alongside more adult themes and in-depth storylines, the programme's makers have also commissioned a new theme tune. Executive producer Johnathan Young discusses the new-style programme, and composer Big George explains what makes a successful theme tune.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00lsq6q)
The Help

Episode 4

Dramatisation of Kathryn Stockett's novel set in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1962, about three brave women who dare to cross the racial lines.

Aibileen begins to wonder whether she should take part in Skeeter's clandestine writing project, regardless of the risks involved.

Aibileen ...... Alibe Parsons
Minny ...... Octavia Spencer
Skeeter ...... Laurel Lefkow
Elizabeth/Celia ...... Lydia Parker
Hilly ...... Madeleine Potter
Miss Walters/Mrs Phelan ...... Debora Weston
Raleigh/Johnny ...... Nathan Nolan
Mae Mobley ...... Edward Prout

Adapted by Penny Leicester.


THU 20:00 The Report (b00lpp1f)
How is Social Housing Allocated?

British homes for British people: planned changes to the way social housing is allocated would give greater priority to those waiting the longest. Phil Kemp investigates whether this represents a fairer system or 'dog whistle' politics.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00lpr3j)
Let's Start a Bank

Now might be a very good time to start a brand new bank, unencumbered by the toxic loans and the government bailouts of most of the old ones. Peter Day finds out from the experts how to start a bank as well as how not to do it.


THU 21:00 Inside the Ethics Committee (b00lpkfb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:45 Top of the Class (b00ct9bk)
Series 1

Tamsin Little

John Wilson meets leading figures in their fields and takes them back to the places and people they left behind but who influenced their later success.

He takes international violinist Tasmin Little back to the Yehudi Menuhin School where she began her musical education as a prodigy at the age of 8. She is reunited with her teacher, Pauline Scott who nurtured her talent and helped her become the player she is today.

Her best friend at the school, Gwawr Owen, is also there as they both rediscover their childhood haunts, share memories of boarding school dinners and Tasmin reveals to John extracts from the diary she kept from her time there.

Producer - Sarah Taylor.


THU 21:58 Weather (b00lnkwx)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00lnl3z)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Is Britain rushing production of a swine flu vaccine?

President Obama struggles to reform the healthcare system.

South Africa's unhappy townships.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00lnng4)
The First Men in the Moon

Episode 4

Tim Pigott-Smith reads from the 1901 novel by HG Wells.

Bedford and Cavor are now fugitives from the moon's inhabitants, the Selenites. They discover a new, terrifying aspect to life there as they feverishly search for their spaceship in order to escape.

Abridged by Neville Teller.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Bigipedia (b00lpr29)
Series 1

Episode 1

The omniscient friend you know from your computer and laser watch takes over Radio 4 for 30 minutes in a unique experiment in broadwebcasting.

Written by Nick Doody and Matt Kirshen with Carey Marx, Neil Edmond and Margaret Cabourn-Smith.

Featuring Ewan Bailey, Sam Battersea, Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Nick Doody, Neil Edmond, Pippa Evans, Melanie Hudson, Lewis MacLeod, Gareth Tunley.


THU 23:30 Whatever Happened To The Working Class (b00hq0n9)
A Taste of Money

Sarfraz Manzoor examines the forces that have had an impact on the traditional 'working class' in Britain. After a decade of supposed 'classlessness', the issue of class is back on the agenda. Once again, it matters if you identify yourself as working class, especially, it seems, if you are white.

Sarfraz is taken on a tour of musical Manchester by DJ Dave Haslam, who reveals how the city has reinvigorated itself through an association with working class youth culture.

He also talks to a theatre group that creates plays for the working people of the city and to Gerald Kaufman MP about the role of education in his journey into 'classlessness'.



FRIDAY 24 JULY 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00lnd8x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00lqnff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00lndb4)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00lndhc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00lndg8)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00lndjn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00lndrp)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Richard Hill.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00lndtf)
Pig farmers who get swine flu are being advised to keep away from their animals. It is part of government advice to the food industry which includes contingency plans in case a large proportion of those working in the food chain become infected. The virus has not yet been identified in pigs in the UK but Defra and the Food Standards Agency have both stressed that flu in pigs is not a food safety issue.

Anna Hill also examines farmers' reactions to the news that a parliamentary group is launching an investigation into the collapse of Dairy Farmers of Britain,

She also finds out why senior politicians have stepped in to ensure that a 400-year-old tradition involving a goat being crowned King of Ireland continues.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00lnfbz)
Presented by James Naughtie and Edward Stourton.

Louise Ellman, the Chair of the Transport Select Committee, discusses what the government may have done wrong.

Conservative health spokesman Mark Simmonds discusses the government's response to swine flu.

Italian news magazine L'Espresso has published a recording that was allegedly made just after Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi finished having sex with a prostitute. Correspondent Duncan Kennedy reports.

Presenter James Naughtie travels to Denmark to explore social well-being and to examine the benefits of an economic policy that prioritises happiness.

Director of the School of Life Sophie Howarth gives advice to those embarking on a 'stay-cation'.

Thought for the Day with Rhidian Brook.

Professor Stephen Glaister, of the RAC Foundation, looks at alternative ways of dealing with road-pricing.

Dr Alan Hay, director of the World Influenza Centre, explains what to expect in relation to swine flu in the coming weeks.

Home affairs editor Mark Easton and Mike Trace, chairman of the International Drug Policy Consortium, examine whether the criminal justice system can deal with increasing cocaine use.

Film footage giving an insight into the life of composer Gustav Holst has been discovered in Cheltenham, the town where he was born. Marjorie Imlah, chair of the Holst Birthplace Trust, explains what the interviews reveal.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has asserted the rights of Israelis to settle wherever they want in Jerusalem, despite calls from the US to halt development of settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Ron Prosor, Israel's ambassador to the UK, explains Mr Netanyahu's comments.

Briony Leyland reports from the Isle of Wight where workers at the Vestas Wind Systems factory are continuing a sit-in protest over the closing of the factory.

Jim Muir examines reports on the excitement in northern Iraq in the build-up to the election.

Colonel Stuart Tootal describes the experiences and the sacrifices of the soldiers at war in Afghanistan.

Former editor of The Economist Bill Emmott and Senator Lucio Malan discuss whether or not the scandal surrounding Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's private life will impact on his political career.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00ln1b2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00lqnfh)
In the Valley of Mist

Episode 5

Fenella Woolgar reads from Justine Hardy's account of the lives of ordinary people who have lived in the disputed territory of Kashmir through 20 years of conflict.

The effects of the conflict are compounded by the 2005 earthquake. Mohammad Dar's tireless work for the relief effort leads him to start a new career as an aid worker.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00lnfsm)
Employment support for domestic abuse victims

What can employers do to support women who find themselves in an abusive relationship? Plus, how to get your monosyllabic teenager talking; and what to do with your garden.


FRI 11:00 Blondin of Niagara Falls and Ealing (b00lg72f)
Hardeep Singh Kohli walks in the footsteps of the famous tightrope walker Blondin to mark his first crossing of Niagara Falls 150 years ago.

Hardeep discovers the continuing appeal of defying gravity from the experiences of circus acrobat Chico, the celebrated 'man on wire' Philippe Petit and the slack-liner Jon Ritson.

Tightrope walking hit the big time 150 years ago when Blondin made 16 crossings over the Niagara River. His career lasted until he was 73, when he retired to Niagara House in Ealing, west London.

A Ladbroke Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Cabin Pressure (b00lq8lk)
Series 2

Gdansk

When MJN Air is chartered to ferry a chamber orchestra, Carolyn has to deal with the mysterious Case Of The Poisoned Cashews, while Martin gets to run through all of the Seven Deadly Sins. And Arthur learns how not to pronounce ""Szyszko-Bohusz"", but does eat a lot of pudding.

Starring
Carolyn Knapp-Shappey ..... Stephanie Cole
1st Officer Douglas Richardson ..... Roger Allam
Capt. Martin Crieff ..... Benedict Cumberbatch
Arthur Shappey ..... John Finnemore
Madame Szyszko-Bohusz ..... Britta Gartner
Amsterdam ATC ..... Matt Green
Maestro ..... Simon Greenall

Written by John Finnemore.

Produced & Directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for the BBC


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00lnfxt)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00lng04)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00lng4b)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00lq943)
I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue producer Jon Naismith speaks to Roger Bolton about the experience of returning to the airwaves without Humphrey Lyttelton. We also go behind the scenes at Test Match Special.

On the next edition of Feedback we will be assembling a panel of listeners to raise their concerns about the BBC to the chairman of the BBC Trust, Sir Michael Lyons.

While Sir Michael does not run the BBC, he is the chairman of the group which supervises the corporation on behalf of license fee payers. Technically speaking, the BBC has to do what the BBC Trust says, and the BBC Trust has to do what you say. Is it doing that? If we can remind you;

Mark Damazer has already said on air that the BBC Trust is examining the possibility of adding humanist voices to Thought for the Day. Should they be doing that?

The BBC Trust have recently suspended bonuses for senior BBC staff; there has been no comment about the salaries of the on air talent though. Are presenters paid too much? Should their salaries be made public?

The potential DAB switchover in 2015 will affect many listeners. The Trust has vigorously opposed the suggestion that BBC license fee should be shared with other broadcasters to make local news. But have they said much regarding DAB?

The Trust recently examined radio provision for young people. Their findings were positive but are children actually well served on radio?

Radio 2 and 6 Music's remit are being examined by the Trust. Will this lead to change at the two stations? Would you want it to?

If you feel strongly about these topics, or any other, then please email us and we will be in touch.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00lng6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b0093ws6)
Investigating Mr Thomas

Based on a true story, Rob Gittins's play draws on archive material.

When Time magazine printed a warts-and-all article about Dylan Thomas in 1953, the poet sued them for libel. Needing to gather more evidence, the magazine hired a private detective to shadow Thomas in New York.

Detective ...... Trevor White
Editor ...... Doug Ballard
Beth ...... Genevieve Adam
Nora ...... Laurel Lefkow
Taxi Driver ...... Rhys Parry Jones
Guard ...... Richard Elfyn.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00lq945)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Bunny Guinness, John Cushnie, Matthew Biggs and Pippa Greenwood answer questions posed by gardeners in Hampshire.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 The Inconstant Moon (b00lnkb0)
The Mock Moon

Forty years after the Apollo 11 landing, author Jeanette Winterson offers a series of reflective readings about the moon.

Conspiracy theories, James Bond and the great moon hoax.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00lq947)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00lq949)
Sylvia Syms discusses her adventures in motion pictures. League Of Gentlemen member, writer and actor Mark Gatiss presents his alternative guide to British cinema. Jane Graham on the the thin line between love and hate in modern romantic comedies.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00lnkly)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00lnkp0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b00lq94c)
Series 28

Episode 5

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a satirical review of the week's news, with help from Jon Holmes, Laura Shavin, Mitch Benn and Marcus Brigstocke.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00lng6x)
Mike calls in at Grey Gables to see Roy. He asks Roy if Vicky could have his ticket for the graduation. Roy refuses - Brenda wants him there. Mike says one of Brenda's friends might have a spare.

Later, Mike goes to see Brenda. She isn't happy about Vicky wanting a ticket but says she'll see what she can do. Helen appears. She tells Brenda she's fed up with working too hard and keeping an eye on Annette and Jazzer. Why don't they go for a goss at the Bull?

Annette appears at Home Farm and helps Alice catch Spearmint, who's escaped. Alice asks Annette if she'd like to go for a drink some time with some of her old college friends. Annette's delighted.

At the Bull David's pleased they got the combining done before the rain started. David tells Mike that Kenton's miserable, as the owner of Jaxx has refused his idea of turning the place into a bar.

Helen apologises to Brenda for whingeing on. Annette comes in and tells Helen she's going for a drink with Alice next week, and Helen's thrilled. She and Brenda wonder if there are any hot boys in Alice's crowd!

Episode written by Carole Simpson Solazzo.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00lnkqf)
Arts news and reviews with Kirsty Lang.

Kirsty Lang meets the singer Buffy Sainte-Marie, who is fresh from the Obama campaign and has just released her first album for 17 years. In the 60s, the native American was one of the most controversial folk protest singers in America, blacklisted by many radio stations. Bob Dylan kick-started her career, she went on to write Elvis' favourite love song and the Oscar-winning theme song to An Officer and a Gentleman.

The Prince Charles Cinema in London is screening a film called The Room and tickets are already selling like hot cakes. This is because The Room is reputed by some to be the worst film ever made. However, in America it has become a cult success: fans see it regularly - shouting their favourite bad lines in unison, or throwing objects at the screen. Filmmaker Nick Ahlmark - who persuaded the cinema to put on the screening - explains why this film is so deliciously awful.

Eight thousand breeze blocks will form a four-mile moving sculpture, a sort of domino rally, linking two of the London boroughs hosting the 2012 Olympic Games. The event, joint winner of the inaugural Bank of America Create Art Award, and staged by Station House Opera, sees the concrete dominoes travel through parks, art galleries, up and down stairs, on to a canal barge and even through a tunnel under the River Thames. Judith Knight, the project's producer, explains how the event came about and how it will work.

Kirsty Lang speaks to director and writer Avie Luthra about his new film Mad, Sad and Bad. Starring Meera Syal, the film focuses on a family of selfishly dysfunctional people.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00lsq6s)
The Help

Episode 5

Dramatisation of Kathryn Stockett's novel set in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1962, about three brave women who dare to cross the racial lines.

Aibileen attempts to persuade Minny to contribute to Skeeter's clandestine writing project. But Minny is going to take some convincing.

Aibileen ...... Alibe Parsons
Minny ...... Octavia Spencer
Skeeter ...... Laurel Lefkow
Elizabeth/Celia ...... Lydia Parker
Hilly ...... Madeleine Potter
Miss Walters/Mrs Phelan ...... Debora Weston
Raleigh/Johnny ...... Nathan Nolan
Mae Mobley ...... Edward Prout

Adapted by Penny Leicester.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00lq94f)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in Verwood, Dorset. The panellists are columnist Peter Hitchens, campaigner Peter Tatchell, Minister for the South West Jim Knight and Shadow Welsh Secretary Cheryl Gillan.


FRI 20:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00lq99f)
Series 1

Archaeopteryx

Sir David recounts the remarkable story of a feather, like any other feather from a bird.

Only this one was 150 million years old, and the animal that lost it lived when birds had not yet evolved.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Producer: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2009.


FRI 21:00 The Inconstant Moon Omnibus (b00lq99h)
Episode 2

Omnibus edition of the second half of Jeanette Winterson's series of artistic reflections on the moon.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00lnkwz)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00lnl41)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Norwich by-election victory for the Tories.

Ageing China - Shanghai tells couples to have more than one child.

Thai rice farmers left struggling despite soaring food prices.

A legal wrangle over a yodelling hit.

Thousands of tourists evacuated as fires spread in Spain.

Lebanon in search of the unity government.

A police sting in New Jersey - a tale of corruption, body parts and money laundering.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00lnng6)
The First Men in the Moon

Episode 5

Tim Pigott-Smith reads from the 1901 novel by HG Wells.

The first moon mission comes to a surprising and unexpected conclusion.

Abridged by Neville Teller.

A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00lp2hn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Whatever Happened To The Working Class (b00htvd9)
From Heroes to Zeroes

Sarfraz Manzoor examines the forces that have had an impact on the traditional 'working class' in Britain. After a decade of supposed 'classlessness', the issue of class is back on the agenda. Once again, it matters if you identify yourself as working class, especially, it seems, if you are white.

The working class may have historically been aligned with the labour movement, but Margaret Thatcher's astute recognition of strong individualistic aspirations - such as the desire to own a home - changed the political landscape in ways that are still evident nearly 30 years on.

Sarfraz visits housing estates in Manchester and talks to schoolchildren, academics and politicians about the future of the working class.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00lnkr6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00lsq6v)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00lsq6n)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00lsq6q)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00lsq6s)

4 in a Field 18:30 WED (b00lpc8h)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00lp2hn)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00lp2hn)

A Life With ... 21:00 WED (b00lpkd7)

Act Your Age 23:00 WED (b00fr1tp)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b0085dpd)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b008cnz7)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00lp15r)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00lpp9g)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00lpp9l)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00lnd6v)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00ljy2d)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00ln09l)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00lmdh2)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00lq94f)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00ln0b7)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00ln0b7)

Arthur Smith's Balham Bash 23:00 TUE (b00lp32n)

Baggage 11:30 WED (b00lp6dp)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00ln0qv)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00ln0qv)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00lny4g)

Bigipedia 23:00 THU (b00lpr29)

Blondin of Niagara Falls and Ealing 11:00 FRI (b00lg72f)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00lnmxy)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00lnnhk)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00lnng2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00lnng4)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00lnng6)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00ljmx9)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00lnfkc)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00lnfkc)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00lqnfp)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00lqnfp)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00lqnfc)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00lqnfc)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00lqnff)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00lqnff)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00lqnfh)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00ln10g)

Cabin Pressure 11:30 FRI (b00lq8lk)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00lp32l)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00lp32l)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00ljhml)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00ln1dj)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00lygwz)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b00lygvy)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 08:50 SUN (b00lmdh4)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 20:50 FRI (b00lq99f)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00ln1b2)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00ln1b2)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00lc9ff)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00lp85p)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00lpl8t)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b0093ws6)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00lmz4k)

Expenses: The MPs' Story 09:00 TUE (b00lvl1s)

Expenses: The MPs' Story 21:30 TUE (b00lvl1s)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00lmpkz)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00lndx8)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00lndt7)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00lndt9)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00lndtc)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00lndtf)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00lk9dy)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00lq943)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00lk028)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00lp32g)

From Dots to Downloads - Tune-Books on the Web 13:30 TUE (b00lp15m)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00ln099)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00lnkqh)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00lnkq7)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00lnkq9)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00lnkqc)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00lnkqf)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00lmd9b)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00lq945)

Give Me the MoonLITE 21:00 MON (b00lnycv)

Hazelbeach 11:30 MON (b00lny4b)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00lp15p)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:00 SUN (b00ljy2b)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b00lny4j)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00lpr3j)

In Living Memory 11:00 WED (b00lp6dm)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00lp32j)

Inside the Ethics Committee 09:00 THU (b00lpkfb)

Inside the Ethics Committee 21:00 THU (b00lpkfb)

Iraq United 20:00 MON (b00lny4l)

Journey to Armenia: Mandelstam - The Long Desired for Voyage 11:30 THU (b00lpl8p)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00lmd9d)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00lq947)

Laurence & Gus: Hearts and Minds 18:30 TUE (b00lp2hq)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00ln0b1)

Macavity's Not There: TS Eliot in the 21st Century 11:30 TUE (b00lp043)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00lpm1s)

McLevy 14:15 TUE (b00nhw1f)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00lmp9r)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00ln0hc)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00lnd9w)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00lnd8q)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00lnd8s)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00lnd8v)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00lnd8x)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00lp5gn)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00lp5gn)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00lp85r)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00ln09d)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00ln09d)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00lk12w)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00lpc9l)

Musical Migrants 09:30 TUE (b00b4nsn)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00lmpb0)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00ln0hp)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00lndm3)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00lndjg)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00lndjj)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00lndjl)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00lndjn)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00ln0qx)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00lmpk6)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00ln102)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00ln10b)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00ln0b9)

News 13:00 SAT (b00ln09j)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00ln0r1)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00ln2dc)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00ln2dc)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00lmpkb)

Open Country 15:02 THU (b00lmpkb)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00ln09s)

PM 17:00 MON (b00lnknr)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00lnklr)

PM 17:00 WED (b00lnklt)

PM 17:00 THU (b00lnklw)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00lnkly)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00lnd6q)

Planning for Pandemic 11:00 MON (b00lqcll)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00ljhrs)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00ln2df)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00lmpb2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00lndt5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00lndrh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00lndrk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00lndrm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00lndrp)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00ln0b3)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00ln0b3)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00ln0b3)

Questions, Questions 13:30 THU (b00lpl8r)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b00ljy26)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00ln106)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00ln106)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00ln106)

Round Britain Quiz 13:30 MON (b00lny4d)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00ln09n)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00lmz4h)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00ln0b5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00lmp9w)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00ln0hk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00lndjd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00lndh5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00lndh7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00lndh9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00lndhc)

Shappi Talk 18:30 THU (b00lpmz7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00lmp9t)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00lmp9y)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00ln09v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00ln0hg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00ln0hm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00ln2dh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00lndg0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00lndh3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00lnd9y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00lndg2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00lndb0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00lndg4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00lndb2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00lndg6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00lndb4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00lndg8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00ln09z)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00ln2dm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00lnkq5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00lnknt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00lnknw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00lnkny)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00lnkp0)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00ln0qz)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00ln0qz)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00lny46)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00lny46)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00ln10d)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00ln104)

Tarantino's Jukebox 10:30 SAT (b00lnczw)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00ln10j)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00lnd6s)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00kwn9v)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00lng7p)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00lng7p)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00lng6q)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00lng6q)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00lng6s)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00lng6s)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00lng6v)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00lng6v)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00lng6x)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00lk30m)

The Call in the Middle of the Night 20:45 WED (b00lpc9z)

The Chambers 11:00 TUE (b00lnzq9)

The Estuary 14:45 SUN (b008kllk)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00lmd9g)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00lq949)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00ln1b5)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00ln1b5)

The Ian Blair Years 13:30 SUN (b00ksvt7)

The Inconstant Moon Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b00lq99h)

The Inconstant Moon 15:45 MON (b00lnkb2)

The Inconstant Moon 15:45 TUE (b00lnk9t)

The Inconstant Moon 15:45 WED (b00lnk9w)

The Inconstant Moon 15:45 THU (b00lnk9y)

The Inconstant Moon 15:45 FRI (b00lnkb0)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00lp6dr)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b00lmdh0)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b00lq94c)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00lpp1f)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00ln096)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00ln1b9)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00lnl78)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00lnl3t)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00lnl3x)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00lnl3z)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00lnl41)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00lk12r)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00lpc8f)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00lnnhw)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00lnnhm)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00lms6h)

Today 06:00 MON (b00lnfk9)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00lnfbs)

Today 06:00 WED (b00lnfbv)

Today 06:00 THU (b00lnfbx)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00lnfbz)

Top of the Class 21:45 THU (b00ct9bk)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00lmpk8)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00lmpl1)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00ln09g)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00ln09x)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00ln100)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00ln108)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00ln1b7)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00ln2dk)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00lnd6x)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00lny44)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00lng42)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00lnl3r)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00lnfzy)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00lnkws)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00lng00)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00lnkwv)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00lng02)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00lnkwx)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00lng04)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00lnkwz)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00lnd6z)

Whatever Happened To The Working Class 23:30 WED (b00hkl7g)

Whatever Happened To The Working Class 23:30 THU (b00hq0n9)

Whatever Happened To The Working Class 23:30 FRI (b00htvd9)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00ln09q)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00lnfxk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00lnfsf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00lnfsh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00lnfsk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00lnfsm)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00ljzdh)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b00lp2hl)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00lng6n)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00lng44)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00lng46)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00lng48)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00lng4b)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00lnfy0)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00lnfxm)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00lnfxp)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00lnfxr)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00lnfxt)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00lmpb4)